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Sample records for alces alces gigas

  1. Anti-Brucella Antibodies in Moose (Alces alces gigas), Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and Plains Bison (Bison bison bison) in Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Godfroid, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We used an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the rose bengal test (RBT) to test for anti-Brucella antibodies in moose (Alces alces gigas), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and plains bison (Bison bison bison) from various game management units (GMUs) in Alaska, US, sampled from 1982 to 2010. A portion of the sera had previously been tested with the standard plate test (SPT), the buffered Brucella antigen (BBA) card test, and the card test (CARD). No antibody-positive plains bison were identified. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in moose (iELISA, n=4/87; RBT, n=4/87; SPT, n=4/5; BBA, n=4/4) from GMU 23 captured in 1992, 1993, and 1995 and in muskoxen (iELISA, n=4/52; RBT, n=4/52; CARD, n=4/35) from GMUs 26A and 26B captured in 2004, 2006, and 2007. A negative effect of infection on the health of individuals of these species is probable. The presence of antibody-positive animals from 1992 to 2007 suggests presence of brucellae over time. The antibody-positive animals were found in northern Alaska, an area with a historically higher prevalence of Brucella-positive caribou, and a spillover of Brucella suis biovar 4 from caribou may have occurred. Brucella suis biovar 4 causes human brucellosis, and transmission from consumption of moose and muskoxen is possible. PMID:26540335

  2. Mitochondrial phylogeography of moose (Alces alces) in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hundertmark, Kris J.; Bowyer, R. Terry; Shields, Gerald F.; Schwartz, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide variation was assessed from the mitochondrial control region of North American moose (Alces alces) to test predictions of a model of range expansion by stepping-stone dispersal and to determine whether patterns of genetic variation support the current recognition of 4 subspecies. Haplotypes formed a star phylogeny indicative of a recent expansion of populations. Values of nucleotide and haplotype diversity were low continentwide but were greatest in the central part of the continent and lowest in peripheral populations. Despite low mitochondrial diversity, moose exhibited a high degree of differentiation regionally, which was not explained by isolation by distance. Our data indicate a pattern of colonization consistent with a large central population that supplied founders to peripheral populations (other than Alaska), perhaps through rare, long-distance dispersal events (leptokurtic dispersal) rather than mass dispersal by a stepping-stone model. The colonization scenario does not account for the low haplotype diversity observed in Alaska, which may be derived from a postcolonization bottleneck. Establishment of peripheral populations by leptokurtic dispersal and subsequent local adaptation may have been sufficient for development of morphological differentiation among extant subspecies.

  3. Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Pūraitė, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Radzijevskaja, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne bacterium that infects a wide range of animal species. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of A. phagocytophilum in Norwegian moose Alces alces and to characterize the bacteria by sequencing of partial msp4 and 16S rRNA genes. Hunters collected spleen samples from 99 moose of different ages during 2013 and 2014 in two areas: Aust-Agder County (n = 70) where Ixodes ricinus ticks are abundant and Oppland County (n = 29) where ticks were either absent, or abundance very low. A. phagocytophilum was detected only in moose from the I. ricinus - abundant area. The overall prevalence of infection according to 16S rRNA and msp4 gene-based PCR was 41.4% and 31.4% respectively. Sequence analysis of the partial 16S rRNA and msp4 gene revealed two and eight different sequence types respectively. Four of eight msp4 sequence types determined in this study were unique, while others were identical to sequences derived from other ruminants and ticks. The present study indicates that moose could be a potential wildlife reservoir of A. phagocytophilum in Norway. PMID:26428857

  4. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-08-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  5. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K.; Childress, April L.; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2015-01-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  6. A geographical cluster of malignant catarrhal fever in Moose (Alces alces)in Norway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cases of lethal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) were diagnosed in Lesja, Norway, December 2008 – February 2010. The diagnosis was based on PCR identification of ovine herpesvirus 2 DNA (n=3) and typical histopathological lesions (n=1). To...

  7. Resurrection and redescription of Varestrongylus alces (Nematoda; Protostrongylidae), a lungworm of Eurasian elk (Alces alces), with a report on associated pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varestrongylus alces Demidova & Naumitscheva, 1953 is resurrected for protostrongylid nematodes of Eurasian elk in Europe. Descriptions of males (11.36-16.95 mm) and females (16.25- 21.52 mm) are based on specimens collected from the terminal bronchioles in the lungs of Eurasian elk, Alces alces (L...

  8. The alc-GR system: a modified alc gene switch designed for use in plant tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gethin R; Garoosi, G Ali; Koroleva, Olga; Ito, Masaki; Laufs, Patrick; Leader, David J; Caddick, Mark X; Doonan, John H; Tomsett, A Brian

    2005-07-01

    The ALCR/alcA (alc) two-component, ethanol-inducible gene expression system provides stringent control of transgene expression in genetically modified plants. ALCR is an ethanol-activated transcription factor that can drive expression from the ALCR-responsive promoter (alcA). However, the alc system has been shown to have constitutive expression when used in plant callus or cell suspension cultures, possibly resulting from endogenous inducer produced in response to lowered oxygen availability. To widen the use of the alc system in plant cell culture conditions, the receptor domain of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was translationally fused to the C terminus of ALCR to produce ALCR-GR, which forms the basis of a glucocorticoid-inducible system (alc-GR). The alc-GR switch system was tested in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension cells using a constitutively expressed ALCR-GR with four alternative alcA promoter-driven reporter genes: beta-glucuronidase, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein, haemagglutinin, and green fluorescent protein-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Arath;CDKA;1 cyclin-dependent kinase. Gene expression was shown to be stringently dependent on the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and, in cell suspensions, no longer required ethanol for induction. Thus, the alc-GR system allows tight control of alcA-driven genes in cell culture and complements the conventional ethanol switch used in whole plants. PMID:16010000

  9. The alc-GR System. A Modified alc Gene Switch Designed for Use in Plant Tissue Culture1[w

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Gethin R.; Garoosi, G. Ali; Koroleva, Olga; Ito, Masaki; Laufs, Patrick; Leader, David J.; Caddick, Mark X.; Doonan, John H.; Tomsett, A. Brian

    2005-01-01

    The ALCR/alcA (alc) two-component, ethanol-inducible gene expression system provides stringent control of transgene expression in genetically modified plants. ALCR is an ethanol-activated transcription factor that can drive expression from the ALCR-responsive promoter (alcA). However, the alc system has been shown to have constitutive expression when used in plant callus or cell suspension cultures, possibly resulting from endogenous inducer produced in response to lowered oxygen availability. To widen the use of the alc system in plant cell culture conditions, the receptor domain of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was translationally fused to the C terminus of ALCR to produce ALCR-GR, which forms the basis of a glucocorticoid-inducible system (alc-GR). The alc-GR switch system was tested in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension cells using a constitutively expressed ALCR-GR with four alternative alcA promoter-driven reporter genes: β-glucuronidase, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein, haemagglutinin, and green fluorescent protein-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Arath;CDKA;1 cyclin-dependent kinase. Gene expression was shown to be stringently dependent on the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and, in cell suspensions, no longer required ethanol for induction. Thus, the alc-GR system allows tight control of alcA-driven genes in cell culture and complements the conventional ethanol switch used in whole plants. PMID:16010000

  10. The infection of reintroduced ruminants - Bison bonasus and Alces alces - with Anaplasma phagocytophilum in northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Víchová, Bronislava; Werszko, Joanna; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Pyziel, Anna M; Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Szewczyk, Tomasz; Peťko, Branislav

    2015-12-01

    The north-eastern part of Poland is considered an area of high risk for infection with tick-borne diseases, including with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agents. The etiological agent of HGE is Anaplasma phagocytophilum. As the animal reservoir for A. phagocytophilum in the environment serve the species from Cervidae and Bovidae families. European bison (Bison bonasus) and elk (Alces alces) are the big ruminant species, reintroduced to the forests of Middle Europe after many decades of absence. In the foci of zoonotic diseases they are able to play a role as natural reservoir to pathogens, however, their status as protected animals means their study has been rare and fragmentary. The studies of B. bonasus were conducted in Białowieża Primeval Forest and A. alces in Biebrza National Park. PCR amplifications were performed using primers amplifing the end of the groES gene, the intergenic spacer and approximately two-thirds of the groEL gene in the first round, and primers that span a 395-bp region of the groEL gene were used in the second round. The positive results were obtained in B. bonasus and A. alces, the prevalence of infection was 66.7 and 20.0%, respectively. Randomly selected samples were sequenced, sequences were compared with GenBank entries using Blast N2.2.13 and determined as A. phagocytophilum. The results presented herein are the first record of the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in A. alces, and at the same time confirm the previous observations regarding the infection of B. bonasus with A. phagocytophilum. PMID:26408585

  11. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases. PMID:27174031

  12. Effects of simulated moose Alces alces browsing on the morphology of rowan Sorbus aucuparia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jager, N.R.D.; Pastor, J.

    2010-01-01

    In much of northern Sweden moose Alces alces browse rowan Sorbus aucuparia heavily and commonly revisit previously browsed plants. Repeated browsing of rowan by moose has created some concern for its long-term survival in heavily browsed areas. We therefore measured how four years of simulated moose browsing at four population densities (0, 10, 30 and 50 moose/1,000 ha) changed plant height, crown width, available bite mass, the number of bites per plant and per plant forage biomass of rowan saplings. Increased biomass removal led to a significant decline in plant height (P < 0.001), but a significant increase in the number of bites per plant (P = 0.012). Increases in the number of bites per plant more than compensated for weak decreases in bite mass, leading to a weak increase in per plant forage biomass (P = 0.072). With the decline in plant height and increase in the number of stems per plant, a greater number of bites remain within the height reach of moose relative to unbrowsed controls. Moose therefore stand to benefit from revisiting previously browsed plants, which may result in feeding loops between moose and previously browsed rowan saplings. ?? 2010 Wildlife Biology, NKV.

  13. The first detection of species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893 in moose, Alces alces (Linnaeus), in Norway.

    PubMed

    Puraite, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Lipatova, Indre; Paulauskas, Algimantas

    2016-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease and various wildlife species are reservoir hosts for zoonotic species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and prevalence of Babesia spp. in moose Alces alces (Linnaeus) in two regions of Norway. A total of 99 spleen samples were collected from animals of various ages from an area with the occurrence of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Linnaeus, 1758), and from an area where the ticks are known to be absent. Infection was detected by the amplification of different regions of the 18S rRNA gene by using two different PCR primer sets specific of Babesia. Babesia spp. were found in the spleen samples of four moose. All Babesia-infected animals were from an area where ticks occur, with an infection rate of 6% (4 of 70). Babesia-positive samples were obtained from a five-month old moose calf and three adults. Two Babesia species, Babesia capreoli (Enigk et Friedhoff, 1962) and a B. odocoilei-like, were identified. Co-infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum was obtained in two animals. This is the first report of the occurrence of B. capreoli and B. odocoilei-like species in moose. PMID:27188749

  14. Population genetic structure of moose (Alces Alces) of South-central Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; McDonough, John T.; Barboza, Perry S.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Farley, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    The location of a population can influence its genetic structure and diversity by impacting the degree of isolation and connectivity to other populations. Populations at range margins areoften thought to have less genetic variation and increased genetic structure, and a reduction in genetic diversity can have negative impacts on the health of a population. We explored the genetic diversity and connectivity between 3 peripheral populations of moose (Alces alces) with differing potential for connectivity to other areas within interior Alaska. Populations on the Kenai Peninsula and from the Anchorage region were found to be significantly differentiated (FST= 0.071, P < 0.0001) with lower levels of genetic diversity observed within the Kenai population. Bayesian analyses employing assignment methodologies uncovered little evidence of contemporary gene flow between Anchorage and Kenai, suggesting regional isolation. Although gene flow outside the peninsula is restricted, high levels of gene flow were detected within the Kenai that is explained by male-biased dispersal. Furthermore, gene flow estimates differed across time scales on the Kenai Peninsula which may have been influenced by demographic fluctuations correlated, at least in part, with habitat change.

  15. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION AND MOLECULAR DIVERSITY OF BARTONELLA SPP. INFECTIONS IN MOOSE (ALCES ALCES) IN FINLAND.

    PubMed

    Pérez Vera, Cristina; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Spillmann, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Sironen, Tarja

    2016-04-28

    Moose, Alces alces (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) in Finland are heavily infested with deer keds, Lipoptena cervi (Diptera: Hippoboschidae). The deer ked, which carries species of the genus Bartonella, has been proposed as a vector for the transmission of bartonellae to animals and humans. Previously, bartonella DNA was found in deer keds as well as in moose blood collected in Finland. We investigated the prevalence and molecular diversity of Bartonella spp. infection from blood samples collected from free-ranging moose. Given that the deer ked is not present in northernmost Finland, we also investigated whether there were geographic differences in the prevalence of bartonella infection in moose. The overall prevalence of bartonella infection was 72.9% (108/148). Geographically, the prevalence was highest in the south (90.6%) and lowest in the north (55.9%). At least two species of bartonellae were identified by multilocus sequence analysis. Based on logistic regression analysis, there was no significant association between bartonella infection and either age or sex; however, moose from outside the deer ked zone were significantly less likely to be infected (P<0.015) than were moose hunted within the deer ked zone. PMID:26967131

  16. A genetic discontinuity in moose (Alces alces) in Alaska corresponds with fenced transportation infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Farley, Sean D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Barboza, Perry S.

    2015-01-01

    The strength and arrangement of movement barriers can impact the connectivity among habitat patches. Anthropogenic barriers (e.g. roads) are a source of habitat fragmentation that can disrupt these resource networks and can have an influence on the spatial genetic structure of populations. Using microsatellite data, we evaluated whether observed genetic structure of moose (Alces alces) populations were associated with human activities (e.g. roads) in the urban habitat of Anchorage and rural habitat on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. We found evidence of a recent genetic subdivision among moose in Anchorage that corresponds to a major highway and associated infrastructure. This subdivision is most likely due to restrictions in gene flow due to alterations to the highway (e.g. moose-resistant fencing with one-way gates) and a significant increase in traffic volume over the past 30 years; genetic subdivision was not detected on the Kenai Peninsula in an area not bisected by a major highway. This study illustrates that anthropogenic barriers can substructure wildlife populations within a few generations and highlights the value of genetic assessments to determine the effects on connectivity among habitat patches in conjunction with behavioral and ecological data..

  17. Bartonella Infections in Deer Keds (Lipoptena cervi) and Moose (Alces alces) in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Duodu, Samuel; Madslien, Knut; Hjelm, Eva; Molin, Ylva; Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Harris, Philip D.; Colquhoun, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Infections with Bartonella spp. have been recognized as emerging zoonotic diseases in humans. Large knowledge gaps exist, however, relating to reservoirs, vectors, and transmission of these bacteria. We describe identification by culture, PCR, and housekeeping gene sequencing of Bartonella spp. in fed, wingless deer keds (Lipoptena cervi), deer ked pupae, and blood samples collected from moose, Alces alces, sampled within the deer ked distribution range in Norway. Direct sequencing from moose blood sampled in a deer ked-free area also indicated Bartonella infection but at a much lower prevalence. The sequencing data suggested the presence of mixed infections involving two species of Bartonella within the deer ked range, while moose outside the range appeared to be infected with a single species. Bartonella were not detected or cultured from unfed winged deer keds. The results may indicate that long-term bacteremia in the moose represents a reservoir of infection and that L. cervi acts as a vector for the spread of infection of Bartonella spp. Further research is needed to evaluate the role of L. cervi in the transmission of Bartonella to animals and humans and the possible pathogenicity of these bacteria for humans and animals. PMID:23104416

  18. A geographic cluster of malignant catarrhal fever in moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Vikøren, Turid; Klevar, Siv; Li, Hong; Hauge, Anna Germundsson

    2015-04-01

    Three cases of lethal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) were diagnosed in Lesja, Norway, December 2008-February 2010. The diagnosis was based on PCR identification of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) DNA (n = 3) and typical histopathologic lesions (n = 1). To study the possibility of subclinical or latent MCF virus (MCFV) infection in this moose population and in red deer (Cervus elaphus), we examined clinically normal animals sampled during hunting in Lesja 2010 by serology and PCR. Sera from 63 moose and 33 red deer were tested for antibodies against MCFV by competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To test for MCFVs, a consensus PCR for herpesviral DNA was run on spleen samples from 23 moose and 17 red deer. All samples were antibody and PCR negative. Thus, there is no evidence of previous exposure, subclinical infection, or latent infection in this sample. This seasonal cluster of SA-MCF cases (2008-10) may be attributable to exposure of moose to lambs when OvHV-2 shedding is presumed to be maximal, compounded by an unusual extended grazing period by sheep in the autumn. PMID:25574807

  19. Detection of antibodies to Neospora caninum in moose (Alces alces): the first report in Europe.

    PubMed

    Moskwa, Bozena; Goździk, Katarzyna; Bień, Justyna; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Reiterová, Katarína; Cabaj, Władysław

    2014-02-01

    Neospora caninum Dubey, Carpenter, Speer, Topper et Uggla, 1988 is a protozoan parasite originally reported as a major cause of bovine abortions worldwide. It is documented that the parasite is widely spread among non-carnivorous cervids. The purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of N. caninum in moose (Alces alces Linnaeus). Blood samples collected in 2010 and 2012 in the northeastern Poland were tested for antibodies to N. caninum by agglutination test (NAT), a commercial competitive screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Sera that gave a positive result were further investigated by western blot (WB) analysis to verify the presence of antibodies. Antibodies to N. caninum were detected in one of seven moose. The antibody titer was confirmed by NAT (1 : 1 280), cELISA (I = 91%) and ELISA (OD = 0.736). The main immunodominant antigens detected by WB were 120, 70, 55, 35 and 16 kDa proteins. This is the first evidence of N. caninum seropositivity in moose living in a natural environment in Europe. PMID:24684051

  20. Insight into the bacterial gut microbiome of the North American moose (Alces alces)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The work presented here provides the first intensive insight into the bacterial populations in the digestive tract of the North American moose (Alces alces). Eight free-range moose on natural pasture were sampled, producing eight rumen samples and six colon samples. Second generation (G2) PhyloChips were used to determine the presence of hundreds of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), representing multiple closely related species/strains (>97% identity), found in the rumen and colon of the moose. Results A total of 789 unique OTUs were used for analysis, which passed the fluorescence and the positive fraction thresholds. There were 73 OTUs, representing 21 bacterial families, which were found exclusively in the rumen samples: Lachnospiraceae, Prevotellaceae and several unclassified families, whereas there were 71 OTUs, representing 22 bacterial families, which were found exclusively in the colon samples: Clostridiaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and several unclassified families. Overall, there were 164 OTUs that were found in 100% of the samples. The Firmicutes were the most dominant bacteria phylum in both the rumen and the colon. Microarray data available at ArrayExpress, accession number E-MEXP-3721. Conclusions Using PhyloTrac and UniFrac computer software, samples clustered into two distinct groups: rumen and colon, confirming that the rumen and colon are distinct environments. There was an apparent correlation of age to cluster, which will be validated by a larger sample size in future studies, but there were no detectable trends based upon gender. PMID:22992344

  1. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L).

    PubMed

    Felton, Annika M; Felton, Adam; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Krizsan, Sophie J; Hedwall, Per-Ola; Stolter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF). The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat), interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L.), a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose's self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i) maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii) increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality. PMID:26986618

  2. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L)

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Annika M.; Felton, Adam; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.; Krizsan, Sophie J.; Hedwall, Per-Ola; Stolter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF). The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat), interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L.), a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose’s self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i) maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii) increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality. PMID:26986618

  3. Mitochondrial phylogeography of moose (Alces alces): Late Pleistocene divergence and population expansion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hundertmark, Kris J.; Shields, Gerald F.; Udina, Irina G.; Bowyer, R. Terry; Danilkin, Alexei A.; Schwartz, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    We examined phylogeographic relationships of moose (Alces alces) worldwide to test the proposed existence of two geographic races and to infer the timing and extent of demographic processes underpinning the expansion of this species across the Northern Hemisphere in the late Pleistocene. Sequence variation within the left hypervariable domain of the control region occurred at low or moderate levels worldwide and was structured geographically. Partitioning of genetic variance among regions indicated that isolation by distance was the primary agent for differentiation of moose populations but does not support the existence of distinct eastern and western races. Levels of genetic variation and structure of phylogenetic trees identify Asia as the origin of all extant mitochondrial lineages. A recent coalescence is indicated, with the most recent common ancestor dating to the last ice age. Moose have undergone two episodes of population expansion, likely corresponding to the final interstade of the most recent ice age and the onset of the current interglacial. Timing of expansion for the population in the Yakutia–Manchuria region of eastern Asia indicates that it is one of the oldest populations of moose and may represent the source of founders of extant populations in North America, which were colonized within the last 15,000 years. Our data suggest an extended period of low population size or a severe bottleneck prior to the divergence and expansion of extant lineages and a recent, less-severe bottleneck among European lineages. Climate change during the last ice age, acting through contraction and expansion of moose habitat and the flooding of the Bering land bridge, undoubtedly was a key factor influencing the divergence and expansion of moose populations.

  4. Factors affecting deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) prevalence and infestation intensity in moose (Alces alces) in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi), a hematophagous ectoparasite of Cervids, is currently spreading in Scandinavia. In Norway, keds are now invading the south-eastern part of the country and the abundant and widely distributed moose (Alces alces) is the definitive host. However, key factors for ked abundance are poorly elucidated. The objectives of our study were to (i) determine deer ked infestation prevalence and intensity on moose and (ii) evaluate if habitat characteristics and moose population density are determinants of deer ked abundance on moose. Methods In order to identify key factors for deer ked abundance, a total of 350 skin samples from the neck of hunted moose were examined and deer keds counted. Infestation intensity was analyzed in relation to moose age and sex, moose population density and landscape characteristics surrounding the killing site. Results Deer ked infestation prevalence was 100%, but infestation intensity varied from 0.001 to 1.405 keds/cm2. Ked intensity was highest in male yearlings (~1.5 years) and positively associated with longitude and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) dominated habitat and negatively associated with bogs and latitude. Moose population density during autumn showed a tendency to be positively associated, while altitude tended to be negatively associated with ked intensity. Conclusions Deer keds exploit the whole moose population within our study area, but are most prevalent in areas dominated by Scots pine. This is probably a reflection of Scots pine being the preferred winter browse for moose in areas with highest moose densities in winter. Ked intensity decreases towards the northwest and partly with increasing altitude, probably explained by the direction of dispersal and reduced temperature, respectively. Abundant deer ked harm humans and domestic animals. Moose management authorities should therefore be aware of the close relationship between moose, deer ked and habitat, using the knowledge as a

  5. NMR study of the ternary carbides M2 AlC (M=Ti,V,Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Lin, J. Y.; Xie, B. X.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study of the layered ternary carbides Ti2AlC , V2AlC , and Cr2AlC using Al27 NMR spectroscopy. The quadrupole splittings, Knight shifts, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times on each material have been identified. The sign of the isotropic Knight shift varies from positive for Ti2AlC and V2AlC to negative for Cr2AlC , attributed to the enhancement of hybridization with increasing valence electron count in the transition metal. Universally long relaxation times are found for these alloys. Results provide a measure of Al-s Fermi-level density of states Ns(EF) for Ti2AlC and V2AlC . In addition, the evidence that Ns(EF) correlates with the transition metal d -electron count has been explored in the present NMR investigation.

  6. Age structure of moose (Alces alces) killed by gray wolves (Canis lupus) in northeastern Minnesota, 1967-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Nelson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The age structure of Moose (Alces alces) killed by gray Wolves (Canis lupus) is available from only two national parks in the united States where hunting by people is not allowed and from three areas in Alaska where Moose are hunted (Mech 1966; Peterson et al.1984; Ballard et al. 1987; Mech et al. 1998). The samples of Moose killed by gray Wolves from each hunted area are relatively small (47–117), given that Moose live to 20 or more years (Passmore et al. 1955). This article adds age data from another 77 Moose killed by gray Wolves from a fourth (lightly) human-hunted area and assesses the age structure of all the samples.

  7. Effect of Dermacentor albipictus (Acari:Ixodidae) on blood composition, weight gain and hair coat of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Glines, M V; Samuel, W M

    1989-04-01

    The physiological effects of the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, on moose, Alces alces, were investigated. Blood composition, weight gain, food intake and change in the hair coat of moose calves, four infested with D. albipictus larvae, and eight uninfested, were monitored. Infested moose groomed extensively, apparently in response to feeding nymphal and adult ticks, and developed alopecia. Other clinical signs included: chronic weight loss, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypophosphatemia, and transient decreases in serum aspartate transaminase and calcium during the period of nymphal and adult female tick engorgement. Infested animals did not become anorexic. Two moose with severe hair loss had increases in gamma globulin shortly after the onset of female tick engorgement. Results suggest that alopecia is associated with tick resistance. Animals that groom and develop hair loss likely carry fewer ticks and therefore suffer less severely from blood loss. PMID:2714121

  8. Morphological and molecular characteristics of four Sarcocystis spp. in Canadian moose (Alces alces), including Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2014-04-01

    Individual sarcocysts were isolated from fresh or alcohol-fixed muscle samples of two moose from Alberta, Canada, and examined by light (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular methods, comprising polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the complete18S rRNA gene and the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). By LM, four sarcocyst types were recognized, and the sequencing results showed that each type represented a distinct species, i.e. Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis alceslatrans, Sarcocystis ovalis and Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp. The finding of S. alceslatrans and S. ovalis has been reported briefly previously, but further details are provided here, including the ultrastructure of sarcoysts of S. alceslatrans as seen by SEM. The species S. alces was found for the first time in Canadian moose, whereas the finding of S. taeniata is the first record of this species in any host. The sarcocysts of S. taeniata were sac-like and about 1,000-1,100 × 60-80 μm in size. By LM, the cysts had a thin and smooth wall with no visible protrusions, whereas SEM revealed that the cyst surface had sparsely but regularly distributed, thin ribbon-like protrusions, about 2 μm long and 0.2 μm wide, lying flat against the surface and leaving most of the cyst surface naked. Similar protrusions have previously been reported from Sarcocystis grueneri in reindeer, which was found by sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses to be the species most closely related to S. taeniata. The phylogenetic analyses further suggested that S. taeniata, like S. alces and S. alceslatrans, use canids as definitive hosts, whereas corvid birds are known definitive hosts for S. ovalis. In contrast to the three other species found, S. taeniata displayed considerable intra-specific and intra-isolate sequence variation (substitutions, insertions/deletions) in certain regions of the 18S rRNA gene. PMID:24535735

  9. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING ALC13 INHIBITION OF AGONIST-STIMULATED INOSITOL PHOSPHATE ACCUMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible mechanisms of AlC13-induced inhibition of agonist-stimulated inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation were investigated using rat brain cortex slices, synaptosomes or homogenates. nder conditions in which AlC13 inhibits carbachol (CARB) stimulated IP accumulation (Gp-mediate...

  10. Control of interfaces in Al-C fibre composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrier, S. G.; Blue, C. A.; Lin, R. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The interface of Al-C fiber composite was modified by coating a silver layer on the surface of carbon fibres prior to making composites, in an attempt to improve the wettability between molten aluminum and carbon fibers during infiltration. An electroless plating technique was adopted and perfected to provide a homogeneous silver coating on the carbon fiber surface. Al-C fiber composites were prepared using a liquid infiltration technique in a vacuum. It was found that silver coating promoted the wetting between aluminum and carbon fibers, particularly with polyacrylonitrile-base carbon fibers. However, due to rapid dissolution of silver in molten aluminum, it was believed that the improved infiltration was not due to the wetting behavior between molten aluminum and silver. The cleaning of the fiber surface and the preservation of the cleaned carbon surface with silver coating was considered to be the prime reason for the improved wettability. Interfacial reactions between aluminum and carbon fibers were observed. Amorphous carbon was found to react more with aluminum than graphitic carbon. This is believed to be because of the inertness of the graphitic basal planes.

  11. Physiological evaluation of free-ranging moose (Alces alces) immobilized with etorphine-xylazine-acepromazine in Northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluation of physiology during capture and anesthesia of free-ranging wildlife is useful for determining the effect that capture methods have on both ecological research results and animal welfare. This study evaluates capture and anesthesia of moose (Alces alces) with etorphine-xylazine-acepromazine in Northern Sweden. Methods Fifteen adult moose aged 3–15 years were darted from a helicopter with a combination of 3.37 mg etorphine, 75 mg xylazine, and 15 mg acepromazine. Paired arterial blood samples were collected 15 minutes apart with the first sample at 15–23 minutes after darting and were analyzed immediately with an i-STAT®1 Portable Clinical Analyzer. Results All animals developed hypoxemia (PaO2 <10 kPa) with nine animals having marked hypoxemia (PaO2 5.5-8 kPa). All moose were acidemic (ph<7.35) with nine moose having marked acidemia (pH<7.20). For PaCO2, 14 moose had mild hypercapnia (PaCO2 6-8 kPa) and two had marked hypercapnia (PaCO2>8 kPa). Pulse, respiratory rate, pH and HCO3 increased significantly over time from darting whereas lactate decreased. Conclusions The hypoxemia found in this study is a strong indication for investigating alternative drug doses or combinations or treatment with supplemental oxygen. PMID:23276208

  12. Reproductive characteristics in female Swedish moose (Alces alces), with emphasis on puberty, timing of oestrus, and mating

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The moose (Alces alces) is an intensively managed keystone species in Fennoscandia. Several aspects of reproduction in moose have not been fully elucidated, including puberty, timing of mating and oestrus, and the length of the oestrus period. These aspects are relevant for an adaptive management of moose with respect to harvest, population size, demography and environmental conditions. Therefore, an investigation of female moose reproduction was conducted during the moose-hunting period in southern Sweden from 2008 to 2011. Results A total of 250 reproductive organs and information on carcass weight and age was collected from four different hunting areas (provinces of Öland, Småland, Södermanland, and Västergötland) in southern Sweden. The results showed that puberty in female moose varied with carcass weight, age, and time of season. The period for oestrous/mating lasted from about mid September to the beginning of November. Conclusions The oestrus period (predominantly for heifers) is longer than previously reported and was not finished when the hunting period started. Sampling the uterine cervix to detect spermatozoa was a useful method to determine if mating had occurred. To avoid hunting of moose during oestrus, we suggest that the hunting period should be postponed by at least 14 days in southern Sweden. PMID:24735953

  13. Improvement of arterial oxygenation in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) immobilized with etorphine-acepromazine-xylazine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of intranasal oxygen and/or early reversal of xylazine with atipamezole on arterial oxygenation in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) immobilized with etorphine-acepromazine-xylazine with a cross-sectional clinical study on 33 adult moose was evaluated. Moose were darted from a helicopter with 3.37 mg etorphine, 15 mg acepromazine and 75 mg xylazine. Intranasal oxygen at a flow rate of 4 L/min and/or early reversal of xylazine with 7.5 mg atipamezole to improve oxygenation was evaluated, using four treatment regimens; intranasal oxygen (n = 10), atipamezole intramuscularly (n = 6), atipamezole intravenously (n = 10), or a combination of atipamezole intravenously and intranasal oxygen (n = 7). Arterial blood was collected 7–30 minutes (min) after darting, and again 15 min after institution of treatment and immediately analyzed using an i-STAT®1 Portable Clinical Analyzer. Results Before treatment the mean ± SD (range) partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) was 62 ± 17 (26–99) mmHg. Twenty-six animals had a PaO2 < 80 mmHg. Ten had a PaO2 of 40–60 mmHg and three animals had a PaO2 < 40 mmHg. Intranasal oxygen and intravenous administration of atipamezole significantly increased the mean PaO2, as did the combination of the two. In contrast, atipamezole administered intramuscularly at the evaluated dose had no significant effect on arterial oxygenation. Conclusions This study shows that intranasal oxygen effectively improved arterial oxygenation in immobilized moose, and that early intravenous reversal of the sedative component, in this case xylazine, in an opioid-based immobilization drug-protocol significantly improves arterial oxygenation. PMID:25124367

  14. High-pressure x-ray diffraction study of Ta4AlC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoun, Bouchaib; Saxena, S. K.; El-Raghy, T.; Barsoum, M. W.

    2006-05-01

    Using a synchrotron radiation source and a diamond anvil cell, we measured the pressure dependence of the lattice parameters of a recently discovered phase, Ta4AlC3. This phase adopts a hexagonal structure with the space group P63/mmc; at room conditions, the a and c parameters are 3.087(5) and 23.70(4)Å, respectively. Up to a pressure of 47GPa, no phase transformations were observed. Like Ta2AlC, but unlike many related phases such as Ti4AlN3, Ti3SiC2, Ti3GeC2, and Zr2InC, the compressibility of Ta4AlC3 along the c and a axes are almost identical. The bulk modulus of Ta4AlC3, 261±2GPa, is ≈4% greater than that of Ta2AlC. Both, however, are ≈37% lower than the 345±9GPa of TaC.

  15. Structure of V{sub 2}AlC studied by theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Jochen M.; Mertens, Raphael; Music, Denis

    2006-01-01

    We have studied V{sub 2}AlC (space group P6{sub 3}/mmc, prototype Cr{sub 2}AlC) by ab initio calculations. The density of states (DOS) of V{sub 2}AlC for antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and paramagnetic configurations have been discussed. According to the analysis of DOS and cohesive energy, no significant stability differences between spin-polarized and non-spin-polarized configurations were found. Based on the partial DOS analysis, V{sub 2}AlC can be classified as a strongly coupled nanolaminate according to our previous work [Z. Sun, D. Music, R. Ahuja, S. Li, and J. M. Schneider, Phys. Rev. B 70, 092102 (2004)]. Furthermore, this phase has been synthesized in the form of thin films by magnetron sputtering. The equilibrium volume, determined by x-ray diffraction, is in good agreement with the theoretical data, implying that ab initio calculations provide an accurate description of V{sub 2}AlC.

  16. On the heat capacities of M2AlC (M=Ti,V,Cr) ternary carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drulis, Monika K.; Drulis, H.; Gupta, S.; Barsoum, M. W.; El-Raghy, T.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the heat capacities cp of bulk polycrystalline samples of Ti2AlC, V2AlC, and Cr2AlC in the 3-260 K temperature range. Given the structural and chemical similarities of these compounds it is not surprising that the cp's and their temperature dependencies were quite similar. Nevertheless, at all temperatures the heat capacity of Cr2AlC was higher than the other two. The density of states at the Fermi level were 3.9, 7.5, and 14.6 (eV unit cell)-1 for Ti2AlC, V2AlC, and Cr2AlC, respectively. The results obtained are analyzed using the Debye and Einstein model approximations for cp. Good description of cp is obtained if one assumes that nine phonon modes vibrate according to the Debye model approximation whereas the remaining 3 of 12 modes expected for M2AlC formula unit fulfill an Einstein-like phonon vibration pattern. Debye temperatures θD describing acoustic phonon and Einstein temperature θE describing optical phonon contributions have been estimated for the studied compounds. The Debye temperatures are reasonably high and fall in the range of 600-700 K. A linear dependence was found between the number of d electrons along the row Ti, V, and Cr and the density of states at the Fermi level.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10457 - 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, mixed esters with benzyl alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... esters with benzyl alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol. 721.10457...-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol (PMN P-03-154; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.10457 - 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, mixed esters with benzyl alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... esters with benzyl alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol. 721.10457...-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... alc., cyclohexanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, fumaric acid and propylene glycol (PMN P-03-154; CAS No....

  19. Short-Term Evaluation of a Web-Based College Alcohol Misuse and Harm Prevention Course (College Alc)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paschal, Mallie J.; Bersamin, Melina; Fearnow-Kenney, Melodie; Wyrick, David; Currey, David

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the short-term effects of a web-based alcohol misuse and harm prevention course (College Alc) among incoming freshmen at a California public university. Analysis results indicated that at the end of the fall semester, students randomly assigned to College Alc (n = 173) had a higher level of alcohol-related knowledge and less…

  20. ALC/50/ values for some polymeric materials. [Apparent Lethal Concentration fire toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Schneider, J. E.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Apparent lethal concentrations for 50 per cent of the test animals within a 30-min exposure period (ALC/50/) were determined for seventeen samples of polymeric materials, using the screening test method. The materials evaluated included resin-glass composites, film composites, and miscellaneous resins. ALC(50) values, based on weight of original sample charged, ranged from 24 to 110 mg/l. Modified phenolic resins seemed to exhibit less toxicity than the baseline epoxy resins. Among the film composites evaluated, only flame modified polyvinyl fluoride appeared to exhibit less toxicity than the baseline polyvinyl fluoride film.

  1. Potential Vertical Transmission of Winter Ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) from Moose (Alces americanus) Dams to Neonates.

    PubMed

    Severud, William J; DelGiudice, Glenn D

    2016-01-01

    North American moose (Alces americanus) frequently become infested with winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus). During capture of neonatal moose in northeastern Minnesota, US, in May-June 2013 and 2014, we recovered adult ticks from neonates, presumably vertically transferred from dams, heretofore, not documented. Infestations on neonates may have population-level implications. PMID:26555113

  2. Alcadein Cleavages by Amyloid β-Precursor Protein (APP) α- and γ-Secretases Generate Small Peptides, p3-Alcs, Indicating Alzheimer Disease-related γ-Secretase Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Saori; Fujishige, Sayaka; Araki, Yoichi; Kato, Naoko; Araseki, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaki; Hartmann, Dieter; Saftig, Paul; Fahrenholz, Falk; Taniguchi, Miyako; Urakami, Katsuya; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Martins, Ralph N.; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Maeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Gandy, Sam; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins, designated Alcα, Alcβ, and Alcγ. The Alcs express in neurons dominantly and largely colocalize with the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. Alcs and APP show an identical function as a cargo receptor of kinesin-1. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Alc proteins appears highly similar to that of APP. We found that APP α-secretases ADAM 10 and ADAM 17 primarily cleave Alc proteins and trigger the subsequent secondary intramembranous cleavage of Alc C-terminal fragments by a presenilin-dependent γ-secretase complex, thereby generating “APP p3-like” and non-aggregative Alc peptides (p3-Alcs). We determined the complete amino acid sequence of p3-Alcα, p3-Alcβ, and p3-Alcγ, whose major species comprise 35, 37, and 31 amino acids, respectively, in human cerebrospinal fluid. We demonstrate here that variant p3-Alc C termini are modulated by FAD-linked presenilin 1 mutations increasing minor β-amyloid species Aβ42, and these mutations alter the level of minor p3-Alc species. However, the magnitudes of C-terminal alteration of p3-Alcα, p3-Alcβ, and p3-Alcγ were not equivalent, suggesting that one type of γ-secretase dysfunction does not appear in the phenotype equivalently in the cleavage of type I membrane proteins. Because these C-terminal alterations are detectable in human cerebrospinal fluid, the use of a substrate panel, including Alcs and APP, may be effective to detect γ-secretase dysfunction in the prepathogenic state of Alzheimer disease subjects. PMID:19864413

  3. Lattice instability of V2AlC at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZeJin; Liu, Qiang; Li, Jin; Wang, Zhao; Guo, AiMin; Linghu, RongFeng; Cheng, XinLu; Yang, XiangDong

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the elastic and thermodynamic properties of nanolaminate V2AlC by using the ab initio pseudopotential total energy method. The axial compressibility shows that the c axis is always stiffer than a axis. The elastic constants revealed the structural instability at about 500 and 732 GPa. Furthermore, elastic constants C 44 reached its maximum at about 550 GPa, differing with the other four C 11, C 12, C 13 and C 33 constants. The Poisson's ratio investigations demonstrated that a higher ionic or weaker covalent contribution in intra-atomic bonding and the degree of ionicity increases with pressure. The G/ B and B/ C 44 investigations revealed that V2AlC is brittle and the brittleness decreases with pressure. Also, we found that V2AlC is elastic anisotropic materials and the degree of anisotropy rapidly rises with pressure. Study on Debye temperature and Grüneisen parameter observed weak temperature and strong pressure responses, whereas the sensitive dependence in the thermal expansion coefficient and Helmholtz free energy are clearly seen.

  4. High-temperature neutron diffraction and first-principles study of temperature-dependent crystal structures and atomic vibrations in Ti3AlC2, Ti2AlC, and Ti5Al2C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Nina J.; Vogel, Sven C.; Caspi, El'ad N.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report on the thermal expansions and temperature-dependent crystal structures of select ternary carbide Mn +1AXn (MAX) phases in the Ti-Al-C phase diagram in the 100-1000 °C temperature range. A bulk sample containing 38(±1) wt. % Ti5Al2C3 ("523"), 32(±1) wt. % Ti2AlC ("211"), 18(±1) wt. % Ti3AlC2 ("312"), and 12(±1) wt. % (Ti0.5Al0.5)Al is studied by Rietveld analysis of high-temperature neutron diffraction data. We also report on the same for a single-phase sample of Ti3AlC2 for comparison. The thermal expansions of all the MAX phases studied are higher in the c direction than in the a direction. The bulk expansion coefficients—9.3(±0.1)×10-6 K-1 for Ti5Al2C3, 9.2(±0.1) ×10-6 K-1 for Ti2AlC, and 9.0(±0.1)×10-6 K-1 for Ti3AlC2—are comparable within one standard deviation of each other. In Ti5Al2C3, the dimensions of the Ti-C octahedra for the 211-like and 312-like regions are comparable to the Ti-C octahedra in Ti2AlC and Ti3AlC2, respectively. The isotropic mean-squared atomic displacement parameters are highest for the Al atoms in all three phases, and the values predicted from first-principles phonon calculations agree well with those measured.

  5. Polyamine metabolism in ripening tomato fruit. II. Polyamine metabolism and synthesis in relation to enhanced putrescine content and storage life of alc tomato fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, R.; Davies, P.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The fruit of the Alcobaca landrace of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) have prolonged keeping qualities (determined by the allele alc) and contain three times as much putrescine as the standard Rutgers variety (Alc) at the ripe stage. Polyamine metabolism and biosynthesis were compared in fruit from Rutgers and Rutgers-alc-a near isogenic line possessing the allele alc, at four different stages of ripening. The levels of soluble polyamine conjugates as well as wall bound polyamines in the pericarp tissue and jelly were very low or nondetectable in both genotypes. The increase in putrescine content in alc pericarp is not related to normal ripening as it occurred with time and whether or not the fruit ripened. Pericarp discs of both normal and alc fruit showed a decrease in the metabolism of (1,4-{sup 14}C)putrescine and (terminal labeled-{sup 3}H)spermidine with ripening, but there were no significant differences between the two genotypes. The activity of ornithine decarboxylase was similar in the fruit pericarp of the two lines. Arginine decarboxylase activity decreased during ripening in Rutgers but decreased and rose again in Rutgers-alc fruit, and as a result it was significantly higher in alc fruit than in the normal fruit at the ripe stage. The elevated putrescine levels in alc fruit appear, therefore, to be due to an increase in the activity of arginine decarboxylase.

  6. Mercury, lead and lead isotope ratios in the teeth of moose (Alces alces) from Isle Royale, U.S. Upper Midwest, from 1952 to 2002.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Outridge, P M; Peterson, Rolf O; Eide, Rune; Isrenn, Rolf

    2009-07-01

    Assessing the effect of recent reductions in atmospheric pollution on metal concentrations in wildlife in North America has been difficult because of the sparse availability of historical samples with which to establish a "pre-regulation" baseline, and because many ecosystems may be affected by local point sources which could obscure broader-scale trends. Here we report a recent 50 yr annual record of Hg, Pb and Pb isotope ratios in the teeth of a resident population of moose (Alces alces) in Isle Royale National Park, a relatively remote island in Lake Superior, Michigan, USA. During the early 1980s, concentrations of tooth Hg abruptly declined by approximately 65% compared to the previous 30 years (p<0.001), similar to a previous study of Hg in herring gull eggs in the Great Lakes region. Lead declined at the same time, and by 2002 Pb in adult moose teeth was approximately 80% lower than it had been prior to the early 1980s (p<0.001). These trends were unaffected by normalization against the geogenic elements La and Sr, which indicates that the trends in Hg and Pb had an anthropogenic cause. Temporal patterns of Pb isotope ratios suggested that the primary sources of Pb at different times in the moose were combustion of U.S. coal and leaded gasoline. Reductions in emissions from coal combustion might explain the co-incident reductions of Hg and Pb in Isle Royale moose, with elimination of alkyl Pb additives also playing a role in the continued tooth Pb reductions after 1983. PMID:20449224

  7. Fibrolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Rumen of North American Moose (Alces alces) and Their Use as a Probiotic in Neonatal Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Suzanne L.; Kim, Christina J.; Reis, Doug; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolytic bacteria were isolated from the rumen of North American moose (Alces alces), which eat a high-fiber diet of woody browse. It was hypothesized that fibrolytic bacteria isolated from the moose rumen could be used as probiotics to improve fiber degradation and animal production. Thirty-one isolates (Bacillus, n = 26; Paenibacillus, n = 1; and Staphylococcus, n = 4) were cultured from moose rumen digesta samples collected in Vermont. Using Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, culturing techniques, and optical densities, isolates were identified and screened for biochemical properties important to plant carbohydrate degradation. Five isolates were selected as candidates for use as a probiotic, which was administered daily to neonate lambs for 9 weeks. It was hypothesized that regular administration of a probiotic to improve fibrolysis to neonate animals through weaning would increase the developing rumen bacterial diversity, increase animal production, and allow for long-term colonization of the probiotic species. Neither weight gain nor wool quality was improved in lambs given a probiotic, however, dietary efficiency was increased as evidenced by the reduced feed intake (and rearing costs) without a loss to weight gain. Experimental lambs had a lower acetate to propionate ratio than control lambs, which was previously shown to indicate increased dietary efficiency. Fibrolytic bacteria made up the majority of sequences, mainly Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Ruminococcus. While protozoal densities increased over time and were stable, methanogen densities varied greatly in the first six months of life for lambs. This is likely due to the changing diet and bacterial populations in the developing rumen. PMID:26716685

  8. Novel nuclear protein ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 is expressed in vascular and mesocarp cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2008-07-01

    Pod shattering is an agronomical trait that is a result of the coordinated action of cell differentiation and separation. In Arabidopsis, pod shattering is controlled by a complex genetic network in which ALCATRAZ (ALC), a member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, is critical for cell separation during fruit dehiscence. Herein, we report the identification of ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 (ACI1) via the yeast two-hybrid screen. ACI1 encodes a nuclear protein with a lysine-rich domain and a C-terminal serine-rich domain. ACI1 is mainly expressed in the vascular system throughout the plant and mesocarp of the valve in siliques. Our data showed that ACI1 interacts strongly with the N-terminal portion of ALC in yeast cells and in plant cells in the nucleus as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Both ACI1 and ALC share an overlapping expression pattern, suggesting that they likely function together in planta. However, no detectable phenotype was found in plants with reduced ACI1 expression by RNA interference technology, suggesting that ACI1 may be redundant. Taken together, these data indicate that ALC may interact with ACI1 and its homologs to control cell separation during fruit dehiscence in Arabidopsis. PMID:18713402

  9. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio calculation of Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Wu, Xiang; Nickel, Klaus Georg; Chen, Jixin; Presser, Volker

    2009-07-01

    The structural stability of the layered ternary carbide Ti3AlC2 was studied up to 35 GPa using x-ray diffraction with a Merrill-Basset-type diamond anvil cell and ab initio calculations. The structure (P63/mmc) was stable in the present pressure range without any phase transition. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was employed to fit the experimental pressure-volume date, from which the isothermal bulk modulus of Ti3AlC2 was determined as 156±5 GPa, which was also supported by theoretical results. In addition, theoretical calculations described anisotropic pressure dependences of the lattice parameters, electronic structure, and bonding properties of Ti3AlC2.

  10. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation - up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ± 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 × 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.

  11. Trace elements in moose (Alices alces) found dead in Northwestern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Cox, E.; Gray, B.

    2004-01-01

    The moose (Alces alces) population in bog and forest areas of Northwestern Minnesota has declined for more than 25 years, and more recently the decline is throughout Northwestern Minnesota. Both deficiencies and elevations in trace elements have been linked to the health of moose worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether trace element toxicity or deficiency may have contributed to the decline of moose in Northwestern Minnesota. Livers of 81 moose found dead in Northwestern Minnesota in 1998 and 1999 were analyzed for trace elements. With the exception of selenium (Se) and copper (Cu), trace elements were not at toxic or deficient levels based on criteria set for cattle. Selenium concentrations in moose livers based on criteria set for cattle were deficient in 3.7% of livers and at a chronic toxicity level in 16% of livers. Copper concentrations based on criteria set for cattle were deficient in 39.5% of livers, marginally deficient in 29.5% of livers and adequate in 31% of livers. Moose from agricultural areas had higher concentrations, on average, of Cd, Cu, Mo and Se in their livers than moose from bog and forest areas. Older moose had higher concentrations of Cd and Zn, and lower concentrations of Cu than younger moose. Copper deficiency, which has been associated with population declines of moose in Alaska and Sweden, may be a factor contributing to the decline of moose in Northwestern Minnesota. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ab initio study of basal slip in Nb(2)AlC.

    PubMed

    Music, Denis; Sun, Zhimei; Voevodin, Andrey A; Schneider, Jochen M

    2006-05-01

    Using ab initio calculations, we have studied shearing in Nb(2)AlC, where NbC and Al layers are interleaved. The stress-strain analysis of this deformation mode reveals Nb-Al bond breaking, while the Nb-C bond length decreases by 4.1%. Furthermore, there is no evidence for phase transformation during deformation. This is consistent with basal slip and may be understood on the basis of the electronic structure: bands below the Fermi level are responsible for the dd bonding between NbC basal planes and only a single band with a weak dd interaction is not resistant to shearing, while all other bands are unaffected. The Al-Nb bonding character can be described as mainly metallic with weak covalent-ionic contributions. Our study demonstrates that Al layers move with relative ease under shear strain. Phase conservation upon shearing is unusual for carbides and may be due to the layered nature of the phase studied. Here, we describe the electronic origin of basal slip in Nb(2)AlC, the atomic mechanism which enables reversible plasticity in this class of materials. PMID:21690790

  13. Oxidation Resistance of Materials Based on Ti3AlC2 Nanolaminate at 600 °C in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivasyshyn, Andrij; Ostash, Orest; Prikhna, Tatiana; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Basyuk, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti3AlC2-based materials had been investigated at 600 °C in static air for 1000 h. It was shown that the intense increase of weight gain per unit surface area for sintered material with porosity of 22 % attributed to oxidation of the outer surface of the specimen and surfaces of pores in the bulk material. The oxidation kinetics of the hot-pressed Ti3AlC2-based material with 1 % porosity remarkably increased for the first 15 h and then slowly decreased. The weight gain per unit surface area for this material was 1.0 mg/cm2 after exposition for 1000 h. The intense initial oxidation of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be eliminated by pre-oxidation treatment at 1200 °C in air for 2 h. As a result, the weight gain per unit surface area for the pre-oxidized material did not exceed 0.11 mg/cm2 after 1000 h of exposition at 600 °C in air. It was demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be significantly improved by niobium addition.

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ±more » 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.« less

  15. Carbon diffusion in alumina from carbon and Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Guenette, Mathew C.; Tucker, Mark D.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.; Ionescu, Mihail

    2011-04-15

    Carbon diffusion is observed in single crystal {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates from carbon and Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films synthesized via pulsed cathodic arc deposition. Diffusion was found to occur at substrate temperatures of 570 deg. C and above. The diffusion coefficient of carbon in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is estimated to be of the order 3x10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/s for deposition temperatures in the 570-770{sup o}C range by examining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) elemental depth profiles. It is suggested that an appropriate diffusion barrier may be useful when depositing carbon containing thin films on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates at high temperatures.

  16. Cold Spraying of Ti2AlC MAX-Phase Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzmann, H.; Gärtner, F.; Höche, D.; Blawert, C.; Klassen, T.

    2013-03-01

    Cold spraying was applied to deposit Ti2AlC on different substrate materials. The study of single impacts by scanning electron microscopy indicates that bonding of the first layer is mainly attributed to the deformation and shear instabilities occurring at substrate sites. Nevertheless, as compared to the feedstock particles, the splats appear flattened by the impact. This deformation seems to be attributed not only to local, internal shear but also to internal fracture. By applying up to five passes under optimized spray parameters, Ti2AlC-coatings with thicknesses of about 110-155 μm were achieved. XRD analysis of the coating proved that the crystallographic structure of the feedstock was retained during cold spraying. The coating microstructures show rather low porosity of about <2%, but several cracks between spray layers. Successful build-up of more than one layer can probably be attributed to local deformation of the highly anisotropic Ti2AlC-phase.

  17. (Nbx, Zr1-x)4AlC3 MAX Phase Solid Solutions: Processing, Mechanical Properties, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lapauw, Thomas; Tytko, Darius; Vanmeensel, Kim; Huang, Shuigen; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Raabe, Dierk; Caspi, El'ad N; Ozeri, Offir; To Baben, Moritz; Schneider, Jochen M; Lambrinou, Konstantina; Vleugels, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    The solubility of zirconium (Zr) in the Nb4AlC3 host lattice was investigated by combining the experimental synthesis of (Nbx, Zr1-x)4AlC3 solid solutions with density functional theory calculations. High-purity solid solutions were prepared by reactive hot pressing of NbH0.89, ZrH2, Al, and C starting powder mixtures. The crystal structure of the produced solid solutions was determined using X-ray and neutron diffraction. The limited Zr solubility (maximum of 18.5% of the Nb content in the host lattice) in Nb4AlC3 observed experimentally is consistent with the calculated minimum in the energy of mixing. The lattice parameters and microstructure were evaluated over the entire solubility range, while the chemical composition of (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 was mapped using atom probe tomography. The hardness, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness at room temperature as well as the high-temperature flexural strength and E-modulus of (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 were investigated and compared to those of pure Nb4AlC3. Quite remarkably, an appreciable increase in fracture toughness was observed from 6.6 ± 0.1 MPa/m(1/2) for pure Nb4AlC3 to 10.1 ± 0.3 MPa/m(1/2) for the (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 solid solution. PMID:27159119

  18. Discovery of carbon-vacancy ordering in Nb4AlC3-x under the guidance of first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Hu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Wu, Erdong; Zhou, Yanchun

    2015-09-01

    The conventional wisdom to tailor the properties of binary transition metal carbides by order-disorder phase transformation has been inapplicable for the machinable ternary carbides (MTCs) due to the absence of ordered phase in bulk sample. Here, the presence of an ordered phase with structural carbon vacancies in Nb4AlC3-x (x ≈ 0.3) ternary carbide is predicted by first-principles calculations, and experimentally identified for the first time by transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with the first-principles prediction, the ordered phase, o-Nb4AlC3, crystalizes in P63/mcm with a = 5.423 Å, c = 24.146 Å. Coexistence of ordered (o-Nb4AlC3) and disordered (Nb4AlC3-x) phase brings about abundant domains with irregular shape in the bulk sample. Both heating and electron irradiation can induce the transformation from o-Nb4AlC3 to Nb4AlC3-x. Our findings may offer substantial insights into the roles of carbon vacancies in the structure stability and order-disorder phase transformation in MTCs.

  19. Discovery of carbon-vacancy ordering in Nb4AlC3–x under the guidance of first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Hu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Wu, Erdong; Zhou, Yanchun

    2015-01-01

    The conventional wisdom to tailor the properties of binary transition metal carbides by order-disorder phase transformation has been inapplicable for the machinable ternary carbides (MTCs) due to the absence of ordered phase in bulk sample. Here, the presence of an ordered phase with structural carbon vacancies in Nb4AlC3–x (x ≈ 0.3) ternary carbide is predicted by first-principles calculations, and experimentally identified for the first time by transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with the first-principles prediction, the ordered phase, o-Nb4AlC3, crystalizes in P63/mcm with a = 5.423 Å, c = 24.146 Å. Coexistence of ordered (o-Nb4AlC3) and disordered (Nb4AlC3–x) phase brings about abundant domains with irregular shape in the bulk sample. Both heating and electron irradiation can induce the transformation from o-Nb4AlC3 to Nb4AlC3–x. Our findings may offer substantial insights into the roles of carbon vacancies in the structure stability and order-disorder phase transformation in MTCs. PMID:26388153

  20. A high-temperature neutron diffraction study of Nb2AlC and TiNbAlC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bentzel, Grady W.; Lane, Nina J.; Vogel, Sven C.; An, Ke; Barsoum, Michel W.; Caspi, El'ad N.

    2014-12-16

    In this paper, we report on the crystal structures of Nb2AlC and TiNbAlC actual composition (Ti0.45,Nb0.55)2AlC compounds determined from Rietveld analysis of neutron diffraction patterns in the 300-1173 K temperature range. The average linear thermal expansion coefficients of a Nb2AlC sample in the a and c directions are, respectively, 7.9(5)x10-6 K-1 and 7.7(5)x10-6 K-1 on one neutron diffractometer and 7.3(3)x10-6 K-1 and 7.0(2)x10-6 K-1 on a second diffractometer. The respective values for the (Ti0.45,Nb0.55)2AlC composition - only tested on one diffractometer - are 8.5(3)x10-6 K-1 and 7.5(5)x10-6 K-1. These values are relatively low compared to other MAX phases. Like othermore » MAX phases, however, the atomic displacement parameters show that the Al atoms vibrate with higher amplitudes than the Ti and C atoms, and 1 more along the basal planes than normal to them. In addition, when the predictions of the atomic displacement parameters obtained from density functional theory are compared to the experimental results, good quantitative agreement is found for the Al atoms. In case of the Nb and C atoms, the agreement was more qualitative.« less

  1. Isolation of pristine MXene from Nb4AlC3 MAX phase: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Srivastava, Pooja; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2016-04-20

    Synthesis of pristine MXene sheets from MAX phase is one of the foremost challenges in getting a complete understanding of the properties of this new technologically important 2D-material. Efforts to exfoliate Nb4AlC3 MAX phase always lead to Nb4C3 MXene sheets, which are functionalized and have several Al atoms attached. Using the first-principles calculations, we perform an intensive study on the chemical transformation of MAX phase into MXene sheets by inserting HF, alkali atoms and LiF in Nb4AlC3 MAX phase. Calculated bond-dissociation energy (BDE) shows that the presence of HF in MAX phase always results in functionalized MXene, as the binding of H with MXene is quite strong while that with F is weak. Insertion of alkali atoms does not facilitate pristine MXene isolation due to the presence of chemical bonds of almost equal strength. In contrast, weak Li-MXene and strong Li-F bonding in Nb4AlC3 with LiF ensured strong anisotropy in BDE, which will result in the dissociation of the Li-MXene bond. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations capture these features and show that at 500-650 K, the Li-MXene bond indeed breaks leaving a pristine MXene sheet behind. The approach and insights developed here for chemical exfoliation of layered materials bonded by chemical bonds instead of van der Waals can promote their experimental realization. PMID:27045339

  2. Heavy metal contents of paddy fields of Alcácer do Sal, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, J C; Henriques, F S

    1990-01-01

    Recent claims of metal contamination in the lower reaches of the Sado River, in the Alcácer do Sal region, Portugal, a major rice-producing area were investigated by carrying out metal surveys in the area. The elements Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu and Pb were measured in the soil and in rice plant parts--roots, shoots and grain--as well as in some weeds growing in the Sado banks, near the paddy fields. Results showed that the metal contents of paddy soils were similar to background concentrations, with the exception of Zn and Cu, which were above those concentrations and reached their highest levels at Vale de Guizo, the monitored station located furthest upstream in the Sado River. At some sites, plant roots accumulated relatively large amounts of Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, but the shoot levels of these metals were within the normal range for rice plants. It is possible that varying, but significant, amounts of Fe associated with the roots were in the form of ferric hydroxide plaque covering their surfaces. Copper levels in the shoots of rice were below the normal contents cited for this plant in the literature. Metal levels of river sediments collected near Vale de Guizo seem to corroborate the possibility of some metal contamination in the Sado River, most probably derived from pyrites mining activity in the upper zone of the Sado basin. PMID:2305246

  3. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations. PMID:27034075

  4. Cold spray deposition of Ti2AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Benjamin R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hauch, Benjamin; Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of Ti2AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ∼90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 HK and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding.

  5. Cold spray deposition of Ti2AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Benjamin R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hauch, Benjamin; Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of Ti2AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ˜90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 HK and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding.

  6. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-04-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations.

