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Sample records for alcian blue ph

  1. Comparison of Alcian Blue, Trypan Blue, and Toluidine Blue for Visualization of the Primo Vascular System Floating in Lymph Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Un; Han, Jae Won; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Cha, Richard; Chang, Byung-Soo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS), floating in lymph ducts, was too transparent to be observed by using a stereomicroscope. It was only detectable with the aid of staining dyes, for instance, Alcian blue, which was injected into the lymph nodes. Some dyes were absorbed preferentially by the PVS than the lymph wall. It remains a standing problem to know what dyes are absorbed better by the PVS than the lymph walls. Such information would be useful to unravel the biochemical properties of the PVS that are badly in need for obtaining large amount of PVS specimens. In the current work we tried two other familiar dyes which were used in PVS research before. We found that Trypan blue and toluidine blue did not visualize the PVS. Trypan blue was cleared by the natural washing. Toluidine blue did not stain the PVS, but it did leave stained spots in the lymph wall and its surrounding tissues, and it leaked out of the lymph wall to stain surrounding connective tissues. These completely different behaviors of the three dyes were found for the first time in the current work and provide valuable information to elucidate the mechanism through which some special dyes stained the PVS preferentially compared to the lymphatic wall. PMID:26379749

  2. Application of alcian blue in the electron microscopic study of mouse and human cerebral cortex nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Castejón, H V; Castejón, O J; Viloria, M E

    1976-01-01

    Alcian blue is a cationic dye which has been used in the histochemical field for the demonstration of polyanions especially carboxylated and sulphated. The results obtained in neurons when this dye was applied to human and mouse cerebral cortex and studied with the electron microscope are the object of the present report. The CNS of normal adult mice was fixed by vascular perfusion with 2% glutaraldehyde-0.1 M sodium cacodylate-0.1 M sucrose at pH = 6.8 followed by the same fixative with the addition of 0.5% alcian blue. After perfusion, brain cortex was taken out, sectioned into small blocks and immersed in a fresh similar mixture and subsequently in OSO4. Blocks were dehydrated and embedded in araldite. Ultrathin sections were doubly stained with uranyl and lead salts. Human brain cortex taken from patients with cerebral edema was fixed by immersion with 6.5% glutaraldehyde-0.1 M sodium phosphate, pH = 7.4 followed by embedding in warm agar and sectioning in slices of 30 mum thickness which were impregnated by immersion in a mixture of 1% alcian blue-acetate buffer-3% glutaraldehyde at pH = 3.5 for 9 to 15 h at 4 degrees C and subsequently immersed in 1% buffered OSO4-0.1 M sucrose, pH = 7.4 for 2 h at 4 degrees S. Sections were dehydrated and embedded in araldite. Ultrathin sections were doubly stained by uranyl and lead salts. We have denominated the complete procedure in both instances GABOUL technique. The submicroscopic study of both tissues, at nerve cells, revealed the presence of an electron dense homogeneous substance thoroughly dispersed at the hyaloplasmic matrix of perikarya, processes and even synaptic endings. This substance was more evident around free and attached ribosomes, GOLGI apparatus, complex vesicles, dense bodies, microtubules, subsurface cisternae and synaptic vesicles. Canaliculi of endoplasmic reticulum and even the perinuclear cistern also showed a moderate content. It is suggested that this electron dense substance, being

  3. A procedure for Alcian blue staining of mucins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2012-10-16

    The isolation and characterization of mucins are critically important for obtaining insight into the molecular pathology of various diseases, including cancers and cystic fibrosis. Recently, we developed a novel membrane electrophoretic method, supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), which separates mucins on a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane impregnated with a hydrophilic polymer. Alcian blue staining is widely used to visualize mucopolysaccharides and acidic mucins on both blotted membranes and SMME membranes; however, this method cannot be used to stain mucins with a low acidic glycan content. Meanwhile, periodic acid-Schiff staining can selectively visualize glycoproteins, including mucins, but is incompatible with glycan analysis, which is indispensable for mucin characterizations. Here we describe a novel staining method, designated succinylation-Alcian blue staining, for visualizing mucins on a PVDF membrane. This method can visualize mucins regardless of the acidic residue content and shows a sensitivity 2-fold higher than that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, a fluorescent periodate Schiff-base stain. Furthermore, we demonstrate the compatibility of this novel staining procedure with glycan analysis using porcine gastric mucin as a model mucin. PMID:22950532

  4. Temporal Change of Alcian Blue-Stained Primo Vascular System in Lymph Vessels of Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the temporal change of a vascular system now known as the primo vascular system (PVS). We used Alcian blue (AB) dye for imaging the distribution of the PVS in lymphatic vessels. The target lymph vessels were chosen as they are easily accessible from the skin, and long-term observation is possible with intact physiological conditions due to a minimal surgical procedure. AB solution was injected into the inguinal lymph node and the target lymph vessels were located along the superficial epigastric vessels. The imaging system allowed processing for extraction of images showing changes in the AB intensity of the visualized PVS components. This newly developed procedure can be used for further study on various dynamic processes of PVS in lymph vessels. PMID:27526158

  5. Alcian Blue and Pyronine Y histochemical stains permit assessment of multiple parameters in pulmonary disease models

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, D. K.; Rodgers, J.; Castilow, E. M.; Varga, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Utilization of a combined Alcian Blue and Pyronine Y histochemical method for the assessment of multiple parameters in the respiratory tract of various species is described. Acidic mucins were deep blue (sialylated mucins), red (sulfated mucins), or variably purple (mixture of sialylated/sulfated mucins), and differential mucus production was readily detected in a murine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine model of pulmonary inflammation. Elastic fibers stained red in the walls of pulmonary arteries, connecting airways, alveolar septa, and subpleural interstitium. Mast cells had red to red-purple granular cytoplasmic staining. Nuclei were ubiquitously counterstained pale blue. Representative staining was detected in tissues from multiple species including inbred mice, rats, ferrets, cats, dogs, sheep, and pigs. The fluorescent property of the stained tissues offers additional modalities with which to analyze tissue sections. This histochemical technique detects multiple critical parameters in routine paraffin sections of lung tissue, reduces the need for repeated serial sectioning and staining, and is cost-effective and simple to perform. PMID:19261646

  6. Lack of correlation between transepithelial transport capacity and paracellular pathway ultrastructure in Alcian blue-treated rabbit gallbladders.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, O; Møllgård, K; Rostgaard, J

    1979-11-01

    The effects of mucosal application of 1 mg% Alcian blue (a trivalent cationic phthalocyanine dye) on functional and ultrastructural parameters of the isolated rabbit gallbladder have been studied. Apart from minor changes in the shape of the group of central microvilli observed in thin-section electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the major ultrastructural change induced by Alcian blue was an almost complete collapse of intercellular spaces in the region above the tight junctions up to the bases of the marginal microvilli as revealed by thin-section electron microscopy. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy demonstrated a complete disappearance of intramembrane particles of neighboring cell membranes corresponding to the region of interspace collapse. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) increased from 44.5 to 58.7 ohm . cm2 upon treatment with Alcian blue. This increase could be well accounted for by the observed structural changes in the paracellular pathway if this pathway determines the low resistance of the rabbit gallbladder epithelium. Despite the increase in RT, net mucosa-to-serosa fluid transport and the spontaneous mucosa-positive potential difference of 3 mV were unaltered by Alcian blue treatment, supporting the hypothesis that the transepithelial transport mechanism per se is electroneutral. A calculation of the maximal paracellular mucosa-to-serosa waterflow in response to a lateral intercellular space hypertonicity of 20 mosM demonstrates that in the Alcian blue-treated gallbladder the resulting figure is about three orders of magnitude too low to keep up with the unaltered spontaneous transepithelial net fluid transport. It is therefore concluded that the tight junction pathway in rabbit gallbladders does not serve as a route for net fluid transport. PMID:500786

  7. Finding Blue Tracks in Gephyrocharax melanocheir Fish Similar to the Locations of Acupuncture Meridians after Injecting Alcian Blue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Zhang, Weibo; Jia, Shuyong; Tian, Yuying; Wang, Guangjun; Li, Hongyan

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated whether a meridian-like distribution of Alcian blue (AB) existed after it was injected into a fish's body and suggested a new animal model for meridian study. Twenty Gephyrocharax melanocheir fish with translucent bodies were injected with AB at a point near the spinal column or the dorsal fin. Distribution of AB was observed using a digital camera and a stereomicroscope. Three or more obvious blue tracks were found: one along the spinal column, another along the posterior margin of the abdomen extending to the superior margin of the anal fin, and a third along both sides of the dorsal fin. They were similar to the locations of the governor, conceptual vessel, and urinary bladder meridians, respectively, on the human body according to the classic theory of traditional Chinese medicine. A few other blue tracks were also found, which apparently did not correspond to any known meridians. The results show that the tracks of AB share important similarities with the locations of classically described meridians and that they are mainly distributed in the interstitial space around bones and blood vessels and inside muscular interstices. This study may provide a new experimental animal model for exploring acupuncture meridians. PMID:26742915

  8. Comparing two methods of plastination and glycerin preservation to study skeletal system after Alizarin red-Alcian blue double staining

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Setayesh M.; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Rabiei, Abbas A.; Hanaei, Mahsa S.; Rashidi, Bahman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Plastination is a new method of preserving tissue samples for a long time. This study aimed to compare the new plastination technique with the conventional preservative method in glycerin for fetus skeleton tissues and young rats dyed by Alizarin red- Alcian blue double staining. Materials and Methods: In this study, 4 groups of 1-day, 3-day, 12-day and mature rats were selected and, after being anesthetized and slaughtered, their skin was completely removed. In Alizarin red- Alcian blue double staining method, first the samples were fixed in 95% ethanol and then their cartilages were dyed by 0.225% Alcian blue solution; after that, they were cleared in 1% KOH. Then, the bones were dyed in 0.003% Alizarin red solution and finally the tissue was decolorized in 95% ethanol. In each group, half of the samples were preserved by the conventional method in a glycerin container and the other half were plastinated. Results: In the present study, the samples preserved by plastination technique were dry, odorless, indecomposable and tangible. Quality of coloring had an inverse relationship with rats’ age. Transparency of the plastinated samples had also an inverse relationship with rats’ age. Therefore, skeletal tissue of younger rats had higher quality and transparency in both preservation methods (glycerin and plastination). Conclusion: This study showed that plastination technique was an appropriate method in comparison with glycerin preservation, which conserved skeletal tissue of fetus and young rats colored by Alizarin red- Alcian blue double staining. And the final result was that plastination technique can generate dry, odorless, indecomposable and tangible samples. PMID:23930264

  9. A novel colorimetric assay of β-D-glucans in basidiomycete strains by alcian blue dye in a 96-well microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    C Semedo, Magda; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Basidiomycete strains synthesize several types of β-d-glucans, which play a major role in the medicinal properties of mushrooms. Therefore, the specific quantification of these β-d-glucans in mushroom strains is of great biochemical importance. Because published assay methods for these β-d-glucans present some disadvantages, a novel colorimetric assay method for β-d-glucan with alcian blue dye was developed. The complex formation was detected by following the decrease in absorbance in the range of 620 nm and by hypsochromic shift from 620 to 606 nm (∼14 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Analysis of variance was used for optimization of the slope of the calibration curve by using the assay mixture containing 0.017% (w/v) alcian blue in 2% (v/v) acetic acid at pH 3.0. The high-throughput colorimetric assay method on microtiter plates was used for quantification of β-d-glucans in the range of 0-0.8 μg, with a slope of 44.15 × 10(-2) and a limit of detection of 0.017 μg/well. Recovery experiments were carried out by using a sample of Hericium erinaceus, which exhibited a recovery of 95.8% for β-1,3-d-glucan. The present assay method exhibited a 10-fold higher sensitivity and a 59-fold lower limit of detection compared with the published method with congo red. β-d-glucans of several mushrooms strains were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia, and they were quantified by this assay method. This assay method is fast, specific, simple, and it can be used to quantify β-d-glucans from other biological sources. PMID:26317582

  10. Further studies on metachromasia in cultured human fibroblasts. Staining of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides) by Alcian blue in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Danes, B S; Scott, J E; Bearn, A G

    1970-10-01

    Staining with Alcian blue in various concentrations of magnesium chloride (alcianophilia) has been found to be a useful supplement to metachromatic staining to detect increased cellular concentrations of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). In many instances alcianophilia at 0.3 M MgCl(2) is more specific than metachromasia and does not give "false positives" sometimes found in normal individuals and in those with cystic fibrosis, Gaucher's disease, familial amaurotic idiocy, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. On the other hand, it gives a "false negative" reaction in the Sanfilippo syndrome (perhaps because the characteristically elevated glycosaminoglycan in this disease, heparan sulfate, is not synthesized by cultured skin fibroblasts), and in the Marfan syndrome. It detects the Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, which metachromasia does not. The "false positives" given by metachromasia in all six families studied thus far are genuine, reproducible reactions that can be traced through at least three generations of normal individuals within a family. There is therefore, in these families, a genetic factor that causes such metachromasia, but it is not increased glycosaminoglycan concentration. PMID:4101365

  11. The quantitative measurement of Alcian Blue–glycosaminoglycan complexes

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Paul

    1973-01-01

    1. A simple new quantitative micro method was developed to study the interaction of the cationic dye Alcian Blue 8GX and acid glycosaminoglycans under different conditions. After washing with ethanol the precipitated Alcian Blue–glycosaminoglycan complex was dissociated in Manoxol IB solution and the amount of bound dye measured spectrophotometrically. 2. Reaction profiles of complex-formation were determined in the presence of different concentrations of MgCl2 at pH5.8, and could be used to study the critical electrolyte concentrations of glycosaminoglycans. At least 50mm-MgCl2 was required to produce maximum precipitation of, and maximum uptake of, Alcian Blue by standard glycosaminoglycans. Maximum uptake of Alcian Blue by glycosaminoglycans in the urine of a patient with Hurler's syndrome required the presence of 25–50mm-MgCl2. 3. Under standard conditions of maximum interaction, calibration curves for the quantitative determination of a series of standard glycosaminoglycans in 20μl volumes were nearly linear over the range 1–10μg. 4. The technique was used to determine the molecular binding ratios of Alcian Blue to glycosaminoglycans under controlled conditions. PMID:4269149

  12. Thymol blue immobilized on tapered fibers as optical transducer for pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Ciaccheri, Leonardo; Falai, Alida; Mignani, Anna G.; Rayss, Jan; Sudolski, Grzegorz

    1999-02-01

    The present work is concerned with the optical characterization of an evanescent wave sensor for pH detection. First, the interaction between the solution containing the acid-base indicator and the fiber core was investigated. Then, the acid-base indicator, thymol blue, was covalently immobilized on the core of a 200/380 micrometers fiber by means of a silylation process of the glass surface. The fiber core surface was modified along a section of 8 mm. A comparison was made using both bare and tapered fibers, with a tapering ratio (fiber diameter/waist diameter) of 2.3. An enhancement in sensitivity of a factor 6 was observed with tapered fibers in the 1/2.5 range, and a sensitivity of 0.05 pH units was attained.

  13. Controllable synthesis of green and blue fluorescent carbon nanodots for pH and Cu(2+) sensing in living cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Bo; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2016-03-15

    We report a controllable strategy for fabrication of green and blue fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for pH and Cu(2+) sensing in living cells. Green and blue fluorescent CDs have been synthesized by hydrothermal method and pyrolysis of leeks, respectively, providing an easy way for the production of CDs without the request of tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. Green fluorescent CDs (G-CDs) exhibit high tolerance to pH values and external cations. Blue fluorescent CDs (B-CDs) can be applied to pH and Cu(2+) sensing. The linear range of Cu(2+) detection is 0.01-10.00 μM and the detection limit is 0.05 μM. For pH detection, there is a good linearity in the pH range of 3.5-10.0. The linear and rapid response of B-CDs to Cu(2+) and pH is valuable for Cu(2+) and pH sensing in living cells. Confocal fluorescent imaging of human cervical carcinoma cells indicates that B-CDs could visualize Cu(2+) and pH fluctuations in living cells with negligible autofluorescence. PMID:26485174

  14. Surface pH controls purple-to-blue transition of bacteriorhodopsin. A theoretical model of purple membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Szundi, I; Stoeckenius, W

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a surface model of purple membrane and applied it in an analysis of the purple-to-blue color change of bacteriorhodopsin which is induced by acidification or deionization. The model is based on dissociation and double layer theory and the known membrane structure. We calculated surface pH, ion concentrations, charge density, and potential as a function of bulk pH and concentration of mono- and divalent cations. At low salt concentrations, the surface pH is significantly lower than the bulk pH and it becomes independent of bulk pH in the deionized membrane suspension. Using an experimental acid titration curve for neutral, lipid-depleted membrane, we converted surface pH into absorption values. The calculated bacteriohodopsin color changes for acidification of purple, and titrations of deionized blue membrane with cations or base agree well with experimental results. No chemical binding is required to reproduce the experimental curves. Surface charge and potential changes in acid, base and cation titrations are calculated and their relation to the color change is discussed. Consistent with structural data, 10 primary phosphate and two basic surface groups per bacteriorhodopsin are sufficient to obtain good agreement between all calculated and experimental curves. The results provide a theoretical basis for our earlier conclusion that the purple-to-blue transition must be attributed to surface phenomena and not to cation binding at specific sites in the protein. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2775832

  15. pH sensor based on sol-gel silica layer deposited on a plastic optical fiber with blue bromophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Méndez, Edgar; Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Andrade-Lucio, Jose A.; Estudillo-Ayala, Julian M.; Trejo-Durán, M.; Ibarra-Manzano, Oscar G.; Ponce-Ballesteros, J. Erasmo; Lessard, Roger A.

    2004-11-01

    Design and characterization of a pH optical fiber sensor with a pH sensitive dye is described in this paper. TEOS (Tetra-ethyl-Orto-Silicate) was used to dope a plastic optical fiber, which will be used as the optical probe (OPTRODE). The sensor is prepared by fixing the doped plastic fiber on a fused ortosilica block surface with blue bromophenol. The fiber surface charged with silica modified the refractive index, which plays an important roll on the fiber, modifies the conditions of light propagation into the plastic optical fiber. The fiber transmittance is used to measure the pH of a solution or a fluid in a range between 4 and 7; such signal is captured by a photodetector and processed with a LabView program. The advantage of this system is that, 2cm of doped fiber are enough to measure the pH of a fluid in real time. The time response of the sensor reported in the present study is approximately 10s.

  16. The role of oxidative stress genes and effect of pH on methylene blue sensitized photooxidation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    İdil, Önder; Macit, İkbal; Kaygusuz, Özge; Darcan, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the survival time of wild type E. coli W3110 and 11 mutants was analysed with a plate count method in methylene blue added or control groups under daylight fluoroscence illumination (4950 lux) at different pH values (5.0, 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) in phosphate buffer. As a result, while the number of bacteria did not decrease under photooxidative stress at pH 5.0 and 6.0 during a 6-hour incubation, the wild type and all mutants decreased more than 2 log. at pH 8.0, and approximately one log. at pH 7.0. It was determined that a 2 log decrease in wild type E. coli takes 3.7 h according to t99 value at pH 8, these values were 2.39 h in the katE mutant, 2.64 h in the soxR mutant, 2.67 h in the oxyR mutant, 2.71 h in the sodB mutant, 3 h in the btuE mutant, 3.38 h in the zwf mutant and 3.40 h in the soxS mutant, respectively (p < 0.05). The roles of these genes were proved with complement tests. Finally, it is found that the effectiveness of photooxidative stress is in direct relation with pH, and the katE, soxR, oxyR, sodB, btuE, zwf, and soxS genes are important for the protection against this stress. PMID:26960359

  17. Sonochemical degradation of Coomassie Brilliant Blue: effect of frequency, power density, pH and various additives.

    PubMed

    Rayaroth, Manoj P; Aravind, Usha K; Aravindakumar, Charuvila T

    2015-01-01

    Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), discharged mainly from textile industries, is an identified water pollutant. Ultrasound initiated degradation of organic pollutants is one among the promising techniques and forms part of the Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). Ultrasonic degradation of CBB under different experimental conditions has been investigated in the present work. The effect of frequency (200 kHz, 350 kHz, 620 kHz and 1 MHz) and power density (3.5 W mL(-1), 9.8 W mL(-1) and 19.6 W mL(-1)) on the degradation profile was evaluated. The optimum performance was obtained at 350 kHz and 19.6 W mL(-1). Similar to other sonolytic degradation of organic pollutants, maximum degradation of CBB was observed under acidic pH. The degradation profile indicated a pseudo-first order kinetics. The addition of ferrous ion (1×10(-4) M), hydrogen peroxide (1×10(-4) M), and peroxodisulphate (1×10(-4) M) had a positive effect on the degradation efficiency. The influence of certain important NOM like SDS and humic acid on the sonolytic degradation of CBB was also investigated. Both the compounds suppress the degradation efficiency. LC-Q-TOF-MS was used to identify the stable intermediate products. Nearly 13 transformed products were identified during 10min of sonication using the optimized operational parameters. This product profile demonstrated that most of the products are formed mainly by the OH radical attack. On the basis of these results, a degradation mechanism is proposed. PMID:25222624

  18. The influence of ph and waterborne metals on egg fertilization of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), the oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Riba, Inmaculada; Gabrielyan, Bardukh; Khosrovyan, Alla; Luque, Angel; Del Valls, T Angel

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of pH and metals on the egg fertilization process of two estuarine species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), the oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and a marine species, the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus). The success of egg fertilization was examined after exposure of gametes to sediment extracts of various degrees of contamination at pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. At the pH levels from 6.5 to 8.0, the egg fertilization of the different species demonstrated different sensitivity to metal and/or acidic exposure. In all species, the results revealed that egg fertilization was almost completely inhibited at pH 6.0. The egg fertilization of the blue mussel M. edulis was the least sensitive to the exposure while that of the sea urchin P. lividus demonstrated a concentration-dependent response to the pH levels from 6.5 to 8.0. The results of this study revealed that acidity increased the concentration of several metal ions (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) but reduced its availability to the organisms, probably related to the reactivity of the ions with most non-metals or to the competition among metals and other waterborne constituents. PMID:27068916

  19. Effect of a light-induced pH gradient on purple-to-blue and purple-to-red transitions of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Nasuda-Kouyama, A.; Fukuda, K.; Iio, T.; Kouyama, T. )

    1990-07-24

    Bacteriorhodopsin-containing vesicles that were able to alkalize the extravesicular medium by greater than 1.5 pH units under illumination, i.e., inside-out vesicles, were reconstituted by reverse-phase evaporation with Halobacterium halobium polar lipids or exogenous phospholipids. Acid titration of a dark-adapted sample was accompanied by a color change from purple to blue (pKa = 2.5-4.5 in 0.15 M K2SO4), and alkali titration resulted in the formation of a red species absorbing maximally at 480 nm (pKa = 7 to greater than 9), the pKa values and the extents of these color changes being dependent on the nature of lipid. When a vesicle suspension at neutral or weakly acidic pH was irradiated by continuous light so that a large pH gradient was generated across the membrane, either a purple-to-blue or a purple-to-red transition took place. The light-induced purple-to-red transition was significant in an unbuffered vesicle suspension and correlated with the pH change in the extravesicular medium. The result suggests that the purple-to-red transition is driven from the extravesicular side, i.e., from the C-terminal membrane surface. In the presence of buffer molecules outside, the dominant color change induced in the light was the purple-to-blue transition, which seemed to be due to a large decrease in the intravesicular pH. But an apparently inconsistent result was obtained when the extravesicular medium was acidified by a HCl pulse, which was accompanied by a rapid color change to blue. We arrived at the following explanation: The two bR isomers, one containing all-trans-retinal and the other 13-cis-retinal, respond differently to pH changes in the extravesicular and the intravesicular medium. In this relation, full light adaptation was not achieved when the light-induced purple-to-blue transition was significant.

  20. Nile Blue-Based Nanosized pH Sensors for Simultaneous Far-Red and Near-Infrared Live Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are tagged with pH-responsive Nile Blue-based labels and used as a new type of pH-responsive colorimetric/fluorescent biosensor for far-red and near-infrared imaging of live cells. The diblock copolymer vesicles described herein are based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine-block-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) [PMPC-PDPA]: the biomimetic PMPC block is known to facilitate rapid cell uptake for a wide range of cell lines, while the PDPA block constitutes the pH-responsive component that enables facile vesicle self-assembly in aqueous solution. These biocompatible vesicles can be utilized to detect interstitial hypoxic/acidic regions in a tumor model via a pH-dependent colorimetric shift. In addition, they are also useful for selective intracellular staining of lysosomes and early endosomes via subtle changes in fluorescence emission. Such nanoparticles combine efficient cellular uptake with a pH-responsive Nile Blue dye label to produce a highly versatile dual capability probe. This is in marked contrast to small molecule dyes, which are usually poorly uptaken by cells, frequently exhibit cytotoxicity, and are characterized by intracellular distributions invariably dictated by their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. PMID:24001153

  1. Nile Blue-based nanosized pH sensors for simultaneous far-red and near-infrared live bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe; Canton, Irene; Warren, Nicholas J; Themistou, Efrosyni; Blanazs, Adam; Ustbas, Burcin; Tian, Xiaohe; Pearson, Russell; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P

    2013-10-01

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are tagged with pH-responsive Nile Blue-based labels and used as a new type of pH-responsive colorimetric/fluorescent biosensor for far-red and near-infrared imaging of live cells. The diblock copolymer vesicles described herein are based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine-block-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) [PMPC-PDPA]: the biomimetic PMPC block is known to facilitate rapid cell uptake for a wide range of cell lines, while the PDPA block constitutes the pH-responsive component that enables facile vesicle self-assembly in aqueous solution. These biocompatible vesicles can be utilized to detect interstitial hypoxic/acidic regions in a tumor model via a pH-dependent colorimetric shift. In addition, they are also useful for selective intracellular staining of lysosomes and early endosomes via subtle changes in fluorescence emission. Such nanoparticles combine efficient cellular uptake with a pH-responsive Nile Blue dye label to produce a highly versatile dual capability probe. This is in marked contrast to small molecule dyes, which are usually poorly uptaken by cells, frequently exhibit cytotoxicity, and are characterized by intracellular distributions invariably dictated by their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. PMID:24001153

  2. Ruthenium Dihydroxybipyridine Complexes are Tumor Activated Prodrugs Due to Low pH and Blue Light Induced Ligand Release

    PubMed Central

    Hufziger, Kyle T.; Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; Charboneau, David J.; Nieto, Ismael; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; Dudley, Timothy J.; Merino, Edward J.; Papish, Elizabeth T.; Paul, Jared J.

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium drugs are potent anti-cancer agents, but inducing drug selectivity and enhancing their modest activity remain challenging. Slow Ru ligand loss limits the formation of free sites and subsequent binding to DNA base pairs. Herein, we designed a ligand that rapidly dissociates upon irradiation at low pH. Activation at low pH can lead to cancer selectivity, since many cancer cells have higher metabolism (and thus lower pH) than non-cancerous cells. We have used the pH sensitive ligand, 6,6′-dihydroxy-2,2′-bipyridine (66′bpy(OH)2), to generate [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, which contains two acidic hydroxyl groups with pKa1 = 5.26 and pKa2 = 7.27. Irradiation when protonated leads to photo-dissociation of the 66′bpy(OH)2 ligand. An in-depth study of the structural and electronic properties of the complex was carried out using X-Ray crystallography, electrochemistry, UV/visible spectroscopy, and computational techniques. Notably, Ru-N bond lengths in the 66′bpy(OH)2 complex are longer (by ~0.3 Å) than in polypyridyl complexes that lack 6 and 6′ substitution. Thus, the longer bond length predisposes the complex for photo-dissociation and leads to the anti-cancer activity. When the complex is deprotonated, the 66′bpy(O−)2 ligand molecular orbitals mix heavily with the ruthenium orbitals, making new mixed metal-ligand orbitals that lead to a higher bond order. We investigated the anti-cancer activities of [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, [Ru(bpy)2(44′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ (44′(bpy(OH)2 = 4,4′-dihydroxy-2,2′-bipyridine) in HeLa cells, which have a relatively low pH. It is found that [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+ is more cytotoxic than the other ruthenium complexes studied. Thus, we have identified a pH sensitive ruthenium scaffold that can be exploited for photo-induced anti-cancer activity. PMID:24184694

  3. The influence of ovarian fluid ph of stripped unfertilized channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus eggs on the hatching success of channel catfish x blue catfish I. furcatus hybrid catfish eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ovarian fluid pH of stripped unfertilized channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) eggs on fertilization and hatch rate of channel catfish ' x blue catfish (I. furcatus) ' hybrid catfish eggs. A significant correlation was established between ovarian...

  4. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  5. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  6. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  7. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  8. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today. PMID:8065194

  9. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  10. Histochemical study of cutaneous mucins in hypothyroid dogs.

    PubMed

    Doliger, S; Delverdier, M; Moré, J; Longeart, L; Régnier, A; Magnol, J P

    1995-11-01

    A dermal mucinosis, visualized as dermal alcianophilic material, is occasionally present in canine hypothyroidism (myxedema). Various histochemical reactions (alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff [PAS], alcian blue at pH 2.6, alcian blue at pH 1.0, critical electrolytical concentrations with and without dimethylsulfoxide, differential hydrolysis by hyaluronidases) were performed on skin biopsies from six dogs (four females and two males ranging from 8 to 13 years) affected by hypothyroidism, all of them presenting dermal mucinosis in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. In these dogs, the only polysaccharidic compound involved in the dermal mucinosis was hyaluronic acid. In this study, hyaluronic acid dermal deposits of hypothyroid dogs were significantly different from those of controls in subepidermal connective tissue and loose reticular connective tissue but not in periadnexal zones. We recommend the combined alcian blue/PAS reaction as a routine technique to assess dermal mucinosis in hypothyroid dogs. PMID:8592797

  11. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Blue-green algae might slow blood clotting. Taking blue-green algae along with medications that ...

  12. Greening the Blue Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Whitney E.; Noble, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Compares the revised Blue Bottle formulation to the classical Blue Bottle. Indicates that the revised formulation gives a somewhat bluer solution, but initially slower reduction when compared to the classical formulation. (Author/KHR)

  13. The Blue Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, J. Joel

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the advantages of an elementary science activity in which students discover that blowing through a straw into a bromthymol blue solution changes the color to yellow. Directions are provided for preparing the bromthymol blue solution. (JR)

  14. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... when someone eats parts of the blue nightshade plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT ... is found in the blue nightshade ( Solanum dulcamara ) plant, especially in the fruit and leaves.

  15. Gospel and Blues Improvisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Richard

    1980-01-01

    The similarities and differences between blues and gospel music are identified and the author suggests that both blues and gospel music have inherent improvisational qualities. Methods of capitalizing on these qualities are presented. Selected readings and recordings are included. (KC)

  16. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Blue nightshade poisoning occurs when someone eats parts of the blue nightshade plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you ...

  17. Prussian Blue as a Prebiotic Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Bermejo, M.; Menor-Salván, C.; Osuna-Esteban, S.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2009-12-01

    Ferrocyanide has been proposed as a potential prebiotic reagent and the complex salt Prussian Blue, Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3, might be an important reservoir of HCN, in the early Earth. HCN is considered the main precursor of amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases under prebiotic conditions. Recently, we observed the formation of Prussian Blue in spark discharge experiments using saline solutions of ferrous chloride, FeCl2. Using Prussian Blue as starting material in ammonium suspensions, we obtained organic compounds containing nitrogen. These results seem to indicate that Prussian Blue could have been first, a sink of HCN, and then in subsequent reactions, triggered by pH fluctuations, it might have lead to organic life precursors.

  18. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R (2) values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R (2) values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  19. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  20. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  1. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  2. Introducing the Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the blues and presents a list of resources that are designed to introduce the blues, both as a feeling and as an influential part of American music and culture. Includes picture books and nonfiction for young readers, nonfiction for older readers, Web sites, and compact disks. (LRW)

  3. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades. PMID:15559577

  4. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    ... bruises. This can raise a question about possible child abuse. It is important to recognize that Mongolian blue ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 11. Read More Benign Child abuse - physical Rashes Update Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  5. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  6. Methylene blue unresponsive methemoglobinemia

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Sibabratta; Natarajan, Manivachagan Muthappa; James, Ebor Jacob; Ebenezer, Kala

    2014-01-01

    Acquired methemoglobinemia is an uncommon blood disorder induced by exposure to certain oxidizing agents and drugs. Although parents may not give any history of toxin ingestion; with the aid of pulse-oximetry and blood gas analysis, we can diagnose methemoglobinemia. Prompt recognition of this condition is required in emergency situations to institute early methylene blue therapy. We report an unusual case of severe toxic methemoglobinemia, which did not respond to methylene blue, but was successfully managed with exchange transfusion. PMID:24872659

  7. Removal of methylene blue from dye effluent using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder (ACLP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman bin Mohamed; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Aminu, Nasiru; Salihi, Ibrahim Umar

    2015-07-01

    Methylene blue (MB), a common environmental pollutant discharged from dye effluents were removed from synthetic effluents in this study using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder. Effects of operating parameters such as pH, initial Methylene blue concentration, adsorbent weight and contact time were examined on methylene blue removal whereas stirring speed was constant at 100 rpm. Results show that low pH (3-4) had more Methylene blue removal than high pH. Methylene blue removal decreased when initial concentration was increased but increased when adsorbent weight was increased. Removal of Methylene blue by Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder was rapid and significantly above 80% in all initial concentrations examined. At optimum conditions of pH 3, 20 minutes contact time and adsorbent weight of 60 mg for Methylene blue initial concentration of 20 mg/L, 40 mg/L and 60 mg/L, Methylene blue removal of 84.7%, 83.9% and 81.2% were obtained respectively. Results suggest that Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder could be potential adsorbents for Methylene blue removal from dye effluents.

  8. Capsule Design for Blue Light Therapy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhangyong; Ren, Binbin; Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Shengrong; Wang, Wei; Pang, Yu; Lin, Jinzhao; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A photo-medical capsule that emits blue light for Helicobacter pylori treatment was described in this paper. The system consists of modules for pH sensing and measuring, light-emitting diode driver circuit, radio communication and microcontroller, and power management. The system can differentiate locations by monitoring the pH values of the gastrointestinal tract, and turn on and off the blue light according to the preset range of pH values. Our experimental tests show that the capsule can operate in the effective light therapy mode for more than 32 minutes and the wireless communication module can reliably transmit the measured pH value to a receiver located outside the body. PMID:26814481

  9. Capsule Design for Blue Light Therapy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Shengrong; Wang, Wei; Pang, Yu; Lin, Jinzhao; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A photo-medical capsule that emits blue light for Helicobacter pylori treatment was described in this paper. The system consists of modules for pH sensing and measuring, light-emitting diode driver circuit, radio communication and microcontroller, and power management. The system can differentiate locations by monitoring the pH values of the gastrointestinal tract, and turn on and off the blue light according to the preset range of pH values. Our experimental tests show that the capsule can operate in the effective light therapy mode for more than 32 minutes and the wireless communication module can reliably transmit the measured pH value to a receiver located outside the body. PMID:26814481

  10. Blue honeysuckle list 47

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript summarizes descriptions for two newly released Lonicera caerulea L., blue honeysuckle, cultivars released for northern production. This fruit is popular in Russia and in Japan, particularly Hokkaido. It has possibility as a new fruit cultivar for North America. The University of Sask...

  11. Plastic optical fiber sensor for gastric ph detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Bracci, Susanna; Cosi, Franco

    1994-02-01

    An optical fiber sensor for gastric pH detection is described, making use of plastic fibers as light carriers and a proper electronic system for both source driving and signal processing. The use of a suitable microprocessor and an internal buffer allows the realization of a portable and reliable device, fed by batteries. The indicators, bromophenol blue (BPB) or thymol blue (TB), are immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) fixed at the end of plastic optical fibers following a proprietary process. The realized optrode, satisfying clinical requirements, was tested `in vitro.' A precision of pH units and a response time of (

  12. Direct spectorphotometric assay of quaternary ammonium compounds using bromthymol blue.

    PubMed

    Lowry, J B

    1979-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and chlorhexidine gluconate were assayed quantitatively by a direct spectrophotometric method with bromthymol blue buffered at pH 7.5. The method shows good results at concentrations of 0--300 microgram/ml and in the presence of epinephrine bitartrate, phenylephrine hydrochloride, pilocarpine hydrochloride, and polyvinyl alcohol. PMID:758444

  13. The Blue Emu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descalzi, Doug; Gillett, John; Gordon, Carlton; Keener, ED; Novak, Ken; Puente, Laura

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal in designing the Blue Emu was to provide an airline with a cost efficient and profitable means of transporting passengers between the major cities in Aeroworld. The design attacks the market where a demand for inexpensive transportation exists and for this reason the Blue Emu is an attractive investment for any airline. In order to provide a profitable aircraft, special attention was paid to cost and economics. For example, in manufacturing, simplicity was stressed in structural design to reduce construction time and cost. Aerodynamic design employed a tapered wing which reduced the induced drag coefficient while also reducing the weight of the wing. Even the propulsion system was selected with cost effectiveness in mind, yet also to maintain the marketability of the aircraft. Thus, in every aspect of the design, consideration was given to economics and marketability of the final product.