  7. Coordinated increase of γ-secretase reaction products in the plasma of some female Japanese sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients: quantitative analysis of p3-Alcα with a new ELISA system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aggregatable amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and non-aggregatable p3-Alcα are metabolic products of the γ-secretase cleavage of amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) and Alcadeinα (Alcα), respectively. Familial AD (FAD) -linked mutations in the presenilin 1 or 2 (PS1 or PS2) component of γ-secretase can cause alternative intramembranous processing of APP and Alcα, leading to a coordinated generation of variants of both Aβ and p3-Alcα. Variant Alcα peptides have been observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since, like APP, Alcα is largely expressed in brain, one might predict that alternative processing of Alcα would be reflected in body fluids of some AD patients. These patients with misprocessing of multiple γ-secretase substrates might define an endophenotype of p3-Alcα, in whom AD is due either to dysfunction of γ-secretase or to a disorder of the clearance of hydrophobic peptides such as those derived from transmembrane domains. Results We developed a simple procedure for extraction of p3-Alcα from plasma and for analyzing this extract in a sensitive, p3-Alcα-specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system. Plasma p3-Alcα levels and Aβ40 levels were examined in sporadic AD subjects from two independent Japanese cohorts. In some of these patients, levels of plasma p3-Alcα were significantly higher, and were accompanied by parallel changes in Aβ40 levels. This AD-related difference was more marked in female subjects, but this phenomenon was not observed in subjects with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Conclusion Reagents and procedures have been established that enable extraction of p3-Alcα from plasma and for quantification of plasma p3-Alcα levels by ELISA. Some populations of AD subjects apparently show increased levels of both p3-Alcα and Aβ40. Quantification of p3-Alcα level may be useful as a readily accessible biomarker

  8. Brief Report: Genetics of Alcoholic Cirrhosis - GenomALC multinational Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, John B.; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul S.; Day, Christopher P.; Masson, Steven; Daly, Ann K.; Cordell, Heather J.; Mueller, Sebastian; Seitz, Helmut K.; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Westerhold, Chi; Liang, Tiebing; Lumeng, Lawrence; Foroud, Tatiana; Nalpas, Bertrand; Mathurin, Philippe; Stickel, Felix; Soyka, Michael; Botwin, Gregory J.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Seth, Devanshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of alcohol-related liver cirrhosis increases with increasing alcohol consumption, but many people with very high intake escape liver disease. We postulate that susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis has a complex genetic component, and propose that this can be dissected through a large and sufficiently-powered genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods The GenomALC Consortium comprises researchers from Australia, France, Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States, with a joint aim of exploring the genetic and genomic basis of alcoholic cirrhosis. For this NIH/NIAAA funded study, we are recruiting high-risk drinkers who are either cases (with alcoholic cirrhosis) or controls (drinking comparable amounts over similar time, but free of significant liver disease). Extensive phenotypic data are obtained using semi-structured interviews and patient records, and blood samples are collected. Results We have successfully recruited 859 participants including 538 matched case-control samples as of September 2014, using study specific inclusion-exclusion criteria and data collection protocols. Of these, 580 are cases (442 men, 138 women) and 279 are controls (205 men, 74 women). Duration of excessive drinking was slightly greater in cases than controls and was significantly less in women than men. Cases had significantly lower lifetime alcohol intake than controls. Both cases and controls had a high prevalence of reported parental alcohol problems, but cases were significantly more likely to report that a father with alcohol problems had died from liver disease (Odds Ratio 2.53, 95% CI 1.31–4.87, p = 0.0055). Conclusions Recruitment of participants for a GWAS of alcoholic cirrhosis has proved feasible across countries with multiple sites. Affected patients often consume less alcohol than unaffected ones, emphasising the existence of individual vulnerability factors. Cases are more likely to report liver disease in a father with alcohol

  9. OC-ALC hazardous waste minimization strategy: Reduction of industrial biological sludge from industrial wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.E. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC) is one of five US Air Force Logistic Centers that perform depot level maintenance of aircraft. As part of the maintenance process, aircraft are cleaned, chemically depainted, repainted, and electroplated. These repair/maintenance processes generate large quantities of dilute liquid effluent which are collected and treated in the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (IWTP) prior to hazardous waste disposal. OC-ALC is committed to reducing the use of hazardous materials in the repair and maintenance of aircraft and ancillary components. A major Air Force initiative is to reduce the amount of hazardous waste discharged off-site by 25% by the end of CY96 and 50% by CY99 end. During maintenance and repair operations, organic chemicals are employed. These organics are discharged to the IWTP for biological degradation. During the biological digestion process, a biological sludge is generated. OC-ALC engineers are evaluating the applicability of a biosludge acid/heat treatment process. In the acid hydrolysis process, an acid is added to the biosludge and processed through a hot, pressurized reactor where the majority of the biosolids are broken down and solubilized. The resulting aqueous product stream is then recycled back to the traditional biotreatment process for digestion of the solubilized organics. The solid waste stream is dewatered prior to disposal. The objective of the subsequent effort is to achieve a reduction in hazardous waste generation and disposal by focusing primarily on end-of-the-pipe treatment at the IWTP. Acid hydrolysis of biosludge is proving to be a practical process for use in industrial and municipal wastewater biotreatment systems that will lower environmental and economic costs by minimizing the production and disposal of biosludge.

  10. Substrate orientation effects on the nucleation and growth of the M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} phase Ti{sub 2}AlC

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D.; Guenette, Mathew C.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.; Persson, Per O. A.; Rosen, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    The M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} (MAX) phases are ternary compounds comprising alternating layers of a transition metal carbide or nitride and a third ''A-group'' element. The effect of substrate orientation on the growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC MAX phase films was investigated by studying pulsed cathodic arc deposited samples grown on sapphire cut along the (0001), (1010), and (1102) crystallographic planes. Characterization of these samples was by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. On the (1010) substrate, tilted (1018) growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC was found, such that the TiC octahedra of the MAX phase structure have the same orientation as a spontaneously formed epitaxial TiC sublayer, preserving the typical TiC-Ti{sub 2}AlC epitaxial relationship and confirming the importance of this relationship in determining MAX phase film orientation. An additional component of Ti{sub 2}AlC with tilted fiber texture was observed in this sample; tilted fiber texture, or axiotaxy, has not previously been seen in MAX phase films.

  11. Oxidation Resistance of Materials Based on Ti3AlC2 Nanolaminate at 600 °C in Air.

    PubMed

    Ivasyshyn, Andrij; Ostash, Orest; Prikhna, Tatiana; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Basyuk, Tatiana

    2016-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti3AlC2-based materials had been investigated at 600 °C in static air for 1000 h. It was shown that the intense increase of weight gain per unit surface area for sintered material with porosity of 22 % attributed to oxidation of the outer surface of the specimen and surfaces of pores in the bulk material. The oxidation kinetics of the hot-pressed Ti3AlC2-based material with 1 % porosity remarkably increased for the first 15 h and then slowly decreased. The weight gain per unit surface area for this material was 1.0 mg/cm(2) after exposition for 1000 h. The intense initial oxidation of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be eliminated by pre-oxidation treatment at 1200 °C in air for 2 h. As a result, the weight gain per unit surface area for the pre-oxidized material did not exceed 0.11 mg/cm(2) after 1000 h of exposition at 600 °C in air. It was demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be significantly improved by niobium addition. PMID:27506531

  12. Measuring the spectrum of mutation induced by nitrogen ions and protons in the human-hamster hybrid cell line A(L)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Ueno, A.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed to charged particles, including protons, alpha particles and heavier ions, during space flights. Therefore, studying the biological effectiveness of these sparsely and densely ionizing radiations is important to understanding the potential health effects for astronauts. We evaluated the mutagenic effectiveness of sparsely ionizing 55 MeV protons and densely ionizing 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions using cells of two human-hamster cell lines, A(L) and A(L)C. We have previously characterized a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in the human-hamster hybrid cell lines A(L)C and A(L). CD59(-) mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen encoded by the CD59 gene located at 11p13. Deletion of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the A(L) hybrid, so that CD59 mutants that lose the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. In contrast, deletion of the 11p15.5 region is not lethal in the hybrid A(L)C, allowing for the detection of chromosome loss or other chromosomal mutations involving 11p15.5. The 55 MeV protons and 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions were each about 10 times more mutagenic per unit dose at the CD59 locus in A(L)C cells than in A(L) cells. In the case of nitrogen ions, the mutations observed in A(L)C cells were predominantly due to chromosome loss events or 11p deletions, often containing a breakpoint in the pericentromeric region. The increase in the CD59(-) mutant fraction for A(L)C cells exposed to protons was associated with either translocation of portions of 11q onto a hamster chromosome, or discontinuous or "skipping" mutations. We demonstrate here that A(L)C cells are a powerful tool that will aid in the understanding of the mutagenic effects of different types of ionizing radiation.

  13. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    PubMed

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate. PMID:24115403

  14. Anisotropic swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated Ti3AlC2-Ti5Al2C3 materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ang, Caen K.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2015-12-17

    Mn + 1AXn (MAX) phase materials based on Ti–Al–C have been irradiated at 400 °C (673 K) with fission neutrons to a fluence of 2 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), corresponding to ~ 2 displacements per atom (dpa). We report preliminary results of microcracking in the Al-containing MAX phase, which contained the phases Ti3AlC2 and Ti5Al2C3. Equibiaxial ring-on-ring tests of irradiated coupons showed that samples retained 10% of pre-irradiated strength. Volumetric swelling of up to 4% was observed. Phase analysis and microscopy suggest that anisotropic lattice parameter swelling caused microcracking. Lastly, variants of titanium aluminum carbide may bemore » unsuitable materials for irradiation at light water reactor-relevant temperatures.« less

  15. The Cretaceous (Cenomanian) continental record of the Laje do Coringa flagstone (Alcântara Formation), northeastern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Manuel Alfredo; Lindoso, Rafael Matos; Mendes, Ighor Dienes; Carvalho, Ismar de Souza

    2014-08-01

    The fossil taxa of the Cenomanian continental flora and fauna of São Luís Basin are observed primarily in the bone bed of the Laje do Coringa, Alcântara Formation. Many of the disarticulated fish and tetrapod skeletal and dental elements are remarkably similar to the chronocorrelate fauna of Northern Africa. In this study, we present a summary of the continental flora and fauna of the Laje do Coringa bone-bed. The record emphasizes the existence of a trans-oceanic typical fauna, at least until the early Cenomanian, which may be interpreted as minor evolutionary changes after a major vicariant event or as a result of a land bridge across the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, thereby allowing interchanges between South America and Africa. The paleoenvironmental conditions in the northern Maranhão State coast during that time were inferred as forested humid areas surrounded by an arid to semi-arid landscape.

  16. Chymotrypsins from the deer (Cervidae) family. Isolation, partial characterization and primary-structure studies of chymotrypsins A and B from both moose (Alces alces) and elk (Cervus elaphus) pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, R M; Stevenson, K J

    1976-01-01

    1. An anionic and a cationic chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) were isolated from the pancreas glands of the moose (Alces alces) and elk (Cervus elaphus). The A and B chymotrypsins from each species were purified to homogeneity by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, affinity chromatography on 4-phenylbutylamine-Sepharose and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE- and CM-cellulose. 2. The molecular weight and pH optimum of each chymotrypsin were similar to those of the corresponding ox A and B chymotrypsins. 3. The substrate specificities of the chymotrypsins were investigated by digestion of glucagon and the oxidized B chain of insulin. The primary specificity of each chymotrypsin for aromatic amino acid residues was further established by determining the Km and kcat for the hydrolysis of a number of synthetic amino acid ester substrates. 4. The amino acid composition and total number of residues of moose and elk chymotrypsin A were similar to those of ox chymotrypsin A. An even greater similarity was observed among the B chymotrypsins of the three species. 5. The A chymotrypsins of moose and elk were fragmented to their constituent 'A', 'B' and 'C' polypeptide chains by succinylation (3-carboxypropionylation), reduction and alkylation of the native enzymes. In each case, the two major chains ('B' and 'C') were separated and isolated. By comparison of the amino acid compositions of moose, elk and oxy 'B' and 'C' chains, a greater difference was observed among the three A chymotrypsins than was suggested by the amino acid compositions of the native enzymes alone. 6. Peptides were isolated from the disulphide bridge and active-site regions of the A and B chymotrypsins of moose and elk by diagonal peptide-'mapping' techniques. From the amino acid compositions of the isolated peptides (assuming maximum homology) and from a comparison of diagonal peptide 'maps', there was established a high degree of primary-structure identity among the mooae, elk and ox chymotrypsins. Tentative sequences

  17. Thermopower of the 312 MAX phases Ti3SiC2 , Ti3GeC2 , and Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, L.; Hug, G.; Pécheur, P.; Scherrer, H.

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure and the thermoelectric tensor are calculated for the 312 MAX phases Ti3SiC2 , Ti3GeC2 , and Ti3AlC2 . The thermoelectric tensor is shown to be anisotropic in all cases. However, for Ti3SiC2 and Ti3GeC2 we find the components of the thermoelectric tensor to be negative along the z direction, Sz<0 , and positive in the basal plane, Sx>0 , whereas Sz>0 and Sx>0 over a large temperature range for Ti3AlC2 . This accounts for the different behavior experimentally observed. Moreover, the calculated thermopower as a function of temperature is in good agreement with experiments on polycrystals.

  18. New insight into the helium-induced damage in MAX phase Ti3AlC2 by first-principles studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiguo; Bai, Xiaojing; Zha, Xianhu; Huang, Qing; He, Jian; Luo, Kan; Zhou, Yuhong; Germann, Timothy C; Francisco, Joseph S; Du, Shiyu

    2015-09-21

    In the present work, the behavior of He in the MAX phase Ti3AlC2 material is investigated using first-principle methods. It is found that, according to the predicted formation energies, a single He atom favors residing near the Al plane in Ti3AlC2. The results also show that Al vacancies are better able to trap He atoms than either Ti or C vacancies. The formation energies for the secondary vacancy defects near an Al vacancy or a C vacancy are strongly influenced by He impurity content. According to the present results, the existence of trapped He atoms in primary Al vacancy can promote secondary vacancy formation and the He bubble trapped by Al vacancies has a higher tendency to grow in the Al plane of Ti3AlC2. The diffusion of He in Ti3AlC2 is also investigated. The energy barriers are approximately 2.980 eV and 0.294 eV along the c-axis and in the ab plane, respectively, which means that He atoms exhibit faster migration parallel to the Al plane. Hence, the formation of platelet-like bubbles nucleated from the Al vacancies is favored both energetically and kinetically. Our calculations also show that the conventional spherical bubbles may be originated from He atoms trapped by C vacancies. Taken together, these results are able to explain the observed formation of bubbles in various shapes in recent experiments. This study is expected to provide new insight into the behaviors of MAX phases under irradiation from electronic structure level in order to improve the design of MAX phase based materials. PMID:26395728

  19. New insight into the helium-induced damage in MAX phase Ti3AlC2 by first-principles studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiguo; Bai, Xiaojing; Zha, Xianhu; Huang, Qing; He, Jian; Luo, Kan; Zhou, Yuhong; Germann, Timothy C.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Du, Shiyu

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the behavior of He in the MAX phase Ti3AlC2 material is investigated using first-principle methods. It is found that, according to the predicted formation energies, a single He atom favors residing near the Al plane in Ti3AlC2. The results also show that Al vacancies are better able to trap He atoms than either Ti or C vacancies. The formation energies for the secondary vacancy defects near an Al vacancy or a C vacancy are strongly influenced by He impurity content. According to the present results, the existence of trapped He atoms in primary Al vacancy can promote secondary vacancy formation and the He bubble trapped by Al vacancies has a higher tendency to grow in the Al plane of Ti3AlC2. The diffusion of He in Ti3AlC2 is also investigated. The energy barriers are approximately 2.980 eV and 0.294 eV along the c-axis and in the ab plane, respectively, which means that He atoms exhibit faster migration parallel to the Al plane. Hence, the formation of platelet-like bubbles nucleated from the Al vacancies is favored both energetically and kinetically. Our calculations also show that the conventional spherical bubbles may be originated from He atoms trapped by C vacancies. Taken together, these results are able to explain the observed formation of bubbles in various shapes in recent experiments. This study is expected to provide new insight into the behaviors of MAX phases under irradiation from electronic structure level in order to improve the design of MAX phase based materials.

  20. Deformation modes and ideal strengths of ternary layered Ti{sub 2}AlC and Ti{sub 2}AlN from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Ting; Wang Jingyang; Zhou Yanchun

    2006-06-01

    Deformation and failure modes were studied for Ti{sub 2}AlC and Ti{sub 2}AlN by deforming the materials from elasticity to structural instability using the first-principles density functional calculations. We found that the TiC{sub 0.5}/TiN{sub 0.5} slabs remain structurally stable under deformations, whereas the weak Ti-Al bonds accommodate deformation by softening and breaking at large strains. The structural stability of the ternary compound is determined by the strength of Ti-Al bond, which is demonstrated to be less resistive to shear deformation than to tension. The ideal stress-strain relationships of ternary compounds are presented and compared with those of the binary materials, TiC and TiN, respectively. For Ti{sub 2}AlC and Ti{sub 2}AlN, their ideal tensile strengths are comparable to those of the binary counterparts, while the ideal shear strengths yield much smaller values. Based on electronic structure analyses, the low shear deformation resistance is well interpreted by the response of weak Ti-Al bonds to shear deformations. We propose that the low shear strengths of Ti{sub 2}AlC and Ti{sub 2}AlN originate from low slip resistance of Al atomic planes along the basal plane, and furthermore suggest that this is the mechanism for low hardness, damage tolerance, and intrinsic toughness of ternary layered carbides and nitrides.

  1. Chromosomal mutations and chromosome loss measured in a new human-hamster hybrid cell line, ALC: studies with colcemid, ultraviolet irradiation, and 137Cs gamma-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Small mutations, megabase deletions, and aneuploidy are involved in carcinogenesis and genetic defects, so it is important to be able to quantify these mutations and understand mechanisms of their creation. We have previously quantified a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in a hamster-human hybrid cell line AL. S1- mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen, S1, which is encoded by the M1C1 gene at 11p13 so that mutants can be detected via a complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay in which S1+ cells are killed and S1- cells survive. But loss of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the AL hybrid, so that mutants that have lost the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. To circumvent this, we fused AL with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a new hybrid, ALC, in which the requirement for maintaining 11p15.5 is relieved, allowing us to detect mutations events involving loss of 11p15.5. We evaluated the usefulness of this hybrid by conducting mutagenesis studies with colcemid, 137Cs gamma-radiation and UV 254 nm light. Colcemid induced 1000 more S1- mutants per unit dose in ALC than in AL; the increase for UV 254 nm light was only two-fold; and the increase for 137Cs gamma-rays was 12-fold. The increase in S1- mutant fraction in ALC cells treated with colcemid and 137Cs gamma-rays were largely due to chromosome loss and 11p deletions often containing a breakpoint within the centromeric region.

  2. Positive Family History, Infection, Low Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) and Absent Thymic Shadow: Diagnostic Clues for all Molecular Forms of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie M; Railey, Mary Dell; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome uniformly fatal during infancy unless recognized and treated successfully by bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Because SCID infants have no abnormal physical appearance, diagnosis is usually delayed unless newborn screening is performed. Objective In this study, we sought to evaluate the presenting features of all 172 SCID patients transplanted at this institution over the past 31 years. Methods We reviewed original charts from 172 consecutive classic SCID patients who received either T cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical (N=154) or HLA-identical (N=18) non-ablative related marrow transplants at Duke University Medical Center from 1982–2013. Results The mean age at presentation was 4.87 months. When there was a family history of early infant death or known SCID (63/172 or 37%), the mean presentation age was much earlier, 2.0 months compared to 6.6 months. Failure to thrive was common, with 84 patients (50%) having a weight less than the 5th percentile. The leading infections included oral moniliasis (43%), viral infections (61/172 35.5%) and Pneumocystis jiroveci (26%) pneumonia. The group mean ALC was 1454/cmm; 88% of the infants had an ALC less than 3000/cmm. Absent thymic shadow was seen in 92% of infants with electronic radiographic data available. An absence of T cell function was found in all patients. Conclusions SCID infants appear normal at birth but later present with failure to thrive and/or recurrent fungal, viral and bacterial infections. Low ALCs and absent thymic shadow on chest x-ray are key diagnostic clues. The absence of T cell function confirms the diagnosis. PMID:25824440

  3. First-principles phonon calculations of thermal expansion in Ti3SiC2 , Ti3AlC2 , and Ti3GeC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Atsushi; Chaput, Laurent; Tanaka, Isao; Hug, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    Thermal properties of ternary carbides with composition Ti3SiC2 , Ti3AlC2 , and Ti3GeC2 were studied using the first-principles phonon calculations. The thermal expansions, the heat capacities at constant pressure, and the isothermal bulk moduli at finite temperatures were obtained under the quasiharmonic approximation. Comparisons were made with the available experimental data and excellent agreements were obtained. Phonon band structures and partial density of states were investigated. These compounds present unusual localized phonon states at low frequencies, which are due to atomiclike vibrations parallel to the basal plane of the Si, Al, or Ge elements.

  4. Structure par RMN d'un complexe AlcR(1-60)-ADN: Reconnaissance du petit sillon par la partie N-terminale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahuzac, B.; Félenbok, B.; Guittet, E.

    1999-10-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is a filamentous fungus able to use ethanol as sole energy source. The activation of the ethanol regulon genes expression is mediated by the AlcR protein. Its DNA-binding domain is located in the N-terminus (residues 1 to 60), and its NMR solution structure shows a global zinc binuclear cluster fold, with two helices in addition to the basic binuclear motif. A small number of crystallographic structures of DNA complexes of binuclear cluster proteins is yet known, and points out the major groove and the first helix as the principal sites of interaction on the DNA and the protein respectively. In this article we show evidences that the N-terminus of the protein is involved in binding to the minor groove. Aspergillus nidulans est un champignon filamenteux capable d'utiliser l'éthanol comme source unique d'énergie. La protéine AlcR est responsable de l'activation de l'expression des gènes du régulon éthanol. Le domaine de liaison à l'ADN est situé dans la partie N-terminale de la protéine (a.a. 1 à 60), et sa structure déterminée par RMN en solution montre un repliement global en bouquet binucléaire à zinc, avec deux hélices supplémentaires par rapport au motif de base. Alors que les structures déjà connues de complexes ADN - bouquets binucléaires permettent de situer dans le grand sillon la quasi-totalité des interactions, nous montrons dans la présente étude l'implication du début de la séquence dans la reconnaissance du petit sillon de l'ADN (a.a. 5 et 6).

  5. [Assay of three kinds of aluminum fractions (Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c)) in polynuclear aluminum solutions by Al-Ferron timed spectrophotometry and demarcation of their time limits].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-yi; Zhang, Cai-hua; Bi, Shu-ping; Zhang, Zhen-chao; Yang, Wei-hua

    2005-02-01

    Al-Ferron timed spectrophotometry assay is a basic method in the study on the formation of polynuclear hydroxyl aluminum species and their transformation laws in aqueous systems. In actual working process, this methodology has some dogmatism and arbitrariness in the time limits demarcation of the three kinds of aluminum fractions (Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c)) in polynuclear aluminum solutions, which makes this kind of classification rougher, and the experimental results non-reproducible. The reason for this difference is that the specific species within Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c) have different reaction mechanism and dynamics, and that specific species of Al(b) having different OH/Al ratios have different reaction rates with ferron. In this paper, the ExpAssoc distribution was applied to quantitatively fit the Al-Ferron reaction dynamics curve, and the extrapolation method was used to survey the 1 min measured value [Al(a)] of monomeric Al, which is hard to obtain in manual manipulation. The time demarcation between Al(b) and Al(c) should reach the point of the experimental data curve up to horizontal platform. The microwave-radiated technology was used to fast assay the total aluminum concentration [Al(T)]. With these methods, the contents of monomeric Al(a), polynuclear Al(b) and gel Al(c) can be conveniently and quantitatively measured. It offers a novel method for surmounting the arbitrariness in the measurement of the three kinds of aluminum fractions and the repetitive calculation of Al(a) and Al(b). PMID:15852869

  6. Electronic structure investigation of Ti3 AlC2 , Ti3 SiC2 , and Ti3 GeC2 by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, M.; Palmquist, J.-P.; Mattesini, M.; Li, S.; Ahuja, R.; Eriksson, O.; Emmerlich, J.; Wilhelmsson, O.; Eklund, P.; Högberg, H.; Hultman, L.; Jansson, U.

    2005-12-01

    The electronic structures of epitaxially grown films of Ti3AlC2 , Ti3SiC2 , and Ti3GeC2 have been investigated by bulk-sensitive soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. The measured high-resolution Ti L , C K , Al L , Si L , and Ge M emission spectra are compared with ab initio density-functional theory including core-to-valence dipole matrix elements. A qualitative agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. A weak covalent Ti-Al bond is manifested by a pronounced shoulder in the Ti L emission of Ti3AlC2 . As Al is replaced with Si or Ge, the shoulder disappears. For the buried Al and Si layers, strongly hybridized spectral shapes are detected in Ti3AlC2 and Ti3SiC2 , respectively. As a result of relaxation of the crystal structure and the increased charge-transfer from Ti to C, the Ti-C bonding is strengthened. The differences between the electronic structures are discussed in relation to the bonding in the nanolaminates and the corresponding change of materials properties.

  7. Hyperfine rather than spin splittings dominate the fine structure of the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- bands of AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouthier, Dennis J.; Kalume, Aimable

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and wavelength resolved emission spectra of the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- band system of the gas phase cold aluminum carbide free radical have been obtained using the pulsed discharge jet technique. The radical was produced by electron bombardment of a precursor mixture of trimethylaluminum in high pressure argon. High resolution spectra show that each rotational line of the 0-0 and 1-1 bands of AlC is split into at least three components, with very similar splittings and intensities in both the P- and R-branches. The observed structure was reproduced by assuming bβS magnetic hyperfine coupling in the excited state, due to a substantial Fermi contact interaction of the unpaired electron in the aluminum 3s orbital. Rotational analysis has yielded ground and excited state equilibrium bond lengths in good agreement with the literature and our own ab initio values. Small discrepancies in the calculated intensities of the hyperfine lines suggest that the upper state spin-spin constant λ' is of the order of ≈0.025-0.030 cm-1.

  8. H Ly-alpha transmittance of thin foils of C, Si/C, and Al/C for keV particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Jenkins, D. G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    A class of instruments designed for remote sensing of space plasmas by measuring energetic neutral atoms (ENA) uses a thin foil as both a signal generator and a light shield. An ENA imager must look directly at the ENA source region, which is also usually an intense source of H Ly-alpha (1216 A) photons. It is desirable to minimize the energy threshold for ENA detectors, at the same time maximizing the blocking of H Ly-alpha. Optimizing filter design to meet these two contrary requirements has led us to measure the transmittance of thin C, Si/C, and Al/C foils at H Ly-alpha. Our results indicate that (1) transmittance of less than 0.0007 can be achieved with 7 micro-g/sq cm Si on 1.7 micro-g/sq cm C; (2) an Si/C composite foil with a thin carbon layer is more effective in blocking UV radiation while having the lowest energy threshold of all the foils measured; and (3) transmittance of Si/C foils of known Si and C thicknesses cannot be accurately predicted, but must be measured.

  9. The effect of M (M=Ti,Cr,V,Nb) on the transport and elastic properties of nanolayered ternary carbides M2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettinger, J.; Barsoum, M.

    2005-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the electronic, magneto-transport, thermal and elastic properties of the family of materials M2AlC where M is Ti, V, Cr or Nb in the temperature range 4 to 300K. The elastic constants were measured for all compounds ultrasonically. The bulk moduli and anisotropic Young's moduli were found to vary in these compounds depending on the transition metal M. The Debye temperatures were in the 640-710 K range for all materials investigated. The Seebeck coefficients for these four materials were small with differing temperature dependences. All but the Nb containing material have Seebeck coefficients that change sign. The electrical conductivity, Hall coefficient and magnetoresistances are analyzed within a two-band framework assuming a temperature-independent charge carrier concentration. We concluded that there is little correlation between the Seebeck voltage and Hall number. As with other MAX-phase materials, all these materials are nearly compensated. Comparisons between these results will be presented. Results will be discussed in relation to theoretical work and recent measurements on related systems.

  10. The effect of M (M=Ti, Cr, V, Nb) on transport and elastic properties of nanolayered ternary carbides M2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettinger, Jeff; Finkel, Peter; Lofland, Sam; Barsoum, Michel; Gupta, Adrish

    2006-03-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of the electronic, magneto-transport, thermal and elastic properties of the family of materials M2AlC where M is Ti, V, Cr or Nb in the temperature range 4 to 300K. The elastic constants were measured for all compounds ultrasonic technique. The bulk moduli and anisotropic Young's moduli found to be varied in these compounds for various transition metal M. The Debye temperatures were high in the 640-710 K range and quite insensitive to composition. The Seebeck coefficient was a non-monotonic function of a temperature: at the lowest temperatures is small but increases with increasing temperature and saturates at 60-80 K and goes through zero again manifesting change in the dominating charge carrier type. The electrical conductivity, Hall coefficient and magnetoresistances are analyzed within a two-band framework assuming a temperature-independent charge carrier concentration. We concluded that there is little correlation between the Seebeck voltage and Hall number. As with other MAX-phase materials, all these materials are nearly compensated. Comparisons of these results will be presented. Results will be discussed in relation to theoretical work and recent measurements on related systems.

  11. Substrate-Driven Convergence of the Microbial Community in Lignocellulose-Amended Enrichments of Gut Microflora from the Canadian Beaver (Castor canadensis) and North American Moose (Alces americanus)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mabel T.; Wang, Weijun; Lacourt, Michael; Couturier, Marie; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Master, Emma R.

    2016-01-01

    Strategic enrichment of microcosms derived from wood foragers can facilitate the discovery of key microbes that produce enzymes for the bioconversion of plant fiber (i.e., lignocellulose) into valuable chemicals and energy. In this study, lignocellulose-degrading microorganisms from the digestive systems of Canadian beaver (Castor canadensis) and North American moose (Alces americanus) were enriched under methanogenic conditions for over 3 years using various wood-derived substrates, including (i) cellulose (C), (ii) cellulose + lignosulphonate (CL), (iii) cellulose + tannic acid (CT), and (iv) poplar hydrolysate (PH). Substantial improvement in the conversion of amended organic substrates into biogas was observed in both beaver dropping and moose rumen enrichment cultures over the enrichment phases (up to 0.36–0.68 ml biogas/mg COD added), except for enrichments amended with tannic acid where conversion was approximately 0.15 ml biogas/mg COD added. Multiplex-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed systematic shifts in the population of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochaetes, Chloroflexi, and Elusimicrobia in response to the enrichment. These shifts were predominantly substrate driven, not inoculum driven, as revealed by both UPGMA clustering pattern and OTU distribution. Additionally, the relative abundance of multiple OTUs from poorly defined taxonomic lineages increased from less than 1% to 25–50% in microcosms amended with lignocellulosic substrates, including OTUs from classes SJA-28, Endomicrobia, orders Bacteroidales, OPB54, and family Lachnospiraceae. This study provides the first direct comparison of shifts in microbial communities that occurred in different environmental samples in response to multiple relevant lignocellulosic carbon sources, and demonstrates the potential of enrichment to increase the abundance of key lignocellulolytic microorganisms and encoded activities. PMID:27446004

  12. Substrate-Driven Convergence of the Microbial Community in Lignocellulose-Amended Enrichments of Gut Microflora from the Canadian Beaver (Castor canadensis) and North American Moose (Alces americanus).

    PubMed

    Wong, Mabel T; Wang, Weijun; Lacourt, Michael; Couturier, Marie; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Master, Emma R

    2016-01-01

    Strategic enrichment of microcosms derived from wood foragers can facilitate the discovery of key microbes that produce enzymes for the bioconversion of plant fiber (i.e., lignocellulose) into valuable chemicals and energy. In this study, lignocellulose-degrading microorganisms from the digestive systems of Canadian beaver (Castor canadensis) and North American moose (Alces americanus) were enriched under methanogenic conditions for over 3 years using various wood-derived substrates, including (i) cellulose (C), (ii) cellulose + lignosulphonate (CL), (iii) cellulose + tannic acid (CT), and (iv) poplar hydrolysate (PH). Substantial improvement in the conversion of amended organic substrates into biogas was observed in both beaver dropping and moose rumen enrichment cultures over the enrichment phases (up to 0.36-0.68 ml biogas/mg COD added), except for enrichments amended with tannic acid where conversion was approximately 0.15 ml biogas/mg COD added. Multiplex-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed systematic shifts in the population of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochaetes, Chloroflexi, and Elusimicrobia in response to the enrichment. These shifts were predominantly substrate driven, not inoculum driven, as revealed by both UPGMA clustering pattern and OTU distribution. Additionally, the relative abundance of multiple OTUs from poorly defined taxonomic lineages increased from less than 1% to 25-50% in microcosms amended with lignocellulosic substrates, including OTUs from classes SJA-28, Endomicrobia, orders Bacteroidales, OPB54, and family Lachnospiraceae. This study provides the first direct comparison of shifts in microbial communities that occurred in different environmental samples in response to multiple relevant lignocellulosic carbon sources, and demonstrates the potential of enrichment to increase the abundance of key lignocellulolytic microorganisms and encoded activities. PMID:27446004

  13. Perceptions of environmental change and use of traditional knowledge to plan riparian forest restoration with relocated communities in Alcântara, Eastern Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Riparian forests provide ecosystem services that are essential for human well-being. The Pepital River is the main water supply for Alcântara (Brazil) and its forests are disappearing. This is affecting water volume and distribution in the region. Promoting forest restoration is imperative. In deprived regions, restoration success depends on the integration of ecology, livelihoods and traditional knowledge (TEK). In this study, an interdisciplinary research framework is proposed to design riparian forest restoration strategies based on ecological data, TEK and social needs. Methods This study takes place in a region presenting a complex history of human relocation and land tenure. Local populations from seven villages were surveyed to document livelihood (including ‘free-listing’ of agricultural crops and homegarden tree species). Additionally, their perceptions toward environmental changes were explored through semi-structured interviews (n = 79). Ethnobotanical information on forest species and their uses were assessed by local-specialists (n = 19). Remnants of conserved forests were surveyed to access ecological information on tree species (three plots of 1,000 m2). Results included descriptive statistics, frequency and Smith’s index of salience of the free-list results. Results The local population depends primarily on slash-and-burn subsistence agriculture to meet their needs. Interviewees showed a strong empirical knowledge about the environmental problems of the river, and of their causes, consequences and potential solutions. Twenty-four tree species (dbh > 10 cm) were found at the reference sites. Tree density averaged 510 individuals per hectare (stdv = 91.6); and 12 species were considered the most abundant (density > 10ind/ha). There was a strong consensus among plant-specialists about the most important trees. The species lists from reference sites and plant-specialists presented an important convergence

  14. A critical evaluation of GGA + U modeling for atomic, electronic and magnetic structure of Cr2AlC, Cr2GaC and Cr2GeC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, M.; Alling, B.; Rosen, J.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we critically evaluate methods for treating electron correlation effects in multicomponent carbides using a GGA + U framework, addressing doubts from previous works on the usability of density functional theory in the design of magnetic MAX phases. We have studied the influence of the Hubbard U-parameter, applied to Cr 3d orbitals, on the calculated lattice parameters, magnetic moments, magnetic order, bulk modulus and electronic density of states of Cr2AlC, Cr2GaC and Cr2GeC. By considering non-, ferro-, and five different antiferromagnetic spin configurations, we show the importance of including a broad range of magnetic orders in the search for MAX phases with finite magnetic moments in the ground state. We show that when electron correlation is treated on the level of the generalized gradient approximation (U = 0 eV), the magnetic ground state of Cr2AC (A = Al, Ga, Ge) is in-plane antiferromagnetic with finite Cr local moments, and calculated lattice parameters and bulk modulus close to experimentally reported values. By comparing GGA and GGA + U results with experimental data we find that using a U-value larger than 1 eV results in structural parameters deviating strongly from experimentally observed values. Comparisons are also done with hybrid functional calculations (HSE06) resulting in an exchange splitting larger than what is obtained for a U-value of 2 eV. Our results suggest caution and that investigations need to involve several different magnetic orders before lack of magnetism in calculations are blamed on the exchange-correlation approximations in this class of magnetic MAX phases.

  15. Trends in electronic structures and structural properties of MAX phases: a first-principles study on M(2)AlC (M = Sc, Ti, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, or Ta), M(2)AlN, and hypothetical M(2)AlB phases.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Arai, Masao; Sasaki, Taizo; Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-17

    MAX phases are a large family of layered ceramics with many potential structural applications. A set of first-principles calculations was performed for M(2)AlC and M(2)AlN (M = Sc, Ti, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, or Ta) MAX phases as well as for hypothetical M(2)AlB to investigate trends in their electronic structures, formation energies, and various mechanical properties. Analysis of the calculated data is used to extend the idea that the elastic properties of MAX phases can be controlled according to the valence electron concentration. The valence electron concentrationcan be tuned through the various combinations of transition metal and nonmetal elements. PMID:25419878

  16. Assessing and modeling moose (Alces alces) habitats with airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, M.; Packalén, P.; Matala, J.; Mehtätalo, L.; Pusenius, J.

    2013-08-01

    In the analysis of forest resources, the use of ALS (airborne laser scanning) enables detailed three dimensional (3D) descriptions of forests and their vegetation. Simultaneously, ecologists have recognized that 3D information on vegetation is highly important in analyzing the habitat suitability of a given site. Recently, animals’ habitat preferences have been analyzed, for example, with GPS-collared animals. This has resulted in detailed knowledge about the animals’ movements both spatially and temporally. This study combines 3D information on vegetation obtained from ALS data with information about animal locations from GPS data. The aim was to map and analyze the habitat preferences of moose. The study area was located on the west coast of Finland. The data consisted of 18 GPS-collared moose (monitored from 2009 to 2010) and ALS data collected in 2010. We investigated how habitat structure changes as a function of distance to observed moose locations and how observed moose locations differ from randomly selected locations in terms of 3D structure. We also created a model-based habitat suitability map and tested it against moose occurrences. The results suggested that there are clear differences between the areas occupied and not occupied by moose and that these differences can be detected from ALS data. More importantly, ALS proved its potential in linking 3D descriptions of vegetation directly to observed moose locations without any proxy variables. These observations strongly support future studies.

  17. [Vector systems and rhythms in movements and orientation of elk (Alces alces L.) and other wild animals (Mammalia)].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtsev, V A

    2002-01-01

    The orientation of elk and other mammals studied in fields with visual and instrumental tracing has obviously hierarchical organization. Animals usually choose general direction headed for distant markers and then select short-distance landmarks. Movements of animals to distant and close landmarks is characterized by almost constant or regularly changing angles between main direction and movement vector. Fragments of trajectories represent left-side or right-side spirals with decreasing or increasing curvature according to the main direction. Three types of spirals differed by average values of initial angles are considered. Orientation to distant landmarks or along direction of movement possesses discrete reaction on the given landmarks and has some characters of iteration process. Special rhythms of activity (rhythms of orientation changing) participate in regulation of changing of movement directions and orientation reactions. They take part in formation of sinusoid, spiral and other trajectories. Rhythmic regulation involves great statistical variability of parameters (lengths, angles, time periods between consecutive orientations) that can be adaptive meaning. Lengths of orientation vectors and trajectory fragments are similar to some linear elements of landscape. Angular parameters of orientation are more variable. The main ones are similar to the angular parameters of Earth rotation. It looks, that orientation parameters evolved under the influence of Sun-Earth compass in inertial field of Earth rotation. PMID:12298181

  18. The first detection of nematodes Ashworthius sidemi in elk Alces alces (L.) in Poland and remarks of ashworthiosis foci limitations.

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Kuligowska, Izabela; Lachowicz, Jacek; Pyziel, Anna M; Moskwa, Bożena

    2013-12-01

    Ashworthius sidemi, a nematode belonging to the family of Trichostrongylidae, is a primary parasite of the Asian deer, mainly sika deer (Cervus nippon), with which it was introduced to Ukraine, as well as Slovakia, the Czech Republic and France. Migrating red deer carried this parasite from neighboring countries to Polish territory. Until now, in Poland, this parasite has been recorded in European bison, red deer, roe deer and fallow deer. As a result of post-mortem examinations of 10 elk, 2 of them from the Augustów Forest and Biebrza Marshes, A. sidemi were found in abomasa for the first time in Poland. The intensity of the invasions was 120 and 7 specimens, respectively. This finding of Ashworthius sidemi in elk indicates a further expansion of the focus of ashworthiosis in BiaŁowieża towards the north into the Biebrza Marshes and the Augustowska Forest. The growth of the elk population and their tendency for long distance migrations can contribute to the spread of the parasitosis in much greater distances than deer. On the basis of our own research and data from the literature, the current spread of ashworthiosis in Poland is discussed. PMID:24338312

  19. Physical characteristics of rumen contents in four large ruminants of different feeding type, the addax (Addax nasomaculatus), bison (Bison bison), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces alces).

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Fritz, Julia; Bayer, Dorothee; Nygren, Kaarlo; Hammer, Sven; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Hummel, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Based on morphological and physiological observations, it has been suggested that differences exist in the degree that reticuloruminal (RR) contents are stratified between various ruminant species. However, the occurrence of stratification has hardly been measured in non-domestic species. Forestomach contents of free-ranging moose (n=22) and red deer (24) shot during regular hunting procedures, and of captive (but 100% forage fed) addax (6) and bison (10) culled for commercial or management purposes were investigated. There was no difference between the species in the degree by which RR ingesta separated according to size due to buoyancy characteristics in vitro. However, RR fluid of moose was more viscous than that of the other species, and no difference in moisture content was evident between the dorsal and the ventral rumen in moose, in contrast to the other species. Hence, the RR milieu in moose appears less favourable for gas or particle separation due to buoyancy characteristics. These findings are in accord with notable differences in RR papillation between the species. In moose, particle separation is most likely restricted to the reticulum, whereas in the other species, the whole rumen may pre-sort particles in varying degrees; a possible explanation for this pattern is a hypothetically lesser saliva production and fluid throughput in moose. The results suggest that differences in RR physiology may occur across ruminant species. The RR sorting mechanism should be considered a dynamic process that is better measured by its result--the significantly smaller particle size in the distal digestive tract when compared to the RR--than by regional differences in particle size within the RR. PMID:19049897

  20. Polymorphisms and variants in the prion protein sequence of European moose (Alces alces), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Wik, Lotta; Mikko, Sofia; Klingeborn, Mikael; Stéen, Margareta; Simonsson, Magnus; Linné, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) sequence of European moose, reindeer, roe deer and fallow deer in Scandinavia has high homology to the PrP sequence of North American cervids. Variants in the European moose PrP sequence were found at amino acid position 109 as K or Q. The 109Q variant is unique in the PrP sequence of vertebrates. During the 1980s a wasting syndrome in Swedish moose, Moose Wasting Syndrome (MWS), was described. SNP analysis demonstrated a difference in the observed genotype proportions of the heterozygous Q/K and homozygous Q/Q variants in the MWS animals compared with the healthy animals. In MWS moose the allele frequencies for 109K and 109Q were 0.73 and 0.27, respectively, and for healthy animals 0.69 and 0.31. Both alleles were seen as heterozygotes and homozygotes. In reindeer, PrP sequence variation was demonstrated at codon 176 as D or N and codon 225 as S or Y. The PrP sequences in roe deer and fallow deer were identical with published GenBank sequences. PMID:22441661

  1. Serendipitous discovery of a novel protostrongylid (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in caribou (Rangifer tarandus), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) and moose (Alces alces) from North America by DNA sequence comparisons.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many protostrongylid nematode species produce first-stage larvae with dorsal tail spines (DSL) that are shed in feces of wild ungulates. Definitive identification of DSL is rarely possible through comparative morphology; however, fecal samples are often the only feasible means to assess the distribu...

  2. The influence of top-down, bottom-up and abiotic factors on the moose (Alces alces) population of Isle Royale.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Peterson, Rolf O

    2004-01-22

    Long-term, concurrent measurement of population dynamics and associated top-down and bottom-up processes are rare for unmanipulated, terrestrial systems. Here, we analyse populations of moose, their predators (wolves, Canis lupus), their primary winter forage (balsam fir, Abies balsamea) and several climatic variables that were monitored for 40 consecutive years in Isle Royale National Park (544 km2), Lake Superior, USA. We judged the relative importance of top-down, bottom-up and abiotic factors on moose population growth rate by constructing multiple linear regression models, and calculating the proportion of interannual variation in moose population growth rate explained by each factor. Our analysis indicates that more variation in population growth rate is explained by bottom-up than top-down processes, and abiotic factors explain more variation than do bottom-up processes. Surprisingly, winter precipitation did not explain any significant variation in population growth rate. Like that detected for two Norwegian ungulate populations, the relationship between population growth rate and the North Atlantic Oscillation was nonlinear. Although this analysis provides significant insight, much remains unknown: of the models examined, the most parsimonious explain little more than half the variation in moose population growth rate. PMID:15058396

  3. The influence of top-down, bottom-up and abiotic factors on the moose (Alces alces) population of Isle Royale.

    PubMed Central

    Vucetich, John A.; Peterson, Rolf O.

    2004-01-01

    Long-term, concurrent measurement of population dynamics and associated top-down and bottom-up processes are rare for unmanipulated, terrestrial systems. Here, we analyse populations of moose, their predators (wolves, Canis lupus), their primary winter forage (balsam fir, Abies balsamea) and several climatic variables that were monitored for 40 consecutive years in Isle Royale National Park (544 km2), Lake Superior, USA. We judged the relative importance of top-down, bottom-up and abiotic factors on moose population growth rate by constructing multiple linear regression models, and calculating the proportion of interannual variation in moose population growth rate explained by each factor. Our analysis indicates that more variation in population growth rate is explained by bottom-up than top-down processes, and abiotic factors explain more variation than do bottom-up processes. Surprisingly, winter precipitation did not explain any significant variation in population growth rate. Like that detected for two Norwegian ungulate populations, the relationship between population growth rate and the North Atlantic Oscillation was nonlinear. Although this analysis provides significant insight, much remains unknown: of the models examined, the most parsimonious explain little more than half the variation in moose population growth rate. PMID:15058396

  4. Complex patterns of population genetic structure of moose, Alces alces, after recent spatial expansion in Poland revealed by sex-linked markers.

    PubMed

    Swisłocka, Magdalena; Czajkowska, Magdalena; Duda, Norbert; Danyłow, Jan; Owadowska-Cornil, Edyta; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, human activity directly and indirectly influenced the demography of moose in Poland. The species was close to extinction, and only a few isolated populations survived after the Second World War; then, unprecedented demographic and spatial expansions had occurred, possibly generating a very complex pattern of population genetic structure at the present-day margins of the species range in Poland. Over 370 moose from seven populations were collected from Poland, and partial sequences of the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA-cr; 607 bp) were obtained. In addition, the entire mtDNA cytochrome b gene (1,140 bp) and Y-chromosome markers (1,982 bp in total) were studied in a chosen set of individuals. Twelve mtDNA haplotypes that all belonged to the European moose phylogroup were recorded. They could be divided into two distinct clades: Central Europe and the Ural Mountains. The first clade consists of three distinct groups/branches: Biebrza, Polesie, and Fennoscandia. The Biebrza group has experienced spatial and demographic expansion in the recent past. Average genetic differentiation among moose populations in Poland at mtDNA-cr was great and significant (Φ ST = 0.407, p < 0.001). Using mtDNA-cr data, four separate groups of population were recognized using spatial analysis of molecular variance and principal coordinate analysis, including a relict population in Biebrza National Park, a reintroduced Kampinos National Park population, as well as populations that were descendants of moose that colonized Poland from the east (Lithuania, Belarus, and Ukraine) and the north (former East Prussia). Among all the sequenced Y-chromosome markers, polymorphisms were found in the DBY14 marker in three populations only; four haplotypes were recorded in total. No significant differentiation was detected for this Y-linked marker among moose populations in Poland. Our mtDNA study revealed that a variety of different factors-bottleneck, the presence of relict, autochthonous populations, translocations, limited female dispersal, and the colonization from the east and north-are responsible for the observed complex pattern of population genetic structure after demographic and spatial expansion of moose in Poland. PMID:24244040

  5. EVALUATION OF PROPYLENE CARBONATE IN AIR LOGISTICS CENTER (ALC) DEPAINTING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes a two-phase, laboratory-scale screening study that evaluated solvent blends containing propylene carbonate (PC) as a potential replacement for methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) in aircraft radome depainting operations. he study was conducted at Oklahoma City Air Lo...

  6. 20 CFR 655.132 - H-2A labor contractor (H-2ALC) filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... obligations under the H-2A program by including with the Application for Temporary Employment Certification the original surety bond as required by 29 CFR 501.9. The bond document must clearly identify the... bond (as calculated pursuant to 29 CFR 501.9) and any identifying designation used by the surety...

  7. Materials Data on Ce3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ti2AlC (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Pr3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Dy3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ho3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ta4AlC3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. 20 CFR 655.132 - H-2A labor contractor (H-2ALC) filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the original surety bond as required by 29 CFR 501.9. The bond document must clearly identify the... bond (as calculated pursuant to 29 CFR 501.9) and any identifying designation used by the surety for... safety standards, driver licensure, and vehicle insurance as required under 29 U.S.C. 1841 and 29 CFR...

  14. EVALUATION OF PROPYLENE CARBONATE IN AIR LOGISTICS CENTER (ALC) DEPAINTING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes a two-phase, laboratory-scale screening study that evaluated solvent blends containing propylene carbonate (PC) as a potential replacement for methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) in aircraft radome depainting operations. The study was conducted at Oklahoma City Air L...

  15. Materials Data on Er3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Tb3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Mn3AlC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Sc2AlC (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. GigaDB: announcing the GigaScience database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    With the launch of GigaScience journal, here we provide insight into the accompanying database GigaDB, which allows the integration of manuscript publication with supporting data and tools. Reinforcing and upholding GigaScience’s goals to promote open-data and reproducibility of research, GigaDB also aims to provide a home, when a suitable public repository does not exist, for the supporting data or tools featured in the journal and beyond. PMID:23587345

  20. Furanocoumarins from Dorstenia gigas.

    PubMed

    Franke, K; Porzel, A; Masaoud, M; Adam, G; Schmidt, J

    2001-03-01

    A series of linear and angular prenylated furanocoumarins and a benzofuran derivative were isolated from leaves and twigs of Dorstenia gigas (Moraceae), a plant occurring endemically on Socotra Island (Yemen). The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS, UV) and chemical derivatization. PMID:11281139

  1. 40 CFR 721.2535 - Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu alc.-blocked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, 1,1â²-methylanebis[4... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2535 Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato... chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2535 - Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu alc.-blocked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, 1,1â²-methylanebis[4... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2535 Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato... chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2535 - Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu alc.-blocked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, 1,1â²-methylanebis[4... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2535 Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato... chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2535 - Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu alc.-blocked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, 1,1â²-methylanebis[4... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2535 Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato... chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2535 - Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu alc.-blocked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, 1,1â²-methylanebis[4... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2535 Benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato... chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,1′-methylanebis[4-isocyanato-, homopolymer, Bu...

  6. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  7. Electron spin resonance spectra and structure of Al(C sub 6 H sub 6 ) hydrocarbon matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.A.; Joly, H.A.; Mile, B. )

    1989-10-11

    Reactions of Al atoms with benzene at 77 K in benzene and inert hydrocarbon matrices on a rotating cryostat have been studied by ESR spectroscopy. A monoligand complex, Al(C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), is the only paramagnetic product, and at 4 K the ESR spectrum shows resolvable hyperfine interactions with one aluminum and two equivalent protons and has the following magnetic parameters in adamantane: a{sub x}(Al) = 56 MHz, a{sub y}(Al) = a{sub z}(Al) = 14 MHz, a{sub x}(2H) = a{sub y}(2H) = a{sub y}(2H) = a{sub z}(2H) = 27 MHz, g{sub x} = 2.0010, g{sub y} = 1.9970, and g{sub z} = 2.0060. The spectrum changes with an increase in temperature and at 220 K is more consistent with an interaction with six equivalent protons with parameters a{sub Al} = 9.5 MHz, a{sub H}(6) = 5.3 MHz, and g = 2.0010. Two alternative bonding schemes are discussed.

  8. Gigas Meets Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 July 2003

    Roughly halfway between the great volcanoes of Olympus Mons and Pavonis Mons, the graben (troughs) of Ulysses Fossae intersect with the furrows of Gigas (gigantic) Sulci. A clear time sequence is evident: first came the formation of the sulci terrain (to the left), which then was fractured by graben radial to Olympus Mons, followed by flooding of lava. All but the deepest graben are filled by lava in the topographic low between the two volcanic rises.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 11.8, Longitude 234.3 East (125.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Rate of water exchange between Al(C 2O 4)(H 2O) 4+(aq) complexes and aqueous solutions determined by 17O-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Crawford, Susan Neugebauer; Casey, William H.

    1997-12-01

    Substitution of an oxalate molecule for two inner-coordination-sphere waters of Al(H 2O) 63+(aq) enhances, by a factor of ≈ 10 2, the rate of exchange of water molecules from the innercoordination sphere to the bulk solution. The rate parameters for chemical exchange are: k ex298 = 109 s -1, ΔH ‡ = 68.9 ± 2.4 kJ/mol, and ΔS ‡ = 25.3 ± 6.7 J/mol/K, measured via dynamic 17O-NMR. This reactivity enhancement of coordinated waters by oxalate results from a change in bonding between Al(III) and oxygens throughout the complex upon ligation by oxalate. A similar process has been proposed to explain ligand-enhanced dissolution of oxide minerals (e.g., Stumm, 1991; Casey and Ludwig, 1995; Phillips et al., 1997) where a stable adsorbate increases the flux of metals from a surface. These new rate coefficients for aluminum-oxalate complexes, along with previous work on aluminum-fluoride complexes, show a correlation with the respective equilibrium constants similar to that obtained by Ludwig et al. (1995, 1996).

  10. Study by non-destructive technique of gilding coat of arms of the Real Alcázar of Seville, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robador, M. D.; Pérez-Rodriguez, J. L.; Muñoz-García, A.; Garófano, I.; Garrote, M. A.; Odriozola, C.; Durán, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Real Alcazar of Seville is a building inscribed in the World Heritage List, being the most ancient Real Palace in Europe still in use. It was built over roman buildings, from the XI century to our days, exceptional buildings and gardens of the highest architectonical, cultural and historic value. High value wall paintings of different periods are located in different places all over the palace. In one of its chamber - the King's bedroom - golden medallions that represent the coat of arms of Leon and Castilla Kingdom appear decorating its walls. The objective of this work was the study of the materials employed in the manufacture of these coats by portable and non-destructive techniques: X-ray diffraction (XDR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy. The support used for gilding was also studied using conventional techniques such as: powder X-ray diffraction (powder XRD), thermal analysis (DTA-TG) and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results obtained by portable XRD, XRF and Raman spectroscopy showed that the polychrome was carried out with gold in all samples studied. Other elements such as silver and cooper were also found in minor proportion. XRF allowed the quantification of the different metal (average composition: Au 79.5 %, Ag 8.1 %, Cu 5 %). There were various ways of adhering the golden leaf to the surface, but for large areas a bole mix of fine earth was typical. For other ornamentations, technique based on an aqueous medium and brushed onto the part to be gilded was used an. For panel and wall paintings, however, oil mordant was commonly used. In our study the gold was adhered to the surface using oil mordant. The powder XRD of the support showed the presence of gypsum and small proportion of anhydrite. However, calcium carbonate was not detected due to low proportion and low diffraction intensity of the mineral. The DTA-TG study confirms the presence of calcite (less than 5%). This technique also revealed the presence of organic compounds (oil mordant). The FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbonate in these supports. The determination of the composition of the golden of the coat of arms by portable XRF and Raman spectroscopy was very useful and allowed the determination of the quantitative composition of the gold layer employed. The DTA-TG technique showed an endothermic effect about 675 °C and a mass lost, between 600 - 750 °C, attributed to the decomposition of carbonate. The FT-IR confirmed the presence of carbonate. This mineral was not well characterized by XRD. Acknowledge: This work as supported by project BIA 2009-12618, FPI 2010 Pre-Doc fellowship.

  11. Systems Harmonization and Convergence - the GIGAS Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, P. G.; Biancalana, A.; Coene, Y.; Uslander, T.

    2009-04-01

    0.1 Background The GIGAS1 Support Action promotes the coherent and interoperable development of the GMES, INSPIRE and GEOSS initiatives through their concerted adoption of standards, protocols, and open architectures. 0.2 Preparing for Coordinated Data Access The GMES Coordinated Data Access System is under design and implementation2. This objective has motivated the definition of the interoperability standards between the contributing missions. The following elements have been addressed with associated papers submitted to OGC: The EO Product Metadata has been based on the OGC Geographic Markup Language, addressing sensor characteristics for optical, radar and atmospheric products. Collection and service discovery: an ISO extension package for CSW ebRim has been proposed. Catalogue Service (CSW): an Earth Observation extension package of the CSW ebRim has been proposed. Feasibility Analysis and Order: an Order interface control document and an Earth Observation profile of the Sensor Planning Service have been proposed. Online Data Access: an Earth Observation profile of the Web Map Services (WMS) for visualization and evaluation purposes has been proposed. Identity (user) management: the objective in the long term is to allow for a single sign-on to the Coordinated Data Access system by users registered in the various Earth Observation ground segments by providing a federated identity across participating ground segments, exploiting OASIS standards. 0.3 The GIGAS proposed harmonization approach The approach proposed by GIGAS is based on three elements: Technology watch Comparative analysis Shaping of initiatives and standards This paper concentrates on the methodology for technology watch and comparative analysis. The complexity of the GIGAS scenario involving huge systems (i.e. GEOSS, INSPIRE, GMES etc.) entails the interaction with different heterogeneous partners, each with a specific competence, expertise and know-how. 0.3.1 Technology watch The methodology

  12. GigaDB: promoting data dissemination and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, Tam P; Zhe, Xiao Si; Edmunds, Scott C; Li, Peter; Goodman, Laurie; Hunter, Christopher I

    2014-01-01

    Often papers are published where the underlying data supporting the research are not made available because of the limitations of making such large data sets publicly and permanently accessible. Even if the raw data are deposited in public archives, the essential analysis intermediaries, scripts or software are frequently not made available, meaning the science is not reproducible. The GigaScience journal is attempting to address this issue with the associated data storage and dissemination portal, the GigaScience database (GigaDB). Here we present the current version of GigaDB and reveal plans for the next generation of improvements. However, most importantly, we are soliciting responses from you, the users, to ensure that future developments are focused on the data storage and dissemination issues that still need resolving. Database URL: http://www.gigadb.org. PMID:24622612

  13. Population structure of the giant garter snake, Thamnophis gigas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paquin, M.M.; Wylie, G.D.; Routman, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    The giant garter snake, Thamnophis gigas, is a threatened species endemic to California's Central Valley. We tested the hypothesis that current watershed boundaries have caused genetic differentiation among populations of T. gigas. We sampled 14 populations throughout the current geographic range of T. gigas and amplified 859 bp from the mitochondrial gene ND4 and one nuclear microsatellite locus. DNA sequence variation from the mitochondrial gene indicates there is some genetic structuring of the populations, with high F ST values and unique haplotypes occurring at high frequency in several populations. We found that clustering populations by watershed boundary results in significant between-region genetic variance for mtDNA. However, analysis of allele frequencies at the microsatellite locus NSU3 reveals very low F ST values and little between-region variation in allele frequencies. The discordance found between mitochondrial and microsatellite data may be explained by aspects of molecular evolution and/or T. gigas life history characteristics. Differences in effective population size between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, or male-biased gene flow, result in a lower migration rate of mitochondrial haplotypes relative to nuclear alleles. However, we cannot exclude homoplasy as one explanation for homogeneity found for the single microsatellite locus. The mitochondrial nucleotide sequence data supports conservation practices that identify separate management units for T. gigas. ?? Springer 2006.

  14. Preparation and antioxidant activities of oligosaccharides from Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun; Huang, Xiaolian

    2017-02-01

    Oligosaccharides were prepared from Crassostrea gigas by hydrolysis of polysaccharide in C. gigas with peroxide oxygen (H2O2). The hydrolysates were cleared of protein, filtered, ultrafiltered and precipitated with absolute ethanol to give C. gigas oligosaccharides (CGOs). Factors affecting CGO yields, i.e., reaction time, temperature, and H2O2 concentration, were optimised as follows: 2.96h reaction time, 84.71°C reaction temperature, and 2.46% H2O2 concentration. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of CGOs reached 10.61%. The CGOs were then partially characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, monosaccharide composition, and antioxidant activities. Results indicate that CGOs possessed strong hydroxyl radical activity, 2,2-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl-radical-scavenging activity and reducing capacity at a concentration of 100μg/mL. PMID:27596415

  15. Updrafts, Downdrafts, Entrainment, and Detrainment in the Giga-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, S. K.; Glenn, I.

    2012-12-01

    We are investigating the properties of evolving three-dimensional updraft and downdraft "cores" in a model dataset from the Giga-LES, a large-domain LES (large-eddy simulation) of tropical oceanic deep convection (Khairoutdinov et al. 2009). We have also applied the analysis method developed by Kuang and Bretherton (2006) to investigate various aspects of the ensemble characteristics of cumulus convection in the Giga-LES. Our results agree with those of Kuang and Bretherton for the cumulus updraft properties. We have examined the relative merits of different entrainment and cloud-top-height assumptions in spectral plume models of cumulus updrafts, the characteristics of downdrafts, and the nature of a rapid transition from shallow to deep convection.isualization of cumulus clouds from the Giga-LES. The realistic structure is associated with entrainment.

  16. Heritability of shell pigmentation in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is a species of considerable economic importance, with among the highest global production of any cultured aquatic animal species. In the interest of increasing the value of Pacific oysters sold as “singles” for the half-shell market, we explored the feasibili...