  14. Prostatic blue nevus.

    PubMed

    Anderco, Denisa; Lazăr, Elena; Tăban, Sorina; Miclea, Fl; Dema, Alis

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old patient with no significant personal urological history. The clinical and ultrasound examination revealed a prostatic gland with increased volume and homogenous appearance. After transurethral resection, multiples gray-brown-blackish prostatic chips were obtained, which could be confused with a malignant melanoma. The histological routine examination in conjunction with the histochemical (Fontana-Masson) and immunohistochemical (S100, HMB45) reactions established the diagnosis of prostatic blue nevus. The presence of melanin in prostatic tissue is an unusual aspect, being encountered three distinct lesions: blue nevus, melanosis and malignant melanoma. Recognition and correct classification of each of these three entities is fundamental, concerning the clinical and prognosis implications. PMID:20809037

  15. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  16. The Blue Marble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 'blue marble' image is based on the most detailed collection of true-color imagery of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. Most of the information contained in this image came from MODIS, illustrating MODIS' outstanding capacity to act as an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of this image is based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the satellite's view on any single day. Global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data was used to simulate the ocean surface. MODIS doesn't measure 3-D features of the Earth, so the surface observations were draped over topographic data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR sensor-the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of MODIS imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. A large collection of imagery based on the blue marble in a variety of sizes and formats, including animations and the full (1 km) resolution imagery, is available at the Blue Marble page. Image by Reto Stockli, Render by Robert Simmon. Based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  17. Blue ocean leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets. PMID:24956870

  18. Blue emitting undecaplatinum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Bhat, Shridevi; Pradeep, T.

    2014-07-01

    A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents.A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, instrumentation, chromatogram of the crude cluster; SEM/EDAX, DLS, PXRD, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS of the isolated Pt11 cluster; UV/Vis, MALDI MS and SEM/EDAX of isolated 2 and 3; and 195Pt NMR of the K2PtCl6 standard. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02778g

  19. Proof of concept of using chromogenic arrays as a tool to identify blue cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Ros-Lis, José V; Vivancos, José-Luis; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-04-01

    A new chromogenic array for the identification and classification of blue cheeses has been developed. It is based on the response of a chromogenic array composed of five sensing materials prepared by the incorporation of pH indicators to MCM-41 and alumina. Four blue cheeses were tested: Roquefort, Blue Stilton, blue cheese with leaves and blue cheese spread. The colour modulations of the chromogenic array were processed by the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The statistical PCA analysis showed different responses to each cheese. PLS-DA models were developed by incorporating the data measured at diverse times, and this approach allowed us to obtain a perfect classification of all five cheeses in 5.5h. The results suggest that chromogenic arrays and optoelectronic noses can be a suitable approach to develop simple systems to classify blue cheeses and of potential use for the detection of food fraud. PMID:25442626

  20. Pluto’s Blue Haze

    NASA Video Gallery

    The sky on Pluto is blue! Kind of. This is Pluto in an Minute. So it’s not exactly the case that the sky on Pluto is blue, rather, what the New Horizons science team has found in recent images do...

  1. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  2. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuhua; Lai, Hong; Shi, Zhongliang

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  3. Adsorption of Two Dyes by Mg(OH)2: Procion Blue HB and Remazol Brilliant Blue R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouberka, Zohra; Bentaleb, Kahina; Benabbou, Khalil A.; Maschke, Ulrich

    The use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. Mg(OH)2 sludge was produced from precipitation of magnesium ions (Mg2+) with NaOH in pH = 10 and investigated as a low-cost adsorbent. This paper deals with the removal of textile dyes from aqueous solutions by Mg(OH)2. Reactive Procion blue HB (PR) and Acid Remazol brilliant blue R (RB) were used as model compounds. The adsorption capacity was found as 43.47 and 26.89 mg/g at initial pH 6.5.

  4. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  5. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation. PMID:24663457

  6. Nile Blue derivatives as lysosomotropic photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei; Shulok, Janine R.; Kirley, S. D.; Cincotta, Louis; Foley, James W.

    1991-06-01

    The benzophenoxazines, including several Nile blue analogues, are a unique group of dyes that localize selectively in animal tumors. Chemical modifications of Nile blue A can yield derivatives with high 1O2 quantum yields. These derivatives represent a group of potentially effective photosensitizers for selective phototherapy of malignant tumors. In vitro evaluation of these derivatives has indicated that those with high 1O2 yields are very effective in mediating the photocytotoxicity of tumor cells. This photodynamic effect is most likely mediated through the action of 1O2, since photoirradiation under D2O enhanced and under hypoxic conditions diminished the photocytotoxic action. The subcellular localization of these photosensitizers in bladder tumor cells in culture was examined by light and fluorescence microscopies as well as by histochemical and biochemical studies. The results indicate that these dyes are localized primarily in the lysosome. The cellular uptake and retention of these dyes is energy- and pH-dependent. Agents such as nigericin, which alter the transmembrane pH gradient, reduced uptake and enhanced efflux of the dyes, while agents such as valinomycin, which reduce cellular membrane potential, had no effect on the uptake. These findings are consistent with having ion-trapping as the mechanism for the uptake of these dyes. Photoirradiation of sensitizer-treated cells obliterated lysosomes in a light-dose and drug-dose dependent fashion. Release of the hydrolytic enzymes may be the main cause for subsequent cell death since the cytolytic effect was reduced by a specific inhibitor of lysosomal proteolytic enzyme. A lysosomotropic photosensitization mechanism is therefore proposed for the photocytotoxic action of the Nile blue derivatives. This mechanism may provide an approach to the development of new photosensitizers for the effective and selective destruction of malignant tumors.

  7. Blue upconversion thulium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.; Weber, M.E.; Dulick, M.

    1990-01-01

    Upconversion has been an active area of research for at least two decades, mainly because of its wide ranging applications from infrared quantum counters, visible-emitting phosphors, to upconversion lasers. The upconversion lasers have recently become attractive with the advent of semiconductor laser diodes as the pump source. In an upconversion laser, the laser active ion is excited by internal upconversion of near-ir or red light via multiphoton excitation or cooperative processes and emits anti-Stokes visible light. Since the laser diode output wavelength can be composition turned to match the upconversion laser ion absorption lines, a substantial fraction of the ions can be driven into higher energy levels, thus enhancing the upconversion process. These upconversion solid-state lasers offer a potentially simple and compact source of visible coherent light with semiconductor laser diode excitation. We recently reported a novel upconversion thulium laser that emits blue light at 77 K. In this paper additional data on this 77 K upconversion laser as well as preliminary results on the room temperature upconversion laser are presented. In these demonstrations, dye lasers were used instead of diode lasers because they were more readily available than high power semiconductor laser diodes and their wavelengths could be adjusted easily. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Blue metal complex pigments involved in blue flower color

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kosaku

    2006-01-01

    The blue pigment of cornflower, protocyanin, has been investigated for a long time, but its precise structure was not entirely explained until recently. The molecular structure of the pigment was recently shown to be a metal complex of six molecules each of anthocyanin and flavone glycoside, with one ferric iron, one magnesium and two calcium ions by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The studies provided the answer to the question posed in the early part of the last century, “why is the cornflower blue and rose red when both flowers contain the same anthocyanin?” This work was achieved on the basis of the results of long years of the studies made by many researchers. In this review, the author focuses on the investigations of the blue metal complex pigments involved in the bluing of flowers, commelinin from Commelina commusis, protocyanin from Centaurea cyanus, protodelphin from Salvia patens and hydrangea blue pigment. PMID:25792777

  9. Hazards of solar blue light

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    Short-wavelength visible light (blue light) of the Sun has caused retinal damage in people who have stared fixedly at the Sun without adequate protection. The author quantified the blue-light hazard of the Sun according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines by measuring the spectral radiance of the Sun. The results showed that the exposure limit for blue light can be easily exceeded when people view the Sun and that the solar blue-light hazard generally increases with solar elevation, which is in accordance with a model of the atmospheric extinction of sunlight. Viewing the Sun can be very hazardous and therefore should be avoided except at very low solar elevations.

  10. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  11. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  12. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  13. Metal Complex Pigment Involved in the Blue Sepal Color Development of Hydrangea.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Tomomi; Ito, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadao; Yoshida, Kumi

    2015-09-01

    Anthocyanins exhibit various vivid colors from red through purple to blue and are potential sources of food colorants. However, their usage is restricted because of their instability, especially as a blue colorant. The blue sepal color of Hydrangea macrophylla is due to a metal complex named "hydrangea-blue complex" composed of delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, 1, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 2, and/or 5-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid, 3, as copigments, and Al(3+) in aqueous solution at approximately pH 4.0. However, the ratio of each component ins not stoichiometric, but is fluctuates within a certain range. The hydrangea-blue complex exists only in aqueous solution, exhibiting a stable blue color, but attempts at crystallization have failed; therefore, the structure remains obscure. To clarify the basis of the character of the hydrangea-blue pigment and to obtain its structural information, we studied the mixing conditions to reconstruct the same blue color as observed in the sepals. In highly concentrated sodium acetate buffer (6 M, pH 4.0) we could measure (1)H NMR of both the hydrangea-blue complex composed of 1 (5 mM), 2 (10 mM), and Al(3+) (10 mM) and a simple 1-Al(3+) complex. We also recorded the spectra of complexes composed with structurally different anthocyanins and copigments. Comparison of those signals indicated that in the hydrangea-blue complex 1 might be under equilibrium between chelating and nonchelating structures having an interaction with 2. PMID:26006163

  14. Cyanobacterial blue color formation during lysis under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Arii, Suzue; Tsuji, Kiyomi; Tomita, Koji; Hasegawa, Masateru; Bober, Beata; Harada, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Cyanobacteria produce numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as β-cyclocitral, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol, which show lytic activity against cyanobacteria. Among these compounds, only β-cyclocitral causes a characteristic color change from green to blue (blue color formation) in the culture broth during the lysis process. In August 2008 and September 2010, the lysis of cyanobacteria involving blue color formation was observed at Lake Tsukui in northern Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We collected lake water containing the cyanobacteria and investigated the VOCs, such as β-cyclocitral, β-ionone, 1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-phenylethanol, as well as the number of cyanobacterial cells and their damage and pH changes. As a result, the following results were confirmed: the detection of several VOCs, including β-cyclocitral and its oxidation product, 2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid; the identification of phycocyanin based on its visible spectrum; the lower pH (6.7 and 5.4) of the lysed samples; and characteristic morphological change in the damaged cyanobacterial cells. We also encountered the same phenomenon on 6 September 2013 in Lake Sagami in northern Kanagawa Prefecture and obtained almost the same results, such as blue color formation, decreasing pH, damaged cells, and detection of VOCs, including the oxidation products of β-cyclocitral. β-Cyclocitral derived from Microcystis has lytic activity against Microcystis itself but has stronger inhibitory activity against other cyanobacteria and algae, suggesting that the VOCs play an important role in the ecology of aquatic environments. PMID:25662969

  15. Cyanobacterial Blue Color Formation during Lysis under Natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kiyomi; Tomita, Koji; Hasegawa, Masateru; Bober, Beata; Harada, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as β-cyclocitral, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol, which show lytic activity against cyanobacteria. Among these compounds, only β-cyclocitral causes a characteristic color change from green to blue (blue color formation) in the culture broth during the lysis process. In August 2008 and September 2010, the lysis of cyanobacteria involving blue color formation was observed at Lake Tsukui in northern Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We collected lake water containing the cyanobacteria and investigated the VOCs, such as β-cyclocitral, β-ionone, 1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-phenylethanol, as well as the number of cyanobacterial cells and their damage and pH changes. As a result, the following results were confirmed: the detection of several VOCs, including β-cyclocitral and its oxidation product, 2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid; the identification of phycocyanin based on its visible spectrum; the lower pH (6.7 and 5.4) of the lysed samples; and characteristic morphological change in the damaged cyanobacterial cells. We also encountered the same phenomenon on 6 September 2013 in Lake Sagami in northern Kanagawa Prefecture and obtained almost the same results, such as blue color formation, decreasing pH, damaged cells, and detection of VOCs, including the oxidation products of β-cyclocitral. β-Cyclocitral derived from Microcystis has lytic activity against Microcystis itself but has stronger inhibitory activity against other cyanobacteria and algae, suggesting that the VOCs play an important role in the ecology of aquatic environments. PMID:25662969

  16. Miniature Chemical Optical Fiber Sensors For Ph Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisde, G.; Perez, J. J.

    1987-10-01

    A miniature optode (diameter about 1 mm) was built with 200/280 all-silica fibers usable over long distances. The immobilized indicator is fixed on a cross-linked styrene/divinyl-benzene copolymer (XADZI). The sensors are constructed so that measurements can be taken either by absorption at many different points in the single optical fiber, or by reflection from the end of the fiber. A wide range of pH values are encountered with radioactive wastes, and experiments are performed either with bromophenol blue (3.0 to 6.0) or a double-indicator (thymol blue) between 0.8 and 3.2, and 9 and 13 pH, as well as other indicators. Lifetimes, reversibility and kinetics are considered. A new low-cost device is proposed for chemical process control and medical applications.

  17. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  18. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  19. Methylene blue related sterile endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, A K E; Ulagantheran V, V; Siow, Y C; Lim, K S

    2008-08-01

    To report a case of methylene blue related endophthalmitis. Observational case report. Review of clinical record, photographs. A 60 year old man developed endophthalmitis after methylene blue was accidentally used to stain the anterior capsule during phacoemulsification of cataract. His left visual acuity deteriorated from 6/12 to 6/36 two weeks after the operation. Despite intensive treatment with topical and intravitreal antibiotics, his condition deteriorated. A vitrectomy and silicone oil injection eventually managed to control the progression of the disease and salvage the eye. However the visual outcome remained poor due to corneal decompensation and retinal ischemia. Both vitreous tap and vitreous biopsy were negative for any organism. Methylene blue is extremely toxic to ocular structures and should not be used intraocularly. PMID:19248701

  20. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  1. The blue-collar brain.

    PubMed

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  2. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  3. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  4. The Blue-Collar Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body’s tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  5. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  6. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  7. Brain Responses to Violet, Blue, and Green Monochromatic Light Exposures in Humans: Prominent Role of Blue Light and the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Vandewalle, Gilles; Schmidt, Christina; Albouy, Geneviève; Sterpenich, Virginie; Darsaud, Annabelle; Rauchs, Géraldine; Berken, Pierre-Yves; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s) monochromatic violet (430 nm), blue (473 nm), and green (527 nm) light exposures of equal photon flux (1013ph/cm2/s) while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. Conclusion/Significance These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function. PMID:18043754

  8. Fiber optic evanescent field sensors for pH monitoring in civil infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Vimer, Cristian S.

    2002-06-01

    Fiber optic pH sensors based on the evanescent field spectroscopic technique is studied. Portions of poly (-methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cladding of plastic clad silica (PCS) optical fibers are replaced with new cladding composed of PMMA doped with a pH sensitive chromophore. Methyl Red, Thymol Blue, Thymolphtalein are used for sensing pH at the acid, neutral and base levels. Changes in the pH of the analyte are detected by measuring the absorption spectrum of the new cladding in the sensing region of the optical fiber.

  9. PhD and the Manager's Dream: Professionalising the Students, the Degree and the Supervisors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    This article has two main aims: to analyse relevant literature on the doctoral degree, and to assess whether recent funding changes in the UK have changed the nature of the PhD in the social sciences in a research-intensive and prestigious UK university. Data were collected at BlueSkies University where interviews with social sciences PhD…

  10. Blue light hazard and aniridia.

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, R. V.; Dickinson, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    The fundi of three patients with aniridia were photographed with a 470 nm illuminating light source. No apparent change in contrast was observable throughout the macular region. This would suggest an absence of the macular pigment. The likelihood of aniridics being more susceptible than normal persons to blue light damage is discussed. Images PMID:3978071

  11. Singing' the Black and Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane

    2004-01-01

    It is so obvious that the sky is blue in the daytime and black at night, but it took the smartest humans thousands of years of observation, thought, discussion, conjecture, and analysis to finally come up with answers that make scientific sense as to why the sky is these colors. This article discusses light and the scientific research…

  12. Flying the Blue Ribbon Flag.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Lynda

    2000-01-01

    Guntersville Elementary School, a preK-2 school in Alabama, earned the U.S. Department of Education's Blue Ribbon Schools award through creative programs addressing school readiness, parent education, and the need for extended-day and summer activities; a progressive curriculum; and various community partnerships. (SV)

  13. The Taos Blue Lake Ceremony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodine, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Blue Lake Ceremony of the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. Reproduces the 1906 account of the ceremony by anthropologist Matilda Coxe Stevenson and notes modern verification and change. Discusses the importance of this annual August pilgrimage and initiation rite to the preservation of Taos culture. (SV)

  14. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  15. A Colorful Mixing Experiment in a Stirred Tank Using Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujilo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecillia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballesca´-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Marion Moise´s

    2014-01-01

    A simple experiment designed to study mixing of a material of complex rheology in a stirred tank is described. Non-Newtonian suspensions of blue maize flour that naturally contain anthocyanins have been chosen as a model fluid. These anthocyanins act as a native, wide spectrum pH indicator exhibiting greenish colors in alkaline environments, blue…

  16. Red Shoe-Blue Shoe: An Acid-Base Demonstration with a Fashionable Twist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breyer, Arthur C.; Uzelmeier, Calvin E.

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates that acid-base indicators come in many forms and the reversible effects that acids and bases have on the colors of such indicators. An object is dyed in an indicator, which causes the object to turn dark blue at pH less than 3.0 to 5.0. Suggests using dyeable fabric shoes and other cotton articles. (PVD)

  17. The Blues Poetry of Langston Hughes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Edward E.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the criteria of the blues as an American art form. He then shows how Langston Hughes captures the mood, the feeling, the rhythm and the impact of the blues in his poetry. (Author/LF)

  18. Practical utility of the blue spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    Some aspects of multispectral photography in the blue region are discussed briefly, and sample images are submitted to demonstrate the potential utility of the blue multispectral record for oceanography.

  19. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  20. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  1. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  2. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  3. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  4. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  5. Specific staining of nuclei with aqueous solutions of celestin blue B and gallocyanine.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M K

    1982-09-01

    This paper presents methods for specific staining of nuclei with aqueous solutions of celestin blue B and gallocyanine in tissue sections from which RNA has been extracted selectively with concentrated phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20 min or by hydrolysis in 6 N HCl at 28 degrees C for 15 min. It has been found that pH of the freshly prepared celestin blue B dye solution is 3.0 and that of an aqueous solution of gallocyanine is 2.8. These pHs can be lowered to 1.5 with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid and at this pH staining of the nuclei is possible. But with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid and at this pH staining of the nuclei is possible. But if the pHs are lowered with concentrated hydrochloric or phosphoric acid, effective use of these dyes is not possible. It has been suggested that some dispersion of the two dyes takes place with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid which are used to lower the pH. Staining of the nuclei is also possible with an aqueous solution of celestin blue B at pH 3.0 but the same is not possible with gallocyanine at pH 2.8. The absorption spectra of nuclei stained with an aqueous solution of celestin blue B at pH 1.5 and 3.0 are fairly identical, the peak of maximum absorption being at 620 nm. Those of nuclei stained with an aqueous solution of gallocyanine reveal irregular peaks. Possible implications of these findings have been discussed. PMID:6183561

  6. On Seeing Reddish Green and Yellowish Blue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Hewitt D.; Piantanida, Thomas P.

    1983-01-01

    Stabilization of the retinal image of the boundary between a pair of red/green or yellow/blue stripes, but not their outer edges, results in the entire region being perceived simultaneously as both red/green or yellow/blue. This suggests that the percepts of reddish-green/yellowish-blue apparently are possible in corticocortical color vision…

  7. Dynamic, equilibrium and human studies of adsorption of 201Tl by Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Pathak, D P; Singh, A K

    2006-03-01

    Prussian blue is the recommended but infrequently required antidote for radiocesium and thallium chemical poisoning. Conceivably, its most frequent application will be the decontamination of radiothallium (thallous chloride) from human body following myocardial scintigraphy. Dosage schedule and physicochemical parameters of interaction with radiothallium, however, need to be defined, as the known data is inadequate on this account. The objective of the present study is to create physiologically relevant and mathematically rigorous data on interaction of Prussian blue with Tl, to estimate dosage schedule of Prussian blue suitable for myocardial scintigraphy, and to perform preliminary human studies to evaluate the efficacy of the antidote in reducing the considerable radiation burden imparted by this radiotracer. Adsorption efficacy of Prussian blue for radiothallium was found to be more than 95% at basic (intestinal) pH even at low concentrations and in presence of the physiological cations, potassium and sodium. Isotherm analysis and derivations using Langmuir, Bajpai, Lagergreen, and Freundlich equations suggest a favorable adsorption of Tl on Prussian blue with qmax being 5,000 MBq g. Based on these findings and clinical considerations, particularly preferential gall bladder excretion and enterohepatic recycling of radioactive thallous chloride, a dose of 100 mg Prussian blue with every major meal for 3 days was considered adequate for the purpose. Our experience with the first two patients (serving as their own self-controls) suggests that Prussian blue therapy is a safe and effective method to significantly reduce radiation burden imparted by thallium myocardial scintigraphy. PMID:16505622

  8. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... on September 3, 2010 (75 FR 54187). The workers supply claims processing services and customer... Employment and Training Administration Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc... Adjustment Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield,...

  9. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The Physics of the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  11. Food habits of blue grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.

    1944-01-01

    The food habits of Blue Grouse vary from a simple winter diet that is made up predominantly of coniferous needles to a complex diet during the summer months, characterized by great variety of foods including green leaves, fruits and seeds, flowers, animal matter and coniferous needles. The spring and fall, which represent the transition periods between these two, are characterized by feeding habits that are generally intermediate. The diets of the two species of Blue Grouse, Dendrugapus obscurus and Dendragapus juliginosus, are quite similar as far as major types of food are concerned, but they differ considerably in the species that are taken. Such differences reflect differences in the vegetation within the ecologic and geographic ranges occupied by the two species.

  12. Ol' Blue Eyes, in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Scholarly books with "identity" and "culture" in the title have loomed large on academic publishing lists for several years. Scholarly books with "Sinatra" in the title are a more recent phenomenon. Despite his six-decade career as the Voice (the 1940s), the Chairman of the Board (the 50s and 60s), and Ol' Blue Eyes (the 70s through his death, in…

  13. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  14. Models of Individual Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Alison

    This chapter describes the current state of models of individual blue stragglers. Stellar collisions, binary mergers (or coalescence), and partial or ongoing mass transfer have all been studied in some detail. The products of stellar collisions retain memory of their parent stars and are not fully mixed. Very high initial rotation rates must be reduced by an unknown process to allow the stars to collapse to the main sequence. The more massive collision products have shorter lifetimes than normal stars of the same mass, while products between low mass stars are long-lived and look very much like normal stars of their mass. Mass transfer can result in a merger, or can produce another binary system with a blue straggler and the remnant of the original primary. The products of binary mass transfer cover a larger portion of the colour-magnitude diagram than collision products for two reasons: there are more possible configurations which produce blue stragglers, and there are differing contributions to the blended light of the system. The effects of rotation may be substantial in both collision and merger products, and could result in significant mixing unless angular momentum is lost shortly after the formation event. Surface abundances may provide ways to distinguish between the formation mechanisms, but care must be taken to model the various mixing mechanisms properly before drawing strong conclusions. Avenues for future work are outlined.

  15. The Cryptochrome Blue Light Receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuhong; Liu, Hongtao; Klejnot, John; Lin, Chentao

    2010-09-23

    Cryptochromes are photolyase-like blue light receptors originally discovered in Arabidopsis but later found in other plants, microbes, and animals. Arabidopsis has two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, which mediate primarily blue light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and photoperiodic control of floral initiation, respectively. In addition, cryptochromes also regulate over a dozen other light responses, including circadian rhythms, tropic growth, stomata opening, guard cell development, root development, bacterial and viral pathogen responses, abiotic stress responses, cell cycles, programmed cell death, apical dominance, fruit and ovule development, seed dormancy, and magnetoreception. Cryptochromes have two domains, the N-terminal PHR (Photolyase-Homologous Region) domain that bind the chromophore FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the CCE (CRY C-terminal Extension) domain that appears intrinsically unstructured but critical to the function and regulation of cryptochromes. Most cryptochromes accumulate in the nucleus, and they undergo blue light-dependent phosphorylation or ubiquitination. It is hypothesized that photons excite electrons of the flavin molecule, resulting in redox reaction or circular electron shuttle and conformational changes of the photoreceptors. The photoexcited cryptochrome are phosphorylated to adopt an open conformation, which interacts with signaling partner proteins to alter gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and consequently the metabolic and developmental programs of plants. PMID:21841916

  16. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  17. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  18. Inflation and alternatives with blue tensor spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Xue, Wei E-mail: wei.xue@sissa.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the tilt of the primordial gravitational waves spectrum. A hint of blue tilt is shown from analyzing the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR data. Motivated by this, we explore the possibilities of blue tensor spectra from the very early universe cosmology models, including null energy condition violating inflation, inflation with general initial conditions, and string gas cosmology, etc. For the simplest G-inflation, blue tensor spectrum also implies blue scalar spectrum. In general, the inflation models with blue tensor spectra indicate large non-Gaussianities. On the other hand, string gas cosmology predicts blue tensor spectrum with highly Gaussian fluctuations. If further experiments do confirm the blue tensor spectrum, non-Gaussianity becomes a distinguishing test between inflation and alternatives.

  19. Polish Terms for "Blue" in the Perspective of Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanulewicz, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    The Polish set of terms for blue includes, inter alia, the following adjectives: "niebieski" "blue", "blekitny" "(sky) blue", "granatowy" "navy blue", "lazurowy" "azure", "modry" "(intense) blue" and "siny" "(grey) violet-blue". The adjective "niebieski" is the basic term; however, it shares some of its functions with "blekitny", which is…

  20. Methylene blue doped polymers: efficient media for optical recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushamani, M.; Sreekumar, K.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Joseph, R.

    2004-05-01

    Polymer materials find application in optical storage technology, namely in the development of high information density and fast access type memories. A new polymer blend of methylene blue sensitized polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) in methanol is prepared and characterized and its comparison with methylene blue sensitized PVA in methanol and complexed methylene blue sensitized polyvinyl chloride (CMBPVC) is presented. The optical absorption spectra of the thin films of these polymers showed a strong and broad absorption region at 670-650 nm, matching the wavelength of the laser used. A very slow recovery of the dye on irradiation was observed when a 7:3 blend of polyvinyl alcohol/polyacrylic acid at a pH of 3.8 and a sensitizer concentration of 4.67 · 10-5 g/ml were used. A diffraction efficiency of up to 20% was observed for the MBPVA/alcohol system and an energetic sensitivity of 2000 mJ/cm2 was obtained in the photosensitive films with a spatial frequency of 588 lines/mm.

  1. Glucosylceramide modulates endolysosomal pH in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sillence, Dan J

    2013-06-01

    GlcCer accumulation causes Gaucher disease where GlcCer breakdown is inhibited due to a hereditary deficiency in glucocerebrosidase. Glycolipids are endocytosed and targeted to the Golgi apparatus in normal cells but in Gaucher disease they are mistargeted to lysosomes. To better understand the role of GlcCer in endocytic sorting RAW macrophages were treated with Conduritol B-epoxide to inhibit GlcCer breakdown. Lipid analysis found increases in GlcCer led to accumulation of both triacylglycerol and cholesterol consistent with increased lysosomal pH. Ratio imaging of macrophages using both acridine orange and lysosensor yellow/blue to measure endolysosomal pH revealed increases in Conduritol B-epoxide treated RAW macrophages and Gaucher patient lymphoblasts. Increased endolysosomal pH was restricted to Gaucher lymphoblasts as no significant increases in pH were seen in Fabry, Krabbe, Tay-Sachs and GM1-gangliosidosis lymphoblasts. Substrate reduction therapy utilises inhibitors of GlcCer synthase to reduce storage in Gaucher disease. The addition of inhibitors of GlcCer synthesis to RAW macrophages also led to increases in cholesterol and triacylglycerol and an endolysosomal pH increase of up to 1 pH unit. GlcCer modulation appears specific since glucosylsphingosine but not galactosylsphingosine reversed the effects of GlcCer depletion. Although no acute effects on glycolipid trafficking were observed using bafilomycin A the results are consistent with a multistep model whereby increases in pH lead to altered trafficking via cholesterol accumulation. GlcCer modulates endolysosomal pH in lymphocytes suggesting an important role in normal lysosomes which may be disrupted in Gaucher disease. PMID:23628459

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Plate-Like Titanate/cobalt Blue Pigment Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Liu, Xiangwen; Goto, Takahiro; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2012-06-01

    Plate-like titanate/cobalt blue pigment composite was successfully synthesized by mixing cobalt blue (CoAl2O4) pigment nanoparticles with plate-like lepidocrocite-type potassium lithium titanate (K0.8Li0.27Ti1.73O4, PLT) microparticles in water in order to improve the comfort and covering ability when applied on skin as cosmetics. PLT was synthesized by KCl flux method at 1000°C for 5 h using K2CO3, Li2CO3 and TiO2 as starting materials, while CoAl2O4 nanoparticle was synthesized by mixing Co(NO3)2 ṡ 6H2O and Al(NO3)3 ṡ 9H2O with the molar ratio of Co:Al 1:6 at pH 9 followed by calcination at 1000°C for 1 h. The morphology of the PLT/CoAl2O4 composite strongly depended on the solution pH. Since in a low pH solution, the surface of PLT was negatively charged, while that of cobalt blue was positively charged, CoAl2O4 nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of PLT by electrostatic attraction force. PLT/CoAl2O4 composites obtained showed nice feeling, high flickering pearlescent, excellent UV-shielding characteristic and novel blue color.

  3. White versus blue: Does the wild 'albino' bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) differ in fruit quality compared to the blue one?

    PubMed

    Zorenc, Zala; Veberic, Robert; Stampar, Franci; Koron, Darinka; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja

    2016-11-15

    Wild albino and blue bilberry fruit were analyzed to compare different fruit characteristics linked to the composition of primary and secondary metabolites. Compounds were identified using HPLC-MS and standard quality parameters were determined. Albino berries were significantly smaller, accumulated less water and were characterized by 23% higher dry weight. Soluble solids content and pH value were higher in albino bilberry and their surface was lighter and characterized by a yellow hue. Both bilberry forms accumulated identical individual sugars and organic acids; however, the albino form had 33% higher content of total sugars and 9% higher content of total organic acids compared to the blue type. Fifteen anthocyanins were identified in both forms, but in albino bilberries, individual anthocyanins were only detected in traces. Blue bilberry contained 1.6-fold higher levels of flavanols, 2.1-fold higher levels of flavonols, 2.5-fold higher levels of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and consequently, 4.6-fold higher total phenolic content. PMID:27283708

  4. Uncovering blue diffuse dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-04-01

    Extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies are known to be very rare, despite the large numbers of low-mass galaxies predicted by the local galaxy luminosity function. This paper presents a subsample of galaxies that were selected via a morphology-based search on Sloan Digital Sky Survey images with the aim of finding these elusive XMP galaxies. By using the recently discovered XMP galaxy, Leo P, as a guide, we obtained a collection of faint, blue systems, each with isolated H II regions embedded in a diffuse continuum, that have remained optically undetected until now. Here we show the first results from optical spectroscopic follow-up observations of 12 of ˜100 of these blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies yielded by our search algorithm. Oxygen abundances were obtained via the direct method for eight galaxies, and found to be in the range 7.45 < 12 + log (O/H) < 8.0, with two galaxies being classified as XMPs. All BDDs were found to currently have a young star-forming population (<10 Myr) and relatively high ionization parameters of their H II regions. Despite their low luminosities (-11 ≲ MB ≲ -18) and low surface brightnesses (˜23-25 mag arcsec-2), the galaxies were found to be actively star forming, with current star formation rates between 0.0003 and 0.078 M⊙ yr-1. From our current subsample, BDD galaxies appear to be a population of non-quiescent dwarf irregular galaxies, or the diffuse counterparts to blue compact galaxies and as such may bridge the gap between these two populations. Our search algorithm demonstrates that morphology-based searches are successful in uncovering more diffuse metal-poor star-forming galaxies, which traditional emission-line-based searches overlook.

  5. The mixing of blue stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella; De Propris, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution spectroscopy for a sample of 17 blue stragglers in M67, in order to measure abundances of Beryllium, Carbon, Oxygen and the Carbon isotope (13C/12C) abundance ratio. The main aim of this project is to measure indications of deep mixing and therefore elucidate the processes responsible for the formation of these stars, whether stellar collisions, WUMa type mass transfer or Algol-like binary evolution. The data will also allow us to measure the importance of magnetic fields and search for faint companions via their effect on other spectral lines

  6. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  7. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  8. The Blue Marble 43 Years Later

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    article title:  The Blue Marble 43 Years Later View larger image Here ... points over more than four decades apart. The iconic "Blue Marble" view on the left was taken 43 years ago on December 7, 1972 from Apollo ... points over more than four decades apart. The iconic "Blue Marble" view on the left was taken 43 years ago on December 7, 1972 from Apollo ...

  9. The Blue Dots Initiative and Roadmapping Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudé du Foresto, V.

    2010-10-01

    The Blue Dots initiative (a grassroot effort to build a scientific community in Europe around the exoplanet theme) is introduced. The Blue Dots activities include the elaboration of a roadmap towards the spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets, a summary of which is presented here. While the roadmap will need to be updated regularly, it is expected that the methodology developed within Blue Dots will provide a durable framework for the elaboration of future revisions.

  10. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  11. Polymer stabilized and dispersed blue phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemiklioglu, Emine

    Blue phase liquid crystal (BPLC) materials have potential for advanced applications of display material and technology based on their optical behaviors, such as field-induced birefringence and sub-millisecond response time, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than the present nematic liquid crystal based displays. Since blue phases appear in the narrow temperature range between the chiral nematic and the isotropic phases, there is a temperature range limitation for the application of blue phase liquid crystal. In this dissertation, we have developed blue phase liquid crystal materials with a wide temperature range and low driving voltage. The first goal was to develop wide-temperature range blue phase liquid crystal materials using several stabilization methods notably polymer stabilization, doping of carbon-nanotubes and bent-core molecules. The temperature range could be expanded more than 54°C via the polymer stabilization. The second goal was to explore the polymer dispersed blue phase liquid crystal combining the advantages of the polymer dispersion method and blue phase materials. Polymer encapsulated blue phase films showed a large Kerr constant, low switching voltage and fast response time. Moreover, the temperature range of encapsulated blue phase films were successfully expanded from 9°C to 54°C .

  12. Optically tuneable blue phase photonic band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Lin, T.-H.; Liu, J.-H.

    2010-03-22

    This study investigates an optically switchable band gap of photonic crystal that is based on an azobenzene-doped liquid crystal blue phase. The trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene deforms the cubic unit cell of the blue phase and shifts the photonic band gap. The fast back-isomerization of azobenzene was induced by irradiation with different wavelengths light. The crystal structure is verified using Kossel diffraction diagram. An optically addressable blue phase display, based on Bragg reflection from the photonic band gap, is also demonstrated. The tunable ranges are around red, green, and blue wavelengths and exhibit a bright saturated color.

  13. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  14. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  15. Characteristics of blue organic light emitting diodes with different thick emitting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chong; Tsuboi, Taiju; Huang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated blue organic light emitting diodes (called blue OLEDs) with emitting layer (EML) of diphenylanthracene derivative 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) doped with blue-emitting DSA-ph (1-4-di-[4-(N,N-di-phenyl)amino]styryl-benzene) to investigate how the thickness of EML and hole injection layer (HIL) influences the electroluminescence characteristics. The driving voltage was observed to increase with increasing EML thickness from 15 nm to 70 nm. The maximum external quantum efficiency of 6.2% and the maximum current efficiency of 14 cd/A were obtained from the OLED with 35 nm thick EML and 75 nm thick HIL. High luminance of 120,000 cd/m2 was obtained at 7.5 V from OLED with 15 nm thick EML.

  16. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  17. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  18. Blue collection bag after ileal diversion.

    PubMed

    Hildreth, T A; Cass, A S

    1978-02-01

    Five children with ileal diversions have shown asymptomatic blue staining of the urine collection bags. A tryptophan derivative (indican) in the urine that oxidizes to indigo blue on exposure to air is thought to be the cause of this benign transient phenomenon. PMID:628994

  19. Delta Blues Scholarship and Imperialist Nostalgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, William P.

    When Delta blues are considered to be "folk music," the genre is inextricably tied to the neocolonial, sharecropping system of cotton production characteristic of the Mississippi Delta region between the Civil War and World War II. "Imperialist nostalgia," then, arises in accounts which pay primary and positive tribute to blues performances…

  20. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  1. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1in L929 fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuipers, David P.; Praamsma, Riemer C.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  2. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  3. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  4. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  5. Elementary theorems regarding blue isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-04-01

    Blue CDM-photon isocurvature perturbations are attractive in terms of observability and may be typical from the perspective of generic mass relations in supergravity. We present and apply three theorems useful for blue isocurvature perturbations arising from linear spectator scalar fields. In the process, we give a more precise formula for the blue spectrum associated with the axion model of Kasuya and Kawasaki [Axion Isocurvature Fluctuations with Extremely Blue Spectrum, Phys. Rev. D 80, 023516 (2009).], which can in a parametric corner give a factor of O (10 ) correction. We explain how a conserved current associated with Peccei-Quinn symmetry plays a crucial role and explicitly plot several example spectra including the breaks in the spectra. We also resolve a little puzzle arising from a naive multiplication of isocurvature expression that sheds light on the gravitational imprint of the adiabatic perturbations on the fields responsible for blue isocurvature fluctuations.

  6. Blue/white organic light-emitting diodes and passive matrix display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Lin; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhu, Wen-Qing; Xu, Shao-Hong

    2005-01-01

    The blue organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on anthracene derivatives (ADN) doped with distryrylarylene derivatives (BCzVB and DSA-ph) were presented. The device of ADN doped with BCzVb shows high color purity (x=0.146, y=0.162) with maximum luminance 11600 cd/m2 (15V), current efficiency 2.8 cd/A, while the device of ADN doped with DSA-ph exhibits a sky blue with as high as efficiency 8.29 cd/A, both have a flat efficiency vs current density responses. A typical blue device of ADN doped with TBPe is used for comparison, which gives greenish blue and a stronger current-induced flyorescence quenching. Three kinds of White organic light emitting devices (WOLED) with different dopants and doping sites were constructed. The cell with a single-doped red dye in the light emitting layer (EML)(single-doped) and the cell with both red and blue dyes doped in a single EML (double-doped as well as the cell with red and blue dyes doped in EML and a green dye in another layer (triple-doped). The triple-doped cell shows much higher performance than other two cells: maximum luminance 21200cd/m2, 1026 cd/m2 at driving current 20mA/cm2, efficiency 6cd/A and a half lifetime over 22245h were reached. A passive display features 102x64 pixels with pixel size of 0.25x0.25mm2 pixel pitch 0.08mm, luminance 100 cd/m2 at driving duty 1/64, and power consumption of 0.6W was constructed.

  7. Removal of Methylene Blue and Orange-G from Waste Water Using Magnetic Biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, N. M.; Fo, Y. T.; Al-Salim, Hikmat Said; Sahu, J. N.; Abdullah, E. C.; Nizamuddin, S.; Jayakumar, N. S.; Ganesan, P.

    2015-04-01

    The study on the removal of methylene blue (MB) and orange-G dyes using magnetic biochar derived from the empty fruit bunch (EFB) was carried out. Process parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage, agitation speed and contact time were optimized using Design-Expert Software v.6.0.8. The statistical analysis reveals that the optimum conditions for the maximum adsorption of MB are at pH 2 and pH 10, dosage 1.0 g, and agitation speed and contact time of 125 rpm and 120 min respectively. While for orange-G, at pH 2, dosage 1.0 g, and agitation speed and contact time of 125 rpm and 120 min respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of 31.25 mg/g and 32.36 mg/g for MB and orange-G respectively. The adsorption kinetic for both dyes obeyed pseudo-second order.

  8. Photo-degradation of methylene blue using Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Jizhou; Li Aidong; Li Xiangyu; Zhai Haifa; Zhang Wenqi; Gong Youpin; Li Hui; Wu Di

    2010-06-15

    A photocatalyst of Ta-doped ZnO was prepared by a modified Pechini-type method. The structural, morphological properties and photocatalytic activity of 1 mol % Ta-doped ZnO samples annealed at different temperatures were characterized. The photo-oxidation of methylene blue under the visible-light irradiation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. It is found that the photocatalysis of 1% Ta-doped ZnO annealed at 700 {sup o}C showed excellent performance of the photodegradation of methylene blue, which was attributed to a competitive trade-off among the crystallinity, surface hydroxyl groups, and specific surface area. The processing parameter such as the pH value also played an important role in tuning the photocatalytic activity. The maximum photodecomposed rate was achieved at pH=8, and an novel model about the absorption of methylene blue on the surface of the catalysts was proposed. - Graphical abstract: This model describes the adsorption between the amphoteric behavior of the metal oxide and the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) on the surface of the catalyst at the acidic and alkaline condition.

  9. Simulation of dye adsorption by beech sawdust as affected by pH.

    PubMed

    Batzias, F A; Sidiras, D K

    2007-03-22

    The effect of pH on the batch kinetics of methylene blue adsorption on beech sawdust was simulated, in order to evaluate sawdust potential use as low cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal. The zero point of charge pH(pzc) of the sawdust, in order to explain the effect of pH in terms of pH(pzc), was measured by the mass titration and the automatic titration methods. The adsorption capacity, estimated according to Freundlich's model, indicate that increase of the pH enhances the adsorption behaviour of the examined material. The lower adsorption of methylene blue at acidic pH is due to the presence of excess H(+) ions that compete with the dye cation for adsorption sites. As the pH of the system increases, the number of positively charged sites decreases while the number of the negatively charged sites increases. The negatively charged sites favour the adsorption of dye cation due to electrostatic attraction. The increase in initial pH from 8.0 to 11.5 increases the amount of dye adsorbed. PMID:16934396

  10. Design and characterization of a plastic optical fiber pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Licínio; Simões, Pedro; Carvalho, Rui S.; Lopes, Paulo; Ferreira, Mário

    2013-11-01

    In this paper are present the design and characterization of a pH sensor using plastic optical fiber (POF) technology and a material produced by the sol-gel process with TEOS (tetraethyl orthosilicate) to immobilize universal indicator of pH (comprised of Thymol Blue, Methyl Red, Bromothymol Blue and Phenolphthalein) inside the silica matrix. This matrix is positioned between two extensions of plastic optical fiber tightly positioned at each side with both fibers aligned and sharing a common optical axis. This set will work as a pH sensor since the matrix embedded with indicator and in the presence of a solution (basic or acid solution) will change the optical transmittance properties. The optical source is a superluminescent white LED and the receiver is a photodiode having a good and linear responsivity in the visible spectrum. This pH sensitive matrix has large pores which allow the diffusion of the surrounding fluid molecules into the matrix and thus the close contact of these to the indicator molecules. This contact causes the change of color of the whole matrix allowing proper colorimetric detection by the photodiode. This variation of color associated with the detector wavelength linear response is the base of operation of the proposed device. This pH sensor presents many advantages over the standard and commercial pH meters namely, lightweight, portability and a low cost.

  11. A wearable fingernail chemical sensing platform: pH sensing at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Cho, Thomas N; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Wang, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    This article demonstrates an example of a wearable chemical sensor based on a fingernail platform. Fingernails represent an attractive wearable platform, merging beauty products with chemical sensing, to enable monitoring of our surrounding environment. The new colorimetric pH fingernail sensor relies on coating artificial nails with a recognition layer consisted of pH indicators entrapped in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. Such color changing fingernails offer fast and reversible response to pH changes, repeated use, and intense color change detected easily with naked eye. The PVC matrix prevents leaching out of the indicator molecules from the fingernail sensor toward such repeated use. The limited narrow working pH range of a single pH indicator has been addressed by multiplexing three different pH indicators: bromothymol blue (pH 6.0-7.6), bromocresol green (pH 3.8-5.4), and cresol red (pH 7.2-8.8), as demonstrated for analyses of real-life samples of acidic, neutral, and basic character. The new concept of an optical wearable chemical sensor on fingernail platforms can be expanded towards diverse analytes for various applications in connection to the judicious design of the recognition layer. PMID:26838451

  12. X-ray Photochemistry of Prussian Blue Cellulosic Materials: Evidence for a Substrate-Mediated Redox Process.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Claire; Languille, Marie-Angélique; Moretti, Giulia; Réguer, Solenn

    2015-07-28

    Beside its promising applications in the design of multifunctional materials, batteries and biosensors, the pigment Prussian blue is still studied in heritage science because of its capricious fading behavior due to a complex light-induced redox mechanism. We studied model heritage materials composed of Prussian blue embedded into a cellulosic fiber substrate by means of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Significant X-ray radiation damage was observed and characterized. X-ray radiation induced first a reduction of Prussian blue, in a similar way to what visible light does, followed by a complete degradation of the pigment and the formation of iron(III) oxyhydroxide. We took advantage of this X-ray photochemistry to investigate in depth the redox behavior of Prussian blue. We could particularly demonstrate that the rate, extent, and quality of Prussian blue photoreduction can be tuned by modifying the pH and alkali cation content of the cellulosic substrate. The present study represents a step further in the understanding of Prussian blue heritage materials from an electrochemical viewpoint and provides evidence of substrate-mediated photochemistry applicable to a wider class of Prussian blue composite materials. PMID:26125282

  13. Cool Stars Sing the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttermoser, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    A high-dispersion spectral atlas of cool red giant stars in the blue and violet is presented. The spectra were obtained over a six-year time period with the stellar spectrograph of the McMath-Pierce Telescope on Kitt Peak. Both N-type carbon stars and M-type oxygen-rich stars are presented from 3900 to 4600 Å, with the M-type stars containing both semiregular and Mira-type variables. The dominant absorption features in these stars at these wavelength result primarily from neutral metals, especially iron, and the CH and CN diatomic molecules. The Miras also show strong emission lines during some of their pulsation cycle. Many of these emission lines result from fluorescence from the Mg II h & k lines in the UV. For these fluoresced features, comparisons are made between the Miras and the semiregular carbon-rich and oxygen-rich variables. Where the oxygen-rich semiregulars show no hint of fluorescence in these features, the carbon stars show a definite ``filling-in'' of the absorption lines.

  14. Semiconducting layered blue phosphorus: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David

    2014-05-01

    We investigate a previously unknown phase of phosphorus that shares its layered structure and high stability with the black phosphorus allotrope. We find the in-plane hexagonal structure and bulk layer stacking of this structure, which we call "blue phosphorus," to be related to graphite. Unlike graphite and black phosphorus, blue phosphorus displays a wide fundamental band gap. Still, it should exfoliate easily to form quasi-two-dimensional structures suitable for electronic applications. We study a likely transformation pathway from black to blue phosphorus and discuss possible ways to synthesize the new structure. PMID:24836265

  15. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  16. Blue jays nest in an unusual structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin L.; Lyons, Curtis P.; Sedgwick, James A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a successful Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) nest in an unusual structure on the side of a building.  The nest was located near the edge of the species' range along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  The nest was completely obvious, suggesting that the structure itself provided adequate cover and sercurity for the jays.  Blue Jays appear to be declining in some areas of the United States such as the Southeast.  Structures such as the one we describe may be more useful in attracting Blue Jays than the nesting platforms available commercially.

  17. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; Sulentic, J. W.; Stirpe, G. M.; Dultzin, D.; Del Olmo, A.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    [OIII]λ 5007 "blue outliers"—that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars—appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40~% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate z sample of 52 sources qualify as "blue outliers" (i.e., quasars with [OIII]λλ 4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of "blue outliers" to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  18. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  19. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  20. Blue Ribbon Panel Report - BRP - Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Blue Ribbon Panel Report outlines 10 recommendations to accelerate progress against cancer. The panel was established to ensure that the Cancer Moonshot's approaches are grounded in the best science.

  1. Blue Origin Tests BE-3 Engine

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin successfully fires the thrust chamber assembly for its new 100,000 pound thrust BE-3 liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen rocket engine. As part of the company's Reusable Booster System (RBS)...

  2. Blue Ribbon Panel 2016 Video Playlist

    Cancer.gov

    Blue Ribbon Panel members discuss recommendations from the panel report that was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7, 2016. The playlist includes an overview video and 10 videos on the specific recommendations.

  3. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-09-01

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  4. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Stones Urinalysis Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  5. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  6. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  7. Blue irradiance intercomparison in the medical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Antonio F. G.

    2012-10-01

    This work presents the results of a blue irradiance intercomparison among industrial laboratories of medical devices companies. This intercomparison aims to support the metrological issues of medical equipment manufactures regarding the blue irradiance infant phototherapy equipment requirements on the international standard IEC 60601-2-50:2000. The results showed a low agreement of participants' measurements according to normalized error criterion. The major explanation for this result is associated to an incorrect equipment choice and long recalibration period.

  8. Studies on plasma processing of blue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, S. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Mishra, B.

    2015-02-01

    Plasma smelting was carried out using blue dust and petroleum coke mixtures for five different compositions. By altering percentage of reductant and type of plasma forming gas, recovery rate and degree of metallization were calculated in order to examine the extent of reduction of blue dust. The products were characterized by XRD and optical microscopy techniques. The results of these investigations exhibited that highest degree of metallization and recovery rate of about 98% and 86% respectively, were achieved for nitrogen plasma smelted products.

  9. Barium Enhancement in NGC 6819 Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliman, Katelyn; Mathieu, Robert D.; Schuler, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Possible formation pathways for blue straggler stars include mergers in hierarchical triple systems, stellar collisions during dynamical encounters, and mass transfer from a giant companion. Extensive work on the blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 188 (7 Gyr) has led to exciting discoveries including a binary secondary mass distribution peaked at 0.5 MSolar and the detection of three young white dwarf binary companions. These indicate that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star is the dominant mechanism for blue straggler formation in open clusters. Such mass transfer events should pollute the surface abundance of the blue straggler with nucleosynthesis products from the evolved donor. The other formation pathways, mergers and collisions, are predicted to produce no such enhancements. In an effort to move beyond NGC 188 and into other open clusters we present the first results of a surface abundance study of the blue stragglers in the intermediate-aged open cluster NGC 6819 (2.5 Gyr) using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. This part of our study centers on the s-process element barium as a tracer of formation via mass transfer. We compare the blue straggler surface abundance of barium to that of a sample of main-sequence stars in NGC 6819 and find multiple blue stragglers with anomalous abundances. Surprising, most of the blue stragglers with barium anomalies show no radial-velocity evidence for a companion. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation under grant AST- 0908082 and the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium.

  10. Axion isocurvature fluctuations with extremely blue spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2009-07-15

    We construct an axion model for generating isocurvature fluctuations with blue spectrum, n{sub iso}=2-4, which is suggested by recent analyses of admixture of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations with independent spectral indices, n{sub ad}{ne}n{sub iso}. The distinctive feature of the model is that the spectrum is blue at large scales while scale invariant at small scales. This is naturally realized by the dynamics of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field.

  11. Stylish or safe blue-block eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciosek, Jerzy

    1998-10-01

    The subject of modern, save and stylish eyewear is entertaining not only to people with unwell eyesight. Many people use glasses with anti-UV or blue-block coatings, glasses for driving or working with a computer. There were investigated the blue-block eyewear. There were analyzed reflected radiation at 300 - 400 nm wavelengths with cross- incidence. The traditional eyewear with classical or stylish frame may not protect sight against the UV radiation.

  12. MitoBlue: a nontoxic and photostable blue-emitting dye that selectively labels functional mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mateo I; Martínez-Costas, José; Mascareñas, José L; Vázquez, M Eugenio

    2014-12-19

    We report the discovery of a fluorogenic dye, N(1),N(3)-di(2-aminidonaphthalen-6-yl) propane-1,3-diamine, MitoBlue, which selectively stains functional mitochondria while displaying low toxicity, bright blue emission, and high resistance to photobleaching. Additionally, we show that a biotin-labeled MitoBlue derivative can be used as a handle for the delivery of streptavidin-tagged species to the mitochondria. PMID:25325672

  13. MitoBlue: A Nontoxic and Photostable Blue-Emitting Dye That Selectively Labels Functional Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a fluorogenic dye, N1,N3-di(2-aminidonaphthalen-6-yl) propane-1,3-diamine, MitoBlue, which selectively stains functional mitochondria while displaying low toxicity, bright blue emission, and high resistance to photobleaching. Additionally, we show that a biotin-labeled MitoBlue derivative can be used as a handle for the delivery of streptavidin-tagged species to the mitochondria. PMID:25325672

  14. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications. PMID:27323169

  15. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  16. [pH sensors based on rubbery ormosils preparation and their spectrum studies].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dai, Yuan-jing; Li, Wei; Zhuang, Zhi-xia; Wang, Xiao-ru

    2002-02-01

    A new type of methyl substituted ormosils as a matrix for bromophenol blue (BPhB) and bromocresol green (BCG) is described. The new ormosils combine features of classical TEOS sol-gel material such as solvability in organic solvent and those of sol-gel glasses such as transparent and a porous structure, the ormosils also make a good mechanical stability. The influence of the conditions during the polymerisation process on the photochemical properties of BPhB and BCG has been studied. This sol-gel material was wed to immobilize pH-sensitive absorption dyes, bromothymol blue and bromocresol green, to prepare pH sensing films. The several aspects of the sensing films, including the leaching of the dye from gel, response time to different pH buffer solution, absorption spectra and the improvement of the immobilization of the dyes to filmo, were also discussed. PMID:12940039

  17. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. PMID:26238330

  18. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  19. Safe thyroidectomy with intraoperative methylene blue spraying

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to minimalize operative complications by spraying of methylene blue stain on thyroid glands and the perithyroidal area. Material and methods The intra-operative methylene blue spraying technique was used prospectively on a total of 56 patients who had undergone primary (not recurrent) thyroid surgery for a variety of thyroid diseases. Bilateral total thyroidectomy was performed in all cases. After superior but before inferior pole ligation, 0.5ml of methylene blue was sprayed over the thyroid lobe and perilober area. Tissues, especially parathyroides, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and the inferior thyroid artery, were identified and evaluated. Results Recurrent laryngeal nerve and arteries were not stained and thus they remained white in all cases while all other tissues were stained blue. Within three minutes parathyroid glands washed out the blue stain and the original yellow color was regained. Thyroid tissue wash-out time was not less than 15 minutes; perithyroideal muscles, tendinous and lipoid structures took no less than 25 minutes. Conclusion The safety of intravascular methylene blue guidance on thyroid surgery is known. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of the spraying technique, a new technique which ensures not only identification of parathyroid glands within three minutes, but also identification of recurrent laryngeal nerves and inferior thyroid arteries. PMID:23148801

  20. Sustained effects of blue light on Streptococcus mutans in regrown biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Berneron, Julie; Steinberg, Doron; Featherstone, John D B; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2016-04-01

    In prior studies, exposure of Streptococcus mutans in biofilm to blue light using high fluences of up to 680 J/cm(2) did not interfere with bacterial capability to reform an initial biofilm; however, a delayed antibacterial effect was observed. Our aim was to determine the sustained effecttts of blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light on the pathogenicity of the newly formed biofilm. S. mutans were grown to form biofilm that was exposed to blue light (wavelengths, 460-480 nm) for 1, 3, and 7 min (equivalent to 37, 112, and 262 J/cm(2), respectively). Then, bacteria were suspended and allowed to regrow into new biofilms. The regrown biofilms were assessed for bacterial quantification by optical density (OD) measurement and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), bacterial viability and extracellular polysaccharide production by fluorescent staining using confocal scanning laser microscopy, acid production by bacteria (acidogenicity), and bacterial survival at low pH (aciduricity) using qPCR. Bacterial growth in the regrown biofilms was increased when samples were previously exposed to light; however, under the confocal microscopy, a higher proportion of dead bacteria and a reduction in polysaccharide production were observed. The acidogenicity from the regrown biofilm was lowered as fluences of light increased. The aciduricity of the regrown biofilm was decreased, meaning less growth of bacteria into biofilm in low pH with increasing fluences. Blue light has sustained effects on S. mutans bacteria grown into new biofilm. Although bacterial growth in biofilm increased, bacterial viability and virulence characteristics were impaired. The cariogenic potential over time of S. mutans previously exposed to blue light when grown on tooth surfaces is yet to be determined. PMID:26796707

  1. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Mostafa Mahmoud Sami; El-Ayouty, Yassin Mahmoud; Piercey-Normore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis. The algal dry weight (DW) was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4mg/g DW, respectively) was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g DW) was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159mg/g DW) was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis. PMID:26991300

  2. Studying Mixing in Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions Using Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballescá-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Newtonian fluids occur in many relevant flow and mixing scenarios at the lab and industrial scale. The addition of acid or basic solutions to a non-Newtonian fluid is not an infrequent operation, particularly in Biotechnology applications where the pH of Non-Newtonian culture broths is usually regulated using this strategy. Methodology and Findings We conducted mixing experiments in agitated vessels using Non-Newtonian blue maize flour suspensions. Acid or basic pulses were injected to reveal mixing patterns and flow structures and to follow their time evolution. No foreign pH indicator was used as blue maize flours naturally contain anthocyanins that act as a native, wide spectrum, pH indicator. We describe a novel method to quantitate mixedness and mixing evolution through Dynamic Color Analysis (DCA) in this system. Color readings corresponding to different times and locations within the mixing vessel were taken with a digital camera (or a colorimeter) and translated to the CIELab scale of colors. We use distances in the Lab space, a 3D color space, between a particular mixing state and the final mixing point to characterize segregation/mixing in the system. Conclusion and Relevance Blue maize suspensions represent an adequate and flexible model to study mixing (and fluid mechanics in general) in Non-Newtonian suspensions using acid/base tracer injections. Simple strategies based on the evaluation of color distances in the CIELab space (or other scales such as HSB) can be adapted to characterize mixedness and mixing evolution in experiments using blue maize suspensions. PMID:25401332

  3. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants. PMID:23411339

  4. Removal of vertigo blue dyes from Batik textile wastewater by adsorption onto activated carbon and coal bottom ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmiyati, L., Puspita Adi; Deni, V.; Robi Indra, S.; Islamica, Dlia; Fuadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Removal of vertigo blue dye from batik textile wastewater was studied by adsorptionprocess onto activated carbon (AC) and coal bottom ash (CBA).The influence of experimental conditions (pH solution, dye concentration, and contact time) were studied on the both adsorbents. At equilibrium conditions, the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir model for carbon active was 6.29mg/g at pH that found to be considerably higher than that obtained for coal bottom ash 3.72mg/g pH 9. From Freundlich model, the maximum adsorption capacity is less for coal bottom ash (pH 9) than that for carbon active (pH4).

  5. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers § 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with § 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  6. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers § 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with § 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  7. [Adsorption of methylene blue onto vanadium-doped magnetite].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Liang; Zhu, Jian-Xi; He, Hong-Ping; Yuan, Peng

    2010-06-01

    A series of vanadium-doped magnetite (Fe3-x VxO4, x < 0.4) synthesized by an oxidation-precipitation method, were characterized using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The obtained results show that the synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 has spinel structure while vanadium mostly replaces Fe3+ in the octahedral sites. The synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 is magnetic material, with crystal size ranging from 28 to 35 nm. The substitution of vanadium in the magnetite structure increases the amount of surface hydroxyls. The experimental adsorption results indicate that, in neutral pH condition, the maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3-x VxO4 increase obviously with the increase of vanadium concentration in magnetite while the adsorption isotherm complies well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on Fe3-x VxO4 can get equilibrium in the first 25 min, supporting a pseudo-second order equation. Moreover, the rise of the solution pH value results in an increase of the adsorption capability of MB on Fe3-x VxO4. PMID:20698274

  8. The inductive-effect of electron withdrawing trifluoromethyl for thermally activated delayed fluorescence: tunable emission from tetra- to penta-carbazole in solution processed blue OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ling; Hu, Jia; Cao, Xudong; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Chao; Tao, Youtian; Zhang, Xinwen; Huang, Wei

    2015-08-21

    The non-conjugated inductive effect of trifluoromethyl (CF3) was found to be a new acceptor instead of other conjugated moieties. Two blue emissive compounds, 4CzCF3Ph and 5CzCF3Ph, were synthesized using a simple catalyst-free C-N coupling reaction. Solution-processed TADF devices based on the 5CzCF3Ph dopant exhibit significantly higher efficiency (11.8 cd A(-1), 5.2%) than 4CzCF3Ph (1.03 cd A(-1), 0.67%) due to the smaller ΔE(ST) value for efficient RISC. PMID:26179717

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the blue pigment VINAMON® Blue BX FW - a phthalocyanine blue in a vinyl glove.

    PubMed

    Weimann, Stefanie; Skudlik, Christoph; John, Swen Malte

    2010-10-01

    A 44-year-old metalworker suffered from severe hand eczema in spite of treatment with corticosteroid ointments. He had been using protective cotton gloves with blue PVC anti-slip dots on the finger tips. On clinical examination, the backs of both hands were erythematous and thickened while the finger tips showed vesicles. There was a positive patch test reaction to the blue PVC dots of an unworn cotton glove at 72, 96, 120 hours. To identify the causative chemicals, we carried out further patch tests using ingredients of the glove and cupric sulfate. The patient reacted to the blue dye VYNAMON(®) Blue BX FW (PB 15) at two concentrations - 10% at 72 and 96 hours, and 50% at 48 and 72 hours. This dye is a very strong and brilliant blue with red-copper tones and resistant to fire and weathering. The cupric-phthalocyanine complexes are used as pigments in cosmetics (e. g. CI 74160, 74180, 74260). To the best of our knowledge, no allergic reactions to this dye have been described, particularly not in gloves. PMID:20163502

  10. Blue holes: Windows into chemical and physical hydrogeologic processes in karst of modern carbonate platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. B.; Gulley, J.; Spellman, P.

    2011-12-01

    Potable water is extracted from thin freshwater lenses that float on saltwater underlying many modern carbonate platforms. Protection of these thin aquifers is critical for the sustainable use of the limited water resources. The fresh water lenses are frequently intersected by dissolution and collapse features, commonly referred to as blue holes in the Bahamas. These features offer windows into physical and chemical processes within and below the freshwater lenses and provide opportunities to study natural and anthropogenic changes to the fresh water quantity and quality. Blue holes also efficiently link surface and subsurface environments and allow fluxes of organic carbon and oxygen into the aquifers. Remineralization of the organic carbon should increase pCO2, reduce pH, and thus enhance dissolution of the aquifer rocks. Enhanced dissolution requires exchange of water between the blue holes and the aquifer porosity, but most modern carbonate platforms have hydraulic gradients as low as 10-5 and lack allogenic recharge, thereby limiting processes to drive exchange. We measured chemical compositions and levels of water in blue holes and wells on San Salvador Island and Rum Cay, Bahamas to develop new techniques to estimate aquifer characteristics and water quality of modern carbonate platforms. On both islands, dampened amplitudes and lags of tides at wells (representing matrix permeability) and blue holes (representing conduit permeability) relative to the ocean indicate approximately 2.5 orders of magnitude greater hydraulic conductivity of conduits than the aquifer matrix. Tidal flow modified by this aquifer heterogeneity exchanges water between blue holes and aquifer rocks at tidal frequency. At Ink Well Blue Hole, on San Salvador Island, organic carbon remineralization is observed as an increase from around 50 to 70 mg/g dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and a decrease in δ13CDIC values from around -10 to -15% with depth across the halocline. This

  11. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  12. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers--a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10,000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12,000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  13. Variations on the "Blue-Bottle" Demonstration Using Food Items That Contain FD&C Blue #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiger, Felicia A.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Campbell, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Erioglaucine dye (FD&C Blue #1) can be used instead of methylene blue in the classic "blue-bottle" demonstration. Food items containing FD&C Blue #1 and reducing species such as sugars can therefore be used at the heart of this demonstration, which simply requires the addition of strong base such as sodium hydroxide lye.

  14. 76 FR 19466 - Wellpoint, Inc. D/B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield, et al.; Amended Certification Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... January 26, 2011 (76 FR 4731). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration Wellpoint, Inc. D/B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield, et al.; Amended.../Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield Enterprise Provider Data Management Team Including On-Site Leased...

  15. Thermochromism of bacteriorhodopsin and its pH dependence.

    PubMed

    Neebe, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Schromczyk, Nina; Hampp, Norbert A

    2008-06-12

    Purple membranes (PMs), which consist of the photochromic membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and lipids only, show complex thermochromic properties. Three different types of reversible temperature-dependent spectral transitions were found, involving spectral states absorbing at 460, 519, and 630 nm. These thermochromic absorption changes were analyzed in the range from 10 to 80 degrees C. In dependence on the bulk pH value, hypsochromic or bathochromic shifts in the BR absorption spectra are observed in BR gels as well as in BR films. The thermochromic changes between both purple and blue or purple and red were quantified in the CIE color system. The molecular changes causing these effects are discussed, and a model is presented in terms of intramolecular protonation equilibriums. The thermochromic properties of BR may be of interest in applications like security tags, as this feature may complement the well-known photochromic properties of BR. PMID:18491932

  16. Formation Channels for Blue Straggler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Melvyn B.

    In this chapter we consider two formation channels for blue straggler stars: (1) the merger of two single stars via a collision, and (2) those produced via mass transfer within a binary. We review how computer simulations show that stellar collisions are likely to lead to relatively little mass loss and are thus effective in producing a young population of more-massive stars. The number of blue straggler stars produced by collisions will tend to increase with cluster mass. We review how the current population of blue straggler stars produced from primordial binaries decreases with increasing cluster mass. This is because exchange encounters with third, single stars in the most massive clusters tend to reduce the fraction of binaries containing a primary close to the current turn-off mass. Rather, their primaries tend to be somewhat more massive and have evolved off the main sequence, filling their Roche lobes in the past, often converting their secondaries into blue straggler stars (but more than 1 Gyr or so ago and thus they are no longer visible today as blue straggler stars).

  17. Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Blue Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Blue energy in the form of ocean waves offers an enormous energy resource. However, it has yet to be fully exploited in order to make it available for the use of mankind. Blue energy harvesting is a challenging task as the kinetic energy from ocean waves is irregular in amplitude and is at low frequencies. Though electromagnetic generators (EMGs) are well-known for harvesting mechanical kinetic energies, they have a crucial limitation for blue energy conversion. Indeed, the output voltage of EMGs can be impractically low at the low frequencies of ocean waves. In contrast, triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly suitable for blue energy harvesting as they can effectively harvest mechanical energies from low frequencies (<1 Hz) to relatively high frequencies (∼kHz) and are also low-cost, lightweight, and easy to fabricate. Several important steps have been taken by Wang's group to develop TENG technology for blue energy harvesting. In this Perspective, we describe some of the recent progress and also address concerns related to durable packaging of TENGs in consideration of harsh marine environments and power management for an efficient power transfer and distribution for commercial applications. PMID:27408982

  18. GEMS: The destiny of Blue Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häußler, Boris; Bell, Eric F.; Barden, Marco; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Borch, Andrea; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; Koposov, Sergey E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Wolf, Christian

    2007-05-01

    One of the key predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation models is that a significant fraction of elliptical galaxies form in late merging events. One of the most important observations of such an assembly is the existence of blue spheroidal galaxies, which have spheroid-dominated morphologies and blue colors indicating recent star formation, as an intermediate step in the evolution of elliptical galaxies. We present results from the GEMS survey showing the properties of these galaxies derived from 2-D galaxy fitting of the ˜8000 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 28'x28' HST mosaic. For the first time we were able to divide the observed population of blue elliptical galaxies into sub-populations of different stellar masses. We found that massive blue ellipticals are likely to be the progenitors of red elliptical galaxies while low-mass blue ellipticals have half-light radii considerably in excess of those measured for low-mass present day elliptical galaxies and instead have larger sizes similar to present-day disk-dominated systems with substantial bulges (see Figure)

  19. "Blue and seven phenomena" among Japanese students.

    PubMed

    Saito, M

    1999-10-01

    To investigate color and number preferences in Japan, 586 university undergraduates (239 men and 347 women; M age = 20.9 yr.) were asked to name a color (Question 1), to name their preferred color (Question 2), and to name their preferred number between zero and nine (Question 3). The results showed that Japanese students chose blue (33.5%) or red (26.0%) when asked to name a color but that red was not chosen as frequently as blue as a preferred color (red: 11.1%, blue: 37.1%). Sex differences were found on both Questions 1 and 2 by chi-squared test. Black was chosen more by men, while pink was selected more by women. 22.5% subjects also selected the number seven, supporting Simon's observation of the "blue-seven phenomenon." The reasons given for the choice showed that seven was "a lucky number" and "represented happiness" among Japanese students. Four colors (blue, red, white, and black) accounted for 76.8% and 65.1% of responses to Questions 1 and 2, respectively, and odd numbers 68.4% for Question 3. PMID:10597589

  20. Spectroscopic investigations on the photodegradation of toluidine blue dye using cadmium sulphide nanoparticles prepared by a novel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakandeswari, N.; Sangami, G.; Dharmaraj, N.; Taek, Nam Ki; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-05-01

    A novel method to prepare cadmium sulphide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) possessing nearly uniform size was adopted using eggshell membrane (ESM), under different pH conditions. Significant yield of CdS NPs with smallest possible size was obtained by increasing the pH of the reaction medium from acidic to alkaline. The above prepared CdS NPs have been characterized by UV-vis absorption as well as emission spectra, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The efficiency of the above prepared CdS NPs as a catalyst for the photodegradation of toluidine blue (TB) dye, as a function of pH as well as the ratio between the catalyst and the substrate was studied after irradiation with UV light. The results showed that an efficient interaction took place between the catalyst and the substrate to cause degradation of the selected dye. A maximum degradation of toluidine blue dye (90%) was observed at pH 8 which is higher than that of the efficiencies at pH 4 and pH 6.

  1. New spiro[benzotetraphene-fluorene] derivatives: synthesis and application in sky-blue fluorescent host materials.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Ryung; Lee, Chil-Won; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2014-07-01

    Blue light-emitting spiro[benzotetraphene-fluorene] (SBTF)-based host materials, 3-(1-naphthyl)-10-naphthylspiro[benzo[ij]tetraphene-7,9'-fluorene] (1), 3-(2-naphthyl)-10-naphthylspiro[benzo[ij]tetraphene-7,9'-fluorene] (2), and 3-[2-(6-phenyl)naphthyl]-10-naphthylspiro[benzo[ij]tetraphene-7,9'-fluorene] (3) were designed and prepared via multi-step Suzuki coupling reactions. Introducing various aromatic groups into SBTF core lead to a reduction in band gap and a determination of the color purity and luminescence efficiency. Typical sky-blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with the configuration of ITO/N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-bis[(4-diphenylamino)phenyl]-biphenyl-4,4'-diamie (60 nm)/N,N,N',N'-tetra(1-biphenyl)-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (30 nm)/host: dopant (30 nm, 5%)/LG201 (electron transporting layer, 20 nm)/LiF/Al were developed using SBTF derivatives as a host material and p-bis(p-N,N-diphenyl-aminostyryl)benzene (DSA-Ph) as a sky-blue dopant material. A device obtained from three materials doped with DSA-Ph showed color purity of 0.148 and 0.239, a luminance efficiency of 7.91 cd/A, and an external quantum efficiency >4.75% at 5 V. PMID:24859632

  2. Identification of the mineralization front: comparison of a modified toluidine blue stain with tetracycline fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, A R; Kujawa, M; Mathews, C H; Parfitt, A M

    A modified toluidine blue method for identification of the mineralization front at the zone of demarcation between bone and osteoid in undecalcified, plastic-embedded sections of bone is described. The intensity of staining is increased both by increasing the pH of the solution and by increasing the duration of staining. The method is reproducible, since measurements of the extent of mineralization front on two nonadjacent sections from the same biopsy in 20 cases had a correlation coefficient of 0.98. The identification of the mineralization front by toluidine blue agrees closely with identification by means of in vivo tetracycline uptake, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 between measurements of its extent using the two methods on adjacent sections from the same biopsy. It is likely that both toluidine blue staining at pH 6.5 and tetracycline uptake depend on some property of the most recently deposited bone mineral. With either method we find low values for the extent of mineralization front as a fraction of osteoid surface in many patients with osteoporosis. The uniformly normal values for this quantity in osteoporosis reported by other investigators may reflect different criteria for distinguishing osteoid-covered from quiescent bone surfaces. PMID:6200748

  3. Blue-green atomic mercury photodissociation laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fill, E.; Gerck, E.

    The accomplishment of a blue-green Hg laser after dissociating HgI2 with a KrF laser is reported. The iodide was contained in a cell with an aluminum mirror, and heating with the KrF laser caused green laser emission at 180 C and a blue line above 210 C, with total emission increasing up to 260 C and then tailing off. The emitted wavelengths were measured at 435-8 and 546.1 nm, with the pulse shape having a duration of 1 ns with peak power of 3 kW for the blue and an order of magnitude less for the green. The KrF laser was tuned to emit at 248 nm, and no decrease in the resulting emissions were detected after 10,000 pulses in the iodide laser.

  4. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  5. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~ 4 and ~ 11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH ~ 14 and brown at pH ~ 2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH ~ 14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH ~ 2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH ~ 2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450 cm- 1, 616 to 632 cm- 1, 1332 to 1343 cm- 1 etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~ 1548 cm- 1 in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~ 1580 cm- 1. Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH ~ 14. For example, the 423 cm- 1 band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~ 447 cm- 1 in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~ 850, ~ 1067 and ~ 1214 cm- 1 in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH ~ 2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH ~ 14). The DFT

  6. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~4 and ~11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH~14 and brown at pH~2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH~14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH~2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH~2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450cm(-1), 616 to 632cm(-1), 1332 to 1343cm(-1) etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~1548cm(-1) in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~1580cm(-1). Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH~14. For example, the 423cm(-1) band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~447cm(-1) in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~850, ~1067 and ~1214cm(-1) in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH~2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH~14). The DFT calculations for these

  7. Eastward migration of blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, B.

    1972-01-01

    Of 3,789 recoveries of blue-winged teal (Anas discors) banded prior to the hunting season in the prairie pothole region, 183 (4.8 percent) were recovered, due east in New England, Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces during the subsequent hunting season. Of 19 recoveries looked at in detail, all were banded as either hatching-year (flying young) or local (flightless young) birds. A blue-winged teal banded in Minnesota in September was retrapped in October in South Carolina, before being shot later that month in Colombia, South America.

  8. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available.2-5 Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of classroom demonstrations have been described for showing the effects.6-11 This paper describes how these demonstrations can be enhanced by using a spectrometer to measure the preferential scattering of the shorter wavelength light.

  9. Change in NO2 reveals Parade Blue is cleaner than APEC Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoran; Liu, Cheng; Xie, Zhouqing; Xie, Pinhua; Xing, Chengzhi; Xu, Jin; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-04-01

    The spectacular Parade Blue (blue sky), and APEC Blue (blue sky) were renowned worldwide caused by the limiting discharge policy of the Chinese government. For evaluating the reduction of these two events, we analyzed the variation of NO2 columns Beijing by looking at a long-term monitoring using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite observations from August 2014 to November 2015, covering Grand Military Parade (GMP, September 2015) and APEC (November 2014) period. We found that the NO2 columns abruptly decreased both GMP and APEC. However, change in the MAX-DOAS and the OMI NO2 during GMP was larger than during APEC via comparison with the same period in 2014, indicating Parade Blue is cleaner than APEC Blue. The spatial distribution of NO2 and backward trajectories together with meterological parameters suggested that GMP Blue may be due to the regional significant decreasing discharge in peripheral cities. No weekend effect during GMP further confirmed the role of controlling discharge. This study provides direct evidence that it is possible to clean air in China.

  10. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  11. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  12. Decomposition of Methylene Blue by using an Atmospheric Plasma Jet with Ar, N2, O2, or Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Hara, Tamio

    2013-05-01

    We have performed experiments on the decomposition of methylene blue by using an atmospheric plasma jet with various working gases. The decomposition efficiencies of Ar, N2, and O2 plasmas are almost equivalent; on the other hand, the rate of methylene blue decomposition by air plasma is lower than those by the other plasmas. From the absorption spectra, it has been found that HONO (nitrous acid) is produced by air plasma-liquid reactions. It has been clarified by a series of experiments, where oxygen concentration in N2 plasma is varied, that the concentration of HONO increases and the rate of methylene blue decomposition degrades with increasing oxygen gas flow rate. Furthermore, the presence of nitrate ions and nitrite ions was confirmed by ion chromatography and pH measurement.

  13. Adsorption and electropolymerization of toluidine blue on the nanostructured octakis(hydridodimethylsiloxy)octasilsesquioxane surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro do Carmo, Devaney Rocha de Castro, Gustavo; Utrera Martines, Marco Antonio; Filho, Newton Luiz Dias; Ramos Stradiotto, Nelson

    2008-12-01

    Toluidine blue O (TBO) was adsorbed on the octakis(hydridodimethylsiloxy)octasilsesquioxane (Q{sub 8}M{sub 8}{sup H}) surface. The characterization of the precursor (Q{sub 8}M{sub 8}{sup H}) and resulting materials obtained by the reaction of Q{sub 8}M{sub 8}{sup H} and toluidine blue (CTBO) were defined using Fourier transform infrared spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance solid-state {sup 13}C and Si{sup 29} magic angle spinning. The electrochemical polymerization in a glassy carbon electrode was verified by means of a film silsesquioxane formation (FCTBO) using cyclic voltammetry in a potential range of -0.5 to 1.3 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)) in a Britton Robinson (B-R) buffer solution (pH 2.0). The cyclic voltammogram of the film exhibits two redox couples with a formal potential of -0.15 and -0.02 V (B-R buffer pH 5). The formal potential shifts linearly in the cathodic direction by increasing the pH solution with a slope of 71 and 57 mV per unit for the first and second couple, respectively. The film was electrochemically very stable.