  17. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P < 0.001) with F(ST) < 0.109 and R(ST) < 0.125. Results of analyses from STRUCTURE indicated 2 prominent population groups, a mix of moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P < 0.01). Finally, there was no evidence of bottlenecks either at the population level or overall. We conclude that weak population structure occurs among moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast. PMID:18836148

  18. Stochasticity of convection in Giga-LES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Chevrotière, Michèle; Khouider, Boualem; Majda, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    The poor representation of tropical convection in general circulation models (GCMs) is believed to be responsible for much of the uncertainty in the predictions of weather and climate in the tropics. The stochastic multicloud model (SMCM) was recently developed by Khouider et al. (Commun Math Sci 8(1):187-216, 2010) to represent the missing variability in GCMs due to unresolved features of organized tropical convection. The SMCM is based on three cloud types (congestus, deep and stratiform), and transitions between these cloud types are formalized in terms of probability rules that are functions of the large-scale environment convective state and a set of seven arbitrary cloud timescale parameters. Here, a statistical inference method based on the Bayesian paradigm is applied to estimate these key cloud timescales from the Giga-LES dataset, a 24-h large-eddy simulation (LES) of deep tropical convection (Khairoutdinov et al. in J Adv Model Earth Syst 1(12), 2009) over a domain comparable to a GCM gridbox. A sequential learning strategy is used where the Giga-LES domain is partitioned into a few subdomains, and atmospheric time series obtained on each subdomain are used to train the Bayesian procedure incrementally. Convergence of the marginal posterior densities for all seven parameters is demonstrated for two different grid partitions, and sensitivity tests to other model parameters are also presented. A single column model simulation using the SMCM parameterization with the Giga-LES inferred parameters reproduces many important statistical features of the Giga-LES run, without any further tuning. In particular it exhibits intermittent dynamical behavior in both the stochastic cloud fractions and the large scale dynamics, with periods of dry phases followed by a coherent sequence of congestus, deep, and stratiform convection, varying on timescales of a few hours consistent with the Giga-LES time series. The chaotic variations of the cloud area fractions were

  19. Analysis of toughening mechanisms in the Strombus gigas shell.

    PubMed

    DiPette, Scott; Ural, Ani; Santhanam, Sridhar

    2015-08-01

    A finite element analysis of the fracture mechanisms in the Strombus gigas conch shell is presented in this work. The S. gigas shell has a complex microarchitecture that consists of three main macroscopic layers of calcium carbonate: the inner, middle, and outer layers. Each layer is composed of lamellae of calcium carbonate, held together by a cohesive organic protein. As a result of this elaborate architecture, the S. gigas shell exhibits a much greater damage tolerance than the calcium carbonate by itself, with a work of fracture reported to be three magnitudes of order greater. The two main energy dissipating factors that contribute to this are multiple, parallel cracking along first-order interfaces in the inner and outer layers and crack bridging through the second-order interfaces of the middle layer. Finite element analysis was conducted to simulate and replicate flexural strength and work-of-fracture results obtained in the literature for both dry and wet physical bend test specimens. Several parameters were varied including protein strength and fracture toughness, initial protein damage, and the relative heights of macroscopic layers in order to create a model that predicted published, experimental results. The simulations indicate that having some initially weakened protein interfaces is key to matching the parallel cracking in the inner layer of the physical specimens. The wet models exhibit significantly higher work of fracture compared to the dry specimens in large part due to a crack growth resistance behavior in the middle layer, which was successfully modeled. The parametric studies that have been performed on the finite element models provide guidelines for manufacturing the ideal S. gigas-inspired, biomimetic composite. PMID:25955562

  20. Moderate establishment success of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, on a sheltered intertidal mussel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens Kristian; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2015-10-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg 1793) is introduced into marine ecosystems worldwide. In Denmark, C. gigas was introduced into the micro tidal Limfjord, around 1972 for aquaculture. This study describes the population structure of C. gigas at Agger Tange in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Here, C. gigas use beds of Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) as primary habitat. The mean abundance (± 1 SD) of C. gigas was unchanged during our study (45 ± 2 indv. m- 2), while it increased for M. edulis from 2010 to 2011 (934 ± 610 to 1434 ± 750 indv. m- 2, respectively). In 2009, a newly settled cohort of C. gigas was present, but in the succeeding years no or negligible recruitment was recorded. However, age cohort analyses, based on individual shell size at different ages, suggest successful recruitment in three out of seven years. A comparison with the course of the bioinvasion in List Tidal Basin, suggests that the population at Agger Tange is not in the expansion phase of the bioinvasion, despite of frequent settlement, high shell growth rates and relatively high abundance. So far, C. gigas has had moderate establishment success. We conclude that C. gigas is still in the establishment phase, but that this is prolonged, presumably due to low food availability.

  1. Prey escaping wolves, Canis lupus, despite close proximity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe attacks by wolf (Canis lupus) packs in Minnesota on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and a moose (Alces alces) in which wolves were within contact distance of the prey but in which the prey escaped.

  2. Experimental oral transmission of chronic wasting disease to red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus): Early detection and late stage distribution of protease-resistant prion protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease CWD is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of wild and farmed cervid ruminants, including Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), or moose (Alces alces). Reliable data ...

  3. Baseline body temperatures, heart rates, and respiratory rates of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Franzmann, A W; Schwartz, C C; Johnson, D C

    1984-10-01

    Baseline body temperatures (BT), heart rates (HR) and respiratory rates (RR) were obtained from Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas Miller) at the Moose Research Center (MRC), Alaska. Excitability, seasons and drugs influenced the values to varying degrees. Excitability was the most influential factor. Safe expected ranges were: BT 38.4 to 38.9 C, HR 70 to 91 beats/min (b/min), and RR 13 to 40 respirations/min (r/min). These ranges incorporated all seasons, a central nervous system depressant drug and a paralyzing drug. Values which may be considered critical and an indication that corrective action should be taken include: BT 40.2 C, HR 102 b/min, and RR 40 r/min. It is recommended that persons trained in monitoring vital signs be on hand during moose capture and immobilization procedures. PMID:6530720

  4. A Glycoprotein in Shells of Conspecifics Induces Larval Settlement of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Hebert Ely; Hashimoto, Kyotaro; Yoshida, Asami; Hara, Kenji; Imai, Chisato Chris; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Satuito, Cyril Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Settlement of larvae of Crassostrea gigas on shell chips (SC) prepared from shells of 11 different species of mollusks was investigated. Furthermore, the settlement inducing compound in the shell of C. gigas was extracted and subjected to various treatments to characterize the chemical cue. C. gigas larvae settled on SC of all species tested except on Patinopecten yessoensis and Atrina pinnata. In SC of species that induced C. gigas larvae to settle, settlement was proportionate to the amount of SC supplied to the larvae. When compared to C. gigas SC, all species except Crassostrea nippona showed lower settlement inducing activities, suggesting that the cue may be more abundant or in a more available form to the larvae in shells of conspecific and C. nippona than in other species. The settlement inducing activity of C. gigas SC remained intact after antibiotic treatment. Extraction of C. gigas SC with diethyl ether (Et2O-ex), ethanol (EtOH-ex), and water (Aq-ex) did not induce larval settlement of C. gigas larvae. However, extraction of C. gigas SC with 2N of hydrochloric acid (HCl-ex) induced larval settlement that was at the same level as the SC. The settlement inducing compound in the HCl-ex was stable at 100°C but was destroyed or degraded after pepsin, trypsin, PNGase F and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatments. This chemical cue eluted between the molecular mass range of 45 and 150 kDa after gel filtration and revealed a major band at 55 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel after staining with Stains-all. Thus, a 55 kDa glycoprotein component in the organic matrix of C. gigas shells is hypothesized to be the chemical basis of larval settlement on conspecifics. PMID:24349261

  5. Final Report for CRADA Agreement , AL-C-2006-01 with Microsens Biotechnologies: Detection of the Abnormal Prion Protein in Blood by Improving the Extraction of this Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Mary Jo

    2009-03-31

    Several conditions were examined to optimize the extraction protocol using Seprion beads for the abnormal prion protein. Different combinations of water, hexafluro-2-propanol and formic acid were used. The results of these extraction protocols showed that the magnetic beads coated with Seprion reagents were subject to degradation, themselves, when the extraction conditions that would solubilize the abnormal prion protein were used. These compounds caused interference in the immunoassay for the abnormal prion protein and rendered these protocols incompatible with the assay systems. In an attempt to overcome this problem, another approach was then used. The coated beads were used as an integral part of the assay platform. After washing away denaturing agents, the beads with the 'captured' abnormal prion were incubated directly in the immunoassay, followed by analysis by the capillary electrophoresis. When a capillary electrophoresis electro-kinetic separation was attempted, the beads disturbed the analysis making it impossible to interpret. A pressure separation method was then developed for capillary electrophoresis analysis. When 20 samples, 5 of which were positive were analyzed, the assay identified 4 of the 5 positives and had no false positives. When a larger number of samples were analyzed the results were not as good - there were false positives and false negatives. It was then observed that the amount of beads that were loaded was dependent upon how long the beads were allowed to settle before loading them into the capillary. This resulted in unacceptable variations in the results and explained that when large numbers of samples were evaluated the results were not consistent. Because the technical difficulties with using the Seprion beads could not be overcome at this time, another approach is underway that is outside of the scope of this CRADA. No further agreements have been developed. Because the results were not favorable, no manuscripts were written nor intellectual property developed.

  6. Photothermal characterization of thermally treated shells of Strombus Gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ayala, A.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Aldana, D.

    2005-06-01

    The thermal properties of the marine shells of the mollusk Strombus gigas are studied using photoacoustic techniques. In order to generate changes in the layered structure of the shells, they were thermally treated in the range from ambient temperature up to 400ºC. Our results show that the thermal diffusivity and conductivity have a maximum at 200ºC due to the degradation of the organic matrix. At higher temperatures the thermal diffusivity and conductivity decrease due to the calcium carbonate structural phase transition from aragonite to calcite.

  7. Collaborative Teaching Practices in Undergraduate Active Learning Classrooms: A Report of Faculty Team Teaching Models and Student Reflections from Two Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Kelsey J.

    2015-01-01

    Effectively managing active learning classrooms (ALCs), particularly large ALCs, can present a variety of challenges for instructors. There is a rapidly growing body of research literature addressing the impact of ALCs on student engagement and learning, but fewer studies have focused on investigating instructional practices and instructors in…

  8. Mitochondrial genome of the endangered marine gastropod Strombus gigas Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Edna J; Castro, Erick R; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas is an endangered marine gastropod of significant economic importance across the Greater Caribbean region. This work reports for the first time the complete mitochondrial genome of S. gigas, obtained by FLX 454 pyrosequencing. The mtDNA genome encodes for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. In addition, the coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to other previously reported mitogenomes of gastropods. PMID:25186797

  9. Initial Data of Digital Correlation ECE with a Giga Hertz Sampling Digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hayato; Inagaki, Shigeru; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Nagayama, Yoshio

    2015-03-01

    The proposed Digital Correlation ECE (DCECE) technique is applied in Large Helical Device. DCECE is realized by the use of the Giga Hertz Sampling Digitizer. The waveform of intermediate frequency band of ECE, whose frequency is several giga hertz, can be discretized and saved directly. The discretized IF data can be used for the analysis of correlation ECE with arbitrary parameter of spatial resolution and temporal resolution. In this paper, the characteristic of DCECE and initial Data in LHD is introduced.

  10. Habitat suitability and conservation of the Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, B.J.; Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data. We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas. ?? 2010 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  11. Habitat suitability and conservation of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data.We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas.

  12. Impact and fracture analysis of fish scales from Arapaima gigas.

    PubMed

    Torres, F G; Malásquez, M; Troncoso, O P

    2015-06-01

    Fish scales from the Amazonian fish Arapaima gigas have been characterised to study their impact and fracture behaviour at three different environmental conditions. Scales were cut in two different directions to analyse the influence of the orientation of collagen layers. The energy absorbed during impact tests was measured for each sample and SEM images were taken after each test in order to analyse the failure mechanisms. The results showed that scales tested at cryogenic temperatures display fragile behaviour, while scales tested at room temperature did not fracture. Different failure mechanisms have been identified, analysed and compared with the failure modes that occur in bone. The impact energy obtained for fish scales was two to three times higher than the values reported for bone in the literature. PMID:25842120

  13. Perkinsus marinus in Crassostrea gigas in the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Espinoza, T L; Grijalva-Chon, J M; Castro-Longoria, R; Ramos-Paredes, J

    2010-04-01

    To determine the agent responsible for the massive mortalities of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in northwest Mexico, 30 oysters were sampled after a severe mortality event in 2006 along the Sonoran coast. Histological analyses revealed the presence of a protozoan and Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) assays showed the presence of Perkinsus sp., identified as P. marinus from the DNA sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex. PCR analyses for Marteilia refringens, M. sydneyi, and Haplosporidium costale were negative. P. marinus presence in the Pacific oyster may be responsible for massive mortalities of the oyster, along with other environmental factors in the Gulf of California. PMID:20481094

  14. Adult Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) May Have Light Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjian; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Ting; Li, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    Light-sensitivity is an important aspect of mollusk survival as it plays a vital role in reproduction and predator avoidance. In the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas light sensitivity has been demonstrated in the larval stage but has not yet been conclusively demonstrated in adult oysters. In this paper we describe an experiment which was undertaken to determine if adult Pacific oysters were sensitive to light. One LED flashlight was used to shine light onto adult oysters while they were filtering seawater through their shell openings. We found that the degree of opening increased gradually during the light period but rapidly decreased when the flashlight was turned off in the treated group but not in the control group. These results suggest that adult Pacific oyster may be sensitive to light. PMID:26474058

  15. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators. PMID:27074023

  16. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat.

    PubMed

    Tape, Ken D; Gustine, David D; Ruess, Roger W; Adams, Layne G; Clark, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators. PMID:27074023

  17. Cytoplasmic fragment of Alcadein α generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis enhances amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) transport into the late secretory pathway and facilitates APP cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. PMID:25406318

  18. Cytoplasmic Fragment of Alcadein α Generated by Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis Enhances Amyloid β-Protein Precursor (APP) Transport into the Late Secretory Pathway and Facilitates APP Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. PMID:25406318

  19. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  20. Phylogeny of forkhead genes in three spiralians and their expression in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Fei; Liu, Jun; Que, Huayong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    The Fox genes encode a group of transcription factors that contain a forkhead domain, which forms a structure known as a winged helix. These transcription factors play a crucial role in several key biological processes, including development. High-degree identity in the canonical forkhead domain has been used to divide Fox proteins into 23 families (FoxA to FoxS). We surveyed the genome of three spiralians, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, the limpet Lottia gigantea, and the annelid Capitella teleta. We identified 25 C. gigas fox genes, 21 L. gigantea fox genes, and 25 C. teleta fox genes. The C. gigas fox and L. gigantea fox genes represented 19 of the 23 families, whereas FoxI, Q1, R, and S were missing. The majority of the Fox families were observed within the C. teleta fox genes, with the exception of FoxR and S. In addition, the foxAB-like gene, foxY-like gene, and foxH gene were also present in the three genomes. The conserved FoxC-FoxL1 cluster, observed in mammals, was also found in C. gigas. The diversity of temporal expression patterns observed across the developmental process implies the C. gigas fox genes exert a wide range of functions. Further functional studies are required to gain insight into the evolution of Fox genes in bilaterians.

  1. The GigaFitter: Performance at CDF and Perspectives for Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Annovi, A.; Bettini, M.; Bucciantonio, M.; Catastini, P.; Crescioli, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Giannetti, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Nicoletto, M.; Piendibene, M.; Volpi, G.

    2010-04-01

    The Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) is a processor developed at CDF experiment to perform online fast and precise track reconstruction. SVT is made of two pipelined processors, the Associative Memory, finding low precision tracks, and the Track Fitter, refining the track quality whith high precision fits. We will describe the architecture and the performances of a next generation track fitter, the GigaFitter, developed to reduce the degradation of the SVT efficiency due to the increasing instantaneous luminosity. The GigaFitter reduces the track parameter reconstruction to a few clock cycles and can perform many fits in parallel, thus allowing high resolution tracking at very high rate. The core of the GigaFitter is implemented in a modern Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA chip, rich in powerful DSP arrays. The FPGA is housed on a mezzanine board which receives the data from a subset of the tracking detector and transfers the fitted tracks to a Pulsar motherboard for the final corrections. Instead of the current 12 boards, one per sector of the detector, the final system will be much more compact, consisting of a single GigaFitter Pulsar board equipped with four mezzanine cards receiving the data from the entire tracking detector. Moreover, the GigaFitter modular structure is adequate to scale for much better performances and is general enough to be easily adapted to future High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments and applications outside HEP.

  2. The Trilogy is Complete - GigaGalaxy Zoom Phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The third image of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project has just been released online, completing this eye-opening dive into our galactic home in outstanding fashion. The latest image follows on from views, released over the last two weeks, of the sky as seen with the unaided eye and through an amateur telescope. This third instalment provides another breathtaking vista of an astronomical object, this time a 370-million-pixel view of the Lagoon Nebula of the quality and depth needed by professional astronomers in their quest to understand our Universe. The newly released image extends across a field of view of more than one and a half square degree - an area eight times larger than that of the full Moon - and was obtained with the Wide Field Imager attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. This 67-million-pixel camera has already created several of ESO's iconic pictures. The intriguing object depicted here - the Lagoon Nebula - is located four to five thousand light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). The nebula is a giant interstellar cloud, 100 light-years across, where stars are forming. The scattered dark patches seen all over the nebula are huge clouds of gas and dust that are collapsing under their own weight and which will soon give birth to clusters of young, glowing stars. Some of the smallest clouds are known as "globules" and the most prominent ones have been catalogued by the astronomer Edward Emerson Barnard. The Lagoon Nebula hosts the young open stellar cluster known as NGC 6530. This is home for 50 to 100 stars and twinkles in the lower left portion of the nebula. Observations suggest that the cluster is slightly in front of the nebula itself, though still enshrouded by dust, as revealed by reddening of the starlight, an effect that occurs when small dust particles scatter light. The name of the Lagoon Nebula derives from the wide lagoon-shaped dark lane located in the middle of the

  3. Terrestrial ecology of semi-aquatic giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are a vital component of habitat for semiaquatic herpetofauna, but for most species adjacent terrestrial habitats are also essential. We examined the use of terrestrial environments by Giant Gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) to provide behavioral information relevant to conservation of this state and federally listed threatened species. We used radio telemetry data collected 1995–2011 from adults at several sites throughout the Sacramento Valley, California, USA, to examine Giant Gartersnake use of the terrestrial environment. We found Giant Gartersnakes in terrestrial environments more than half the time during the summer, with the use of terrestrial habitats increasing to nearly 100% during brumation. While in terrestrial habitats, we found Giant Gartersnakes underground more than half the time in the early afternoon during summer, and the probability of being underground increased to nearly 100% of the time at all hours during brumation. Extreme temperatures also increased the probability that we would find Giant Gartersnakes underground. Under most conditions, we found Giant Gartersnakes to be within 10 m of water at 95% of observations. For females during brumation and individuals that we found underground, however, the average individual had a 10% probability of being located > 20 m from water. Individual variation in each of the response variables was extensive; therefore, predicting the behavior of an individual was fraught with uncertainty. Nonetheless, our estimates provide resource managers with valuable information about the importance of protecting and carefully managing terrestrial habitats for conserving a rare semiaquatic snake.

  4. High Infestation by Dawestrema cycloancistrioides in Arapaima gigas Cultured in the Amazon Region, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Patrick D.; Malheiros, Antonio F.; Vasquez, Narda D.; Chavez, Milton D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Dawestrema cycloancistrioides in semi-intensive fish farming of fingerlings of Arapaima gigas. Between September and November 2013, 60 individuals of A. gigas born in captivity, were collected in three concrete ponds, from a semi-intensive fish farm in the Peruvian Amazon. For the study of sclerotized structures, parasites were fixed in a solution of ammonium picrate glycerine and mounted in Canada balsam. To visualize internal structures, parasites were fixed in hot formaldehyde solution (4%) for staining with Gomori's trichrome. The parasitic indexes calculated were prevalence, mean intensity, and mean abundance. This study identified a high infestation of a monogenean D. cycloancistrioides in gills of A. gigas. The prevalence was 100%. The mean intensity and mean abundance of the parasite were 144.9 of parasites per individual. This study confirms the necessity of constant monitoring of fish in order to reduce fish mortality. PMID:26464924

  5. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus*

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela–Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh. PMID:25055974

  6. [Ingestion and digestion of seven species of microalgae by larvae of Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae)].

    PubMed

    Patiño Súarez, V; Aldana Aranda, D

    2000-12-01

    The potential nutritional value of seven microalgal diets as measured by their ingestibility and digestibility to queen conch Strombus gigas larvae was tested with 30 day old larvae reared at 28 degrees C and fed at 1000 cells x ml(-1). The algae were Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii Isochrysis aff. galbana, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Chlamydomonas coccoides, Chaetoceros sp. and Thalassiosira fluviatilis. Ingestion and digestion were measured by the four nutritional stages studied with epifluorescence microscopy with live larvae. Temporal and absolute indices showed that larvae fed Chaetoceros sp. and T. fluviatilis had lower ingestion and digestion levels. The other algae are recommend to feed S. gigas larvae. PMID:15266796

  7. Mechanical properties and the laminate structure of Arapaima gigas scales.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Wei, C T; Olevsky, E A; Meyers, Marc A

    2011-10-01

    The Arapaima gigas scales play an important role in protecting this large Amazon basin fish against predators such as the piranha. They have a laminate composite structure composed of an external mineralized layer and internal lamellae with thickness of 50-60 μm each and composed of collagen fibers with ~1 μm diameter. The alignment of collagen fibers is consistent in each individual layer but varies from layer to layer, forming a non-orthogonal plywood structure, known as Bouligand stacking. X-ray diffraction revealed that the external surface of the scale contains calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. EDS results confirm that the percentage of calcium is higher in the external layer. The micro-indentation hardness of the external layer (550 MPa) is considerably higher than that of the internal layer (200 MPa), consistent with its higher degree of mineralization. Tensile testing of the scales carried out in the dry and wet conditions shows that the strength and stiffness are hydration dependent. As is the case of most biological materials, the elastic modulus of the scale is strain-rate dependent. The strain-rate dependence of the elastic modulus, as expressed by the Ramberg-Osgood equation, is equal to 0.26, approximately ten times higher than that of bone. This is attributed to the higher fraction of collagen in the scales and to the high degree of hydration (30% H(2)O). Deproteinization of the scale reveals the structure of the mineral component consisting of an interconnected network of platelets with a thickness of ~50 nm and diameter of ~500 nm. PMID:21783123

  8. Literature review of giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) biology and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the available literature on giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) to compile existing information on this species and identify knowledge gaps that, if addressed, would help to inform conservation efforts for giant gartersnakes.  Giant gartersnakes comprise a species of semi-aquatic snake precinctive to wetlands in the Central Valley of California.  The diversion of surface water and conversion of wetlands to agricultural and other land uses resulted in the loss of more than 90 percent of natural giant gartersnake habitats.  Because of this habitat loss, giant gartersnakes are now listed by the United States and California Endangered Species Acts as Threatened.  Most extant populations occur in the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, which comprises the northern portion of the giant gartersnake’s former range.  The huge demand for water in California for agriculture, industry, recreation, and other human consumption, combined with periodic severe drought, places remaining giant gartersnake habitats at increased risk of degradation and loss.  This literature review summarizes the available information on giant gartersnake distribution, habitat relations, behavior, demography, and other aspects of its biology relevant to conservation.  This information is then compiled into a graphical conceptual model that indicates the importance of different aspects of giant gartersnake biology for maintaining positive population growth, and identifies those areas for which important information relevant for conservation is lacking.  Directing research efforts toward these aspects of giant gartersnake ecology will likely result in improvements to conserving this unique species while meeting the high demands for water in California.

  9. Sequence, expression divergence, and complementation of homologous ALCATRAZ loci in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Shuijin; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Guo, Yuan; Pak, Haksong; Chen, Mingxun; Shi, Congguang; Meng, Huabing; Jiang, Lixi

    2009-08-01

    The genomic era provides new perspectives in understanding polyploidy evolution, mostly on the genome-wide scale. In this paper, we show the sequence and expression divergence between the homologous ALCATRAZ (ALC) loci in Brassica napus, responsible for silique dehiscence. We cloned two homologous ALC loci, namely BnaC.ALC.a and BnaA.ALC.a in B. napus. Driven by the 35S promoter, both the loci complemented to the alc mutation of Arabidopsis thaliana, yet only the expression of BnaC.ALC.a was detectable in the siliques of B. napus. Sequence alignment indicated that BnaC.ALC.a and BolC.ALC.a, or BnaA.ALC.a and BraA.ALC.a, possess a high level of similarity. The understanding of the sequence and expression divergence among homologous loci of a gene is of due importance for an effective gene manipulation and TILLING (or ECOTILLING) analysis for the allelic DNA variation at a given locus. PMID:19504267

  10. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): developing community resources to study diverse invertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Mónica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W; Ryan, Joseph F; Schulze, Anja; Wörheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E; Diaz, M Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-François; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, François; Moroz, Leonid L; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rhodes, Adelaide; Santos, Scott R; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the "invertebrates," but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a "Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance" (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation on the yields of volatile extracts of Angelica gigas Nakai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Jun-Hyoung; Song, Hyun-Pa; Kim, Dong-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kwon, Joog-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2007-11-01

    The study was carried out to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on the volatile flavor components including essential oils, of Angelica gigas Nakai. The volatile organic compounds from non- and irradiated A. gigas Nakai at doses of 1, 3, 5, 10 and 20 kGy were extracted by a simultaneous steam distillation and extraction (SDE) method and identified by GC/MS analysis. A total of 116 compounds were identified and quantified from non- and irradiated A. gigas Nakai. The major volatile compounds were identified 2,4,6-trimethyl heptane, α-pinene, camphene, α-limonene, β-eudesmol, α-murrolene and sphatulenol. Among these compounds, the amount of essential oils in non-irradiated sample were 77.13%, and the irradiated samples at doses of 1, 3, 5, 10 and 20 kGy were 84.98%, 83.70%, 83.94%, 82.84% and 82.58%, respectively. Oxygenated terpenes such as β-eudesmol, α-eudesmol, and verbenone were increased after irradiation but did not correlate with the irradiation dose. The yields of active substances such as essential oil were increased after irradiation; however, the yields of essential oils and the irradiation dose were not correlated. Thus, the profile of composition volatiles of A. gigas Nakai did not change with irradiation.

  12. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the “invertebrates,” but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a “Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance” (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  13. Seawater temperature effect on metal accumulation and toxicity in the subantarctic Macquarie Island isopod, Exosphaeroma gigas.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexander; King, Catherine K; Hill, Nicole A; Cooper, Ashley; Townsend, Ashley T; Mondon, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    Very little is currently known of subantarctic nearshore invertebrates' sensitivity to environmental metals and the role of temperature in this relationship. This study investigated Cu and Zn toxicity in the common subantarctic intertidal isopod, Exosphaeroma gigas, and the influence of temperature on Cu toxicity and bioaccumulation kinetics. Adult E. gigas are insensitive to Cu and Zn at concentrations of 3200 and 7400μg/L respectively in non-renewal tests at 5.5°C (ambient subtidal temperature) over 14days. Under renewed exposures over the same temperature and time period the LC50 for copper was 2204μg/L. A 10-fold increase in Cu body burden occurred relative to zinc, indicating E. gigas has different strategies for regulating the two metals. Copper toxicity and time to mortality both increased with elevated temperature. However, temperature did not significantly affect Cu uptake rate and efflux rate constants derived from biodynamic modelling at lower Cu concentrations. These results may be attributable to E. gigas being an intertidal species with physiological mechanisms adapted to fluctuating environmental conditions. Cu concentrations required to elicit a toxicity response indicates that E. gigas would not be directly threatened by current levels of Cu or Zn present in Macquarie Island intertidal habitats, with the associated elevated temperature fluctuations. This study provides evidence that the sensitivity of this subantarctic intertidal species to metal contaminants is not as high as expected, and which has significance for the derivation of relevant guidelines specific to this distinct subpolar region of the world. PMID:27367827

  14. Fishery biology of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjun; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Bilin; Li, Gang; Lu, Huajie

    2014-06-01

    The jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4°-11°N, 90°-100°W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6°-9°N and 91°-94°W and by 6°30'-7°30'N and 96°-97°W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29°C. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female: male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant difference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65% of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery resources.

  15. Innovative uses of GigaPan Technology for Onsite and Distance Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C.; Schott, R. C.; Piatek, J. L.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    GigaPans are gigapixel panoramic images that can be viewed at a wide range of magnifications, allowing users to explore them in various degrees of detail from the smallest scale to the full image extent. In addition to panoramic images captured with the GigaPan camera mount ('Dry Falls' - http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/89093), users can also upload annotated images (For example, 'Massanutten sandstone slab with trace fossils (annotated)', http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/124295) and satellite images (For example, 'Geology vs. Topography - State of Connecticut', http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/111265). Panoramas with similar topics have been gathered together on the site in galleries, both user-generated and site-curated (For example, http://www.gigapan.com/galleries?categories=geology&page=1). Further innovations in display technology have also led to the development of improved viewers (for example, the annotations in the image linked above can be explored via paired viewers at http://coursecontent.nic.edu/bdrichards/gigapixelimages/callanview) GigaPan panoramas can be created through use of the GigaPan robotic camera mount and a digital camera (different models of the camera mount are available and work with a wide range of cameras). The camera mount can be used to create high-resolution pans ranging in scale from hand sample to outcrop up to landscape via the stitching software included with the robotic mount. The software can also be used to generate GigaPan images from other sources, such as thin section or satellite images, so these images can also be viewed with the online viewer. GigaPan images are typically viewed via a web-based interface that allows the user to interact with the image from the limits of the image detail up to the full panorama. After uploading, information can be added to panoramas with both text captions and geo-referencing (geo-located panoramas can then be viewed in Google Earth). Users can record specific locations and zoom levels in

  16. Critical update for the clinical use of L-carnitine analogs in cardiometabolic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mingorance, Carmen; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Rosalía; Justo, María Luisa; Álvarez de Sotomayor, María; Herrera, María Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) are two naturally occurring carnitine derivates formed by carnitine acetyltransferase. The beneficial cardiovascular effects of ALC and PLC have been extensively evaluated in animals and humans during the last 20 years. For instance, many clinical trials have suggested ALC and PLC as potential strategies in the management of peripheral arterial disease, heart and cerebral ischemia, and congestive heart failure. As a result, several experts have already aimed to revise the clinical evidence supporting the therapeutic use of ALC and PLC. On the basis of their conclusions, our aim was a critical review of the effectiveness of ALC and PLC in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Therefore we also describe recent studies that have addressed the emerging use of ALC and PLC amelioration of the insulin resistant state and its related morbidities. PMID:21490942

  17. Generation and analysis of a 29,745 unique Expressed Sequence Tags from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) assembled into a publicly accessible database: the GigasDatabase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although bivalves are among the most-studied marine organisms because of their ecological role and economic importance, very little information is available on the genome sequences of oyster species. This report documents three large-scale cDNA sequencing projects for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas initiated to provide a large number of expressed sequence tags that were subsequently compiled in a publicly accessible database. This resource allowed for the identification of a large number of transcripts and provides valuable information for ongoing investigations of tissue-specific and stimulus-dependant gene expression patterns. These data are crucial for constructing comprehensive DNA microarrays, identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in coding regions, and for identifying genes when the entire genome sequence of C. gigas becomes available. Description In the present paper, we report the production of 40,845 high-quality ESTs that identify 29,745 unique transcribed sequences consisting of 7,940 contigs and 21,805 singletons. All of these new sequences, together with existing public sequence data, have been compiled into a publicly-available Website http://public-contigbrowser.sigenae.org:9090/Crassostrea_gigas/index.html. Approximately 43% of the unique ESTs had significant matches against the SwissProt database and 27% were annotated using Gene Ontology terms. In addition, we identified a total of 208 in silico microsatellites from the ESTs, with 173 having sufficient flanking sequence for primer design. We also identified a total of 7,530 putative in silico, single-nucleotide polymorphisms using existing and newly-generated EST resources for the Pacific oyster. Conclusion A publicly-available database has been populated with 29,745 unique sequences for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The database provides many tools to search cleaned and assembled ESTs. The user may input and submit several filters, such as

  18. Attenuated reproduction of Strombus gigas by an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like parasite in the digestive gland.

    PubMed

    Baqueiro Cardenas, Erick; Montero, Jorge; Frenkiel, Liliane; Aldana Aranda, Dalila

    2012-07-01

    An intense and generalized sporozoan infection was detected in every population of the queen conch, Strombus gigas through the Caribbean. In this contribution we establish the relationship between occurrences of an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like organism and reproductive activity at San Andres archipelago, Colombia. Occurrence of the parasites was estimated counting the feeding stage Merozoites and cysts Sporozoites at 40× magnification. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS) was made to correlate the parasites stages abundance with frequency of the reproductive stages. Gametogenesis and spawning were always low coinciding with high numbers of Merozoites, a positive correlation was established between parasite abundance with reabsorption and undifferentiated stages, and negative correlation was observed between parasite abundance with maturity and spawning stages. The nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) shows that gametogenesis, maturity and spawning increase as the number of parasites decrease, factor that could be threatening reproduction of S. gigas through the Caribbean. PMID:22484565

  19. Cytochemical characterization of yolk granule acid phosphatase during early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Dongchun; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a cytochemical method and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine acid phosphatase activities of yolk granules throughout the early developmental stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic change of yolk granule acid phosphatase, and the mechanisms underlying its involvement in yolk degradation during the early developmental stages of molluscs. Three types of yolk granules (YGI, YGII, and YGIII) that differed in electron density and acid phosphatase reaction were identified in early cleavage, morula, blastula, gastrula, trochophore, and veliger stages. The morphological heterogeneities of the yolk granules were related to acid phosphatase activity and degrees of yolk degradation, indicating the association of acid phosphatase with yolk degradation in embryos and larvae of molluscs. Fusion of yolk granules was observed during embryogenesis and larval development of C. gigas. The fusion of YGI (free of acid phosphatase reaction) with YGII (rich in acid phosphatase reaction) could be the way by which yolk degradation is triggered.

  20. Results and insights from the NCSU Insect Museum GigaPan project

    PubMed Central

    Bertone, Matthew A.; Blinn, Robert L.; Dew1, Tanner M. StanfieldKelly J.; Seltmann, Katja C.; Deans, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pinned insect specimens stored in museum collections are a fragile and valuable resource for entomological research. As such, they are usually kept away from viewing by the public and hard to access by experts. Here we present a method for mass imaging insect specimens, using GigaPan technology to achieve highly explorable, many-megapixel panoramas of insect museum drawers. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the system, and describe future avenues of collections research using this technology. PMID:22859883

  1. Giga-z: A 100,000 Object Superconducting Spectrophotometer for LSST Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Danica W.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; O'Brien, Kieran; Hirata, Chris

    2013-09-01

    We simulate the performance of a new type of instrument, a Superconducting Multi-Object Spectrograph (SuperMOS), that uses microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs, a new detector technology, feature good quantum efficiency in the UVOIR, can count individual photons with microsecond timing accuracy, and, like X-ray calorimeters, determine their energy to several percent. The performance of Giga-z, a SuperMOS designed for wide field imaging follow-up observations, is evaluated using simulated observations of the COSMOS mock catalog with an array of 100,000 R 423 nm = E/ΔE = 30 MKID pixels. We compare our results against a simultaneous simulation of LSST observations. In 3 yr on a dedicated 4 m class telescope, Giga-z could observe ≈2 billion galaxies, yielding a low-resolution spectral energy distribution spanning 350-1350 nm for each; 1000 times the number measured with any currently proposed LSST spectroscopic follow-up, at a fraction of the cost and time. Giga-z would provide redshifts for galaxies up to z ≈ 6 with magnitudes mi <~ 25, with accuracy σΔz/(1 + z) ≈ 0.03 for the whole sample, and σΔz/(1 + z) ≈ 0.007 for a select subset. We also find catastrophic failure rates and biases that are consistently lower than for LSST. The added constraint on dark energy parameters for WL + CMB by Giga-z using the FoMSWG default model is equivalent to multiplying the LSST Fisher matrix by a factor of α = 1.27 (wp ), 1.53 (wa ), or 1.98 (Δγ). This is equivalent to multiplying both the LSST coverage area and the training sets by α and reducing all systematics by a factor of 1/\\sqrt{\\alpha }, advantages that are robust to even more extreme models of intrinsic alignment.

  2. Size increment of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas mature females in Peruvian waters, 1989-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Juan; Tafur, Ricardo; Taipe, Anatolio; Villegas, Piero; Keyl, Friedeman; Dominguez, Noel; Salazar, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Changes in population structure of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas in Peruvian waters were studied based on size-at-maturity from 1989 to 2004. From 1989 to 1999, mature squid belonging to the medium-sized group prevailed, but from 2001 on, mature squids were larger. This change is not related to the changes in sea surface temperature and we hypothesized that it was caused by the population increase of mesopelagic fishes as prey.

  3. [Effects of calcification on respiratory quotient of cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and its fouling animals].

    PubMed

    Ren, Li-Hu; Zhang, Ji-Hong; Fang, Jian-Guang; Yao, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Yi-Tao; Gao, Zhen-Kun; Zhang, Ming-Liang

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory quotient (RQ) is one of the basic indices in physiology and energy metabolism of animals. When RQ is calculated, the amount of released CO2 is typically used directly. But for calcifying marine organisms, calcification which can affect dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content in the water may cause methodological error to some extent, if it is ignored. In this paper, RQ and O/N of cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and 3 marine fouling animal species (Mytilus edulis, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava) were measured in the respiratory chamber to discuss the effect of calcification in RQ determination. The results demonstrated that calcification rates of C. gigas and M. edulis were (56.37 +/- 14.85) and (17.95 +/- 7.21) micromol x g(-1) x h(-1), respectively. (3.72 +/- 0.80) and (1.48 +/- 0.14) mg x L(-1) DIC in the water were correspondingly decreased, which occupied about (60.9 +/- 7.6)% and (39.9 +/- 5.7)% of respired CO2, respectively. RQ values of 4 animals were C. gigas 1.38 +0.19, M. edulis 1.18 +/- 0.11, C. intestinalis 1.11 +/- 0.05 and S. clava 1.32 +/- 0.19, which agreed with the O/N values except C. intestinalis. Meanwhile, the uncorrected RQ values of C. gigas and M. edulis were 0.56 +/- 0.19 and 0.70 +/- 0.04, respectively, which were contrary to the O/N values. Therefore, it was obviously that calcification could result in a significant influence on the respiratory quotient by affecting water DIC concentration and should be accurately calculated in RQ measurement. PMID:25223039

  4. Identification and functional characterization of two executioner caspases in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Qu, Tao; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Xu, Fei; Huang, Wen; Li, Chunyan; Du, Yishuai; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-3 and caspase-7 are two key effector caspases that play important roles in apoptotic pathways that maintain normal tissue and organ development and homeostasis. However, little is known about the sequence, structure, activity, and function of effector caspases upon apoptosis in mollusks, especially marine bivalves. In this study, we investigated the possible roles of two executioner caspases in the regulation of apoptosis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. A full-length caspase-3-like gene named Cgcaspase-3 was cloned from C.gigas cDNA, encoding a predicted protein containing caspase family p20 and p10 domain profiles and a conserved caspase active site motif. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that both Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 may function as effector caspases clustered in the invertebrate branch. Although the sequence identities between the two caspases was low, both enzymes possessed executioner caspase activity and were capable of inducing cell death. These results suggested that Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 were two effector caspases in C. gigas. We also observed that nucleus-localized Cgcaspase-3, may function as a caspase-3-like protein and cytoplasm-localized Cgcaspase-1 may function as a caspase-7-like protein. Both Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 mRNA expression increased after larvae settled on the substratum, suggesting that both caspases acted in several tissues or organs that degenerated after oyster larvae settlement. The highest caspase expression levels were observed in the gills indicating that both effector caspases were likely involved in immune or metabolic processes in C. gigas. PMID:24551213

  5. Genome and Transcriptome Analyses Provide Insight into the Euryhaline Adaptation Mechanism of Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Li, Li; She, Zhicai; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, has developed special mechanisms to regulate its osmotic balance to adapt to fluctuations of salinities in coastal zones. To understand the oyster’s euryhaline adaptation, we analyzed salt stress effectors metabolism pathways under different salinities (salt 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40 for 7 days) using transcriptome data, physiology experiment and quantitative real-time PCR. Results Transcriptome data uncovered 189, 480, 207 and 80 marker genes for monitoring physiology status of oysters and the environment conditions. Three known salt stress effectors (involving ion channels, aquaporins and free amino acids) were examined. The analysis of ion channels and aquaporins indicated that 7 days long-term salt stress inhibited voltage-gated Na+/K+ channel and aquaporin but increased calcium-activated K+ channel and Ca2+ channel. As the most important category of osmotic stress effector, we analyzed the oyster FAAs metabolism pathways (including taurine, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, proline and arginine) and explained FAAs functional mechanism for oyster low salinity adaptation. FAAs metabolism key enzyme genes displayed expression differentiation in low salinity adapted individuals comparing with control which further indicated that FAAs played important roles for oyster salinity adaptation. A global metabolic pathway analysis (iPath) of oyster expanded genes displayed a co-expansion of FAAs metabolism in C. gigas compared with seven other species, suggesting oyster’s powerful ability regarding FAAs metabolism, allowing it to adapt to fluctuating salinities, which may be one important mechanism underlying euryhaline adaption in oyster. Additionally, using transcriptome data analysis, we uncovered salt stress transduction networks in C. gigas. Conclusions Our results represented oyster salt stress effectors functional mechanisms under salt stress conditions and explained the expansion of FAAs metabolism pathways as

  6. SPATULA and ALCATRAZ, are partially redundant, functionally diverging bHLH genes required for Arabidopsis gynoecium and fruit development.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Paicu, Teodora; Alvarez, John P; Swain, Steve M; Smyth, David R

    2011-12-01

    The Arabidopsis gynoecium is a complex organ that facilitates fertilization, later developing into a dehiscent silique that protects seeds until their dispersal. Identifying genes important for development is often hampered by functional redundancy. We report unequal redundancy between two closely related genes, SPATULA (SPT) and ALCATRAZ (ALC), revealing previously unknown developmental roles for each. SPT is known to support septum, style and stigma development in the flower, whereas ALC is involved in dehiscence zone development in the fruit. ALC diverged from a SPT-like ancestor following gene duplication coinciding with the At-β polyploidy event. Here we show that ALC is also involved in early gynoecium development, and SPT in later valve margin generation in the silique. Evidence includes the increased severity of early gynoecium disruption, and of later valve margin defects, in spt-alc double mutants. In addition, a repressive version of SPT (35S:SPT-SRDX) disrupts both structures. Consistent with redundancy, ALC and SPT expression patterns overlap in these tissues, and the ALC promoter carries two atypical E-box elements identical to one in SPT required for valve margin expression. Further, SPT can heterodimerize with ALC, and 35S:SPT can fully complement dehiscence defects in alc mutants, although 35S:ALC can only partly complement spt gynoecium disruptions, perhaps associated with its sequence simplification. Interactions with FRUITFULL and SHATTERPROOF genes differ somewhat between SPT and ALC, reflecting their different specializations. These two genes are apparently undergoing subfunctionalization, with SPT essential for earlier carpel margin tissues, and ALC specializing in later dehiscence zone development. PMID:21801252

  7. Functional analysis of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) β-thymosin: Focus on antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Seo, Jung-Kil; Lee, Min Jeong; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu

    2015-07-01

    An antimicrobial peptide, ∼5 kDa in size, was isolated and purified in its active form from the mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight analysis revealed 4656.4 Da of the purified and unreduced peptide. A comparison of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of oyster antimicrobial peptide with deduced amino acid sequences in our local expressed sequence tag (EST) database of C. gigas (unpublished data) revealed that the oyster antimicrobial peptide sequence entirely matched the deduced amino acid sequence of an EST clone (HM-8_A04), which was highly homologous with the β-thymosin of other species. The cDNA possessed a 126-bp open reading frame that encoded a protein of 41 amino acids. To confirm the antimicrobial activity of C. gigas β-thymosin, we overexpressed a recombinant β-thymosin (rcgTβ) using a pET22 expression plasmid in an Escherichia coli system. The antimicrobial activity of rcgTβ was evaluated and demonstrated using a bacterial growth inhibition test in both liquid and solid cultures. PMID:25842181

  8. Local envenomation from the bite of a juvenile false water cobra (Hydrodynastes gigas; Dipsadidae).

    PubMed

    Keyler, D E; Richards, D P; Warrell, D A; Weinstein, S A

    2016-03-01

    The false water cobra (Hydrodynastes gigas) is a non-front-fanged colubroid snake frequently exhibited in zoos, and maintained by amateur collectors. Little detailed documentation regarding the time-course of symptoms development and the consequences of their bites to humans has been published. Reported here is a case of envenoming in a 25 yo male that occurred after the bite of a juvenile H. gigas. The victim was bitten on the fourth digit of the left hand while processing the snake for sex determination, and the snake remained attached to the digit for approximately 30 s; there was no jaw advancement. Within 5 min, intense local pain developed, and at 4hr post bite the entire dorsal aspect of the hand was significantly edematous, The local effects progressed and involved the entire forearm, and the local pain referred to the axillary region. Mild paresthesia and local blanching ("pallor") were noted in the affected digit, but resolved within 7 days. The clinical course in the patient showed that moderate localized symptoms may result from the bite of a juvenile H.gigas. PMID:26743113

  9. Thermal stress induces a distinct transcriptome profile in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Bo-Mi; Hwang, In Joon; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-09-01

    Oysters are frequently subjected to heat stress during tidal emersion/immersion cycles in their habitats due to attachment on the rocky shore. To understand the effect of temperature elevation on the whole transcriptome over time, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was exposed to seawater temperature 32°C for 72h from the control 20°C. RNA-seq identified differentially expressed stress responsive transcripts upon thermal stress in the gill tissues of C. gigas. The primary effect of heat stress appears to be significantly induced transcription of molecular chaperones, including members of the heat shock protein (hsp) families, while genes typically associated with protein metabolism, such as those involved in protein degradation (e.g. ATP-dependent proteolysis pathway) and biosynthesis (e.g. ribosomal protein genes), were repressed. In particular, several hsp70 isoforms and a small hsp20 maintained prolonged mRNA expressions for 72h. This study provides preliminary insights into the molecular response of C. gigas to heat stress and suggests a basis for future studies examining molecular adaptation or thermotolerance metabolism in the Pacific oyster. PMID:27341139

  10. Changes in protein expression of pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed in situ to urban sewage.

    PubMed

    Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Gomes, Tânia; Company, Rui; Moraes, Roberta R M; Sasaki, Silvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Bicego, Márcia C; Melo, Cláudio M R; Bainy, Afonso C D; Bebianno, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    The composition and concentration of substances in urban effluents are complex and difficult to measure. These contaminants elicit biological responses in the exposed organisms. Proteomic analysis is a powerful tool in environmental toxicology by evidencing alterations in protein expression due to exposure to contaminants and by providing a useful framework for the development of new potential biomarkers. The aim of this study was to determine changes in protein expression signatures (PES) in the digestive gland of oysters Crassostrea gigas transplanted to two farming areas (LIS and RIB) and to one area contaminated by sanitary sewage (BUC) after 14 days of exposure. This species is one of the most cultivated molluscs in the world. The identified proteins are related to the cytoskeleton (CKAP5 and ACT2), ubiquitination pathway conjugation (UBE3C), G protein-coupled receptor and signal transduction (SVEP1), and cell cycle/division (CCNB3). CKAP5 showed higher expression in oysters kept at BUC in comparison with those kept at the farming areas, while ACT2, UBE3C, SVEP1, and CCNB3 were suppressed. The results suggest that these changes might lead to DNA damage, apoptosis, and interference with the immune system in oyster C. gigas exposed to sewage and give initial information on PES of C. gigas exposed to sanitary sewage, which can subsequently be useful in the development of more sensitive tools for biomonitoring coastal areas, particularly those devoted mainly to oyster farming activities. PMID:25398216

  11. Properties of Pseudomonas enalia, a Marine Bacterium Pathogenic for the Invertebrate Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)1

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Sparks, A. K.

    1967-01-01

    Bacteriological investigations of dead and dying oysters in populations of Crassostrea gigas grown in Hood Canal, Oyster Bay, and Willapa Bay, Washington, were undertaken. Living, and presumably normal, oysters within the same sample set were also examined. Results indicated that the natural flora of Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg) is composed of organisms representing the genera Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Vibrio. Pollution indicator organisms such as Escherichia coli were not found. The flora of dead or dying oysters included a somewhat greater incidence of Pseudomonas sp.; a seawater-requiring organism isolated on several occasions from oyster gapers which had been collected from different geographical areas was identified as P. enalia. A description of the organism has been provided, and the characteristics are listed to facilitate identification by other workers encountering the organism in future studies of a similar kind. The seawater requirement exhibited by P. enalia was deduced to be a requirement for sodium chloride for growth of the organism. Experiments to determine the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas enalia were performed by use of experimentally infected animals maintained in aerated seawater tanks. Death of C. gigas occurred when the animal body tissue was injected with viable bacterial cell suspension. Results of histological studies of the normal and infected oyster tissue suggest that bacterial invasion of the tissue occurred. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6053175

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogenic analysis of the mudskipper Scartelaos gigas (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Yuting; Chen, Shixi; Chen, Wei; Hong, Wanshu

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Scartelaos gigas was firstly determined. The circular genome (16 717 bp) comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. The overall base composition of S. gigas is 28.9% for C, 28.3% for A, 26.4% for T, 16.4% for G, with a slight A + T bias of 54.7%. In the control region, the termination-associated sequence and conserved sequence block domains were found, but the tandem repeat structure was not found. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement. The phylogenic analysis using the Neighbor-Joining method showed that the fishes belonging to Gobiidae, Odontoburidae, and Eleotridae formed three branches grouped with other fishes into one clade which separated from the mammals. We hope that the results from the present study will provide useful molecular information for the further studies on genetic structure and demographic history of S. gigas. PMID:26436681

  13. The novel cargo Alcadein induces vesicle association of kinesin-1 motor components and activates axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yoichi; Kawano, Takanori; Taru, Hidenori; Saito, Yuhki; Wada, Sachiyo; Miyamoto, Kanako; Kobayashi, Hisako; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki O; Ohsugi, Yu; Yamamoto, Tohru; Matsuno, Kenji; Kinjo, Masataka; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Alcadeinα (Alcα) is an evolutionarily conserved type I membrane protein expressed in neurons. We show here that Alcα strongly associates with kinesin light chain (KD≈4–8 × 10−9 M) through a novel tryptophan- and aspartic acid-containing sequence. Alcα can induce kinesin-1 association with vesicles and functions as a novel cargo in axonal anterograde transport. JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1), an adaptor protein for kinesin-1, perturbs the transport of Alcα, and the kinesin-1 motor complex dissociates from Alcα-containing vesicles in a JIP1 concentration-dependent manner. Alcα-containing vesicles were transported with a velocity different from that of amyloid β-protein precursor (APP)-containing vesicles, which are transported by the same kinesin-1 motor. Alcα- and APP-containing vesicles comprised mostly separate populations in axons in vivo. Interactions of Alcα with kinesin-1 blocked transport of APP-containing vesicles and increased β-amyloid generation. Inappropriate interactions of Alc- and APP-containing vesicles with kinesin-1 may promote aberrant APP metabolism in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:17332754

  14. Prognostic Implication of the Absolute Lymphocyte to Absolute Monocyte Count Ratio in Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated With Doxorubicin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine or Equivalent Regimens.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Dimopoulou, Maria N; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Petevi, Kyriaki; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Moschogiannis, Maria; Dimou, Maria; Boutsikas, George; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Gainaru, Gabriella; Plata, Eleni; Flevari, Pagona; Koutsi, Katerina; Papageorgiou, Loula; Telonis, Vassilios; Tsaftaridis, Panayiotis; Sachanas, Sotirios; Yiakoumis, Xanthoula; Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Viniou, Nora-Athina; Siakantaris, Marina P; Variami, Eleni; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Konstantopoulos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    Low absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) to absolute monocyte count (AMC) ratio (ALC/AMC) is an independent prognostic factor in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but different cutoffs (1.1, 1.5, and 2.9) have been applied. We aimed to validate the prognostic significance of ALC/AMC in 537 homogenously treated (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine or equivalents ± radiotherapy) classical HL patients at various cutoffs. The median ALC/AMC was 2.24 (0.44-20.50). The median AMC was 0.653 × 10(9)/L (0.050-2.070). Lower ALC/AMC was associated with established markers of adverse prognosis. In total, 477 (89%), 418 (78%), and 189 (35%) patients had an ALC/AMC ratio of ≥1.1, ≥1.5, and ≥2.9; respectively; 20% had monocytosis (≥0.9 × 10(9)/L). Ten-year time to progression (TTP) was 77% versus 55% for patients with ALC/AMC ≥1.1 and <1.1 (p = .0002), 76% versus 68% for ALC/AMC ≥1.5 and <1.5 (p = .049), 77% versus 73% for ALC/AMC ≥2.9 and <2.9 (p = .35), and 79% versus 70% for ALC/AMC ≥2.24 and <2.24 (p = .08), respectively. In stages ΙΑ/ΙΙΑ and in patients ≥60 years old, ALC/AMC had no significant effect on TTP. In advanced stages, ALC/AMC was significant only at the cutoff of 1.1 (10-year TTP 67% vs. 48%; p = .016). In younger, advanced-stage patients, the differences were more pronounced. In multivariate analysis of TTP, ALC/AMC < 1.1 (p = .007) and stage IV (p < .001) were independent prognostic factors; ALC/AMC was independent of International Prognostic Score in another model. ALC/AMC was more predictive of overall survival than TTP. At the cutoff of 1.1, ALC/AMC had independent prognostic value in multivariate analysis. However, the prognostically inferior group comprised only 11% of patients. Further research is needed prior to the widespread use of this promising marker. PMID:26921291

  15. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  16. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  17. ENSO variability during MIS 11 (424-374 ka) from Tridacna gigas at Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayling, Bridget F.; Chappell, John; Gagan, Michael K.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS 11) from ∼424,000 to 374,000 yrs ago included one of the longest and warmest interglacials of the last 800,000 yrs, and is a potential analogue for the Holocene due to the similarity of Earth's orbital configuration at this time. The question of how the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) responds to warmer background climates remains unanswered and is critical to understand how the ENSO system will evolve under the influence of anthropogenic warming. In this study, we present a 35 yr-long, high-resolution record of MIS 11 climate variability in the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) based on coupled measurements of skeletal Mg/Ca and δ18O in giant Tridacna gigas clams from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The δ18O of modern T. gigas from Huon Peninsula faithfully records sea surface temperature, salinity/rainfall and regional ENSO variability. The geochemical integrity of the MIS 11 T. gigas for recording paleo-ENSO events was established through trace element screening, detailed petrography and SEM analysis. The fossil T. gigas δ18O record indicates that ENSO was operating during a 35-yr window in MIS 11, but with fewer events of shorter duration compared to those experienced during the last 100 yrs. The suppressed ENSO variability in the MIS 11 T. gigas record corresponds with a reduction in the amplitude of the average annual cycle in δ18O values. Distinctive changes in local insolation seasonality, and T. gigas δ18O, brought about by changes in Earth's orbit, provide an additional geochronological constraint on the timing of reef growth at Huon Peninsula to around 402 ka during the MIS 11.3 sub-stage (∼424-395 ka).

  18. The Hadal Amphipod Hirondellea gigas Possessing a Unique Cellulase for Digesting Wooden Debris Buried in the Deepest Seafloor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Hatada, Yuji; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Nagahama, Takahiko; Takami, Hideto

    2012-01-01

    The Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench is the deepest point in the ocean (10,994 m). Certain deep-sea animals can withstand the extreme pressure at this great depth. The amphipod Hirondellea gigas is a resident of the Challenger Deep. Amphipods are common inhabitants at great depths and serve as scavengers. However, there is relatively little information available regarding the physiology of H. gigas or this organism's ecological interactions in the hadopelagic zone. To understand the feeding behavior of this scavenger in the deepest oligotrophic hadal zone, we analyzed the digestive enzymes in whole-body extracts. We describe the detection of amylase, cellulase, mannanase, xylanase, and α-glycosidase activities that are capable of digesting plant-derived polysaccharides. Our identification of glucose, maltose, and cellobiose in the H. gigas extracts indicated that these enzymes function under great pressure in situ. In fact, the glucose content of H. gigas averaged 0.4% (w/dry-w). The purified H. gigas cellulase (HGcel) converted cellulose to glucose and cellobiose at an exceptional molar ratio of 2∶1 and efficiently produced glucose from dried wood, a natural cellulosic biomass, at 35°C. The enzyme activity increased under a high hydrostatic pressure of 100 MPa at 2°C, conditions equivalent to those found in the Challenger Deep. An analysis of the amino acid sequence of HGcel supported its classification as a family 31 glycosyl hydrolase. However, none of the enzymes of this family had previously been shown to possess cellulase activity. These results strongly suggested that H. gigas adapted to its extreme oligotrophic hadal oceanic environment by evolving digestive enzymes capable of digesting sunken wooden debris. PMID:22905166

  19. Symbiotic association between symbiodinium and the gastropod Strombus gigas: larval acquisition of symbionts.

    PubMed

    García Ramos, Maribel; Banaszak, Anastazia T

    2014-04-01

    The importance of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. was studied in the early life stages of the gastropod Strombus gigas. This dinoflagellate was not found in the eggs or the gelatinous mass surrounding the eggs of the mollusk; therefore, Symbiodinium is not inherited directly. To determine whether the planktonic veligers can acquire these algae from the environment, they were exposed to freshly isolated Symbiodinium from adult S. gigas (homologous). The optimal stage for Symbiodinium inoculation was found at 48 h post-hatching. Survival and growth rates of veligers and juveniles were higher when inoculated with freshly isolated Symbiodinium in conjunction with daily feeding of Isochrysis spp. Veligers inoculated with Symbiodinium freshly isolated from three host species elicited distinct responses: (1) veligers did not take up Symbiodinium isolated from the hydrozoan Millepora alcicornis suggesting that there is discrimination on contact prior to ingestion, (2) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from the anemone Bartholomea annulata, but the algae did not persist in the host tissue suggesting that selection against this type took place after ingestion or that the algae did not divide in the host, and (3) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from Pterogorgia anceps where it persisted and was associated with metamorphosis of the larvae. In contrast, the Symbiodinium freshly isolated from S. gigas were not associated with metamorphosis and required an inducer such as the red alga Laurencia poitei. These data present a significant advancement for the establishment of a new approach in the aquaculture of this important but declining Caribbean species. PMID:24037186

  20. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast.