  14. Quality of water in an inactive uranium mine and its effects on the quality of water in Blue Creek, Stevens County, Washington, 1984-85. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sumioka, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the report is to present the results of a study done to determine (1) the monthly and annual water budgets and probable variation in runoff for the drainage basin in which the mine is located; (2) if precipitation is the source of low pH water found in pit 3 and the retention pond; (3) the quality of water in pits 3 and 4, the retention pond, streamflow from the basin, Blue Creek upstream and downstream of the point the drainage enters, and near the mouth of Blue Creek; (4) the quality of ground water discharged from the basin into Blue Creek; and (5) the daily mean values of discharge, water temperature, specific conductance, and pH for mine drainage from the basin, Blue Creek upstream and downstream of the mine drainage, and near the mouth of Blue Creek. The report also describes a potential water-quality monitoring program that would allow the determination of annual loads of selected chemical constituents entering Blue Creek from the mine basin and information about the type of ground-water tracers and procedures needed to examine flow paths near the retention pond.

  15. Effects of Spectral Characteristics of Ganzfeld Stimuli on the Photopic Negative Response (PhNR) of the ERG

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Nalini V.; Shirato, Suguru; Kaneko, Muneyoshi; Digby, Beth I.; Robson, John G.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine flash and background colors that best isolate the photopic negative response (PhNR) and maximize its amplitude in the primate ERG. Methods Photopic full-field flash ERGs were recorded from anesthetized macaque monkeys before and after pharmacologic blockade of Na+-dependent spiking activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 to 2 μM, n = 3), blockade of ionotropic glutamatergic transmission with cis-2,3 piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA, 3.3–3.8 mM, n = 3) or laser-induced monocular experimental glaucoma (n = 6), and from six normal human subjects. Photopically matched colored flashes of increasing stimulus strengths were presented on scotopically matched blue, white, or yellow backgrounds of 100 scot cd/m2 using an LED-based stimulator. Results PhNRs that could be eliminated by TTX or severe experimental glaucoma were present in responses to brief (<5 ms) and long-duration (200 ms) stimuli of all color combinations. In normal monkey and human eyes for brief low-energy flashes, PhNR amplitudes were highest for red flashes on blue backgrounds and blue flashes on yellow backgrounds. For high-energy flashes, amplitudes were more similar for all color combinations. For long-duration stimuli, the PhNRon at light onset in monkeys was larger for red and blue stimuli, regardless of background color, than for spectrally broader flashes, except for stimuli >17.7 cd/m2 when PhNRons were all of similar amplitude. For red flashes, eliminating the PhNRon pharmacologically or by glaucoma removed the slowly recovering negative wave that normally followed the transient b-wave and elevated the whole ON response close to the level of the b-wave peak. However, for white, blue, and green flashes, a lower-amplitude plateau that could be removed by PDA remained. Conclusions For weak to moderate flash strengths, the best stimulus for maximizing PhNR amplitude is one that primarily stimulates one cone type, on a background with minimal adaptive effect on cones. For stronger

  16. T's and Blues. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles provides basic information on abuse of Talwin, a mild prescription painkiller (T's), and Pyribenzamine, a nonprescription antihistimine (Blues). These two drugs, taken in combination, produce an effect similar to that produced by heroin. Stories from "Drug Survival News,""Emergency Medicine," and "FDA Consumer"…

  17. Practices of Blue Ribbon Catholic Schools, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealey, Robert J., Comp.

    For almost 20 years, the U.S. Department of Education has invited schools to seek the Blue Ribbon School Award. A large number of Catholic schools have received this award. For this publication, the Department of Elementary Schools Executive Committee requested principals of awarded schools to write a short article on an exemplary school program…

  18. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, E.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  19. Blue nano titania made in diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Teleki, Alexandra; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-05-21

    Blue titanium suboxide nanoparticles (including Magneli phases) were formed directly without any post-processing or addition of dopants by combustion of titanium-tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) vapor at atmospheric pressure. Particle size, phase composition, rutile and anatase crystal sizes as well as the blue coloration were controlled by rapid quenching of the flame with a critical flow nozzle placed at various heights above the burner. The particles showed a broad absorption in the near-infrared region and retained their blue color upon storage in ambient atmosphere. A high concentration of paramagnetic Ti3+ centres was found in the substoichiometric particles by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Furthermore particles with controlled band gap energy from 3.2 to 3.6 eV were made by controlling the burner-nozzle-distance from 10 to 1 cm, respectively. The color robustness and extent of suboxidation could be further enhanced by co-oxidation of TTIP with hexamethyldisiloxane in the flame resulting in SiO2-coated titanium suboxide particles. The process is cost-effective and green while the particles produced can replace traditional blue colored, cobalt-containing pigments. PMID:19421486

  20. Visualising DNA in Classrooms Using Nile Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Christine; Roche, Scott; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Giving students the opportunity to extract, manipulate and visualise DNA molecules enhances a constructivist approach to learning about modern techniques in biology and biotechnology Visualisation usually requires agarose gel electrophoresis and staining. In this article, we report on an alternative DNA stain, Nile Blue A, that may be used in the…

  1. Blue-noise halftoning for hexagonal grids.

    PubMed

    Lau, Daniel L; Ulichney, Robert

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we closely scrutinize the spatial and spectral properties of aperiodic halftoning schemes on rectangular and hexagonal sampling grids. Traditionally, hexagonal sampling grids have been shunned due to their inability to preserve the high-frequency components of blue-noise dither patterns at gray-levels near one-half, but as will be shown, only through the introduction of diagonal correlations between dots can even rectangular sampling grids preserve these frequencies. And by allowing the sampling grid to constrain the placement of dots, a particular algorithm may introduce visual artifacts just as disturbing as excess energy below the principal frequency. If, instead, the algorithm maintains radial symmetry by introducing a minimum degree of clustering, then that algorithm can maintain its grid defiance illusion fundamental to the spirit of the blue-noise model. As such, this paper shows that hexagonal grids are preferrable because they can support gray-levels near one-half with less required clustering of minority pixels and a higher principal frequency. Along with a thorough Fourier analysis of blue-noise dither patterns on both rectangular and hexagonal sampling grids, this paper also demonstrates the construction of a blue-noise dither array for hexagonal grids. PMID:16671307

  2. The blue rubber bleb [corrected] nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, a rare condition characterized by lesions of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and other parts of the body, can result in serious gastrointestinal bleeding and other adverse results and be challenging to manage. The clinical features and treatment of this rare disorder are reviewed here. PMID:19518008

  3. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The…

  4. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    PubMed

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  5. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  6. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 3. Trypan blue.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2014-11-01

    Trypan blue is colorant from the 19(th) century that has an association with Africa as a chemotherapeutic agent against protozoan (Trypanosomal) infections, which cause sleeping sickness. The dye still is used for staining biopsies, living cells and organisms, and it also has been used as a colorant for textiles. PMID:24867494

  7. Heparin sensing: Blue-chip binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriver, Zachary; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-08-01

    Heparin is an anionic polysaccharide that has tremendous clinical importance as an anticoagulant. Several dyes have been developed that can detect heparin, and the latest example -- named Mallard Blue -- has now been shown to have excellent sensing properties under biologically relevant conditions.

  8. A Discography of the Real Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Dean

    1972-01-01

    A short account of the rise and decline of the Blues and a discussion of the artists who performed it is followed by an annotated bibliography of periodicals, books, records and tapes related to this form of Black" music. (184 references) (NH)

  9. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    PubMed

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time. PMID:27039979

  10. Agonism and dominance in female blue monkeys.

    PubMed

    Klass, Keren; Cords, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Agonistic behavior features prominently in hypotheses that explain how social variation relates to ecological factors and phylogenetic constraints. Dominance systems vary along axes of despotism, tolerance, and nepotism, and comparative studies examine cross-species patterns in these classifications. To contribute to such studies, we present a comprehensive picture of agonistic behavior and dominance relationships in wild female blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis), an arboreal guenon, with data from 9 groups spanning 18 years. We assessed where blue monkeys fall along despotic, tolerant, and nepotistic spectra, how their dominance system compares to other primates, primarily cercopithecines, and whether their agonistic behavior matches socioecological model predictions. Blue monkeys showed low rates of mainly low-intensity agonism and little counter-aggression. Rates increased with rank and group size. Dominance asymmetry varied at different organizational levels, being more pronounced at the level of interactions than dyad or group. Hierarchies were quite stable, had moderate-to-high linearity and directional consistency and moderate steepness. There was clear maternal rank inheritance, but inconsistent adherence to Kawamura's rules. There was little between-group variation, although hierarchy metrics showed considerable variation across group-years. Overall, blue monkeys have moderately despotic, moderately tolerant, and nepotistic dominance hierarchies. They resemble other cercopithecines in having significantly linear and steep hierarchies with a generally stable, matriline-based structure, suggesting a phylogenetic basis to this aspect of their social system. Blue monkeys most closely match Sterck et al.'s [1997] Resident-Nepotistic-Tolerant dominance category, although they do not fully conform to predictions of any one socioecological model. Our results suggest that socioecological models might better predict variation within than across clades, thereby

  11. Design and Synthesis of Metal Complexes of (2E)-2-[(2E)-3-Phenylprop-2-en-1-ylidene]hydrazinecarbothioamide and Their Photocatalytic Degradation of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, P. Murali; Reddy, N. B. Gopal; Kottam, Nagaraju; Yallur, B. C.; Katreddi, Hussain Reddy

    2013-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation has been considered to be an efficient process for the degradation of organic pollutants, which are present in the effluents released by industries. The photocatalytic bleaching of cationic dye methylene blue was carried out spectrometrically on irradiation of UV light using Cu(II), Ni(II), and Co(II) complexes of (2E)-2-[(2E)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-ylidene]hydrazinecarbothioamide (HL). The effects of pH and metal ion were studied on the efficiency of the reaction. Cu(II) complex shows better catalytic activity and the highest percentage degradation (~88.8%) of methylene blue was observed at pH 12. A tentative mechanism has also been proposed for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue. PMID:24363623

  12. Study on low-cost calibration-free pH sensing with disposable optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Tolosa, Leah; Rao, Govind

    2012-07-13

    As labor costs become more expensive, less labor-intensive disposable devices have become more ubiquitous. Similarly, the disposable optical pH sensor developed in our lab could provide a convenient yet cost-effective way for pH sensing in processes that require stringent pH control. This optical pH sensor is prepared in uniform individual lots of 100-200 sensors per lot. Calibration is accomplished on a few randomly selected sensors out of each lot. We show that all others in the same lot can then be used directly without requiring individual calibration. In this paper, a calibration model is derived to include all the factors that affect the signal of the disposable sensor. Experimental results show that the derived calibration model fits the experimental data. The readings of 28 randomly selected disposable sensors with 4 sensors from each of the 7 lots show an error less than 0.1 pH units in the useful sensing range of the sensor. The calibration model indicates that if further improvement on precision is desired, more uniform porous material and more advanced coating techniques will be required. When it comes to the effects of the varying coasters, house-made low-cost fluorometers, the variability in the brightness ratio of the blue-to-violet LEDs is the primary reason for the lack of precision. Other factors like LED light intensity distribution, optical properties of the filters and electronics also contribute to the coaster-to-coaster difference, but to a lesser extent. Two different methods for correcting the instrument variations were introduced. After correction, the collective reading errors for all the tested instruments were reduced to less than 0.2 pH units within the sensor's useful sensing range. Based on this result, our lab is currently implementing further improvements in modifying the coasters to equalize the ratios of blue-to-violet LED brightness. PMID:22704475

  13. Using an organic molecule with low triplet energy as a host in a highly efficient blue electrophosphorescent device.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong; Zhu, Liping; Liu, Tengxiao; Jiang, Bei; Ma, Dongge; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2014-02-17

    To achieve high efficiencies in blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs), the triplet energies (T1) of host materials are generally supposed to be higher than the blue phosphors. A small organic molecule with low singlet energy (S1) of 2.80 eV and triplet energy of 2.71 eV can be used as the host material for the blue phosphor, [bis(4,6-difluorophenylpyridinato-N,C(2'))iridium(III)] tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate (FIr6; T1=2.73 eV). In both the photo- and electro-excited processes, the energy transfer from the host material to FIr6 was found to be efficient. In a three organic-layer device, the maximum current efficiency of 37 cd A(-1) and power efficiency of 40 Lm W(-1) were achieved for the FIr6-based blue PhOLEDs. PMID:24449253

  14. Novel tannin-based adsorbent in removing cationic dye (Methylene Blue) from aqueous solution. Kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, J; González-Velasco, M; Beltrán-Heredia, J; Gragera-Carvajal, J; Salguero-Fernández, J

    2010-02-15

    Natural tannin-based adsorbent has been prepared on the basis of the gelification of Quebracho bark extract. The resulting product, Quebracho Tannin Gel (QTG) was tested as cationic dye adsorbent with Methylene Blue (MB). Kinetics of adsorption process were studied out and a period of 15 days was determined for reaching equilibrium. The influences of pH and temperature were evaluated. As pH or temperature raise q capacity of QTG increases. Theoretical modelization of dye-QTG adsorption was carried out by multiparametric adjustment according to Langmuir's hypothesis. Values of the k(l1), k(l2) and activation energies were calculated. PMID:19782466

  15. Adamantane-based wide-bandgap host material: blue electrophosphorescence with high efficiency and very high brightness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Zhu, Liping; Li, Yifan; Yu, Ling; Wu, Kailong; Chen, Tianheng; Huang, Manli; Wang, Feng; Gong, Shaolong; Ma, Dongge; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2015-05-26

    An adamantane-based host material, namely, 4-{3-[4-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]adamantan-1-yl}benzonitrile (CzCN-Ad), was prepared by linking an electron-donating carbazole unit and an electron-accepting benzonitrile moiety through an adamantane bridge. In this approach, two functional groups were attached to tetrahedral points of adamantane to construct an "sp(3)" topological configuration. This design strategy endows the host material with a high triplet energy of 3.03 eV due to the disruption of intramolecular charge transfer. Although CzCN-Ad has a low molecular weight, the rigid nonconjugated adamantane bridge results in a glass transition temperature of 89 °C. These features make CzCN-Ad suitable for fabricating blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). The devices based on sky-blue phosphor bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')](picolinato)iridium(III) (FIrpic) achieved a high maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 24.1%, which is among the best results for blue PhOLEDs ever reported. Furthermore, blue PhOLEDs with bis(2,4-difluorophenylpyridinato)-tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate iridium(III) (FIr6) as dopant exhibited a maximum EQE of 14.2% and a maximum luminance of 34 262 cd m(-2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest luminance ever reported for FIr6-based PhOLEDs. PMID:25900890

  16. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency. PMID:26878687

  17. Developing the urban blue: Comparative health responses to blue and green urban open spaces in Germany.

    PubMed

    Völker, Sebastian; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Recently, new perspectives upon healthy urban open spaces propose that open spaces can be regarded as urban green or blue spaces. However, there has so far been very little research into blue environments and their benefits for mental well-being. Our article focuses on the effects of water in cities, "urban blue" (as compared to "urban green"), on human health and well-being. To assess the mental well-being of visitors, we conducted qualitative semi-standardised interviews (n=113), asking which differences in well-being occur when visiting urban green and blue spaces in high-density areas of the inner city in Dusseldorf and Cologne, Germany. Although we found many similarities, some health-enhancing effects for users turned out to be prominent for urban blue in the four conceptual therapeutic landscape dimensions: experienced, symbolic, social and activity space. These effects include enhanced contemplation, emotional bonding, participation, and physical activity. The results suggest that urban blue as a health-promoting factor needs more detailed and accurate determination and examination of its general and local health-enhancing effects. PMID:25475835

  18. Development of an underwater in-situ spectrophotometric sensor for seawater pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterbury, Robert D.; Byrne, Robert H.; Kelly, John; Leader, Bram; McElligott, Sean; Russell, Randy

    1996-12-01

    A pH sensor based upon spectrophotometric techniques has been developed for in-situ analysis of surface seawater. This sensor utilizes a spectrophotometric pH indicator (Thymol Blue) which has been calibrated for use in seawater as a function of temperature and salinity. Shipboard spectrophotometric pH analyses routinely demonstrate a precision on the order of plus or minus 0.0004 pH units. In- situ analysis of seawater pH has demonstrated a precision on the order of plus or minus 0.001 and an accuracy, using shipboard measurements as a standard, on the order of plus or minus 0.01. The sensor is a self-contained system which pumps seawater, meters in indicator, spectrophotometrically determines indicator absorbance and stores data with a 1 Hz acquisition frequency. The sensor employs two absorbance cells, each with three wavelength channels, to obtain the spectrophotometric absorbance. The sensor system, rated for depths up to 500 m, provides pH, conductivity, temperature and can be operated via computer or in a standalone mode with internal data storage. The sensor utilizes less than 12 watts of power and is packaged in a 29' long by 4.5' diameter aluminum housing.

  19. Methylene blue mediated photodynamic therapy for resistant plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Salah, Manal; Samy, Nevien; Fadel, Maha

    2009-01-01

    Topical treatment of resistant psoriatic plaque stage lesions may be difficult and the systemic therapies seem inappropriate. Therefore, a topical 0.1% methylene blue (MB) hydrogel was prepared and evaluated for percent drug content, drug uniformity, pH, rheological and organoleptic characters such as feel tackiness, grittiness sensation, and transparency in addition to release kinetics study in vitro. The efficiency of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of MB photo-activated using 565 mW Light emitting diode (LED) 670 nm was evaluated in patients with resistant plaque psoriasis. The gel was evaluated in single blinded study. The patients were subjected to repeated sessions of irradiation, skin biopsies from each patient in the beginning and at the end of the sessions were taken for histopathological studies. Results showed the hydrogel was transparent nongritty and the drug uniformly dispersed with pH=7.2 and viscosity value=25.04 Pa. The drug content was found to be 99.4 +/- 0.15 %. Drug release was following zero order kinetics with rate constant K=0.348 +/- 0.01 and T(1/2) = 0.95 +/- 0.5 hours. Sixteen patients experienced complete clearance of their treated lesions. Skin appeared normal in color, texture, and pliability with no complications indicating the lack of skin sensitivity. Histopathological examinations showed nearly normal epidermis at the end of all sessions. The authors concluded that the prepared hydrogel was safe, stable, and very effective. The results are encouraging to accept MB as a photosensitizer for PDT and as a safe and effective method for treatment of selected cases of resistant localized psoriasis PMID:19180895

  20. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... National Park Service Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of proposed award of temporary concession contracts for Blue Ridge Parkway, NC/VA... Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina and Virginia, for a term not to exceed 3 years. The visitor...

  1. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  2. Is blue light good or bad for plants?

    PubMed

    Dougher, T A; Bugbee, B G

    1998-01-01

    Blue photons are energetically expensive so the most energy-efficient lamps contain the least blue light. Blue photons are not used efficiently in photosynthesis, but blue light has dramatic effects on plant development. We studied the growth and development of soybean, wheat, and lettuce plants under high-pressure sodium and metal halide lamps with yellow filters creating five fractions of blue light (0.5%, 3.5%, 6%, 1 8%, and 26% blue) at 500 micromoles m-2 s-1 and (< 0.1%, 1.7%, 6%, 12%, and 26%) at 200 mol m-2 s-1. The response was species dependent. Lettuce was highly sensitive to blue light fraction and had an optimum dry weight and leaf area at about 6% blue, but results were complicated by sensitivity to lamp type. Wheat and soybean were less sensitive to blue light, but dry mass and leaf area decreased steadily with increasing blue light. Blue light fraction significantly affected specific leaf area (SLA, m2 kg-1) and chlorophyll in lettuce, but had no significant effect on wheat and soybeans. The data suggest that lettuce benefits from some added blue light, but soybean and wheat may not. PMID:11541668

  3. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  4. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  5. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  6. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  7. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  8. Degradation of Methylene Blue Using Biologically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vanaja, M.; Paulkumar, K.; Baburaja, M.; Rajeshkumar, S.; Gnanajobitha, G.; Malarkodi, C.; Sivakavinesan, M.; Annadurai, G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has great interest and achievement due to its eco-benign and low time consuming properties. In this study silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by using Morinda tinctoria leaf extract under different pH. The aqueous leaf extract was added to silver nitrate solution; the color of the reaction medium was changed from pale yellow to brown and that indicates reduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles. Thus synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Dispersity and morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM); crystalline nature and purity of synthesized silver nanoparticles were revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectrum was examined to identify the effective functional molecules responsible for the reduction and stabilization of silver nanoparticles synthesized by leaf extract. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined by degradation of methylene blue under sunlight irradiation. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles were effectively degrading the dye nearly 95% at 72 h of exposure time. PMID:24772055

  9. Sensitive colorimetric cytotoxicity measurement using alarmar blue.

    PubMed

    Page, B; Page, M

    1995-01-01

    Cytotoxicity testing of anticancer drugs requires techniques which are sensitive, reproductible and applicable to large scale testing using automated instruments. End point staining of cells or viability stains are reliable but they are often not sensitive enough or not suitable for automation. We have already described a fluorometric cytotoxicity assay using a non fluorescent substrate, Alarmar Blue, which upon reduction in living cells, yields a fluorescent product. This assay is sensitive and highly reproductible but it is limited since automated fluorescent plate readers are not found frequently in laboratories. The conditions are now described for using Alamar Blue as a substrate in a colorimetric cytotoxicity assay. This new economical assay could be used with advantage for large scale screening of cytotoxic agents in microtitration plates. PMID:21597689

  10. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  11. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  12. Experiencing Blues at the Crossroads: A Place-Based Method for Teaching the Geography of Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a pedagogical module that explores the geography of blues culture across the Mississippi Delta. By focusing on blues culture, rather than simply blues music itself, this project provides a forum for understanding the broader geographical conditions from which this musical form emerged. This module utilizes place-based…

  13. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  14. Combined Cellular Blue Nevus and Trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Richard; Emanuel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Biphasic lesions composed of melanocytic and epithelial components are not uncommon. Combined trichoepithelioma and cellular blue naevus is a rare lesion that may mimic melanoma clinically. The authors describe what they believe to be the fourth case of this rare tumor and review the literature. Recent descriptions of malignant basomelanocytic tumors have raised interesting questions surrounding the pathogenesis of lesions composed of these cell lineages. PMID:24003350

  15. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  16. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive blue 220 textile dye by Lentinus crinitus extracellular extract.

    PubMed

    Niebisch, Carolina Heyse; Malinowski, Alexandre Knoll; Schadeck, Ruth; Mitchell, David A; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Paba, Jaime

    2010-08-15

    Studies were carried on the decolorization of the textile dye reactive blue 220 (RB220) by a novel isolate of Lentinus crinitus fungi. The optimal conditions for the production of destaining activity were obtained in media containing intermediate concentrations of ammonium oxalate and glucose (10 g L(-1)) as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively, at 28 degrees C and pH 5.5. Maximum decolorization efficiency against RB220 achieved in this study was around 95%. Ultra-violet and visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometric analyses, before and after decolorization, suggest that decolorization was due to biodegradation. This effect was associated with a putative low molecular weight laccase (41 kDa) displaying good tolerance to a wide range of pH values, salt concentrations and temperatures, suggesting a potential role for this organism in the remediation of real dye containing effluents. PMID:20452721

  17. Red, Green, and Blue Astro-combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David; Glenday, Alex; Li, Chih-Hao; Korzennik, Sylvain; Noah Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Benedick, Andrew; Kaertner, Franz; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2011-06-01

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar lines are approaching Earth-like planet sensitivity. Astro-combs, a combination of an octave spanning femtosecond laser and a mode-filtering cavity provide a likely route to increased calibration precision and accuracy. We present results from three astro-combs operating in the red/near-IR, green and blue spectral ranges. Light from a 1-GHz, octave-spanning Ti:Sapphire laser is filtered by a Fabry-Perot Cavity (FPC) constructed from Doubly-Chirped Mirrors to produce a red astro-comb with 100 nm of optical bandwidth. This astro-comb has calibrated an astrophysical spectrograph at the 1 m/s level. In the blue astro-comb, Ti:Sapphire comb light, doubled in a BBO crystal is filtered to 50 GHz mode spacing with an FPC. The blue astro-comb has performed 50 cm/s calibrations. In the ``green'' astro-comb, light from the 1 GHz Ti:Sapphire comb laser is broadened in a photonic crystal fiber optimized to produce light in the green. This 1-GHz spaced green light is then filtered to roughly 40 GHz via an FPC with zero group delay dispersion mirrors, providing approximately 50 nm of astro-comb light centered near 550 nm.

  18. QCD and the BlueGene

    SciTech Connect

    Vranas, P

    2007-06-18

    Quantum Chromodynamics is the theory of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. It is a celebrated theory and one of its inventors, F. Wilczek, has termed it as '... our most perfect physical theory'. Part of this is related to the fact that QCD can be numerically simulated from first principles using the methods of lattice gauge theory. The computational demands of QCD are enormous and have not only played a role in the history of supercomputers but are also helping define their future. Here I will discuss the intimate relation of QCD and massively parallel supercomputers with focus on the Blue Gene supercomputer and QCD thermodynamics. I will present results on the performance of QCD on the Blue Gene as well as physics simulation results of QCD at temperatures high enough that sub-nuclear matter transitions to a plasma state of elementary particles, the quark gluon plasma. This state of matter is thought to have existed at around 10 microseconds after the big bang. Current heavy ion experiments are in the quest of reproducing it for the first time since then. And numerical simulations of QCD on the Blue Gene systems are calculating the theoretical values of fundamental parameters so that comparisons of experiment and theory can be made.

  19. Blue Rose perimeter defense and security system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, F.; Pollock, J.

    2006-05-01

    An in-ground perimeter security system has been developed by the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport based upon fiber optic sensor technology. The system, called Blue Rose, exploits the physical phenomenon of Rayleigh optical scattering, which occurs naturally in optical fibers used traditionally for Optical Time Domain Reflectometry techniques to detect sound and vibration transmitted by intruders such as people walking or running and moving vehicles near the sensor. The actual sensor is a single-mode optical fiber with an elastomeric coating that is buried in the ground. A long coherence length laser is used to transmit encoded light down the fiber. Minute changes in the fiber in response to the intrusion produce phase changes to the returning backscattered light signal. The return light signal contains both the actual intrusion sound and the location information of where along the fiber the intrusion has occurred. A digital, in-ground, Blue Rose system has been built and is now operational at NUWC. Due to the low cost of the optical fiber sensor and unique benefits of the system, the Blue Rose system provides an advantage in long perimeter or border security applications and also reduces security manning requirements and therefore overall cost for security.

  20. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    PubMed

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate. PMID:26627784

  1. The Blue Comet: A Railroad's Astronomical Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumstay, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Between 1929 February 21 and 1941 September 27, the Central New Jersey Railroad operated a luxury passenger train between Jersey City and Atlantic City. Named The Blue Comet, the locomotive, tender, and coaches sported a unique royal blue paint scheme designed to evoke images of celestial bodies speeding through space. Inside each car were etched window panes and lampshades featuring stars and comets. And each coach sported the name of a famous comet on its side; these comets were of course named for their discoverers. Some of the astronomers honored in this unique fashion remain famous to this day, or at least their comets do. The names D'Arrest, Barnard, Encke, Faye, Giacobini, Halley, Olbers, Temple, Tuttle, and Westphal are familiar ones. But Biela, Brorsen, deVico, Spitaler, and Winnecke have now largely faded into obscurity; their stories are recounted here. Although more than sixty years have elapsed since its last run, The Blue Comet, perhaps the most famous passenger train in American history, lives on in the memories of millions of passengers and railfans. This famous train returned to the attention of millions of television viewers on the evening of 2007 June 3, in an episode of the HBO series The Sopranos. This work was supported by a faculty development grant from Valdosta State University.

  2. The effect of graphene on liquid-crystalline blue phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrič, M.; Tzitzios, V.; Kralj, S.; Cordoyiannis, G.; Lelidis, I.; Nounesis, G.; Georgakilas, V.; Amenitsch, H.; Zidanšek, A.; Kutnjak, Z.

    2013-09-01

    The stabilization of liquid-crystalline blue phases is recently attracting considerable interest because of the envisioned applications in fast optical displays and tunable photonic crystals. We report on the effect of surface-functionalized graphene nanosheets on the blue phase range of a chiral liquid crystal. Calorimetric and optical measurements, reproducible on heating and cooling, demonstrate that the resulting soft nanocomposite exhibits an increased blue phase temperature stability range for a minute concentration of dispersed graphene. The impact is stronger on the ordered, cubic structured blue phase I. These findings suggest that anisotropic nanoparticles may be of great usefulness for stabilizing blue phases.

  3. pH- and Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel Nanoparticles with Dual Photoluminescence for Bioprobes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shi, Ce; Yang, Xudong; Shen, Bowen; Sun, Yuanqing; Chen, Yang; Xu, Xiaowei; Sun, Hongchen; Yu, Kui; Yang, Bai; Lin, Quan

    2016-06-28

    This study demonstrates high contrast and sensitivity by designing a dual-emissive hydrogel particle system, whose two emissions respond to pH and temperature strongly and independently. It describes the photoluminescence (PL) response of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)-based core/shell hydrogel nanoparticles with dual emission, which is obtained by emulsion polymerization with potassium persulfate, consisting of the thermo- and pH-responsive copolymers of PNIPAM and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). A red-emission rare-earth complex and a blue-emission quaternary ammonium tetraphenylethylene derivative (d-TPE) with similar excitation wavelengths are inserted into the core and shell of the hydrogel nanoparticles, respectively. The PL intensities of the nanoparticles exhibit a linear temperature response in the range from 10 to 80 °C with a change as large as a factor of 5. In addition, the blue emission from the shell exhibits a linear pH response between pH 6.5 and 7.6 with a resolution of 0.1 unit, while the red emission from the core is pH-independent. These stimuli-responsive PL nanoparticles have potential applications in biology and chemistry, including bio- and chemosensors, biological imaging, cancer diagnosis, and externally activated release of anticancer drugs. PMID:27232534

  4. Wide range pH measurements using a single H(+)-selective chromoionophore and a time-based flow method.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Rostamzadeh, Abolfazl; Maesum, Saeed

    2006-02-28

    A hydrophilic transparent triacetyl cellulose membrane was adopted as a pH optode by immobilizing highly selective and sensitive Nile blue indicator on the membrane. Contrary to the common procedure for determinations using optodes, in which a steady state response is measured, a new approach is introduced in which the dynamic response of the optode is used as the analytical signal. While in common procedures, pH optodes exhibit limited linear dynamic range (often 2-4 pH units only), it is shown that in a time-based flow method, an optode with only one acid-base indicator can be used for measurement in the pH range of 0-10. The procedure is simple, inexpensive and rapid. PMID:18970487

  5. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  6. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  7. Sol-gel synthesis of ZnO transparent conductive films: The role of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addonizio, Maria Luisa; Aronne, Antonio; Daliento, Santolo; Tari, Orlando; Fanelli, Esther; Pernice, Pasquale

    2014-06-01

    The sol-gel synthesis of undoped and B- or Al-doped ZnO thin films were critically examined with particular reference to the influence of the pH of the reaction medium on some of their specific characteristics, such as thickness, morphology, doping level and optical properties, in view of their application in the photovoltaic field. Using triethanolamine (TEA) as chelating agent, a range of basic pH from 7.66 to 8.76 was explored starting from a very concentrated zinc acetate dehydrate (ZAD) solution in ethanol, [Zn2+] = 1.0 M, and keeping the ZAD/TEA = 1. A more basic environment gives more porous films whose thickness and crystallinity are higher than those achieved at lower pH. It was found that the morphology, as well as the sheet resistance (Rs) of films, depends on both pH and doping. Increasing the pH the Rs decreases for both undoped and doped films. At a certain pH undoped films exhibit a granular microstructure and lower Rs than B- or Al-doped films which exhibit a finer texture, characterized by a lower porosity. Optical properties strongly depend on the pH as well. Increasing the pH, a noticeable blue shift effect was observed, that was attributed mainly to structural changes and to a lesser extent to the Burnstein-Moss effect.

  8. Isoelectric focusing of human parotid salivary proteins in hybrid carrier ampholyte-immobilized pH gradient polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Khoo, K S; Beeley, J A

    1990-06-01

    Isoelectric focusing of human salivary proteins with carrier ampholyte-isoelectric focusing systems requires prior desalting and concentration of samples, a procedure which is time-consuming and requires relatively large volumes of samples. By contrast, immobilized pH gradient gels are more tolerant to salt loads. Thus pretreatment of samples consists only of centrifugation prior to isoelectric focusing. If larger loads (greater than 50 micrograms) are required, the samples may be concentrated by lyophilization and reconstitution in a smaller volume of water or by dialysis against 30% w/v polyethylene glycol. Immobilized pH gradient polyacrylamide gels (incorporating a hybrid carrier ampholyte system) of two pH ranges (pH 4-9 and pH 3.5-5.0) have been used to separate the proteins in human parotid saliva. The effects of urea on focused patterns were studied; in pH 4-9 gels it gave improved resolution of protein bands, whereas in pH 3.5-5.0 gels it prevented protein precipitation. The salivary proteins were then visualized by staining with Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 or a silver procedure. Using the latter, 25-30 well-resolved bands were formed on a pH 4-9 gel loaded with 20 micrograms of proteins. The method offers considerable advantages compared with carrier ampholyte-isoelectric focusing. PMID:1697536

  9. An ultrasensitive method of real time pH monitoring with complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-02-01

    CMOS sensors are becoming a powerful tool in the biological and chemical field. In this work, we introduce a new approach on quantifying various pH solutions with a CMOS image sensor. The CMOS image sensor based pH measurement produces high-accuracy analysis, making it a truly portable and user friendly system. pH indicator blended hydrogel matrix was fabricated as a thin film to the accurate color development. A distinct color change of red, green and blue (RGB) develops in the hydrogel film by applying various pH solutions (pH 1-14). The semi-quantitative pH evolution was acquired by visual read out. Further, CMOS image sensor absorbs the RGB color intensity of the film and hue value converted into digital numbers with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to determine the pH ranges of solutions. Chromaticity diagram and Euclidean distance represent the RGB color space and differentiation of pH ranges, respectively. This technique is applicable to sense the various toxic chemicals and chemical vapors by situ sensing. Ultimately, the entire approach can be integrated into smartphone and operable with the user friendly manner. PMID:25597802

  10. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. R.; Bakar, N. A.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Johari, W. L. W.; Ahmad, S. A.; Jirangon, H.; Syed, M. A.; Shukor, M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  11. Flood Tide Transport of Blue Crab Postlarvae: Limitations in a Lagoonal Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudaback, C.; Eggleston, D.

    2005-05-01

    Blue crabs, an important commercial species, spend much of their life in estuaries along the east coast. The larvae spawn at or near the ocean, but the juveniles mature in the lower salinity waters of the estuary. It is generally believed that blue crab postlarvae migrate into near surface waters on flood, possibly cued by increasing salinity, and return to the bottom on ebb. Over several tidal cycles, the postlarvae travel a significant distance up-estuary. This model applies quite well to Chesapeake Bay, which has a strong along-estuary salinity gradient and large tides, but may not apply as well to Pamlico Sound, where circulation and salinity are more wind-driven than tidal. A recently completed study (N. Reyns, PhD), indicates that postlarval blue crabs use flood tides and wind-driven currents to cross Pamlico Sound. This study was based on observations with good spatial coverage, but limited vertical and temporal resolution. We have recently completed a complementary study, sampling crab larvae around the clock at four depths at a single location. Preliminary results from the new study suggest that the crab postlarvae do swim all the way to the surface, on flood only, and that flood currents are strongest slightly below the surface. These observations suggest the utility of flood tide transport in this system. However, near bottom salinity does not seem to be driven by tides; at this point it is unclear what cue might trigger the vertical migration of the postlarvae.

  12. Blue emitting ZnO nanostructures grown through cellulose bio-templates.

    PubMed

    Oudhia, Anjali; Sharma, Savita; Kulkarni, Pragya; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a green and cost-effective recipe for the synthesis of blue-emitting ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) using cellulose bio-templates. Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf extract prepared in different solvents were used as biological templates to produce nanostructures of wurtzite ZnO with a particle size ~12-36 nm. A cellulose-driven capping mechanism is used to describe the morphology of ZnO NPs. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) studies showed that solvents affect the growth process and the capping mechanism of bio-template severely. Structural changes in ZnO NPs were evident with variation in pH, dielectric constants (DC) and boiling points (BP) of solvents. Furthermore, an energy band model is proposed to explain the origin of the blue emission in the as-obtained ZnO NPs. PL excitation studies and the theoretical enthalpy values of individual defects were used to establish the association between the interstitial-zinc-related defect levels and the blue emission. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26597927

  13. Method for continuous records of the pH of low-level clouds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Black, H.D.; Landsberg, H.E.

    1983-08-31

    A redesigned automatic pH measuring fog interceptor was installed during June to August at 1000 meters elevation in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, together with an automatic weather station. A detailed description of the equipment is given. It recorded four events. Two were short-lived radiation fogs which had pH of around 6.7. Two other events were post-frontal, non-precipitating low-level clouds. Their pH was also near neutral, although a bulk sample showed a pH of 5.5. In the latter case the 24-hour trajectory indicated an orgin of the air mass in the Great Lake region. All the other cases showed trajectories suggesting local origin rather thhan advection of air. The pH values which are higher than most reported in the literature, especially from the Adirondacks, are ascribed to possible incorporation of the locally abundant limestone dust into the droplets. 22 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Kinetic studies on the adsorption of methylene blue onto vegetal fiber activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, Hakima; Fatiha, Bentahar; Salah, Hanini

    2013-10-01

    The vegetable sponge of cylindrical loofa (CL), a natural product which grows in the north of Algeria, was used to prepare activated carbons. Two activated carbons, AC1 and AC2, by two physiochemical activation methods to be used for methylene blue removal from wastewater. The surface structure of AC1, AC2 and CL were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the prepared activated carbons was determined by batch tests. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and granulometry were investigated, at agitation rate 150 rpm. The results showed that the equilibrium uptake increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The maximum % removal of MB obtained was 99% at 50 °C for AC1 and 82% at 30 °C for AC2. The increase in initial pH in the ranges of 2-10 increases the yields removal of MB on AC2. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The latter provided the best correlation of the experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order model.

  15. Structural characteristics of mixed oxides MOx/SiO2 affecting photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Blitz, J. P.; Bandaranayake, B.; Pakhlov, E. M.; Zarko, V. I.; Sulym, I. Ya.; Kulyk, K. S.; Galaburda, M. V.; Bogatyrev, V. M.; Oranska, O. I.; Borysenko, M. V.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Janush, W.

    2012-06-01

    A series of photocatalysts based on silica (nanoparticulate) supported titania, ceria, and ceria/zirconia were synthesized and characterized by a variety of techniques including surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, surface charge density, and photocatalytic behavior toward methylene blue decomposition. Thermal treatment at 600 °C increases the anatase content of the titania based catalysts detected by XRD. Changes in the infrared spectra before and after thermal treatment indicate that at low temperature there are more tbnd Sisbnd Osbnd Titbnd bonds than at high temperature. As these bonds break upon heating the SiO2 and TiO2 separate, allowing the TiO2 anatase phase to form. This results in an increased catalytic activity for the thermally treated samples. Nearly all titania based samples exhibit a negative surface charge density at pH 7 (initial pH of photocatalytic studies) which aids adsorption of methylene blue. The crystallinity of ceria and ceria/zirconia based catalysts are in some cases limited, and in others non-existent. Even though the energy band gap (Eg) can be lower for these catalysts than for the titania based catalysts, their photocatalytic properties are inferior.

  16. Selectively Modulating Triplet Exciton Formation in Host Materials for Highly Efficient Blue Electrophosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanhuan; Bi, Ran; Chen, Ting; Yuan, Kai; Chen, Runfeng; Tao, Ye; Zhang, Hongmei; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Wei

    2016-03-23

    The concept of limiting the triplet exciton formation to fundamentally alleviate triplet-involved quenching effects is introduced to construct host materials for highly efficient and stable blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). The low triplet exciton formation is realized by small triplet exciton formation fraction and rate with high binding energy and high reorganization energy of triplet exciton. Demonstrated in two analogue molecules in conventional donor-acceptor molecule structure for bipolar charge injection and transport with nearly the same frontier orbital energy levels and triplet excited energies, the new concept host material shows significantly suppressed triplet exciton formation in the host to avoid quenching effects, leading to much improved device efficiencies and stabilities. The low-voltage-driving blue PhOLED devices exhibit maximum efficiencies of 43.7 cd A(-1) for current efficiency, 32.7 lm W(-1) for power efficiency, and 20.7% for external quantum efficiency with low roll-off and remarkable relative quenching effect reduction ratio up to 41%. Our fundamental solution for preventing quenching effects of long-lived triplet excitons provides exciting opportunities for fabricating high-performance devices using the advanced host materials with intrinsically small triplet exciton formation cross section. PMID:26937742

  17. Reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue by Enterobacter sp. strain Dr.Y13.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Rahman, M F; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2009-09-01

    Extensive use of metals in various industrial applications has caused substantial environmental pollution. Molybdenum-reducing bacteria isolated from soils can be used to remove molybdenum from contaminated environments. In this work we have isolated a local bacterium with the capability to reduce soluble molybdate to the insoluble molybdenum blue. We studied several factors that would optimize molybdate reduction. Electron donor sources such as glucose, sucrose, lactose, maltose and fructose (in decreasing efficiency) supported molybdate reduction after 24 h of incubation with optimum glucose concentration for molybdate reduction at 1.5% (w/v). The optimum pH, phosphate and molybdate concentrations, and temperature for molybdate reduction were pH 6.5, 5.0, 25 to 50 mM and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Mo-blue produced by cellular reduction exhibited a unique absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Metal ions such as chromium, cadmium, copper, silver and mercury caused approximately 73, 71, 81, 77 and 78% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. All of the respiratory inhibitors tested namely rotenone, azide, cyanide and antimycin A did not show any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting components of the electron transport system are not responsible for the reducing activity. The isolate was tentatively identified as Enterobacter sp. strain Dr.Y13 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. PMID:19455513

  18. Highly Efficient Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Employing a Host Material with Small Bandgap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ye-Xin; Hu, Yun; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Zuo-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-06-29

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PhOLED) with a high maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 26.6% was achieved using a new material, 2,8-bis(9,9-dimethylacridin-10(9H)-yl)dibenzo[b,d]furan (DBF-DMS) with a small bandgap, as the host. The device with DBF-DMS showed improved performance compared with that with 1,3-di-9-carbazolylbenzene, which is ascribed to the enhancement in carrier injection and transporting abilities and material stability of DBF-DMS. A lifetime of more than 100 h (time to 50% of the initial luminance, 1000 cd/m(2) with an EQE of 19.6%) in the other DBF-DMS-based device is obtained by further utilizing better device structure. This is a report indicating that host material with a small bandgap like DBF-DMS can be successfully utilized toward blue PhOLEDs with high performance. PMID:27281124

  19. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by wood millet carbon optimization using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri

    2015-02-01

    The use of cheep, non-toxic, safe and easily available adsorbent are efficient and recommended material and alternative to the current expensive substance for pollutant removal from wastewater. The activated carbon prepared from wood waste of local tree (millet) extensively was applied for quantitative removal of methylene blue (MB), while simply. It was used to re-used after heating and washing with alkaline solution of ethanol. This new adsorbent was characterized by using BET surface area measurement, FT-IR, pH determination at zero point of charge (pHZPC) and Boehm titration method. Response surface methodology (RSM) by at least the number of experiments main and interaction of experimental conditions such as pH of solution, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage was optimized and set as pH 7, contact time 18 min, initial dye concentration 20 ppm and 0.2 g of adsorbent. It was found that variable such as pH and amount of adsorbent as solely or combination effects seriously affect the removal percentage. The fitting experimental data with conventional models reveal the applicability of isotherm models Langmuir model for their well presentation and description and Kinetic real rate of adsorption at most conditions efficiently can be represented pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion. It novel material is good candidate for removal of huge amount of MB (20 ppm) in short time (18 min) by consumption of small amount (0.2 g).

  20. Immobilization of methylene blue onto bentonite and its application in the extraction of mercury (II).

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Mohamed M; Abou-El-Sherbini, Khaled S; Al-Muaikel, Nayef S

    2010-06-15

    Methylene blue was immobilized onto bentonite (BNT). The modified clay (MB-BNT) was used to extract Hg(2+) at pH 6.0 yielding Hg-MB-BNT. BNT, MB-BNT and Hg-MB-BNT were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectra, and elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. MB is suggested to be intercalated into the major phase of BNT; montmorillonite mineral (MMT), lying parallel to the aluminosilicate layers, with a capacity of 36 mequiv./100g. MB-BNT shows good stability in 0.1-1M hydrochloric or nitric acids, ammonium hydroxide, and concentrated Na(+), K(+) or NH(4)(+) chlorides or iodides. It shows good selectivity towards Hg(2+) with an extraction capacity of 37 mequiv./100g in the presence of I(-) giving rise to a ratio of MB/Hg(2+)/I(-) 1:1:3 in the clay phase. Extracted Hg(2+) could be quantitatively recovered by ammonia buffer at pH 8.5. MB-BNT was successfully applied to recover Hg(2+) from spiked natural water and cinnabar mineral samples using the optimum conditions; pH 6.0, time of stirring 10 min and 10 mL of 0.05 M NH(4)Cl/NH(4)OH at pH 8.5 as eluent. PMID:20133060

  1. Sonochemical degradation of naphthol blue black in water: Effect of operating parameters.

    PubMed

    Ferkous, Hamza; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Merouani, Slimane

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the sonochemical degradation of naphthol blue black (NBB), an acidic diazo dye, in water was investigated. The effects of several operating parameters such as initial NBB concentration, acoustic intensity, ultrasonic frequency, nature of the dissolved gas and solution pH on the degradation of the dye were carried out. The obtained results showed that ultrasound completely destroyed NBB (5 mg L(-1)) after 45 min of sonication and most of the chemical oxygen demand was eliminated after 90 min of treatment. It was found that the initial rate of sonolytic degradation increased with increasing the initial NBB concentration. The fitting of the experimental data by a heterogeneous Langmuir-kinetics model showed that NBB degraded mainly at the interfacial region of the bubble by hydroxyl radical (OH) attack. The degradation rate of the dye increased substantially with increasing acoustic intensity in the range of 0.44-3.58 W cm(-2) and decreased with increasing frequency in the range of 585-1140 kHz. The rate of NBB degradation decreased in the order of Ar>air>N2. The significant degradation was achieved in acidic conditions (pH 2) where the initial degradation rate was 1.37 and 1.66 higher than those observed at pH 6 and pH 10, respectively. PMID:25843901

  2. Why are blue zhamanshinites blue Liquid immiscibility in an impact melt

    SciTech Connect

    Zolensky, M.E. ); Koeberl, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors report here a study of the cause of the coloration of blue zhamanshinites, which are glassy impact melt rocks from the Zhamanshin crater in the USSR. They find that the blue color results from Rayleigh scattering from spherical, 100 nm-diameter inclusions of a separate Ca-Fe-Mg-P-rich silicate glass. These observations can best be explained by the operation of liquid immiscibility in the zhamanshinite melt, and suggest that liquid immiscibility may have a more general role in impactite evolution.

  3. Why are blue zhamanshinites blue? Liquid immiscibility in an impact melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Koeberl, Christian

    1991-01-01

    A study of the cause of the coloration of blue zhamanshinites, which are glassy impact melt rocks from the Zhamanshin crater in the USSR are reported. It is found that the blue color results from Rayleigh scattering from spherical, 100 nm-diameter inclusions of a separate Ca-Fe-Mg-P-rich silicate glass. These observations can best be explained by the operation of liquid immiscibility in the zhamanshinite melt, and suggest that liquid immiscibility may have a more general role in impactite evolution.

  4. MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-11-10

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter Γ in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

  5. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  6. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  7. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  8. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  9. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

  10. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  11. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  12. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  13. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  14. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, P.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1998-09-08

    A laser is disclosed for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr{sup 3+} ions and Yb{sup 3+} ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output. 11 figs.

  15. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A laser for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr.sup.3+ ions and Yb.sup.3+ ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output.

  16. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  17. Blue compact dwarfs - Extreme dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.

    1987-01-01

    Observational data on the most extreme members of the irregular dwarf (dI) galaxy class, the blue compact dwarfs (BCDs), are characterized, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The properties of the young stellar population, the ionized gas, the older star population, and the gas and dust of BCDs are contrasted with those of other dIs; BCD morphology is illustrated with sample images; and the value of BCDs (as nearby 'young' chemically unevolved galaxies) for studies of galaxy formation, galactic evolution, and starburst triggering mechanisms is indicated.

  18. Slow-blue PanSTARRS transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Bruce, Alastair; Lawrence, Andy; Ward, Martin; Collinson, James; Elvis, Martin; Gezari, Suvi; Smartt, Steven; Smith, Ken; Wright, Darryl; Fraser, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 50 blue, nuclear "transients" in PanSTARRS-1 has revealed different types of extremely variable AGN. The majority show a gradual brightening by ~2 mag from the SDSS observation a decade ago and may represent a new class of AGN microlensed by foreground galaxies. Spectra from the William Herschel Telescope identify these as z~1 AGN with atypical spectroscopic properties. We present an analysis of their photometric and spectroscopic variability in an effort to constrain the detailed structure of the source AGN.

  19. Spectroscopic surveys of faint blue stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary; Boley, Forrest I.; Swanson, Steven R.; Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of 450 faint blue stars obtained with the spectrograph and intensified Reticon scanner on the 1.3 m telescope at the McGraw Hill Observatory located at Kitt Peak are examined. The study is limited to objects brighter than V = 17.0 in magnitude. It is found that the relative numbers of objects such as white dwarfs, QSOs and CVs in the Kisco survey (Noguchi et al. 1980) is similar to that in the survey of Green et al., (1986).

  20. Maya Blue Paint: An Ancient Nanostructured Material

    PubMed

    Jose-Yacaman; Rendon; Arenas; Serra Puche MC

    1996-07-12

    Maya blue paint was often used in Mesoamerica. The origin of its color and its resistance to acids and biocorrosion have not been fully understood. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray microanalysis studies of authentic samples show that palygorskite crystals in the paint form a superlattice that probably occurs as a result of mixing with indigo molecules. An amorphous silicate substrate contains inclusions of metal nanoparticles encapsulated in the substrate and oxide nanoparticles on the surface. The beautiful tone of the color is obtained only when both the particles and the superlattice are present. PMID:8662502

  1. Nonlinear Pulsation Modeling of Luminous Blue Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Despain, Kate M.; Guzik, Joyce A.; Cox, Arthur N.

    1997-12-31

    Using an updated version of the Ostlie and Cox (1993) nonlinear hydrodynamics code, we show the results of Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) envelope models based on evolution models of initial mass 50-80 M solar. including mass loss. The models use OPAL opacities, contain 60-120 Lagrangian zones, include time dependent convection, and are given an initial photospheric radial velocity amplitude of 1 km/sec. Our goal is to explain the reason for the LBV instability strip and suggest a cause for LBV outbursts observed in massive stars in our Galaxy as well as the LMC and SMC.

  2. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  3. Blue Marble Space Institute essay contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, based in Seattle, Wash., is inviting college students to participate in its essay contest. Essays need to address the question, "In the next 100 years, how can human civilization prepare for the long-term changes to the Earth system that will occur over the coming millennium?" According to the institute, the purpose of the contest is "to stimulate creative thinking relating to space exploration and global issues by exploring how changes in the Earth system will affect humanity's future."

  4. Investigations of blue emitting phosphors for thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Särner, Gustaf; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus

    2008-12-01

    Blue emitting phosphors are investigated and reported for possible use in thermometry. Currently reported thermographic phosphors in general have the drawback of long emission lifetimes obstructing the possibility to time gate for background discrimination. An additional problem is that many thermographic phosphors have emission in the red spectral region, making them vulnerable for black body radiation at high temperatures. This work reports the temperature sensitivity for nine phosphors considered suitable for accurate temperature measurements in harsh conditions both in single points and in two dimensions (2D).

  5. The curious conversion of Empire Blue Cross.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    The for-profit conversion of Empire Blue Cross in New York challenges the case law and conventional policy wisdom that financial assets from formerly nonprofit organizations should be used to endow independent charitable foundations. The appropriation of Empire's assets by state government itself, and their subsequent deployment to subsidize health care institutions and repay political obligations, changes the conversion process from one that pits nonprofits against for-profits to one that pits private, nonprofit organizations against public-sector programs in the competition for new financial resources. PMID:12889758

  6. Sonophotocatalytic degradation of trypan blue and vesuvine dyes in the presence of blue light active photocatalyst of Ag3PO4/Bi2S3-HKUST-1-MOF: Central composite optimization and synergistic effect study.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, S; Rahimi, M R; Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K

    2016-09-01

    An efficient simultaneous sonophotocatalytic degradation of trypan blue (TB) and vesuvine (VS) using Ag3PO4/Bi2S3-HKUST-1-MOF as a novel visible light active photocatalyst was carried out successfully in a continuous flow-loop reactor equipped to blue LED light. Ag3PO4/Bi2S3-HKUST-1-MOF with activation ability under blue light illumination was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), photoluminescence (PL) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The effect of operational parameters such as the initial TB and VS concentration (5-45mg/L), flow rate (30-110mL/min), irradiation and sonication time (10-30min), pH (3-11) and photocatalyst dosage (0.15-0.35g/L) has been investigated and optimized using central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function (DF). Maximum sonophotodegradation percentage (98.44% and 99.36% for TB and VS, respectively) was found at optimum condition set as: 25mg/L of each dye, 70mL/min of solution flow rate, 25min of irradiation and sonication time, pH 6 and 0.25g/L of photocatalyst dosage. At optimum conditions, synergistic index value was obtained 2.53 that indicated the hybrid systems including ultrasound irradiation and photocatalysis have higher efficiency compared with sum of the individual processes. PMID:27150785

  7. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, M H; Spalding, E P

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition. PMID:8755616

  8. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  9. Differential migration of Blue Grouse in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, Brian S.; Hoffman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    We examined migration of adult Blue Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) in north-central Colorado by radio tracking 13 males and 19 females. Elevational changes associated with movements to winter areas were greater for males (median = 488 m, range = 183-671 m) than females (median = 122 m, range = -61-760 m). Males (median = 10.5 km, range = 1.0-29.4 km) also moved farther than females (median = 1.0 km, range = 0.1-28.0 km), resulting in partial segregation of sexes during winter. Directional orientation of movements to wintering areas was nonrandom for long-distance (>3 km) migrants. Median elevational change (122 m) and distance (0.6 km) between the first-winter and first-breeding areas for seven juvenile females were similar to movements of adult females. Males (median = 7 July) departed breeding areas earlier than females (median = 11 August), but arrived (median = 14 October) on winter areas about the same time as females (median = 23 October). Both sexes exhibited fidelity to winter areas. The average distance between winter locations ranged from 94 to 312 m (median = 135 m) for 11 radio-marked adults, suggesting Blue Grouse were sedentary on their winter ranges.

  10. Maya blue: a clay-organic pigment?

    PubMed

    Van Olphen, H

    1966-11-01

    Maya Blue, a pigment used by the Mayas in Yucatan, is remarkably stable: the color is not destroyed by hot concentrated mineral acids or by heating to about 250 degrees C. The principal constituent is the colorless mineral attapulgite. It is proposed that the pigment is an adsorption complex of attapulgite and natural indigo; a synthetic equivalent may be prepared from attapulgite and either indoxylester or indigo, or by applying the vat-dyeing technique, with reduced indigo.The low dye content of the pigment (less than 0.5 percent) indicates that the dye is absorbed only on the external surfaces of the attapulgite particles and not throughout the channels in their structures. The complex as such is not stable to acids, but the stability displayed by Maya Blue is achieved simply by heating the complex to from 75 degrees to 150 degrees C for several days. An analogous stable pigment can be prepared from sepiolite and indigo. No stable pigments could be prepared from clays with platelike structures or from zeolites. PMID:17778806

  11. Phenothiazinium photosensitisers XI. Improved toluidine blue photoantimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark; O'Kane, Ciara; Rawthore, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    The phenothiazinium derivative toluidine blue O (TBO) is widely employed as a photoantimicrobial agent in clinical trialling, particularly in dentistry. However, its activity against a range of pathogenic microbial species is not significantly different to that of the standard photoantimicrobial methylene blue. In the current study, derivatives of TBO with varying hydrocarbon substitution in chromophore position 2 were synthesised via the established anilinethiosulphonic route, using the mild oxidant silver(II) carbonate to allow substituent preservation. The resulting series of analogues demonstrated the expected increases in visible absorption wavelength and lipophilicity with increasing hydrocarbon content, as well as decreased aggregation for derivatives with bulkier substituents, and all produced singlet oxygen on illumination in vitro. Screening against a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens relevant to infection control showed remarkable increases in activity relative to the parent compound, particularly against the clinically important Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, in order to demonstrate clinical relevance, the photoactivities of the new derivatives against microbial targets were compared to conventional antibacterial and antifungal drugs, as well as biocides commonly used for local disinfection. Activity here was also generally greater than that of the conventional agents used for comparison, considerably so relative to the local disinfectant agents. PMID:27093001

  12. Pulsations and outbursts of luminous blue variables

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.; Guzik, J.A.; Soukup, M.S.; Despain, K.M.

    1997-06-01

    We propose an outburst mechanism for the most luminous stars in our and other galaxies. These million solar luminosity stars, with masses (after earlier mass loss) of between 20 and maybe 70 solar masses, are pulsationally unstable for both radial and low-degree nonradial modes. Some of these modes are ``strange,`` meaning mostly that the pulsations are concentrated near the stellar surface and have very rapid growth rates in linear theory. The pulsation driving is by both the high iron line opacity (near 150,000 K) and the helium opacity (near 30,000 K) kappa effects. Periods range from 5 to 40 days. Depending on the composition, pulsations periodically produce luminosities above the Eddington limit for deep layers. The radiative luminosity creates an outward push that readily eases the very low gamma envelope to very large outburst radii. A key point is that a super-Eddington luminosity cannot be taken up by the sluggish convection rapidly enough to prevent an outward acceleration of much of the envelope. As the helium abundance in the envelope stellar material increases by ordinary wind mass loss and the luminous blue variable outbursts, the opacity in the deep pulsation driving layers decreases. This makes the current Eddington luminosity even higher so that pulsations can then no longer give radiative luminosities exceeding the limit. For the lower mass and luminosity luminous blue variables there is considerably less iron line opacity driving, and pulsations are almost all caused by the helium ionization kappa effect.

  13. Raphael Meldola, his blue and his times.

    PubMed

    Travis, A S

    2012-05-01

    Raphael Meldola (1849-1915), English industrial and academic chemist, spectroscopist, naturalist, educator and lobbyist for science, is today almost a forgotten scientist whose life is celebrated only with a medal awarded by the Royal Society of Chemistry that honors achievement by younger chemists. In the 1870-80s, however, he invented a number of important synthetic dyestuffs including the cotton dyes isamine blue and Meldola's blue, and also naphthol green B, all of which have had application in biology and medicine. I describe here the early emergence of the synthetic dye industry, the first science-based industry, Meldola's role in its development, and his own inventions. Meldola's wide ranging achievements in science led to appointments as president of important professional scientific and manufacturers' societies. He was a fervent disciple of natural selection, a correspondent of Charles Darwin, and a prominent 19(th)-century neo-Darwinian. In 1886, drawing on analogies with evolutionary theory, he warned the British that neglect of science, particularly chemistry, would lead to industrial decline and even extinction, though his message generally was ignored, at least until 1914. PMID:22148999

  14. Blue LEDs feasibility for tissue fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Denisov, Nikolay A.

    2000-04-01

    We considered the limited number of light-induced fluorescence applications for marketed ultra-bright blue LEDs where they can compete with versatile laser sources. Satisfactory optical output and miniature size as well as low power consumption of blue LEDs emitting at 470 nm allow to consider them as a promising alternatives to metal vapor or gas lasers used in many expires LIF applications. Available to authors LEDs form Hewlett-Packard, Micro Electronics Corp., Nichia Chemical Industries Ltd. and Toyoda Gosei Co. were tested to comply with demands to a tissue excitation source for portable spectroscopes. The optical performance of LEDs has shown that selected group of InGaN LEDs could be successfully used for that. The miniature illuminator that includes LED, focusing condenser, filter set and distal fiberoptic light concentrator was designed and tested in conjunction with portable CCD- equipped spectroscope. Operating in dark condition the proposed LED illuminator provides the level of fluorescence signal sufficient to detect spectral abnormalities in human Caucasian skin and excised gastrointestinal samples. All tissue autofluorescence data taken under LED illumination were compared with readings under He-Cd laser excitation and showed a good match. A new diagnostic designs based on LEDs were considered for clinical use.

  15. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  16. The Return of the Blue Butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Anabela

    2014-05-01

    The Return of the Blue Butterfly The English writer Charles Dickens once wrote: "I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free". But are they really? The work that I performed with a group of students from 8th grade, had a starting point of climate change and the implications it has on ecosystems. Joining the passion I have for butterflies, I realized that they are also in danger of extinction due to these climatic effects. Thus, it was easy to seduce my students wanting to know more. Luckily I found Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo, a researcher at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, who has worked on butterflies and precisely investigated this issue. Portugal is the southern limit of butterfly-blue (Phengaris alcon), and has been many years in the red book of endangered species. Butterfly-blue is very demanding of their habitat, and disappears very easily if ideal conditions are not satisfied. Increased fragmentation of landscapes and degradation of suitable habitats, are considered the greatest challenges of the conservation of Phengaris butterfly in Portugal. In recent decades, climate change has also changed butterfly-blue spatial distribution with a movement of the species northward to colder locations, and dispersion in latitude. Butterflies of Europe must escape to the North because of the heat. Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo and her research team began a project, completed in December 2013, wanted to preserve and restore priority habitats recognized by the European Union to help species in danger of disappearing with increasing temperature. The blue butterfly is extremely important because it is a key indicator of the quality of these habitats. In the field, the butterflies are monitored to collect all possible data in order to identify the key species. Butterflies start flying in early July and cease in late August. Mating takes about an hour and occurs in the first days of life. The gentian-peat (Gentiana pneumonanthe) serves as the host plant for

  17. A chimeric repressor of petunia PH4 R2R3-MYB family transcription factor generates margined flowers in torenia.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2016-05-01

    The development of new phenotypes is key to the commercial development of the main floricultural species and cultivars. Important new phenotypes include features such as multiple-flowers, color variations, increased flower size, new petal shapes, variegation and distinctive petal margin colourations. Although their commercial use is not yet common, the transgenic technologies provide a potentially rapid means of generating interesting new phenotypes. In this report, we construct 5 vectors which we expected to change the color of the flower anthocyanins, from purple to blue, regulating vacuolar pH. When these constructs were transformed into purple torenia, we unexpectedly recovered some genotypes having slightly margined petals. These transgenic lines expressed a chimeric repressor of the petunia PhPH4 gene under the control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S RNA promoter. PhPH4 is an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor. The transgenic lines lacked pigmentation in the petal margin cells both on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Expressions of Flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and Flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) genes were reduced in the margins of these transgenic lines, suggesting an inhibitory effect of PhPH4 repressor on anthocyanin synthesis. PMID:27089475

  18. Blue-light receptor in a white mutant of Physarum polycephalum mediates inhibition of spherulation and regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Schreckenbach, T; Walckhoff, B; Verfuerth, C

    1981-01-01

    Blue light induces sporulation of Physarum polycephalum macroplasmodia and reversibly inhibits spherulation (sclerotization) of microplasmodia. Illuminated microplasmodia have an abnormal appearance. The photobiological responses of the plasmodia appear to be unaffected by the absence of yellow pigment in the white mutant strain used. Illumination of microplasmodial suspensions with blue light (lambda max approximately 465 nm) results also in an early effect on glucose metabolism: glucose consumption is reversibly inhibited. By using radioactive glucose it was shown that the main products formed are a water-insoluble glucan and the disaccharide trehalose. Inhibition of glucose consumption in the light results in decreased production of these two compounds. Illumination of microplasmodial suspensions also causes a reversible effect on the pH of the medium which is interpreted as a decreased production of a yet unidentified acid from glucose. The action spectrum of the light-induced pH response shows maxima near 390, 465, and 485 nm. It resembles the absorption spectrum of a flavoprotein and confirms the existence of a blue-light receptor in P. polycephalum microplasmodia. Images PMID:6940119

  19. Adsorption treatment and recovery of the hazardous dye, Brilliant Blue FCF, over bottom ash and de-oiled soya.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Mittal, Alok; Krishnan, Lisha; Mittal, Jyoti

    2006-01-01

    Two waste materials-bottom ash, a power plant waste, and de-oiled soya, an agricultural waste-are meticulously and successfully used as adsorbent for the removal and recovery of a hazardous triphenylmethane dye, Brilliant Blue FCF. Both the materials were characterized by chemical analysis, IR, DTA, SEM and XRD studies. Their physical characteristics like surface area, porosity, density and loss on ignition were also determined. The adsorption of the dye over both materials was achieved under different pH, adsorbate concentration, sieve size, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature, etc. conditions. For both the systems Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied and, based on these models, useful thermodynamic parameters were calculated. For both the adsorbents, the kinetic measurements indicate that the adsorption process follows first order kinetics and film diffusion and particle diffusion mechanisms are operative at lower and higher concentrations, respectively, in each case. By percolating the dye solution through fixed-bed columns the bulk removal of the Brilliant Blue FCF was carried out and necessary parameters were determined to find out the percentage saturation of both the columns. Recovery of Brilliant Blue FCF was made by eluting dilute NaOH of pH 11 through each column. PMID:16040036

  20. Experimental and kinetic studies on methylene blue adsorption by coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, D; Namasivayam, C

    2007-01-01

    Varying the parameters such as agitation time, dye concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature carried out the potential feasibility of thermally activated coir pith carbon prepared from coconut husk for removal of methylene blue. Greater percentage of dye was removed with decrease in the initial concentration of dye and increase in amount of adsorbent used. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye on coir pith carbon was a gradual process. Lagergren first-order, second-order, intra particle diffusion model and Bangham were used to fit the experimental data. Equilibrium isotherms were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubnin-Radushkevich, and Tempkin isotherm. The adsorption capacity was found to be 5.87 mg/g by Langmuir isotherm for the particle size 250-500 microm. The equilibrium time was found to be 30 and 60 min for 10 and 20 mg/L and 100 min for 30, 40 mg/L dye concentrations, respectively. A maximum removal of 97% was obtained at natural pH 6.9 for an adsorbent dose of 100 mg/50 mL and 100% removal was obtained for an adsorbent dose of 600 mg/50 mL of 10 mg/L dye concentration. The pH effect and desorption studies suggest that chemisorption might be the major mode of the adsorption process. The change in entropy (DeltaS0) and heat of adsorption (DeltaH0) of coir pith carbon was estimated as 117.20 J/mol/K and 30.88 kJ/mol, respectively. The high negative value of change in Gibbs free energy indicates the feasible and spontaneous adsorption of methylene blue on coir pith carbon. PMID:16427273

  1. Simple Bipolar Host Materials for High-Efficiency Blue, Green, and White Phosphorescence OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Jiuyan; Liu, Di; Jin, Qian

    2016-08-31

    3-(1H-Pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine is used as electron-transporting unit to construct bipolar host materials o-CzPyPz, m-CzPyPz, and p-CzPyPz for application in phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). By varying the ortho-, meta-, or para-linking mode between the n-type 3-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine and the p-type carbazole on phenylene bridge, the optoelectronic parameters are tuned to large extent. The highly twisted o-CzPyPz has high triplet energy of 2.95 eV, while the isomer p-CzPyPz with more coplanar conformation has smaller triplet energy of 2.67 eV. The m-CzPyPz-hosted blue PhOLED exhibits a peak current efficiency of 49.1 cd A(-1) (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 24.5%) and low-efficiency roll-off, while the p-CzPyPz-hosted green PhOLEDs turns on at 2.8 V and exhibits high efficiencies of 91.8 cd A(-1) (96.1 lm W(-1) and 27.3%). Furthermore, two-emitting-layer white OLEDs are fabricated with m-CzPyPz or p-CzPyPz as common hosts for both blue and orange phosphors, which realize high efficiencies of 57.8 cd A(-1) (45.4 lm W(-1) and 23.6%) and 60.7 cd A(-1) (38.1 lm W(-1) and 23.1%). The optimization of host structure for good matching of host and dopant and finally for the ideal performance is discussed. PMID:27517473

  2. Influence of the composition of unripe genipap (Genipa americana L.) fruit on the formation of blue pigment.

    PubMed

    Bentes, Adria de S; de Souza, Hugo A L; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Lopes, Alessandra S; de Faria, Lênio J G

    2015-06-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of unripe genipap fruits and the proximate and amino acid compositions of the endocarp and mesocarp of the unripe fruits were determined, placing special emphasis on the possible role of the protein-amino acid fraction on the formation of the typical blue pigment of the matrix. The two parts of the fruit analyzed have low energy (49.88 kcal/100 g for mesocarp and 43.48 kcal/100 g for endocarp) and high fiber content (7.88 % for mesocarp and 16.76 % for endocarp). The endocarp showed protein content (3.19 %) five times higher than the mesocarp (0.62 %), which may explain in part the greater amounts of blue pigment formed in the endocarp when compared to the mesocarp. Furthermore, the pH found in mesocarp (4.49) and endocarp (5.21) is within the optimum range for the formation of the blue pigment. A significant color change (ΔE (*)  = 26.45) was observed in endocarp during its exposure to the air for 2 h. Free aspartic and glutamic acids and cystine were the predominant amino acids in the mesocarp, while glutamic and aspartic acids and leucine were predominant in the endocarp. According to the results, the formation of blue pigment does not cause any change in the amino acid composition. PMID:26028777

  3. Facile synthesis of pectin-stabilized magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue nanocomposites for selective cesium removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Avinash A; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-09-01

    This work focused on the development of pectin-stabilized magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue (PSMGPB) nanocomposites for removal of cesium from wastewater. The PSMGPB nanocomposite showed an improved adsorption capacity of 1.609mmol/g for cesium, compared with magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue, magnetic pectin Prussian blue, and magnetic Prussian blue nanocomposites, which exhibited adsorption capacities of 1.230, 0.901, and 0.330mmol/g, respectively. Increased adsorption capacity of PSMGPB nanocomposites was attributed to the pectin-stabilized separation of graphene oxide sheets and enhanced distribution of magnetites on the graphene oxide surface. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the effective separation of graphene oxide sheets due to the incorporation of pectin. The optimum temperature and pH for adsorption were 30°C and 7.0, respectively. A thermodynamic study indicated the spontaneous and the exothermic nature of cesium adsorption. Based on non-linear regression, the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Tempkin models. PMID:27262093

  4. Jupiter in blue, ultraviolet and near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These three images of Jupiter, taken through the narrow angle camera of NASA's Cassini spacecraft from a distance of 77.6 million kilometers (48.2 million miles) on October 8, reveal more than is apparent to the naked eye through a telescope.

    The image on the left was taken through the blue filter. The one in the middle was taken in the ultraviolet. The one on the right was taken in the near infrared.

    The blue-light filter is within the part of the electromagnetic spectrum detectable by the human eye. The appearance of Jupiter in this image is, consequently, very familiar. The Great Red Spot (below and to the right of center) and the planet's well-known banded cloud lanes are obvious. The brighter bands of clouds are called zones and are probably composed of ammonia ice particles. The darker bands are called belts and are made dark by particles of unknown composition intermixed with the ammonia ice.

    Jupiter's appearance changes dramatically in the ultraviolet and near infrared images. These images are near negatives of each other and illustrate the way in which observations in different wavelength regions can reveal different physical regimes on the planet.

    All gases scatter sunlight efficiently at short wavelengths; this is why the sky appears blue on Earth. The effect is even more pronounced in the ultraviolet. The gases in Jupiter's atmosphere, above the clouds, are no different. They scatter strongly in the ultraviolet, making the deep banded cloud layers invisible in the middle image. Only the very high altitude haze appears dark against the bright background. The contrast is reversed in the near infrared, where methane gas, abundant on Jupiter but not on Earth, is strongly absorbing and therefore appears dark. Again the deep clouds are invisible, but now the high altitude haze appears relatively bright against the dark background. High altitude haze is seen over the poles and the equator.

    The Great Red Spot, prominent in all images, is

  5. Colorimetric Determination of pH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

  6. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  7. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Methods Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Results Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P < 0.03, all) and on temporal frequency (P < 0.03, all). In the presence of blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change −0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>−0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P < 0.003). Overall, neonatal astigmatism was reduced with blue light. Conclusions Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work. PMID:26393671

  8. Intracellular pH Recovery Rates in Bivalve Hemocytes Following Exposure to Acidic Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxton, A.; Wikfors, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of ocean acidification effects upon carbonate shell-forming species have caused great concern for the future of shellfisheries. Nevertheless, bivalve species inhabiting an estuarine environment have evolved in these environments with fluctuating pH levels. Previous experimental studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of oyster hemocytes to maintain intracellular homeostasis under acidic external conditions. However, little information is known of this homeostatic mechanism in other molluscan shellfish species present in these same habitats. In the current study we propose to determine if other bivalve species of aquaculture interest also possess this intracellular regulation by applying an in vitro hemocyte pH-recovery assay, previously developed for oysters, on the northern quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the softshell clam, Mya arenaria. Preliminary results from the determination of initial intracellular pH levels, the initial step in the rate recovery assay, indicated a pH range between 7.0-7.4. This range was comparable to initial values measured in oysters, and consistent with data reported in the current literature. The second step of the hemocyte pH-recovery assay involves exposing oyster hemocytes to acidic external conditions and measuring the ability of the hemocyte intracellular pH to maintain homeostasis (i.e. recovery rate). Results from the recovery rate process will be presented.

  9. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device. PMID:25388935

  10. Blue star-forming isolated elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerna, I.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Avila-Reese, V.; Abonza-Sane, J.; del Olmo, A.

    2016-06-01

    The isolated environment seems to favor the formation of blue, star-forming galaxies that are not observed in a high-density environment such as the Coma supercluster. These galaxies, with masses between 7 × 10^9 and 2 × 10^10 h‑2 Msun, are also the youngest galaxies from a sample of isolated elliptical galaxies with light-weighted stellar ages ˜1 < Gyr and exhibit bluer colors toward the galaxy center. Around 30-60% of their present-day luminosity, but only <5% of their present-day mass, is due to star formation in the last 1 Gyr. The color and star-formation activity in these galaxies could be explained by rejuvenation of ellipticals by recent (<1 Gyr) cold gas accretion.

  11. Identification of human megakaryocytes with rhodanile blue.

    PubMed

    Kass, L

    1985-04-01

    Using the oxazine dye rhodanile blue, large typical megakaryocytes and small megakaryocytes (micromegakaryocytes) from the bone marrows of normal persons, and from patients with a variety of preleukemic disorders, acute lymphoblastic and nonlymphoblastic leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura as an example of nonmalignant but abnormal megakaryocytopoiesis, showed intense pink staining of the cytoplasm. This pink metachromasia was not obliterated by prior digestion with either diastase or ribonuclease, but was markedly diminished or obliterated by preincubation with hyaluronidase, suggesting that the stain may detect a high content of acid mucopolysaccharides in megakaryocytes. Since the stain is simple, direct, and reproducible, it may represent a useful addition to the cytochemistry of megakaryocytes and complement the more complex immunologic techniques available currently. PMID:2580502

  12. Retrofitting outlet tunnel for Blue River Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.Y.; Stow, J.A.; Edmister, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The major development of the Blue River Project is to use the existing tunnel to supply water to a penstock and turbine located in a proposed powerhouse. The flood release through the tunnel is presently discharged by open channel flow. After the modification, the outlet and a new gate structure will be pressurized to allow combined usage of hydropower and flood release. The velocity through the new gate will increase by almost 70 percent. A complex transition was designed to house the bifurcation to penstock and to the new dual gate structure. A comprehensive physical model study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of the transition. Turbulent pressure fluctuation tests and analyses were performed from upstream of the bifurcation through the new gates. A revised transition was designed to minimize any potential pressure fluctuation and cavitation problems.

  13. Efficient blue electroluminescence from a fluorinated polyquinoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, I. D.; Pei, Q.; Marrocco, M.