    PubMed

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-06-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  1. An HcpR paralog of Desulfovibrio gigas provides protection against nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sofia M.; Amaral, Catarina; Neves, Susana S.; Santos, Cátia; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas belongs to the group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). These ubiquitous and metabolically versatile microorganisms are often exposed to reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Nonetheless, the mechanisms and regulatory elements involved in nitrosative stress protection are still poorly understood. The transcription factor HcpR has emerged as a putative regulator of nitrosative stress response among anaerobic bacteria. HcpR is known to orchestrate the expression of the hybrid cluster protein gene, hcp, proposed to be involved in cellular defense against RNS. According to phylogenetic analyses, the occurrence of hcpR paralog genes is a common feature among several Desulfovibrio species. Within the D. gigas genome we have identified two HcpR-related sequences. One of these sequences, hcpR1, was found in the close vicinity of the hcp gene and this finding prompted us to proceed with its functional characterization. We observed that the growth of a D. gigas strain lacking hcpR1 is severely impaired under nitrosative stress. An in silico search revealed several putative targets of HcpR1 that were experimentally validated. The fact that HcpR1 regulates several genes encoding proteins involved in nitrite and nitrate metabolism, together with the sensitive growth phenotype to NO displayed by an hcpR1 mutant strain, strongly supports a relevant role of this factor under nitrosative stress. Moreover, the finding that several Desulfovibrio species possess HcpR paralogs, which have been transmitted vertically in the evolution and diversification of the genus, suggests that these sequences may confer adaptive or survival advantage to these organisms, possibly by increasing their tolerance to nitrosative stress. PMID:26273559

  2. Comprehensive model of Jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas trophic ecology in the Northern Humboldt current system.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Ana; Ménard, Frédéric; Tafur, Ricardo; Espinoza, Pepe; Argüelles, Juan; Maehara, Víctor; Flores, Oswaldo; Simier, Monique; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas plays an important role in marine food webs both as predator and prey. We investigated the ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability of the diet composition of jumbo squid in the northern Humboldt Current system. For that purpose we applied several statistical methods to an extensive dataset of 3,618 jumbo squid non empty stomachs collected off Peru from 2004 to 2011. A total of 55 prey taxa was identified that we aggregated into eleven groups. Our results evidenced a large variability in prey composition as already observed in other systems. However, our data do not support the hypothesis that jumbo squids select the most abundant or energetic taxon in a prey assemblage, neglecting the other available prey. Indeed, multinomial model predictions showed that stomach fullness increased with the number of prey taxa, while most stomachs with low contents contained one or two prey taxa only. Our results therefore question the common hypothesis that predators seek locally dense aggregations of monospecific prey. In addition D. gigas consumes very few anchovy Engraulis ringens in Peru, whereas a tremendous biomass of anchovy is potentially available. It seems that D. gigas cannot reach the oxygen unsaturated waters very close to the coast, where the bulk of anchovy occurs. Indeed, even if jumbo squid can forage in hypoxic deep waters during the day, surface normoxic waters are then required to recover its maintenance respiration (or energy?). Oxygen concentration could thus limit the co-occurrence of both species and then preclude predator-prey interactions. Finally we propose a conceptual model illustrating the opportunistic foraging behaviour of jumbo squid impacted by ontogenetic migration and potentially constrained by oxygen saturation in surface waters. PMID:24465788

  3. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast

    PubMed Central

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G.; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-01-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of hemocyanin of the giant African millipede, Archispirostreptus gigas.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian; Fago, Angela; Hagner-Holler, Silke; Malte, Hans; Burmester, Thorsten; Weber, Roy E

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to other terrestrial arthropods, where gaseous O2 that fuels aerobic metabolism diffuses to the tissues in tracheal tubes, and most other metazoans, where O2 is transported to tissues by circulating respiratory proteins, the myriapods (millipedes and centipedes) strikingly have tracheal systems as well as circulating hemocyanin (Hc). In order to elucidate the evolutionary origin and biological significance of millipede Hc, we report the molecular structure (subunit composition and amino acid sequence) of multimeric (36-mer) Hc from the forest floor-dwelling giant African millipede Archispirostreptus gigas and its allosteric oxygen-binding properties under various physico-chemical conditions. Archispirostreptus gigas Hc consists of only a single subunit type with differential glycosylation. Phylogenic analysis revealed that millipede Hc is a sister group to centipede HcA, which supports an early divergence of distinct Hc subunits in myriapods and an ancient origin of multimeric Hcs. Archispirostreptus gigas Hc binds O2 with a high affinity and shows a strong Bohr effect. O2 binding is, moreover, modulated by Ca(2+) ions, which increase the O2 affinity of the Hc in the tense (T; deoxygenated) as well as the relaxed (R; oxygenated) states, and by (l)-lactate, which modulates Hc-O2 affinity by changing the allosteric equilibrium constant, L. Cooperativity in O2 binding at half O2 saturation (n50) is pH dependent and maximal at ~pH 7.4, and the number of interacting O2-binding sites (q) is markedly increased by binding Ca(2+). The data are discussed in the light of the mutually supplementary roles of Hc and the tracheal system for tissue O2 supply. PMID:23348936

  5. Transcriptomic Responses to Salinity Stress in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Background Low salinity is one of the main factors limiting the distribution and survival of marine species. As a euryhaline species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is considered to be tolerant to relative low salinity. The genes that regulate C. gigas responses to osmotic stress were monitored using the next-generation sequencing of whole transcriptome with samples taken from gills. By RNAseq technology, transcript catalogs of up- and down-regulated genes were generated from the oysters exposed to low and optimal salinity seawater. Methodology/Principal Findings Through Illumina sequencing, we reported 1665 up-regulated transcripts and 1815 down-regulated transcripts. A total of 45771 protein-coding contigs were identified from two groups based on sequence similarities with known proteins. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the genes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. The genes that changed expression significantly were highly represented in cellular process and regulation of biological process, intracellular and cell, binding and protein binding according to GO annotation. The results highlighted genes related to osmoregulation, signaling and interactions of osmotic stress response, anti-apoptotic reactions as well as immune response, cell adhesion and communication, cytoskeleton and cell cycle. Conclusions/Significance Through more than 1.5 million sequence reads and the expression data of the two libraries, the study provided some useful insights into signal transduction pathways in oysters and offered a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to hypoosmotic stress for oysters. In addition, the characterization of C. gigas transcriptome will not only provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms about the response to osmotic stress of the oysters, but also facilitate research into biological processes to find underlying physiological adaptations to

  6. Comprehensive Model of Jumbo Squid Dosidicus gigas Trophic Ecology in the Northern Humboldt Current System

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Ana; Ménard, Frédéric; Tafur, Ricardo; Espinoza, Pepe; Argüelles, Juan; Maehara, Víctor; Flores, Oswaldo; Simier, Monique; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas plays an important role in marine food webs both as predator and prey. We investigated the ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability of the diet composition of jumbo squid in the northern Humboldt Current system. For that purpose we applied several statistical methods to an extensive dataset of 3,618 jumbo squid non empty stomachs collected off Peru from 2004 to 2011. A total of 55 prey taxa was identified that we aggregated into eleven groups. Our results evidenced a large variability in prey composition as already observed in other systems. However, our data do not support the hypothesis that jumbo squids select the most abundant or energetic taxon in a prey assemblage, neglecting the other available prey. Indeed, multinomial model predictions showed that stomach fullness increased with the number of prey taxa, while most stomachs with low contents contained one or two prey taxa only. Our results therefore question the common hypothesis that predators seek locally dense aggregations of monospecific prey. In addition D. gigas consumes very few anchovy Engraulis ringens in Peru, whereas a tremendous biomass of anchovy is potentially available. It seems that D. gigas cannot reach the oxygen unsaturated waters very close to the coast, where the bulk of anchovy occurs. Indeed, even if jumbo squid can forage in hypoxic deep waters during the day, surface normoxic waters are then required to recover its maintenance respiration (or energy?). Oxygen concentration could thus limit the co-occurrence of both species and then preclude predator-prey interactions. Finally we propose a conceptual model illustrating the opportunistic foraging behaviour of jumbo squid impacted by ontogenetic migration and potentially constrained by oxygen saturation in surface waters. PMID:24465788

  7. Giga-z: A 100,000 OBJECT SUPERCONDUCTING SPECTROPHOTOMETER FOR LSST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Danica W.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; O'Brien, Kieran; Hirata, Chris

    2013-09-15

    We simulate the performance of a new type of instrument, a Superconducting Multi-Object Spectrograph (SuperMOS), that uses microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs, a new detector technology, feature good quantum efficiency in the UVOIR, can count individual photons with microsecond timing accuracy, and, like X-ray calorimeters, determine their energy to several percent. The performance of Giga-z, a SuperMOS designed for wide field imaging follow-up observations, is evaluated using simulated observations of the COSMOS mock catalog with an array of 100,000 R{sub 423{sub nm}} = E/{Delta}E = 30 MKID pixels. We compare our results against a simultaneous simulation of LSST observations. In 3 yr on a dedicated 4 m class telescope, Giga-z could observe Almost-Equal-To 2 billion galaxies, yielding a low-resolution spectral energy distribution spanning 350-1350 nm for each; 1000 times the number measured with any currently proposed LSST spectroscopic follow-up, at a fraction of the cost and time. Giga-z would provide redshifts for galaxies up to z Almost-Equal-To 6 with magnitudes m{sub i} {approx}< 25, with accuracy {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.03 for the whole sample, and {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.007 for a select subset. We also find catastrophic failure rates and biases that are consistently lower than for LSST. The added constraint on dark energy parameters for WL + CMB by Giga-z using the FoMSWG default model is equivalent to multiplying the LSST Fisher matrix by a factor of {alpha} = 1.27 (w{sub p} ), 1.53 (w{sub a} ), or 1.98 ({Delta}{gamma}). This is equivalent to multiplying both the LSST coverage area and the training sets by {alpha} and reducing all systematics by a factor of 1/{radical}({alpha}), advantages that are robust to even more extreme models of intrinsic alignment.

  8. Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Zeidberg, Louis D.; Robison, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial groundfish species off western North America. Recognizing the interactive effects of multiple changes in the environment is an issue of growing concern in ocean conservation and sustainability research. PMID:17646649

  9. Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zeidberg, Louis D; Robison, Bruce H

    2007-07-31

    A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial groundfish species off western North America. Recognizing the interactive effects of multiple changes in the environment is an issue of growing concern in ocean conservation and sustainability research. PMID:17646649

  10. Range expansion of moose in arctic Alaska linked to warming and increased shrub habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tape, Ken D.; Gustine, David D.; Reuss, Roger W.; Adams, Layne G.; Clark, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators.

  11. Structural basis for the fracture toughness of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas.

    PubMed

    Kamat, S; Su, X; Ballarini, R; Heuer, A H

    2000-06-29

    Natural composite materials are renowned for their mechanical strength and toughness: despite being highly mineralized, with the organic component constituting not more than a few per cent of the composite material, the fracture toughness exceeds that of single crystals of the pure mineral by two to three orders of magnitude. The judicious placement of the organic matrix, relative to the mineral phase, and the hierarchical structural architecture extending over several distinct length scales both play crucial roles in the mechanical response of natural composites to external loads. Here we use transmission electron microscopy studies and beam bending experiments to show that the resistance of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas to catastrophic fracture can be understood quantitatively by invoking two energy-dissipating mechanisms: multiple microcracking in the outer layers at low mechanical loads, and crack bridging in the shell's tougher middle layers at higher loads. Both mechanisms are intimately associated with the so-called crossed lamellar microarchitecture of the shell, which provides for 'channel' cracking in the outer layers and uncracked structural features that bridge crack surfaces, thereby significantly increasing the work of fracture, and hence the toughness, of the material. Despite a high mineral content of about 99% (by volume) of aragonite, the shell of Strombus gigas can thus be considered a 'ceramic plywood' and can guide the biomimetic design of tough, lightweight structures. PMID:10890440

  12. Structural basis for the fracture toughness of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, S.; Su, X.; Ballarini, R.; Heuer, A. H.

    2000-06-01

    Natural composite materials are renowned for their mechanical strength and toughness: despite being highly mineralized, with the organic component constituting not more than a few per cent of the composite material, the fracture toughness exceeds that of single crystals of the pure mineral by two to three orders of magnitude. The judicious placement of the organic matrix, relative to the mineral phase, and the hierarchical structural architecture extending over several distinct length scales both play crucial roles in the mechanical response of natural composites to external loads. Here we use transmission electron microscopy studies and beam bending experiments to show that the resistance of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas to catastrophic fracture can be understood quantitatively by invoking two energy-dissipating mechanisms: multiple microcracking in the outer layers at low mechanical loads, and crack bridging in the shell's tougher middle layers at higher loads. Both mechanisms are intimately associated with the so-called crossed lamellar microarchitecture of the shell, which provides for `channel' cracking in the outer layers and uncracked structural features that bridge crack surfaces, thereby significantly increasing the work of fracture, and hence the toughness, of the material. Despite a high mineral content of about 99% (by volume) of aragonite, the shell of Strombus gigas can thus be considered a `ceramic plywood', and can guide the biomimetic design of tough, lightweight structures.

  13. Occurrence of Apicomplexa-like structures in the digestive gland of Strombus gigas throughout the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Dalila Aldana; Frenkiel, Liliane; Brulé, Thierry; Montero, Jorge; Cárdenas, Erick Baqueiro

    2011-02-01

    The queen conch, Strombus gigas, is a marine resource of ecological and economical importance in the Caribbean region. Given its importance in this region, and the critical status of most populations, the reproductive biology of this species has been studied to support management decisions. It was from these studies that a generalized sporozoan infection was detected. This study describes the geographic distribution of a coccidian (Apicomplexa) parasite infecting the digestive gland of S. gigas throughout the Caribbean. The parasite was present in every location sampled. Based on histological analysis, the parasites from all locations are similar and appear to complete their life cycle within the digestive gland. The highest occurrence of the parasites was registered in samples from Puerto Rico (54 parasites per field) and Martinique (45 parasites per field). The lowest incidence was registered on the Mexican coast of Yucatan peninsula, at Alacranes and Chinchorro with 17 parasites per field. Data showed significant differences among sites (Kruskal Wallis H=106.957; p ≤ 0.05). The abundance of parasites found in the digestive ducts and in the faeces suggests the liberation of parasites to the environment. A gradual decrease in abundance was found from East to West of the Caribbean sea. PMID:20851703

  14. Evidence of a bactericidal permeability increasing protein in an invertebrate, the Crassostrea gigas Cg-BPI

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Marcelo; Gueguen, Yannick; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Romestand, Bernard; Fievet, Julie; Pugnière, Martine; Roquet, Françoise; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Vandenbulcke, Franck; Levy, Ofer; Sauné, Laure; Bulet, Philippe; Bachère, Evelyne

    2007-01-01

    A cDNA sequence with homologies to members of the LPS-binding protein and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) family was identified in the oyster Crassostrea gigas. The recombinant protein was found to bind LPS, to display bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, and to increase the permeability of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. This indicated that it is a BPI rather than an LPS-binding protein. By in situ hybridization, the expression of the C. gigas BPI (Cg-bpi) was found to be induced in hemocytes after oyster bacterial challenge and to be constitutive in various epithelia of unchallenged oysters. Thus, Cg-bpi transcripts were detected in the epithelial cells of tissues/organs in contact with the external environment (mantle, gills, digestive tract, digestive gland diverticula, and gonad follicles). Therefore, Cg-BPI, whose expression profile and biological properties are reminiscent of mammalian BPIs, may provide a first line of defense against potential bacterial invasion. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of a BPI in an invertebrate. PMID:17965238

  15. Genetics of the Steller's Sea Cow (Hydrodamalis gigas): A Study of Ancient Bone Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crerar, Lorelei D.

    Georg Wilhelm Steller was born 100 years before Darwin in 1709 and he was part of a vast exploration fifty years before Lewis and Clark explored America. Steller was important to the study of marine mammals because he was the only naturalist to see and describe the great northern sea cow ( Hydrodamalis gigas). Knowledge of an extinct population can be used to aid the conservation of a current population. Extraction of DNA from this extinct animal was performed in order to determine the population structure of the Steller's sea cow. A test was also developed that can definitively state whether or not a random bone sample came from H. gigas. This test could be used by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to examine material distributed in the North Pacific to determine whether samples are legally traded extinct Steller's sea cow or illegally traded extant marine mammal species protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).

  16. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host. PMID:27439510

  17. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas).

    PubMed

    Torres, F G; Troncoso, O P; Rivas, E R; Gomez, C G; Lopez, D

    2014-04-01

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. PMID:24582216

  18. Demography of the ecosystem engineer Crassostrea gigas, related to vertical reef accretion and reef persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walles, Brenda; Mann, Roger; Ysebaert, Tom; Troost, Karin; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-03-01

    Marine species characterized as structure building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal adaptation efforts in the face of sea level rise. Successful employment of ecosystem engineers in coastal protection largely depends on long-term persistence of their structure, which is in turn dependent on the population dynamics of the individual species. Oysters, such as the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), are recognized as ecosystem engineers with potential for use in coastal protection. Persistence of oyster reefs is strongly determined by recruitment and shell production (growth), processes facilitated by gregarious settlement on extant shell substrate. Although the Pacific oyster has been introduced world-wide, and has formed dense reefs in the receiving coastal waters, the population biology of live oysters and the quantitative mechanisms maintaining these reefs has rarely been studied, hence the aim of the present work. This study had two objectives: (1) to describe the demographics of extant C. gigas reefs, and (2) to estimate vertical reef accretion rates and carbonate production in these oyster reefs. Three long-living oyster reefs (>30 years old), which have not been exploited since their first occurrence, were examined in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands. A positive reef accretion rate (7.0-16.9 mm year-1 shell material) was observed, consistent with self-maintenance and persistent structure. We provide a framework to predict reef accretion and population persistence under varying recruitment, growth and mortality scenarios.

  19. Behavioral ecology of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in relation to oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Field, John C.; Markaida, Unai; Gilly, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Habitat utilization, behavior and food habits of the jumbo or Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, were compared between an area recently inhabited in the northern California Current System (CCS) and a historically established area of residence in the Gulf of California (GOC). Low dissolved oxygen concentrations at midwater depths define the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), an important environmental feature in both areas. We analyzed vertical diving behavior and diet of D. gigas and hydrographic properties of the water column to ascertain the extent to which squid utilized the OMZ in the two areas. The upper boundary of the OMZ has been shoaling in recent decades in the CCS, and this phenomenon has been proposed to vertically compress the pelagic environment inhabited by aerobic predators. A shoaling OMZ will also bring mesopelagic communities into a depth range with more illumination during daytime, making these organisms more vulnerable to predation by visual predators (i.e. jumbo squid). Because the OMZ in the GOC is considerably shallower than in the CCS, our study provides insight into the behavioral plasticity of jumbo squid and how they may respond to a shoaling OMZ in the CCS. We propose that shoaling OMZs are likely to be favorable to jumbo squid and could be a key indirect factor behind the recent range expansion of this highly migratory predator.

  20. The Rehbinder effect in iron during giga-cycle fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikov, M. V.; Naimark, O. B.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the adsorptive strength reduction effect (the Rehbinder effect) on the fatigue life of pure iron under the giga-cycle loading regime was investigated. Specimens were loaded by an ultrasonic testing machine with a frequency of 20 kHz in air and in contact with eutectic alloy of gallium with tin and indium. A significant (by several orders of magnitude) worsening of the life-time of iron in contact with a molten metal as compared with tests in air was established. The liquid metal penetrates into the material to a depth of 200 μm to the center of a fatigue crack. The mechanism of the fatigue crack initiation in the giga-cycle regime of loading in contact with a surfactant is differing: the crack is formed on the surface of the specimen rather than within it as is the case for air. Based on the electron and optical microscopy data for the fracture surface, it can be concluded that exactly the change in the crack initiation mechanism reduces the fatigue life of iron in contact with a liquid metal because the initiated crack propagates regardless of the surfactant.

  1. Nanoemitter of giga- and terahertz ranges based on a carbon peapod: Numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Kolesnikova, A. S.; Nefedov, I. S.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2014-05-01

    A mathematical model of a nanoemitter for the giga- and terahertz ranges based on a carbon nanopeapod formed by a (10, 10) nanotube with encapsulated C60 fullerenes has been proposed. The fundamental possibility of the generation of giga- and terahertz radiation by a charged free fullerene oscillating in the potential well created by the atomic framework of the nanotube and several fullerenes polymerized with its walls and with each other has been proven. The radiation frequency is controlled by means of an external electric field. The dependence of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations on the charge of C60 and on the external field strength has been revealed by the molecular dynamics method. If the fullerene has a charge of +1 e or +2 e, it emits electromagnetic waves only in the gigahertz range in strong external fields. At the same time, the physical conditions under which the frequency of radiation can be 0.36 GHz have been established: the charge of the fullerene must be +3 e, the tube should be oriented strictly along the external field lines, and the strength should be 0.1 V/nm.

  2. The Rehbinder effect in iron during giga-cycle fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikov, M. V. Naimark, O. B.

    2015-10-27

    The influence of the adsorptive strength reduction effect (the Rehbinder effect) on the fatigue life of pure iron under the giga-cycle loading regime was investigated. Specimens were loaded by an ultrasonic testing machine with a frequency of 20 kHz in air and in contact with eutectic alloy of gallium with tin and indium. A significant (by several orders of magnitude) worsening of the life-time of iron in contact with a molten metal as compared with tests in air was established. The liquid metal penetrates into the material to a depth of 200 μm to the center of a fatigue crack. The mechanism of the fatigue crack initiation in the giga-cycle regime of loading in contact with a surfactant is differing: the crack is formed on the surface of the specimen rather than within it as is the case for air. Based on the electron and optical microscopy data for the fracture surface, it can be concluded that exactly the change in the crack initiation mechanism reduces the fatigue life of iron in contact with a liquid metal because the initiated crack propagates regardless of the surfactant.

  3. Biodiversity research in the “big data” era: GigaScience and Pensoft work together to publish the most data-rich species description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With the publication of the first eukaryotic species description, combining transcriptomic, DNA barcoding, and micro-CT imaging data, GigaScience and Pensoft demonstrate how classical taxonomic description of a new species can be enhanced by applying new generation molecular methods, and novel computing and imaging technologies. This 'holistic’ approach in taxonomic description of a new species of cave-dwelling centipede is published in the Biodiversity Data Journal (BDJ), with coordinated data release in the GigaScience GigaDB database. PMID:24229463

  4. Biodiversity research in the "big data" era: GigaScience and Pensoft work together to publish the most data-rich species description.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Scott C; Hunter, Chris I; Smith, Vincent; Stoev, Pavel; Penev, Lyubomir

    2013-01-01

    With the publication of the first eukaryotic species description, combining transcriptomic, DNA barcoding, and micro-CT imaging data, GigaScience and Pensoft demonstrate how classical taxonomic description of a new species can be enhanced by applying new generation molecular methods, and novel computing and imaging technologies. This 'holistic' approach in taxonomic description of a new species of cave-dwelling centipede is published in the Biodiversity Data Journal (BDJ), with coordinated data release in the GigaScience GigaDB database. PMID:24229463

  5. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U. Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility. PMID:27034737

  6. Use of laboratory assays to predict subsequent growth and survival of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) families planted in coastal waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding programs for improving Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) stocks are expensive, labor-intensive, and rely on lengthy field trials that are subject to stochastic outbreaks of Summer Mortality Syndrome. Laboratory assays that identify and eliminate poor-performing families prior to...

  7. Growth and survival of juvenile queen conch, Strombus gigas fed artificial diets containing varying levels of digestible protein and energy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture methods for queen conch, Strombus gigas, have been established for several decades. However, there is a need to improve husbandry techniques for the growout of juveniles. The purpose of this study was to determine growth and survival of juvenile queen conch fed artificial diets with incr...

  8. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  9. Changes in molecular genetic variation at ALFP loci associated with naturalization and domestication of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important commercial species in the US Pacific Northwest with a history of propagation first using wild-caught seed imported directly from the Miyagi region of northern Japan (1920s – 1970s) followed by an extended period of seed collection from a few sel...

  10. Genomic Analysis of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Reveals Possible Conservation of Vertebrate Sex Determination in a Mollusc

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xu, Fei; Guo, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of sex in animal kingdom, we have only limited understanding of how sex is determined and evolved in many taxa. The mollusc Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exhibits complex modes of sexual reproduction that consists of protandric dioecy, sex change, and occasional hermaphroditism. This complex system is controlled by both environmental and genetic factors through unknown molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genes related to sex-determining pathways in C. gigas through transcriptome sequencing and analysis of female and male gonads. Our analysis identified or confirmed novel homologs in the oyster of key sex-determining genes (SoxH or Sry-like and FoxL2) that were thought to be vertebrate-specific. Their expression profile in C. gigas is consistent with conserved roles in sex determination, under a proposed model where a novel testis-determining CgSoxH may serve as a primary regulator, directly or indirectly interacting with a testis-promoting CgDsx and an ovary-promoting CgFoxL2. Our findings plus previous results suggest that key vertebrate sex-determining genes such as Sry and FoxL2 may not be inventions of vertebrates. The presence of such genes in a mollusc with expression profiles consistent with expected roles in sex determination suggest that sex determination may be deeply conserved in animals, despite rapid evolution of the regulatory pathways that in C. gigas may involve both genetic and environmental factors. PMID:25213692

  11. Transcriptome profiling of selectively bred Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas families that differ in tolerance of heat shock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sessile inhabitants of marine intertidal environments commonly face heat stress, an important component of summer mortality syndrome in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Marker-aided selection programs would be useful for developing oyster strains that resist summer mortality; however, there i...

  12. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  13. Transcriptome response of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) to infection with Vibrio tubiashii using cDNA AFLP differential display

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used qualitative complementary DNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) differential display analysis and real-time, quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to identify genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas whose transcription either changes in response to exposure to a pathogenic bacter...

  14. Colonisation of the Non-Indigenous Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Determined by Predation, Size and Initial Settlement Densities

    PubMed Central

    Hedge, Luke H.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2014-01-01

    Survival of incipient non-indigenous populations is dramatically altered by early predation on new colonisers. These effects can be influenced by morphological traits, such as coloniser size and density. The Australian non-native Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas is generally more fecund and faster growing compared to the native Saccostrea glomerata found in the same habitat. It is therefore important to quantify how the two species differ in survival across coloniser density and predation gradients. This information could become pertinent to the management of wild and aquaculture populations of the non-native C. gigas. Using a field-based factorial experiment we model the survival of incipient populations of both the native S. glomerata and the non-indigenous C. gigas as a function of coloniser density, predator reduction and individual size. Unexpectedly, survival of the non-indigenous C. gigas increased compared to S. glomerata when individuals were larger. The proportional survival of newly colonised oyster populations also increased with larger initial populations, regardless of species identity. Further, predator reduction resulted in increased survival of both oyster species, irrespective of coloniser size or initial density. Here we quantitatively demonstrate the effects of recruit density and size on enhancing the survivability of incipient oyster populations. PMID:24663029

  15. GigaPan Technology to Enhance In-Class and In-Field Learning in Community College Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, J. I.; Bentley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Community college students account for over 40% of all undergraduates in the United States as well as the majority of minority and non-traditional students attending undergraduate courses. Implementing innovative, cost effective, and formative pedagogies to the diverse backgrounds of students that typically enroll at a community is often a challenge. Interactive pedagogies in geology pose a unique challenge considering that students gain the most long-term knowledge when topics covered in a course are exposed to them in outdoor settings where they are allowed to explore and make connections. The ability to expose students to real world examples is challenging to many community college faculty considering that that many; lack funds or means for transportation of students, do not have administrative support on such endeavors, teach evening or night classes, or have a high percentage of students who are physically limited or have obligations to work and family. A joint collaborative between El Paso Community College (EPCC) and Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has explored the usage of GigaPan technology to create multi-layered online material to minimize these issues faced by many community college faculty and students. The primary layer of the online material is GigaPans of local geological sites that highlight large-scale structures in the El Paso, Texas region that are commonly used in local field trips and lab book material. The second layer is of Macro-GigaPans of hand samples of key outcrops from the primarily GigaPans which facilitate student learning, exploration, and ability to make connections by exploring smaller scale features of the primary layer. A third layer of online material, GigaPans of thin sections of hand samples (from secondary layers), and curriculum based on the GigaPans was then created to assist students in evaluating proposed hypotheses on the primary layers' geological origin. GigaPan cirriculum was utilized in introductory

  16. Larval and Post-Larval Stages of Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Are Resistant to Elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    R, Dineshram; Dennis, Choi K. S.; Adela, Li J.; Yu, Ziniu; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-01-01

    The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3–0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days) survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days) exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images) or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios). Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century. PMID:23724027

  17. Electronic structure and optical properties of layered ternary transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    The electronic structure and optical properties of Ti3AC 2 (A=Al, Si, Ge), Ti2AC (A=Al, Ga, In; Si, Ge, Sn; P, As; S), Ti2AlN, M2AlC (M=V, Nb, Cr) and Tan+1AlC n (n=1˜4) have been studied using first--principles orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals (OLCAO) method. These layered ternary transition--metal carbides and nitrides are also commonly referred to as "MAX phases". Trends were observed for the calculated density of states (DOS) at Fermi--level, with respect to elemental variations and number of M and X layers. A local minimum of DOS(Ef) was found for Ti3AlC2, Ti2InC and Cr2AlC, predicting relatively high intrinsic structural stability. While a local maximum or an incline was discovered for Ti3GeC2, Ti2GeC, Ti2SnC, Ti 2PC, Nb2AlC, Ta2AlC, Ta4AlC3 and Ta5AlC4, indicating their lower intrinsic structural stability. Inter-band optical conductivities showed anisotropy, but not considerable. The reflectance and colors of the MAX phase compounds were also obtained.

  18. Association analysis of PRNP gene region with chronic wasting disease in Rocky Mountain elk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of cervids including whitetail (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), and moose (Alces alces). A leucine variant at position 132 (132L) in...

  19. Sense of Belonging and First-Year Academic Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Steve; Zhou, Mingming; Gervan, Ted; Wiebe, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a broad range of factors that affect the sense of belonging of undergraduate students taking a first-year academic literacy course (ALC) at a multicultural, multilingual university in Vancouver, Canada. Students who fail to meet the university's language and literacy requirements are required to pass ALC before they can…

  20. Transcription and protein synthesis inhibitors influence long-term effects of acetyl-l-carnitine on non-associative learning in the leech.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna; Scuri, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is the principal acetyl ester of L-carnitine and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism. ALC affects several targets in the nervous system. Along this line of investigation, we analyzed the long-term effects of ALC on elementary nonassociative learning in the swimming induction model of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, in which nociceptive stimulation of the dorsal skin produces a more rapid swim response to a test stimulus (sensitization). In this simplified model a single ALC administration blocked the sensitizing effects of nociceptive stimulation in swim induction showing increasingly long lasting effects. Herein, we have analyzed the long-term effects of ALC on sensitization and dishabituation. Leeches were treated with inhibitors of either transcription or protein synthesis 30 min after the administration of ALC and, subsequently, subjected to noxious stimuli: the animals exhibited a sensitized swimming response 6 days after ALC treatment but not after 2 hours indicating that the long-term suppressive effects of ALC on sensitization/dishabituation needed mRNA and protein synthesis. PMID:25463319

  1. Exploring Dimensions of Social Inclusion among Alternative Learning Centres in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Dawn X.; Barnes, Rachelle Redmond

    2016-01-01

    Increasing disparities in out-of-school suspension and dropout rates have led a number of school districts to develop alternative models of education to include alternative learning centres (ALCs). Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this study explores dimensions of social inclusion among ALCs, located in the southeastern region of the…

  2. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system. PMID:27100509

  3. [Character identification of 12 kinds of pilose antler medicinal materials].

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Guo, Y; Ren, W

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, commercial medicinal materials of 12 kinds of pilose antler, Cervus nippon, C. elaphus, C. albirostris, C. unicolor, C. eldihainanus, C. timorensis C. porinus, Dama dama, Rangifer farandus, Alces alces, Elaphurus davidianus, Capreolus capreolus were compared and identified. A key and simple character illustration were listed. PMID:12571919

  4. Aminoclay-lipid hybrid composite as a novel drug carrier of fenofibrate for the enhancement of drug release and oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Shao, Yating; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to prepare the aminoclay-lipid hybrid composite to enhance the drug release and improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. Antisolvent precipitation coupled with an immediate freeze-drying method was adopted to incorporate fenofibrate into aminoclay-lipid hybrid composite (ALC). The optimal composition of the ALC formulation was determined as the ratios of aminoclay to krill oil of 3:1 (w/w), krill oil to fenofibrate of 2:1 (w/w), and antisolvent to solvent of 6:4 (v/v). The morphological characteristics of ALC formulation were determined using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray powder diffraction, which indicated microcrystalline state of fenofibrate in ALC formulation. The ALC formulation achieved almost complete dissolution within 30 minutes, whereas the untreated powder and physical mixture exhibited less than 15% drug release. Furthermore, ALC formulation effectively increased the peak plasma concentration (C max) and area under the curve (AUC) of fenofibric acid (an active metabolite) in rats by approximately 13- and seven-fold, respectively. Furthermore, ALC formulation exhibited much lower moisture sorption behavior than the lyophilized formulation using sucrose as a cryoprotectant. Taken together, the present findings suggest that ALC formulation is promising for improving the oral absorption of poorly soluble fenofibrate. PMID:27042061

  5. Osteoporotic skull lesions in moose at Isle Royale National Park.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, M; Peterson, R O

    1996-01-01

    Osteoporotic lesions were evaluated in the skulls of moose (Alces alces) collected in Isle Royale National Park, Michigan (USA), from 1958 to 1994. Circular lesions which penetrated the outer table of the skull were distributed over the frontal and nasal bones asymmetrically in both sexes. About 32% of skulls recovered had some porotic lesions with slightly greater prevalence among males. PMID:8627919

  6. MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER IN FREE-RANGING CERVIDS ASSOCIATED WITH OVHV-2 AND CPHV-2 DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathological lesions were summarized in 18 free-ranging cervids (15 moose (Alces alces), two roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), and one red deer (Cervus elaphus)) diagnosed with malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) after examination at the National Veterinary Institute, Oslo 1982-2005. Eye lesions (conjunct...

  7. Aminoclay–lipid hybrid composite as a novel drug carrier of fenofibrate for the enhancement of drug release and oral absorption

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Shao, Yating; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to prepare the aminoclay–lipid hybrid composite to enhance the drug release and improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. Antisolvent precipitation coupled with an immediate freeze-drying method was adopted to incorporate fenofibrate into aminoclay–lipid hybrid composite (ALC). The optimal composition of the ALC formulation was determined as the ratios of aminoclay to krill oil of 3:1 (w/w), krill oil to fenofibrate of 2:1 (w/w), and antisolvent to solvent of 6:4 (v/v). The morphological characteristics of ALC formulation were determined using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray powder diffraction, which indicated microcrystalline state of fenofibrate in ALC formulation. The ALC formulation achieved almost complete dissolution within 30 minutes, whereas the untreated powder and physical mixture exhibited less than 15% drug release. Furthermore, ALC formulation effectively increased the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) of fenofibric acid (an active metabolite) in rats by approximately 13- and seven-fold, respectively. Furthermore, ALC formulation exhibited much lower moisture sorption behavior than the lyophilized formulation using sucrose as a cryoprotectant. Taken together, the present findings suggest that ALC formulation is promising for improving the oral absorption of poorly soluble fenofibrate. PMID:27042061

  8. Motivation, Test Results, Gender Differences, and Foreign Languages: How Do They Connect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammit, Susan A.

    The testing of 32,000 students in Australia and New Zealand participating in The Australian Language Certificates (ALC) provided the opportunity to examine students' attitude and learning preferences when studying a language other than English. The ALC offered the opportunity to learn seven languages in a Languages Other Than English (LOTE)…

  9. Seroprevalence, isolation, first genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii, and possible congenital transmission in wild moose from Minnesota, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infections are widespread in white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but little is known of its prevalence in other cervids in the USA. Moose (Alces alces) is a popular large game animal, hunted for its meat and trophy antlers. Here, we report seroprevalence, isolation and genet...

  10. Prognostic value of lymphocyte/monocyte ratio in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: correlation with International Prognostic Score and tumor associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jakovic, Ljubomir R; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Andjelic, Bosko M; Bogdanovic, Andrija D; Perunicic Jovanovic, Maja D; Babic, Dragan D; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    We studied the prognostic significance of the absolute lymphocyte/monocyte count ratio (ALC/AMC), its contribution to the prognostic value of the International Prognostic Score (IPS), and evaluated if ALC/AMC could serve as a proxy for the frequency of CD68 + tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in 101 patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified best cut-off values of 2.0 for ALC/AMC and 25% for CD68 + TAM. Patients with ALC/AMC < 2, IPS > 2 and > 25% CD68 + TAM had an inferior overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). Spearman's test also uncovered a significant correlation between the ALC/AMC and TAM. Multivariate analysis identified ALC/AMC < 2, IPS > 2 and > 25% CD68 + TAM as poor prognostic factors of OS and EFS. After evaluating ALC/AMC and IPS, we stratified patients into three progressively-worse-outcome groups (low-risk: 0 risk factors; intermediate: 1 risk factor; high: 2 risk factors). Our study encourages the combination of ALC/AMC with IPS, for refining risk prediction in advanced HL patients. PMID:26727349

  11. Acetyl-L-Carnitine as an Adjunctive Therapy in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasi, Seyed-Hesameddin; Heidari, Shahram; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Tabrizi, Mina; Ghaleiha, Ali; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether a previous observed Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) treatment effect could be repeated in an ALC adjunctive therapy treatment trial of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. This was a six-week, randomized clinical trial undertaken in an outpatient child and adolescent…

  12. Sufentanil citrate immobilization of Alaskan moose calves.

    PubMed

    Kreeger, Terry J; Kellie, Kalin A

    2012-10-01

    Free-ranging Alaskan moose calves (Alces alces gigas) were immobilized with 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil (S; n=16), 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil plus 0.27 mg/kg xylazine (SX; n=11), or 0.007 mg/kg carfentanil plus 0.36 mg/kg xylazine (CX; n=13). Immobilants were antagonized with 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone (S) or 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone plus 2.4 mg/kg tolazoline (SX, CX). There were no differences in induction (P ≥ 0.29) or processing (P ≥ 0.44) times between groups. Moose given either S or SX had significantly shorter recovery times than moose given CX (P=0.001) and recovery times from S were shorter than from SX (P=0.02). Oxygen saturation values for all groups averaged 85 ± 8%, but were significantly higher (P=0.048) for CX (89 ± 7%) than for S (82 ± 8%). Based on these data, sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg or sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg plus xylazine at 0.25 mg/kg could provide effective remote immobilization for Alaskan moose calves and could be substituted for carfentanil or thiafentanil should the need arise. PMID:23060515

  13. Moose milk and hair element levels and relationships.

    PubMed

    Franzmann, A W; Flynn, A; Arneson, P D

    1976-04-01

    Milk was collected from 21 Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) at the Kenai Moose Research Center (MRC), Soldotna, Alaska nad analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy for Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn. Hair samples were collected from 100 moose at the MRC to correspond with the lactation period and serve as a metabolic indicator of mineral elements stored in tissue. Published analyses of bovine milk were compared to moose milk; Al, Fe, Se and Zn were higher in moose milk by factors of 1.6 to 290. Elements potentially influenced by nutrition and those determined genetically were also considered. Elements in moose milk and hair values were compared, since mineral element levels in hair potentially reflect the availability and intake of these elements. Calcium and Mg were the only values in hair lower than the values in milk (factors of 4.2 and 1.5 respectively). Moose, as well as domestic cattle, apparently are subjected to lactation stress by the genetically determined levels of Ca and Mg in milk. PMID:933310

  14. The categorization and mutual modulation of expanded MyD88s in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Mengqiang; Zhang, Huan; Li, Meijia; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-07-01

    MyD88 serves as a critical cytosolic adaptor mediating activation of NF-κB in innate immunity. It has been found that there is a considerable expansion of MyD88 in Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, four typical MyD88 genes in Crassostrea gigas (CgMyD88-A to CgMyD88-D) were successfully cloned and their potential functions were investigated together with another two known ones (CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2). Multiple alignments revealed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C remained the conserved DD and TIR domains, while there was a significant variation of E51Q in the DD of CgMyD88-A, and some variations in both DD and TIR domains of CgMyD88-D, respectively. Both truncated CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 lacked Box II in their only TIR domains. Expression pattern analysis showed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C genes possessed higher expression in normal tissues, compared with the other four. When oysters were under bacteria challenge, CgMyD88-B, CgMyD88-C, CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 were firstly induced, while CgMyD88-A and CgMyD88-D were suppressed. Dual luciferase reporter assays showed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C could promote the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, while the other four CgMyD88 genes failed or even suppressed the activities of CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C on the activation of NF-κB signaling. It was deduced that after oysters were challenged by bacteria, CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C could rapidly and efficiently activate NF-κB signaling pathway to elicit anti-pathogen responses before suppressor CgMyD88 genes (CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2) exceeding their expression level. These results suggested that there was mutual modulation of expanded CgMyD88 genes on activating NF-κB signaling pathway in oyster C. gigas. PMID:27074442

  15. Calcium mobilisation following shell damage in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, J K; Ramesh, K; Melzner, F; Sundh, H; Sundell, K

    2016-06-01

    Shell growth of oysters requires calcium uptake from the environment and transport to the area of shell formation. A shell regeneration assay in combination with radiolabelled calcium was used to investigate uptake and distribution of calcium to different tissues and hemolymph fractions in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia, Ostreoida). Oysters were notched at the shell margin and subsequently sampled for hemolymph and grading of shell regeneration during a two week experimental period. Half of the oysters were additionally exposed to (45)Ca and sampled for hemolymph and tissues. Total plasma calcium concentrations increased in notched oysters compared to controls on 1, 2 and 7days after notching. A decrease in plasma calcium levels was apparent on day 4, for both total and ionic calcium. The shell regeneration assay in the notched oysters resulted in a visible deposition of CaCO3 onto the regenerate from day 7 onwards. This was coinciding with an increased uptake of total calcium on days 11 and 14 as well as free, i.e. ionic and ligand-bound calcium, on day 14. At day 1, notching also increased calcium uptake into the mantle tissues, in areas above the notch and near the hinge. During the experiment, both the total hemocyte count and the number of granulocytes increased in notched compared to control oysters. The present study suggests that induced shell damage results in a dynamic regulation of the calcium uptake from the environment and the distribution of calcium within the body, starting directly after notching. Increases in both total calcium concentrations and uptake rates coincided with the visible depositions of CaCO3 on the regenerate shell. C. gigas was found to transport calcium mainly in the ionic form in the hemolymph, with only minor parts being bound to proteins or smaller ligands. Hemolymph measurement also revealed that C. gigas is able to regulate the extracellular concentrations of calcium and potassium. The changes in plasma calcium

  16. Biases in determining the diet of jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (D' Orbigny 1835) (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) off southern-central Chile (34°S-40°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Christian M.; Arancibia, Hugo; Cubillos, Luis A.

    2008-12-01

    The diet of jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) off southern-central Chile is described to examine potential biases in the determination of their main prey. Specimens were collected from catches using different fishing gear (jigging, trawl and purse-seine), from July 2003 to January 2004, and from December 2005 to October 2006. The stomach contents were analyzed in terms of frequency of occurrence, number, and weight of prey items and the diet composition was analyzed using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. In the industrial purse-seine fleet for jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyi), the dominant prey of D. gigas was T. murphyi. In the industrial mid-trawl fishery for Patagonian grenadier ( Macruronus magellanicus), the dominant species in the diet of D. gigas was M. magellanicus. Similarly, Chilean hake ( Merluccius gayi) was the main prey in the diet of D. gigas obtained in the industrial trawl fishery for Chilean hake; and, in both artisanal fisheries (purse-seine for small pelagics and jigging), small pelagic fish and D. gigas were the main prey in the stomach contents of D. gigas. Cannibalism in D. gigas varied between different fleets and probably is related to stress behavior during fishing. The Detrended Correspondence Analysis ordination showed that the main prey in the diet of D. gigas is associated with the target species of the respective fishery. Consequently, biases are associated with fishing gear, leading to an overestimate in the occurrence of the target species in the diet. We recommend analyzing samples from jigging taken at the same time and place where the trawl and purse-seine fleets are operating to avoid this problem, and the application of new tools like stable isotope, heavy metal, and fatty acid signature analyses.

  17. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit

    PubMed Central

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C.; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Design Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. Setting St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Participants One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Main outcome measures Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients’ hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Results Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients’ ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the

  18. Copper, zinc and lead bioaccumulation in marine snail, Strombus gigas, from Guacanayabo Gulf, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Díaz Rizo, O; Olivares Reumont, S; Viguri Fuente, J; Díaz Arado, O; López Pino, N; D'Alessandro Rodríguez, K; Arado López, J O; Gelen Rudnikas, A; Arencibia Carballo, G

    2010-09-01

    Levels of copper, zinc and lead were determined in sediments and edible muscle of marine snail Strombus gigas collected from Guacanayabo Gulf, Cuba. The concentration range of each metal in marine snail muscle on mg kg(-1) wet weight varied as follows: Cu = 6.4-32.6, Zn = 20.4-31.1 and Pb = 0.2-2.3; and in corresponding sediments (on mg kg(-1) dry weight) as: Cu = 157-186, Zn = 56-94 and Pb = 20-37. The average biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) obtained for studied metals are less than unity in all cases, indicating that only a little fraction of metal content in the sediments is bioavailable, independently of their possible enrichments in the sediments. The concentrations of copper and lead in some of the marine snails are above typical public health recommended limits. PMID:20676604

  19. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Simon; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Vitorino, Miguel; Costa, Luca; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a Force Feedback Microscope, the gap between the nano-tip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G''(kg/sec) together with the static force. This is made possible thanks to feedback force which cancels in real time the force acting on the tip. It avoids the mechanical instabilities due to the nucleation of the nanobridge. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus

  20. Gravity and light effects on the circadian clock of a desert beetle, Trigonoscelis gigas.

    PubMed

    Hoban-Higgins, T M; Alpatov, A M; Wassmer, G T; Rietveld, W J; Fuller, C A

    2003-07-01

    Circadian function is affected by exposure to altered ambient force environments. Under non-earth gravitational fields, both basic features of circadian rhythms and the expression of the clock responsible for these rhythms are altered. We examined the activity rhythm of the tenebrionid beetle, Trigonoscelis gigas, in conditions of microgravity (microG; spaceflight), earth's gravity (1 G) and 2 G (centrifugation). Data were recorded under a light-dark cycle (LD), constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD). Free-running period (tau) was significantly affected by both the gravitational field and ambient light intensity. In DD, tau was longer under 2 G than under either 1 G or microG. In addition, tauLL was significantly different from tauDD under microG and 1 G, but not under 2 G. PMID:12837319

  1. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-15

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. {sup 1}H, {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, and {sup 71}Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. An electron microscopy study of the microstructure and microarchitecture of the Strombus gigas shell

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, P.C.; Laraia, V.J. ); Heuer, A.H. ); Aindow, M. )

    1989-11-01

    A scanning and transmission electron microscopy study is presented of the microstructure of the Strombus gigas shell. The hierarchical nature of this crossed-lamellar structure and the defect content of the mineral component are described. The mineral component consists of small single crystal grains of aragonite, the metastable orthorhombic polymorph of CaCO{sub 3}. The habit and morphology of the grains discussed here have not been determined previously. The observed habit and defect structure suggest that the organic matrix exerts a high degree of control over the crystal growth of the mineral phase and is responsible for the long range order in the microarhitecture. Electron beam heating of the mineral component leads to certain phase changes and these are discussed. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Gravity and light effects on the circadian clock of a desert beetle, Trigonoscelis gigas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Alpatov, A. M.; Wassmer, G. T.; Rietveld, W. J.; Fuller, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    Circadian function is affected by exposure to altered ambient force environments. Under non-earth gravitational fields, both basic features of circadian rhythms and the expression of the clock responsible for these rhythms are altered. We examined the activity rhythm of the tenebrionid beetle, Trigonoscelis gigas, in conditions of microgravity (microG; spaceflight), earth's gravity (1 G) and 2 G (centrifugation). Data were recorded under a light-dark cycle (LD), constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD). Free-running period (tau) was significantly affected by both the gravitational field and ambient light intensity. In DD, tau was longer under 2 G than under either 1 G or microG. In addition, tauLL was significantly different from tauDD under microG and 1 G, but not under 2 G.

  4. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  5. [Determination of proximal chemical composition of squid (dosidicus gigas) and development of gel products].

    PubMed

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; Pérez, L M; Paredes, M P

    1999-06-01

    The good nutritional properties of meat from big squid (Dosidicus gigas) living on the Chilean coast, was determined through its proximal composition 70 cal/100 g fresh meat; 82.23 +/- 0.98% moisture; 15.32 +/- 0.93% protein; 1.31 +/- 0.12% ashes; 0.87 +/- 0.18% fat and 0.27% NNE (non-nitrogen extract). The big squid meat was used to develop a gel product which contained NaCl and TPP. It was necessary to use additives for gel preparation, such as carragenin or alginate or egg albumin, due to the lack of gelation properties of squid meat. Formulations containing egg albumin showed the highest gel force measured by penetration as compared to those that contained carragenin or alginate. PMID:10488395

  6. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Realized detection and capture probabilities for giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) using modified floating aquatic funnel traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-01-01

    Detection and capture probabilities for giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) are very low, and successfully evaluating the effects of variables or experimental treatments on giant gartersnake populations will require greater detection and capture probabilities than those that had been achieved with standard trap designs. Previous research identified important trap modifications that can increase the probability of snakes entering traps and help prevent the escape of captured snakes. The purpose of this study was to quantify detection and capture probabilities obtained using the most successful modification to commercially available traps to date (2015), and examine the ability of realized detection and capture probabilities to achieve benchmark levels of precision in occupancy and capture-mark-recapture studies.

  8. Temporal and maternal effects on reproductive ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    We used mixed-effects models to examine relationships of reproductive characteristics of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) to improve population modeling and conservation planning for this species. Neonates from larger litters had lower mass, and mass of neonates also was affected by random variation among mothers. Length of mother did not affect relative mass of litters; however, our data suggest that longer mothers expended less reproductive effort per offspring than shorter mothers. We detected random variation in length of neonates among mothers, but these lengths were not related to length of mother or size of litter. Mean size of litter varied among years, but little evidence existed for a relationship between size of litter or mass of litter and length of mother. Sex ratios of neonates did not differ from 1:1.

  9. Characterization of the mantle transcriptome in bivalves: Pecten maximus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Yarra, Tejaswi; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2016-06-01

    The calcareous shells secreted by bivalve molluscs display diverse and species specific structural compositions, which indicates possible divergent biomineralization processes. Thus, studying multiple mollusc species will provide a more comprehensive understanding of shell formation. Here, the transcriptomes of the mantle tissues responsible for shell deposition were characterized in three commercially relevant bivalve species. Using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics tools, de novo transcriptome assemblies of mantle tissues were generated for the mussel Mytilus edulis, the oyster Crassostrea gigas and the scallop Pecten maximus. These transcriptomes were annotated, and contigs with similarity to proteins known to have shell formation roles in other species were identified. Comparison of the shell formation specific proteins in the three bivalves indicates the possibility of species specific shell proteins. PMID:27160853

  10. Bacteriophage as models for virus removal from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) during re-laying.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, T. J.; Martin, K.

    1993-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of using naturally-occurring bacteriophages to assess the impact of re-laying on levels of viral contamination in Crassostrea gigas, the Pacific oyster. Two phages were chosen. One, male-specific (F+), was enumerated using Salmonella typhimurium. The other, a somatic phage, was detected using an, as yet, uncharacterized Escherichia coli. Investigations, using a variety of re-laying sites, demonstrated that numbers of F+ phage in oyster tissue declined more rapidly than those of somatic phage. For example, in oysters placed in commercially-used sea water ponds, F+ phage reached undetectable levels within 2-3 weeks, whereas somatic phage could still be detected 5 weeks after re-laying. The studies suggest that F+ phage may not be a suitable indicator for virus removal and that somatic phage may be better suited to this role. PMID:8405159

  11. A single bio-energetics growth and reproduction model for the oyster Crassostrea gigas in six Atlantic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Bourlès, Yves; Maurer, Danièle; Robert, Stéphane; Mazurié, Joseph; Gangnery, Aline; Goulletquer, Philippe; Pouvreau, Stéphane

    2011-11-01

    Many studies based on bioenergetics growth models have investigated the effects of environmental factors on oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) growth and physiology. However, most of these models are site-specific and cannot be applied to other culture sites without the re-estimation of parameters or re-formulation of some processes. We aimed to develop a generic growth model suitable for application in contrasting environments, with a constant set of parameters. We tested the oyster-DEB model (Bourlès et al. 2009) for the stimulation of C. gigas growth in different cohorts (spats and adults) at major shellfish culture sites in France, in several years: Arcachon (1993-1994); Marennes-Oléron (2007); Quiberon (1999, 2000, 2001); Brest Harbour (2008); Mont-Saint-Michel Bay (2003); Baie-des-Veys (2002). These different ecosystems offer a wide range of values for the two forcing variables of the model: water temperature (range: 6-24 °C) and phytoplankton concentration (annual average: 110-700 × 10 3 cell L -1). The validation data (dry flesh mass of C. gigas) were obtained from various growth surveys carried out by IFREMER. The oyster-DEB model simulated the oyster growth dynamics of both spat and adult stages of C. gigas accurately over time at the various culture sites. The model captures: i) the active spring growth; ii) the timing and amplitude of spawning events; and iii) the lean periods ( i.e. loss of dry flesh mass) in autumn and winter. The half-saturation coefficient Xk is the only model parameter that varied between sites and years. This environment-specific coefficient reflects variability in the food of the oysters: quantitative and qualitative effects of the inorganic material and of the phytoplankton species on the feeding response of C. gigas. With a single set of parameters (other than for Xk), this is thus the first bio-energetic growth model for C. gigas robust enough and of a sufficiently generic nature for the accurate simulation of oyster growth in

  12. Protective Effect of Anthocyanin from Lonicera Caerulea var. Edulis on Radiation-Induced Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitian; Wang, Zhenyu; Ma, Fengming; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Cuilin; Yao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC), was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole body 60Coγ radiation. The spleen index, thymus index, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and glutathione (GSH) content in liver tissue were measured. Compared with the radiation control group, the levels of MDA in all ALC treated groups decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Moreover, the GSH content, activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver tissue were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in all ALC groups. These results demonstrate that ALC may be a potential radioprotector, and a further study of the molecular mechanism is needed for further application. PMID:23109882

  13. Protective effect of anthocyanin from Lonicera Caerulea var. Edulis on radiation-induced damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitian; Wang, Zhenyu; Ma, Fengming; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Cuilin; Yao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC), was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole body (60)Coγ radiation. The spleen index, thymus index, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and glutathione (GSH) content in liver tissue were measured. Compared with the radiation control group, the levels of MDA in all ALC treated groups decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Moreover, the GSH content, activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver tissue were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in all ALC groups. These results demonstrate that ALC may be a potential radioprotector, and a further study of the molecular mechanism is needed for further application. PMID:23109882

  14. Physicochemical characterization and toxicity of decursin and their derivatives from Angelica gigas.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Bimit; Chae, Jung-Woo; Baek, In-Hwan; Song, Gyu-Yong; Song, Jin-Sook; Cho, Seong-Kwon; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2012-01-01

    Angelica gigas NAKAI is used to treat dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, menopause, abdominal pain, injuries, migraine, and arthritis. The present study provided a physicochemical and toxicological characterization of compounds in A. gigas NAKAI (decursin, decursinol angelate, diketone decursin, ether decursin, epoxide decursin and oxim decursin). Diketone decursin (173.16 μg/mL) and epoxide decursin (122.12 μg/mL) exhibited >100 μg/mL kinetic solubility after applying nephelometry, suggesting a highly soluble compound. The Student’s t-test revealed significant differences in the pKa ranges of the compounds by automatic titration from capillary electrophoresis (p<0.05). Diketone decursin, epoxide decursin and oxim decursin might be formulated into an oral dosage form (log P: 0-3) by an automatic titration analysis. A parallel artificial membrane permeability assay demonstrated permeability coefficients of <10 x 10⁻⁶ cm/s for all of the compounds, suggesting poor permeability. Ether decursin exhibited a toxic effect after being applied to mouse (NIH 3T3, EC₅₀: 57.9 μM) and human (HT-29, EC₅₀: 36.1 μM; Hep-G2, EC₅₀: 4.92 μM) cells. Additionally, epoxide and oxim decursin were toxic through acute oral toxicity (four and three deaths of Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice) and mutation toxicity testing by applying Salmonella typhimurium cells with and without S9. Although diketone decursin exhibited less permeability, it is potentially valuable pharmacological compound that should be investigated. PMID:22791156

  15. The cytochemical and ultrastructural characteristics of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Xin, Lusheng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Phagocytes have been proved to play vital roles in the innate immune response. However, the cellular characteristics of phagocytes in invertebrates, especially in molluscs, remain largely unknown. In the present study, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was employed to sort the phagocytes from the non-phagocytic haemocytes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The cytochemical staining analysis revealed that phagocytes were positive staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase, while negative staining for toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. The non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited positive staining for periodic acid-Schiff, weak positive staining for toluidine blue, but negative staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase. In addition, phagocytes exhibited ultrastructural cellular features similar to those of macrophages, with large cell diameter, rough cell membrane and extended pseudopodia revealed by the scanning electron microscopy, while the non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited small cell diameter, smooth cell surface and round spherical shape. Transmission electron microscopy further demonstrated that phagocytes were abundant of cytoplasmic bodies and mitochondria, while non-phagocytic haemocytes were characterized as the comparatively large cell nucleus with contorted and condensed heterochromatin adherent to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, compared with non-phagocytic haemocytes, phagocytes exhibited significantly higher levels of intracellular cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, interferon-like protein and interleukin-17, and significantly higher abundance of lysosome and reactive oxygen species, which were of great importance to the activation of immune response and pathogen clearance. Taken together, these findings revealed the different cytochemical and ultrastructural features between phagocytes and non-phagocytic haemocytes in C. gigas, which would provide an important clue to investigate the

  16. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    PubMed

    Isikman, Serhan O; Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Coskun, Ahmet F; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2). This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3) across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3), which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  17. Differential gene transcription, biochemical responses, and cytotoxicity assessment in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Miguel A S; Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Mattos, Jacó J; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Mello, Álvaro C P; Zacchi, Flávia L; Piazza, Clei E; Siebert, Marília N; Piazza, Rômi S; Alvarez-Muñoz, Diana; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Bebianno, Maria João; Gomes, Carlos H A M; Melo, Cláudio M R; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals, such as anti-inflammatory nonsteroidal drugs, are frequently detected in aquatic ecosystems. Studies about the effects of these substances in nontarget organisms, such as bivalves, are relevant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on antioxidant status caused by ibuprofen (IBU) in oysters Crassostrea gigas exposed for 1, 4, and 7 days at concentrations 1 and 100 μg L(-1). Levels of IBU in tissues of oysters, as well as cell viability of hemocytes, were measured. The transcription of cytochrome P450 genes (CYP2AU2, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, CYP30C1), glutathione S-transferase isoforms (GST-ω-like and GST-π-like), cyclooxygenase-like (COX-like), fatty acid binding protein-like (FABP-like), caspase-like, heat shock protein-like (HSP70-like), catalase-like (CAT-like), and the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were also evaluated in the gills of oysters. The highest levels of IBU were observed in animals exposed to 100 μg L(-1). A significant upregulation of CYP2AU1, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, GST-ω-like, GST-π-like, COX-like, and FABP-like was observed in oysters exposed to IBU under different experimental conditions. Oysters exposed to 1 μg L(-1) for 7 days showed a significantly higher transcription of CYP2AU2, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, GST-ω-like, and GST-π-like but lower GR activity. In conclusion, C. gigas exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of IBU (1 μg L(-1)) exhibited increased transcription of certain genes and alterations on antioxidant and auxiliary enzymes, which could, in the the long term, cause damages to exposed organisms. PMID:25595931

  18. Giga-Pixel Lensfree Holographic Microscopy and Tomography Using Color Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ∼350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ∼0.8, across a field-of-view of ∼20.5 mm2. This constitutes a digital image with ∼0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ∼1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ±50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ∼0.35 µm×0.35 µm×∼2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ∼0.03 µm3 across a sample volume of ∼5 mm3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  19. Multiple γ-secretase product peptides are coordinately increased in concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of a subpopulation of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcadeinα (Alcα) is a neuronal membrane protein that colocalizes with the Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein (APP). Successive cleavage of APP by β- and γ-secretases generates the aggregatable amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), while cleavage of APP or Alcα by α- and γ-secretases generates non-aggregatable p3 or p3-Alcα peptides. Aβ and p3-Alcα can be recovered from human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We have previously reported alternative processing of APP and Alcα in the CSF of some patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD (SAD). Results Using the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system that detects total p3-Alcα, we determined levels of total p3-Alcα in CSF from subjects in one of four diagnostic categories (elderly controls, MCI, SAD, or other neurological disease) derived from three independent cohorts. Levels of Aβ40 correlated with levels of total p3-Alcα in all cohorts. Conclusions We confirm that Aβ40 is the most abundant Aβ species, and we propose a model in which CSF p3-Alcα can serve as a either (1) a nonaggregatable surrogate marker for γ-secretase activity; (2) as a marker for clearance of transmembrane domain peptides derived from integral protein catabolism; or (3) both. We propose the specification of an MCI/SAD endophenotype characterized by co-elevation of levels of both CSF p3-Alcα and Aβ40, and we propose that subjects in this category might be especially responsive to therapeutics aimed at modulation of γ-secretase function and/or transmembrane domain peptide clearance. These peptides may also be used to monitor the efficacy of therapeutics that target these steps in Aβ metabolism PMID:22534039

  20. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Smith, Lee B.; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S.; Chambers, Thomas J. G.; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O’Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L. M.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk. PMID:24753613

  1. Effect of Jyotishmati (Celastrus paniculatus) seeds in animal models of pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A.; Agarwal, Sneha; Garud, Mayuresh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Jyotishmati, scientifically known as Celastrus paniculatus Wild (Celastraceae) is one of the most important medicinal plants in Ayurveda. The plant has shown significant pharmacological activities like anti-arthritic, wound healing, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant. Objective: To study possible effects of alcoholic extract of Celastrus paniculatus seeds (AlcE) in experimentally induced pain and inflammation in mice. Materials and Methods: The antinociceptive activity was evaluated in Swiss albino mice by tail immersion, hot plate, and acetic-acid-induced writhing tests at doses of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in model of carrageenan-induced acute plantar inflammation in Wistar rats. Results: In tail immersion test, AlcE showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in tail withdrawal response at dose of 250 mg/kg with maximum possible effect of 15.71%. The maximum possible effect of 23.32% and 30.16% (P < 0.001) was seen at dose of 500 and 1000 mg/kg at 3 hours after administration of extract, respectively. In hot plate test, increase in paw licking time was reported at dose of 500 and 1000 mg/kg. AlcE (1,000 mg/kg) showed maximum response (6.23 ± 0.46) when compared with control (3.20 ± 0.18) at 90 min. In acetic acid induced writhings, AlcE at dose of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg body weight showed 32.35%, 49.01%, and 58.82% inhibition in writhings, respectively. AlcE treated animals (500 and 1,000 mg/kg) showed significant decrease in paw edema at 3 hours and 4 hours, when compared with control animals. Conclusion: Jyotishmati seed extract possesses significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26166997

  2. [Distribution, abundance, density and morphometry of Strombus gigas (Mesogasteropoda: Strombidae) in Alacranes reef, Yucatán, México].