    1994-09-01

    High efficiency blue electroluminescence is demonstrated from a polyquinoline ether, a new class of soluble, electroluminescent, polyaromatic polymer. Multilayer devices (consisting of hole and electron transport layers in addition to the emissive polyquinoline layer) show an internal quantum efficiency in excess of 4% at 450 nm. Light emitted from these devices is easily visible in room light with luminence levels of 30 cd/m2 at 55 V with a current density of 9 mA/cm2. The transport layers are shown to serve a dual function—to modify the carrier injection properties and to block passage of carriers of the opposite polarity thereby trapping carriers in the emissive layer.

  14. Approaches toward a blue semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1989-01-01

    Possible approaches for obtaining semiconductor diode laser action in the blue region of the spectrum are surveyed. A discussion of diode lasers is included along with a review of the current status of visible emitters, presently limited to 670 nm. Methods are discussed for shifting laser emission toward shorter wavelengths, including the use of II-IV materials, the increase in the bandgap of III-V materials by addition of nitrogen, and changing the bandstructure from indirect to direct by incorporating interstitial atoms or by constructing superlattices. Non-pn-junction injection methods are surveyed, including avalanche breakdown, Langmuir-Blodgett diodes, heterostructures, carrier accumulation, and Berglund diodes. Prospects of inventing new multinary semiconducting materials are discussed, and a number of novel materials described in the literature are tabulated. New approaches available through the development of quantum wells and superlattices are described, including resonant tunneling and the synthesis of arbitrary bandgap materials through multiple quantum wells.

  15. Blue Skies Research and the global economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braben, Donald W.

    2002-11-01

    Robert Solow's seminal work of the 1950s showed that science and technology are major sources of long-term global economic growth. But we have recently changed the ways that science and technology are managed. Industrial and academic research once thrived on individual freedom and flair. Progressively for the past three decades or so, however, research has been focused on short-term objectives selected by consensus. Global per-capita growth has steadily declined. Scientific enterprise is losing diversity. Blue Skies Research can help to restore diversity and to create the new technologies that can stimulate growth, but funding agencies nowadays rarely allow total freedom. A new coefficient of adventurousness is described. Its use, or other means, may help restore economic growth to its former levels.

  16. Sunspot temperatures from red and blue photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Preminger, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Photometric images are used to measure the temperature of sunspots at different wavelengths. Images at 672.3 nm and 472.3 nm are obtained at the San Fernando Observatory using the CFDT2 (2.5'' x 2.5'' pixels). Images at 607.1 nm and 409.4 nm are obtained by the PSPT at Mauna Loa Observatory. Monochromatic intensities are converted to temperatures as in Steinegger et al (1990). The pixel by pixel temperature for a sunspot is converted into a bolometric contrast for that sunspot according to Chapman et al (1994). Sunspot temperatures, i.e., their bolometric contrasts, are calculated from both red (672.3 nm) and blue wavelengths (472.3 nm) and compared.

  17. A bolt out of the blue.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Joseph R

    2005-05-01

    Lightning is a particularly unsettling product of bad weather. It causes more deaths and injuries in the U.S. than either hurricanes or tornadoes do, and it strikes without warning, sometimes with nothing but blue sky overhead. In central Florida, where I live, thunderstorms are a daily occurrence during the summer, and so, ironically, people in the Sunshine State often spend their afternoons indoors to avoid the risk of death from the sky. Worldwide, lightning flashes about four million times a day, and bolts have even been observed on other planets. Yet despite its familiarity, we still do not know what causes lightning. It is a misconception that Benjamin Franklin solved the puzzle when he conducted his famous kite experiment in 1752. PMID:15882023

  18. Blue laser inorganic write-once media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Mau; Yeh, Ru-Lin

    2004-09-01

    With the advantages of low cost, portability and compliance with ROM disc, write once disk has become the most popular storage media for computer and audio/video application. In addition, write once media, like CD-R and DVD-/+ R, are used to store permanent or nonalterable information, such as financial data transitions, legal documentation, and medical data. Several write once recording materials, such as TeO[1], TeOPd[2] and Si/Cu [3] have been proposed to realize inorganic write once media. Moreover, we propose AlSi alloy [4] to be used for recording layer of write once media. It had good recording properties in DVD system although the reflectivity is too low to be used for DVD-R disk. In this paper, we report the further results in blue laser system, such as the static and dynamic characteristics of write once media.

  19. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  20. Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Hernroth, B; Baden, S; Tassidis, H; Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Bergström Lind, S; Bergquist, J

    2016-08-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5-3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens. PMID:27288994

  1. Blue Marble: Remote Characterization of Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, Neville; Lewis, Brian; Chartres, James; Genova, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The study of the nature and distribution of habitable environments beyond the Solar System is a key area for Astrobiology research. At the present time, our Earth is the only habitable planet that can be characterized in the same way that we might characterize planets beyond the Solar System. Due to limitations in our current and near-future technology, it is likely that extra-solar planets will be observed as single-pixel objects. To understand this data, we must develop skills in analyzing and interpreting the radiation obtained from a single pixel. These skills must include the study of the time variation of the radiation, and the range of its photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric properties. In addition, to understand whether we are properly analyzing the single pixel data, we need to compare it with a ground truth of modest resolution images in key spectral bands. This paper discusses the concept for a mission called Blue Marble that would obtain data of the Earth using a combination of spectropolarimetry, spectrophotometry, and selected band imaging. To obtain imagery of the proper resolution, it is desirable to place the Blue Marble spacecraft no closer than the outer region of cis-lunar space. This paper explores a conceptual mission design that takes advantage of low-cost launchers, bus designs and mission elements to provide a cost effective observing platform located at one of the stable Earth-moon Lagrangian points (L4, L5). The mission design allows for the development and use of novel technologies, such as a spinning moon sensor for attitude control, and leverages lessons-learned from previous low-cost spacecraft such as Lunar Prospector to yield a low-risk mission concept.

  2. Evolution of local luminous compact blue galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabidoux, Katherine; Pisano, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a type of very blue, very compact star-forming galaxy that was common at z~1 but is rare in the local universe. While it is clear from this discrepancy that LCBGs must be a rapidly-evolving class of galaxy, it is not clear what type(s) of galaxy they become. Fortunately, since they are bright and nearby, the rare examples of z~0 LCBGs are easily studied across a large range of wavelengths. We have conducted a study of z~0 analogs to the z~1 LCBGs to investigate their galaxy-wide internal properties in order to determine what is triggering their current episode of star formation, for how long the star formation can continue, and what the galaxies may become once their star formation rates decrease from current levels. We have taken resolved H I observations of nine LCBGs and unresolved radio continuum observations of 35 LCBGs and combined this data with archival broad-band data to probe their global properties. We conclude that LCBGs are rotationally-supported, star-forming disk galaxies that, while they may be forming small central bulges or bars, are highly unlikely to evolve into dwarf elliptical, dwarf spheroidal, or elliptical galaxies on their own due to their masses and rotation velocities. LCBGs will likely fade to be spiral galaxies with lower surface brightnesses once their current episodes of star formation conclude. In addition, we have modeled the SEDs of the LCBGs in our sample to determine whether LCBGs' star formation is ramping up or winding down, and for how much longer their current active phase of star formation will last. We have begun to put together a picture of the current evolutionary stage of this class of galaxies, and have better constrained their future evolutionary paths.

  3. A comparison of the second harmonic generation from light-adapted, dark-adapted, blue, and acid purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Sheves, M; Lewis, A; Bouevitch, O

    1994-09-01

    The second order nonlinear polarizability and dipole moment changes upon light excitation of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR), dark-adapted BR, blue membrane, and acid purple membrane have been measured by second harmonic generation. Our results indicate that the dipole moment changes of the retinal chromophore, delta mu, are very sensitive to both the chromophore structure and protein/chromophore interactions. Delta mu of light-adapted BR is larger than that of dark-adapted BR. The acid-induced formation of the blue membrane results in an increase in the delta mu value, and formation of acid purple membrane, resulting from further reduction of pH to 0, returns the delta mu to that of light-adapted BR. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7811928

  4. A comparison of the second harmonic generation from light-adapted, dark-adapted, blue, and acid purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Sheves, M; Lewis, A; Bouevitch, O

    1994-01-01

    The second order nonlinear polarizability and dipole moment changes upon light excitation of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR), dark-adapted BR, blue membrane, and acid purple membrane have been measured by second harmonic generation. Our results indicate that the dipole moment changes of the retinal chromophore, delta mu, are very sensitive to both the chromophore structure and protein/chromophore interactions. Delta mu of light-adapted BR is larger than that of dark-adapted BR. The acid-induced formation of the blue membrane results in an increase in the delta mu value, and formation of acid purple membrane, resulting from further reduction of pH to 0, returns the delta mu to that of light-adapted BR. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7811928

  5. Preconcentration and separation of iron, zinc, cadmium and mercury, from waste water using Nile blue a grafted polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    El-shahat, M F; Moawed, E A; Zaid, M A A

    2003-04-10

    The present work describes a novel method for the incorporation of Nile blue A into polyurethane foam matrix. This foam material was found to be very suitable for the extraction of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The characterization of Nile blue A grafted foam and the effect of halide concentration, pH, shaking time, extraction isotherm and capacity have been investigated. This foam material was found to be suitable for the separation and preconcentration of iron (III), zinc (II), cadmium (II) and mercury (II) from waste water. The extraction was accomplished in (15-20) minutes. Iron was separated from acid medium (2-4 M HCl), zinc from (3-5 M HCl), cadmium from (4-6 M HCl) as thiocyanate complexes and mercury was separated from (1-2 M HCl) as chloride. PMID:18968973

  6. Facile Synthesis of Prussian Blue Derivate-Modified Mesoporous Material via Photoinitiated Thiol-Ene Click Reaction for Cesium Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ma, Jiaqi; He, Weiwei; Hua, Daoben

    2015-08-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize a functional mesoporous material for efficient removal of cesium is reported. Specifically, Prussian blue derivate-modified SBA-15 (SBA-15@FC) was prepared by photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction between thiol-modified SBA-15 and pentacyano(4-vinyl pyridine)ferrate complex. The effects of weight percentage of the Prussian blue derivate, pH, adsorbent dose, co-existing ions, and initial concentration were evaluated on the adsorption of cesium ions. The adsorption kinetically follows a pseudo-second-order model and reaches equilibrium within 2 h with a high adsorption capacity of about 13.90 mg Cs g(-1) , which indicates that SBA-15@FC is a promising adsorbent to effectively remove cesium from aqueous solutions. PMID:25965318

  7. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  8. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  9. 77 FR 68117 - Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice... (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2), Blue Summit Wind, LLC (Blue Summit) filed a...) interconnection facilities that deliver power from the Blue Summit's wind energy generator (Blue Summit...

  10. BLUE JOINT WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA, AND BLUE JOINT ROADLESS AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, Karen; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    During field studies of the Blue Joint Wilderness Study Area, Montana, and the Blue Joint Roadless Area, Idaho, areas of substantiated resource potential for epithermal precious-metal vein deposits were identified in areas of hydrothermal alteration and fossil hot springs activity in the Eocene volcanic rocks. Areas with substantiated resource potential for cobalt, copper, silver, and barite resources of the sediment-hosted type were identified in the Proterozoic quartz schist of the eastern part of the area. Probable potential exists for molybdenum in a prophyry system; anomalously high molybdenum values are coincident with high values for precious and base metals and uranium in some places. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  11. New York's Blue Cross and Blue Shield, 1934-1990: the complicated politics of nonprofit regulation.

    PubMed

    Marmor, T R

    1991-01-01

    The story of New York Blue Cross is one of complex interaction with state and federal regulators and also with hospitals, the medical profession, commercial insurers, and the public, who make up the regulatory environment. Negotiation, cooperation, and adaptation among parties whose goals and assumptions were partly parallel characterize the relationships. As we can see from New York Blue Cross's origins and its role in the development and administration of certificate-of-need legislation, Medicare, insurance practice and regulation, and hospital rate setting, this story does not represent the capture of government by a special interest, nor the gradual souring of a public interest organization, nor disinterested and distant government regulation. PMID:1800576

  12. OBSTACLES TO BLUE-COLLAR PARTICIPATION IN ADULT EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONDON, JACK; WENKERT, ROBERT

    WITH THE INCREASING LEISURE TIME OF BLUE-COLLAR WORKERS, CONCERN IS GROWING OVER THEIR LOW PARTICIPATION IN ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MYTHS ABOUT BLUE-COLLAR WORKERS WHICH STAND IN THEIR WAY INCLUDE--LOWER CLASS APATHY, INCAPABILITY OF SUSTAINED INTELLECTUAL EFFORT, AND LACK OF APPRECIATION OF THE VALUE OF EDUCATION. OBSTACLES INHERING IN SOCIAL…

  13. 3 CFR - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 29, 2010 Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Memorandum for the Secretary of Energy Expanding our Nation's capacity to generate clean nuclear energy is crucial...

  14. On the use of a single blue band in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, J. W., III

    1970-01-01

    The selection of a single blue band to quantitatively measure ocean chlorophyll is dependent upon the altitude and spectral bandwidth of the filter. These relationships are discussed, and the conclusion made that a blue band from 0.44 to 0.50 microns would best serve this oceanographic application.

  15. The Blue Stragglers of the Old Open Cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Robert D.; Geller, Aaron M.

    The old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 has yielded a wealth of astrophysical insight into its rich blue straggler population. Specifically, the NGC 188 blue stragglers are characterised by: A binary frequency of 80 % for orbital periods less than 104 days;

  16. Using the Blue Gourami in Ethological and Embryological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Theresa; Pollak, Edward I.

    1981-01-01

    Lists advantages in the use of the blue gourami in laboratory experiments on reproduction and embryogenesis. Materials and procedures for maintaining and spawning blue gouramis are provided. Also includes details on microscopic examination of developing embryos and histological techniques for microscope slide preparation. (CS)

  17. Blue starters∷ Brief upward discharges from an intense Arkansas thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Sentman, D. D.; Heavner, M. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Osborne, D. L.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    This paper documents the first observations of a new stratospheric electrical phenomenon associated with thunderstorms. On the night of 30 June (UT 1 July) 1994, 30 examples of these events, which we have called “blue starters,” were observed in a 6 m 44 s interval above the very energetic Arkansas thunderstorm where blue jets were first observed. The blue starters are distinguished from blue jets by a much lower terminal altitude. They are bright and blue in color, and protrude upward from the cloud top (17-18 km) to a maximum 25.5 km (83,655 ft.) in altitude. All blue starters events were recorded from two small areas near Texarkana, Texas/Arkansas where hail 7.0 cm in diameter was falling. Comparison to cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes revealed: 1. Blue starters were not observed to be coincident with either positive or negative CG flashes, but they do occur in the same general area as negative CG flashes; 2. Cumulative distributions of the negative CG flashes in ±5 s before and after the starter and within a radius of 50 km shows a significant reduction for about 3 s following the event in the two cells where starters and jets were observed. The energy deficit is approximately 109 J. It is possible that blue starters are a short-lived streamer phenomenon.

  18. [Blue nevus syndrome: endoscopic treatment by sclerosis and banding ligation].

    PubMed

    Sala Felis, T; Urquijo Ponce, J J; López Viedma, B; Pertejo Pastor, V; Berenguer Lapuerta, J

    1999-03-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the presence of cavernous hemangiomas in the skin and gastrointestinal tract with frequent digestive hemorrhages. Different therapeutic modalities exist: medical treatment, surgical resection; and most recently, endoscopic therapy has been described. We present a patient with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome treated with combined endoscopic therapy: sclerosis and band ligation. PMID:10228324

  19. 75 FR 5485 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... HOUSE, WASHINGTON, January 29, 2010 [FR Doc. 2010-2421 Filed 2-2-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 6450-01-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Memorandum of January 29, 2010 Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future... material. Accordingly, I request that you establish a Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear...

  20. 75 FR 13757 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy... announcing an open meeting of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (the Commission)....

  1. Blue Ribbon Schools: Elementary and Secondary School Recognition Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Reform Assistance and Dissemination.

    Since the Blue Ribbon Schools Program was established by the Secretary of Education in 1982, it has developed into a national school-improvement strategy. This brochure outlines the three purposes of the Blue Ribbon Schools Program: (1) identify and recognize outstanding public and private schools across the nation; (2) make research-based…

  2. 36 CFR 7.34 - Blue Ridge Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blue Ridge Parkway. 7.34 Section 7.34 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.34 Blue Ridge Parkway. (a) Snowmobiles. After consideration of any special situations,...

  3. 36 CFR 7.34 - Blue Ridge Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blue Ridge Parkway. 7.34 Section 7.34 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.34 Blue Ridge Parkway. (a) Snowmobiles. After...

  4. Contemporary Use of Ticagrelor in Interventional Practice (from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium).

    PubMed

    Karve, Amrita M; Seth, Milan; Sharma, Manoj; LaLonde, Thomas; Dixon, Simon; Wohns, David; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2015-06-01

    Ticagrelor has greater antiplatelet activity than clopidogrel and is approved for use in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). There are limited data on use of ticagrelor in real-world practice. We assessed ticagrelor use in 64,600 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention from January 2012 to March 2014 at 47 Michigan hospitals in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium. Preprocedural risk of major adverse events was estimated with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium risk prediction models. The proportion of patients receiving clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 72% (n = 46,864), 20% (n = 12,596), and 8% (n = 5,140), respectively, using ticagrelor increasing over time. Ticagrelor was used at 45 hospitals, ranging from 0.5% to 64.9% of discharges. Patients receiving ticagrelor were older (63.6 vs 59.4), more often women (32.9% vs 26.7%), and were more likely to present with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (24.4% vs 18.8%), cardiogenic shock within 24 hours (1.3% vs 0.9%), and anginal class IV (47.8% vs 43.0%) (p <0.05). Compared with prasugrel, ticagrelor was prescribed in patients with a higher predicted risk of percutaneous coronary intervention complications: contrast nephropathy (2.5% vs 1.6%), transfusion (2.2% vs 1.4%), and death (1.2% vs 0.7%) (p <0.001); >10% of patients were given prasugrel or ticagrelor for a non-ACS indication. Ticagrelor is prescribed to a higher risk population, and 1 in 10 patients prescribed ticagrelor or prasugrel did not have ACS. PMID:25846767

  5. Comparative metabolism and genotoxicity of the structurally similar nitrophenylenediamine dyes, HC Blue 1 and HC Blue 2, in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kari, F W; Driscoll, S M; Abu-Shakra, A; Strom, S C; Jenkins, W L; Volosin, J S; Rudo, K M; Langenbach, R

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies indicated that HC Blue 1 induced heptocellular carcinomas in B6C3F1 mice whereas the structurally similar nitroaromatic amine HC Blue 2 did not. In an attempt to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms responsible for their different carcinogenic potencies, comparative metabolism and genetic toxicity studies were undertaken. Eighteen-hour urinary recovery of administered radioactivity was equivalent for both compounds following oral gavage (100 mg/kg) in female B6C3F1 mice. By HPLC analysis, HC Blue 1 yielded 3 major polar metabolite peaks, one of which was susceptible to glucuronidase. In vivo metabolism of HC Blue 2 yielded a single major metabolite peak which was not hydrolyzed by glucuronidase. Metabolism by B6C3F1 mouse hepatocytes yielded metabolite profiles which were qualitatively similar to the profiles observed after in vivo metabolism. HC Blue 1 was metabolized by hepatocytes at approximately twice the rate of HC Blue 2. Cytogenetic evaluations of mouse hepatocytes after in vitro treatment indicated HC Blue 1 was more potent than HC Blue 2 in inducing chromosomal aberrations while both chemicals showed weak activity for inducing sister-chromatid exchanges. Furthermore, in the V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay, HC Blue 1, but not HC Blue 2, inhibited cell-to-cell communication suggesting a non-genotoxic activity may be present for HC Blue 1. It is concluded that qualitative and quantitative differences exist in the metabolism of these compounds and that genotoxic as well as nongenotoxic effects may contribute to their different carcinogenic potencies. PMID:2361189

  6. Removal of Remazol Blue 19 from wastewater by zinc-aluminium-chloride-layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhattabi, El Hassan; Lakraimi, Mohamed; Badreddine, Mohamed; Legrouri, Ahmed; Cherkaoui, Omar; Berraho, Moha

    2013-06-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also called anionic clays, consist of cationic brucite-like layers and exchangeable interlayer anions. These hydrotalcite-like compounds, with Zn and Al in the layers and chloride in the interlayer space, were prepared following the coprecipitation method at constant pH. The affinity of this material for Remazol Blue 19, RB19 [ 2- (3- (4- Amino- 9,10- dihydro- 3- sulpho- 9,10- dioxoanthracen- 4- yl) aminobenzenesulphonyl) vinyl) disodiumsulphate], was studied as a function of contact time, pH of the solutions LDH dose and the RB19/[Zn-Al-Cl] mass ratio. It was found that 48 h is enough time for the equilibrium state to be reached with maximum RB19 retention at pH of 9 for an LDH dose equal to 100 mg and with an RB19/[Zn-Al-Cl] mass ratio higher than 3. The adsorption isotherm, described by the Langmuir model, is of L-type. The results demonstrate that RB19 retention on LDHs occurs by adsorption on external surface when RB19/[Zn-Al-Cl] mass ratio is equal or <3 and by both adsorption and interlayer ion exchange for ratios higher than 3. A mechanism for removal of RB19 anion has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and TG analysis (TG and DTG curves).

  7. Adsorption of blue copper on a natural and electrochemically treated bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, M.; Mountassir, Y.; Benyaich, A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics and equilibrium studies of the adsorption of blue copper on a natural (NC) and electrochemically treated (EMC) bentonite, taken in different experimental conditions, were carried out. Changes of the dye uptake versus operating factors were evaluated using response surface methodology (RSM). The kinetics at 5-50 °C and pH < 10 obeyed the pseudo-first-order equation. Beyond pH 10, the pseudo-second-order equation also was suitable. The kinetics for NC was essentially controlled by external diffusion. However, both internal and external diffusion were the rate-limiting steps of the EMC kinetics. The NC isotherms were well described by the Langmuir model and the maximum uptake was around 21 mg/g. In the case of EMC, the Freundlich equation was rather fitting. Dye adsorption on both sorbents was a non-spontaneous process (2 < Δ G T 0 < 8 kJ/mol). According to the RSM results, pH had a negative impact on the dye adsorption and was the most influential factor in the case of EMC. For NC, the clay dose was rather the most important parameter.

  8. Oxidative degradation of Remazol Turquoise Blue G 133 by soybean peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Marchis, Tatiana; Avetta, Paola; Bianco-Prevot, Alessandra; Fabbri, Debora; Viscardi, Guido; Laurenti, Enzo

    2011-02-01

    Reactive dyes are widely employed in textile industries and their removal from wastewaters is a relevant environmental problem. In addition to chemical and physical methods, several bioremediation approaches, involving intact micro-organisms or isolated enzymes, have been proposed to decolorize dye solutions. In this paper, we report the complete and fast decolourization of a Cu(II)-phthalocyanine based reactive dye (Remazol Turquoise Blue G 133) by means of the soybean peroxidase/H(2)O(2) system. The oxidative degradation of the dye in aqueous solution at 25°C was studied as function of pH, revealing a quantitative decolourization yield at acidic pH values with a maximum of activity at pH 3.3. The reaction products were identified and characterized by HPLC-diode array detector (DAD)-mass spectrometry (MS), ionic chromatography and EPR techniques. This analysis showed that the enzyme catalyses the breaking of the phthalocyanine ring producing sulfophthalimide as the main degradation product, and the release of stoichiometric amount of ammonium and Cu(II) ions. PMID:21194634

  9. Removal of acid blue 062 on aqueous solution using calcinated colemanite ore waste.

    PubMed

    Atar, Necip; Olgun, Asim

    2007-07-19

    Colemanite ore waste (CW) has been employed as adsorbent for the removal of acid blue 062 anionic dye (AB 062) from aqueous solution. The adsorption of AB 062 onto CW was examined with respect to contact time, calcination temperature, particle size, pH, adsorbent dosage and temperature. The physical and chemical properties of the CW, such as particle sizes and calcinations temperature, play important roles in dye adsorption. The dye adsorption largely depends on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at pH 1. Three simplified kinetics models, namely, pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intraparticle diffusion models were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanisms. The kinetic adsorption of AB 062 on CW follows a pseudo-second order equation. The adsorption data have been analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results indicate that the Langmuir model provides the best correlation of the experimental data. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy of the adsorption of dye onto CW. PMID:17197077

  10. How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Allen, Justine J; Hanlon, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata), one of the world's most venomous animals, has long captivated and endangered a large audience: children playing at the beach, divers turning over rocks, and biologists researching neurotoxins. These small animals spend much of their time in hiding, showing effective camouflage patterns. When disturbed, the octopus will flash around 60 iridescent blue rings and, when strongly harassed, bite and deliver a neurotoxin that can kill a human. Here, we describe the flashing mechanism and optical properties of these rings. The rings contain physiologically inert multilayer reflectors, arranged to reflect blue-green light in a broad viewing direction. Dark pigmented chromatophores are found beneath and around each ring to enhance contrast. No chromatophores are above the ring; this is unusual for cephalopods, which typically use chromatophores to cover or spectrally modify iridescence. The fast flashes are achieved using muscles under direct neural control. The ring is hidden by contraction of muscles above the iridophores; relaxation of these muscles and contraction of muscles outside the ring expose the iridescence. This mechanism of producing iridescent signals has not previously been reported in cephalopods and we suggest that it is an exceptionally effective way to create a fast and conspicuous warning display. PMID:23053367

  11. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  12. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  13. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  14. UNC Health Systems and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina patient-centered medical home collaborative.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Don; Rubinow, David R

    2011-01-01

    UNC Health Systems and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina have entered into a joint venture that is designed to improve patient outcomes and experience and to control medical costs for patients with chronic conditions. This commentary reviews the impetus for, and the anticipated outcomes of, the model practice. PMID:21901922

  15. 76 FR 71355 - United States et al. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana, Inc. et al.; Proposed Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... health- insurance company that has vigorously and effectively competed against Blue Cross to provide... Cross is a nonprofit corporation based in Helena, Montana. Blue Cross sells a range of commercial health... each of these geographic areas. 3. The hospital defendants are each non-profit corporations...

  16. Production and Processing Traits of Blue Catfish, Blue Catfish X Channel Catfish Hybrids, and Two Strains of Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish is the primary species used in commercial catfish farming. However, increased incidence of disease and associated economic losses have led to speculation that other catfish species or hybrids also have potential. In this study production and processing traits of blue catfish, blue x ...

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from Blue Crab Meat (Callinectus sapidus) and Blue Crab Processing Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive, intracellular food borne pathogen which causes a severe disease called listeriosis in high risk groups. However, there is limited information about the prevalence and sources of L. monocytogenes in blue crab and blue crab processing plants in Maryland. The...

  18. Evaluation of Experimentally Measured and Model-Calculated pH for Rock-Brine-CO2 Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    Reliable pH estimation is essential for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies of formation reactivities conducted under geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH; however, the accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In this study, we expanded the measurement range of a spectrophotometric method for pH determination, and we applied the method to measure the pH in batch-reactor experiments utilizing rock samples from five ongoing GCS demonstration projects. A combination of color-changing pH indicators, bromophenol blue and bromocresol green, was shown to enable measurements over the pH range of 2.5-5.2. In-situ pH measurements were compared with pH values calculated using geochemical models. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. For rocks comprised of carbonate, siltstone, and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain proton consuming and producing reactions that occur between the basalt minerals and CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  19. Intracellular pH Recovery Rates of Hemocytes from Estuarine and Open Ocean Bivalve Species Following In vitro Acid Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxton, A.; Wikfors, G.

    2013-12-01

    Decreasing pH in estuarine systems is a growing concern for researchers studying mollusk species. Debates continue on whether estuarine bivalve species are more or less vulnerable to ocean acidification than marine species because estuaries can present multiple environmental stressors. The aim of this study is to understand the homeostatic mechanisms of bivalve hemocytes following exposure to extracellular acid treatment. Previous measurements using fluorescent SNARF probes and flow-cytometry have determined the intracellular pH of hemocytes from several bivalve species (eastern oyster, bay scallop, northern quahog, soft-shell clam, and blue mussel) to range between 7.0-7.4. In the present study of four bivalve species, recovery rate profiles were determined for intracellular hemocyte pH following addition of acid to hemolymph in vitro. These profiles indicate that soft-shell clams and bay scallops maintained homeostasis with very little change in intracellular pH. In contrast, an initial drop in intracellular pH in northern quahogs was followed by a steady recovery of intracellular pH. Contrasting results between species appear to be unrelated to mineral shell composition (aragonite vs. calcite) or habitat location (infaunal vs. epifaunal). The next phase of this study will be to determine if offshore species (surfclams and sea scallops) will have similar responses. Results from these studies will provide a better understanding of the physiological responses of estuarine and marine species exposed to acidified environments.

  20. Low pH myoglobin photoproducts.

    PubMed Central

    Sage, J T; Morikis, D; Li, P; Champion, P M

    1992-01-01

    Recently, there has been interest in determining the conditions under which the iron-histidine bond ruptures in myoglobin at low pH, so that the effect of proximal heme ligation can be studied. A 220-cm-1 Raman mode, assigned to iron-histidine stretching, is clearly visible after photolysis of aqueous MbCO samples below pH4 at room temperature (Sage et al. Biochemistry. 30:1237-1247). In contrast, Iben et al. (Biophys. J. 59:908-919) do not observe this mode upon photolysis of a pH3 MbCO sample in a glycerol/water glass at low temperature. In order to account for both the low temperature and the room temperature experiments, Iben et al. suggest a scheme involving an unusual protonation state of the proximal histidine. Here, we discuss some inconsistencies in their explanation of the room temperature results and offer instead a simple modification of an earlier model. In addition, circular dichroism data are presented that indicate partial unfolding of MbCO in aqueous solution below pH4, and raise questions about the claim of Iben et al. that MbCO remains folded in 75% glycerol at pH3. PMID:1581497

  1. Highly Efficient Multiphoton-Pumped Frequency-Upconversion Stimulated Blue Emission with Ultralow Threshold from Highly Extended Ladder-Type Oligo(p-phenylene)s.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, King Fai; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2016-08-26

    A series of highly extended π-conjugated ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene)s containing up to 10 phenyl rings with (L)-Ph(n)-NPh (n=7-10) or without diphenylamino endcaps (L)-Ph(n) (n=7 and 8) were synthesized and investigated for their multiphoton absorption properties for frequency upconverted blue ASE/lasing. Extremely large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections and highly efficient 2PA ASE/lasing with ultralow threshold were achieved. (L)-Ph(10)-NPh exhibits the highest intrinsic 2PA cross-section of 3643 GM for a blue emissive organic fluorophore reported so far. The record-high 2PA pumped ASE/lasing efficiency of 2.06 % was obtained by un-endcapped oligomer, (L)-Ph(8) rather than that with larger σ2 , suggesting that a molecule with larger σ2 is not guaranteed to exhibit higher η2 . All of these oligomers exhibit exceptionally ultralow 2PA pumped ASE/lasing thresholds, among which the lowest 2PA pumped threshold of circa 0.26 μJ was achieved by (L)-Ph(10)-NPh. PMID:27485210

  2. Sequential study on reactive blue 29 dye removal from aqueous solution by peroxy acid and single wall carbon nanotubes: experiment and theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The majority of anthraquinone dye released to the environment come from antrapogenic sources. Several techniques are available for dyes' removal. In this study removal of reactive blue 29 (RB29) by an advanced oxidation process sequenced with single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated. Advanced oxidation process was optimized over a period of 60 minutes by changing the ratio of acetic acid to hydrogen peroxide, the compounds which form peroxy acid. Reduction of 20.2% -56.4% of reactive blue 29 was observed when the ratio of hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid/dye changed from 344/344/1 to 344/344/0.08 at different times (60, 120 and 180 min). The optimum ratio of acetic acid/hydrogen peroxide/dye was found to be 344/344/0.16 over 60 min. The resultant then was introduced for further removal by single wall carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs) as adsorbent. The adsorption of reactive blue 29 onto SWCNTs was also investigated. Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms were determined and the results revealed that the adsorption of RB29 onto SWCNTs was well explained by BET model and changed to Freundlich isotherm when SWCNTs was used after the application of peroxy acid. Kinetic study showed that the equilibrium time for adsorption of RB 29 on to SWCNT is 4 h. Experiments were carried out to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorbent capacity and the effect of solution pH on the removal of reactive blue29. The pseudo-second order kinetic equation could best describe the sorption kinetics. The most efficient pH for color removal (amongst pH=3, 5 and 8) was pH= 5. Further studies are needed to identify the peroxy acid degradation intermediates and to investigate their effects on SWCNTs. PMID:23369540

  3. A microdestructive capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of blue-pen-ink strokes on office paper.

    PubMed

    Calcerrada, Matías; González-Herráez, Miguel; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-06-26

    This manuscript describes the development of a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the detection of acid and basic dyes and its application to real samples, blue-pen-ink strokes on office paper. First, a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was developed for the separation of basic and acid dyes, by studying the separation medium (buffer nature, pH and relative amount of additive) and instrumental parameters (temperature, voltage and capillary dimensions). The method performance was evaluated in terms of selectivity, resolution (above 5 and 2 for acid dyes and basic dyes, respectively, except for two basic dye standards), LOD (lower than 0.4 mg/L) and precision as intraday and interday RSD values of peak migration times (lower than 0.6%). The developed method was then applied to 34 blue pens from different technologies (rollerball, ballpoint, markers) and with different ink composition (gel, water-based, oil-based). A microdestructive sample treatment using a scalpel to scratch 0.3mg of ink stroke was performed. The entire electropherogram profile allowed the visual discrimination between different types of ink and brands, being not necessary a statistical treatment. A 100% of discrimination was achieved between pen technologies, brands, and models, although non-reproducible zones in the electropherograms were found for blue gel pen samples. The two different batches of blue oil-based pens were also differentiated. Thus, this method provides a simple, microdestructive, and rapid analysis of different blue pen technologies which may complement the current analysis of questioned documents performed by forensic laboratories. PMID:26003620

  4. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  5. A severe case of vasoplegic shock following metformin overdose successfully treated with methylene blue as a last line therapy.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rachel Erin; Cartner, Michaela; Winearls, James

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented to hospital 24 h after an intentional overdose of metformin and gliclazide. He had a critical metabolic acidosis on presentation with a pH of 6.88, and very rapidly deteriorated into distributive shock refractory to large volume fluid resuscitation and massive doses of vasopressors. We introduced a methylene blue infusion as a rescue therapy in an attempt to improve the patient's haemodynamics, which was successful. The patient made a full recovery with no long-term sequelae. PMID:26150642

  6. Blue glass: A new impactite variety from Zhamanshin crater, USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, C. )

    1988-03-01

    A new variety of impact glass has been discovered at Zhamanshin impact crater (USSR). The crater has been known as the source of different impact glasses such as irghizites and Si-rich zhamanshinites (Si-rich varieties) and Si-poor (andesitic) zhamanshinites. The newly discovered impact glass is of distinct blue color and shows a layered structure with numerous small vesicles. The blue color ranges between the layers from opaque turquoise to very dark blue. The layers of blue glass are usually connected with layers of greyish or brownish color showing normal Si-rich zhamanshinite composition. The major and trace element chemistry of the blue glass differs from the chemistry of other Si-rich impact glasses from the Zhamanshin crater in several ways. One of the most distinct features is the high CaO content (up to about 7 wt.%), and the different CaO/MgO ratios. Volatile trace elements are generally intermediate between irghizites and Si-rich zhamanshinites, or even higher than in Si-rich zhamanshinites, reflecting the inhomogeneity of the blue glass. REE abundances are slightly larger than in Si-rich zhamanshinites and irghizites and show a less pronounced Eu anomaly. Impact mixing of country rocks present at the crater seems capable of explaining the chemistry of the blue glass.

  7. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  8. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  9. Ambipolar Phosphine Derivatives to Attain True Blue OLEDs with 6.5% EQE.

    PubMed

    Kondrasenko, Ilya; Tsai, Zheng-Hua; Chung, Kun-You; Chen, Yi-Ting; Ershova, Yana Yu; Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; Hung, Wen-Yi; Chou, Pi-Tai; Karttunen, Antti J; Koshevoy, Igor O

    2016-05-01

    A family of new branched phosphine derivatives {Ph2N-(C6H4)n-}3P → E (E = O 1-3, n = 1-3; E = S 4-6, n = 1-3; E = Se 7-9, n = 1-3; E = AuC6F5 4-6, n = 1-3), which are the donor-acceptor type molecules, exhibit efficient deep blue room temperature fluorescence (λem = 403-483 nm in CH2Cl2 solution, λem = 400-469 nm in the solid state). Fine tuning the emission characteristics can be achieved varying the length of aromatic oligophenylene bridge -(C6H4)n-. The pyramidal geometry of central R3P → E fragment on the one hand disrupts π-conjugation between the branches to preserve blue luminescence and high triplet energy, while on the other hand provides amorphous materials to prevent excimer formation and fluorescence self-quenching. Hence, compounds 2, 3, 5, and 12 were used as emitters to fabricate nondoped and doped electroluminescent devices. The luminophore 2 (E = O, n = 2) demonstrates excellently balanced bipolar charge transport and good nondoped device performance with a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQEmax) of 3.3% at 250 cd/m(2) and Commission International de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.15, 0.08). The doped device of 3 (E = O, n = 3) shows higher efficiency (EQEmax of 6.5, 6.0 at 100 cd/m(2)) and high color purity with CIE (0.15, 0.06) that matches the HDTV standard blue. The time-resolved electroluminescence measurement indicates that high efficiency of the device can be attributed to the triplet-triplet annihilation to enhance generation of singlet excitons. PMID:27100797

  10. Structure and Electronic Configurations of the Intermediates of Water Oxidation in Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Zakharova, Taisiya; Alperovich, Igor; Meyer, Thomas J.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-04-08

    Catalytic O{sub 2} evolution with cis,cis-[(bpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)Ru{sup III}ORu{sup III}(OH{sub 2})(bpy){sub 2}]{sup 4+} (bpy is 2,2-bipyridine), the so-called blue dimer, the first designed water oxidation catalyst, was monitored by UV-vis, EPR, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with ms time resolution. Two processes were identified, one of which occurs on a time scale of 100 ms to a few seconds and results in oxidation of the catalyst with the formation of an intermediate, here termed [3,4]'. A slower process occurring on the time scale of minutes results in the decay of this intermediate and O{sub 2} evolution. Spectroscopic data suggest that within the fast process there is a short-lived transient intermediate, which is a precursor of [3,4]'. When excess oxidant was used, a highly oxidized form of the blue dimer [4,5] was spectroscopically resolved within the time frame of the fast process. Its structure and electronic state were confirmed by EPR and XAS. As reported earlier, the [3,4]' intermediate likely results from reaction of [4,5] with water. While it is generated under strongly oxidizing conditions, it does not display oxidation of the Ru centers past [3,4] according to EPR and XAS. EXAFS analysis demonstrates a considerably modified ligand environment in [3,4]'. Raman measurements confirmed the presence of the O-O fragment by detecting a new vibration band in [3,4]' that undergoes a 46 cm{sup -1} shift to lower energy upon {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O exchange. Under the conditions of the experiment at pH 1, the [3,4]' intermediate is the catalytic steady state form of the blue dimer catalyst, suggesting that its oxidation is the rate-limiting step.