    PubMed

    Pérez Pérez, M; Aldana Aranda, D

    2000-12-01

    A population of the conch Strombus gigas was sampled in 109 transects (100 x 10 m each) for an area of 109000 m2 (eight surveys in 1998 and six in 1999) in Yucatan, Mexico; S. gigas was the most abundant conch species (97% of individuals) and ocurred at depths of 0.5-18 m. Mean density was 0.0084 individuals/m2 (Standard deviation SD=0.0138, n=1910). Maximum density (0.015 individuals/m2) was at 0.5-2 m and minimal (0.001 individuals/m2) at 16-18 m. Shell length was 120-290 mm (mena=211.6, SD=26, n=1136). Shell lip thickness, measured only in adults, was 1-28 mm (mean=8.7, SD=7.5, n=1136). PMID:15266792

  3. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Dégremont, Lionel; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A) one family per bag; (B) one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C) same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas. PMID:26039375

  4. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Dégremont, Lionel; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A) one family per bag; (B) one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C) same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas. PMID:26039375

  5. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  6. Bulked segregant analysis of the pirarucu (Arapaima gigas) genome for identification of sex-specific molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Almeida, I G; Ianella, P; Faria, M T; Paiva, S R; Caetano, A R

    2013-01-01

    Arapaima gigas (Osteoglossidae) is one of the largest fish species in the Amazon Basin, attaining lengths of over 2.5 m and weights of over 100 kg. Its flesh is prized, and it has great potential for production in aquaculture systems. However, live pirarucu cannot be reliably sexed visually, even after sexual development, since this species does not have clear external sexual dimorphism. Simple and inexpensive methods for sexing immature pirarucu based on DNA markers would facilitate production of this species in commercial operations. We analyzed A. gigas male and female DNA pools with 566 RAPD primers, generating 2609 fragments, with an estimated 1341 segregating polymorphic markers, and an estimated average spacing of 714 kb, which corresponds to less than 0.1% of the species' genome. Two putative sex-specific fragments were initially identified in bulked samples; but they were not confirmed in a study of individual male and female samples. We suggest that A. gigas has developed a non-chromosomal system of sex determination or, alternatively, that the species has undergone a recent loss of the chromosome carrying the sex-determining locus. PMID:24338425

  7. Cloning and expression patterns of two Smad genes during embryonic development and shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Huan, Pin; Liu, Baozhong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways play many important roles in the early development of mollusks. However, limited information is known concerning their detailed mechanisms. Here, we describe the identification, cloning and characterization of two Smad genes, the key components of TGF-β signaling pathways, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Sequence analysis of the two genes, designated as cgi-smad1/ 5/ 8 and cgi-smad4, revealed conserved functional characteristics. The two genes were widely expressed in embryos and larvae, suggesting multiple roles in the early development of C. gigas. The mRNA of the two genes aggregated in the D quadrant and cgi-smad4 was highly expressed on the dorsal side of the gastrula, indicating that TGF-β signaling pathways may be involved in dorsoventral patterning in C. gigas. Furthermore, high expression levels of the two genes in the shell fields of embryos at different stages suggested important roles for TGF-β signaling pathways in particular phases of shell development, including the formation of the initial shell field and the biomineralization of larval shells. The results of this study provide fundamental support for elucidating how TGF-β signaling pathways participate in the early development of bivalve mollusks, and suggest that further work is warranted to this end.

  8. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 detection and relationship with Crassostrea gigas spat mortality in France between 1998 and 2006

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since its molecular characterisation, Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) has been regularly detected in Crassostrea gigas in France. Although its pathogenicity was demonstrated on larval stages, its involvement during mortality outbreaks at the juvenile stage was highly suspected but not evidenced. To investigate mortality outbreaks, the French National Network for Surveillance and Monitoring of Mollusc Health (REPAMO) carried out two surveys in juvenile C. gigas. The first survey lasted from 1998 to 2006 and was an epidemiological inquiry occurring when oyster farmers reported mortality outbreaks. The second survey, a longitudinal one, was set up in 1998 to complete the network observations on OsHV-1. Data analysis showed a specific pattern of mortality outbreaks associated with OsHV-1 detection. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 detection mainly appeared during the summer, suggesting the influence of the seawater temperature on its occurrence. It mostly presented a patchy distribution in the field in contrast to the nursery. Significant relationship between OsHV-1 detection and spat mortality was found, preferentially in sheltered and closed environments. The longitudinal survey confirmed most of the network observations. Although subsequent works particularly epidemiological surveys would be useful to confirm the causal link between the detection of OsHV-1 and the mortality outbreaks in juvenile C. gigas, the role of OsHV-1 in oyster mortality is progressing. PMID:21635731

  9. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activity of Cultivated and Wild Angelica gigas Nakai Extracts Prepared Using Different Extraction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Bo-Young; Lee, Hye-Jin; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Kim, Hyun-Ku

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological activities of cultivated Angelica gigas Nakai (CAG) and wild Angelica gigas Nakai (WAG) extracts prepared by extraction with water, 30% ethanol, 60% ethanol, or 90% ethanol. The electron donating ability of the WAG extracts was higher than that of the CAG extracts and 0.1% and 1.0% solutions of the comparative substance, L-ascorbic acid. The superoxide dismutase-like activity of the CAG extracts was higher than that of WAG extracts. Superoxide dismutase-like activity was highest (33.95%) in the CAG water extract. The total polyphenol content was highest in the 60% ethanol extracts of WAG. The nitrite scavenging ability of the CAG and WAG extracts was highest at a pH of 1.2. The tyrosinase inhibitory effect was highest (43.72%) in the water extract of WAG. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activity was highest (83.84%) in the 60% ethanol extract of WAG. The results of the present study will be useful for understanding the antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activities of Angelica gigas Nakai extracts. PMID:25580391

  10. Lethal dose and clinical signs of Aeromonas hydrophila in Arapaima gigas (Arapaimidae), the giant fish from Amazon.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcia K R; Sampaio, Luciana S; Proietti-Junior, Aldo A; Yoshioka, Eliane T O; Rodrigues, Dália P; Rodriguez, Anselmo F R; Ribeiro, Ricardo A; Faria, Fernando S E D V; Ozório, Rodrigo O A; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-05-30

    Aeromonas hydrophila is causing substantial economic losses in world aquaculture. This study determined the tolerance limit (LD50-96h) of A. hydrophila in Arapaima gigas, and also investigated the clinical signs after intradermal inoculation. Arapaima gigas fingerlings were inoculated intraperitoneally with 0 (control), 1.0×10(5), 1.0×10(6), 1.0×10(7), 1.0×10(9) and 1.0×10(10)CFU/mL of A. hydrophila for the determination of LD50-96h, which was 1.8×10(8)CFU/mL. In another trial with intradermal inoculation of 1.8×10(8)CFU/mL A. hydrophila, there was a 91.6% of mortality between 8 and 23h, and several clinical signs were found. As follows: depigmentation in the tegument, lesions in the tail and fins, loss of balance, reduction of respiratory movements, hemorrhagic foci, necrotic hemorrhages in the kidney, liver and swim bladder, splenomegaly, ascites in the abdominal cavity and hyperemia, enlargement of the gall bladder, among other clinical signs observed. The results showed that A. gigas has a relative tolerance to A. hydrophila when compared to other Neotropical fish species. PMID:27139024

  11. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I: Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A.; Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active, epipelagic squid known to undertake diel vertical migrations across a large temperature and oxygen gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Hypoxia is known to cause metabolic suppression in D. gigas. However, the precise oxygen level at which metabolic suppression sets in is unknown. Here we describe a novel ship-board swim tunnel respirometer that was used to measure metabolic rates and critical oxygen partial pressures (Pcrit) for adult squids (2-7kg). Metabolic rate measurements were validated by comparison to the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mantle muscle tissue (2-17kg). We recorded a mean routine metabolic rate of 5.91μmolg-1h-1 at 10°C and 12.62μmolg-1h-1 at 20°C. A temperature coefficient, Q10, of 2.1 was calculated. D. gigas had Pcrits of 1.6 and 3.8kPa at 10 and 20°C, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate (MO2) varied with body mass (M) according to MO2=11.57M-0.12±0.03 at 10°C. Citrate synthase activity varied with body mass according to Y=9.32M-0.19±0.02.

  12. Protease inhibitors and haemagglutinins associated with resistance to the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Romestand, B; Corbier, F; Roch, P

    2002-10-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan responsible for dramatic mortality in the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, but not in the Pacific oyster, C. gigas. To understand the host-parasite relationship, we inoculated P. marinus trophozoites into the shell cavity of C. gigas and measured, over 2 months, (i) intensity of infection, (ii) protease inhibitory activities against P. marinus proteases and against bovine z-chymotrypsin, (iii) plasma haemagglutinin titre, (iv) plasma protein concentration, (v) plasma lysozyme activity and (vi) total haemocyte count. We observed that the highest protease inhibitory activities and haemagglutinin titres (3-10 days post-challenge) preceded parasite elimination (initiated 7 days post-challenge). In contrast, plasma protein concentration, lysozyme activity and total haemocyte count showed no significant modification following the challenge. It is hypothesized that the capacity of C. gigas to increase its protease inhibitors represents the key event in resistance to parasite infection by neutralizing the proteases secreted by P. marinus, thus preserving the oyster haemagglutinins from degradation. Such haemagglutinins will be ready to act as opsonins stimulating phagocytosis of parasites. PMID:12403320

  13. Identification and characterisation of an ostreid herpesvirus-1 microvariant (OsHV-1 µ-var) in Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oysters) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cheryl; Hick, Paul; Gabor, Melinda; Spiers, Zoe; Fell, Shayne A; Gu, Xingnian; Read, Andrew; Go, Jeffrey; Dove, Michael; O'Connor, Wayne; Kirkland, Peter D; Frances, Jane

    2013-07-22

    Between November 2010 and January 2011, triploid Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oysters) cultivated in the Georges River, New South Wales, experienced >95% mortality. Mortalities also occurred in wild diploid C. gigas in the Georges River and shortly thereafter in the adjacent Parramatta River estuary upstream from Sydney Harbour. Neighbouring Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) did not experience mortalities in either estuary. Surviving oysters were collected to investigate the cause of mortalities. Histologically all oysters displayed significant pathology, and molecular testing revealed a high prevalence of ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1). Quantitative PCR indicated that many C. gigas were carrying a high viral load at the time of sampling, while the load in S. glomerata was significantly lower (p < 0.001). Subsequent in situ hybridisation experiments confirmed the presence of a herpesvirus in C. gigas but not S. glomerata tissues, suggesting that S. glomerata is not susceptible to infection with OsHV-1. Naïve sentinel triploid C. gigas placed in the Georges River estuary in January 2011 quickly became infected and experienced nearly 100% mortality within 2 wk of exposure, indicating the persistence of the virus in the environment. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences derived from the C2/C6 region of the virus revealed that the Australian strain of OsHV-1 belongs to the microvariant (µ-var) cluster, which has been associated with severe mortalities in C. gigas in other countries since 2008. Environmental data revealed that the Woolooware Bay outbreaks occurred during a time of considerable environmental disturbance, with increased water temperatures, heavy rainfall, a toxic phytoplankton bloom and the presence of a pathogenic Vibrio sp. all potentially contributing to oyster stress. This is the first confirmed report of OsHV-1 µ-var related C. gigas mortalities in Australia. PMID:23872855

  14. Connected components labeling for giga-cell multi-categorical rasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Pawel; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2013-09-01

    Labeling of connected components in an image or a raster of non-imagery data is a fundamental operation in fields of pattern recognition and machine intelligence. The bulk of effort devoted to designing efficient connected components labeling (CCL) algorithms concentrated on the domain of binary images where labeling is required for a computer to recognize objects. In contrast, in the Geographical Information Science (GIS) a CCL algorithm is mostly applied to multi-categorical rasters in order to either convert a raster to a shapefile, or for statistical characterization of individual clumps. Recently, it has become necessary to label connected components in very large, giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters but performance of existing CCL algorithms lacks sufficient speed to accomplish such task. In this paper we present a modification to the popular two-scan CCL algorithm that enables labeling of giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters. Our approach is to apply a divide-and-conquer technique coupled with parallel processing to a standard two-scan algorithm. For specificity, we have developed a variant of a standard CCL algorithm implemented as r.clump in GRASS GIS. We have established optimal values of data blocks (stemming from the divide-and-conquer technique) and optimal number of computational threads (stemming from parallel processing) for a new algorithm called r.clump3p. The performance of the new algorithm was tested on a series of rasters up to 160 Mcells in size; for largest size test raster a speed up over the original algorithm is 74 times. Finally, we have applied the new algorithm to the National Land Cover Dataset 2006 raster with 1.6×1010 cells. Labeling this raster took 39 h using two-processors, 16 cores computer and resulted in 221,718,501 clumps. Estimated speed up over the original algorithm is 450 times. The r.clump3p works within the GRASS environment and is available in the public domain.

  15. Effects of Dietary Alpha-lipoic Acid and Acetyl-L-carnitine on Growth Performance and Meat Quality in Arbor Acres Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Ru; Ji, Cheng; Ma, Qiugang; Huang, Jin; Yin, Haicheng; Liu, Laiting

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary alpha-lipoic acid (LA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality in Arbor Acres broilers. A total of 486 1-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allocated to 9 dietary treatments, 9 treatments were group A (0 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group B (50 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group C (100 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group D (0 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group E (50 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group F (100 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group G (0 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC), group H (50 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC), group I (100 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC). Birds were slaughtered at 42 days old. Average daily gain (ADG), average feed intake (AFI), feed conversion rate (FCR), eviscerated rate, breast muscle percentage, thigh muscle percentage, abdominal fat percentage, liver weight, muscle color (L* value, a* value, b* value), pH values at 45 min and 24 h postmortem were measured. Results showed that there existed an interaction between LA and ALC in growth performance of broilers, carcass traits and meat quality. The overall result is that high level of LA and ALC led to lower AFI, ADG (p<0.01), lower abdominal fat percentage, liver weight (p<0.01), lower L* value, a* value, and b* value of breast muscle, L* value of thigh muscle (p<0.05), and higher FCR (p<0.01), eviscerated rate (p<0.01), breast muscle percentage, thigh muscle percentage (p<0.05), a* value, pH 45 min and pH 24 h of thigh muscle (p<0.01). These results suggested that dietary LA and ALC contributed to the improvement of meat quality in broilers. PMID:25050042

  16. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  17. Actions and Interactions of Alcohol and Transforming Growth Factor ß1 on Prepubertal Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinod K.; Hiney, Jill K.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol (ALC) diminishes gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and delays puberty. Glial transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) plays a role in glial-neuronal communications facilitating prepubertal GnRH secretion. We assessed the effects of acute ALC administration on TGFß1-induced GnRH gene expression in the brain preoptic area (POA), and release of the peptide from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Furthermore, we assessed actions and interactions of TGFβ1 and ALC on an adhesion/signaling gene family involved in glial-neuronal communications. Methods Prepubertal female rats were administered ALC or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h. At 0900 h saline or TGFβ1 (100ng/3μl) was administered into the third ventricle. At 1500 h the POA was removed and frozen for gene expression analysis and repeated for protein assessments. In another experiment, the MBH was removed from ALC-free rats. After equilibration, tissues were incubated in Locke’s medium only or medium containing TGFß1 with or without 50 mM ALC for measurement of GnRH peptide released in vitro. Results TGFβ1 induced GnRH gene expression in the POA and this effect was blocked by ALC. We also described the presence and responsiveness of the TGFβ1 receptor in the POA and showed that acute ALC exposure not only altered the TGFß1 induced increase in TGFß-R1 protein expression but also the activation of receptor associated proteins, Smad2 and Smad3, key downstream components of the TGFß1 signaling pathway. Assessment of an adhesion/signaling family consisting of glial RPTPβ and neuronal Caspr1 and contactin showed that the neuronal components were induced by TGFβ1 and that ALC blocked these effects. Finally, TGFß1 was shown to induce release of the GnRH peptide in vitro, an action that was blocked by ALC. Conclusion We have demonstrated glial-derived TGFß1 induces GnRH gene expression in the POA, and stimulates release of the peptide from the MBH; actions necessary for

  18. Preferential bivalent formation in tetraploid male of pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas Thunberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengrui; Wang, Xinglian; Zhang, Quanqi; Allen, Standish

    2013-11-01

    Artificially induced tetraploid Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, produces more aneuploid gametes than normal diploid one, although they showed a comparable fecundity to diploidy. The meiotic chromosome configuration of 3 tetraploid and 1 tetraploid/triploid mosaic males were analyzed through direct chromosome observation. A majority of metaphase I spermatocytes contained both bivalents and quadrivalents. The chromosome configuration of these males was characterized by preferential formation of bivalents to quadrivalents. Bivalents appeared in all spermatocytes and consisted of 86% of all chromosome aggregates. In comparison, quadrivalents occurred in 91% spermatocytes and consisted of only 12.6% of all chromosome aggregates. The mean bivalent frequency per spermatocyte varied between 14.4 and 17.2; while that of quadrivalents varied between 2.2 and 2.7. Most quadrivalents were tandemly chained (58%) or circled (39%). The total number of chromosome aggregates per spermatocyte ranged from 13 to 20 with an average of 17.6; while 18 (16 bivalents and 2 quadrivalents) was the most frequent. Univalents and trivalents appeared in very low frequency. Aneuploid (hypotetraploid) spermatocytes were observed in a low frequency. The chromosome configuration of in the mosaic individual was similar to that of tetraploid individuals. The percentage of triploid spermatocytes (2%) of the mosaic individual was significantly lower (χ2 =30, P < 0.01) than that of triploid cells (46%) in its somatic tissue.

  19. Toxicity of untreated wood leachates towards two saltwater organisms (Crassostrea gigas and Artemia franciscana).

    PubMed

    Libralato, G; Losso, C; Ghirardini, A Volpi

    2007-06-01

    Wood is widely used in the development of freshwater, estuarine and marine coastlines. Timbers last according to their content of naturally occurring preservatives (mostly phenols and aldehydes), produced to prevent decay from biotic agents. When untreated woods are exposed to aquatic media, leachates are generated with likely toxic effects on the target environment. The potential impact on saltwaters of leachates from some untreated timbers of both native and tropical species has been assessed. The leaching procedure was set up considering British Standard test methods for paints and OECD guidelines for wood preservatives emission scenarios. Toxicity was monitored via the acute toxicity test with the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and the sub-chronic embryotoxicity test with the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Brine shrimps evidenced no toxic effects while oysters discriminated well among leachates: the tropical wood species showed similar or relatively lower toxic effects than the native ones according to both leaching cycles (24 and 72 h). The ecotoxicological data have been integrated with some physical and chemical parameters. PMID:17141956

  20. Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 replication and host response in adult Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Tourbiez, Delphine; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Faury, Nicole; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Renault, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality outbreaks associated with OsHV-1 detection have been reported in Crassostrea gigas spat and juveniles in several countries. Nevertheless, adult oysters do not demonstrate mortality in the field related to OsHV-1 detection and were thus assumed to be more resistant to viral infection. Determining how virus and adult oyster interact is a major goal in understanding why mortality events are not reported among adult Pacific oysters. Dual transcriptomics of virus-host interactions were explored by real-time PCR in adult oysters after a virus injection. Thirty-nine viral genes and five host genes including MyD88, IFI44, IkB2, IAP and Gly were measured at 0.5, 10, 26, 72 and 144 hours post infection (hpi). No viral RNA among the 39 genes was detected at 144 hpi suggesting the adult oysters are able to inhibit viral replication. Moreover, the IAP gene (oyster gene) shows significant up-regulation in infected adults compared to control adults. This result suggests that over-expression of IAP could be a reaction to OsHV-1 infection, which may induce the apoptotic process. Apoptosis could be a main mechanism involved in disease resistance in adults. Antiviral activity of haemolymph against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) was not significantly different between infected adults versus control. PMID:25294338

  1. Autotetraploid Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) obtained using normal diploid eggs: induction and impact on cytogenetic stability.

    PubMed

    Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Ledu, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We describe two methods of producing viable and fertile autotetraploid Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) based on the use of normal-sized oocytes produced by normal diploid females. Our methods showed that the oocyte size is not a limiting factor for the success of the induction to autotetraploidy. These methods offer means of direct introgression of genetic progress from elite diploid lines to tetraploids used as broodstock, avoiding a triploid step with the risk of transferring undesirable traits from highly fecund triploids. High variability in the level of cytogenetic stability was found among the different tetraploid oysters tested, showing that induction method has an important impact on the long-term cytogenetic stability of the tetraploids. It appears that induction method based on the use of triploid females induces a greater cytogenetic instability among tetraploids so obtained, and this compared to tetraploids originating from the two methods described in our present study. As the aneuploidies and reversions observed in tetraploids can have serious consequences for the sustainability of tetraploid broodstock itself, as well as their triploid offspring, the two tetraploid induction methods described in the present work offer means to produce tetraploids with optimal cytogenetic, genetic, and zootechnical performances. PMID:26230146

  2. Zooming to the centre of the Milky Way - GigaGalaxy Zoom phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    The second of three images of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project has just been released online. It is a new and wonderful 340-million-pixel vista of the central parts of our home galaxy as seen from ESO's Paranal Observatory with an amateur telescope. This 34 by 20-degree wide image provides us with a view as experienced by amateur astronomers around the world. However, its incredible beauty and appeal owe much to the quality of the observing site and the skills of Stéphane Guisard, the world-renowned astrophotographer, who is also an ESO engineer. This second image directly benefits from the quality of Paranal's sky, one of the best on the planet, where ESO's Very Large Telescope is located. In addition, Guisard has drawn on his professional expertise as an optical engineer specialising in telescopes, a rare combination in the world of astrophotographers. Guisard, as head of the optical engineering team at Paranal, is responsible for ensuring that the Very Large Telescope has the best optical performance possible. To create this stunning, true-colour mosaic of the Galactic Centre region, Guisard assembled about 1200 individual images, totalling more than 200 hours of exposure time, collected over 29 nights, during Guisard's free time, while working during the day at Paranal [1]. The image shows the region spanning the sky from the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer) to Scorpius (the Scorpion). The very colourful Rho Ophiuchi and Antares region is a prominent feature to the right, although much darker areas, such as the Pipe and Snake nebulae also stand out. The dusty lane of our Milky Way runs obliquely through the image, dotted with remarkable bright, reddish nebulae, such as the Lagoon and the Trifid Nebulae, as well as NGC 6357 and NGC 6334. This dark lane also hosts the very centre of our Galaxy, where a supermassive black hole is lurking. "The area I have depicted in this image is an incredibly rich region of the sky, and the one I find most beautiful

  3. Effect of cadmium on the defense response of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to Listonella anguillarum challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Ming; Lü, Jiasen; Wu, Huifeng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2013-09-01

    Heavy metal pollution can affect the immune capability of organisms. We evaluated the effect of cadmium (Cd) on the defense responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to Listonella anguillarum challenge. The activities of several important defensive enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), acid phosphatase (ACP), Na+, K+ -ATPase in gills and hepatopancreas, and phenoloxidase-like (POL) enzyme in hemolymph were assayed. In addition, the expression levels of several genes, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), metallothionein (MT), and bactericidal/permeability increasing (BPI) protein were quantified by fluorescent quantitative PCR. The enzyme activities of SOD, ACP, POL, and GPx in hepatopancreas, and the expression of HSP90 were down-regulated, whereas GPx activity in the gill, Na+, K+-ATPase activities in both tissues, and MT expression was increased in Cdexposed oysters post L. anguillarum challenge. However, BPI expression was not significantly altered by co-stress of L. anguillarum infection and cadmium exposure. Our results suggest that cadmium exposure alters the oysters' immune responses and energy metabolism following vibrio infection.

  4. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met(5)]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met(5)]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  5. Decursin from Angelica gigas suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Ting; Kang, Ju-Hee; Li, Hua; Cho, Hyewon; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Yim, Mijung

    2016-03-01

    Osteoclasts are the only cells capable of breaking down bone matrix, and excessive activation of osteoclasts is responsible for bone-destructive diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of decursin from extract of Angelica gigas root on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Decursin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation without cytotoxicity. In particular, decursin maintains the characteristics of macrophages by blocking osteoclast differentiation by RANKL. Furthermore, the RANKL-stimulated bone resorption was diminished by decursin. Mechanistically, decursin blocked the RANKL-triggered ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) phosphorylation, which results in suppression of c-Fos and the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) expression. In accordance with the in vitro study, decursin reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in vivo. Therefore, decursin exerted an inhibitory effect on osteoclast formation and bone loss in vitro and in vivo. Decursin could be useful for the treatment of bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption. PMID:26825541

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids incorporated colloidal systems for the delivery of Angelica gigas Nakai extract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Jun; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae Young; Lee, Song Yi; Yoon, In-Soo; Kang, Wie-Soo; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fish oil-enriched colloidal systems were developed for the oral delivery of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) extract (ext). By constructing a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, the composition of oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsion (ME) systems based on ω-3 (oil), Labrasol (surfactant), and water was determined. AGN ext was dissolved into the ME system and d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was added to the ME formulation in order to enhance the mucosal absorption of the pharmacologically active ingredients in the AGN ext. The droplet size of AGN-loaded MEs was 205-277 nm and their morphology was spherical. The release of major components of AGN, decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA), from ME formulations in pH 1.2 and 6.8 buffers was significantly greater (P<0.05) than that from the AGN suspension group. The pharmacokinetic properties of AGN-loaded MEs in rats were evaluated by measuring decursinol (DOH) concentrations in plasma after oral administration. TPGS-included ME (F2) resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) systemic exposure of DOH than that with ME without TPGS (F1), AGN ext+TPGS, and AGN in suspension. Severe toxicity of F1 and F2 on the intestinal epithelium was not observed by histological staining. The colloidal carriers described herein are promising delivery systems for oral administration of AGN ext. PMID:26764107

  7. Onshore-offshore movement of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Gilly, William F.; Field, John C.; Payne, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) have greatly extended their range in the California Current System, where they forage on a variety of ecologically and economically important species that inhabit both coastal and offshore mesopelagic regions. Swimming abilities and behavior are important factors in assessing the impacts of this range expansion, particularly in regard to foraging in conjunction with onshore-offshore movement over the continental shelf. Here we describe a study of horizontal movements by jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf off Washington, USA, using acoustic tags in association with the Census of Marine Life's Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Program (POST) receiver arrays. We detected frequent movements along the shelf break, movement onto the shelf at night, and no evidence of movement as a cohesive school. Our results demonstrate feasibility of using acoustic tags and arrays to document horizontal movements of jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf. This is important in order to determine how those movements overlap with those of other ecologically and commercially important fish species.

  8. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  9. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  10. Evaluation of Giga-cycle Fatigue Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steels Using Ultrasonic Fatigue Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kyouhei; Ogawa, Takeshi

    Ultrasonic fatigue tests have been performed in austenitic stainless steel, SUS316NG, in order to investigate giga-cycle fatigue strength of pre-strained materials, i.e. 5, 10 and 20% tensile pre-strains and -20% compressive pre-strain. The pre-strains were applied before specimen machining. The austenitic stainless steels are known to exhibit remarkable self-heating during the fatigue experiment. Therefore, heat radiation method was established by setting fatigue specimens in a low temperature chamber at about -100°C. The self-heating was controlled by intermittent loading condition, which enabled us to maintain the test section of the specimens at about room temperature. The results revealed that the fatigue strength increased with increasing pre-strain levels. Fish-eye fracture was observed for -20% pre-strained specimen fractured at 4.11×107 cycles, while the other specimens exhibited ordinary fatigue fracture surface originated from stage I facet on the specimen surface. The increase in fatigue limit was predicted by Vickers hardness, HV, which depended on the size of indented region. The prediction was successful using HV values obtained by the size of the indented region similar to those of the stage I facets.

  11. Extraction and Identification of the Pigment in the Adductor Muscle Scar of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shixin; Hou, Xin; Wei, Lei; Li, Jian; Li, Zhonghu; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, UV (ultraviolet) and IR (infrared radiation) spectral analysis were integrated to identify the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The pigment was extracted from the adductor muscle scars of cleaned oyster shells that were pulverized, hydrolyzed in hot hydrochloric acid, purified with diethyl ether, and dissolved in 0.01 mL/L NaOH. The maximum absorption of the pigment in the UV absorption spectrum within the range of 190-500 nm was observed between 210-220 nm. The UV absorbance decreased with increasing wavelength which was consistent with the UV spectral absorption characteristics of melanin. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy scanning revealed characteristic absorption peaks that emerged near 3440 cm-1 and 1630 cm-1, which was consistent with infrared scanning features of eumelanin (a type of melanin). This study has demonstrated for the first time that the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster is melanin, hinting that the adductor muscle could be another organ pigmenting the mollusc shell with melanin other than mantle. PMID:26555720

  12. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  13. Trace element concentrations in the top predator jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) from the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Rosa, Rui

    2014-04-01

    Jumbo (or Humboldt) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a large jet-propelled top oceanic predator off the Eastern Pacific. The present study reports, for the first time, concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb in gills, mantle and digestive gland of this powerful pelagic squid in the Gulf of California. Zinc and Cu were the most abundant elements. All elements, with the exception of As, were largely stored in digestive gland; particularly Cd that reached concentrations between 57 and 509 µg g(-1). Significant relationships between tissues were found for Co (digestive gland-gills), As (gills-mantle) and Cd (digestive gland-mantle). Proportionality of Cd concentrations between mantle and digestive gland suggested that detoxification capacity by digestive gland was insufficient to avoid the transfer of this element to mantle and other tissues. Nonetheless, Cd concentrations in the mantle were always below the regulatory limit and, therefore lack of constraints for human consumption. On the basis of the fishery landings, one may estimate that up to 1t of Cd can be annually removed by jumbo squid fisheries. PMID:24530735

  14. Salting-in effect on muscle protein extracted from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ru; Pan, Weichun; Lin, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Li, Mengya; Li, Jianrong; Niu, Fuge; Li, Ang

    2017-01-15

    The salting-in effect on muscle protein is well-known in food science but hard to explain using conventional theories. Myofibrillar protein extracted from the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was selected as a model muscle protein to study this mechanism in KCl solutions. Changes in the secondary structures of myofibrillar protein molecules caused by concentrated salts, particularly in the paramyosin molecule conformation, have been reported. Zeta-potential determinations showed that these secondary structures have modified protein molecule surfaces. The zeta-potential of the myofibrillar protein molecules fell from -7.24±0.82 to -9.99±1.65mV with increasing salt concentration from 0.1 to 0.5M. The corresponding second virial coefficient increased from -85.43±3.8×10(-7) to -3.45±1.3×10(-7) molmLg(-2). The extended law of corresponding states suggests that reduced attractive interactions increase the protein solubility. Solubility measurements in alternating KCl concentrations showed that the conformational change was reversible. PMID:27542474

  15. Heavy metal toxicity in Exosphaeroma gigas (Crustacea, Isopoda) from the coastal zone of Beagle Channel.

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Comoglio, Laura; Amin, Oscar

    2007-11-01

    Acute toxicity of copper, cadmium, and zinc on isopod Exosphaeroma gigas was evaluated at 20 per thousand and 30 per thousand salinity. Six concentrations were assayed to estimate effective concentration of the toxicant that affects 50% of tested animal (EC50), while physiological responses and bioaccumulation were determined at 0.42 and 1.95 mg L(-1) of each metal. The following toxicity orders were obtained: Cd>or=Cu>Zn at 20 per thousand salinity and Cu>Zn>or=Cd at 30 per thousand salinity. Copper treatments showed a reduction in oxygen consumption at 30 per thousand salinity, while an opposite trend was observed at 20 per thousand salinity. Zinc caused dissimilar effects, while in cadmium significant reduction was only registered in 0.42(20 per thousand) mg L(-1). Ammonia excretion was generally higher in treatments than control at 20 per thousand salinity. At 30 per thousand salinity, excretion did not change in relation to control or diminished. In general terms, O:N atomic ratios indicated a preponderant protein metabolism. Bioaccumulation of assayed metals was higher at lowest salinity and increased with increasing toxic concentrations. PMID:17223192

  16. Investigation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) skin gelatin peptides for their in vitro antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Eresha; Rajapakse, Niranjan; Byun, Hee-Guk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2005-09-01

    Peptides derived from tryptic hydrolysate of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) skin gelatin were assessed for their antioxidant properties in different in vitro assay systems. The hydrolysate itself exhibited a strong lipid peroxidation inhibition and it was much higher than that of natural antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol. In addition, it could scavenge highly active free radicals in oxidative systems, in the order of hydroxyl and carbon-centered radicals. Two representative peptides with comparatively higher antioxidant potency were purified and characterized as Phe-Asp-Ser-Gly-Pro-Ala-Gly-Val-Leu (880.18 Da) and Asn-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gln-Ala-Gly-Gln-Pro-Gly-Glu-Arg (1241.59 Da). Furthermore, viability of radical-mediated oxidation-induced human lung fibroblasts was enhanced following the treatment of two peptides. However it did not exhibit substantial ion chelation, and we presumed that the observed radical scavenging potency of these peptides play a vital role for their strong antioxidant activity. Based on our results we suggest that hydrophobic amino acids present in peptide sequences contributed greatly for observed antioxidant activities. PMID:15916780

  17. Purification and characterization of trimethylamine-N-oxide demethylase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    PubMed

    Fu, Xue-Yan; Xue, Chang-Hu; Miao, Ben-Chun; Liang, Jun-Ni; Li, Zhao-Jie; Cui, Feng-Xia

    2006-02-01

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide demethylase (TMAOase) was purified from Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) and characterized in detail herein. The TMAOase was extracted from squid with 20 mM Tris-acetate buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.0 M NaCl, followed by acid treatment and heat treatment. Then it was purified by deithylaminoethyl-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, subsequently resulting in an 839-fold purification. The molecular mass of the TMAOase was defined to be 17.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the purified TMAOase was 7.0, and its optimum temperature was confirmed to be 55 degrees C. The TMAOase was stable to heat treatment up to 50 degrees C and stable at pH 7.0-9.0. Reducing agents such as DTT, Na2SO3, and NADH were effective at activating TMAOase, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, as well as Mg2+ and Ca2+, could also enhance the activity of TMAOase remarkably, whereas the TMAOase could be significantly inhibited by tea polyphenol, phytic acid and acetic acid. In addition, the TMAOase converted TMAO to dimethylamine and formaldehyde stoichiometrically with a K(m) of 26.2 mM. PMID:16448210

  18. Characteristics of deacetylation and depolymerization of β-chitin from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2011-09-27

    This study evaluated the deacetylation characteristics of β-chitin from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens by using strongly alkaline solutions of NaOH or KOH. Taguchi design was employed to investigate the effect of reagent concentration, temperature, time, and treatment step on molecular mass (MM) and degree of deacetylation (DDA) of the chitosan obtained. The optimal treatment conditions for achieving high MM and DDA of chitosan were identified as: 40% NaOH at 90°C for 6h with three separate steps (2h+2h+2h) or 50% NaOH at 90°C for 6h with one step, or 50% KOH at 90°C for 4h with three steps (1h+1h+2h) or 6h with one step. The most important factor affecting DDA and MM was temperature and time, respectively. The chitosan obtained was then further depolymerized by cellulase or lysozyme with cellulase giving a higher degradation ratio, lower relative viscosity, and a larger amount of reducing-end formations than that of lysozyme due to its higher susceptibility. This study demonstrated that jumbo squid pens are a good source of materials to produce β-chitosan with high DDA and a wide range of MM for various potential applications. PMID:21700271

  19. Partial characterization of an effluent produced by cooking of Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Romero, Zaidy G; Ramirez-Suarez, Juan C; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; Carvallo-Ruiz, Gisela; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2010-01-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle was cooked simulating industrial procedures (95 degrees C x 25 min, 1.2:5 muscle:water ratio). The effluent produced was analyzed for chemical and biochemical oxygen demands (COD and BOD(5), respectively), proximate analysis, flavor-related compounds (free amino acids, nucleotides and carbohydrates) and SDS-PAGE. The COD and BOD(5) exhibited variation among samplings (N=3) (27.4-118.5 g O(2)/L for COD and 11.3-26.7 g O(2)/L for BOD(5)). The effluent consisted of 1% total solids, 75% of which represented crude protein. Sixty percent of the total free amino acid content, which imparts flavor in squid species, corresponded to glutamic acid, serine, glycine, arginine, alanine, leucine and lysine. The nucleotide concentration followed this order, Hx>ADP>AMP>ATP>IMP>HxR. The variation observed in the present work was probably due to physiological maturity differences among the squid specimens (i.e., juvenile versus mature). Solids present in squid cooking effluent could be recovered and potentially used as flavor ingredients in squid-analog production by the food industry. PMID:19748263

  20. Screening and selection of stress resistant Lactobacillus spp. isolated from the marine oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-In; Kim, Min Hee; Kim, Kwan Young; So, Jae-Seong

    2010-10-01

    We attempted to isolate Lactobacillus spp. from the marine oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and select stress resistant strains for development of a future marine aquaculture feed adjuvant. A total of 83 lactobacilli strains were isolated from oyster. They were all Gram-positive, rod-shaped and catalase-negative. By performing a stress resistance assay, we selected eighteen isolates. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Lactobacillus paracasei was the most prevalent species among the selected isolates. The in vitro antagonistic effect of the selected strains against fish pathogens was assayed by measurement of inhibition diameters. Except for MH44, MH51, MH53 and MH62, most of the isolates showed inhibition of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio proteolyticus (diameters over 15 mm). Lactobacillus rhamnosus MH22 was selected as the most stress resistant strain showing the MICs of 1.8 M NaCl, 14% ethanol and 0.014% hydrogen peroxide. L. rhamnosus MH22 isolated from oyster has a potential to be applied as a microbial feed adjuvant for marine aquaculture. PMID:20633689

  1. Essential Fatty Acid Assimilation and Synthesis in Larvae of the Bivalve Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Fiz; Robert, René; Quéré, Claudie; Wikfors, Gary H; Soudant, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) are important for bivalve larval survival and growth. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess for the first time through a mass-balance approach dietary EFA incorporation and synthesis within Crassostrea gigas larvae. A first experiment was carried out using two microalgae, Tisochrysis lutea (T) and Chaetoceros neogracile (Cg), as mono- and bi-specific diets. A second experiment using a similar design was performed to confirm and extend the results obtained in the first. Flow-through larval rearing was used for accurate control of food supply and measurement of ingestion. Non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids were synthetized from precursors supplied in the diet: 16:1n-7 and 18:1n-9, mediated by Δ5 desaturase. Moreover, this Δ5 desaturase presumably allowed larvae to convert 20:3n-6 and 20:4n-3 to 20:4n-6 and 20:5n-3, respectively, when the product EFA were poorly or not supplied in the diet, as when larvae were fed T exclusively. Under our experimental conditions, none of the diets induced 22:6n-3 synthesis; however, 22:6n-3 incorporation into larval tissues occurred selectively under non-limiting dietary supply to maintain optimal levels in the larvae. This combination of flow-through larval rearing and biochemical analysis of FA levels could be applied to additional dietary experiments to precisely define optimal levels of EFA supply. PMID:25771891

  2. Protective role of Arapaima gigas fish scales: structure and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Sherman, Vincent R; Gludovatz, Bernd; Mackey, Mason; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Chang, Edwin H; Schaible, Eric; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2014-08-01

    The scales of the arapaima (Arapaima gigas), one of the largest freshwater fish in the world, can serve as inspiration for the design of flexible dermal armor. Each scale is composed of two layers: a laminate composite of parallel collagen fibrils and a hard, highly mineralized surface layer. We review the structure of the arapaima scales and examine the functions of the different layers, focusing on the mechanical behavior, including tension and penetration of the scales, with and without the highly mineralized outer layer. We show that the fracture of the mineral and the stretching, rotation and delamination of collagen fibrils dissipate a significant amount of energy prior to catastrophic failure, providing high toughness and resistance to penetration by predator teeth. We show that the arapaima's scale has evolved to minimize damage from penetration by predator teeth through a Bouligand-like arrangement of successive layers, each consisting of parallel collagen fibrils with different orientations. This inhibits crack propagation and restricts damage to an area adjoining the penetration. The flexibility of the lamellae is instrumental to the redistribution of the compressive stresses in the underlying tissue, decreasing the severity of the concentrated load produced by the action of a tooth. The experimental results, combined with small-angle X-ray scattering characterization and molecular dynamics simulations, provide a complete picture of the mechanisms of deformation, delamination and rotation of the lamellae during tensile extension of the scale. PMID:24816264

  3. A water-vapour giga-maser in the active galaxy TXFS2226-184.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, A M; Henkel, C; Greenhill, L J; Dey, A; van Breugel, W; Codella, C; Antonucci, R

    1995-12-14

    Active galactic nuclei are thought to be powered by gas falling into a massive black hole; the different types of active galaxy may arise because we view them through a thick torus of molecular gas at varying angles of inclination. One way to determine whether the black hole is surrounded by a torus, which would obscure the accretion disk around the black hole along certain lines of sight, is to search for water masers, as these exist only in regions with plentiful molecular gas. Since the first detection of an extra-galactic water maser in 1979, they have come to be associated primarily with active galaxies, and have even been used to probe the mass of the central engine. Here we report the detection of a water giga-maser in the radio galaxy TXFS2226-184. The strength of the emission supports a recently proposed theory of maser pumping that allows for even more powerful masers, which might be detectable at cosmological distances. Water masers may accordingly provide a way to determine distances to galaxies outside the usual distance ladder, providing an independent calibration of the Hubble constant. PMID:7501016

  4. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5'-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  5. Introduction, establishment and expansion of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Oosterschelde (SW Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaal, A. C.; Kater, B. J.; Wijsman, J.

    2009-03-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was first introduced as an exotic species by oyster farmers in 1964 in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands). The initial phase is not well documented but first natural spatfall was recorded in 1975. Excessive spatfall occurred in 1976 and this is considered the start of the expansion phase of the wild oysters. Oyster beds in intertidal and subtidal areas of the Oosterschelde estuary have been growing since. The development in the intertidal area has been reconstructed by using aerial photography, validated by ground truth in 2000-2002. In the subtidal areas extensive oyster beds have been detected by using side scan sonar; on hard substrates along the dikes coverage with oysters up to 90% locally has been recorded by scuba diving surveys. Expansion has also occurred into adjacent water bodies including the Wadden Sea. By forming resistant reefs the oysters induce structural changes in the ecosystem. It is concluded that bed area is still expanding while decrease of the fraction live animals may indicate adjustment of the stock size to the local conditions.

  6. Effects of ocean acidification on immune responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Cao, Ruiwen; Ning, Xuanxuan; You, Liping; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Chunlin; Wei, Lei; Cong, Ming; Wu, Huifeng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by anthropogenic CO2emissions, has been proposed as one of the greatest threats in marine ecosystems. A growing body of evidence shows that ocean acidification can impact development, survival, growth and physiology of marine calcifiers. In this study, the immune responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated after elevated pCO2 exposure for 28 days. The results demonstrated that OA caused an increase of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in hemocytes. Moreover, elevated pCO2 had an inhibitory effect on some antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased the GSH level in digestive gland. However, the mRNA expression pattern of several immune related genes varied depending on the exposure time and tissues. After exposure to pCO2 at ∼2000 ppm for 28 days, the mRNA expressions of almost all tested genes were significantly suppressed in gills and stimulated in hemocytes. Above all, our study demonstrated that elevated pCO2 have a significant impact on the immune systems of the Pacific oyster, which may constitute as a potential threat to increased susceptibility of bivalves to diseases. PMID:26706224

  7. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  8. An ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas improves atherosclerosis by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Young; Kim, Jihyun; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Tae-Su; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Park, Sung Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas (EAG) on the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and high-cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (25 ng/mL) for the induction of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. EAG (1-10 µg/mL) significantly inhibited both the thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by feeding male New Zealand white rabbits with 0.5% cholesterol in diet for 10 weeks, during which EAG (1% in diet) was given for the final 8 weeks after 2-week induction of hypercholesterolemia. Hypercholesterolemic rabbits exhibited great increases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) levels, and finally severe atheromatous plaque formation covering 28.4% of the arterial walls. EAG significantly increased high-density lipoproteins (HDL), slightly decreased LDL, and potentially reduced the atheroma area to 16.6%. The results indicate that EAG attenuates atherosclerosis not only by inhibiting VASC proliferation, but also by increasing blood HDL levels. Therefore, it is suggested that EAG could be an alternative or an adjunct therapy for the improvement of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:24999363

  9. Decursin from Angelica gigas Nakai Inhibits B16F10 Melanoma Growth Through Induction of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Soo; Seo, Hyobin; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Bae, Sang Mun; Son, Hye-Nam; Lee, Yoon Jeong; Ryu, Sungpil; Park, Rang-Woon; Nam, Ju-Ock

    2015-10-01

    Decursin, a bioactive phytochemical isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (danggwi), has shown preclinical anticancer efficacy in various cancer models. However, the antitumor effect of decursin in melanoma models remains undefined. The antitumor activities of decursin were investigated in B16F10 cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that treatment with decursin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in B16F10 cells, but not in normal cells. Decursin also induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells, as determined by annexin V-staining assay and transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining assay. Decursin increased the phosphorylation of p38 as well as the expression of Bax while decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and the expression of Bcl-2 in B16F10 cells. Moreover, decursin activated caspase-3 in B16F10 cells and xenograft tumor tissue. Together, these findings support further investigations into the potential use of decursin in the treatment of melanoma cells. PMID:26336081

  10. Linkage disequilibrium in wild and cultured populations of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiang; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) can be applied for mapping the actual genes responsible for variation of economically important traits through association mapping. The feasibility and efficacy of association studies are strongly dependent on the extent of LD which determines the number and density of markers in the studied population, as well as the experimental design for an association analysis. In this study, we first characterized the extent of LD in a wild population and a cultured mass-selected line of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas). A total of 88 wild and 96 cultured individuals were selected to assess the level of genome-wide LD with 53 microsatellites, respectively. For syntenic marker pairs, no significant association was observed in the wild population; however, three significant associations occurred in the cultured population, and the significant LD extended up to 12.7 cM, indicating that strong artificial selection is a key force for substantial increase of genome-wide LD in cultured population. The difference of LD between wild and cultured populations showed that association studies in Pacific oyster can be achieved with reasonable marker densities at a relatively low cost by choosing an association mapping population. Furthermore, the frequent occurrence of LD between non-syntenic loci and rare alleles encourages the joint application of linkage analysis and LD mapping when mapping genes in oyster. The information on the linkage disequilibrium in the cultured population is useful for future association mapping in oyster.

  11. Extraction and Identification of the Pigment in the Adductor Muscle Scar of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Li, Jian; Li, Zhonghu; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, UV (ultraviolet) and IR (infrared radiation) spectral analysis were integrated to identify the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The pigment was extracted from the adductor muscle scars of cleaned oyster shells that were pulverized, hydrolyzed in hot hydrochloric acid, purified with diethyl ether, and dissolved in 0.01 mL/L NaOH. The maximum absorption of the pigment in the UV absorption spectrum within the range of 190–500 nm was observed between 210–220 nm. The UV absorbance decreased with increasing wavelength which was consistent with the UV spectral absorption characteristics of melanin. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy scanning revealed characteristic absorption peaks that emerged near 3440 cm-1 and 1630 cm-1, which was consistent with infrared scanning features of eumelanin (a type of melanin). This study has demonstrated for the first time that the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster is melanin, hinting that the adductor muscle could be another organ pigmenting the mollusc shell with melanin other than mantle. PMID:26555720

  12. Vibrio crosai sp. nov., isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Adrián; Balboa, Sabela; Romalde, Jesús L; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    A motile, facultative anaerobic, marine bacterial isolate (CAIM 1437(T)) was obtained from a cultured oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in Sonora, México. The strain was studied by a phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of the 16S rRNA and five housekeeping genes, i.e. ftsZ, gapA, pyrH, recA, and topA. Comparison of the almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence with those of other type strains of the genus Vibrio showed a close relationship with the type strains of Vibrio orientalis and Vibrio rotiferianus, with similarity values ranging from 98.4 to 98.3 %, respectively. MLSA placed this strain within the Orientalis clade. The DNA-DNA hybridization value of strain CAIM 1437(T) with V. orientalis was 59 % and with V. rotiferianus 55 %. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 45.6 mol %. Phenotypic characteristics also showed differences with the species analysed. The results presented here support the description of a novel species, for which the name Vibrio crosai sp. nov. is proposed, with CAIM 1437(T) (= DSM 27145(T)) as the type strain. PMID:24973134

  13. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  14. Combined metabolome and proteome analysis of the mantle tissue from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to elevated pCO2.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lei; Wang, Qing; Ning, Xuanxuan; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Chunlin; Cao, Ruiwen; Wu, Huifeng; Cong, Ming; Li, Fei; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has been found to affect an array of normal physiological processes in mollusks, especially posing a significant threat to the fabrication process of mollusk shell. In the current study, the impact of exposure to elevated pCO2 condition was investigated in mantle tissue of Crassostrea gigas by an integrated metabolomic and proteomic approach. Analysis of metabolome and proteome revealed that elevated pCO2 could affect energy metabolism in oyster C. gigas, marked by differentially altered ATP, succinate, MDH, PEPCK and ALDH levels. Moreover, the up-regulated calponin-2, tropomyosins and myosin light chains indicated that elevated pCO2 probably caused disturbances in cytoskeleton structure in mantle tissue of oyster C. gigas. This work demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and metabolomics could provide important insights into the effects of OA at molecular levels. PMID:25559488

  15. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Characterized by Shell Colors: Identification of Genetic Bases Potentially Involved in Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dandan; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Zhao, Xuelin; Kong, Lingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Shell color polymorphisms of Mollusca have contributed to development of evolutionary biology and population genetics, while the genetic bases and molecular mechanisms underlying shell pigmentation are poorly understood. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is one of the most important farmed oysters worldwide. Through successive family selection, four shell color variants (white, golden, black and partially pigmented) of C. gigas have been developed. To elucidate the genetic mechanisms of shell coloration in C. gigas and facilitate the selection of elite oyster lines with desired coloration patterns, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified among the four shell color variants by RNA-seq. Results Digital gene expression generated over fifteen million reads per sample, producing expression data for 28,027 genes. A total number of 2,645 DEGs were identified from pair-wise comparisons, of which 432, 91, 43 and 39 genes specially were up-regulated in white, black, golden and partially pigmented shell of C. gigas, respectively. Three genes of Abca1, Abca3 and Abcb1 which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters super-families were significantly associated with white shell formation. A tyrosinase transcript (CGI_10008737) represented consistent up-regulated pattern with golden coloration. We proposed that white shell variant of C. gigas could employ “endocytosis” to down-regulate notch level and to prevent shell pigmentation. Conclusion This study discovered some potential shell coloration genes and related molecular mechanisms by the RNA-seq, which would provide foundational information to further study on shell coloration and assist in selective breeding in C. gigas. PMID:26693729

  16. Mercury in cultured oysters (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 and C. corteziensis Hertlein, 1951) from four coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Osuna-Martínez, C C; Páez-Osuna, F; Alonso-Rodríguez, R

    2010-09-01

    In order to determine the mercury concentrations in cultured oysters from coastal lagoons (SE Gulf of California), several individuals of Crassostrea gigas and C. corteziensis were collected and their mercury levels were measured with a cold vapor analyzer. The mean concentrations during the rainy and dry seasons, respectively, were 0.70 and 0.15 microg g(-1) in C. gigas and 0.56 and 0.18 microg g(-1) in C. corteziensis. During the rainy season, elevated mercury contents are apparently related to terrigen transport from the watershed, while during the dry season, the moderate levels are related to upwellings. PMID:20697884

  17. Acetyl-l-carnitine restores synaptic transmission and enhances the inducibility of stable LTP after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Kitti; Frank, Rita; Szabó, József; Knapp, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2016-09-22

    Hypoxic circumstances result in functional and structural impairments of the brain. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on hippocampal slices is a technique widely used to investigate the consequences of ischemic stroke and the potential neuroprotective effects of different drugs. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance in the body, and it can therefore be administered safely even in relatively high doses. In previous experiments, ALC pretreatment proved to be effective against global hypoperfusion. In the present study, we investigated whether ALC can be protective in an OGD model. We are not aware of any earlier study in which the long-term potentiation (LTP) function on hippocampal slices was measured after OGD. Therefore, we set out to determine whether an effective ALC concentration has an effect on synaptic plasticity after OGD in the hippocampal CA1 subfield of rats. A further aim was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effect of this compound. The experiments revealed that ALC is neuroprotective against OGD in a dose-dependent manner, which is manifested not only in the regeneration of the impaired synaptic transmission after the OGD, but also in the inducibility and stability of the LTP. In the case of the most effective concentration of ALC (500μM), use of a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) revealed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a key role in the restoration of the synaptic transmission and plasticity reached by ALC treatment. PMID:27378558

  18. Characterizing absolute lymphocyte count profiles in dimethyl fumarate–treated patients with MS

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew; Gold, Ralf; Phillips, J. Theodore; Selmaj, Krzysztof; Chang, Ih; Novas, Mark; Rana, Jitesh; Marantz, Jing L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF), indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), is a disease-modifying therapy with potential immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects. In clinical trials, DMF was associated with reduced white blood cell and absolute lymphocyte counts. Current US prescribing information recommends obtaining a complete blood count, including absolute lymphocyte count (ALC), before initiating and during DMF treatment. Methods: We conducted an integrated analysis of phase 2b/3/long-term extension studies of DMF in MS (N = 2,470) to characterize ALC profiles. Results: Mean ALCs decreased by 30% during the first year and then plateaued, remaining above the lower limit of normal (LLN). Among patients treated ≥6 months (N = 2,099), 2.2% experienced ALCs <500 mm3 persisting ≥6 months. ALCs remained ≥LLN in 84% and 76% of patients during the first 6 and 12 months, respectively; of these, 0.1% and 0%, respectively, developed ALCs <500 mm3 persisting ≥6 months at any time. Evidence of ALC improvement following DMF discontinuation was observed. DMF efficacy was not substantially different in patients with and without lymphopenia. Conclusion: Lymphocyte monitoring provides effective means for early identification of patients at risk for developing severe, prolonged lymphopenia. PMID:27347439

  19. In the rat brain acetyl-L-carnitine treatment modulates the expression of genes involved in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Enrico; Macchi, Monica; Durante, Mauro; Brunelli, Marcello

    2008-10-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance that, when administered at supraphysiological concentration, is neuroprotective. It is a molecule of considerable interest for its clinical application in various neural disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and painful neuropathies. Suppression subtractive hybridization methodology was used for the generation of subtracted cDNA libraries and the subsequent identification of differentially expressed transcripts in the rat brain after ALC treatment. The method generates an equalized representation of differentially expressed genes irrespective of their relative abundance and it is based on the construction of forward and reverse cDNA libraries that allow the identification of the genes which are regulated by ALC. We report that ALC treatment: (1) upregulates lysosomal H(+)/ATPase gene expression and (2) downregulates myelin basic protein gene expression. The expression of these genes is altered in some forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) pathologies. In this case, ALC might rebalance the disorders underlying NCL disease represented by a disturbance in pH homeostasis affecting the acidification of vesicles transported to lysosomal compartment for degradation. This study provides evidence that ALC controls genes involved in these serious neurological pathologies and provides insights into the ways in which ALC might exert its therapeutic benefits. PMID:18726077

  20. Benefits of oxygen incorporation in atomic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Atomic laminates such as MAX phases benefit from the addition of oxygen in many ways, from the formation of a protective oxide surface layer with self-healing capabilities when cracks form to the tuning of anisotropic conductivity. In this paper oxygen incorporation and vacancy formation in M 2AlC (M  =  Ti, V, Cr) MAX phases have been studied using first-principles calculations where the focus is on phase stability and electronic structure for different oxygen and/or vacancy configurations. Oxygen prefers different lattice sites depending on M-element and this can be correlated to the number of available non-bonding M d-electrons. In Ti2AlC, oxygen substitutes carbon while in Cr2AlC it is located interstitially within the Al-layer. I predict that oxygen incorporation in Ti2AlC stabilizes the material, which explains the experimentally observed 12.5 at% oxygen (x  =  0.5) in Ti2Al(C1‑x O x ). In addition, it is also possible to use oxygen to stabilize the hypothetical Zr2AlC and Hf2AlC. Hence, oxygen incorporation may be beneficial in many ways. Not only can it make a material more stable, but it also can act as a reservoir for internal self-healing with shorter diffusion paths.

  1. Acetyl-L-carnitine and oxaloacetate in post-treatment against LTP impairment in a rat ischemia model. An in vitro electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, K; Knapp, L; Mészáros, J; Kis, Z; Farkas, T; Vécsei, L; Toldi, J

    2015-06-01

    A high proportion of research relating to cerebral ischemia focuses on neuroprotection. The application of compounds normally present in the organism is popular, because they do not greatly influence the synaptic activity by receptor modulation, and can be administered without serious side effects. Oxaloacetate (OxAc) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) are such favorable endogenous molecules. ALC can exert a protective effect by improving the energy state of the neurons under ischemic conditions. A promising neuroprotective strategy is glutamate scavenging, which can be achieved by the intravenous administration of OxAc. This study involved the possible protective effects of ALC and OxAc in different post-treatment protocols against long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment. Ischemia was induced in rats by 2-vessel occlusion, which led to a decreased LTP relative to the control group. High-dose (200 mg/kg) ALC or OxAc post-treatment resulted in a higher potentiation relative to the 2VO group, but it did not reach the control level, whereas low-dose ALC (100 mg/kg) in combination with OxAc completely restored the LTP function. Many previous studies have concluded that ALC can be protective only as pretreatment. The strategy described here reveals that ALC can also be neuroprotective when utilized as post-treatment against ischemia. PMID:25432433

  2. [Reproductive activity of Strombus gigas (Mesogasteropoda: Strombidae) in differente habitats of Alacranes reef, Yucatán].

    PubMed

    Pérez Pérez, Manuel; Aldana Aranda, Dalila

    2003-06-01

    The spawning relationships with temperature/photoperiod of Strombus gigas were investigated considering three habitats in Alacranes Reef, Yucatan, between February 1999 and March 2000. The sites were 22 degrees 34'N, 89 degrees 42'W (site 1); 22 degrees 29'N, 89"45'W (site 2) and 22 degrees 22'N, 89 degrees 39'W (site 3). At each site, transects (100 m x 10 m) were done. Different kinds of reproductive behavior of S. gigas was observed: such as copulating and egg-laying. Individuals alone and egg masses were registered as well. The S. gigas shell length and lip thickness were measured. High density of adults was found at site 2 with 87 conchs in one transect of 1000 m2. The mean density per m2 was 0.004 for site 1; 0.035 for site 2; and 0.003 for site 3. The mean shell length was 220 mm and the lip thickness mean was 16 mm (N = 783) for all sites. In February 1999 egg-laying female was found on sand. There was a high reproductive activity at site 2 with 8 egg-laying and 18 egg masses. Minimum reproductive activity was found at site 3 with 2 egg masses. The bottom-water temperature was related positively with copulating pairs (r = 0.723, f = 11.05, p < 0.01) and egg masses (r = 0.736, f = 11.82, p < 0.1). Correlation between photoperiod with copulating pairs (r = 0.857, f = 27.78, p < 0.01) and egg masses (r = 0.782, f = 15.77, p < 0.01) were found as well. PMID:15264562

  3. Use of nanoindentation technique for a better understanding of the fracture toughness of Strombus gigas conch shell

    SciTech Connect

    Romana, L.; Thomas, P.; Bilas, P.; Mansot, J.L.; Merrifiels, M.; Bercion, Y.; Aranda, D. Aldana

    2013-02-15

    In this work the nanochemical properties of the composite organomineral biomaterial constituting Strombus gigas conch shell are studied by means of dynamic mechanical analyses associated to nanoidentation technique. The measurements are performed on shell samples presenting different surface orientations relative to the growth axis of the conch shell. The influence of the organic component of the biomaterial on its nanomechanical properties is also investigated by studying fresh and dried S. gigas conch shells. Monocrystalline aragonite is used as a reference. For the understanding of nanochemical behaviour, special attention is paid to the pop in events observed on the load/displacement curves which results from nanofractures' initiation and propagation occuring during the load process. In order to better understand the mechanical properties systematic studies of the structure and morphology are performed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The hardness and Young's modulus values measured on bio aragonite samples are close to those of the aragonite mineral standard. This surprising result shows that, H and E values are not related to the bio composition and lamellar structure of the bio aragonite. However, it was found that the organic layer and the micro architecture strongly influence the nanofracture initiation and propagation processes in the samples. Statistic study of the pop-in events can help to predict the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of the material. - Highlights: ► Nanomechanical properties of Strombus gigas conch shell ► Low influence of the crossed lamellar structure on H and E values at the nano scale ► Strong influence of the crossed lamellar on nanocracks initiation ► Correlation between mechanical behaviors at the macro and nano scales.