  11. ``Red-to-blue'' colorimetric detection of cysteine via anti-etching of silver nanoprisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yonglong; Li, Zihou; Gao, Yuexia; Gong, An; Zhang, Yujie; Hosmane, Narayan S.; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2014-08-01

    The reported strategies for cysteine (Cys) colorimetric detection based on noble metal nanomaterials include triggering aggregation, etching or fluorescence quenching of nanomaterials by Cys. In this study, we propose a new strategy for Cys colorimetric detection, i.e. anti-etching of silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs). In the absence of Cys, iodide ions (I-) could etch the corners and edges of AgNPRs and induce the morphology transition from nanoprism to nanodisk, which results in color change of the AgNPR dispersion from blue to red. In its presence, however, Cys can prevent the AgNPRs from I- attack. In that case, the color of the AgNPR dispersion containing I- and Cys remains blue. The mechanism is confirmed by using UV-vis spectra, TEM, DLS, Raman spectra and XPS spectra. According to the sensing effect of the Cys detection system, the concentration of I- incubated with AgNPRs, incubation time of AgNPRs and I-, and pH of AgNPR dispersions are optimized to 5.0 μM, 10 min, and pH 6.2, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed Cys detection system has excellent selectivity and high sensitivity. The limit of detection (LOD) of our Cys detection system is 25 nM by the naked eye, which is much better than the reported lowest LOD by eye-vision (100 nM), and 10 nM by UV-vis spectroscopy. The results of Cys detection in rabbit urine or plasma samples reinforce that our Cys detection system is applicable for rapid colorimetric detection of Cys in real body fluid samples.The reported strategies for cysteine (Cys) colorimetric detection based on noble metal nanomaterials include triggering aggregation, etching or fluorescence quenching of nanomaterials by Cys. In this study, we propose a new strategy for Cys colorimetric detection, i.e. anti-etching of silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs). In the absence of Cys, iodide ions (I-) could etch the corners and edges of AgNPRs and induce the morphology transition from nanoprism to nanodisk, which results in color change of the

  12. Characteristics of Nitrate Reduction in a Mutant of the Blue-Green Alga Agmenellum quadruplicatum1

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, S. E.; Van Baalen, Chase

    1973-01-01

    Characteristics of nitrate reduction in terms of nitrite production in an N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced mutant of the blue-green alga Agmenellum quadruplicatum are described. Following induction of nitrate reduction a linear rate of nitrite production proportional to cell concentration was observed. Rate of nitrite production and growth rate showed similar responses to pH, temperature, and light intensity. If required, only trace amounts of carbon dioxide were necessary for nitrite production. Atmospheres of oxygen or nitrogen inhibited production of nitrite. In addition, a low but constant rate of nitrite production was observed in the dark. Nitrite production by mutant AQ-6 was studied in terms of photosynthesis. As nitrite production proceeded, rate of photosynthesis declined. Ultraviolet irradiation and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea poisoning did not prevent nitrite production. The action spectrum of nitrite production was chlorophyll a-like. PMID:16658328

  13. Current control by electrode coatings formed by polymerization of dopamine at prussian blue-modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bowen; Su, Lei; Yang, Hankun; Shu, Tong; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-03-21

    Electrode coating with polydopamine (PDA) is fast becoming a popular surface modification technique. In this study we report the investigation of the use of PDA as electrode coatings with Prussian blue (PB) as an electrode material model. The PB layer was galvanostatically deposited at an Au electrode, followed by PDA coating with the assistance of ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The thickness of PDA coatings was measured to be ∼60 nm. Electrochemical characterization of the PDA-coated PB electrode revealed that the PDA coatings could stabilize the PB at neutral pH and allow the permeation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, the PDA coatings were found to effectively exclude the common interfering compounds such as cysteine, ascorbic acid and uric acid, and exhibit selective electrocatalysis towards the electroreduction of H2O2. Accordingly, the PDA-coated PB electrode was applied for determination of H2O2 released from live cells. PMID:26876689

  14. Acylated delphinidin glycosides from violet and violet-blue flowers of Clematis cultivars and their coloration.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Keisuke; Kitajima, Junichi; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2013-11-01

    Three new acylated delphinidin glycosides, delphinidin 3-O-beta-[(2"-trans-caffeoylglucopyranosyl)-(1 --> 2)-(6"-succinylgalactopyranoside)]-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (1), delphinidin 3-O-beta-[(2"-trans-caffeoylglucopyranosyl)-(1 --> 2)-(6"-trans-caffeoyl-tartaroyl-malonylgalactopyranoside)]-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (2), and delphinidin 3-O-beta-[(2"-trans-caffeoylglucopyranosyl)-(1 --> 2)-(6"-trans-caffeoyl-tartaroyl-malonylgalactopyranoside)]-3'-O-beta-glucuronopyranoside (3), were isolated from the violet and violet-blue sepals of Clematis cultivars 'Jackmanii Superba' and 'Fujimusume'. The chemical structures of the isolated anthocyanins were determined by LC-MS, characterization of hydrolyzates, and UV, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The visible absorption spectra of these anthocyanins were compared with those of fresh sepals and crude extracts in pH 5.1 buffer solution. In addition, the co-pigment effect with some kaempferol glycosides and caffeoylglucose was examined. PMID:24427942

  15. Effect of a magnetic field on the adsorptive removal of methylene blue onto wheat straw biochar.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoting; Zhu, Weiyong; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Lili; Zhu, Lingfeng; Zhao, Weigao

    2016-04-01

    Biochar pyrolyzed from wheat straw was innovatively used for the adsorptive removal of cationic dye methylene blue through exposure to a magnetic field. The adsorption capability of the biochar pyrolyzed at 200 °C exceeded that of samples pyrolyzed at higher temperatures. The surface acidic functional groups of wheat straw biochar were deduced to be more sensitive to the effects of the external magnetic field. The enhancement of the magnetic field achieved by increases in the initial dye concentration, and a decrease in the biochar dosage and solution pH, were more significant compared with those caused by other conditions. Kinetic experiments indicated that chemisorption occurred during adsorption. The qmax values for dye adsorption without, and with, an external magnetic field were found to be 46.6 and 62.5mg/g, respectively. These demonstrated that wheat straw biochar could be used for the efficient adsorption of pollutants when assisted by an external magnetic field. PMID:26845216

  16. Rapid and simple spectrophotometric determination of persulfate in water by microwave assisted decolorization of Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lajuan; Yang, Shiying; Wang, Leilei; Shi, Chao; Huo, Meiqing; Li, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A rapid and simple method for determination of persulfate in aqueous solution was developed. The method is based on the rapid reaction of persulfate with Methylene Blue (MB) via domestic microwave activation, which can promote the activation of persulfate and decolorize MB quickly. The depletion of MB at 644 nm (the maximum absorption wavelength of MB) is in proportion to the increasing concentration of persulfate in aqueous solution. Linear calibration curve was obtained in the range 0-1.5 mmol/L, with a limit of detection of 0.0028 mmol/L. The reaction time is rapid (within 60 sec), which is much shorter than that used for conventional methods. Compared with existing analytical methods, it need not any additives, especially colorful Fe2+, and need not any pretreatment for samples, such as pH adjustment. PMID:25968279

  17. GPAW on Blue Gene/P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Nichols; Enkovaara, Jussi; Dulak, Marcin; Glinsvad, Christian; Larsen, Ask; Mortensen, Jens; Shende, Sameer; Morozov, Vitali; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Density function theory (DFT) is the most widely employed electronic structure method due to its favorable scaling with system size and accuracy for a broad range of molecular and condensed-phase systems. The advent of massively parallel supercomputers have enhanced the scientific community's ability to study larger system sizes. Ground state DFT calculations of systems with O (103) valence electrons can be routinely performed on present-day supercomputers. The performance of these massively parallel DFT codes at the scale of 1 - 10K execution threads are not well understood; even experienced DFT users are unaware of Amdahl's Law and the non-trivial scaling bottlenecks that are present in standard O (N3) DFT algorithms. The GPAW code was ported an optimized for the Blue Gene/P. We present our algorithmic parallelization strategy and interpret the results for a number of benchmark tests cases. Lastly, I will describe opportunities for computer allocations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. This work has been supported by the Academy of Finland (Project 110013), Tekes MASI-program, Danish Center for Scientific Computing, Lundbeck Foundation, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Blue photoluminescent carbon nanodots from limeade.

    PubMed

    Suvarnaphaet, Phitsini; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Wetcharungsri, Jutaphet; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara; Ajayan, Pulickel Madhavapanicker; Tang, I-Ming; Asanithi, Piyapong

    2016-12-01

    Carbon-based photoluminescent nanodot has currently been one of the promising materials for various applications. The remaining challenges are the carbon sources and the simple synthetic processes that enhance the quantum yield, photostability and biocompatibility of the nanodots. In this work, the synthesis of blue photoluminescent carbon nanodots from limeade via a single-step hydrothermal carbonization process is presented. Lime carbon nanodot (L-CnD), whose the quantum yield exceeding 50% for the 490nm emission in gram-scale amounts, has the structure of graphene core functionalized with the oxygen functional groups. The micron-sized flake of the as-prepared L-CnD powder exhibits multicolor emission depending on an excitation wavelength. The L-CnDs are demonstrated for rapidly ferric-ion (Fe(3+)) detection in water compared to Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) ions. The photoluminescence quenching of L-CnD solution under UV light is used to distinguish the Fe(3+) ions from others by naked eyes as low concentration as 100μM. Additionally, L-CnDs provide exceptional photostability and biocompatibility for imaging yeast cell morphology. Changes in morphology of living yeast cells, i.e. cell shape variation, and budding, can be observed in a minute-period until more than an hour without the photoluminescent intensity loss. PMID:27612786

  19. Red and blue shifted hydridic bonds.

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Mirosław

    2014-09-15

    By performing MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations for a large set of dimer systems possessing a R-H hydridic bond involved in diverse types of intermolecular interactions (dihydrogen bonds, hydride halogen bonds, hydride hydrogen bonds, and charge-assisted hydride hydrogen bonds), we show that this is rather an elongation than a shortening that a hydride bond undergoes on interaction. Contrary to what might have been expected on the basis of studies in uniform electric field, this elongation is accompanied by a blue instead of red shift of the R-H stretching vibration frequency. We propose that the "additional" elongation of the R-H hydridic bond results from the significant charge outflow from the sigma bonding orbital of R-H that weakens this bond. The more standard red shift obtained for stronger complexes is explained by means of the Hermansson's formula and the particularly strong electric field produced by the H-acceptor molecule. PMID:25043253

  20. Age determination of blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dane, C.W.

    1968-01-01

    Primary feather length, markings on the greater secondary coverts, and the degree of bill spotting were evaluated as characters for use in the spring to distinguish first-year, blue-winged teal (Anas discors) females from older ones. The length of the 10th primary feather did not prove suitable to separate different aged females. Extreme primary lengths might be used to determine the age of some males. In females that have been through a postnuptial molt the greater secondary coverts have a more symmetrical, and more acutely angled, white, inverted 'V'-marking. Any female with a 'V' subjectively classified as good has gone through at least one postnuptial molt, and a female with no sign of a 'V' on the coverts is a juvenile or yearling before her first postnuptial molt. By measuring the longest bill spot on the upper mandible of each known-age female, it was possible to determine the age of some female teal. Because the spots fade during the breeding season, no lower size limit could be set to delineate first-year females at that time of year, but any nest-trapped hen with a spot longer than 10 mm was considered to be older than 1 year. Upper and lower limits were also established to distinguish some yearlings and 2-year-olds in the fall.

  1. The University of Montana's Blue Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The University of Montana's Department of Physics and Astronomy runs the state of Montana's only professional astronomical observatory. The Observatory, located on nearby Blue Mountain, houses a 16 inch Boller and Chivens Cassegrain reflector (purchased in 1970), in an Ash dome. The Observatory sits just below the summit ridge, at an elevation of approximately 6300 feet. Our instrumentation includes an Op-Tec SSP-5A photoelectric photometer and an SBIG ST-9E CCD camera. We have the only undergraduate astronomy major in the state (technically a physics major with an astronomy option), so our Observatory is an important component of our students' education. Students have recently carried out observing projects on the photometry of variable stars and color photometry of open clusters and OB associations. In my poster I will show some of the data collected by students in their observing projects. The Observatory is also used for public open houses during the summer months, and these have become very popular: at times we have had 300 visitors in a single night.

  2. Spectroscopy of Methylene Blue-Smectite Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jacobs; Schoonheydt

    1999-12-01

    Aqueoussuspensions of different Na-smectite type clay minerals were exchanged with methylene blue (Mb) and analyzed by visible spectroscopy. The spectra show bands of two types of monomers, protonated Mb, Mb-dimers, and higher aggregates. Their relative importance and the bandwidth was found to depend on parameters such as the particle morphology, the degree of dispersion, and the extent and location of the layer charge of the smectite. This can be qualitatively explained by the relative importance of three types of interactions, Mb-surface, H(2)O-surface, and Mb-Mb interactions. For hectorite and laponite at small loadings, H(2)O-surface interactions are dominant. Mb-islands are formed with a characteristic monomer absorption at 653 nm. Monomers at the surface absorb at 670 nm as found in barasym and saponite. Wyoming bentonite takes an intermediate position. As the loading increases Mb-Mb and Mb-surface interactions become dominant, giving rise to monomers absorbing at 670 nm, dimers, and higher aggregates. The bandwidths of the absorption bands reflect the structure of the clay particle associates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10550246

  3. Potential Biosorbent Derived from Calligonum polygonoides for Removal of Methylene Blue Dye from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Nasrullah, Asma; Khan, Hizbullah; Khan, Amir Sada; Man, Zakaria; Muhammad, Nawshad; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Abd El-Salam, Naser M.

    2015-01-01

    The ash of C. polygonoides (locally called balanza) was collected from Lakki Marwat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, and was utilized as biosorbent for methylene blue (MB) removal from aqueous solution. The ash was used as biosorbent without any physical or chemical treatment. The biosorbent was characterized by using various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The particle size and surface area were measured using particle size analyzer and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation (BET), respectively. The SEM and BET results expressed that the adsorbent has porous nature. Effects of various conditions such as initial concentration of methylene blue (MB), initial pH, contact time, dosage of biosorbent, and stirring rate were also investigated for the adsorption process. The rate of the adsorption of MB on biomass sample was fast, and equilibrium has been achieved within 1 hour. The kinetics of MB adsorption on biosorbent was studied by pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the pseudo-second-order has better mathematical fit with correlation coefficient value (R2) of 0.999. The study revealed that C. polygonoides ash proved to be an effective, alternative, inexpensive, and environmentally benign biosorbent for MB removal from aqueous solution. PMID:25705714

  4. Potential biosorbent derived from Calligonum polygonoides for removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Asma; Khan, Hizbullah; Khan, Amir Sada; Man, Zakaria; Muhammad, Nawshad; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Abd El-Salam, Naser M

    2015-01-01

    The ash of C. polygonoides (locally called balanza) was collected from Lakki Marwat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, and was utilized as biosorbent for methylene blue (MB) removal from aqueous solution. The ash was used as biosorbent without any physical or chemical treatment. The biosorbent was characterized by using various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The particle size and surface area were measured using particle size analyzer and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation (BET), respectively. The SEM and BET results expressed that the adsorbent has porous nature. Effects of various conditions such as initial concentration of methylene blue (MB), initial pH, contact time, dosage of biosorbent, and stirring rate were also investigated for the adsorption process. The rate of the adsorption of MB on biomass sample was fast, and equilibrium has been achieved within 1 hour. The kinetics of MB adsorption on biosorbent was studied by pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the pseudo-second-order has better mathematical fit with correlation coefficient value (R (2)) of 0.999. The study revealed that C. polygonoides ash proved to be an effective, alternative, inexpensive, and environmentally benign biosorbent for MB removal from aqueous solution. PMID:25705714

  5. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of methylene blue by a magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peifang; Cao, Muhan; Wang, Chao; Ao, Yanhui; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    A solvothermal method was employed to prepare a novel magnetic composite adsorbent composed of graphene, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the particle size distribution of the samples before and after adsorption was also carried out. The performance of as-prepared composites was investigated by the adsorption of dye methylene blue. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of the samples was up to 65.79 mg g-1, which was almost equal to the sum of magnetic graphene and magnetic MWCNTs. The effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption performance of methylene blue onto the magnetic adsorbents was investigated. The kinetic was well-described by pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion model, while the isotherm obeyed the Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, the as-prepared composites were found to be regenerative and reusable. The application in the treatment of an artificial dye wastewater and its cost estimation were also discussed. Therefore, the as-prepared magnetic composites can be severed as a potential adsorbent for removal of dye pollutant, owing to its high adsorption performance, magnetic separability and efficient recyclable property.

  6. Methylene blue-related corneal edema and iris discoloration.

    PubMed

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Aslanci, Mehmet Emin; Baykara, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old female patient who developed corneal edema and iris discoloration following the inadvertent use of 1% methylene blue instead of 0.025% trypan blue to stain the anterior capsule during cataract phacoemulsification surgery. Copious irrigation was performed upon realization of incorrect dye use. Corneal edema and iris discoloration developed during the early postoperative period and persisted at 24-months follow-up. However, keratoplasty was not required. The intracameral use of 1% methylene blue has a cytotoxic effect on the corneal endothelium and iris epithelium. Copious irrigation for at least 30 min using an anterior chamber maintainer may improve outcomes. PMID:27224079

  7. Ultra fast polymer network blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zakir; Masutani, Akira; Danner, David; Pleis, Frank; Hollfelder, Nadine; Nelles, Gabriele; Kilickiran, Pinar

    2011-06-01

    Polymer-stabilization of blue phase liquid crystal systems within a host polymer network are reported, which enables ultrafast switching flexible displays. Our newly developed method to stabilize the blue phase in an existing polymer network (e.g., that of a polymer network liquid crystal; PNLC) has shown wide temperature stability and fast response speeds. Systems where the blue phase is stabilized in an already existing polymer network are attractive candidates for ultrafast LCDs. The technology also promises to be applied to flexible PNLC and/or polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) displays using plastic substrate such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

  8. "Red-to-blue" colorimetric detection of cysteine via anti-etching of silver nanoprisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonglong; Li, Zihou; Gao, Yuexia; Gong, An; Zhang, Yujie; Hosmane, Narayan S; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2014-09-21

    The reported strategies for cysteine (Cys) colorimetric detection based on noble metal nanomaterials include triggering aggregation, etching or fluorescence quenching of nanomaterials by Cys. In this study, we propose a new strategy for Cys colorimetric detection, i.e. anti-etching of silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs). In the absence of Cys, iodide ions (I(-)) could etch the corners and edges of AgNPRs and induce the morphology transition from nanoprism to nanodisk, which results in color change of the AgNPR dispersion from blue to red. In its presence, however, Cys can prevent the AgNPRs from I(-) attack. In that case, the color of the AgNPR dispersion containing I(-) and Cys remains blue. The mechanism is confirmed by using UV-vis spectra, TEM, DLS, Raman spectra and XPS spectra. According to the sensing effect of the Cys detection system, the concentration of I(-) incubated with AgNPRs, incubation time of AgNPRs and I(-), and pH of AgNPR dispersions are optimized to 5.0 μM, 10 min, and pH 6.2, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed Cys detection system has excellent selectivity and high sensitivity. The limit of detection (LOD) of our Cys detection system is 25 nM by the naked eye, which is much better than the reported lowest LOD by eye-vision (100 nM), and 10 nM by UV-vis spectroscopy. The results of Cys detection in rabbit urine or plasma samples reinforce that our Cys detection system is applicable for rapid colorimetric detection of Cys in real body fluid samples. PMID:25083798

  9. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  10. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  11. First-Principles pH Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-03-01

    Despite being one of the most important macroscopic measures and a long history even before the quantum mechanics, the concept of pH has rarely been mentioned in microscopic theories, nor being incorporated computationally into first-principles theory of aqueous solutions. Here, we formulate a theory for the pH dependence of solution formation energy by introducing the proton chemical potential as the microscopic counterpart of pH in atomistic solution models. Within the theory, the general acid-base chemistry can be cast in a simple pictorial representation. We adopt density-functional molecular dynamics to demonstrate the usefulness of the method by studying a number of solution systems including water, small solute molecules such as NH3 and HCOOH, and more complex amino acids with several functional groups. For pure water, we calculated the auto- ionization constant to be 13.2 with a 95 % accuracy. For other solutes, the calculated dissociation constants, i.e., the so- called pKa, are also in reasonable agreement with experiments. Our first-principles pH theory can be readily applied to broad solution chemistry problems such as redox reactions.

  12. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  13. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  14. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  15. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  16. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  17. Freshwater microalgae harvested via flocculation induced by pH decrease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that microalga has been widely regarded as one of the most promising raw materials of biofuels. However, lack of an economical, efficient and convenient method to harvest microalgae is a bottleneck to boost their full-scale application. Many methods of harvesting microalgae, including mechanical, electrical, biological and chemical based, have been studied to overcome this hurdle. Results A new flocculation method induced by decreasing pH value of growth medium was developed for harvesting freshwater microalgae. The flocculation efficiencies were as high as 90% for Chlorococcum nivale, Chlorococcum ellipsoideum and Scenedesmus sp. with high biomass concentrations (>1g/L). The optimum flocculation efficiency was achieved at pH 4.0. The flocculation mechanism could be that the carboxylate ions of organic matters adhering on microalgal cells accepted protons when pH decreases and the negative charges were neutralized, resulting in disruption of the dispersing stability of cells and subsequent flocculation of cells. A linear correlation between biomass concentration and acid dosage was observed. Furthermore, viability of flocculated cells was determined by Evans Blue assay and few cells were found to be damaged with pH decrease. After neutralizing pH and adding nutrients to the flocculated medium, microalgae were proved to maintain a similar growth yield in the flocculated medium comparing with that in the fresh medium. The recycling of medium could contribute to the economical production from algae to biodiesel. Conclusions The study provided an economical, efficient and convenient method to harvest fresh microalgae. Advantages include capability of treating high cell biomass concentrations (>1g/L), excellent flocculation efficiencies (≥ 90%), operational simplicity, low cost and recycling of medium. It has shown the potential to overcome the hurdle of harvesting microalgae to promote full-scale application to biofuels

  18. Purification and characterization of phytase with a wide pH adaptation from common edible mushroom Volvariella volvacea (Straw mushroom).

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijing; Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-02-01

    A novel phytase with a molecular mass of 14 kDa was isolated from fresh fruiting bodies of the common edible mushroom Volvariella volvacea (Straw mushroom). The isolation procedure involved successive chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Affi-gel blue gel, Q-Sepharose and Superdex-75. The enzyme was a monomeric protein and was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose and Affi-gel blue gel, but was adsorbed on Q-Sepharose. The enzyme was purified 51.6-fold from the crude extract with 25.9% yield. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence GEDNEHDTQA exhibited low homology to the other reported phytases. The optimal pH and temperature of the purified enzyme was 5 and 45 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was quite stable over the pH range of 3.0 to 9.0 with less than 30% change in its activity, suggesting that it can be used in a very wide pH range. The enzyme exhibited broad substrate selectivity towards various phosphorylated compounds, but lacked antifungal activity against tested plant pathogens. PMID:22435144

  19. Blue Nile Rainfall Experiment: Validation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, M.

    2014-12-01

    The accuracy of three widely-used, near-global, high-resolution satellite rainfall products (CMORPH, TMPA-RT v7, TMPA-RP v7) is assessed over the Blue Nile River Basin, a basin characterized by complex terrain and tropical monsoon. The assessment is made using dense experimental networks of rain gauges deployed at two, 0.25°×0.25°, sites that represent contrasting topographic features: the lowland plain (mean elevation of 719 m.a.s.l.) site and the highland mountain (mean elevation of 2268 m.a.s.l.). The investigation period covers the summer seasons of 2012 through 2014. Compared to the highland mountain site, the lowland plain site exhibits marked extremes of rain intensity, higher rain intensity, lower frequency of rain occurrence, and smaller seasonal rainfall accumulation. All the satellite products considered tend to overestimate the mean rainfall rate at the lowland plain site, but underestimate it at the highland mountain site. The satellite products miss more rainfall at the highland mountain site than at the lowland plain site. The satellite products underestimate the heavy rain rates at both sites. Both sites have uncertainty (root mean square error) values greater than 100% for 3 hour accumulations of less than 5 mm, or daily accumulations of less than 10 mm, and the uncertainty values decrease with increasing rainfall accumulation. Among the satellite products, CMORPH suffers from a large positive bias at the lowland plain site, and TMPA-RP and TMPA-RT miss a large number of rainfall events that contribute nearly half of the total rainfall at the lowland plain.

  20. On the Triple Origin of Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2009-06-01

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are stars observed to be hotter and bluer than other stars with the same luminosity in their environment. As such they appear to be much younger than the rest of the stellar population. Two main channels have been suggested to produce such stars: (1) collisions between stars in clusters or (2) mass transfer between, or merger of, the components of primordial short-period binaries. Here we suggest a third scenario, in which the progenitors of BSSs are formed in primordial (or dynamically formed) hierarchical triple stars. In such configurations, the dynamical evolution of the triples through the Kozai mechanism and tidal friction can induce the formation of very close inner binaries. Angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind or stellar evolution could then lead to the merger of these binaries (or to mass transfer between them) and produce BSSs in binary (or triple) systems. We study this mechanism and its implications and show that it could naturally explain many of the characteristics of the BSS population in clusters, most notably the large binary fraction of long-period BSS binaries; their unique period-eccentricity distribution (with typical periods > 700 days); and the typical location of these BSSs in the color-magnitude diagram, far from the cluster turnoff point of their host clusters. We suggest that this scenario has a major (possibly dominant) role in the formation of BSSs in open clusters and give specific predictions for the BSSs population formed in this manner. We also note that triple systems may be the progenitors of the brightest planetary nebulae in old elliptical galaxies, which possibly evolved from BSSs.

  1. White Arctic vs. Blue Arctic: Making Choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Newton, R.; Schlosser, P.; Pomerance, R.; Tremblay, B.; Murray, M. S.; Gerrard, M.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic warms and shifts from icy white to watery blue and resource-rich, tension is arising between the desire to restore and sustain an ice-covered Arctic and stakeholder communities that hope to benefit from an open Arctic Ocean. If emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere continue on their present trend, most of the summer sea ice cover is projected to be gone by mid-century, i.e., by the time that few if any interventions could be in place to restore it. There are many local as well as global reasons for ice restoration, including for example, preserving the Arctic's reflectivity, sustaining critical habitat, and maintaining cultural traditions. However, due to challenges in implementing interventions, it may take decades before summer sea ice would begin to return. This means that future generations would be faced with bringing sea ice back into regions where they have not experienced it before. While there is likely to be interest in taking action to restore ice for the local, regional, and global services it provides, there is also interest in the economic advancement that open access brings. Dealing with these emerging issues and new combinations of stakeholders needs new approaches - yet environmental change in the Arctic is proceeding quickly and will force the issues sooner rather than later. In this contribution we examine challenges, opportunities, and responsibilities related to exploring options for restoring Arctic sea ice and potential pathways for their implementation. Negotiating responses involves international strategic considerations including security and governance, meaning that along with local communities, state decision-makers, and commercial interests, national governments will have to play central roles. While these issues are currently playing out in the Arctic, similar tensions are also emerging in other regions.

  2. A quantitative model for using acridine orange as a transmembrane pH gradient probe.

    PubMed

    Clerc, S; Barenholz, Y

    1998-05-15

    Monitoring the acidification of the internal space of membrane vesicles by proton pumps can be achieved easily with optical probes. Transmembrane pH gradients cause a blue-shift in the absorbance spectrum and the quenching of the fluorescence of the cationic dye acridine orange. It has been postulated that these changes are caused by accumulation and aggregation of the dye inside the vesicles. We tested this hypothesis using liposomes with transmembrane concentration gradients of ammonium sulfate as model system. Fluorescence intensity of acridine orange solutions incubated with liposomes was affected by magnitude of the gradient, volume trapped by vesicles, and temperature. These experimental data were compared to a theoretical model describing the accumulation of acridine orange monomers in the vesicles according to the inside-to-outside ratio of proton concentrations, and the intravesicular formation of sandwich-like piles of acridine orange cations. This theoretical model predicted quantitatively the relationship between the transmembrane pH gradients and spectral changes of acridine orange. Therefore, adequate characterization of aggregation of dye in the lumen of biological vesicles provides the theoretical basis for using acridine orange as an optical probe to quantify transmembrane pH gradients. PMID:9606150

  3. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  4. Removal of reactive blue 19 from aqueous solution by pomegranate residual-based activated carbon: optimization by response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this research, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize Reactive Blue 19 removal by activated carbon from pomegranate residual. A 24 full factorial central composite design (CCD) was applied to evaluate the effects of initial pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration, and contact time on the dye removal efficiency. Methodology The activated carbon prepared by 50 wt.% phosphoric acid activation under air condition at 500°C. The range of pH and initial dye concentration were selected in a way that considered a wide range of those variables. Furthermore, the range of contact time and adsorbent dose were determined based on initial tests. Levels of selected variables and 31 experiments were determined. MiniTab (version 16.1) was used for the regression and graphical analyses of the data obtained. Results It was found that the decrease of initial dye concentration and the increase of initial pH, adsorbent dose, and contact time are beneficial for improving the dye removal efficiency. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results presented high R2 value of 99.17% for Reactive Blue 19 dye removal, which indicates the accuracy of the polynomial model is acceptable. Conclusions Initial pH of 11, adsorbent dose of 1.025 g/L, initial dye concentration of 100 mg/L, and contact time of 6.8 minutes found to be the optimum conditions. Dye removal efficiency of 98.7% was observed experimentally at optimum point which confirmed close to model predicted (98.1%) result. PMID:24678702

  5. Improved wound healing in blue LED treated superficial abrasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Bacci, Stefano; De Siena, Gaetano; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco; Alfieri, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    A blue-LED photocoagulator device was designed in order to induce a selective photocoagulation effect in superficial bleeding. An in vivo study in rat back skin evidenced an improved healing process in the LED treated abrasions.

  6. Nested Paleozoic successor basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, J.F.; Groszos, M.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  7. 44. Blue Coal Corporation Office Building (foreground), Huber Breaker (left), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Blue Coal Corporation Office Building (foreground), Huber Breaker (left), Retail Coal Storage Bins (far center) Photograph taken by George Harven - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  8. 20. GROVE OF TREES PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. GROVE OF TREES -- PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE -- TRANSPLANTED FROM NEW MEXICO MANZANO MOUNTAINS, WEST OF BUILDINGS 4 AND T-59, LOOKING NORTHWEST - U. S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, 2100 Ridgecrest Southeast, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, NM

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey From The Blue Book, Official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey From The Blue Book, Official Souvenir View Book Panama Pacific International Exposition - 1915 VIEW FROM THE EAST - Palace of Fine Arts, Baker Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Valuing the European 'coastal blue carbon' storage benefit.

    PubMed

    Luisetti, T; Jackson, E L; Turner, R K

    2013-06-15

    'Blue' carbon ecosystems are important carbon storage providers that are currently not protected by any international mechanism, such as REDD. This study aims to contribute to raising awareness in the political domain about the 'blue' carbon issue. This analysis also provides guidance in terms of how to value stock and flows of ecosystem services adding to the debate begun by the Costanza et al. (1997) paper in Nature. Through scenario analysis we assess how human welfare benefits will be affected by changes in the European coastal blue carbon stock provision. The current extent of European coastal blue carbon has an accounting stock value of about US$180 million. If EU Environmental Protection Directives continue to be implemented and effectively enforced, society will gain an appreciating asset over time. However, a future policy reversal resulting in extensive ecosystem loss could mean economic value losses as high as US$1 billion by 2060. PMID:23623654

  11. The toxicology of Octopus maculosa: the blue-ringed octopus.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M S

    1999-10-01

    The biotoxicology of the Australian blue-ringed octopus is detailed with the view of introducing it as a remedy into the homoeopathic Materia Medica and stimulating the second step of proving this venom. PMID:10582647

  12. MANCHESTER MILLS, PRINT WORKS: BLUE DYE AND SOAPING; PRINTING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MANCHESTER MILLS, PRINT WORKS: BLUE DYE AND SOAPING; PRINTING AND BLEACHING BUILDINGS. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1905 VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. From the collection of Mr. George Durette, Photographer, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  13. 48. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA., Photographer, Date unknown SECTION THROUGH BUILDING, LOOKING NORTH - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 50. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angleles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown ENTRANCE AND TYPICAL BAY ON FLOWER STREET - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 45. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown SECOND FLOOR PLAN - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 44. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown FIRST FLOOR PLAN - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 53. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown DETAILS OF CORRIDORS ON SECOND - TWELFTH FLOORS - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 47. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angleles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown WEST ELEVATION - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 51. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown EXTERIOR, ELEVATION DETAILS - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 52. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown DETAILS OF MAIN FLOOR ELEVATOR LOBBY - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 49. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown SECTION THROUGH BUILDING, LOOKING EAST - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 46. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown NORTH ELEVATION - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. View of secondfloor Blue Lodge lobby from the southwest. Left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of second-floor Blue Lodge lobby from the southwest. Left door leads to the hallway to Norman Hall. Central door opens to the Egyptian Hall inner vestibule. - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Suzanne Newton's "I Will Call it Georgie's Blues".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes Suzanne Newton's children's book, "I Will Call It Georgie's Blues." Includes discussion questions about the book, and a list of activities. Provides an annotated bibliography of fiction, picture books, nonfiction, and biography titles about jazz and jazz musicians. (AEF)

  5. Beat the Winter Blues: Shedding Light on Seasonal Sadness

    MedlinePlus

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Beat the Winter Blues Shedding Light on Seasonal Sadness As the days get shorter, ... clock” responds to cues in your surroundings, especially light and darkness. During the day, your brain sends ...

  6. Nested Paleozoic "successor" basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, James F.; Groszos, Mark S.

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  7. Effect of electrolyte pH on CIEF with narrow pH range ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Páger, Csilla; Vargová, Andrea; Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kilár, Ferenc

    2012-11-01

    CIEF of components following sequential injection of ampholytes and the sample zone offers unique advantages for analysis. The most important one of these is the efficient separation of amphoteric compounds having pIs outside the pH range of the ampholytes applied, but the resolution of the components can be increased by an adequate setup in the injection protocol. In this study, the effect of the pH of the anolyte and catholyte on the selectivity and speed of the isoelectric focusing was investigated. Changes in the pH values significantly influenced the resolution and the length of the pH gradient, while changes in the charge state of components were also observed. Three ampholyte solutions (from different suppliers) covering only two pH units were used for the analyses of substituted nitrophenol dyes in uncoated capillary. With appropriate setup, the components, with pIs not covered by the ampholyte pH range, migrated in charged state outside the pH gradient. This phenomenon is preferable for coupling isoelectric focusing to MS detection, by evading the undesirable ion suppression effect of ampholytes. PMID:23086725

  8. Exfoliation of Egyptian Blue and Han Blue, Two Alkali Earth Copper Silicate-based Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Salguero, Tina T.

    2014-01-01

    In a visualized example of the ancient past connecting with modern times, we describe the preparation and exfoliation of CaCuSi4O10 and BaCuSi4O10, the colored components of the historic Egyptian blue and Han blue pigments. The bulk forms of these materials are synthesized by both melt flux and solid-state routes, which provide some control over the crystallite size of the product. The melt flux process is time intensive, but it produces relatively large crystals at lower reaction temperatures. In comparison, the solid-state method is quicker yet requires higher reaction temperatures and yields smaller crystallites. Upon stirring in hot water, CaCuSi4O10 spontaneously exfoliates into monolayer nanosheets, which are characterized by TEM and PXRD. BaCuSi4O10 on the other hand requires ultrasonication in organic solvents to achieve exfoliation. Near infrared imaging illustrates that both the bulk and nanosheet forms of CaCuSi4O10 and BaCuSi4O10 are strong near infrared emitters. Aqueous CaCuSi4O10 and BaCuSi4O10 nanosheet dispersions are useful because they provide a new way to handle, characterize, and process these materials in colloidal form. PMID:24796494

  9. Incidentally Detected Blue Nevus of Endocervix: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shaila Talengala; Shivamurthy, Archana; Kini Rao, Anuradha Calicut

    2015-01-01

    Blue nevi are uncommon, asymptomatic lesions of the uterine cervix. These lesions are not often detected clinically or on colposcopy. Careful histopathological examination is required. The nevus cells are said to originate from the immature melanoblasts of the neural crest. These lesions need to be differentiated from malignant melanoma and melanosis of the cervix. We present here a case report of incidentally detected cervical blue nevus in a 52 year old lady. PMID:26351493

  10. Methylene blue treatment in experimental ischemic stroke: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Methylene blue, a drug grandfathered by the Food and Drug Administration with a long history of safe usage in humans for treating methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning, has recently been shown to be neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. The goal of this paper is to review studies on methylene blue in experimental stroke models. PMID:27042692

  11. Blue Mountain Lake, New York, earthquake of October 7, 1983.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wendt, G.

    1984-01-01

    The October 7 earthquake near Blue Mountain Lake in the central Adirondack Mountains registered a preliminary Richter magnitude of 5.2. It was widely felt throughout the Northeastern United States and Canada and occurred in an area that has been periodically shaken by earthquakes throughout recorded history. Since 1737, at least 346 felt earthquakes have occurred in New York; an earthquake of similar magnitude last shook the Blue Mountain Lake area on June 9, 1975.    