  4. Locomotion and behavior of Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in relation to natural hypoxia in the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gilly, William F; Zeidberg, Louis D; Booth, J Ashley T; Stewart, Julia S; Marshall, Greg; Abernathy, Kyler; Bell, Lauren E

    2012-09-15

    We studied the locomotion and behavior of Dosidicus gigas using pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags to record environmental parameters (depth, temperature and light) and an animal-borne video package (AVP) to log these parameters plus acceleration along three axes and record forward-directed video under natural lighting. A basic cycle of locomotor behavior in D. gigas involves an active climb of a few meters followed by a passive (with respect to jetting) downward glide carried out in a fins-first direction. Temporal summation of such climb-and-glide events underlies a rich assortment of vertical movements that can reach vertical velocities of 3 m s(-1). In contrast to such rapid movements, D. gigas spends more than 80% of total time gliding at a vertical velocity of essentially zero (53% at 0±0.05 m s(-1)) or sinking very slowly (28% at -0.05 to -0.15 m s(-1)). The vertical distribution of squid was compared with physical features of the local water column (temperature, oxygen and light). Oxygen concentrations of ≤20 μmol kg(-1), characteristic of the midwater oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), can influence the daytime depth of squid, but this depends on location and season, and squid can 'decouple' from this environmental feature. Light is also an important factor in determining daytime depth, and temperature can limit nighttime depth. Vertical velocities were compared over specific depth ranges characterized by large differences in dissolved oxygen. Velocities were generally reduced under OMZ conditions, with faster jetting being most strongly affected. These data are discussed in terms of increased efficiency of climb-and-glide swimming and the potential for foraging at hypoxic depths. PMID:22915711

  5. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  6. Seasonal variation of Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae) parasitemia from Boa constrictor amarali (Serpentes, Boidae) and Hydrodynastes gigas (Serpentes, Colubridae).

    PubMed

    de Vieira Santos, Mariana Morena; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena; da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the parasitemia variation of three Hepatozoon species in Brazilian snakes. This study was conducted between 2001 and 2003 and included Hepatozoon terzii from Boa constrictor amarali, and Hepatozoon migonei and Hepatozoon cyclagrasi from Hydrodynastes gigas. It was observed that the parasitemia tended to decrease in all three Hepatozoon species but the parasites were not eliminated. This data suggest that Hepatozoon infection may be similar to Toxoplasma gondii infection, in that it persists throughout host life. PMID:15999279

  7. Tests of anaerobic alactacid and lactacid capacities: description and reliability.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, J A; Lortie, G; Boulay, M R; Bouchard, C

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is 1) to describe maximal anaerobic alactacid (AAC) and lactacid (ALC) capacity test and 2) to determine their reliabilities in men and women. The subjects were submitted to either a 10-s (2 trials) or a 90-s (1 trial) all-out ergocycle test for AAC and ALC respectively. Thirty-four male and 24 female subjects were tested for AAC, while 21 males and 19 females took part in the ALC test. A modified bicycle ergometer allowed the exact measurement of the distance and the work load for the computation of the work performed. load for the computation of the work performed. Each subject was tested and retested within 7 days. In both AAC and ALC, male subjects performed more work than women. AAC was 108 +/- 16 (mean +/- SD) and 90 +/- 14 J/kg for males and females respectively while ALC was 486 +/- 50 and 377 +/- 34 J/kg. Although the work load was designed to be 0.09 kp/kg for the AAC and 0.05 kp/kg for the ALC tests, there were wide variations between subjects with respect to the optimal load (AAC: from 0.05 to 0.11; ALC: from 0.03 to 0.06 kp/kg). Reproducibility was consistently high, with intraclass correlations of 0.98 and 0.99 for AAC (AAC-Max) and ALC respectively, with no difference between the male and female subgroups. It is concluded that these AAC and ALC tests, designed under assumptions of face validity, allow for differences between males and females and are highly repeatable. PMID:6652864

  8. The shell organic matrix of the crossed lamellar queen conch shell (Strombus gigas).

    PubMed

    Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Benhamada, Sana; Guichard, Nathalie; Marie, Benjamin; Plasseraud, Laurent; Corneillat, Marion; Alcaraz, Gérard; Checa, Antonio; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    In molluscs, the shell organic matrix comprises a large set of biomineral-occluded proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides that are secreted by the calcifying mantle epithelium, and are supposed to display several functions related to the synthesis of the shell. In the present paper, we have characterized biochemically the shell matrix associated to the crossed-lamellar structure of the giant queen conch Strombus gigas. The acid-soluble (ASM) and acid-insoluble (AIM) matrices represent an extremely minor fraction of the shell. Both are constituted of polydisperse and of few discrete proteins among which three fractions, obtained by preparative SDS-PAGE and named 1P3, 2P3 and 3P3, are dominant and were further characterized. Compared to other matrices, the acid-soluble matrix is weakly glycosylated (3%) and among the discrete components, only 3P3 seems noticeably glycosylated. The monosaccharide composition of the ASM shows that mannose represents the main monosaccharide. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a high ratio of this sugar in a skeletal matrix. Furthermore, the ASM interacts with the in vitro crystallization of calcium carbonate, but this interaction is moderate. It differs from that of the isolated 1P3 fraction but is similar to that of the 2P3 and 3P3 fractions. At last, antibodies developed from the 3P3 fraction were used to localize this fraction within the shell by immunogold. This study is the first one aiming at characterizing the organic matrix associated to the crossed-lamellar structure of the queen conch shell. PMID:24291423

  9. Effect of Carbonate Chemistry Alteration on the Early Embryonic Development of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Gazeau, Frédéric; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry; Peene, Jan; Heip, Carlo H. R.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae). Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition). Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions. PMID:21860666

  10. Horseshoe crab, Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) spawning population at Balok Beach, Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, A N; Christianus, A; Shakibazadeh, S; Hajeb, P

    2012-07-01

    Local and regional decline of Asian horseshoe crabs has spurred a study on its spawning population at Balok Beach, Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia. This location was identified as spawning site due to the occurrence of horseshoe crab spawning pairs and nests. Size-frequency, length-weight relationships, sex ratio and epibiont infestation of Tachypleus gigas were studied. Instar stage was estimated based on prosomal width. Condition of the horseshoe crab carapace was reported. Visual search technique of horseshoe crab was conducted during high tide of new and full moons. Prosomal, opisthosomal and telson length and weight of each horseshoe crab were measured. Largest female was recorded with mean prosomal length and width of 154.4 and 246.9 mm, respectively. About 69.8% of the males belonged to size group of 151-200 mm and 53.3% of females were grouped into 201-250 mm. All individuals were of fourteenth to sixteenth instar stages. Sex ratio varied from 0.313 to 2.5 and attributed to commercial harvest and monsoon season. Sand sediment of study site showed 93% of fine sands with grain size ranged from 120 to 250 microm. Acorn and pedunculate barnacle, conical and flat slipper shells were found on the carapace of the specimens. Most males had damaged eyes and carapaces while females with broken telsons. Body damages of about 19.9% on the specimens were likely due to nearby fishing activities. Lack of satellite male indicated low spawning population. The finding of this study showed that the species is extremely threatened by human activities and coastal development. PMID:24218930

  11. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis. PMID:26975413

  12. Crystal structure of rubredoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas to ultra-high 0.68 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-J. . E-mail: cjchen@nsrrc.org.tw; Lin, Y.-H.; Huang, Y.-C.; Liu, M.-Y. . E-mail: mingliu@nsrrc.org.tw

    2006-10-13

    Rubredoxin (D.g. Rd) is a small non-heme iron-sulfur protein shown to function as a redox coupling protein from the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio gigas. The protein is generally purified from anaerobic bacteria in which it is thought to be involved in electron transfer or exchange processes. Rd transfers an electron to oxygen to form water as part of a unique electron transfer chain, composed by NADH:rubredoxin oxidoreductase (NRO), rubredoxin and rubredoxin:oxygen oxidoreductase (ROO) in D.g. The crystal structure of D.g. Rd has been determined by means of both a Fe single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) signal and the direct method, and refined to an ultra-high 0.68 A resolution, using X-ray from a synchrotron. Rd contains one iron atom bound in a tetrahedral coordination by the sulfur atoms of four cysteinyl residues. Hydrophobic and {pi}-{pi} interactions maintain the internal Rd folding. Multiple conformations of the iron-sulfur cluster and amino acid residues are observed and indicate its unique mechanism of electron transfer. Several hydrogen bonds, including N-H..., SG of the iron-sulfur, are revealed clearly in maps of electron density. Abundant waters bound to C-O peptides of residues Val8, Cys9, Gly10, Ala38, and Gly43, which may be involved in electron transfer. This ultrahigh-resolution structure allows us to study in great detail the relationship between structure and function of rubredoxin, such as salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, water structures, cysteine ligands, iron-sulfur cluster, and distributions of electron density among activity sites. For First time, this information will provide a clear role for this protein in a strict anaerobic bacterium.

  13. A cytokine-like factor astakine accelerates the hemocyte production in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqun; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Meijia; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Astakine has been reported to be a hematopoietic growth factor of prokineticin homolog firstly found in arthropods freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In the present study, an astakine homologous gene was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgAstakine). The full length cDNA of CgAstakine encoded a polypeptide of 103 amino acids containing a prokineticin (PK) domain homologous to that in astakine from freshwater crayfish P. leniusculus. The deduced amino acid sequence of CgAstakine shared higher similarity with those of other invertebrate astakines than prokineticins from vertebrates. The mRNA of CgAstakine was highly expressed in hepatopancreas and adductor muscle of oyster, while the CgAstakine protein was mainly distributed in hepatopancreas, gill and hemocytes. The mRNA expression of CgAstakine in hemocytes was significantly increased (p < 0.01) and maintained at a high level from 3 h to 9 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge. After the oyster hemocytes were incubated with 5 μg/mL recombinant CgAstakine protein (rCgAstakine) for 24 h in vitro, the proliferation of hemocytes was significantly increased to 1.89 fold of that in control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the total count of oyster hemocytes was significantly upregulated (2.45 fold of that in control group, p < 0.05) at 12 h after the oysters were received an injection of rCgAstakine (0.5 μg/g). These results collectively indicated that CgAstakine could modulate the hemocytes proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, and probably involved in the hematopoietic process fighting against the invasion of foreign pathogens. PMID:26523496

  14. Disruption of amylase genes by RNA interference affects reproduction in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Huvet, Arnaud; Béguel, Jean-Philippe; Cavaleiro, Nathalia Pereira; Thomas, Yoann; Quillien, Virgile; Boudry, Pierre; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Fabioux, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Feeding strategies and digestive capacities can have important implications for variation in energetic pathways associated with ecological and economically important traits, such as growth or reproduction in bivalve species. Here, we investigated the role of amylase in the digestive processes of Crassostrea gigas, using in vivo RNA interference. This approach also allowed us to investigate the relationship between energy intake by feeding and gametogenesis in oysters. Double-stranded (ds)RNA designed to target the two α-amylase genes A and B was injected in vivo into the visceral mass of oysters at two doses. These treatments caused significant reductions in mean mRNA levels of the amylase genes: -50.7% and -59% mRNA A, and -71.9% and -70.6% mRNA B in 15 and 75 µg dsRNA-injected oysters, respectively, relative to controls. Interestingly, reproductive knock-down phenotypes were observed for both sexes at 48 days post-injection, with a significant reduction of the gonad area (-22.5% relative to controls) and germ cell under-proliferation revealed by histology. In response to the higher dose of dsRNA, we also observed reductions in amylase activity (-53%) and absorption efficiency (-5%). Based on these data, dynamic energy budget modeling showed that the limitation of energy intake by feeding that was induced by injection of amylase dsRNA was insufficient to affect gonadic development at the level observed in the present study. This finding suggests that other driving mechanisms, such as endogenous hormonal modulation, might significantly change energy allocation to reproduction, and increase the maintenance rate in oysters in response to dsRNA injection. PMID:25883379

  15. Tenacibaculum crassostreae sp. nov., isolated from the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sun; Baik, Keun Sik; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Eun Mi; Lee, Dong-Heon; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Jeon, Che Ok; Jung, Jae Sung

    2009-07-01

    A rod-shaped, yellow-pigmented, aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, designated strain JO-1(T), was isolated from an apparently healthy Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, collected at Wan Island, Korea. It grew at 15-37 degrees C (optimum 30 degrees C) only in the presence of sea salts. Strain JO-1(T) hydrolysed casein, Tween 80 and starch. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (23.8 %), summed feature 3 (comprising C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH; 14.5 %) and iso-C(15 : 1) G (14.1 %). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain JO-1(T) was a member of the genus Tenacibaculum in the family Flavobacteriaceae, with sequence similarity of 94.6-97.8 % to the type strains of recognized members of the genus. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 31.4 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness levels between strain JO-1(T) and the five closest relatives, Tenacibaculum litoreum KCCM 42115(T), T. lutimaris KCTC 12302(T), T. aestuarii KCTC 12569(T), T. mesophilum DSM 13764(T) and T. adriaticum JCM 14633(T), were less than 28 %. Phylogenetic analyses and differences in physiological and biochemical characteristics suggested that strain JO-1(T) (=KCTC 22329(T) =JCM 15428(T)) should be classified as the type strain of a novel species within the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculum crassostreae sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:19542127

  16. Caspase-3 serves as an intracellular immune receptor specific for lipopolysaccharide in oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiachao; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Yiqun; Li, Meijia; Cheng, Qi; Zhao, Depeng; Yang, Bin; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death process controlled by a family of cysteine proteases called caspases, which plays a crucial role in the immune system homeostasis. The apoptosis and the detailed regulation mechanism have been well studied in vertebrate, but the information in lower animals, especially invertebrates, is still very limited. In the present study, Caspase-3 in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgCaspase-3) was enriched by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affinity chromatography and further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-mass spectrometry. The binding activity of CgCaspase-3 to LPS was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed its high binding specificity and moderate binding affinity (KD = 1.08 × 10(-6) M) to LPS. The recombinant CgCaspase-3 exhibited high proteolytic activity to substrate Ac-DEVD-pNA and relatively weak activity to substrate Ac-DMQD-pNA and Ac-VDQQD-pNA. The binding of CgCaspase-3 to LPS significantly inhibited its proteolytic activity toward AC-DEVD-pNA in vitro. The over-expression of CgCaspase-3 leaded to the phosphatidylserine exposure on the external plasma membrane and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, which reduced cell viability, and finally induced cell apoptosis. But the cell apoptosis mediated by CgCaspase-3 in vivo was significantly inhibited by the treatment of LPS. These results collectively indicated that CgCaspase-3 could serve as an intracellular LPS receptor, and the interaction of LPS with CgCaspase-3 specifically inhibited the cell apoptosis induced by CgCaspase-3. PMID:26993662

  17. Metal speciation and toxicity of Tamar Estuary water to larvae of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Money, Cathryn; Braungardt, Charlotte B; Jha, Awadhesh N; Worsfold, Paul J; Achterberg, Eric P

    2011-07-01

    As part of the PREDICT Tamar Workshop, the toxicity of estuarine waters in the Tamar Estuary (southwest England) was assessed by integration of metal speciation determination with bioassays. High temporal resolution metal speciation analysis was undertaken in situ by deployment of a Voltammetric In situ Profiling (VIP) system. The VIP detects Cd (cadmium), Pb (lead) and Cu (copper) species smaller than 4 nm in size and this fraction is termed 'dynamic' and considered biologically available. Cadmium was mainly present in the dynamic form and constituted between 56% and 100% of the total dissolved concentration, which was determined subsequently in the laboratory in filtered discrete samples. In contrast, the dynamic Pb and Cu fractions were less important, with a much larger proportion of these metals associated with organic ligands and/or colloids (45-90% Pb and 46-85% Cu), which probably reduced the toxicological impact of these elements in this system. Static toxicity tests, based on the response of Crassostrea gigas larva exposed to discrete water samples showed a high level of toxicity (up to 100% abnormal development) at two stations in the Tamar, particularly during periods of the tidal cycle when the influence of more pristine coastal water was at its lowest. Competitive ligand-exchange Cu titrations showed that natural organic ligands reduced the free cupric ion concentration to levels that were unlikely to have been the sole cause of the observed toxicity. Nonetheless, it is probable that the combined effect of the metals determined in this work contributed significantly to the bioassay response. PMID:21704365

  18. Sequential Isotopic Signature Along Gladius Highlights Contrasted Individual Foraging Strategies of Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Lorrain, Anne; Argüelles, Juan; Alegre, Ana; Bertrand, Arnaud; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Richard, Pierre; Cherel, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Background Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, but knowledge of their feeding ecology is limited. In particular, intra- and inter-individual variations in their use of resources has not been adequatly explored, although there is growing evidence that individual organisms can vary considerably in the way they use their habitats and resources. Methodology/Principal Findings Using δ13C and δ15N values of serially sampled gladius (an archival tissue), we examined high resolution variations in the trophic niche of five large (>60 cm mantle length) jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas) that were collected off the coast of Peru. We report the first evidence of large inter-individual differences in jumbo squid foraging strategies with no systematic increase of trophic level with size. Overall, gladius δ13C values indicated one or several migrations through the squid's lifetime (∼8–9 months), during which δ15N values also fluctuated (range: 1 to 5‰). One individual showed an unexpected terminal 4.6‰ δ15N decrease (more than one trophic level), thus indicating a shift from higher- to lower-trophic level prey at that time. The data illustrate the high diversity of prey types and foraging histories of this species at the individual level. Conclusions/Significance The isotopic signature of gladii proved to be a powerful tool to depict high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids, thus complementing traditional information offered by stomach content analysis and stable isotopes on metabolically active tissues. The observed differences in life history strategies highlight the high degree of plasticity of the jumbo squid and its high potential to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:21779391

  19. Antioxidant deficit in gills of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) exposed to chlorodinitrobenzene increases menadione toxicity.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Arl, Miriam; Sacchet, Cássia Lopes; Engel, Cristiano Severino; Danielli, Naissa Maria; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Brocardo, Caroline; Maris, Angelica Francesca; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2012-02-01

    Disturbances in antioxidant defenses decrease cellular protection against oxidative stress and jeopardize cellular homeostasis. To knock down the antioxidant defenses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, animals were pre-treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and further challenged with pro-oxidant menadione (MEN). CDNB pre-treatment (10 μM for 18 h) was able to consume cellular thiols in gills, decreasing GSH (53%) and decrease protein thiols (25%). CDNB pre-treatment also disrupted glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase activity in the gills, but likewise strongly induced glutathione S-transferase activity (270% increase). Surprisingly, hemocyte viability was greatly affected 24 h after CDNB removal, indicating a possible vulnerability of the oyster immune system to electrophilic attack. New in vivo approaches were established, allowing the identification of higher rates of GSH-CDNB conjugate export to the seawater and enabling the measurement of the organic peroxide consumption rate. CDNB-induced impairment in antioxidant defenses decreased the peroxide removal rate from seawater. After showing that CDNB decreased gill antioxidant defenses and increased DNA damage in hemocytes, oysters were further challenged with 1 mM MEN over 24 h. MEN treatment did not affect thiol homeostasis in gills, while CDNB pre-treated animals recovered GSH and PSH to the control level after 24 h of depuration. Interestingly, MEN intensified GSH and PSH loss and mortality in CDNB-pre-treated animals, showing a clear synergistic effect. The superoxide-generating one-electron reduction of MEN was predominant in gills and may have contributed to MEN toxicity. These results support the idea that antioxidant-depleted animals are more susceptible to oxidative attack, which can compromise survival. Data also corroborate the idea that gills are an important detoxifying organ, able to dispose of organic peroxides, induce phase II enzymes, and efficiently export GSH

  20. Linkage Maps of Microsatellite DNA Markers for the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Sophie; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    We constructed male and female consensus linkage maps for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, using a total of 102 microsatellite DNA markers typed in 11-day-old larvae from three families. We identified 11 and 12 linkage groups in the male and female consensus maps, respectively. Alignment of these separate maps, however, suggests 10 linkage groups, which agrees with the haploid chromosome number. The male linkage map comprises 88 loci and spans 616.1 cM, while the female map comprises 86 loci and spans 770.5 cM. The male and the female maps share 74 loci; 2 markers remain unlinked. The estimated coverages for the consensus linkage maps are 79% for the male and 70–75% for the female, on the basis of two estimates of genome length. Ninety-five percent of the genome is expected to lie within 16 and 21 cM of markers on the male and female maps, respectively, while 95% of simulated minimum distances to the male and female maps are within 10.1 and 13.6 cM, respectively. Females have significantly more recombination than males, across 118 pairs of linked markers in common to the parents of the three families. Significant differences in recombination and orders of markers are also evident among same-sex parents of different families as well as sibling parents of opposite sex. These observations suggest that polymorphism for chromosomal rearrangements may exist in natural populations, which could have profound implications for interpreting the evolutionary genetics of the oyster. These are the first linkage maps for a bivalve mollusc that use microsatellite DNA markers, which should enable them to be transferred to other families and to be useful for further genetic analyses such as QTL mapping. PMID:15454548

  1. Effects of mosquito control pesticides on competent queen conch (Strombus gigas) larvae.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Gabriel A; Glazer, Robert A; Wetzel, Dana

    2013-10-01

    Pesticides are applied seasonally in the Florida Keys to control nuisance populations of mosquitoes that pose a health threat to humans. There is, however, a need to investigate the effects of these pesticides on non-target marine organisms. We tested naled and permethrin, two mosquito adulticides used in the Keys, on a critical early life-history stage of queen conch (Strombus gigas). We conducted 12-h exposure experiments on competent (i.e., capable of undergoing metamorphosis) queen conch larvae using environmentally relevant pesticide concentrations. We found that there was little to no mortality and that the pesticides did not induce or interfere with metamorphosis. However, after introduction of a natural metamorphic cue (extract of the red alga Laurencia potei), a significantly greater proportion of larvae underwent metamorphosis in the pesticide treatments than in those with the alga alone. In addition to the morphogenetic pathway that induces metamorphosis when stimulated, there thus appears to be a regulatory pathway that enhances the response to metamorphic triggers, as suggested by the increased sensitivity of the queen conch larvae to the algal cue after pesticide exposure (i.e., the pesticides stimulated the regulatory pathway). The regulatory pathway probably plays a role in the identification of high-quality habitat for metamorphosis, as the increased response to the algal cue suggests. Aerial drift and runoff can carry these pesticides into nearshore waters, where they may act as a false signal of favorable conditions and facilitate metamorphosis in suboptimal habitat, thus adversely affecting recruitment in nearshore queen conch populations. PMID:24243960

  2. Foraging ecology and movement patterns of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John C.; Elliger, Carl; Baltz, Ken; Gillespie, Graham E.; Gilly, William F.; Ruiz-Cooley, R. I.; Pearse, Devon; Stewart, Julia S.; Matsubu, William; Walker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    From 2002 to 2010, the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) has been regularly encountered in large numbers throughout the California Current System (CCS). This species, usually found in subtropical waters, could affect coastal pelagic ecosystems and fisheries as both predator and prey. Neither the abundance of jumbo squid nor the optimal ocean conditions in which they flourish are well known. To understand better the potential impacts of this species on both commercial fisheries and on food-web structure we collected nearly 900 specimens from waters of the CCS, covering over 20° of latitude, over a range of depths and seasons. We used demographic information (size, sex, and maturity state) and analyzed stomach contents using morphological and molecular methods to best understand the foraging ecology of this species in different habitats of the CCS. Squid were found to consume a broad array of prey. Prey in offshore waters generally reflected the forage base reported in previous studies (mainly mesopelagic fishes and squids), whereas in more coastal waters (shelf, shelf break and slope habitats) squid foraged on a much broader mix that included substantial numbers of coastal pelagic fishes (Pacific herring and northern anchovy, as well as osmerids and salmonids in northern waters) and groundfish (Pacific hake, several species of rockfish and flatfish). We propose a seasonal movement pattern, based on size and maturity distributions along with qualitative patterns of presence or absence, and discuss the relevance of both the movement and distribution of jumbo squid over space and time. We find that jumbo squid are a generalist predator, which feeds primarily on small, pelagic or mesopelagic micronekton but also on larger fishes when they are available. We also conclude that interactions with and potential impacts on ecosystems likely vary over space and time, in response to both seasonal movement patterns and highly variable year-to-year abundance of the squid themselves.

  3. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Hothem, R.L.; Bergen, D.R.; Martin, L.L.; Taylor, R.J.; Brussee, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (??g/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (??g/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations. ?? 2008 US Government.

  4. Discovery and validation of genic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Wang, Di; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    The economic and ecological importance of the oyster necessitates further research on the molecular mechanisms, which both regulate the commercially important traits of the oyster and help it to survive in the variable marine environment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been widely used to assess genetic variation and identify genes underlying target traits. In addition, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a potentially powerful method for validating candidate SNPs. In this study, we adopted a rapid and efficient pipeline for the screening and validation of SNPs in the genic region of Crassostrea gigas based on transcriptome sequencing and HRM analysis. Transcriptomes of three wild oyster populations were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. In total, 50-60 million short reads, corresponding to 4.5-5.4 Gbp, from each population were aligned to the oyster genome, and 5.8 × 10(5) SNPs were putatively identified, resulting in a predicted SNP every 47 nucleotides on average. The putative SNPs were unevenly distributed in the genome and high-density (≥2%), nonsynonymous coding SNPs were enriched in genes related to apoptosis and responses to biotic stimuli. Subsequently, 1,671 loci were detected by HRM analysis, accounting for 64.7% of the total selected candidate primers, and finally, 1,301 polymorphic SNP markers were developed based on HRM analysis. All of the validated SNPs were distributed into 897 genes and located in 672 scaffolds, and 275 of these genes were stress inducible under unfavourable salinity, temperature, and exposure to air and heavy metals. The validated SNPs in this study provide valuable molecular markers for genetic mapping and characterization of important traits in oysters. PMID:24823694

  5. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Rondon, R; Akcha, F; Alonso, P; Menard, D; Rouxel, J; Montagnani, C; Mitta, G; Cosseau, C; Grunau, C

    2016-06-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an increase in energy production and mitotic activity in 5-month-spats from diuron-exposed genitors. These results could correspond to a "catch-up growth" phenomenon allowing the spats from diuron-exposed genitors, which displayed a growth delay at 3 months, to gain a normal size when they reach the age of 6 months. These results indicate that exposure to a concentration of diuron that is frequently encountered in the field during the oyster's gametogenesis stage can impact the next generation

  6. Cellular and Transcriptional Responses of Crassostrea gigas Hemocytes Exposed in Vitro to Brevetoxin (PbTx-2)

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Danielle F.; de Oliveira, Eliza S.; Vieira, Renato C.; Simoes, Erik; Trevisan, Rafael; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hemocytes mediate a series of immune reactions essential for bivalve survival in the environment, however, the impact of harmful algal species and their associated phycotoxins upon bivalve immune system is under debate. To better understand the possible toxic effects of these toxins, Crassostrea gigas hemocytes were exposed to brevetoxin (PbTx-2). Hemocyte viability, monitored through the neutral red retention and MTT reduction assays, and apoptosis (Hoechst staining) remained unchanged during 12 h of exposure to PbTx-2 in concentrations up to 1000 µg/L. Despite cell viability and apoptosis remained stable, hemocytes incubated for 4 h with 1000 µg/L of PbTx-2 revealed higher expression levels of Hsp70 (p < 0.01) and CYP356A1 (p < 0.05) transcripts and a tendency to increase FABP expression, as evaluated by Real-Time quantitative PCR. The expression of other studied genes (BPI, IL-17, GSTO, EcSOD, Prx6, SOD and GPx) remained unchanged. The results suggest that the absence of cytotoxic effects of PbTx-2 in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes, even at high concentrations, allow early defense responses to be produced by activating protective mechanisms associated to detoxification (CYP356A1 and possibly FABP) and stress (Hsp70), but not to immune or to antioxidant (BPI, IL-17, EcSOD, Prx6, GPx and SOD) related genes. PMID:22611355

  7. Cytochemical investigation of the digestive gland of two strombidae species (Strombus gigas and Strombus pugilis) in relation to the nutrition.

    PubMed

    Volland, Jean-Marie; Gros, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    Strombus gigas and Strombus pugilis are threatened species and aquaculture represents a good alternative solution to the fishing. In this study, we highlighted the intracellular digestion process in the digestive gland of two Strombidae species, S. gigas and Strombuspugilis, by the cytochemical characterization of two lysosomal enzymes: acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase. In order to check the efficiency of artificial food digestion, we conducted the characterization on freshly collected, starved and artificially fed individuals of S. pugilis. TEM observations of digestive gland sections from freshly collected individuals of both species revealed the presence of acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase activity mostly located in the apical third of digestive cells. Both enzymes were also detected in artificially fed individuals. In response to the starvation, acid phosphatase is not produced anymore by digestive cells, while arylsulfatase is still present. To our knowledge, this is the first cytochemical validation of intracellular digestion of artificial food in Strombidae. This study highlights the intracellular digestion of artificial food developed for Strombidae aquaculture. Moreover, we have shown that the lysosomal activity could be used as a feed index. PMID:22628255

  8. [Genetic diversity in two populations of the snail Strombus gigas (Gastropoda: Strombidae) from Yucatan, Mexico, using microsatellite].

    PubMed

    Zamora-Bustillos, Roberto; Rodríguez-Canul, Rossanna; García de León, Francisco J; Tello Cetina, Jorge

    2011-09-01

    The pink conch Strombus gigas is an important fisheries resource in the Caribbean region, including the Yucatán Peninsula. We analyzed the genetic diversity and genetic structure of two populations (Alacranes Reef and Chinchorro Bank) with the use of five microsatellite molecular markers. The results indicate that the two populations are in the same rank of genetic diversity (He), from 0.613 to 0.692. Significant deviation from H-WE was observed in the both populations due to deficit to heterozygotes, this was attributed to inbreeding as a consequence of over-fishing; nevertheless, other possible causes considered are mixing of individuals from two or more populations, and the existence of null alleles. Levels of genetic differentiation indicated the existence of a single homogenous population in the Yucatan Peninsula (F(ST) de 0.003, p = 0.49), which fits with highest levels of gene flow is significant (2.3 individuals) between both populations. Results from this study support the hypothesis that S. gigas is part of a single panmictic population in the Yucatan Peninsula; therefore, this fishery resource should be regulated the same way for both areas. PMID:22017119

  9. Identification of molecular and physiological responses to chronic environmental challenge in an invasive species: the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Melody S; Thorne, Michael A S; Amaral, Ana; Vieira, Florbela; Batista, Frederico M; Reis, João; Power, Deborah M

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental responses of an invasive species is critical in predicting how ecosystem composition may be transformed in the future, especially under climate change. In this study, Crassostrea gigas, a species well adapted to the highly variable intertidal environment, was exposed to the chronic environmental challenges of temperature (19 and 24°C) and pH (ambient seawater and a reduction of 0.4 pH units) in an extended 3-month laboratory-based study. Physiological parameters were measured (condition index, shell growth, respiration, excretion rates, O:N ratios, and ability to repair shell damage) alongside molecular analyses. Temperature was by far the most important stressor, as demonstrated by reduced condition indexes and shell growth at 24°C, with relatively little effect detected for pH. Transcriptional profiling using candidate genes and SOLiD sequencing of mantle tissue revealed that classical “stress” genes, previously reported to be upregulated under acute temperature challenges, were not significantly expressed in any of the treatments, emphasizing the different response between acute and longer term chronic stress. The transcriptional profiling also elaborated on the cellular responses underpinning the physiological results, including the identification of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway as a potentially novel marker for chronic environmental challenge. This study represents a first attempt to understand the energetic consequences of cumulative thermal stress on the intertidal C. gigas which could significantly impact on coastal ecosystem biodiversity and function in the future. PMID:24223268

  10. Metal-binding protein in the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas: assessment of the protein as a biochemical environmental indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, B.E.; Thompson, J.A.J.; Ward, S.

    1987-04-01

    In this paper the determination of metal-binding proteins (MBP) in the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is reported. The objectives of this study were to employ a simple, cost-effective method for quantifying MBP and to assess this parameter for possible use as an indicator of identifiable sources of metal input to biological systems. Abnormally high quantities of zinc had been found previously in C. gigas growing in waters adjacent to the Kraft pump mill at Crofton, British Columbia. From 1971 to 1973 oysters near the effluent outfalls were found to have body-burden zinc six to ten times the zinc concentrations found in reference specimens. Zinc dithionite was used in the pulping process at the mill until 1973. Subsequent to a change to sodium dithionite, concentrations of zinc in oysters decreased steadily. A second potential source of contamination is sited directly south of the pulp mill. In this case, leaching of copper and zinc from smelter slag into Osborn Bay has been identified.

  11. Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 genomic diversity in wild populations of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas from Italian coasts.

    PubMed

    Burioli, E A V; Prearo, M; Riina, M V; Bona, M C; Fioravanti, M L; Arcangeli, G; Houssin, M

    2016-06-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is a significant pathogen affecting the young Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, worldwide. A new variant, OsHV-1 μVar, has been associated with recurrent mortality events in Europe since 2008. Epidemiological data collection is key for global risk assessment; however little is known about health status and genotypes present in European wild oyster beds. Most studies to date have involved only cultivated individuals during mortality events, and reported low genotype diversity. With this study, conducted along the Italian coasts, we investigated for the first time the presence of OsHV-1 in European natural oyster beds. Analysis of three genomic regions revealed the presence of at least nine different genotypes, including two variants close to the OsHV-1 reference, known since the early 1990s but with no European record reported since 2010, and highlights relevant genotype diversity in natural environment. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct clusters and geographical distribution of genotypes, with the exception of a variant very closely related to the μVar, which appeared the single genotype present in all the Adriatic sites. Interestingly, these wild symptom free populations could represent, in Europe, an accessible alternative to the import of OsHV-1-resistant oyster strains from the East Pacific, the native area of C. gigas, avoiding the high-risk of non-native marine species and new pathogen introductions. PMID:27234424

  12. Seasonal changes in gene expression and polymorphism of hsp70 in cultivated oysters (Crassostrea gigas) at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Castillo, Adán; Sánchez-Paz, Arturo; Castro-Longoria, Reina; López-Torres, Marco Antonio; Grijalva-Chon, José Manuel

    2015-09-01

    The HSP70 proteins are an important element of the response against thermal stress and infectious diseases, and they are highly conserved and ubiquitous. In some species, variations on the hsp70 encoding sequence resulted in intraspecific differential expression, which leads to variations on thermo-tolerance among individuals. This phenomenon has not been described in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, which is cultivated in Mexico under temperature conditions highly above the optimal for this species. The present study was aimed to identify associations between hsp70 genotypes and their expression levels in C. gigas. By analyzing a 603 bp fragment from the 3' end of the hsp70 gene, 21 different genotypes with 60 nucleotide polymorphic sites were detected, of which 34 sites were found in heterozygous condition. Although no correlation was found between genotype-expression-season, a minimum expression threshold that should be taken into account as an important feature for a future breeding program is proposed. PMID:26254584

  13. Combined effects of pollutants and salinity on embryo-larval development of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Gamain, Perrine; Gonzalez, Patrice; Cachot, Jérôme; Pardon, Patrick; Tapie, Nathalie; Gourves, Pierre Yves; Budzinski, Hélène; Morin, Bénédicte

    2016-02-01

    For several years, low larval recruitment has been observed in Arcachon Bay, in southwest France. Exposure to pollutants could partly account for the reduction of early life stages of the Pacific oyster. This study evaluated the effects of copper and S-metolachlor in combination with salinity on the early life stages of Crassostrea gigas. Embryos were exposed to concentrations of copper (1, 10 and 50 μg L(-1)) or S-metolachlor (10, 100 and 1000 ng L(-1)) and six salinities (18, 21, 24, 27, 30 and 33 u.s.i). Embryotoxicity was measured by considering both the percentage of abnormalities and arrested development in D-shaped larvae. Embryo-larval development was only affected at salinities ≤24 u.s.i, which have never been observed during C. gigas reproduction period in Arcachon Bay. Both contaminants had an effect at environmental concentrations. Our results suggest that copper and metolachlor toxicity was enhanced with decreasing salinity. PMID:26583531

  14. Identification two novel nacrein-like proteins involved in the shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-07-01

    Nacrein-like proteins have carbonic anhydrase (CA)-like domains, but their coding regions are flanked by inserted repeat sequence, such as Gly-X-Asn. Reportedly, nacrein-like proteins show the highest similarity to human carbonic anhydrase 1(α-CA1), possess CA catalytic functions, and play a key role in shell biomineralization. In the present study, two novel nacrein-like proteins were firstly identified from the shell-forming mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. With numerous analyses, it was identified and characterized that both the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were secreted and most closely related to the nacrein-like protein of California mussel Mytilus californianus via phylogenetic analysis. RT-PCR analysis showed that the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were expressed in multiple tissues and the expression levels remarkably rose after entering the spat stage, which were basically consistent with the increase of calcite fractions in the total shell volume. Surprisingly, the Gly-X-Asn repeat domain, which is distinctive in most nacrein-like proteins, was absent in the two newly identified nacrein-like proteins in C. gigas and replaced with a series of acidic amino acids (D/E). Regardless, nacrein-like proteins in mollusks seem to be vital to the deposition of calcium carbonate and likely perform diverse functions. PMID:24584662

  15. Hybridization Between Natural Extract of Angelica gigas Nakai and Inorganic Nanomaterial of Layered Double Hydroxide via Reconstruction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Choi, Ae-Jin; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Oh, Jae-Min

    2016-01-01

    We have hybridized layered double hydroxide (LDH) with Angelica gigas Nakai root extract (AGNR) through reversible dehydration-rehydration reaction which is known as reconstruction. LDHs having well-ordered hydrotalcite-like crystal structure and average size 250 ± 20 nm were prepared by hydrothermal method. The root of Angelica gigas Nakai, which has been utilized in the treatment of female disorders as herbal medicine, was treated with methanol to obtain extract. Pristine LDHs were calcined at 400 °C for 8 hours to obtain layered double oxide (LDO), which was further dispersed into extract solution with various AGNR/LDO weight ratios, 0.11, 0.21 and 0.43. The extract content in each hybrid increased in proportion to initial AGNR/LDO ratio, showing the highest content of ~12%. The zeta potential of LDH shifted from +44 mV to +20 mV upon hybridization with extract, which was attributed to the adsorption of negatively charged organic moieties in AGNR on LDH surface. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) results exhibited that the random stacking of LDH nanolayers resulted in LDH-AGNR hybrid with house-of-cards structure, of which inter-particle cavity serves nano-reservoir for natural extract. According to quantitative analyses, it was revealed that the content of active components in AGNR increased when they were hybridized with LDHs compared with those in AGNR alone. PMID:27398576

  16. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. PMID:25609785

  17. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies. PMID:18345820

  18. Genetic Variation and Breeding Signature in Mass Selection Lines of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Assessed by SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxiao; Feng, Dandan; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In breeding industries, a challenging problem is how to keep genetic diversity over generations. To investigate genetic variation and identify breeding signatures in mass selected lines of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), three sixth-generation selected lines and four wild populations were assessed using 103 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The genetic diversity data indicated that the selected lines exhibited a significant reduction in the observed heterozygosity and observed number of alleles per locus compared with the wild populations (P≤0.05), indicating the selected lines tended to lose genetic diversity contrasted with the wild populations. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis showed that the wild populations and selected lines were not separated into two groups. Using four outlier tests, a total of 17 loci were found under selection at two levels. The global outlier detection suggested that 4 common outlier loci were subject to selection using both the hierarchical island model and Bayesian likelihood approaches. At regional level, 3 SNPs were detected as outlier using at least two outlier tests and one outlier SNP (CgSNP309) was overlapped in the two wild-selected population comparisons. The candidate outlier SNPs provide valuable resources for future association studies in C. gigas. PMID:26954577

  19. A Label-Free Proteomic Analysis on Competent Larvae and Juveniles of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-01-01

    Current understandings on the molecular mechanisms underlying bivalve metamorphosis are still fragmentary, and a comprehensive description is required. In this study, using a large-scale label-free proteomic approach, we described and compared the proteomes of competent larvae (CL) and juveniles (JU) of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. A total of 788 proteins were identified: 392 in the CL proteome and 636 in the JU proteome. Gene Ontology analysis of the proteome from each sample revealed active metabolic processes in both stages. Further quantitative analyses revealed 117 proteins that were differentially expressed between the two samples. These proteins were divided into eight groups: cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, protein synthesis and degradation, immunity and stress response, development of particular tissues, signal regulation, metabolism and energy supply, transport, and other proteins. A certification experiment using real-time PCR assay confirmed 20 of 30 examined genes exhibited the same trends at the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed proteins may play roles in tissue remodeling, signal transduction, and organ development during and after metamorphosis. Novel roles were proposed for some differentially expressed proteins, such as chymotrypsin. The results of this work provide an overview of metamorphosis and post-metamorphosis development of C. gigas at the protein level. Future studies on the functions of the differentially expressed proteins will help to obtain a more in-depth understanding of bivalve metamorphosis. PMID:26247880

  20. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zald, Harold S.J.; Spies, Thomas A.; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J.; Olsen, Keith A.; Steel, E. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  1. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A.; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  2. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  3. Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J [Knoxville, TN; Kirby, Brendan J [Knoxville, TN; Kisner, Roger A

    2009-05-19

    A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

  4. Effects of natural oyster reefs (Crassostrea gigas) on the sediment balance of Oosterschelde tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, João; de Vries, Mindert

    2014-05-01

    The realization of the storm surge barrier and the two secondary dams not only changed the hydrodynamics, but also the geomorphological characteristics of the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands) creating a disequilibrium between erosion and sedimentation. This has lead in the last 25 years to a sand deficit in the Oosterschelde resulting in the erosion of the tidal flats (Smaal & Nienhuis, 1992; Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Due to these phenomena the habitat for intertidal soft-bottom benthic fauna is slowly disappearing, and with it food sources for estuarine birds that use these areas as foraging grounds (Mulder & Louters, 1994). Erosion of tidal flats also locally exposes deeper peat layers, potentially resulting in reduced water clarity and primary production (Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Adding to these problems an increased risk of dike failures and flooding during storm surges is expected, as the dikes gradually become more exposed to wave action. In this research the effect of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) as ecosystem engineers, on the sediment balance in the Oosterschelde was studied. In our analysis we compared long term bathymetry data for transects with and without oyster reefs. Based on height differences, the transects sedimentation/erosion rates were calculated and used to determine if there was a difference between transects without oyster reefs and transects crossing oyster reefs. From the long term analysis, the overall erosional trend of the Oosterschelde tidal flats is clear. The mean observed erosion was - 0,012 m per year. When considering the sections crossing oyster reefs , a mean accumulation of sediment of + 0,007 m per year was observed. The results suggest that these ecosystem engineers, that cover large areas in the Oosterschelde slow down the erosion of the tidal flats in the Oosterschelde, as they act as sediment accumulators and stabilizers. We estimate at least 70000 m3 of sediment per year is accreted on tidal flats due to the effect of

  5. Giga-LES of Hector the Convector keeping the tallest updrafts undiluted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauhut, Thibaut; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Escobar, Juan; Mascart, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The trend of stratospheric water vapour during the past decades is not correctly reproduced by current GCMs. This may be due to lack of representation of rapid water transfers from troposphere to stratosphere. Our modeling study focused on a particular case of tropical very deep convection which takes an active part in this transport. We aimed at understanding its dynamics and the stratosphere moistening processes. We selected a Hector thunderstorm observed on 30 November 2005 over Tiwi Islands, Australia, during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Plumes of ice particles reaching 19 km altitude were measured by lidar aboard the Geophysica stratospheric aircraft. We performed a Giga Large-Eddy Simulation of Hector (100 m horizontal resolution, more than 1 billion grid points) using cutting-edge computing resources, as well as a series of simulations with coarser and coarser horizontal resolutions, from 200 m to 1600 m. A strong morning sea breeze deviated boundary layer westerlies and led to intense convergence of humid air over Tiwi Islands. Deep convection triggered around 12:15 pm and quickly reached 14 km altitude. The associated cold pools organised and generated upward motions at the surface. The most intense upward transport started 1 hour later and lasted around 2 hours. As a result, a couple of updrafts overshot the tropopause carrying ice crystals in the stratosphere. Part of the ice particles precipitated then whereas the remainder sublimated in the lower stratosphere. The consequent vapour pockets were transported and diluted within the stratosphere by easterlies. While moistening appeared to be robust with respect to the grid spacing used, grid spacing on the order of 100 m may be necessary for a reliable estimate of hydration (Dauhut et al. ASL 2014, doi: 10.1002/asl2.534). A comprehensive analysis of individual updrafts and their properties once sorted by their height has been carried out. The couple of updrafts that reach the stratosphere presents a higher

  6. The immunological capacity in the larvae of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Hao; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    As the immune system has not fully developed during early developmental stages, bivalve larvae are more susceptible for pathogens, which frequently leads to the significant mortality in hatcheries. In the present study, the development of immune system and its response against bacteria challenge were investigated in order to characterize the repertoire of immunological capacity of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas during the ontogenesis. The phagocytosis was firstly observed in the early D-veliger larvae (17 hpf), especially in their velum site, which indicated the appearance of functional hemocytes during early D-veliger larvae stage. The whole-mount immunofluorescence assay of three pattern recognition receptors (integrin β-1, caspase-3 and C-type lectin 3) and one immune effector gene (IL17-5) was performed in blastula, early D-veliger and umbo larvae, suggested that velum and digestive gland were the potential sites of immune system in the larvae. The lowest activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and hydrolytic enzyme (lysozyme), as well as descended expression levels of 12 immune genes at the transition between embryogenesis and planktonic, indicated that the larvae at hatching (9 hpf) were in hypo-immunity. While the ascending activities of enzymes and expression levels of seven immune genes during the trochophore stage (15 hpf) suggested the initiation of immune system. The steadily increasing trend of all the 12 candidate genes at the early umbo larvae (120 h) hinted that the immune system was well developed at this stage. After bacterial challenge, some immune recognition (TLR4) and immune effector (IL17-5 and defh2) genes were activated in blastula stage (4 hpf), and other immune genes were up regulated in D-veliger larvae, indicating that the zygotic immune system could respond earlier against the bacterial challenge during its development. These results indicated that the cellular and humoral immune components

  7. The raised coral reef complex of the Kenyan coast: Tridacna gigas U-series dates and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accordi, Giovanni; Brilli, Mauro; Carbone, Federico; Voltaggio, Mario

    2010-08-01

    The Kenyan coast is characterized by a raised fossil reef complex cut by a series of morphological terraces. Shallow subtidal coralgal facies containing Tridacna gigas shells are found at different heights along the coast. Alpha-spectrometric U-series methods were applied to 18 T. gigas samples from different locations along this reef complex with an elevation range from 0 to 15 m above present sea level to obtain chronological information. Apparent U-Th ages, based on the assumption of closed system behaviour, correspond to early marine isotope stage (MIS) 5 ( n = 17) and MIS 7 ( n = 1). However, initial 234U/ 238U activity ratios exhibit a wide range, in many cases much greater than present seawater, which is likely to be associated with diagenetic alteration and migration of U-series isotopes. For this reason, we attempted a form of open system isochron dating after separating the Tridacna samples into three different groups on the basis of current elevation and distribution along the coast. An 'isochron' age of 120 ± 4 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the higher elevation group, placed in the terraced central coastal area; another age, statistically undistinguishable from the previous one, of 118 ± 7 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the group confined along the northern coast. These two groups correspond to a transgressive-regressive cycle connected to the maximum sea level highstand during the MIS 5e. A third 'isochron' age of 100 ± 4 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the group confined along the southern coast, encompassing part of the isotopic substages MIS 5c and d. Based on these data, and on the ecology of T. gigas whose optimal present-day depth range can be considered of 3-10 m below sea level, a maximum tectonic coastal uplift rate of between, respectively, 0.12 and 0.18 mm a -1 was calculated for the period since formation of these shells, and then the paleobathymetry of Tridacna facies has been inferred.

  8. Distribution of trace metals in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and crabs from the east coast of Kyushu Island, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Szefer, P.; Frelek, K.; Geldon, J.

    1997-01-01

    Oysters are known to be exceptional accumulators of Zn and Cu, and their tissue concentrations appear to reflect contamination of metals. According to Lauenstein and Dolvin, oysters clearly have a greater affinity for Ag, Cu and Zn than do mussels, while mussels have greater affinity for Cr and Pb. Oysters have been considered to be potential bioindicators for monitoring metallic pollution in marine environments. Extensive investigations of oysters from the east coast of Kyushu Island, Japan, have been performed. The aim of the study was to examine spatial differences in metal concentrations in soft tissues of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and whole bodies (soft tissues with shells) of the crabs Goetice depressa and Leptodius exaratus inhabiting the Japanese coastal region of the Pacific. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Analysis of the tenderisation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) meat by ultrasonic treatment using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaqin; Yu, Hiaxia; Dong, Kaicheng; Yang, Shuibing; Ye, Xingqian; Chen, Shiguo

    2014-10-01

    Due to its unique structure, jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) meat is sensitive to heat treatment, which makes the traditional squid products taste tough and hard. This study aimed to tenderise jumbo squid meat through ultrasonic treatment. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to predict the tenderising effect of various treatment conditions. According to the results of RSM, the optimal conditions appeared to be a power of 186.9 W, a frequency of 25.6 kHz, and a time of 30.8 min, and the predicted values of flexibility and firmness under these optimal conditions were 2.40 mm and 435.1 g, respectively. Protein degradation and a broken muscle fibre structure were observed through histological assay and SDS-PAGE, which suggests a satisfactory tenderisation effect. PMID:24799231

  10. Conformational changes in proteins recovered from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle through pH shift washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan C; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; García-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Peña-Ramos, Aida

    2016-04-01

    Conformational and thermal-rheological properties of acidic (APC) and neutral (NPC) protein concentrates were evaluated and compared to those of squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle proteins (SM). Surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl status, secondary structure profile, differential scanning calorimetry and oscillatory dynamic rheology were used to evaluate the effect of treatments on protein properties. Acidic condition during the washing process (APC) promoted structural and conformational changes in the protein present in the concentrate produced. These changes were enhanced during the heat setting of the corresponding sol. Results demonstrate that washing squid muscle under the proposed acidic conditions is a feasible technological alternative for squid-based surimi production improving its yield and gel-forming ability. PMID:26593553

  11. Effects of low-dose exposure to pesticide mixture on physiological responses of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Geret, F; Burgeot, T; Haure, J; Gagnaire, B; Renault, T; Communal, P Y; Samain, J F

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effects on the physiology of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, of a mixture of pesticides containing 0.8 μg L(-1) alachlor, 0.6 μg L(-1) metolachlor, 0.7 μg L(-1) atrazine, 0.6 μg L(-1) terbuthylazine, 0.5 μg L(-1) diuron, 0.6 μg L(-1) fosetyl aluminum, 0.05 μg L(-1) carbaryl, and 0.7 μg L(-1) glyphosate for a total concentration of 4.55 μg L(-1) . The total nominal concentration of pesticides mixture corresponds to the pesticide concentrations in the shellfish culture area of the Marennes-Oleron basin. Two varieties of C. gigas were selected on the foreshore, based on their characteristics in terms of resistance to summer mortality, to assess the effects of the pesticide mixture after 7 days of exposure under controlled conditions. The early effects of the mixture were assessed using enzyme biomarkers of nitrogen metabolism (GS, glutamine synthetase), detoxification metabolism (GST, glutathione S-transferase), and oxidative stress (CAT, catalase). Sublethal effects on hemocyte parameters (phagocytosis and esterase activity) and DNA damages (DNA adducts) were also measured. Changes in metabolic activities were characterized by increases in GS, GST, and CAT levels on the first day of exposure for the "resistant" oysters and after 3-7 days of exposure for the "susceptible" oysters. The formation of DNA adducts was detected after 7 days of exposure. The percentage of hemocyte esterase-positive cells was reduced in the resistant oysters, as was the hemocyte phagocytic capacity in both oyster varieties after 7 days of exposure to the pesticide mixture. This study highlights the need to consider the low doses and the mixture of pesticides to evaluate the effects of these molecules on organisms. PMID:22012874

  12. Utilising caging techniques to investigate metal assimilation in Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas at three Irish coastal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltrap, Michelle; Macken, Ailbhe; Davoren, Maria; McGovern, Evin; Foley, Barry; Larsen, Martin; White, Jonathan; McHugh, Brendan

    2013-11-01

    Pollution by metals has been of increasing concern for a number of decades but at present, the mechanism of metal accumulation in sentinel species is not fully understood and further studies are required for environmental risk assessment of metals in aquatic environments. The use of caging techniques has proven to be useful for assessment of water quality in coastal and estuarine environments. This study investigates the application of caging techniques for monitoring uptake of 20 elements [Li, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, As, Sb, Pb, Hg, Cd and Zn] in three marine species namely Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Stable isotopes were used to determine predatory effects and also used for modelling metal uptake in test species and to track nutrient assimilation. Metal levels were monitored at three different coastal locations, namely Dublin Bay, Dunmore East and Omey Island over 18 weeks. Significant differences in concentrations of Mn, Co and Zn between mussels and oysters were found. Correlations between cadmium levels in N. lapillus and δ13C and δ15N suggest dietary influences in Cd uptake. Levels of Zn were highest in C. gigas compared to the other two species and levels of Zn were most elevated at the Dunmore East site. Copper levels were more elevated in all test species at both Dublin Bay and Dunmore East. Mercury was raised in all species at Dunmore East compared to the other two sites. Biotic accumulation of metals in the test species demonstrates that caging techniques can provide a valid tool for biomonitoring in metal impacted areas.

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Two Oysters, Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea hongkongensis Provides Insights into Adaptation to Hypo-Osmotic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Environmental salinity creates a key barrier to limit the distribution of most aquatic organisms. Adaptation to osmotic fluctuation is believed to be a factor facilitating species diversification. Adaptive evolution often involves beneficial mutations at more than one locus. Bivalves hold great interest, with numerous species living in waters, as osmoconformers, who maintain the osmotic pressure balance mostly by free amino acids. In this study, 107,076,589 reads from two groups of Crassostrea hongkongensis were produced and the assembled into 130,629 contigs. Transcripts putatively involved in stress-response, innate immunity and cell processes were identified according to Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses. Comparing with the transcriptome of C. gigas to characterize the diversity of transcripts between species with osmotic divergence, we identified 182,806 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for C. hongkongensis, and 196,779 SNPs for C. gigas. Comparison of 11,602 pairs of putative orthologs allowed for identification of 14 protein-coding genes that experienced strong positive selection (Ka/Ks>1). In addition, 45 genes that may show signs of moderate positive selection (1≥Ka/Ks>0.5) were also identified. Based on Ks ratios and divergence time between the two species published previously, we estimated a neutral transcriptome-wide substitution mutation rate of 1.39×10−9 per site per year. Several genes were differentially expressed across the control and treated groups of each species. This is the first time to sequence the transcriptome of C. hongkongensis and provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource available for it. The increasing amount of transcriptome data on Crassostrea provides an excellent resource for phylogenetic analysis. A large number of SNPs identified in this work are expected to provide valuable resources for future marker and genotyping assay development. The analysis of natural selection provides an

  14. Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle collagen: extraction, characterization, and potential application in the preparation of chitosan-collagen biofilms.

    PubMed

    Uriarte-Montoya, Mario Hiram; Arias-Moscoso, Joe Luis; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Santacruz-Ortega, Hisila; Rouzaud-Sández, Ofelia; Cardenas-Lopez, Jose Luis; Marquez-Rios, Enrique; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat Marina

    2010-06-01

    Collagen-based biomaterials have been widely used due to its binding capabilities. However the properties and potential use of new collagen sources are still under investigation. Fish by-products are an excellent source of collagen. Thus, acid-soluble collagen (ASC) was extracted, and biochemical and physicochemically characterized from one under-utilized specie, jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). In addition, commercial chitosan (95-50%)-ASC (5-50%) blend films were successfully prepared by casting, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular masses of the ASC subunits were about 190kDa, 110kDa, and 97kDa, the content of proline and hydroxyproline was 10.9% and 2.8%, respectively. The FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ((1)H NMR) confirmed collagen peptidic crosslinks, and one endothermic peak was found at 119 degrees C. The FT-IR spectrum showed that chitosan and ASC remain linked into the films mainly due to hydrogen bonding. The 85:15 (chitosan:ASC) ratio was selected for its thermal and mechanical analyses. The thermograms of this film indicated the presence of two peaks, one at 87-98 degrees C and the other at 142-182 degrees C. The chitosan:ASC blend produced a transparent and brittle film, with high percentage of elongation at break, and low tensile strength in comparison to chitosan films. D. gigas mantle might be useful as a new source of plasticizer agent in the preparation of biofilms in composites with chitosan. PMID:20097560

  15. Salinity influences glutathione S-transferase activity and lipid peroxidation responses in the Crassostrea gigas oyster exposed to diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Juliano; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; da Silva, Angela Zaccaron; Guzenski, João; Ferreira, Jaime Fernando; Di Mascio, Paolo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2011-04-15

    Biochemical responses in bivalve mollusks are commonly employed in environmental studies as biomarkers of aquatic contamination. The present study evaluated the possible influence of salinity (35, 25, 15 and 9ppt) in the biomarker responses of Crassostrea gigas oysters exposed to diesel at different nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1mL.L(-1)) using a semi-static exposure system. Salinity alone did not resulted in major changes in the gill's catalase activity (CAT), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST) and lipid peroxidation levels (measured as malondialdehyde, MDA), but influenced diesel related responses. At 25ppt salinity, but not at the other salinity levels, oysters exposed to diesel showed a strikingly positive concentration-dependent GST response. At 25ppt and 1mL.L(-1) diesel, the GST activity in the gills remained elevated, even after one week of depuration in clean water. The increased MDA levels in the oysters exposed to diesel comparing to control groups at 9, 15 and 35ppt salinities suggest the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in those salinities, but not at 25ppt salinity. The MDA quickly returned to basal levels after 24h of depuration. CAT activity was unaltered by the treatments employed. High toxicity for 1mL.L(-1) diesel was observed only at 35ppt salinity, but not in the other salinities. Results from this study strongly suggest that salinity influences the diesel related biomarker responses and toxicity in C. gigas, and that some of those responses remain altered even after depuration. PMID:21349572

  16. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  17. Use of caged Nucella lapillus and Crassostrea gigas to monitor tributyltin-induced bioeffects in Irish coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Giltrap, Michelle; Macken, Ailbhe; Davoren, Maria; Minchin, Dan; McGovern, Evin; Foley, Barry; Strand, Jakob; McHugh, Brendan

    2009-08-01

    Caging studies have been previously reported to be useful for providing valuable information on biological effects of mollusks over short periods of time where resident species are absent. The degree of imposex in caged dog whelk (Nucella lapillus), was measured using the vas deferens sequence index (VSDI) and the Relative Penis Size Index (RPSI) and the extent of shell thickening in caged Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was investigated at t = 0 and t = 18 weeks. Nucella lapillus, when provided with mussels as a food source at the control site at Omey Island on the west Irish coast, did not demonstrate imposex features, whereas those transplanted to port areas did. Dunmore East exhibited the highest level of imposex (3.25 VDSI and 2.37 RPSI). Shell thickening was evident in C. gigas transplanted to Dunmore East, with low effects evident at the control location, Omey Island, and Dublin Bay at t = 18 weeks. Dry weight whole-body concentrations of organotins were most elevated in all species held at Dunmore East compared with other locations. Greatest delta15N and delta13C enrichment was observed within the tissues of the predatory N. lapillus in all three test sites. Increased assimilation in the Dublin Bay oysters might have been influenced by the presence of more nutrients at this location. Surficial sediment organotin levels were most elevated in the Dunmore East <2-mm fraction (22,707 microg tributyltin/kg dry weight), whereas low organotin levels were determined from Dublin and Omey Island sediments. The valuable application of cost-effective caging techniques to deliver integrated biological effects and chemical measurements in the absence of resident gastropod populations in potential organotin/tributyltin hotspot locations is discussed. PMID:19642828

  18. Molecular identification of Taenia spp. in wolves (Canis lupus), brown bears (Ursus arctos) and cervids from North Europe and Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lavikainen, Antti; Laaksonen, Sauli; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Oksanen, Antti; Isomursu, Marja; Meri, Seppo

    2011-09-01

    Taenia tapeworms of Finnish and Swedish wolves (Canis lupus) and Finnish brown bears (Ursus arctos), and muscle cysticerci of Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus), Alaskan Grant's caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) and Alaskan moose (Alces americanus) were identified on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of a 396 bp region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene. Two species were found from wolves: Taenia hydatigena and Taenia krabbei. The cysticerci of reindeer, caribou and one moose also represented T. krabbei. Most of the cysticercal specimens from Alaskan moose, however, belonged to an unknown T. krabbei-like species, which had been reported previously from Eurasian elks (Alces alces) from Finland. Strobilate stages from two bears belonged to this species as well. The present results suggest that this novel Taenia sp. has a Holarctic distribution and uses Alces spp. as intermediate and ursids as final hosts. PMID:21571090

  19. Varestrongylus eleguneniensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae): a widespread, multi-host lungworm of wild North American ungulates, with an emended diagnosis for the genus and explorations of biogeography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varestrongylus eleguneniensis sp. n. is established for a recently discovered protostrongylid nematode found in caribou (Rangifer tarandus), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) and moose (Alces americanus), hosts that collectively occupy an extensive geographic range across northern North America. Descripti...