  12. Mica deposits of the Blue Ridge in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank Gardner

    1968-01-01

    Pegmatites in the Blue Ridge of North Carolina are important sources of sheet and scrap mica, feldspar, kaolin, and quartz.  Small amounts of beryl, columbite-tantalite, monazite, samarskite, and uranium minerals also have been produced.  The mica-bearing pegmatites occur in mica and hornblende gneiss and schist throughout the Blue Ridge province but are concentrated in the Spruce Pine and Franklin-Sylva districts.

  13. Intense excitation source of blue-green laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K. S.

    1985-10-01

    An intense and efficient excitation source for blue-green lasers useful for the space-based satellite laser applications, underwater strategic communication, and measurement of ocean bottom profile is being developed. The source in use, hypocycloidal pinch plasma (HCP), and a newly designed dense-plasma focus (DPF) can produce intense UV photons (200 to 300 nm) which match the absorption spectra of both near UV and blue green dye lasers (300 to 400 nm). During the current project period, the successful enhancement of blue-green laser output of both Coumarin 503 and LD490 dye through the spectral conversion of the HCP pumping light has been achieved with a converter dye BBQ. The factor of enhancement in the blue-green laser output energy of both Coumarin 503 and LD490 is almost 73%. This enhancement will definitely be helpful in achieving the direct high power blue-green laser (> 1 MW) with the existing blue green dye laser. On the other hand the dense-plasma focus (DPF) with new optical coupling has been designed and constructed. For the optimization of the DPF device as the UV pumping light source, the velocity of current sheath and the formation of plasma focus have been measured as function of argon or argon-deuterium fill gas pressure. Finally, the blue-green dye laser (LD490) has been pumped with the DPF device for preliminary tests. Experimental results with the DPF device show that the velocity of the current sheath follows the inverse relation of sq st. of pressure as expected. The blue-green dye (LD490) laser output exceeded 3.1 m at the best cavity tuning of laser system. This corresponds to 3J/1 cu cm laser energy extraction.

  14. Detection of Blue Screen Special Effects in Videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junyu; Yu, Yanru; Su, Yuting; Dong, Bo; You, Xingang

    A new approach to detect digital special effects of blue screen compositing is proposed in this paper. Based on the different qualities between the foreground and background, some statistical features of quantized discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients in the composited videos are extracted to expose the compositing operation. The experimental results show that our proposed algorithm can successfully detect the blue screen compositing in videos.

  15. Relation between pH in the Trunk and Face: Truncal pH Can Be Easily Predicted from Facial pH

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Ae; Kim, Bo Ri; Chun, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical symptoms of facial and truncal acne differ. Skin surface acidity (pH), which is affected by sebum secretions, reflects the different clinical characteristics of the face and trunk. However, no studies have been conducted on truncal sebum production and skin pH. Objective We evaluated the differences and relationship between pH values of the face and trunk. We also evaluated the relationship between pH and the quantity of sebum produced in the trunk. Methods A total of 35 female patients clinically diagnosed with truncal acne were included. We measured pH on the face and truncal area using the Skin-pH-Meter PH 905®. We measured truncal sebum secretions using the Sebumeter SM 815®. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations and differences between pH and sebum. Results Facial pH was significantly higher than chest and back pH values. The correlation between pH on the trunk and the face was significant. We used linear regression equations to estimate truncal pH using only measured pH from the chin. There was no significant relationship between truncal sebum secretion and pH. Conclusion This was the first study that evaluated the differences and correlations between facial and truncal pH. We found that facial pH can predict truncal pH. In addition, we conclude that differences in pH and sebum secretion between the face and trunk are one of the reasons for differences in acne symptom at those sites. PMID:27081270

  16. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  17. Electrochemistry of Prussian blue films on metal and semiconductor electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Viehbeck, A.; DeBerry, D.W.

    1985-06-01

    The electrochemical properties of Prussian blue films on Pt and spark anodized n-type TiO/sub 2/ electrodes were investigated. Evidence for four redox states for Prussian blue was obtained. While the oxidation of Everitt's salt to Prussian blue involves the high spin iron atoms, the oxidation of Prussian blue to Berlin green and Berlin green to Prussian yellow involves the low spin hexacyanoferrate groups. The Prussian blue/Everitt's salt redox system (E/sub 0/ = +0.2V vs. SCE) is the most stable and reversible couple. The diffusion coefficients for reduction and oxidation of this redox couple are 5.0 x 10/sup -9/ and 2.7 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//S, respectively. The photoelectrochromic behavior of Prussian blue on semiconductor TiO/sub 2/ electrodes is discussed. The films deposited on TiO/sub 2/ have short-circuit memory, and lateral color spreading through the film is slow. A light addressable electrochromic display is described.

  18. Blue whale vocalizations recorded around New Zealand: 1964-2013.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian S; Collins, Kym; Barlow, Jay; Calderan, Susannah; Leaper, Russell; McDonald, Mark; Ensor, Paul; Olson, Paula A; Olavarria, Carlos; Double, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Previous underwater recordings made in New Zealand have identified a complex sequence of low frequency sounds that have been attributed to blue whales based on similarity to blue whale songs in other areas. Recordings of sounds with these characteristics were made opportunistically during the Southern Ocean Research Partnership's recent Antarctic Blue Whale Voyage. Detections of these sounds occurred all around the South Island of New Zealand during the voyage transits from Nelson, New Zealand to the Antarctic and return. By following acoustic bearings from directional sonobuoys, blue whales were visually detected and confirmed as the source of these sounds. These recordings, together with the historical recordings made northeast of New Zealand, indicate song types that persist over several decades and are indicative of the year-round presence of a population of blue whales that inhabits the waters around New Zealand. Measurements of the four-part vocalizations reveal that blue whale song in this region has changed slowly, but consistently over the past 50 years. The most intense units of these calls were detected as far south as 53°S, which represents a considerable range extension compared to the limited prior data on the spatial distribution of this population. PMID:24606296

  19. Copper blue in an ancient glass bead: a XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, J. P.; Figueiredo, M. O.

    2006-06-01

    The blue colour in ancient soda-lime glasses has been attributed to the presence of copper and/or cobalt but the origin of different shades is not yet fully interpreted. As a contribution to this question, a non-destructive X-ray absorption study at [ Cu]K-edge was undertaken on the blue (turquoise) layer from a “Nueva Cadiz” type tubular glass bead dated pre-XVII century where copper is the unique colouring agent. Minerals configuring two distinct blue tonalities due to Cu (2+) in similar square coordination were selected as basic model compounds: azurite, which is a classical navy-blue pigment used in ancient wall paintings over plaster, and chalcanthite, displaying exactly the same turquoise-blue tonality of tubular glass beads manufactured since the Egyptian Antiquity. Theoretical modelling of the XAFS spectra was undertaken using the FEFF code. The IFEFFIT software package was used for fitting the calculated spectra to experimental data. EXAFS results are discussed in view of the crystal structures of copper minerals chosen to model the speciation state and structural situation of that element prevailing in the turquoise-blue archaeological glass. Special attention is focused on the difficulties in theoretical modelling [ Cu]K-XANES spectra of ancient glasses with different colourings.

  20. Blue Stragglers in Globular Clusters: Observations, Statistics and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian

    This chapter explores how we might use the observed statistics of blue stragglers in globular clusters to shed light on their formation. This means we will touch on topics also discussed elsewhere in this book, such as the discovery and implications of bimodal radial distributions and the "double sequences" of blue stragglers that have recently been found in some clusters. However, we will focus particularly on the search for a "smoking gun" correlation between the number of blue stragglers in a given globular cluster and a physical cluster parameter that would point towards a particular formation channel. As we shall see, there is little evidence for an intrinsic correlation between blue straggler numbers and stellar collision rates, even in dense cluster cores. On the other hand, there is a clear correlation between blue straggler numbers and the total (core) mass of the cluster. This would seem to point towards a formation channel involving binaries, rather than dynamical encounters. However, the correlation between blue straggler numbers and actual binary numbers—which relies on recently determined empirical binary fractions—is actually weaker than that with core mass. We explain how this surprising result may be reconciled with a binary formation channel if binary fractions depend almost uniquely on core mass. If this is actually the case, it would have significant implications for globular cluster dynamics more generally.

  1. Preparation of multi-coloured different sized fluorescent gold clusters from blue to NIR, structural analysis of the blue emitting Au7 cluster, and cell-imaging by the NIR gold cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Subhasish; Baral, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Rameswar; Jana, Batakrishna; Datta, Ayan; Ghosh, Surajit; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Blue, green, orange-red, red and NIR emitting gold quantum clusters have been prepared in aqueous media by using a bioactive peptide glutathione (reduced) at physiological pH. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses show that the core structure sizes of the five different gold clusters are Au7 (blue), Au16 (green), Au19 (orange-red), Au21 (red) and Au22 (NIR). The photo-stability and pH-stability of these quantum clusters have been measured, and these are photo-stable against continuous UV irradiation for a few hours. They also exhibit moderate to good pH-stability within the pH range of 5-12.5. A computational study reveals the organisation of gold atoms in the thiolate-protected blue quantum cluster and its several structural parameters, including the mode of interaction of ligand molecules with Au atoms in the Au7 cluster. Interestingly, it has been found that NIR emitting gold quantum cluster can easily be internalized into the adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549 cell line). Moreover, a MTT assay indicates that our NIR emitting gold quantum cluster show very low cytotoxicy to A549 cancer cells.Blue, green, orange-red, red and NIR emitting gold quantum clusters have been prepared in aqueous media by using a bioactive peptide glutathione (reduced) at physiological pH. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses show that the core structure sizes of the five different gold clusters are Au7 (blue), Au16 (green), Au19 (orange-red), Au21 (red) and Au22 (NIR). The photo-stability and pH-stability of these quantum clusters have been measured, and these are photo-stable against continuous UV irradiation for a few hours. They also exhibit moderate to good pH-stability within the pH range of 5-12.5. A computational study reveals the organisation of gold atoms in the thiolate-protected blue quantum cluster and its several

  2. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  3. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  4. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  5. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  6. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  8. Molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 is catalyzed by a novel molybdenum-reducing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a V max for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent K m for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent V max and apparent K m values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M(-1) s(-1). The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction. PMID:24724104

  9. Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 Is Catalyzed by a Novel Molybdenum-Reducing Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Shukor, M. Y.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Rahman, M. F. A.; Shamaan, N. A.; Syed, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a Vmax for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent Km for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent Vmax and apparent Km values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M−1 s−1. The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction. PMID:24724104

  10. Final report on the safety assessment of disperse Blue 7.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Disperse Blue 7 is an anthraquinone dye used in cosmetics as a hair colorant in five hair dye and color products reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Hair dyes containing Disperse Blue 7, as "coal tar" hair dye products, are exempt from the principal adulteration provision and from the color additive provision in sections 601 and 706 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 when the label bears a caution statement and "patch test" instructions for determining whether the product causes skin irritation. Disperse Blue 7 is also used as a textile dye. The components of Disperse Blue 7 reportedly include Disperse Turquoise ALF Granules, Disperse Turquoise LF2G, Reax 83A, Tamol SW, and Twitchell Oil. No data were available that addressed the acute, short-term, or chronic toxicity of Disperse Blue 7. A mouse lymph node assay used to predict the sensitization potential of Disperse Blue 7 was negative. Although most bacterial assays for genotoxicity were negative in the absence of metabolic activation, consistently positive results were found with metabolic activation in Salmonella strains TA1537, TA1538, and TA98, which were interpreted as indicative of point mutations. Studies using L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells appeared to confirm this mutagenic activity. Mammalian assays for chromosome damage, however, were negative and animal tests found no evidence of dominant lethal mutations. Cases reports describe patients patch tested with Disperse Blue 7 to determine the source of apparent adverse reactions to textiles. In most patients, patch tests were negative, but there are examples in which the patch test for Disperse Blue 7 was positive. In general, anthraquinone dyes are considered frequent causes of clothing dermatitis. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel determined that there was a paucity of data regarding the safety of Disperse Blue 7 as used in cosmetics. The following data are needed in order to arrive at a conclusion on the safety of

  11. Structure of a Precursor to the Blue Components Produced in the Blue Discoloration in Japanese Radish (Raphanus sativus) Roots.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Katsunori; Masayasu, Nagata

    2016-05-27

    The internal blue discoloration in Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus L.) roots has been reported to be a physiological phenomenon after harvest and poses a significant problem for farmers. To avoid this discoloration, the fundamental development of new radish cultivars that do not undergo discoloration and/or improved cultivation methods is required. Elucidating the chemical mechanism leading to this discoloration could help overcome these difficulties. To determine the mechanism underlying this discoloration, this study was designed to probe the structure of a precursor to the blue components generated during the discoloration process. Soaking fresh roots in aqueous H2O2 resulted in rapid blue discoloration, similar to the natural discoloration. Using a H2O2-based blue discoloration assay, the precursor was extracted and isolated from the fresh roots and identified as the glucosinolate, 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin, via spectroscopy and chemical synthesis. PMID:27128155

  12. Preparation of nanostructured TiO2-based photocatalyst by controlling the calcining temperature and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Mohammed Jasim; Islam, Md Akhtarul; Haque, Sheikh Ariful; Hasan, Saidul; Amin, Mohammad Shaiful Alam; Rahman, Mohammed Mastabur

    2012-08-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 has been synthesized using one-step sol-gel method and characterized by different characterization techniques (SEM, EDS, XRD, and UV-vis spectroscopy). The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) is studied with the synthesized TiO2. The photocatalytic degradation data has been validated using several kinetic models. The TiO2 showed efficient photocatalytic degradation performance on MB and CR. In addition to this, the effect of pH on the photocatalytic degradation has been investigated. The TiO2 showed enhanced photocatalytic performance in basic media than that in neutral or acidic ones.

  13. Sensing pH with TMCs.

    PubMed

    Spalthoff, Christian; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins have been implicated in hair cell mechanotransduction, Drosophila proprioception, and sodium sensing in the nematode C. elegans. In this issue of Neuron, Wang et al. (2016) report that C. elegans TMC-1 mediates nociceptor responses to high pH, not sodium, allowing the nematode to avoid strongly alkaline environments in which most animals cannot survive. PMID:27387645

  14. Red, White, and the Blues Part 3 of 4: The New Beat of the Blues: R&B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassinos-Carr, Cathy

    2004-01-01

    When rhythm & blues--or, as it is more commonly called, R&B, was first born, it did not even have a name. Prior to 1949, all black popular music, including jazz, blues, and gospel, was known as "race music." But by the end of the 1940s, the music had become so successful that it gained a new-found respect--and Billboard magazine, realizing that…

  15. Hexavalent Molybdenum Reduction to Mo-Blue by a Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulfate-Degrading Klebsiella oxytoca Strain DRY14

    PubMed Central

    Halmi, M. I. E.; Zuhainis, S. W.; Yusof, M. T.; Shaharuddin, N. A.; Helmi, W.; Shukor, Y.; Syed, M. A.; Ahmad, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS-) degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v), between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant. PMID:24383052

  16. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of CeO2 using β-cyclodextrin on visible light assisted decoloration of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Pitchaimuthu, Sakthivel; Velusamy, Ponnusamy

    2014-01-01

    An attempt has been made to enhance the photocatalytic activity of CeO(2) for visible light assisted decoloration of methylene blue (MB) dye in aqueous solutions by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The inclusion complexation patterns between host and guest (i.e., β-CD and MB) have been confirmed with UV-visible spectral data. The interaction between CeO(2) and β-CD has also been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis. The photocatalytic activity of the catalyst under visible light was investigated by measuring the photodegradation of MB in aqueous solution. The effects of key operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, initial pH, CeO(2) concentration as well as illumination time on the decolorization extents were investigated. Among the processing parameters, the pH of the reaction solution played an important role in tuning the photocatalytic activity of CeO(2). The maximum photodecoloration rate was achieved at basic pH (pH 11). Under the optimum operational conditions, approximately 99.6% dye removal was achieved within 120 min. The observed results indicate that the decolorization of the MB followed a pseudo-first order kinetics. PMID:24434976

  17. Magnetic Properties of selected Prussian Blue Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Manjita

    Prussian Blue Analogs (PBAs) of composition M[M(C,N)6 ] 2.xH2O are bimetallic cyanide complexes, where M and M are bivalent or trivalent transition metals and x is number of water molecule per unit cell. The PBAs form cubic framework structures, which consist mostly of alternating MIIIN6 and MIIC 6 octahedrals. However, occupancies of the octrahedrals are not perfect: they may be empty and the charges are balanced by the guest water molecules at the lattice site (C or N site) or the interstitial site (between the octahedrals) of the unit cell. Most (but not all) PBAs exhibit negative thermal expansion behavior, i.e. volume decrease with increasing temperature. Another area of interest in PBA research is the occurrence of unusual magnetic properties. Similar to other molecular magnets, large crystal-field splitting due to the octrahedral environment may result in a combination of low- or high-spin configurations of the localized magnetic moments, i.e. spin crossover effects may be found. My dissertation focuses on the magnetic properties of the selected 3d transition-metal PBAs, namely metal hexacyanochromates M3[Cr(C,N)6 ]2.xH2O, metal hexcyanoferrates M3[Fe(C,N)6]2.xH2O and metal hexcyanocobaltates M3[Co(C,N)6]2 .xH2O where M = Mn, Co, Ni and Cu. In particular, I analyzed the temperature and field dependencies of the bulk magnetic response of those PBAs. My results show that the magnetic susceptibility of all studied PBAs follows the Curie-Weiss behavior in the paramagnetic region up to room temperature; however, some of the compounds exhibit long-range magnetic order at lower temperatures (ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic). In particular, the data provide evidence for magnetic ground states for most of the metal hexacyanochromates and all of the metal hexacyanoferrates but none of the hexacyanocobaltates that were studied. For each of the compounds, my analysis provides a measure of the effective magnetic moment, which is then compared with the predicted

  18. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  19. 40 CFR 425.60 - Applicability; description of the through-the-blue subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... through-the-blue subcategory. 425.60 Section 425.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Through-the-Blue Subcategory § 425.60 Applicability; description of the through-the-blue subcategory. The... processes raw or cured cattle or cattle-like hides through the blue tanned state by hair pulp unhairing...

  20. 76 FR 81004 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Woman in Blue, Against...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Woman in Blue, Against Blue Water..., 2003), I hereby determine that the object ``Woman in Blue, Against Blue Water'' by Edvard...

  1. 40 CFR 425.60 - Applicability; description of the through-the-blue subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through-the-blue subcategory. 425.60 Section 425.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Through-the-Blue Subcategory § 425.60 Applicability; description of the through-the-blue subcategory. The... processes raw or cured cattle or cattle-like hides through the blue tanned state by hair pulp unhairing...

  2. Biosorption of methylene blue from aqueous solutions by a waste biomaterial: hen feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2012-09-01

    Biosorption potential of hen feathers (HFs) to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions was investigated. Batch experiments were carried out as function of different process parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration, biosorbent dose and temperature. The optimum conditions for removal of MB were found to be pH 7.0, biosorbent dose = 1.0 g, and initial dye concentration = 50 mg L-1. The temperature had a strong influence on the biosorption process. Experimental biosorption data were modeled by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms with the Langmuir isotherm showing the best fit at all temperatures studied. The maximum monolayer sorption capacity was determined as 134.76 mg g-1 at 303 K. According to the mean free energy values of sorption ( E) calculated using the D-R isotherm model, biosorption of MB onto HFs was chemisorption. Kinetic studies showed that the biosorption of MB followed pseudo second-order kinetics. The activation energy ( E a) determined using the Arrhenius equation confirmed that the biosorption involved chemical ion-exchange. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. To conclude, HFs is a promising biosorbent for MB removal from aqueous solutions.

  3. Modeling the Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Soft Blue-White Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogenes. We developed a predictive tertiary model of the bacterial growth of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. We measured the variations over time of the physicochemical properties in the cheese. Our predictive model was developed based on broth data produced in previous studies. New growth data sets were produced to independently calibrate and validate the developed model. A characteristic of this tertiary model is that it handles dynamic growth conditions described in time series of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. Supplying the model with realistic production and retail conditions showed that the number of L. monocytogenes cells increases 3 to 3.5 log within the shelf life of the cheese. PMID:22983971

  4. Sugarcane bagasse for the removal of erythrosin B and methylene blue from aqueous waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Kaur, Harleen

    2011-12-01

    Present study explores the potentiality of locally available cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin-rich agricultural by-product sugarcane bagasse (SB) for the removal of erythrosin B (EB) and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous waste. The SB has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared and scanning electron microscopy analytical techniques. Batch experiments have been carried out to determine the influence of parameters like initial dye concentration, pH of the medium, contact time between the adsorbate and adsorbent, weight of adsorbent and system temperature on the removal of EB and MB. Optimum conditions for adsorption are found to be pH 9, temperature 308 K and an equilibration time of 1 h. Under these conditions equilibrium isotherms have been analysed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations. Based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, the predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of SB for EB and MB are found to be 500 mg g-1 (at 328 K) and 1,000 mg g-1 (at 308 K), respectively. The separation factor reveals the favourable nature of the isotherm for the studied dyes—SB system. The thermodynamic study indicates that the adsorptions of dyes are spontaneous and endothermic process. High temperatures favour EB adsorption whereas optimum temperature for MB adsorption is 318 K.

  5. Magnetite/Polymer Brush Nanocomposites with Switchable Uptake Behavior Toward Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, Asghar; Wilson, Lee D

    2016-03-01

    The grafting from approach was used to prepare pH-responsive polyacid brushes using poly(itaconic acid) (PIA) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) at the amine functional groups of chitosan. Hybrid materials consisting of polymer brushes and magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were also prepared. The products were structurally characterized and displayed reversible pH-responsive behavior and controlled adsorption/desorption of methylene blue (MB). Switchable binding of MB involves cooperative effects due to conformational changes of brushes and swelling phenomena in solution which arise from response to changes in pH. Above the pKa, magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) are deprotonated and display enhanced electrostatic interactions with high MB removal efficiency (>99%). Below the pKa, MNCs undergo self-assembly and release the cationic dye. The switchable binding of MB and the structure of the polymer brush between collapsed and extended forms relate to changes in osmotic pressure due to reversible ionization of acid groups at variable pH. Reversible adsorption-desorption with variable binding affinity and regeneration ability was demonstrated after five cycles. PMID:26751742

  6. Degradation of Anthraquinone Dye Reactive Blue 4 in Pyrite Ash Catalyzed Fenton Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Becelic-Tomin, Milena; Dalmacija, Bozo; Rajic, Ljiljana; Tomasevic, Dragana; Kerkez, Djurdja; Watson, Malcolm; Prica, Miljana

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite ash (PA) is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4) degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH = 2.5; [PA]0 = 0.2 g L−1; [H2O2]0 = 5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L−1. The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu) content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes. PMID:24526885

  7. Degradation of aqueous methylene blue using an external loop airlift sonophotoreactor: Statistical analysis and optimization.

    PubMed

    Mohajerani, Masroor; Mehrvar, Mehrab; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad

    2016-07-28

    Degradation and mineralization of aqueous methylene blue (MB) are investigated in a bench scale external loop airlift sonophotoreactor. A central composite design along with response surface methodology is employed to model and optimize the sonophotolytic process. A quadratic empirical expression between responses and independent variables (pH and initial concentrations of H2O2 and MB) is derived. The efficiencies of the system for the MB degradation after 10, 15, and 30 min, and total organic carbon reduction after 150 min are considered as responses. The analysis of variance performed high values for the coefficient of determination R(2) and adjusted R(2) for all four responses. Optimum values of process variables for the maximum degradation and mineralization efficiency are pH 6.6 and initial concentrations of H2O2 and MB are 1,280 and 10.56 mg/L, respectively. With optimal operating conditions, 99.93% and 55.32% MB removal (after 10 min) and TOC reduction (after 150 min) are achieved, respectively. Artificial neural networks are also used to model the experimental data. The respirometric study is conducted to compare the biodegradability of untreated and sonophotolytically pre-treated MB solutions at different reaction times. Pre-treated solutions at 180, 240, and 300 min performed higher biodegradability compared to those of untreated MB solutions. PMID:27128152

  8. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  9. Possible role of Prussian blue nanoparticles in chemical evolution: interaction with ribose nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachana; Iqubal, Md. Asif; Kamaluddin

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotides (RMPs) are the building blocks of genetic material consisting of a sugar group, a phosphate group and a nucleobase. Prussian blue (PB) is an ancient compound which is supposed to have formed under the conditions of primitive Earth. The interaction between nucleotides and mineral surfaces is of primary importance in the context of prebiotic chemistry. In the present work, the adsorption of RMPs on PB has been studied in the concentration range 0.4 × 10-4-3.0 × 10-4 M of RMPs at pH 7.5, T = 27°C and found to be 53.1, 41.7, 25.8 and 24.0% for adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate, cytidine 5'-monophosphate and uridine 5'-monophosphate, respectively. Optimum conditions for the adsorption were studied as a function of concentration, time, amount of adsorbent and pH and data obtained were found to fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Langmuir constants (K L and X m ) values were calculated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry techniques were used to investigate the interaction of RMPs on PB surface. Adsorption kinetics of 5'-AMP on PB has been found to be pseudo-second order. Results obtained from this study should prove valuable for a better understanding of the mechanism of RMP-PB interaction.

  10. Studies on decolorization of reactive blue 19 textile dye by Coprinus plicatilis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies were carried on the decolorization of the textile dye reactive blue 19 (RB 19) by a novel isolate of Coprinus plicatilis (C. plicatilis) fungi. We describe an in vitro optimization process for decolorization and its behavior under different conditions of carbon and nitrogen sources, pH, temperature and substrate concentration. Results The optimal conditions for decolorization were obtained in media containing intermediate concentrations of ammonium oxalate and glucose (10 g/L) as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively, at 26°C and pH = 5.5. Maximum decolorization efficiency against RB 19 achieved in this study was around 99%. Ultra-violet and visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometric analyses, before and after decolorization, suggest that decolorization was due to biodegradation. Conclusions This effect was associated with laccase enzyme displaying good tolerance to a wide range of pH values, salt concentrations and temperatures, suggesting a potential role for this organism in the remediation of real dye containing effluents. In conclusion, laccase activity in C. plicatilis was firstly described in this study. PMID:24565535

  11. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Star formation is one of the most basic phenomena in the Universe. Inside stars, primordial material from the Big Bang is processed into heavier elements that we observe today. In the extended atmospheres of certain types of stars, these elements combine into more complex systems like molecules and dust grains, the building blocks for new planets, stars and galaxies and, ultimately, for life. Violent star-forming processes let otherwise dull galaxies shine in the darkness of deep space and make them visible to us over large distances. Star formation begins with the collapse of the densest parts of interstellar clouds, regions that are characterized by comparatively high concentration of molecular gas and dust like the Orion complex (ESO PR Photo 20/04) and the Galactic Centre region (ESO Press Release 26/03). Since this gas and dust are products of earlier star formation, there must have been an early epoch when they did not yet exist. But how did the first stars then form? Indeed, to describe and explain "primordial star formation" - without molecular gas and dust - is a major challenge in modern Astrophysics. A particular class of relatively small galaxies, known as "Blue Dwarf Galaxies", possibly provide nearby and contemporary examples of what may have occurred in the early Universe during the formation of the first stars. These galaxies are poor in dust and heavier elements. They contain interstellar clouds which, in some cases, appear to be quite similar to those primordial clouds from which the first stars were formed. And yet, despite the relative lack of the dust and molecular gas that form the basic ingredients for star formation as we know it from the Milky Way, those Blue Dwarf Galaxies sometimes harbour very active star-forming regions. Thus, by studying those areas, we may hope to better understand the star-forming processes in the early Universe. Very active star formation in NGC 5253 NGC 5253 is one of the nearest of the known Blue Dwarf Galaxies

  12. Reactivity of the isolable disilene R*PhSi=SiPhR* (R* = SitBu3).

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Nils; Niedermayer, Wolfgang; Polborn, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2002-06-17

    The disilene R*PhSi=SiPhR* (R* = supersilyl = SitBu3), which can be quantitatively prepared by dehalogenation of the disilane R*PhClSi-SiBrPhR* with NaR* (yellow, water- and air-sensitive crystals; decomp at ca. 70 degrees C; Si=Si distance 2.182 A), is comparatively reactive. It transforms 1) with Cl2, Br2, HCl, HBr, and HOH under 1,2-addition into disilanes R*PhXSi-SiX'PhR* (X/X' = Hal/Hal, H/Hal, H/OH), 2) with O2, S8, and Sen under insertion into 1,3-disiletanes R*PhSi(-Y-)2SiPhR* (Y = O, S, Se), 3) with Me2C=CH2 under ene reaction into the disilane R*PhRSi-SiHPhR* (R = CH2-CMe=CH2), 4) with N2O, Ten, tBuN identical to C, and Me3SiN=N=N under [2 + 1] cycloaddition into disiliranes -R*PhSi-Y-SiPhR*- (Y = O, Te, C=NtBu, NSiMe3; P4 adds 2 molecules of disilene), 5) with CO2, COS, PhCHO, and Ph2CS under [2 + 2] cycloaddition into disiletanes -R*PhSi-SiPhR*-Y-CO- (Y = O, S) as well as -R*PhSi-SiPhR*-Y-CRPh- (Y/R = O/H, S/Ph), 6) with CS2 and CSe2 under [2 + 3] cycloaddition into ethenes R*2Ph2Si2Y2C = CY2Si2Ph2R*2 (Y = S, Se), and 7) with CH2 = CMe-CMe=CH2 and Ph2CO under [2 + 4] cycloaddition into "Diels-Alder adducts". X-ray structure analyses of seven of these compounds are presented. PMID:12391651

  13. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  14. Tuning of silver cluster emission from blue to red using a bio-active peptide in water.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhasish; Baral, Abhishek; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-03-26

    Blue, green, and red emitting silver quantum clusters have been prepared through green chemical approach by using a bio-active peptide glutathione (reduced) in a 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.46. This study describes fluorescence emission tuning of the silver clusters by making different sized Ag clusters using slightly different reaction conditions keeping the same stabilizing ligand, reducing agent, solvent system, and silver salt precursor. The preparation procedure of these silver quantum clusters is new and highly reproducible. Each of these clusters shows very interesting fluorescence properties with large stokes shifts, and the quantum yields of blue, green, and red clusters are 2.08%, 0.125%, and 1.39%, respectively. These silver quantum clusters have been characterized by using different techniques including fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, field-emission gun transmission electron microscopic (FEG-TEM) imaging and MALDI-TOF MS analyses. MALDI-TOF MS analyses show that the size of these blue, green and red emitting silver clusters are Ag5 (NC1, nanoclusters 1), Ag8 (NC2, nanoclusters 2) and Ag13 (NC3, nanoclusters 3), respectively, by using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as a matrix. These clusters are stable in broad ranges of pH. The NC3 (red emitting) has been successfully utilized for selective and sensitive detection of toxic Hg(II) ions in water by using even naked eyes, fluorometric, and calorimetric studies. The lower limit of detection of Hg(II) ions in water has been estimated to be 126 and 245 nM from fluorometric and UV-vis analyses, respectively. Enthalpy change (ΔH) during this Hg(II) sensing process is 2508 KJ mol(-1). PMID:24568193

  15. Effects of pH adjustment with phosphates on attributes and functionalities of normal and high pH beef.

    PubMed

    Young, O A; Zhang, S X; Farouk, M M; Podmore, C

    2005-05-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscles from six normal- and six high-ultimate pH bulls were selected for fine mincing and subsequent pH adjustment with acid and alkaline pyrophosphate. Four pH treatments were prepared: initially high remains high (mean of pH 6.37), high becomes normal (5.62); initially normal remains normal (5.65), and normal becomes high (6.21). The addition level of phosphate as P(2)O(5) was the same in all replicates. Before pH adjustment, colour and water holding capacity (WHC) values were strongly affected by higher (initial) pH in expected ways: darker, lower chroma, higher capacity. After pH adjustment, these values were affected only by the final pH, not the initial pH (the pH history). Total protein solubility was likewise affected by final pH but not initial pH. In contrast, the combination high initial pH-high final pH improved sarcoplasmic protein solubility by 20% over the combination normal initial pH-high final pH. Sarcoplasmic protein solubility is an indicator of strain required to fracture cooked batters made from the minced meats; in the event, the rank order of the four treatments for strain-to-fracture matched that of sarcoplasmic protein solubility. Statistically, sarcoplasmic protein solubility and strain-to-fracture were both affected by initial pH (P<0.01) and final pH (P<0.001). However, stress required to fracture cooked batters was entirely controlled by initial pH (P<0.01). In other words, the stress-to-fracture advantage of initially high pH meat was not matched by upward pH adjustment of initially normal pH meat. Emulsion stability, which is better with higher pH meat, was affected by initial and final pH (both P<0.01). Cook yield, like WHC of pH-adjusted raw meat, was more due to final pH than initial pH, similarly cooked batter colour, whereas final pH had a significant effect on quality attributes (generally better when higher). An initially high pH history conferred an enduring advantage on three important batter attributes

  16. Global Monthly Water Scarcity: Blue Water Footprints versus Blue Water Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Arjen Y.; Mekonnen, Mesfin M.; Chapagain, Ashok K.; Mathews, Ruth E.; Richter, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater scarcity is a growing concern, placing considerable importance on the accuracy of indicators used to characterize and map water scarcity worldwide. We improve upon past efforts by using estimates of blue water footprints (consumptive use of ground- and surface water flows) rather than water withdrawals, accounting for the flows needed to sustain critical ecological functions and by considering monthly rather than annual values. We analyzed 405 river basins for the period 1996–2005. In 201 basins with 2.67 billion inhabitants there was severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year. The ecological and economic consequences of increasing degrees of water scarcity – as evidenced by the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), Indus, and Murray-Darling River Basins – can include complete desiccation during dry seasons, decimation of aquatic biodiversity, and substantial economic disruption. PMID:22393438

  17. Global monthly water scarcity: blue water footprints versus blue water availability.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Arjen Y; Mekonnen, Mesfin M; Chapagain, Ashok K; Mathews, Ruth E; Richter, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater scarcity is a growing concern, placing considerable importance on the accuracy of indicators used to characterize and map water scarcity worldwide. We improve upon past efforts by using estimates of blue water footprints (consumptive use of ground- and surface water flows) rather than water withdrawals, accounting for the flows needed to sustain critical ecological functions and by considering monthly rather than annual values. We analyzed 405 river basins for the period 1996-2005. In 201 basins with 2.67 billion inhabitants there was severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year. The ecological and economic consequences of increasing degrees of water scarcity--as evidenced by the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), Indus, and Murray-Darling River Basins--can include complete desiccation during dry seasons, decimation of aquatic biodiversity, and substantial economic disruption. PMID:22393438

  18. Blue and grey water footprint of textile industry in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laili; Ding, Xuemei; Wu, Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a newly developed idea that indicates impacts of freshwater appropriation and wastewater discharge. The textile industry is one of the oldest, longest and most complicated industrial chains in the world's manufacturing industries. However, the textile industry is also water intensive. In this paper, we applied a bottom-up approach to estimate the direct blue water footprint (WFdir,blue) and direct grey water footprint (WFdir,grey) of China's textile industry at sector level based on WF methodology. The results showed that WFdir,blue of China's textile industry had an increasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The annual WFdir,blue surpassed 0.92 Gm(3)/yr (giga cubic meter a year) since 2004 and rose to peak value of 1.09 Gm(3)/yr in 2007. The original and residuary WFdir,grey (both were calculated based on the concentration of chemical oxygen demand (CODCr)) of China's textile industry had a similar variation trend with that of WFdir,blue. Among the three sub-sectors of China's textile industry, the manufacture of textiles sector's annual WFdir,blue and WFdir,grey were much larger than those of the manufacture of textile wearing apparel, footware and caps sector and the manufacture of chemical fibers sector. The intensities of WFdir,blue and WF(res)dir,grey of China's textile industry were year by year decreasing through the efforts of issuing restriction policies on freshwater use and wastewater generation and discharge, and popularization of water saving and wastewater treatment technologies. PMID:24334900

  19. Neurometabolic mechanisms for memory enhancement and neuroprotection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first review of the memory-enhancing and neuroprotective metabolic mechanisms of action of methylene blue in vivo. These mechanisms have important implications as a new neurobiological approach to improve normal memory and to treat memory impairment and neurodegeneration associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methylene blue’s action is unique because its neurobiological effects are not determined by regular drug-receptor interactions or drug-response paradigms. Methylene blue shows a hormetic dose-response, with opposite effects at low and high doses. At low doses, methylene blue is an electron cycler in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, with unparalleled antioxidant and cell respiration-enhancing properties that affect the function of the nervous system in a versatile manner. A major role of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase on the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue is supported by available data. The memory-enhancing effects have been associated with improvement of memory consolidation in a network-specific and use-dependent fashion. In addition, low doses of methylene blue have also been used for neuroprotection against mitochondrial dysfunction in humans and experimental models of disease. The unique auto-oxidizing property of methylene blue and its pleiotropic effects on a number of tissue oxidases explain its potent neuroprotective effects at low doses. The evidence reviewed supports a mechanistic role of low-dose methylene blue as a promising and safe intervention for improving memory and for the treatment of acute and chronic conditions characterized by increased oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. PMID:22067440

  20. Enhanced Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm: The second generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Hansell, R.; Seftor, C. S.; Huang, J.; Tsay, S.-C.

    2013-08-01

    The aerosol products retrieved using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 5.1 Deep Blue algorithm have provided useful information about aerosol properties over bright-reflecting land surfaces, such as desert, semiarid, and urban regions. However, many components of the C5.1 retrieval algorithm needed to be improved; for example, the use of a static surface database to estimate surface reflectances. This is particularly important over regions of mixed vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces, which may undergo strong seasonal changes in land cover. In order to address this issue, we develop a hybrid approach, which takes advantage of the combination of precalculated surface reflectance database and normalized difference vegetation index in determining the surface reflectance for aerosol retrievals. As a result, the spatial coverage of aerosol data generated by the enhanced Deep Blue algorithm has been extended from the arid and semiarid regions to the entire land areas. In this paper, the changes made in the enhanced Deep Blue algorithm regarding the surface reflectance estimation, aerosol model selection, and cloud screening schemes for producing the MODIS collection 6 aerosol products are discussed. A similar approach has also been applied to the algorithm that generates the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Deep Blue products. Based upon our preliminary results of comparing the enhanced Deep Blue aerosol products with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements, the expected error of the Deep Blue aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is estimated to be better than 0.05 + 20%. Using 10 AERONET sites with long-term time series, 79% of the best quality Deep Blue AOT values are found to fall within this expected error.