  20. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  1. Caffeinated Alcohol, Sensation Seeking, and Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas P.; Egan, Kathleen L.; Goldin, Shoshanna; Rhodes, Scott D.; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background College students who consume caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CaffAlc) are at increased injury risk. This study examines the extent to which a sensation-seeking personality accounts for the relationship between consumption of CaffAlc and negative outcomes. Methods A Web-based survey was administered to stratified random samples of 4907 college students from eight North Carolina universities in Fall 2009. Sensation seeking was assessed using the Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale (BSSS) (α=0.81). Data were analyzed using linear and logistic regression. Results 3390 students (71.2%) reported past 30-day drinking, of whom 786 (23.2%) consumed CaffAlc. CaffAlc past 30-day drinkers had higher BSSS scores (3.8 vs. 3.4; p<0.001), compared to non-CaffAlc drinkers. Consumption of CaffAlc was associated with more frequent binge drinking (p<0.001) and drunken days in a typical week (p<0.001), even after adjusting for the BSSS score. CaffAlc students were more likely to be taken advantage of sexually (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.70, p=0.012), drive under the influence of alcohol (AOR=2.00, p<0.001), and ride with a driver under the influence of alcohol (AOR=1.87, p<0.001). Injury requiring medical treatment was more prevalent among CaffAlc students with higher BSSS-8 scores (interaction p=0.024), even after adjustment for drinking levels and student characteristics. Conclusions Sensation seeking does not fully account for the increase in risky drinking among college students who consume CaffAlc, nor does it moderate the relationship between CaffAlc and drinking behaviors. Sensation seeking moderates the risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment among college students who consume CaffAlc. Those with strong sensation-seeking dispositions are at the highest risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment. PMID:24761275

  2. Non-specific defensive factors of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas against infection with Marteilioides chungmuensis: a flow-cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Jung; Hwang, Jee Youn; Choi, Dong Lim; Huh, Min Do; Hur, Young Baek; Lee, Nam-Sil; Seo, Jung Soo; Kwon, Mun Gyeong; Choi, Hye-Sung; Park, Myoung Ae

    2011-09-01

    In order to assess changes in the activity of immunecompetency present in Crassostrea gigas infected with Marteilioides chungmuensis (Protozoa), the total hemocyte counts (THC), hemocyte populations, hemocyte viability, and phagocytosis rate were measured in oysters using flow cytometry. THC were increased significantly in oysters infected with M. chungmuensis relative to the healthy appearing oysters (HAO) (P<0.05). Among the total hemocyte composition, granulocyte levels were significantly increased in infected oysters as compared with HAO (P<0.05). In addition, the hyalinocyte was reduced significantly (P<0.05). The hemocyte viability did not differ between infected oysters and HAO. However, the phagocytosis rate was significantly higher in infected oysters relative to HAO (P<0.05). The measurement of alterations in the activity of immunecompetency in oysters, which was conducted via flow cytometry in this study, might be a useful biomarker of the defense system for evaluating the effects of ovarian parasites of C. gigas. PMID:22072822

  3. First record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu Arapaima gigas (Osteichthyes: Arapaimidae) from South America.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Porto, S M; Cárdenas, M Q; Martins, M L; Oliveira, J K Q; Pereira, J N; Araújo, C S O; Malta, J C O

    2015-11-01

    Third-stage larvae (L3) of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected by the first time in juveniles of pirarucu Arapaima gigas farmed in the Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas state. Ninety-eight (98) out of 100 examined fish showed to be parasitized. Five hundred and ninety larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected from the intestines, stomach and pyloric caeca. The mean intensity of parasite indexes was 6.02 (±5.75) ranging from 1 to 40 larvae per host and the mean abundance was 5.9 (±5.76). The A. gigas is the new host record for larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. in Brazil, and this is the first record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu from South America. PMID:26675898

  4. Non-specific Defensive Factors of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas against Infection with Marteilioides chungmuensis: A Flow-Cytometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Jung; Choi, Dong Lim; Huh, Min Do; Hur, Young Baek; Lee, Nam-Sil; Seo, Jung Soo; Kwon, Mun Gyeong; Choi, Hye-Sung; Park, Myoung Ae

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess changes in the activity of immunecompetency present in Crassostrea gigas infected with Marteilioides chungmuensis (Protozoa), the total hemocyte counts (THC), hemocyte populations, hemocyte viability, and phagocytosis rate were measured in oysters using flow cytometry. THC were increased significantly in oysters infected with M. chungmuensis relative to the healthy appearing oysters (HAO) (P<0.05). Among the total hemocyte composition, granulocyte levels were significantly increased in infected oysters as compared with HAO (P<0.05). In addition, the hyalinocyte was reduced significantly (P<0.05). The hemocyte viability did not differ between infected oysters and HAO. However, the phagocytosis rate was significantly higher in infected oysters relative to HAO (P<0.05). The measurement of alterations in the activity of immunecompetency in oysters, which was conducted via flow cytometry in this study, might be a useful biomarker of the defense system for evaluating the effects of ovarian parasites of C. gigas. PMID:22072822

  5. Effects of In Vitro Exposure to Diarrheic Toxin Producer Prorocentrum lima on Gene Expressions Related to Cell Cycle Regulation and Immune Response in Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Background Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3–5 mm). The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30×103 cells mL−1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3×103 cells mL−1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold), chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold), elongation factor 2 (2 fold), and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line). Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30×103 cells mL−1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline). Conclusions On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense. PMID:24825133

  6. Metabolic Cost of Protein Synthesis in Larvae of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Is Fixed Across Genotype, Phenotype, and Environmental Temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy W; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2016-06-01

    The energy made available through catabolism of specific biochemical reserves is constant using standard thermodynamic conversion equivalents (e.g., 24.0 J mg protein(-1)). In contrast, measurements reported for the energy cost of synthesis of specific biochemical constituents are highly variable. In this study, we measured the metabolic cost of protein synthesis and determined whether this cost was influenced by genotype, phenotype, or environment. We focused on larval stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, a species that offers several experimental advantages: availability of genetically pedigreed lines, manipulation of ploidy, and tractability of larval forms for in vivo studies of physiological processes. The cost of protein synthesis was measured in larvae of C. gigas for 1) multiple genotypes, 2) phenotypes with different growth rates, and 3) different environmental temperatures. For all treatments, the cost of protein synthesis was within a narrow range--near the theoretical minimum--with a fixed cost (mean ± one standard error, n = 21) of 2.1 ± 0.2 J (mg protein synthesized)(-1) We conclude that there is no genetic variation in the metabolic cost of protein synthesis, thereby simplifying bioenergetic models. Protein synthesis is a major component of larval metabolism in C. gigas, accounting for more than half the metabolic rate in diploid (59%) and triploid larvae (54%). These results provide measurements of metabolic cost of protein synthesis in larvae of C. gigas, an indicator species for impacts of ocean change, and provide a quantitative basis for evaluating the cost of resilience. PMID:27365413

  7. Effects of exposure to oxamyl, carbofuran, dichlorvos, and lindane on acetylcholinesterase activity in the gills of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Anguiano, Gerardo A; Amador, Alejandro; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Arcos-Ortega, Fabiola; Vazquez-Boucard, Celia

    2010-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been used to test the exposure of mollusk bivalves to pesticides and other pollutants. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a species with a worldwide distribution, and it has a high commercial value. The use of this species as a bioindicator in the marine environment, and the use of measurements of AChE activity in tissues of C. gigas require prior evaluation of organisms exposed to several toxic compounds in the laboratory. In our study, the effects of pesticides on AChE activity in the gills and mantle tissues of C. gigas were analyzed by exposing animals to organophosphate (dichlorvos), carbamate (carbofuran and oxamyl), and organochlorine (lindane) pesticides. Adult Pacific oysters were exposed to several concentrations (0.1-200 microM) of dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl for 96 h, and lindane (1.0 and 2.5 microM) was applied for 12 days. In gill tissues, all pesticides analyzed caused a decrease in AChE activity when compared to the control unexposed group. The mean inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values were determined for dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl pesticides. Dichlorvos had the highest toxic effect, with an IC(50) of 1.08 microM; lesser effects were caused by oxamyl and carbofuran, with IC(50)s of 1.67 and 3.03 microM, respectively. This study reports the effects of pesticides with several chemical structures and validates measurement of AChE activity in the gill tissues of C. gigas for use in environmental evaluations or food quality tests. PMID:19449386

  8. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance, limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs. In this paper, we examined D. gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010. The dominant mantle lengths of D. gigas were 350-450 mm, 250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, respectively. Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs, whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ. The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months, while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old. A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground, while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area. Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas. Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D. gigas. Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  9. Brain perfusion in polysubstance users: Relationship to substance and tobacco use, cognition, and self-regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain perfusion is altered in both alcohol dependence and stimulant dependence. Although most substance users also abuse/depend on alcohol concurrently (polysubstance users; PSU), rigorous perfusion research in PSU is limited. Also, the relationships of perfusion abnormalities with cognition, impulsivity or decision making are not well known. Methods Arterial spin labeling MRI and neuropsychological measures assessed perfusion levels and neurocognition in 20 alcohol dependent individuals with comorbid stimulant dependence (PSU), 26 individuals dependent on alcohol only (ALC), and 31 light/non-drinking controls (LD). The patient groups included smokers and non-smokers. Results ALC had lower perfusion than LD in subcortical and cortical brain regions including the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). Contrary to our hypothesis, regional perfusion was generally not lower in PSU than ALC. However, smoking PSU had lower perfusion than smoking ALC in several regions, including BREOS. Lower BREOS perfusion related to greater drinking severity in smoking substance users and to greater smoking severity in smoking ALC. Lower regional perfusion in ALC and PSU correlated with worse performance in different cognitive domains; smoking status affected perfusion-cognition relationships in ALC only. Lower BREOS perfusion in both substance using groups related to higher impulsivity. Conclusion Although regional perfusion was not decreased in PSU as a group, the combination of cigarette smoking and polysubstance use is strongly related to hypoperfusion in important cortical and subcortical regions. As lower perfusion relates to greater smoking severity, worse cognition and higher impulsivity, smoking cessation is warranted for treatment-seeking PSU and ALC. PMID:25772434

  10. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Moose, Lake Superior Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.; Jordan, Peter A.; Terrell, James W.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the moose (Alces alces). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  11. Upregulation of mGlu2 receptors via NF-κB p65 acetylation is involved in the Proneurogenic and antidepressant effects of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Cuccurazzu, Bruna; Bortolotto, Valeria; Valente, Maria Maddalena; Ubezio, Federica; Koverech, Aleardo; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Grilli, Mariagrazia

    2013-10-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring molecule with an important role in cellular bioenergetics and as donor of acetyl groups to proteins, including NF-κB p65. In humans, exogenously administered ALC has been shown to be effective in mood disturbances, with a good tolerability profile. No current information is available on the antidepressant effect of ALC in animal models of depression and on the putative mechanism involved in such effect. Here we report that ALC is a proneurogenic molecule, whose effect on neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitors is independent of its neuroprotective activity. The in vitro proneurogenic effects of ALC appear to be mediated by activation of the NF-κB pathway, and in particular by p65 acetylation, and subsequent NF-κB-mediated upregulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) expression. When tested in vivo, chronic ALC treatment could revert depressive-like behavior caused by unpredictable chronic mild stress, a rodent model of depression with high face validity and predictivity, and its behavioral effect correlated with upregulated expression of mGlu2 receptor in hippocampi of stressed mice. Moreover, chronic, but not acute or subchronic, drug treatment significantly increased adult born neurons in hippocampi of stressed and unstressed mice. We now propose that this mechanism could be potentially involved in the antidepressant effect of ALC in humans. These results are potentially relevant from a clinical perspective, as for its high tolerability profile ALC may be ideally employed in patient subpopulations who are sensitive to the side effects associated with classical antidepressants. PMID:23670591

  12. Structural brain differences in alcohol-dependent individuals with and without comorbid substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Anderson; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Abe, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Pennington, David; Schmidt, Thomas; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 50% of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD) also use other substances. Therefore, brain structural abnormalities observed in alcohol dependent individuals may not be entirely related to alcohol consumption. This MRI study assessed differences in brain regional tissue volumes between short-term abstinent alcohol dependent individuals without (ALC) and with current substance use dependence (polysubstance users, PSU). Methods Nineteen, one-month-abstinent PSU and 40 ALC as well as 27 light-drinkers (LD) were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MR system. Whole brain T1-weighted images were segmented automatically into regional gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. MANOVA assessed group differences of intracranial volume-normalized tissue volumes of the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes as well as regional subcortical GM volumes. The volumetric measures were correlated with neurocognitive measures to assess their functional relevance. Results Despite similar lifetime drinking and smoking histories, PSU had significantly larger normalized WM volumes than ALC in all lobes. PSU also had larger frontal and parietal WM volumes than LD, but smaller temporal GM volumes as well as smaller lenticular and thalamic nuclei than LD. By contrast, ALC had smaller frontal, parietal, and temporal GM, thalamic GM and cerebellar volumes than LD. ALC also had more sulcal CSF volumes than both PSU and LD. Conclusion One-month-abstinent ALC and PSU exhibited different patterns of gross brain structural abnormalities. The larger lobar WM volumes in PSU in the absence of widespread GM volume loss contrast with widespread GM atrophy in ALC. These structural differences between ALC and PSU may demand different treatment approaches to mitigate specific functionally relevant brain abnormalities. PMID:25263262

  13. Arsenic and arsenic species in cultured oyster (Crassostrea gigas and C. corteziensis) from coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bergés-Tiznado, Magdalena E; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Notti, Alessandra; Regoli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of arsenic (As) through cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from four coastal lagoons (SE Gulf of California). Organisms were collected in two seasons (rainy and dry season), and they were analyzed for total arsenic and chemical speciation of this element. The concentrations of As in oyster soft tissue fluctuated between 5.44 and 9.56 μg/g for rainy season and 6.46 and 8.33 μg/g for dry season (dry weight) in C. gigas. In C. corteziensis, the As concentrations were <5 μg/g for both seasons (dry weight). Arsenic speciation indicated arsenobetaine as the major arseno-compound accounting for 43.2-76.3 % of total content of As. Lower contributions were obtained for non-extractable As (11.3-17.5 %) and other molecules such as arsenocholine and methyl-arsonate (<5 %). Inorganic arsenic was detectable in only two samples, at concentrations lower than <0.1 μg/g. These As data are the first generated for these mollusks in NW Mexico and indicate that C. gigas and C. corteziensis farmed in this area are safe for human consumption in terms of arseno-compounds. PMID:23129525

  14. The toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum disrupts daily rhythmic activities at gene transcription, physiological and behavioral levels in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Damien; Ciutat, Aurélie; Mat, Audrey; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Hégaret, Hélène; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goic, Nelly; Soudant, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the effect of the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum on the daily rhythm of the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Many metabolic and physiological functions are rhythmic in living animals. Their cycles are modeled in accordance with environmental cycles such as the day/night cycle, which are fundamental to increase the fitness of an organism in its environment. A disruption of rhythmic activities is known to possibly impact the health of an animal. This study focused in C. gigas, on a gene known to be involved in circadian rhythmicity, cryptochrome gene (CgCry), on putative clock-controlled genes involved in metabolic and physiological functions, on the length cycle of the style, a structure involved in digestion, and on the rhythmicity of valve activity involved in behavior. The results indicate that daily activity is synchronized at the gene level by light:dark cycles in C. gigas. A daily rhythm of valve activity and a difference in crystalline style length between scotophase and photophase were also demonstrated. Additionally, A. minutum exposure was shown to alter cyclic activities: in exposed oysters, gene transcription remained at a constant low level throughout a daily cycle, valve opening duration remained maximal and crystalline style length variation disappeared. The results show that a realistic bloom of A. minutum clearly can disrupt numerous and diverse molecular, physiological and behavioral functions via a loss of rhythmicity. PMID:25461744

  15. Horizontal movements, vertical-habitat utilization and diet of the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) in the Pacific Ocean off Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzino, Gastón; Gilly, William F.; Markaida, Unai; Salinas-Zavala, César A.; Ramos-Castillejos, Jorge

    2010-07-01

    We deployed four pop-up archival-transmitting (PAT) tags on jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) collected in the Pacific Ocean off the main entrance to Magdalena Bay on the Baja California peninsula in June 2005. This is the first successful deployment of PAT tags on jumbo squid in an area outside the Gulf of California. Summary data were obtained through the ARGOS satellite system for three of the tags; the fourth tag was physically recovered. All of the tagged squid tended to remain on the shallow continental shelf for several days after tagging and then moved offshore into deeper water. Three of the four squid appeared to migrate in a general southerly direction while the fourth remained offshore of Magdalena Bay. All of the squid spent most daylight hours at depths that were associated with the hypoxic oxygen minimum layer, and at night they spent a majority of time in the upper 50 m of the water column. Stomach content analysis and tag temperature-depth data during the first days after tagging revealed that the squid were feeding on pelagic red crabs ( Pleuroncodes planipes) and several larger, neritic fishes over the continental shelf off Magdalena Bay during a seasonal nearshore upwelling. Comparison of our results with those previously collected in the Gulf of California reveal that Dosidicus gigas can vary its behavior and diet to suit local environmental conditions. This adaptability is likely to be an important factor in the ability of D. gigas to invade and colonize new areas.

  16. Causes and effects of a highly successful marine invasion: Case-study of the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in continental NW European estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Karin

    2010-10-01

    Since the 1960's, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced for mariculture at several locations within NW Europe. The oyster established itself everywhere and expanded rapidly throughout the receiving ecosystems, forming extensive and dense reef structures. It became clear that the Pacific oyster induced major changes in NW European estuaries. This paper reviews the causes of the Pacific oyster's remarkably successful establishment and spread in The Netherlands and neighbouring countries, and includes a comprehensive review of consequences for the receiving communities. Ecosystem engineering by C. gigas and a relative lack of natural enemies in receiving ecosystems are identified as the most important characteristics facilitating the invader's successful establishment and expansion. The Pacific oyster's large filtration capacity and eco-engineering characteristics induced many changes in receiving ecosystems. Different estuaries are affected differently; in the Dutch Oosterschelde estuary expanding stocks saturate the carrying capacity whereas in the Wadden Sea no such problems exist. In general, the Pacific oyster seems to fit well within continental NW European estuarine ecosystems and there is no evidence that the invader outcompetes native bivalves. C. gigas induces changes in plankton composition, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity, carrying capacity, food webs and parasite life cycles. The case of the Pacific oyster in NW European estuaries is only one example in an increasing series of biological invasions mediated by human activities. This case-study will contribute to further elucidating general mechanisms in marine invasions; invasions that sometimes appear a threat, but can also contribute to ecological complexity.

  17. A review of current evidence for acetyl-l-carnitine in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2014-06-01

    Despite numerous antidepressants available, many patients with depression do not achieve adequate response rendering needs for novel antidepressants with different mechanism of actions. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a potential antidepressant with novel mechanism of action because of its diverse functions related with neuroplasticity. Animal and cellular models suggest that ALC's neuroplasiticity effect, membrane modulation, and neurotransmitter regulation may play an important role in treatment of depression. Four randomized clinical studies (RCT) demonstrated the superior efficacy of ALC over placebo (PBO) in patients with depression. Two RCTs showed its superior efficacy over PBO in dysthymic disorder, and 2 other RCTs showed that it is equally effective as fluoxetine and amisulpride in treatment of dysthymic disorder. ALC was also effective in improving depressive symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia and minimal hepatic encephalopathy. It was also found to be equally tolerable to PBO and better tolerable than fluoxetine and amisulpride. In conclusion, ALC may be potentially effective and tolerable next treatment option with novel action mechanisms for patients with depression, in particular older population and patients with comorbid medical conditions who are vulnerable to adverse events from antidepressants. However, more clinical trial data with adequately-powered, well-designed and advanced methodology will be mandatory to conclude whether ALC as a monotherapy or augmentation agent may be efficacious and clinically beneficial for depression. PMID:24607292

  18. Differentially Expressed Genes in Hirudo medicinalis Ganglia after Acetyl-L-Carnitine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Federighi, Giuseppe; Macchi, Monica; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Scuri, Rossana; Brunelli, Marcello; Durante, Mauro; Traina, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance that, when administered at supra-physiological concentration, is neuroprotective. It is involved in membrane stabilization and in enhancement of mitochondrial functions. It is a molecule of considerable interest for its clinical application in various neural disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and painful neuropathies. ALC is known to improve the cognitive capability of aged animals chronically treated with the drug and, recently, it has been reported that it impairs forms of non-associative learning in the leech. In the present study the effects of ALC on gene expression have been analyzed in the leech Hirudo medicinalis. The suppression subtractive hybridisation methodology was used for the generation of subtracted cDNA libraries and the subsequent identification of differentially expressed transcripts in the leech nervous system after ALC treatment. The method detects differentially but also little expressed transcripts of genes whose sequence or identity is still unknown. We report that a single administration of ALC is able to modulate positively the expression of genes coding for functions that reveal a lasting effect of ALC on the invertebrate, and confirm the neuroprotective and neuromodulative role of the substance. In addition an important finding is the modulation of genes of vegetal origin. This might be considered an instance of ectosymbiotic mutualism. PMID:23308261

  19. Cancer therapy improvement with mesoporous silica nanoparticles combining photodynamic and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z X; Huang, Y Z; Shi, S G; Tang, S H; Li, D H; Chen, X L

    2014-07-18

    In this work, we develop novel mesoporous silica composite nanoparticles (hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd) for the co-delivery of photosensitizer (PS) tetra-substituted carboxyl aluminum phthalocyanine (AlC4Pc) and small Pd nanosheets as a potential dual carrier system to combine photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photothermal therapy (PTT). In the nanocomposite, PS AlC4Pc was covalently conjugated to a mesoporous silica network, and small Pd nanosheets were coated onto the surface of mesoporous silica by both coordination and electrostatic interaction. Since small Pd nanosheets and AlC4Pc display matched maximum absorptions in the 600-800 nm near-infrared (NIR) region, the fabricated hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd nanocomposites can generate both singlet oxygen and heat upon 660 nm single continuous wavelength (CW) laser irradiation. In vitro results indicated that the cell-killing efficacy by simultaneous PDT/PTT treatment using hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd was higher than PDT or PTT treatment alone after exposure to a 660 nm CW-NIR laser. PMID:24971525

  20. Cancer therapy improvement with mesoporous silica nanoparticles combining photodynamic and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. X.; Huang, Y. Z.; Shi, S. G.; Tang, S. H.; Li, D. H.; Chen, X. L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we develop novel mesoporous silica composite nanoparticles (hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd) for the co-delivery of photosensitizer (PS) tetra-substituted carboxyl aluminum phthalocyanine (AlC4Pc) and small Pd nanosheets as a potential dual carrier system to combine photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photothermal therapy (PTT). In the nanocomposite, PS AlC4Pc was covalently conjugated to a mesoporous silica network, and small Pd nanosheets were coated onto the surface of mesoporous silica by both coordination and electrostatic interaction. Since small Pd nanosheets and AlC4Pc display matched maximum absorptions in the 600-800 nm near-infrared (NIR) region, the fabricated hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd nanocomposites can generate both singlet oxygen and heat upon 660 nm single continuous wavelength (CW) laser irradiation. In vitro results indicated that the cell-killing efficacy by simultaneous PDT/PTT treatment using hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd was higher than PDT or PTT treatment alone after exposure to a 660 nm CW-NIR laser.

  1. The final spawning ground of Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east Peninsular Malaysia is at risk: a call for action

    PubMed Central

    Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd; Chatterji, Anil; Shaharom, Faizah

    2016-01-01

    Tanjung Selongor and Pantai Balok (State Pahang) are the only two places known for spawning activity of the Malaysian horseshoe crab - Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. While the former beach has been disturbed by several anthropogenic activities that ultimately brought an end to the spawning activity of T. gigas, the status of the latter remains uncertain. In the present study, the spawning behavior of T. gigas at Pantai Balok (Sites I-III) was observed over a period of thirty six months, in three phases, between 2009 and 2013. Every year, the crab’s nesting activity was found to be high during Southwest monsoon (May–September) followed by Northeast (November–March) and Inter monsoon (April and October) periods. In the meantime, the number of female T. gigas in 2009–2010 (Phase-1) was higher (38 crabs) than in 2010–2011 (Phase-2: 7 crabs) and 2012–2013 (Phase-3: 9 crabs) for which both increased overexploitation (for edible and fishmeal preparations) as well as anthropogenic disturbances in the vicinity (sand mining since 2009, land reclamation for wave breaker/parking lot constructions in 2011 and fishing jetty construction in 2013) are responsible. In this context, the physical infrastructure developments have altered the sediment close to nesting sites to be dominated by fine sand (2.5Xφ ) with moderately-well sorted (0.6–0.7σφ), very-coarse skewed (−2.4SKφ), and extremely leptokurtic (12.6Kφ) properties. Also, increased concentrations of Cadmium (from 4.2 to 13.6 mg kg−1) and Selenium (from 11.5 to 23.3 mg kg−1) in the sediment, and Sulphide (from 21 to 28 µg l−1) in the water were observed. In relation to the monsoonal changes affecting sheltered beach topography and sediment flux, the spawning crabs have shown a seasonal nest shifting behaviour in-between Sites I-III during 2009–2011. However, in 2012–2013, the crabs were mostly restricted to the areas (i.e., Sites I and II) with high

  2. The final spawning ground of Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east Peninsular Malaysia is at risk: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bryan Raveen; Satyanarayana, Behara; Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd; Chatterji, Anil; Shaharom, Faizah

    2016-01-01

    Tanjung Selongor and Pantai Balok (State Pahang) are the only two places known for spawning activity of the Malaysian horseshoe crab - Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. While the former beach has been disturbed by several anthropogenic activities that ultimately brought an end to the spawning activity of T. gigas, the status of the latter remains uncertain. In the present study, the spawning behavior of T. gigas at Pantai Balok (Sites I-III) was observed over a period of thirty six months, in three phases, between 2009 and 2013. Every year, the crab's nesting activity was found to be high during Southwest monsoon (May-September) followed by Northeast (November-March) and Inter monsoon (April and October) periods. In the meantime, the number of female T. gigas in 2009-2010 (Phase-1) was higher (38 crabs) than in 2010-2011 (Phase-2: 7 crabs) and 2012-2013 (Phase-3: 9 crabs) for which both increased overexploitation (for edible and fishmeal preparations) as well as anthropogenic disturbances in the vicinity (sand mining since 2009, land reclamation for wave breaker/parking lot constructions in 2011 and fishing jetty construction in 2013) are responsible. In this context, the physical infrastructure developments have altered the sediment close to nesting sites to be dominated by fine sand (2.5Xφ ) with moderately-well sorted (0.6-0.7σφ), very-coarse skewed (-2.4SKφ), and extremely leptokurtic (12.6Kφ) properties. Also, increased concentrations of Cadmium (from 4.2 to 13.6 mg kg(-1)) and Selenium (from 11.5 to 23.3 mg kg(-1)) in the sediment, and Sulphide (from 21 to 28 µg l(-1)) in the water were observed. In relation to the monsoonal changes affecting sheltered beach topography and sediment flux, the spawning crabs have shown a seasonal nest shifting behaviour in-between Sites I-III during 2009-2011. However, in 2012-2013, the crabs were mostly restricted to the areas (i.e., Sites I and II) with high oxygen (5.5-8.0 mg l

  3. Evolution of a novel nuclear receptor subfamily with emphasis on the member from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Li, Juan; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-08-10

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) belong to the transcription factor superfamily that regulates development, homeostasis, differentiation, and reproduction in metazoans via control of gene expression. Recently, rapid advances in genome projects on various metazoans have provided new opportunities for studying the evolution and function of NRs. Typically structured NRs are divided into six subfamilies. Here, the gene for a typically structured NR (CgNR8A1) was cloned from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. However, this novel receptor could not be assigned to a known NR subfamily. By data mining, nine other CgNR8A1 gene homologs were identified in metazoans such as cnidarians, mollusks, annelids, echinoderms, hemichordates, and cephalochordates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these receptors belonged to a novel NR subfamily, hereafter designated as NR8. Evolutionary analysis revealed that the NR8 subfamily was phylogenetically the third-oldest NR subfamily, and it originated from a common ancestor of Eumetazoa; several gene loss events occurred independently in ancestors of vertebrates, ecdysozoans, and platyhelminths, which do not have NR8 members. Furthermore, the function of CgNR8A1 was investigated to provide an insight into the functions of this novel NR subfamily. A nuclear localization signal peptide, GKHRNKKPRLD, was identified in CgNR8A1, and a recombinant full-length protein of CgNR8A1 was localized in the nuclei of HeLa cells. The mRNA expression profile of CgNR8A1 suggested that it might be involved in the embryogenesis of C. gigas. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that CgNR8A1 binds strongly to conserved DNA core motifs DR0, DR2, and DR4 and weakly to DR1, DR3, DR5, Half, and Pal0. In summary, the novel NR8 subfamily identified in this study improves our understanding of NR evolution, and the functional analysis of CgNR8A1 provided further insights into the functions of NR8A1s. PMID:25956376

  4. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p < 0.05), and a concomitant increase in mantle muscle octopine levels (from 0.50 to 5.24 μmol g -1 tissue, p < 0.05). Enhanced glycolitic ATP production accounted for only 7.0% and 2.8% at 10 °C and 20 °C, respectively, of the energy deficit that resulted from the decline in aerobic respiration. The observed metabolic suppression presumably extends survival time in the OML by conserving the finite stores of fermentable substrate and avoiding the accumulation of the deleterious anaerobic end products in the tissues. RMR increased significantly with temperature ( p < 0.05), from 8.9 (at 10 °C) to 49.85 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 (at 25 °C) which yielded a Q10 of 2.0 between 10 and 20 °C and 7.9 between 20 and 25 °C ( p < 0.05). These results suggest that 25 °C, although within the normal surface temperature range in the Gulf of California, is outside this species’ normal temperature range. By following the scattering layer into oxygen-enriched shallow water at night, D. gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  5. The modulation of haemolymph arginine kinase on the extracellular ATP induced bactericidal immune responses in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-07-01

    Arginine kinase is an important phosphagen kinase (PK) which plays an essential role in ATP buffering systems in invertebrates. In the present study, an arginine kinase (designated CgAK) was isolated by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affinity chromatography from the haemolymph of Crassostrea gigas. CgAK could directly bind to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner with the dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.46 × 10(-6) M. The interaction with LPS significantly decreased the ATP hydrolytic activity of CgAK, which in turn lead to the accumulation of ATP in vitro. The extracellular ATP stimulation could induce Ca(2+) influx, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the release of lysosomal enzyme in the cellular immune response. In addition, ATP stimulation provoked the bactericidal activity towards Escherichia coli, and the scavenging ROS with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) abrogated the bactericidal activity, indicating that ATP stimulation could induce ROS-dependent antimicrobial activity in haemocytes. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the haemolymph CgAK could serve as an important purinergic regulator to modulate extracellular ATP, which might further have an important effect on the purinergic signaling-activated innate immune response of oyster. PMID:27033465

  6. Effects of storage temperature and duration on toxicity of sediments assessed by Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Beiras, R.; His, E.; Seaman, M.N.L.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of temperature and duration of storage on the toxicity of estuarine sediments were investigated with the Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay. Sediments ranging from unpolluted (controls) to extremely polluted with heavy metals (>100 ppm Hg, Cu, Zn, and Pb) and total hydrocarbons (>1,000 ppm) were collected from sites in southwest France and northern Spain, Control sediments were toxic only at the highest concentrations tested and after freezing in liquid nitrogen ({minus}196 C). Polluted sediments significantly reduced the success of oyster embryogenesis. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of storage temperature on toxicity increased with the prolongation of storage. Prolonged storage of fresh (4 C) sediments resulted in a loss of toxicity, which was more rapid in the less-polluted sediments. Deep-frozen sediments ({minus}196 C) were highly toxic regardless of origin and storage time, and because deep-freezing causes spurious toxicity in the control samples, it cannot be recommended for toxicological studies. In the context of the assessment of sediment toxicity by embryo-larval bioassays, fresh (4 C) storage is recommended when sediments need to be stored for no longer than a few days. The advisable duration of fresh storage to avoid false-negative results is directly related to the degree of toxicity. Should the sediments require prolonged storage, freezing at {minus}20 C appears to be the best choice.

  7. Evidence for colonization and destruction of hinge ligaments in cultured juvenile Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) by cytophaga-like bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Dungan, C F; Elston, R A; Schiewe, M H

    1989-01-01

    Several strains of cytophaga-like gliding bacteria (CLB) were isolated as numerically dominant or codominant components of bacterial populations associated with proteinaceous hinge ligaments of cultured juvenile Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas. These bacteria were morphologically similar to long, flexible bacilli occurring within degenerative lesions in oyster hinge ligaments. Among bacteria isolated from hinge ligaments, only CLB strains were capable of sustained growth with hinge ligament matrix as the sole source of organic carbon and nitrogen. In vitro incubation of cuboidal portions of ligament resilium with ligament CLB resulted in bacterial proliferation on the surfaces and penetration deep into ligament matrices. Bacterial proliferation was accompanied by loss of resilium structural and mechanical integrity, including complete liquefaction, at incubation temperatures between 10 and 20 degrees C. The morphological, distributional, and degradative characteristics of CLB isolated from oyster hinge ligaments provide compelling, albeit indirect, evidence that CLB are the agents of a degenerative disease affecting juvenile cultured oysters. The motility, metabolic, and hydrolytic characteristics of hinge ligament CLB and the low moles percent G + C values (32.4 to 32.9) determined for three representative strains indicate that they are marine Cytophaga spp. Images PMID:2757377

  8. Inheritance mode of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-08-01

    Five full-sib families of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) larvae were used to study the mode of inheritance at eight microsatellite loci, and the feasibility of these markers for kinship estimate was also examined. All eight microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither evidence of sex-linked barriers to transmission nor evidence of major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents was shown. Three of the eight loci showed the presence of null alleles in four families, demonstrating the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. Although the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from five full-sib families were unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated oyster larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and is applicable to the investigation of the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Pacific oyster.

  9. Spatio-temporal variations in biological performances and summer mortality of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in Normandy (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costil, Katherine; Royer, Juliette; Ropert, Michel; Soletchnik, Patrick; Mathieu, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Mortality and biological performances of half-grown Crassostrea gigas were studied from spring 2000 to autumn 2001 at six instrumented stations located in two areas (Gefosse and Grandcamp) of the Bay of Veys (Normandy). Shell and meat growth, condition indexes and a macroscopic maturity index were determined on oysters deployed at the six stations in order to assess spatial variability in the influence of environmental conditions. In addition, histological and biochemical analyses were performed in order to determine the sex and establish the reproductive cycle (at all six sites) and the biochemical composition (at four stations). The data set including monthly mean temperatures and data provided by examination of 2,837 oysters were analysed by Principal Component Analysis and a Hierarchical Ascending Clustering which resulted in the formation of four clusters. The highest station on the shoreline belonged to a cluster characterized notably by low total weight due to a short immersion/feeding period, whereas all other stations belonged to another single cluster. Nevertheless, various biological differences were found between these stations, e.g. the reproductive cycle was generally synchronized throughout the bay but some differences relative to spawning occurrence were observed. In 2000, oyster mortality was higher at Gefosse than at Grandcamp, the latter being a more marine area. In 2001, oyster mortalities were significantly higher and all stations were strongly affected. In the Bay of Veys, oyster biological performances and mortality thus showed spatio-temporal variations which were worthy to be discussed.

  10. Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Hydrolysates Produced on a Plant Scale Have Antitumor Activity and Immunostimulating Effects in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Kai; He, Hai-Lun; Wang, Guo-Fan; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Oyster extracts have been reported to have many bioactive peptides. But the function of oyster peptides produced by proteolysis is still unknown. In this study, the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysates from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) were produced using the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 at laboratory level, and scaled up to pilot (100 L) and plant (1,000 L) levels with the same conditions. And the antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects of the oyster hydrolysates in BALB/c mice were investigated. The growth of transplantable sarcoma-S180 was obviously inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in BALB/c mice given the oyster hydrolysates. Mice receiving 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/g of body weight by oral gavage had 6.8%, 30.6% and 48% less tumor growth, respectively. Concurrently, the weight coefficients of the thymus and the spleen, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells, the spleen proliferation of lymphocytes and the phagocytic rate of macrophages in S180-bearing mice significantly increased after administration of the oyster hydrolysates. These results demonstrated that oyster hydrolysates produced strong immunostimulating effects in mice, which might result in its antitumor activity. The antitumor and immunostimulating effects of oyster hydrolysates prepared in this study reveal its potential for tumor therapy and as a dietary supplement with immunostimulatory activity. PMID:20390104

  11. Efficacy of natural biocide on control of microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines mediated by Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Meeta; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Mandal, Ajoy K; Cheema, Simrita; Lal, Banwari

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of a natural biocide with four chemical tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, and formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, to control microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines. The efficacy of biocides were monitored against Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas in experimental pipes by measuring cell counts, H2S production, Fe(II) production, production of extracellular polymeric substances and structure of biofilm. The treatment with cow urine had minimum planktonic cell counts of 3 x 10(2) CFU/mL as well as biofilm cell counts of 9 x 10(1) CFU/mL as compared with tetrakishydroxyl methyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. Sulfide production was the lowest with cow urine (0.08 mmol/L), followed by tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate 0.72 mmol/L. On day 90 of treatment, Fe(II) production was also found to be the lowest with cow urine. The scanning electron microscopic studies indicated that the biofilm bacteria were killed by cow urine. These results demonstrate the cow urine mediated control of microbially induced corrosion, and this is indicative of its potential as a viable substitute of toxic biocides. To the best of our knowledge, this seems to be the first report which screens possible biocidal activity by cow urine as compared to the most common biocides which oil industry is currently using. PMID:22128548

  12. Summer mortalities and detection of ostreid herpesvirus microvariant in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in Sweden and Norway.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stein; Strand, Åsa; Bodvin, Torjan; Alfjorden, Anders; Skår, Cecilie K; Jelmert, Anders; Aspán, Anna; Sælemyr, Lisbeth; Naustvoll, Lars-Johan; Albretsen, Jon

    2016-01-13

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has recently expanded its range in Scandinavia. The expansion is presumably a result of northwards larval drift. Massive settlements were recorded in many areas along the Swedish west coast and southern Norway in 2013 and 2014. After the spawning season in 2014, the temperature of the surface water peaked at 24-26°C. After this period, high and sudden mortalities occurred in a Swedish hatchery and in wild populations along the Swedish west coast and south coast of Norway. Surveys and collected data showed that mortalities mainly occurred during 3 wk in September. All size classes were affected, and affected populations displayed a patchy distribution with heavily affected and unaffected populations in close proximity. Flat oysters Ostrea edulis and blue mussels Mytilus edulis were unaffected. Ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV) was detected in moribund Pacific oyster spat as well as in surviving adults. The virus was identified as OsHV-1 μvar. This is the first detection of this variant in Scandinavia, showing that OsHV-1 μvar is present in areas with recent establishments of Pacific oysters, and where there is no aquaculture of this species. PMID:26758650

  13. Production and functional evaluation of a protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) by acid dissolution and isoelectric precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Elena Lugo-Sánchez, M; Gisela Carvallo-Ruiz, M; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2008-09-15

    A protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was produced under acidic conditions and its functional-technological capability evaluated in terms of its gel-forming ability, water holding capacity and colour attributes. Technological functionality of the concentrate was compared with that of squid muscle and a neutral concentrate. Protein-protein aggregates insoluble at high ionic strength (I=0.5M), were detected in the acidic concentrate as result of processing with no preclusion of its gel-forming ability during the sol-to-gel thermal transition. Even though washing under acidic condition promoted autolysis of the myosin heavy chain, the acidic concentrate displayed an outstanding ability to gel giving samples with a gel strength of 455 and 1160gcm at 75% and 90% compression respectively, and an AA folding test grade indicative of high gel strength, elasticity, and cohesiveness. The process proved to be a good alternative for obtaining a functional protein concentrate from giant squid muscle. PMID:26049243

  14. ESR studies on the thermal decomposition of trimethylamine oxide to formaldehyde and dimethylamine in jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) extract.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junli; Jia, Jia; Li, Xuepeng; Dong, Liangliang; Li, Jianrong

    2013-12-15

    The effects of ferrous iron, heating temperature and different additives on the decomposition of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) to formaldehyde (FA) and dimethylamine (DMA) and generation of free radicals in jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) extract during heating were evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR). The thermal decomposition of TMAO to TMA, DMA and FA and free radical signals was observed in squid extract, whereas no DMA, FA and free radical signals were detected in cod extract or in aqueous TMAO solution in vitro at high temperatures. Significant increase in levels of DMA, FA and radicals intensity were observed in squid extract and TMAO solution in the presence of ferrous iron with increasing temperature. Hydrogen peroxide stimulated the production of DMA, FA and ESR signals in squid extract, while citric acid, trisodium citrate, calcium chloride, tea polyphenols and resveratrol had the opposite effect. Similar ESR spectra of six peaks regarded as amminium radical were detected in the squid extract and TMAO-iron(II) solution, suggesting that the amminium radical was involved in the decomposition of TMAO. PMID:23993561

  15. Abundance and sexual size dimorphism of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.; Gregory, C.J.; Halstead, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is restricted to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Because of wetland loss in this region, the Giant Gartersnake is both federally and state listed as threatened. We conducted markrecapture studies of four populations of the Giant Gartersnake in the Sacramento Valley (northern Central Valley), California, to obtain baseline data on abundance and density to assist in recovery planning for this species. We sampled habitats that ranged from natural, unmanaged marsh to constructed managed marshes and habitats associated with rice agriculture. Giant Gartersnake density in a natural wetland (1.90 individuals/ha) was an order of magnitude greater than in a managed wetland subject to active season drying (0.17 individuals/ha). Sex ratios at all sites were not different from 1 1, and females were longer and heavier than males. Females had greater body condition than males, and individuals at the least disturbed sites had significantly greater body condition than individuals at the managed wetland. The few remaining natural wetlands in the Central Valley are important, productive habitat for the Giant Gartersnake, and should be conserved and protected. Wetlands constructed and restored for the Giant Gartersnake should be modeled after the permanent, shallow wetlands representative of historic Giant Gartersnake habitat. ?? 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  16. A preliminary investigation of the variables affecting the distribution of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-01-01

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of rare, semi-aquatic snake precinctive to the Central Valley of California. Because of the loss of more than 90% of their natural habitat, giant gartersnakes are listed as Threatened by the United States and California endangered species acts. Little is known, however, about the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley, which is where most extant populations occur. We conducted detection-nondetection surveys for giant gartersnakes throughout the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, and used occupancy models to examine evidence for the effects of landscape-scale GIS-derived variables, local habitat and vegetation composition, and prey communities on patterns of giant gartersnake occurrence. Although our results are based on a relatively small sample of sites, we found that distance to historic marsh, relative fish count, and an interaction of distance to historic marsh with proportion of habitat composed of submerged vegetation were important variables for explaining occupancy of giant gartersnakes. In particular, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur closer to historic marsh and where relatively fewer fish were captured in traps. At locations in or near historic marsh, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur in areas with less submerged vegetation, but this relationship was reversed (and more uncertain) at sites distant from historic marsh. Additional research with a larger sample of sites would further elucidate the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley.

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Selectively Bred Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Families that Differ in Tolerance of Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Christopher J.; Camara, Mark D.; Cunningham, Charles; Jenny, Matthew J.; Langdon, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Sessile inhabitants of marine intertidal environments commonly face heat stress, an important component of summer mortality syndrome in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Marker-aided selection programs would be useful for developing oyster strains that resist summer mortality; however, there is currently a need to identify candidate genes associated with stress tolerance and to develop molecular markers associated with those genes. To identify candidate genes for further study, we used cDNA microarrays to test the hypothesis that oyster families that had high (>64%) or low (<29%) survival of heat shock (43°C, 1 h) differ in their transcriptional responses to stress. Based upon data generated by the microarray and by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that transcription after heat shock increased for genes putatively encoding heat shock proteins and genes for proteins that synthesize lipids, protect against bacterial infection, and regulate spawning, whereas transcription decreased for genes for proteins that mobilize lipids and detoxify reactive oxygen species. RNAs putatively identified as heat shock protein 27, collagen, peroxinectin, S-crystallin, and two genes with no match in Genbank had higher transcript concentrations in low-surviving families than in high-surviving families, whereas concentration of putative cystatin B mRNA was greater in high-surviving families. These ESTs should be studied further for use in marker-aided selection programs. Low survival of heat shock could result from a complex interaction of cell damage, opportunistic infection, and metabolic exhaustion. PMID:19205802

  18. A 5 Giga Samples Per Second 8-Bit Analog to Digital Printed Circuit Board for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Homin; Liu, Howard; Guzzino, Kim; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Chang, Ray; Chen, Ming-Tang

    2014-08-01

    We have designed, manufactured, and characterized an 8-bit 5 Giga samples per second (Gsps) ADC printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). An e2v EV8AQ160 ADC chip was used in the design and the board is plug compatible with the field programmable gate array (FPGA) board developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) community. Astronomical interference fringes were demonstrated across a single baseline pair of antennas using two ADC boards on the Yuan Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) telescope. Several radio interferometers are using this board for bandwidth expansion, such as Submillimeter Array; also, several experimental telescopes are building new spectrometers using the same board. The ADC boards were attached directly to the Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH-2) FPGA board for processing of the digital output signals. This ADC board provides the capability of digitizing radio frequency signals from DC to 2 GHz (3 dB bandwidth), and to an extended bandwidth of 2.5 GHz (5 dB) with derated performance. The following worst-case performance parameters were obtained over 2 GHz: spur free dynamic range (SFDR) of 44 dB, signal-to-noise and distortion (SINAD) of 35 dB, and effective number of bits (ENOB) of 5.5.

  19. Age, maturation, and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Chen, Yong; Tian, Siquan; Li, Jianhua; Fang, Zhou; Yang, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    Age, maturation and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas were studied based on random sampling of the Chinese jigging fishery off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) during 2008-2010. Estimated ages ranged from 144 to 633 days, confirming that the squid is a short-lived species with longevity no longer than 2 years. Occurrence of mature females and hatching in each month indicated that Humboldt squid spawned year-round. Back-calculated hatching dates for the samples were from January 22nd, 2008 to April 22nd, 2010 with a peak between January and March. Two size-based and two hatching date-based populations could be defined from mantle length (ML) at maturity and back-calculated hatching dates, respectively. Females matured at a larger size than males, and there was a significant difference in ML at maturity between the two hatching groups ( P <0.05). The waters adjacent to 11°S off the Peruvian EEZ may be a potential spawning ground. This study shows the complexity of the population structure and large variability in key life history parameters in the Humboldt squid off the Peruvian EEZ, which should be considered in the assessment and management of this important resource.

  20. Physiological change under OsHV-1 contamination in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas through massive mortality events on fields

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Massive mortalities have been observed in France since 2008 on spat and juvenile Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas. A herpes virus called OsHV-1, easily detectable by PCR, has been implicated in the mortalities as demonstrated by the results of numerous field studies linking mortality with OsHV-1 prevalence. Moreover, experimental infections using viral particles have documented the pathogenicity of OsHV-1 but the physiological responses of host to pathogen are not well known. Results The aim of this study was to understand mechanisms brought into play against the virus during infection in the field. A microarray assay has been developed for a major part of the oyster genome and used for studying the host transcriptome across mortality on field. Spat with and without detectable OsHV-1 infection presenting or not mortality respectively were compared by microarray during mortality episodes. In this study, a number of genes are regulated in the response to pathogen infection on field and seems to argue to an implication of the virus in the observed mortality. The result allowed establishment of a hypothetic scheme of the host cell’s infection by, and response to, the pathogen. Conclusions This response shows a “sensu stricto” innate immunity through genic regulation of the virus OsHV-1 life cycle, but also others biological processes resulting to complex interactions between host and pathogens in general. PMID:23987141

  1. Exposure to the Neurotoxic Dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella, Induces Apoptosis of the Hemocytes of the Oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Medhioub, Walid; Ramondenc, Simon; Vanhove, Audrey Sophie; Vergnes, Agnes; Masseret, Estelle; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the apoptotic process occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, exposed to Alexandrium catenella, a paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) producer. Oysters were experimentally exposed during 48 h to the toxic algae. PSTs accumulation, the expression of 12 key apoptotic-related genes, as well as the variation of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis was measured at time intervals during the experiment. Results show a significant increase of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis after 29 h of exposure. Two pro-apoptotic genes (Bax and Bax-like) implicated in the mitochondrial pathway were significantly upregulated at 21 h followed by the overexpression of two caspase executor genes (caspase-3 and caspase-7) at 29 h, suggesting that the intrinsic pathway was activated. No modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the cell signaling Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) and initiation-phase (caspase-2) was observed, suggesting that only the extrinsic pathway was not activated. Moreover, the clear time-dependent upregulation of five (Bcl2, BI-1, IAP1, IAP7B and Hsp70) inhibitors of apoptosis-related genes associated with the return to the initial number of hemocytes in apoptosis at 48 h of exposure suggests the involvement of strong regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster. PMID:24317471

  2. Population genomics shed light on the demographic and adaptive histories of European invasion in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Rohfritsch, Audrey; Bierne, Nicolas; Boudry, Pierre; Heurtebise, Serge; Cornette, Florence; Lapègue, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas originated from the Pacific coast of Asia, but was introduced into several European countries in the early 1970s. Natural populations have now spread across the length of the western seaboard of Europe. To elucidate the demographic and selective processes at play during this rapid expansion, genome-scan analysis was performed on different populations. High diversities and low differentiation were observed overall, but significant genetic differentiation was found among newly established populations and between the newly established northern group and a nearly panmictic group composed of southern European populations and a population from Japan. Loss of genetic diversity was also seen in the north, likely caused by founder events during colonization. The few strongly supported outlier loci revealed a genetic structure uncorrelated with the north/south differentiation, but grouping two samples from the Danish fjords (northern group) and one from the Dutch Scheldt estuary (southern group) with the one from Japan. These findings might reflect the following: (i) parallel adaptation to similar environmental pressures (fjord-like environment) within each of the two groups or (ii) a footprint of a secondary introduction of an alternative genomic background maintained by multifarious isolation factors. Our results call for a closer examination of adaptive genetic structure in the area of origin. PMID:24187588

  3. [A study on feeding ecology and migration patterns of Dosidicus gigas off Peru using stable isotope analysis].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-jun; Li, Yun-kai; Han, Meng-jie

    2015-09-01

    As a pelagic cephalopod and one of the main target species of Chinese distant water fishery, jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas) play a major role in the marine ecosystems of the eastern Pacific. Understanding the feeding ecology and migration patterns of jumbo squids is of importance for better utilizing the resources. The isotopic signatures of gladius, have been proved to be a powerful tool to reveal high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids; which is an archival tissue with no elemental turnover after formation. In this study, the growth equation of gladius proostracum was established based on the age information determined by statolith. Gladius was cut successionally by the growth curve of gladius proostracum, the stable isotopic values of the gladius profiles were determined, and the feeding ecology and migration patterns of jumbo squids during its growth process were investigated. Results showed that the jumbo squids began to migrate after 180 days of postnatal, and their trophic levels tended to decrease throughout the life span. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using continuous sampling hard tissue to study the feeding ecology and habitat transfer of jumbo squids. PMID:26785574

  4. Alternative Processing of γ-Secretase Substrates in Common Forms of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence for γ-Secretase Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Saori; Fujishige, Sayaka; Araki, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Miyako; Urakami, Katsuya; Peskind, Elaine; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Araseki, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Martins, Ralph N.; Maeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masaki; Levey, Allan; Chung, Kathryn A.; Montine, Thomas; Leverenz, James; Fagan, Anne; Goate, Alison; Bateman, Randall; Holtzman, David M.; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Gandy, Sam; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Objective The most common pathogenesis for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) involves misprocessing (or alternative processing) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase due to mutations of the presenilin 1 (PS1) gene. This misprocessing/alternative processing leads to an increase in the ratio of the level of a minor γ-secretase reaction product (Aβ42) to that of the major reaction product (Aβ40). Although no PS1 mutations are present, altered Aβ42/40 ratios are also observed in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD), and these altered ratios apparently reflect deposition of Aβ42 as amyloid. Methods Using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry with quantitative accuracy, we analyzed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of various clinical populations the peptide products generated by processing of not only APP but also an unrelated protein, alcadein (Alc). Alc undergoes metabolism by the identical APP α-secretases and γ-secretases, yielding a fragment that we have named p3-Alcα because of the parallel genesis of p3-Alcα peptides and the p3 fragment of APP. As with Aβ, both major and minor p3-Alcαs are generated. We studied the alternative processing of p3-Alcα in various clinical populations. Results We previously reported that changes in the Aβ42/40 ratio showed covariance in a linear relationship with the levels of p3-Alcα [minor/major] ratio in media conditioned by cells expressing FAD-linked PS1 mutants. Here we studied the speciation of p3-Alcα in the CSF from 3 groups of human subjects (n = 158): elderly nondemented control subjects; mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with a clinical dementia rating (CDR) of 0.5; SAD subjects with CDR of 1.0; and other neurological disease (OND) control subjects. The CSF minor p3-Alcα variant, p3-Alcα38, was elevated (p < 0.05) in MCI subjects or SAD subjects, depending upon whether the data were pooled and analyzed as a single cohort or analyzed individually as 3 separate cohorts. Interpretation

  5. Alcohol Ingestion Impairs Maximal Post-Exercise Rates of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following a Single Bout of Concurrent Training

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Evelyn B.; Camera, Donny M.; Areta, José L.; Burke, Louise M.; Phillips, Stuart M.; Hawley, John A.; Coffey, Vernon G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The culture in many team sports involves consumption of large amounts of alcohol after training/competition. The effect of such a practice on recovery processes underlying protein turnover in human skeletal muscle are unknown. We determined the effect of alcohol intake on rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following strenuous exercise with carbohydrate (CHO) or protein ingestion. Methods In a randomized cross-over design, 8 physically active males completed three experimental trials comprising resistance exercise (8×5 reps leg extension, 80% 1 repetition maximum) followed by continuous (30 min, 63% peak power output (PPO)) and high intensity interval (10×30 s, 110% PPO) cycling. Immediately, and 4 h post-exercise, subjects consumed either 500 mL of whey protein (25 g; PRO), alcohol (1.5 g·kg body mass−1, 12±2 standard drinks) co-ingested with protein (ALC-PRO), or an energy-matched quantity of carbohydrate also with alcohol (25 g maltodextrin; ALC-CHO). Subjects also consumed a CHO meal (1.5 g CHO·kg body mass−1) 2 h post-exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 2 and 8 h post-exercise. Results Blood alcohol concentration was elevated above baseline with ALC-CHO and ALC-PRO throughout recovery (P<0.05). Phosphorylation of mTORSer2448 2 h after exercise was higher with PRO compared to ALC-PRO and ALC-CHO (P<0.05), while p70S6K phosphorylation was higher 2 h post-exercise with ALC-PRO and PRO compared to ALC-CHO (P<0.05). Rates of MPS increased above rest for all conditions (∼29–109%, P<0.05). However, compared to PRO, there was a hierarchical reduction in MPS with ALC-PRO (24%, P<0.05) and with ALC-CHO (37%, P<0.05). Conclusion We provide novel data demonstrating that alcohol consumption reduces rates of MPS following a bout of concurrent exercise, even when co-ingested with protein. We conclude that alcohol ingestion suppresses the anabolic response in skeletal muscle and may therefore impair recovery and adaptation to

  6. Acetyl-L-Carnitine in the Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Li, Ling; Tian, Haoming; Sun, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), a constructive molecule in fatty acid metabolism, is an agent potentially effective for treating peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP). Its effect, however, remains uncertain. We aimed to access the efficacy and safety of ALC for the treatment of patients with PNP. Methods We searched MEDLINE (1996–2014), EMBase (1974–2014), and CENTRAL (May 2014) up to June 27, 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ALC with placebo or other active medications in diabetic and non-diabetic PNP patients that reported the change of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for pooling continuous data. Results Four RCTs comparing ALC with placebo and reporting in three articles (n = 523) were included. Compared with placebo, ALC significantly reduced VAS scores of PNP patients (MD of VAS, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.68-1.72, P <0.00001). In the subgroup analysis, the effect of ALC on VAS was similar in different administration routes (intramuscular-oral sequential subgroup: MD, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.34-2.04, P = 0.006; oral only subgroup: pooled MD, 1.15; 95%CI, 0.33-1.96, P = 0.006), and ALC appeared more effective in diabetic PNP patients than non-diabetic PNP patients (diabetic subgroup: MD, 1.47; 95%CI, 1.06-1.87, P <0.00001; non-diabetic subgroup: MD, 0.71; 95% CI, -0.01-1.43, P = 0.05). No severe adverse events were reported related to ALC. The common adverse events were pain, headache, paraesthesia, hyperesthesia, retching, biliary colic, and gastrointestinal disorders. The rates of total adverse events were similar in ALC and control group. Conclusion The current evidence suggests that ALC has a moderate effect in reducing pain measured on VAS in PNP patients with acceptable safety. Larger trials with longer follow-up, however, are warranted to establish the effects. PMID:25751285

  7. Genomics Study of the Exposure Effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a Paralyzing Toxin Producer, on Crassostrea gigas' Defense System and Detoxification Genes

    PubMed Central

    García-Lagunas, Norma; Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. Principal Findings We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure) induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD), cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450), intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP), and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS) in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×103 cells mL−1) showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×103 cells mL−1) produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×103 cells mL−1 of G. catenatum+0.75×106 cells mL−1 I. galbana) in all the analyzed genes. Conclusions Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to stress generated by

  8. Geographical variation in the genetic diversity and composition of the endangered queen conch Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) from Yucatán, México.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Enriquez, Ricardo; Garcia-Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Mendoza-Carrion, Gabriela; Padilla, Claudia

    2011-09-01

    In Mexico and elsewhere in the Caribbean, the queen conch Strombus gigas is an endangered species. Understanding the genetic connectivity of their populations will support management strategies for long-term conservation of the species. Genetic diversity and population differentiation was assessed from samples collected at Banco Chinchorro and Isla Cozumel in the Mexican Caribbean and at Arrecife Alacranes in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were obtained from the commercial capture at Banco Chinchorro (n = 50) and Isla Cozumel (n = 40) on March 2004. On November 2004, a non-invasive method for the Arrecife Alacranes sampling was applied, taking the hemolymph of live animals (n = 65) and releasing them to the wild. The mitochondrial DNA variation at two genes (COI and Cyt-b) was analyzed. Genetic diversity at the three locations ranged between 0.55-0.65 in COI and 0.87-0.94 in Cyt-b, showing no bottleneck evidences. A non-significant fixation index (F(ST) = 0.019, p = 0.161) and a Maximum Parsimony Network tree that did not show particular clades associated with any of the geographical locations, suggested a lack of statistically significant genetic differentiation among populations. Nevertheless, the cline patterns observed in both genetic diversity and haplotypic frequencies from Banco Chinchorro through Arrecife Alacranes, and the larger genetic distance between these locations from those between Isla Cozumel, Banco Chinchorro and Arrecife Alacranes, suggest the possibility of a pattern of isolation-by distance. The role of the main current systems over the potential genetic differences in S. gigas populations along the Mexican Caribbean, and the conservation management of S. gigas at these locations as discrete units is discussed. PMID:22017118

  9. The Giga Bit Transceiver based Expandable Front-End (GEFE)—a new radiation tolerant acquisition system for beam instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros Marin, M.; Boccardi, A.; Donat Godichal, C.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Lefevre, T.; Levens, T.; Szuk, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Giga Bit Transceiver based Expandable Front-End (GEFE) is a multi-purpose FPGA-based radiation tolerant card. It is foreseen to be the new standard FMC carrier for digital front-end applications in the CERN BE-BI group. Its intended use ranges from fast data acquisition systems to slow control installed close to the beamlines, in a radioactive environment exposed to total ionizing doses of up to 750 Gy. This paper introduces the architecture of the GEFE, its features as well as examples of its application in different setups.

  10. The enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Enkephalinergic neuroendocrine-immune regulatory system is one of the most important neuroendocrine-immune systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates for its significant role in the immune regulation. In the present study, the early onset of enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated to illustrate the function of neural regulation on the innate immune system in oyster larvae. [Met(5)]-enkephalin (Met-ENK) was firstly observed on the marginal of the dorsal half of D-hinged larvae. Six immune-related molecules, including four PRRs (CgCTL-1, CgCTL-2, CgCTL-4, CgNatterin-3) and two immune effectors (CgTNF-1 and CgEcSOD) were detected in the early developmental stages of trochophore, D-hinged and umbo larvae of oyster. After incubated with [Met(5)]-enkephalin, the mRNA expression level of all the PRRs changed significantly (p < 0.05). In trochophore larvae, the expression level of CgNatterin-3 decreased dramatically (p < 0.05) at 6 h, and the expression level of CgCTL-4 was significantly down-regulated at 3 h and 6 h (p < 0.05), respectively. In D-hinged and umbo larvae, only CgCTL-1 was significantly down-regulated and the differences were significant at 3 h and 6 h (p < 0.05), while the expression level of CgCTL-2 and CgCTL-4 increased significantly at 3 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of immune effectors were up-regulated significantly at 3 h and 6 h in trochophore larvae (p < 0.05). The expression level of CgTNF-1 in both blank and experiment groups was up-regulated but there was no significant difference in D-hinged larvae stage. On the contrary, the expression level of CgEcSOD in D-hinged larvae decreased dramatically at 3 h and 6 h after [Met(5)]-enkephalin incubation (p < 0.05). In umbo larvae, the expression level of CgTNF-1 and CgEcSOD in the experiment group increased significantly at 6 h after [Met(5)]-enkephalin

  11. Impact of minimum catch size on the population viability of Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Peel, Joanne R; Mandujano, María del Carmen

    2014-12-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas represents one of the most important fishery resources of the Caribbean but heavy fishing pressure has led to the depletion of stocks throughout the region, causing the inclusion of this species into CITES Appendix II and IUCN's Red-List. In Mexico, the queen conch is managed through a minimum fishing size of 200 mm shell length and a fishing quota which usually represents 50% of the adult biomass. The objectives of this study were to determine the intrinsic population growth rate of the queen conch population of Xel-Ha, Quintana Roo, Mexico, and to assess the effects of a regulated fishing impact, simulating the extraction of 50% adult biomass on the population density. We used three different minimum size criteria to demonstrate the effects of minimum catch size on the population density and discuss biological implications. Demographic data was obtained through capture-mark-recapture sampling, collecting all animals encountered during three hours, by three divers, at four different sampling sites of the Xel-Ha inlet. The conch population was sampled each month between 2005 and 2006, and bimonthly between 2006 and 2011, tagging a total of 8,292 animals. Shell length and lip thickness were determined for each individual. The average shell length for conch with formed lip in Xel-Ha was 209.39 ± 14.18 mm and the median 210 mm. Half of the sampled conch with lip ranged between 200 mm and 219 mm shell length. Assuming that the presence of the lip is an indicator for sexual maturity, it can be concluded that many animals may form their lip at greater shell lengths than 200 mm and ought to be considered immature. Estimation of relative adult abundance and densities varied greatly depending on the criteria employed for adult classification. When using a minimum fishing size of 200 mm shell length, between 26.2% and up to 54.8% of the population qualified as adults, which represented a simulated fishing impact of almost one third of the

  12. Aspects of the symbiosis between some marine microbes and their invertebrate hosts. [Prochloron; Riftia pachyptila; Tridacna gigas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, C.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Prochloron sp. isolated from Diplosoma virens and incubated in the light in NaH/sup 14/CO/sub 3/ demonstrated a high photosynthetic capacity (up to 3.7 ..mu..gC-..mu..g Chl. a/sup -1/.h/sup -1/). In vitro these cyanobacteria release a maximum of 7% of the /sup 14/C they fix in the light. Dark fixation was found to be maximally 3% of light fixation and release in the dark averaged 26% of the total /sup 14/C fixed in the dark. These data imply that the organic carbon released by these cyanobacteria may not be quantitatively important to the host. The labeled compound released by Prochloron in the light is glycolic acid. The major compounds produced by light and dark carbon fixation in Prochloron are identified, and similarities to other photosynthetic cyanobacteria are noted. Trophosome tissue was removed from Riftia pachyptila Jones and assayed for a variety of metabolic capabilities. Trophosome preparations from various worms oxidized methane at rates ranging from 43 to 304 ..mu..mole/g wet weight/h. The trophosome failed to reduce acetylene under a variety of conditions indicating that it lacks the ability to fix appreciable N/sub 2/. The effects of irradiance level and size on the rate of O/sub 2/ evolution and consumption was examined in Tridacna gigas using an oxygen electrode. Seven photosynthesis-irradiance (P-I) curves were generated for intact clams ranging from 1 to 23 cm in shell length. Both alpha and P/sub max/ decreased with increasing size of the clam. Oxygen evolution at 1000 ..mu..E.m/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ and consumption in the dark were measured for an additional 9 clams ranging up to 38 cm in shell length.

  13. Overview and comparison of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) for assessing organic chemical exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huckins, J.N.; Prest, H.F.; Petty, J.D.; Lebo, J.A.; Hodgins, M.M.; Clark, R.C.; Alvarez, D.A.; Gala, W.R.; Steen, A.; Gale, R.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    We performed 20-d, flow-through exposures of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to three concentrations (nominally 10, 100, and 250 ng/L) of a diverse mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure water was seawater free of particulates larger than 0.1 ??m. The results of these controlled laboratory studies demonstrated that SPMDs and oysters concentrate the same chemicals but that the relative amounts accumulated are different. For oysters, the 20-d mean (across treatments) concentration factors (CFs) of test compounds with log Kow ??? 4.8 were much lower (4.0- to 20-fold lower) than those of the same compounds in SPMDs. In contrast, the 20-d CFs of PAHs with log K ow ??? 5.6 in oysters from the low-level treatment were higher than the corresponding CFs for SPMDs. The CFs of these compounds in oysters from the low-level treatment ranged from approximately 3.0- to 13-fold higher than those in oysters from the high-level treatment. This physiologically mediated difference in oyster CFs appears to be linked to active feeding in the low-level treatment and to apparent toxicity-induced cessation of feeding (i.e., valve closure) in the high-level treatment. Because CFs for these compounds in oysters were not independent of exposure concentrations, it follows that tissue levels were not proportional to exposure concentration. However, both sampling approaches have advantages and disadvantages, and the appropriateness of their use depends on the goals of a given study.

  14. Parental exposure to the herbicide diuron results in oxidative DNA damage to germinal cells of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Barranger, Audrey; Heude-Berthelin, Clothilde; Rouxel, Julien; Adeline, Béatrice; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2016-02-01

    Chemical pollution by pesticides has been identified as a possible contributing factor to the massive mortality outbreaks observed in Crassostrea gigas for several years. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. This trans-generational effect occurs through damage to genitor-exposed gametes, as measured by the comet-assay. The presence of DNA damage in gametes could be linked to the formation of DNA damage in other germ cells. In order to explore this question, the levels and cell distribution of the oxidized base lesion 8-oxodGuo were studied in the gonads of exposed genitors. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV and electrochemical detection analysis showed an increase in 8-oxodGuo levels in both male and female gonads after exposure to diuron. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the presence of 8-oxodGuo at all stages of male germ cells, from early to mature stages. Conversely, the oxidized base was only present in early germ cell stages in female gonads. These results indicate that male and female genitors underwent oxidative stress following exposure to diuron, resulting in DNA oxidation in both early germ cells and gametes, such as spermatozoa, which could explain the transmission of diuron-induced DNA damage to offspring. Furthermore, immunostaining of early germ cells seems indicates that damages caused by exposure to diuron on germ line not only affect the current sexual cycle but also could affect future gametogenesis. PMID:26610786

  15. In vivo effects of metaldehyde on Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas: comparing hemocyte parameters in two oyster families.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Pierrick; Burgeot, Thierry; Renault, Tristan

    2015-06-01

    Pollutants via run-off into the ocean represent a potential threat to marine organisms, especially bivalves such as oysters living in coastal environments. These organisms filter large volumes of seawater and may accumulate contaminants within their tissues. Pesticide contamination in water could have a direct or indirect toxic action on tissues or cells and could induce alteration of immune system. Bivalve immunity is mainly supported by hemocytes and participates directly by phagocytosis to eliminate pathogens. Some studies have shown that pesticides can reduce immune defences and/or modify genomes in vertebrates and invertebrates. Metaldehyde is used to kill slugs, snails and other terrestrial gastropods. Although metaldehyde has been detected in surface waters, its effects on marine bivalves including the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have never been studied. Given the mode of action of this molecule and its targets (molluscs), it could be potentially more toxic to oysters than other pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, etc.). Effects of metaldehyde on oyster hemocyte parameters were thus monitored through in vivo experiments based on a short-term exposure. In this work, metaldehyde at 0.1 μg/L, which corresponds to an average concentration detected in the environment, modulated hemocyte activities of Pacific oysters after an in vivo short-term contact. Individuals belonging to two families showed different behaviours for some hemocyte activities after contamination by metaldehyde. These results suggested that effects of pollutants on oysters may differ from an individual to another in relation to genetic diversity. Finally, it appears essential to take an interest in the effects of metaldehyde on a wide variety of aquatic invertebrates including those that have a significant economic impact. PMID:24938813

  16. Density and reproduction of the Queen Conch EUSTROMBUS gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) at Cabo Cruz, Desembarco del Granma National Park, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Cala, Yuself R; de Jesús-Navarrete, Alberto; Ocaña, Frank A; Oliva-Rivera, José

    2013-06-01

    The queen conch Eustrombus gigas is an important fisheries resource in the Caribbean region. In Cuba Island the studies about this resource are very scarce and particularly in the Southeastern regions of the country. With the aim to get important fishery information about this gastropod, adult Queen Conch density and frequency of reproductive activity were evaluated in Cabo Cruz, Cuba, during 2009-2010. Data from three seasons were obtained (rainy, dry and cold fronts periods) from three different areas: Farito, Guafe and Laguna. The highest density was observed in cold fronts season (468.5 ind./ha) and the lowest occurred during the dry season (268.5 ind./ha). The highest density was reported at Laguna (520.4 ind./ha) and the lowest at Farito (290.9ind./ha). In total, 158 reproductive events were observed. The highest frequency was reported in rainy season (36%), followed by dry (9%) and cold fronts (5%) seasons. Reproductive behavior (mating and egg laying) was related to temperature and photoperiod. Reproductive activity was observed during the whole year, which suggests the existence of an important Queen Conch reserve in the Southeastern region of Cuba and an apparently self-sufficient population for recruitment. From our results we may conclude that, the population's sustainable exploitation is viable if the following management measures are observed: functional zoning within the area, rotation of fishing areas and a closed season. We recommend that the Laguna site should be protected as a reproduction zone and banned for fishing activities. PMID:23885580

  17. Postmortem biochemical behavior of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle stored in ice and its relation with quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Ríos, E; Morán-Palacio, E F; Lugo-Sánchez, M E; Ocano-Higuera, V M; Pacheco-Aguilar, R

    2007-09-01

    Several freshness and spoilage indicators were monitored to characterize the postmortem biochemistry of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle. Squid samples were obtained directly from the sea and kept at 0 degrees C during a 15-d storage period. Data at zero time were obtained from cryogenically frozen samples at time of capture. The adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) degradation followed a different pattern as compared with that from fish species. ATP was almost completely depleted at 24-h postcatch from 6.54 to <1 micromol/g, while at the same time Hx was the predominant catabolite with a concentration of 4 mumol/g, reaching 6.85 micromol/g at day 15. K-value data followed a logarithmic pattern with time instead of a linear one, with no change after day 3, thus reducing its suitability as a freshness index. The coefficient Hx/AMP seems to be an adequate alternative for this purpose due to its constant increment with time. The high NH4Cl content in mantle muscle (461.3 +/- 24.5 mg of NH4(+)/100 g) derived from its physiological importance for the species compromises the use of the distillation step of the TVB-N analysis commonly used as a spoilage index. This fact explains why the initially high value of TVB-N detected in mantle muscle (243.7 mg N/100 g) did not correlate with the initial low TMA-N content (1.5 +/- 0.1 mg/100 g of muscle). The results suggested that under the experimental conditions the shelf life of squid exceeds 15 d. PMID:17995632

  18. Metabolic suppression during protracted exposure to hypoxia in the jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, living in an oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A; Häfker, N Sören; Trübenbach, Katja; Zhang, Jing; Tessier, Shannon N; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Rosa, Rui; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-07-15

    The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, can survive extended forays into the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Previous studies have demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and a limited anaerobic contribution to ATP production, suggesting the capacity for substantial metabolic suppression during hypoxic exposure. Here, we provide a more complete description of energy metabolism and explore the expression of proteins indicative of transcriptional and translational arrest that may contribute to metabolic suppression. We demonstrate a suppression of total ATP demand under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen, PO2 =0.8 kPa) in both juveniles (52%) and adults (35%) of the jumbo squid. Oxygen consumption rates are reduced to 20% under hypoxia relative to air-saturated controls. Concentrations of arginine phosphate (Arg-P) and ATP declined initially, reaching a new steady state (~30% of controls) after the first hour of hypoxic exposure. Octopine began accumulating after the first hour of hypoxic exposure, once Arg-P breakdown resulted in sufficient free arginine for substrate. Octopine reached levels near 30 mmol g(-1) after 3.4 h of hypoxic exposure. Succinate did increase through hypoxia but contributed minimally to total ATP production. Glycogenolysis in mantle muscle presumably serves to maintain muscle functionality and balance energetics during hypoxia. We provide evidence that post-translational modifications on histone proteins and translation factors serve as a primary means of energy conservation and that select components of the stress response are altered in hypoxic squids. Reduced ATP consumption under hypoxia serves to maintain ATP levels, prolong fuel store use and minimize the accumulation of acidic intermediates of anaerobic ATP-generating pathways during prolonged diel forays into the OMZ. Metabolic suppression likely limits active, daytime foraging at depth in the core of the OMZ, but confers an energetic advantage over competitors that must

  19. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  20. In situ localization and tissue distribution of ostreid herpesvirus 1 proteins in infected Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Martenot, Claire; Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Faury, Nicole; Houssin, Maryline; Renault, Tristan

    2016-05-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays were conducted on paraffin sections from experimentally infected spat and unchallenged spat produced in hatchery to determine the tissue distribution of three viral proteins within the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Polyclonal antibodies were produced from recombinant proteins corresponding to two putative membrane proteins and one putative apoptosis inhibitor encoded by ORF 25, 72, and 87, respectively. Results were then compared to those obtained by in situ hybridization performed on the same individuals, and showed a substantial agreement according to Landis and Koch numeric scale. Positive signals were mainly observed in connective tissue of gills, mantle, adductor muscle, heart, digestive gland, labial palps, and gonads of infected spat. Positive signals were also reported in digestive epithelia. However, few positive signals were also observed in healthy appearing oysters (unchallenged spat) and could be due to virus persistence after a primary infection. Cellular localization of staining seemed to be linked to the function of the viral protein targeted. A nucleus staining was preferentially observed with antibodies targeting the putative apoptosis inhibitor protein whereas a cytoplasmic localization was obtained using antibodies recognizing putative membrane proteins. The detection of viral proteins was often associated with histopathological changes previously reported during OsHV-1 infection by histology and transmission electron microscopy. Within the 6h after viral suspension injection, positive signals were almost at the maximal level with the three antibodies and all studied organs appeared infected at 28h post viral injection. Connective tissue appeared to be a privileged site for OsHV-1 replication even if positive signals were observed in the epithelium cells of different organs which may be interpreted as a hypothetical portal of entry or release for the virus. IHC constitutes a suited method for analyzing the

  1. Ultrafine Angelica gigas Powder Normalizes Ovarian Hormone Levels and Has Antiosteoporosis Properties in Ovariectomized Rats: Particle Size Effect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Lee, Inae; Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Dong Eun; Lim, Jung Dae; Kang, Wie-Soo; Ko, Sanghoon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The root of Angelica gigas (Korean angelica) is traditionally used to treat women's ailments that are caused by an impairment of menstrual blood flow and cycle irregularities. This study evaluated the effect particle size of Korean angelica powder on its efficacy for treating estrogen-related symptoms of menopause. Initially, Korean angelica roots were pulverized into ultrafine powder, and orally administered to the rats at a concentration of 500 mg/kg body weight for 8 weeks. The effects of Korean angelica powder particle size on extraction yield, contents of bioactive compounds (decursin and decursinol angelate), levels of serum ovarian hormones (estradiol and progesterone), reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), and experimental osteoporosis parameters (mineral density, strength, and histological features) were determined. A significant increase (fivefold) in the contents of decursin and decursinol angelate in the extract of the ultrafine Korean angelica powder was observed compared to coarse Korean angelica powder. Rats were divided into sham-operated or ovariectomized (OVX) groups that were fed coarse (CRS) or ultrafine (UF) ground Korean angelica root. The serum levels of estradiol in the OVX_UF group were 19.2% and 54.1% higher than that of OVX_CRS group. Serum bone-alkaline phosphatase/total-alkaline phosphatase index in the OVX_UF group was half that of the OVX_CRS group. In addition, less trabecular bone loss and thick cortical areas were observed in rats administered ultrafine powder. Therefore, ultrafine grinding may enhance the bioactivity of herbal medicines and be especially useful when their extracted forms lose bioactivity during processing, storage, and oral intake. PMID:23039111

  2. Second-Generation Linkage Maps for the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Reveal Errors in Assembly of Genome Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecock, Dennis; Shin, Grace; Gracey, Andrew Y.; Den Berg, David Van; Samanta, Manoj P.

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, a widely cultivated marine bivalve mollusc, is becoming a genetically and genomically enabled model for highly fecund marine metazoans with complex life-histories. A genome sequence is available for the Pacific oyster, as are first-generation, low-density, linkage and gene-centromere maps mostly constructed from microsatellite DNA markers. Here, higher density, second-generation, linkage maps are constructed from more than 1100 coding (exonic) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as 66 previously mapped microsatellite DNA markers, all typed in five families of Pacific oysters (nearly 172,000 genotypes). The map comprises 10 linkage groups, as expected, has an average total length of 588 cM, an average marker-spacing of 1.0 cM, and covers 86% of a genome estimated to be 616 cM. All but seven of the mapped SNPs map to 618 genome scaffolds; 260 scaffolds contain two or more mapped SNPs, but for 100 of these scaffolds (38.5%), the contained SNPs map to different linkage groups, suggesting widespread errors in scaffold assemblies. The 100 misassembled scaffolds are significantly longer than those that map to a single linkage group. On the genetic maps, marker orders and intermarker distances vary across families and mapping methods, owing to an abundance of markers segregating from only one parent, to widespread distortions of segregation ratios caused by early mortality, as previously observed for oysters, and to genotyping errors. Maps made from framework markers provide stronger support for marker orders and reasonable map lengths and are used to produce a consensus high-density linkage map containing 656 markers. PMID:26248981

  3. Expression of Overdominance for Specific Activity at the Phosphoglucomutase-2 Locus in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea Gigas

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental and genetic components of specific activity variation at the phosphoglucomutase-2 locus in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were examined to assess the direct role played by this polymorphism in a heterozygosity/growth relationship. Both environmental variables studied, season and intertidal position, exerted highly significant effects on phosphoglucomutase specific activity but no interactions occurred between these factors and Pgm-2 genotype. Highly significant differences were also detected between Pgm-2 genotypes. The three most common heterozygotes (Pgm-2(92/100), Pgm-2(96/100) and Pgm-2(100/104)) consistently expressed greater specific activities than the Pgm-2(92/92), Pgm-2(96/96), Pgm-2(100/100) and Pgm-2(104/104) homozygotes. Overall, the specific activities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele exceeded heterozygotes by 24% and 20% in the mantle and adductor muscle tissues, respectively. Heterozygotes formed between the three less frequent Pgm-2(92), Pgm-2(96) and Pgm-2(104) alleles differed sharply from those possessing the Pgm-2(100) allele in being indistinguishable from homozygotes. The possibility of these patterns arising from the undetected presence of an inactive Pgm-2 allele was examined and found to be inconsistent with all of its predicted effects on the specific activity data. Genuine overdominance was shown to be capable of explaining the specific activities of ten structural locus genotypes, allelic frequency distributions in natural populations, and the maintenance of the enzyme polymorphism in a balanced state. The results provide evidence favoring the overdominance explanation for one locus involved in a heterozygosity/growth relationship and suggest that the reported effects of this locus on adult body weight may have been caused by the greater flux capacities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele. PMID:1829426

  4. Expression Characterization of Stress Genes Under High and Low Temperature Stresses in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qihui; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-04-01

    As a characteristic sessile inhabitant of the intertidal zone, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas occupies one of the most physically stressful environments on earth. With high exposure to terrestrial conditions, oysters must tolerate broad fluctuations in temperature range. However, oysters' cellular and molecular responses to temperature stresses have not been fully characterized. Here, we analyzed oyster transcriptome data under high and low temperatures. We also identified over 30 key temperature stress-responsive candidate genes, which encoded stress proteins such as heat shock proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins. The expression characterization of these genes under short-term cold and hot environments (5 and 35 °C) and long-term cold environments (5 °C) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Most of these genes reached expression peaks during the recovery stage after 24 h of heat stress, and these genes were greatly induced around day 3 in long-term cold stress while responded little to short-term cold stress. In addition, in the second heat stress after 2 days of recovery, oysters showed milder expression in these genes and a lower mortality rate, which indicated the existence of plasticity in the oyster's response to heat stress. We confirmed that homeostatic flexibility and anti-apoptosis might be crucial centers of temperature stress responses in oysters. Furthermore, we analyzed stress gene families in 11 different species and found that the linage-specific expansion of stress genes might be implicated in adaptive evolution. These results indicated that both plasticity and evolution played an important role in the stress response adaptation of oysters. PMID:26746430

  5. A preliminary analysis of trace-elemental signatures in statoliths of different spawning cohorts for Dosidicus gigas off EEZ waters of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Fang, Zhou; Hu, Song; Song, Qian

    2015-12-01

    We applied solution-based ICP-MS method to quantify the trace-elemental signatures in statoliths of jumbo flying squid, Dosidius gigas, which were collected from the waters off northern and central Chile during the scientific surveys carried out by Chinese squid jigging vessels in 2007 and 2008. The age and spawning date of the squid were back-calculated based on daily increments in statoliths. Eight elemental ratios (Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Na/Ca, Fe/Ca, Cu/Ca and Zn/Ca) were analyzed. It was found that Sr is the second most abundant element next to Ca, followed by Na, Fe, Mg, Zn, Cu, Ba and Mn. There was no significant relationship between element/Ca and sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS), although weak negative or positive tendency was found. MANOVA analysis showed that multivariate elemental signatures did not differ among the cohorts spawned in spring, autumn and winter, and no significant difference was found between the northern and central sampling locations. Classification results showed that all individuals of each spawned cohorts were correctly classified. This study demonstrates that the elemental signatures in D. gigas statoliths are potentially a useful tool to improve our understanding of its population structure and habitat environment.

  6. Effect of environmental impact to molecular expression of heat-shock protein (HSP70) in oyster Crassostrea gigas from Gamak bay, Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Seob; Jeong, Hee-Dong

    2012-05-01

    The cDNA of Crassostrea gigas HSP70 was cloned and rapid amplification of cDNA (RACE) techniques were used. The full length of HSP70 cDNA was 2045 bp, consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 80 bp, a 3' terminal UTR 146 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1829 bp encoding deduced 620 amino acids. The HSP70 cDNA contained HSP70 family signatures, ATP-GTP binding site motif, tetrapeptide (GGMP) and conserved carboxyl terminal region (EEVD) at C-terminal of deduced amino acid sequence. BLAST analysis revealed that the HSP70 gene has an extreme similarity of 98.9% with C. gigas (AF144646). Northern blotting was used to examine the expression of HSP70 mRNA in the gill tissue of the oyster obtained from surface, middle and bottom layers. The HSP70 mRNA observed the samples taken from middle and bottom layers in September and February, but samples from the surface layer did not find a signal intensity of HSP70 mRNA transcript. Consequently, it seems that the oyster occurring middle and bottom layer have been stressed during the period of summer and winter, which is associated with the massive mortality in Gamak bay. PMID:23029911

  7. A New Type of Metal-Binding Site in Cobalt- And Zinc-Containing Adenylate Kinases Isolated From Sulfate-Reducers D. Gigas And D. Desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, O.Y.; Bursakov, S.A.; Rocco, G.Di; Trincao, J.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Calvete, J.J.; Brondino, C.; Pereira, A.S.; Lampreia, J.; Tavares, P.; Moura, J.J.G.; Moura, I.

    2009-05-18

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterized in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the 'LID' domain. The sequence {sup 129}Cys-X{sub 5}-His-X{sub 15}-Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  8. Association of SORL1 alleles with late-onset Alzheimer's disease. findings from the GIGAS_LOAD study and mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Paolo; Politis, Antonis; Albani, Diego; Rodilossi, Serena; Polito, Letizia; Ateri, Eleonora; Zisaki, Aikaterini; Piperi, Christina; Liappas, Ioannis; Stamouli, Evangelia; Mailis, Antonis; Atti, Anna R; Ferrari, Barbara; Morini, Valentina; Moretti, Francesca; Biella, Gloria; Forloni, Gianluigi; Papadimitriou, George N; Ronchi, Diana De; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Serretti, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is influenced by sorting-protein related receptor (sorLa) that is less expressed in AD patients. The gene encoding sorLa (SORL1) has been investigated as a susceptibility factor for late-onset AD (LOAD) with conflicting results. Our objectives were to confirm the association between SORL1 SNPs and LOAD in two independent South-European centers and to perform a mega-analysis of published samples. We analyzed three SORL1 SNPs (intron 6: rs668387; rs689021; rs641120) from the Greece-Italy Genetic Association Study on lateonset AD (GIGAS_LOAD). Greek sample included 96 patients with LOAD (DSM-IV) and 120 unrelated controls. In Italy, a community-based sample is ongoing. 47 LOAD patients and 165 controls were recruited until study endpoint. These samples and previously published ones (Alzgene) were pooled as in a single study. A test for trend was used to analyze genotype association. In the GIGAS_LOAD sample no association was detected between SORL1 genotypes and LOAD. Conversely all SNPs were associated with LOAD in mega-analysis based on ordinal classification of genotypes (Armitage's test: p < 0.001). Although our analysis of pooled samples has positive results for the association between SORL1 and AD, there is substantial heterogeneity across studies. Thus further examination into SORL1 SNPs and the population is necessary to determine the role of SORL1 in LOAD. PMID:22044026

  9. Acetyl-L-carnitine and lipoic acid improve mitochondrial abnormalities and serum levels of liver enzymes in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Elango; Morgan, Kengathevy; French, Samuel W; Morgan, Timothy R

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities are suggested to be associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver. Liver mitochondrial content and function have been shown to improve in oral feeding of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) to rodents. Carnitine is involved in the transport of acyl-coenzyme A across the mitochondrial membrane to be used in mitochondrial β-oxidation. We hypothesized that oral administration ALC with the antioxidant lipoic acid (ALC + LA) would benefit nonalcoholic fatty liver. To test our hypothesis, we fed Balb/C mice a standard diet (SF) or SF with ALC + LA or high-fat diet (HF) or HF with ALC + LA for 6 months. Acetyl-L-carnitine and LA were dissolved at 0.2:0.1% (wt/vol) in drinking water, and mice were allowed free access to food and water. Along with physical parameters, insulin resistance (blood glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance), liver function (alanine transaminase [ALT], aspartate transaminase [AST]), liver histology (hematoxylin and eosin), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), and mitochondrial abnormalities (carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and electron microscopy) were done. Compared with SF, HF had higher body, liver, liver-to-body weight ratio, white adipose tissue, ALT, AST, liver fat, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance. Coadministration of ALC + LA to HF animals significantly improved the mitochondrial marker carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and the size of the mitochondria in liver. Alanine transaminase and AST levels were decreased. In a nonalcoholic fatty liver mice model, ALC + LA combination improved liver mitochondrial content, size, serum ALT, and AST without significant changes in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and liver fat accumulation. PMID:24176233

  10. Identification and characterization of a long-chain fatty acid transporter in the sophorolipid-producing strain Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashan; Xia, Chengqiang; Fang, Xiaoran; Xue, Haizhao; Song, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The sophorolipid-producing strain Starmerella bombicola CGMCC 1576 has a remarkable ability to produce sophorolipids (SLs) under the acidic and lactonic forms with almost equal proportion. In this study, we found the gene encoding for the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ALCS). This enzyme was putatively identified as a membrane-bound long-chain fatty acid transport protein and contributed to the uptake of long-chain fatty acids. Disruption of the alcs gene resulted in an impaired growth of the alcs-deleted mutant in minimal media containing different fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C22:0, and C24:0) as the sole carbon source and led to a dramatic decrease in the uptake of the fluorescent-tagged long-chain fatty acid analogue-boron dipyrromethene difluoride dodecanoic acid (BODIPY-3823). The absence of this alcs gene caused obvious phenotype changes. Compared with the wild-type strain, the yield and compositions of the SLs produced by the gene-deleted mutant of ∆alcs::six showed almost no lactonic form of SLs, and the acidic SLs were composed of medium-chain. The ALCS enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3) with pMAL-c2x-alcs. The enzyme was purified through a maltose-binding protein (MBP) affinity chromatography column and was confirmed to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant enzyme could catalyze the formation of the long-chain acyl-CoA when the long-chain fatty acids and the coenzyme A were used as substrates. PMID:27183996

  11. Colonic inflammation and secondary bile acids in alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakiyama, Genta; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Zhou, Huiping; Pandak, William M.; Heuman, Douglas M.; Kang, Dae Joong; Takei, Hajime; Nittono, Hiroshi; Ridlon, Jason M.; Fuchs, Michael; Gurley, Emily C.; Wang, Yun; Liu, Runping; Sanyal, Arun J.; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse with/without cirrhosis is associated with an impaired gut barrier and inflammation. Gut microbiota can transform primary bile acids (BA) to secondary BAs, which can adversely impact the gut barrier. The purpose of this study was to define the effect of active alcohol intake on fecal BA levels and ileal and colonic inflammation in cirrhosis. Five age-matched groups {two noncirrhotic (control and drinkers) and three cirrhotic [nondrinkers/nonalcoholics (NAlc), abstinent alcoholic for >3 mo (AbsAlc), currently drinking (CurrAlc)]} were included. Fecal and serum BA analysis, serum endotoxin, and stool microbiota using pyrosequencing were performed. A subgroup of controls, NAlc, and CurrAlc underwent ileal and sigmoid colonic biopsies on which mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were performed. One hundred three patients (19 healthy, 6 noncirrhotic drinkers, 10 CurrAlc, 38 AbsAlc, and 30 NAlc, age 56 yr, median MELD: 10.5) were included. Five each of healthy, CurrAlc, and NAlc underwent ileal/colonic biopsies. Endotoxin, serum-conjugated DCA and stool total BAs, and secondary-to-primary BA ratios were highest in current drinkers. On biopsies, a significantly higher mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and Cox-2 in colon but not ileum was seen in CurrAlc compared with NAlc and controls. Active alcohol use in cirrhosis is associated with a significant increase in the secondary BA formation compared with abstinent alcoholic cirrhotics and nonalcoholic cirrhotics. This increase in secondary BAs is associated with a significant increase in expression of inflammatory cytokines in colonic mucosa but not ileal mucosa, which may contribute to alcohol-induced gut barrier injury. PMID:24699327

  12. Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Peroxidation, and Oxidative Damage of Arsenic in Rat.

    PubMed

    Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Omidi, Ameneh; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sabzevari, Samin; Kazemi, Ali Reza; Sabzevari, Omid

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental contaminant present around the world in both organic and inorganic forms. Oxidative stress is postulated as the main mechanism for As-induced toxicity. This study was planned to examine the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on As-induced oxidative damage in male rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of control (saline), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 20 mg/kg), ALC (300 mg/kg), and NaAsO2 plus ALC. Animals were dosed orally for 28 successive days. Blood and tissue samples including kidney, brain, liver, heart, and lung were collected on the 28th day and evaluated for oxidative damage and histological changes. NaAsO2 exposure caused a significant lipid peroxidation as evidenced by elevation in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as sulfhydryl group content (SH group) was significantly suppressed in various organs following NaAsO2 treatment (P < 0.05). Furthermore, NaAsO2 administration increased serum values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and bilirubin. Our findings revealed that co-administration of ALC and NaAsO2 significantly suppressed the oxidative damage induced by NaAsO2. Tissue histological studies have confirmed the biochemical findings and provided evidence for the beneficial role of ALC. The results concluded that ALC attenuated NaAsO2-induced toxicity, and this protective effect may result from the ability of ALC in maintaining oxidant-antioxidant balance. PMID:26349760

  13. Use of tetracycline hydrochloride and alizarin complexone for immersion marking black rockfish Sebastes schlegelii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Hongjian; Zhang, Xiumei; Fu, Mei; Xi, Dan; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-07-01

    We tested the utility of chemical marking techniques in the juvenile black rockfish Sebastes schlegelii. Juveniles (30-40 mm total length) were immersed in a range of tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) solutions at concentrations ranging from 300 to 500 mg/L, and alizarin complexone (ALC) solutions at concentrations ranging from 200 to 400 mg/L in filtered sea water (salinity of 30) for 24 h, respectively. Otoliths (sagittae, asteriscus), scales, fin rays (dorsal, pectoral, ventral, anal, and caudal fin rays), and fin spines (dorsal, ventral, and anal fin spines) were sampled and used to detect fluorescent marks after a 60-day growth experiment. With the exception of 300 mg/L TC, acceptable marks were produced in the otoliths and fin spines by all concentrations of TC and ALC. In particular, we observed clearly visible marks in the sagittae, asteriscus, and fin spines under normal light at concentrations of 200-400 mg/L, 250-400 mg/L, and 250-400 mg/L ALC, respectively. Scales and fin rays had acceptable marks at much higher concentrations (≥350 mg/L TC, ≥250 mg/L ALC for scales and ≥350 mg/L TC, ≥300 mg/L ALC for fin rays). The best mark quality (i.e., acceptable marks were observed in all sampled structures after immersion marking) were obtained following immersion in TC at between 350-500 mg/L, and ALC between 300-400 mg/L. In addition, there was no significant difference in survival and growth of TC and ALC marked fish compared to their controls up to 60 days post-marking ( P > 0.05).

  14. Cord Blood Units with High CD3(+) Cell Counts Predict Early Lymphocyte Recovery After In Vivo T Cell-Depleted Single Cord Blood Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Nerea; García-Cadenas, Irene; Díaz-Heredia, Cristina; Martino, Rodrigo; Barba, Pere; Ferrà, Christelle; Canals, Carme; Elorza, Izaskun; Olivé, Teresa; Badell, Isabel; Sierra, Jorge; Valcárcel, David; Querol, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    Although high absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) early after transplantation is a simple surrogate for immune reconstitution, few studies to date have established the predictive factors for ALC after umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). We retrospectively studied the factors associated with early lymphocyte recovery and the impact of the ALC on day +42 (ALC42) of ≥300 × 10(6)/L on outcomes in 210 consecutive pediatric and adult patients (112 males; median age, 15 years; range, 0.3 to 60 years; interquartile range, 4 to 36 years) who underwent myeloablative in vivo T cell-depleted single UCBT between 2005 and 2014 for malignant and nonmalignant disorders. In a logistic multivariate regression model, factors favoring a higher ALC42 were higher infused CD3(+) cell dose (odds ratio [OR], 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4 to 5.2; P = .004), lower antithymocyte globulin dose (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.5; P = .01), and better HLA match (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.1; P = .03). In multivariate analysis, lower ALC42 was associated with higher nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.76; 95% CI, 1.34 to 2.32; P = .001), whereas a higher ALC42 was associated with better disease-free survival (HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.15 to 3.6; P < .001) and overall survival (HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.6; P < .001). Our study suggests that the selection of better HLA-matched cord blood units containing higher CD3(+) cell counts and the use of conditioning regimens with lower ATG doses could improve immune reconstitution after UCBT. PMID:27038860

  15. Effect of aluminium on dissolved organic matter mineralization in an allophanic and kaolinitic temperate rain forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Carolina; Matus, Francisco; Fontaine, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Aluminium (Al) and it influence on the mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and thus on carbon (C) sequestration in forest soils is poorly understood. We hypothesized that an addition of Al to the soil solution beyond a molar Al:C ratio of 0.1, induces precipitation of the organic matter which leads to an excess Al in the soil solution causing an inhibitory effect for growing microorganisms. We investigated the effect of Al concentrations for the potential of C biodegradation at different Al:C ratios from DOM and Ah mineral soil horizons from two temperate rain forest soils from southern Chile. Dissolved organic matter and surface mineral horizons were incubated with initial molar Al:C ratio from 0.08 to 1.38 found under at field conditions. Mineralization was quantified by measurement of C-CO2 evolved during 15 days. Increasing the initial Al:C ratio > 0.12, led to a considerable reduction in mineralization (up to 70%). For Al:C ratio < 0.12, the mineralization rates from DOM and mineral soils were unaffected. Consequently, there would be a considerable reduction in the biodegradation of DOM and thus an increased in the C sequestration in mineral soils with molar Al:C ratio > 0.12. The observed DOM losses in the stream water of pristine southern forests can be explained by increasing the bioavailability of organic C for Al:C ratio < 0.12. Aluminium concentration had a marked effect at the spectral ART-FTIR bands assigned to cellulose-like and aromatic compounds in Ah mineral soil, diminishing the mineralization. The present results were also confirmed by the Al fluorescence using a confocal microscopy.

  16. Deep Space Network Antenna Logic Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow; Morgan, Scott; Hames, Peter; Strain, Martha; Owen, Christopher; Shimizu, Kenneth; Wilson, Karen; Shaller, David; Doktomomtaz, Said; Leung, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The Antenna Logic Controller (ALC) software controls and monitors the motion control equipment of the 4,000-metric-ton structure of the Deep Space Network 70-meter antenna. This program coordinates the control of 42 hydraulic pumps, while monitoring several interlocks for personnel and equipment safety. Remote operation of the ALC runs via the Antenna Monitor & Control (AMC) computer, which orchestrates the tracking functions of the entire antenna. This software provides a graphical user interface for local control, monitoring, and identification of faults as well as, at a high level, providing for the digital control of the axis brakes so that the servo of the AMC may control the motion of the antenna. Specific functions of the ALC also include routines for startup in cold weather, controlled shutdown for both normal and fault situations, and pump switching on failure. The increased monitoring, the ability to trend key performance characteristics, the improved fault detection and recovery, the centralization of all control at a single panel, and the simplification of the user interface have all reduced the required workforce to run 70-meter antennas. The ALC also increases the antenna availability by reducing the time required to start up the antenna, to diagnose faults, and by providing additional insight into the performance of key parameters that aid in preventive maintenance to avoid key element failure. The ALC User Display (AUD) is a graphical user interface with hierarchical display structure, which provides high-level status information to the operation of the ALC, as well as detailed information for virtually all aspects of the ALC via drill-down displays. The operational status of an item, be it a function or assembly, is shown in the higher-level display. By pressing the item on the display screen, a new screen opens to show more detail of the function/assembly. Navigation tools and the map button allow immediate access to all screens.

  17. Application of the Beers Criteria to Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospital Inpatient Units

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, Heather; MacAulay, Stacey; Irvine-Meek, Janice; Murray, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Beers criteria were developed to help in identifying potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for elderly patients. These medications are often associated with adverse events and limited effectiveness in older adults. Patients awaiting an alternate level of care (ALC patients) are those who no longer require acute care hospital services and are waiting for placement elsewhere. They are often elderly, have complex medication regimens, and are at high risk of adverse events. At the time of this study no studies had applied the Beers criteria to ALC patients in Canadian hospitals. Objectives: To determine the proportion of ALC patients receiving PIMs and the proportion experiencing selected PIM-related adverse events. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ALC patients 65 years of age or older was performed to identify PIMs and the occurrence of selected adverse events (specifically central nervous system [CNS] events, falls, bradycardia, hypoglycemia, seizures, insomnia, gastrointestinal bleeding, and urinary tract infections). A logistic regression model with a random intercept for each patient was constructed to estimate odds ratios and probabilities of adverse events. Results: Fifty-two ALC patients were included in the study. Of these, 48 (92%) were taking a PIM. Of the 922 adverse events evaluated, 407 (44.1%) were associated with a regularly scheduled PIM. Among patients who were taking regularly scheduled PIMs, there was a significantly increased probability of an adverse CNS event and of a fall (p < 0.001 for both). The most common PIM medication classes were first-generation antihistamines (24 [46%] of the 52 patients), antipsychotics (21 patients [40%]), short-acting benzodiazepines (15 patients [29%]), and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (14 patients [27%]). Conclusions: A high proportion of ALC patients were taking PIMs and experienced an adverse event that may have been related to these drugs. These findings suggest that the ALC

  18. Order and disorder in quaternary atomic laminates from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Dahlqvist, Martin; Rosen, Johanna

    2015-12-21

    We report on the phase stability of chemically ordered and disordered quaternary MAX phases - TiMAlC, TiM2AlC2, MTi2AlC2, and Ti2M2AlC3 where M = Zr, Hf (group IV), M = V, Nb, Ta (group V), and M = Cr, Mo, W (group VI). At 0 K, layered chemically ordered structures are predicted to be stable for M from groups V and VI. By taking into account the configurational entropy, an order-disorder temperature Tdisorder can be estimated. TiM2AlC2 (M = Cr, Mo, W) and Ti2M2AlC3 (M = Mo, W) are found with Tdisorder > 1773 K and are hence predicted to be ordered at the typical bulk synthesis temperature of 1773 K. Other ordered phases, even though metastable at elevated temperatures, may be synthesized by non-equilibrium methods such as thin film growth. Furthermore, phases predicted not to be stable in any form at 0 K can be stabilized at higher temperatures in a disordered form, being the case for group IV, for MTi2AlC2 (M = V, Cr, Mo), and for Ti2M2AlC3 (M = V, Ta). The stability of the layered ordered structures with M from group VI can primarily be explained by Ti breaking the energetically unfavorable stacking of M and C where M is surrounded by C in a face-centered cubic configuration, and by M having a larger electronegativity than Al resulting in a fewer electrons available for populating antibonding Al-Al orbitals. The results show that these chemically ordered quaternary MAX phases allow for new elemental combinations in MAX phases, which can be used to add new properties to this family of atomic laminates and in turn prospects for tuning these properties. PMID:26565395

  19. Queen Conch (Strombus gigas) Testis Regresses during the Reproductive Season at Nearshore Sites in the Florida Keys

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; Griffitt, Robert J.; Liu, Li; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Feswick, April; Glazer, Robert A.; Barber, David S.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Queen conch (Strombus gigas) reproduction is inhibited in nearshore areas of the Florida Keys, relative to the offshore environment where conchs reproduce successfully. Nearshore reproductive failure is possibly a result of exposure to environmental factors, including heavy metals, which are likely to accumulate close to shore. Metals such as Cu and Zn are detrimental to reproduction in many mollusks. Methodology/Principal Findings Histology shows gonadal atrophy in nearshore conchs as compared to reproductively healthy offshore conchs. In order to determine molecular mechanisms leading to tissue changes and reproductive failure, a microarray was developed. A normalized cDNA library for queen conch was constructed and sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences GS-FLX pyrosequencer, producing 27,723 assembled contigs and 7,740 annotated transcript sequences. The resulting sequences were used to design the microarray. Microarray analysis of conch testis indicated differential regulation of 255 genes (p<0.01) in nearshore conch, relative to offshore. Changes in expression for three of four transcripts of interest were confirmed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis indicated changes in biological processes: respiratory chain (GO:0015992), spermatogenesis (GO:0007283), small GTPase-mediated signal transduction (GO:0007264), and others. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that Zn and possibly Cu were elevated in some nearshore conch tissues. Conclusions/Significance Congruence between testis histology and microarray data suggests that nearshore conch testes regress during the reproductive season, while offshore conch testes develop normally. Possible mechanisms underlying the testis regression observed in queen conch in the nearshore Florida Keys include a disruption of small GTPase (Ras)-mediated signaling in testis development. Additionally, elevated tissue levels of Cu (34

  20. [Density, size structure and reproductive activity of the pink conch Eustrombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) in Banco Chinchorro, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Cala, Yuself R; Navarrete, Alberto de Jesús; Ocaña, Frank A; Rivera, José Oliva

    2013-12-01

    The pink conch Eustrombus gigas is an important fisheries resource. At the regional level in the Caribbean, over-exploitation and habitat destruction have caused a decrease in the abundance of this resource. In order to provide necessary information for the species management in Mexico, this work aimed to analyze the total density, adult density, size structure and reproductive behavior of pink conch population at Banco Chinchorro during 2009-2010. Data from three seasons were obtained (rainy, dry and cold fronts periods) in three areas: Norte (North), Centro (Center) and Sur (South). The organisms were separated into two groups: (a) the criteria based upon legal harvest in Mexico: legal size conchs (siphonal length > 200 mm) and illegal size conchs (siphonal length < 200 mm), and (b) the criteria based upon sexual maturity using the 15 mm lip thickness standard: lip < 15 mm as juvenile conch and lip > or = 15 mm as adult conch. Copulation, spawning, egg masses and aggregations were evaluated as reproductive evidences. The highest total density was observed during the dry season with 384ind./ha, and the lowest during the rainy season with 127ind./ha. The highest density was reported at Sur (385ind./ha) and the lowest at Norte (198ind./ ha). The highest adult density was observed during the rainy season (8.33ind./ha), and the lowest occurred in the dry season (6.1 ind./ha). Adult density values were 5.55, 7.05 and 8.33ind./ha for Centro, Sur and Norte areas, respectively. Adult densities were lower than the threshold needed for reproduction, and 42% of the population may be vulnerable to fishing, as they had the minimum size for catch (Lsi 200 mm). Furthermore, only 2.2% of the population reached a Gl > 15 mm as sexual maturity indicator. During the study period, only six evidences of reproductive activity were observed. The smaller densities reported at Banco Chinchorro may cause reproduction events to be almost absent which in turn is sufficient evidence to show

  1. Impact of ocean acidification on energy metabolism of oyster, Crassostrea gigas--changes in metabolic pathways and thermal response.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O; Sokolova, Inna M; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell, synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO₂-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO₂ levels (partial pressure of CO₂ in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated PCo₂ and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pH(e) = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO₂-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and P(e)CO₂ values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO₂-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO₂-incubated oysters ([HCO₃⁻](e) = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO₂-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pH(e) did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO₂-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO₂-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using ¹H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy

  2. Stanols as a tool to track the origin of microbial contamination of oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in shellfish areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loïc; Jardé, Emilie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Petitjean, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Runoff of cattle manures (cows, pigs, sheeps) or discharge of effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) into aquatic ecosystems can lead to microbiological contamination of waters and living organisms. In coastal ecosystems and particularly in shellfish harvesting areas, the presence of pathogen microorganisms in waters induces fecal contamination of filter feeding bivalves (oysters, mussels, scallops…), therefore leading to human health risks associated to the consumption of these contaminated organisms. Watershed management plans that aim at limiting these risks require the development of tools able to identify fecal contamination sources. The fecal indicator bacteria used in the regulations to determine fecal contamination are not source specific since they are found in the feces of most warm-blooded animals. Thus, microbiological biomarkers have been developed in association with chemical biomarkers as Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods. Fecal stanols, by-products of sterols obtained by human and animal microbial gut flora, are found in considerable amounts in feces with different relative proportions depending on their animal or human source. Recently, in association with microbiological biomarkers, the stanol fingerprint of contaminated waters has been successfully used to determine the main source of fecal contamination (cow, pig or human sources) in rural watersheds (Brittany, France). Up to now, the use of the stanol fingerprint to track the fecal contamination in shellfish tissues, especially bivalves, has been limited to the analysis of coprostanol, a stanol commonly associated to human contamination. Therefore, whether the stanol fingerprint can be used as a MST method in bivalves or not is still unknown. The first aim of this study was to compare several organic extraction procedures of stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas to determine a reliable method for stanol fingerprint analysis in bivalves. Solvent extraction and purification

  3. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks

  4. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks contribute

  5. Sclerochronology - a highly versatile tool for mariculture and reconstruction of life history traits of the queen conch, textit{Strombus gigas} (Gastropoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radermacher, Pascal; Schöne, Bernd R.; Gischler, Eberhard; Oschmann, Wolfgang; Thébault, Julien; Fiebig, Jens

    2010-05-01

    The shell of the queen conch Strombus gigas provides a rapidly growing palaeoenvironmental proxy archive, allowing the detailed reconstruction of important life-history traits such as ontogeny, growth rate and growth seasonality. In this study, modern sclerochronological methods are used to cross-date the palaeotemperatures derived from the shell with local sea surface temperature (SST) records. The growth history of the shell suggests a bimodal seasonality in growth, with the growing season confined to the interval between April and November. In Glovers Reef, offshore Belize, the queen conch accreted shell carbonate at rates of up to 6 mm day-1 during the spring (April-June) and autumn (September-November). However a reduced period of growth occurred during the mid-summer months (July-August). The shell growth patterns indicate a positive response to annual seasonality with regards to precipitation. It seems likely that when precipitation levels are high, food availability is increased as the result of nutrient input to the ecosystem in correspondence with an increase in coastal runoff. Slow growth rates occur when precipitation, and as a consequence riverine runoff, is low. The SST however appears to influence growth only on a secondary level. Despite the bimodal growing season and the winter cessation in growth, the growth rates reconstructed here from two S. gigas shells are among the fastest yet reported for this species. The S. gigas specimens from Belize reached their final shell height (of 22.7 and 23.5 cm in distance between the apex and the siphonal notch) at the transition to adulthood in just 2 years. The extremely rapid growth as observed in this species permits detailed, high-resolution reconstructions of life-history traits where sub-daily resolutions can be achieved with ease. The potential for future studies has yet to be further explored. Queen conch sclerochronology provides an opportunity to recover extremely high-resolution palaeotemperature

  6. Analysis of Giga-size Earth Observation Data in Open Source GRASS GIS 7 - from Desktop to On-line Solutions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Mitasova, H.; Jasiewicz, J.; Neteler, M.; Gebbert, S.

    2014-12-01

    GRASS GIS is a leading open source GIS for geospatial analysis and modeling. In addition to being utilized as a desktop GIS it also serves as a processing engine for high performance geospatial computing for applications in diverse disciplines. The newly released GRASS GIS 7 supports big data analysis including temporal framework, image segmentation, watershed analysis, synchronized 2D/3D animations and many others. This presentation will focus on new GRASS GIS 7-powered tools for geoprocessing giga-size earth observation (EO) data using spatial pattern analysis. Pattern-based analysis connects to human visual perception of space as well as makes geoprocessing of giga-size EO data possible in an efficient and robust manner. GeoPAT is a collection of GRASS GIS 7 modules that fully integrates procedures for pattern representation of EO data and patterns similarity calculations with standard GIS tasks of mapping, maps overlay, segmentation, classification(Fig 1a), change detections etc. GeoPAT works very well on a desktop but it also underpins several GeoWeb applications (http://sil.uc.edu/ ) which allow users to do analysis on selected EO datasets without the need to download them. The GRASS GIS 7 temporal framework and high resolution visualizations will be illustrated using time series of giga-size, lidar-based digital elevation models representing the dynamics of North Carolina barrier islands over the past 15 years. The temporal framework supports efficient raster and vector data series analysis and simplifies data input for visual analysis of dynamic landscapes (Fig. 1b) allowing users to rapidly identify vulnerable locations, changes in built environment and eroding coastlines. Numerous improvements in GRASS GIS 7 were implemented to support terabyte size data processing for reconstruction of MODIS land surface temperature (LST) at 250m resolution using multiple regressions and PCA (Fig. 1c) . The new MODIS LST series (http://gis.cri.fmach.it/eurolst/) includes

  7. Higher infused lymphocyte dose predicts higher lymphocyte recovery, which in turn, predicts superior overall survival following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hiwase, Devendra K; Hiwase, Smita; Bailey, Michael; Bollard, Geraldine; Schwarer, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard of care for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) younger than 70 years. However, despite this aggressive therapy most patients will still die of progressive disease. Recent reports have suggested that lymphocyte recovery is an important predictor of relapse or progressive disease in a number of hematologic malignancies including MM. We have conducted retrospective analysis of factors that could predict overall (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) in patients with MM who had ASCT. One hundred nineteen patients with multiple myeloma underwent ASCT. The median OS and PFS were 64 and 32 months, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that absolute lymphocyte count on day 30 following ASCT (ALC-30), international staging system (ISS) stage at diagnosis, and age at diagnosis significantly influenced OS and PFS following ASCT. OS (96 versus 48 months, P = .04) and PFS (43 versus 29 months, P = .03) following ASCT were higher in patients with ALC-30 >or=1.0 x 10(9)/L compared to patients ALC-30 <1.0 x 10(9)/L. Higher ALC-60, ALC-100, ALC-180, and ALC-365 did not predict superior OS and PFS. Patients with early-stage disease had significantly higher OS (ISS stages I, II, and III: 96, 53, and 29 months, respectively; P = .0023) and PFS (ISS stages I, II, and III: 55.5, 31, and 12 months, respectively; P = .027) compared to patients with advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. On univariate analysis, the type of initial chemotherapy (melphalan, VAD, PCAB), lymphocyte count on day of leukapheresis, and the lymphocyte dose infused (LY-DO) significantly influenced lymphocyte recovery following ASCT. Patients who received higher lymphocyte dose (LY-DO) >or=0.2 x 10(9)/kg had higher median ALC-15 (0.25 versus 0.19 x 10(9)/L; P = .3), ALC-30 (1.20 versus 0.99 x 10(9)/L; P = .08), ALC-60 (1.90 versus 1.01 x 10(9)/L; P = .013), ALC-100 (1.58 versus 1.03 x 10

  8. Remote Semantic Memory for Public Figures in HIV Infection, Alcoholism, and their Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Rosemary; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Sassoon, Stephanie A.; Thompson, Megan A.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impairments in component processes of working and episodic memory mark both HIV infection and chronic alcoholism, with compounded deficits often observed in individuals comorbid for these conditions. Remote semantic memory processes, however, have only seldom been studied in these diagnostic groups. Examination of remote semantic memory could provide insight into the underlying processes associated with storage and retrieval of learned information over extended time periods while elucidating spared and impaired cognitive functions in these clinical groups. Methods We examined component processes of remote semantic memory in HIV infection and chronic alcoholism in 4 subject groups (HIV, ALC, HIV+ALC, and age matched healthy adults) using a modified version of the Presidents Test. Free recall, recognition, and sequencing of presidential candidates and election dates were assessed. In addition, component processes of working, episodic, and semantic memory were assessed with ancillary cognitive tests. Results The comorbid group (HIV+ALC) was significantly impaired on sequencing of remote semantic information compared with age matched healthy adults. Free recall of remote semantic information was also modestly impaired in the HIV+ALC group, but normal performance for recognition of this information was observed. Few differences were observed between the single diagnosis groups (HIV, ALC) and healthy adults, although examination of the component processes underlying remote semantic memory scores elicited differences between the HIV and ALC groups. Selective remote memory processes were related to lifetime alcohol consumption in the ALC group and to viral load and depression level in the HIV group. Hepatitis C diagnosis was associated with lower remote semantic memory scores in all three clinical groups. Education level did not account for group differences reported. Conclusions This study provides behavioral support for the existence of adverse effects

  9. Metal bioaccumulation and physiological condition of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) reared in two shellfish basins and a marina in Normandy (northwest France).

    PubMed

    Séguin, A; Caplat, C; Serpentini, A; Lebel, J M; Menet-Nedelec, F; Costil, K

    2016-05-15

    A 5-month experiment combining a geochemical survey of metals with a bioaccumulation study in batches of Crassostrea gigas was conducted in two shellfish farming areas and a marina in Normandy (France). Various endpoints at different levels of biological organization were studied. ROCCH data showed differences in biota contamination between the two shellfish areas but the present study revealed only slight differences in metallic contamination and biomarkers. By contrast, significantly different values were recorded in the marina in comparison with the two other sites. Indeed, higher levels of Cd, Cu and Zn were measured in the oysters from the marina, and these oysters also showed a poorer physiological condition (e.g., condition index, histopathological alterations and neutral lipid content). For coastal monitoring, the multi-biomarker approach coupled with an assessment of metallic contamination in biota appeared to be suitable for discriminating spatial differences in environmental quality after only a few months of exposure. PMID:26975610

  10. Influence of Crassostrea gigas on the permeability and microstructure of the surface layer of concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Lv, JianFu; Mao, JiZe; Ba, HengJing

    2015-01-01

    Concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea and bearing Crassostrea gigas (CG) with differing areal coverages was investigated for evidence of biologically induced corrosion prevention. The experimental results indicated that both the chloride ion profile and the neutralization depth of the concrete decreased with increasing CG coverage. Moreover, the water absorption rate and the chloride ion permeability of concrete with the original surface intact also declined with increasing degrees of CG coverage. However, the water absorption rates of three concrete samples with 2 mm of the surface layer removed were similar, as was their chloride ion permeability. Mercury intrusion porosimetry tests indicated that CG significantly reduced the pore structure of the concrete surface layer. SEM observation revealed that the CG cementation membrane and left valve were tightly glued to the concrete surface and had a dense structure. Concrete durability indices showed that high CG coverage greatly improved concrete durability. PMID:25584410

  11. Combined climate- and prey-mediated range expansion of Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas), a large marine predator in the California Current System.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julia S; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Foley, David G; Gilly, William F; Robison, Bruce H; Field, John C

    2014-06-01

    Climate-driven range shifts are ongoing in pelagic marine environments, and ecosystems must respond to combined effects of altered species distributions and environmental drivers. Hypoxic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in midwater environments are shoaling globally; this can affect distributions of species both geographically and vertically along with predator-prey dynamics. Humboldt (jumbo) squid (Dosidicus gigas) are highly migratory predators adapted to hypoxic conditions that may be deleterious to their competitors and predators. Consequently, OMZ shoaling may preferentially facilitate foraging opportunities for Humboldt squid. With two separate modeling approaches using unique, long-term data based on in situ observations of predator, prey, and environmental variables, our analyses suggest that Humboldt squid are indirectly affected by OMZ shoaling through effects on a primary food source, myctophid fishes. Our results suggest that this indirect linkage between hypoxia and foraging is an important driver of the ongoing range expansion of Humboldt squid in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. PMID:24443361

  12. Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Daniel V.; Silva, Tomé S.; Cordeiro, Odete D.; Cavaco, Sofia I.; Simes, Dina C.

    2012-01-01

    Nacre, when implanted in vivo in bones of dogs, sheep, mice, and humans, induces a biological response that includes integration and osteogenic activity on the host tissue that seems to be activated by a set of proteins present in the nacre water-soluble matrix (WSM). We describe here an experimental approach that can accurately identify the proteins present in the WSM of shell mollusk nacre. Four proteins (three gigasin-2 isoforms and a cystatin A2) were for the first time identified in WSM of Crassostrea gigas nacre using 2DE and LC-MS/MS for protein identification. These proteins are thought to be involved in bone remodeling processes and could be responsible for the biocompatibility shown between bone and nacre grafts. These results represent a contribution to the study of shell biomineralization process and opens new perspectives for the development of new nacre biomaterials for orthopedic applications. PMID:22666151

  13. In vivo effects of LCO soluble fraction on immune-related functions and gene transcription in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg).

    PubMed

    Bado-Nilles, Anne; Renault, Tristan; Faury, Nicole; Le Floch, Stéphane; Quentel, Claire; Auffret, Michel; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2010-05-01

    The effects of a soluble fraction of light cycle oil (LCO) on haemocyte parameters, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and mRNA expression of immune-related genes, in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were tested after seven days of exposure and two weeks of recovery period. Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) out of ten detected in tank water had bioaccumulated at the end of the contamination period. The concentration of PAHs in oyster tissues decreased during the recovery period and 14 days after the exposure, 69% of bioaccumulated PAHs were detected in contaminated oysters. The exposure induced severe oyster mortality (21%), external and internal green colouration of the shell and a significant decrease of PO activity. The mRNA expression of several genes was altered. As a conclusion, a modulation of immune-related parameters was demonstrated using three different approaches, namely cellular (flow cytometry), biochemical (spectrophotometry) and genomics (gene transcription) in oysters after contact with soluble fraction of LCO. PMID:19800699

  14. Novel, major 2α- and 2β-hydroxy bile alcohols and bile acids in the bile of Arapaima gigas, a large South American river fish.

    PubMed

    Sato née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nakane, Naoya; Namegawa, Kazunari; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Omura, Kaoru; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Raines, Jan; Hagey, Lee R; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Bile alcohols and bile acids from gallbladder bile of the Arapaima gigas, a large South American freshwater fish, were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures of the major isolated compounds were determined by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. The novel bile salts identified were six variants of 2-hydroxy bile acids and bile alcohols in the 5α- and 5β-series, with 29% of all compounds having hydroxylation at C-2. Three C27 bile alcohols were present (as ester sulfates): (24ξ,25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,24,26-hexol; (25ξ)-5β-cholestan-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol, and (25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. A single C27 bile acid was identified: (25ξ)-2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestan-26-oic acid, present as its taurine conjugate. Two novel C24 bile acids were identified: the 2α-hydroxy derivative of allochenodeoxycholic acid and the 2β-hydroxy derivative of cholic acid, both occurring as taurine conjugates. These studies extend previous work in establishing the natural occurrence of novel 2α- and 2β-hydroxy-C24 and C27 bile acids as well as C27 bile alcohols in both the normal (5β) as well as the (5α) "allo" A/B-ring juncture. The bile salt profile of A. gigas appears to be