Science.gov

Sample records for alcohol amphetamines barbiturates

  1. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited..., marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine. This prohibition shall not apply in cases where the drug is...

  2. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited..., marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine. This prohibition shall not apply in cases where the drug is...

  3. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited..., marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine. This prohibition shall not apply in cases where the drug is...

  4. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited..., marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine. This prohibition shall not apply in cases where the drug is...

  5. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited..., marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine. This prohibition shall not apply in cases where the drug is...

  6. Amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Amphetamines KidsHealth > For Teens > Amphetamines A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Amphetamines What Are Amphetamines? Amphetamines are stimulants. They speed up functions in ...

  7. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21 of... property being under the influence of or using or possessing any narcotic drug, marijuana, hallucinogen... influence of alcoholic beverages; (d) Bringing alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens,...

  8. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21 of... property being under the influence of or using or possessing any narcotic drug, marijuana, hallucinogen... influence of alcoholic beverages; (d) Bringing alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens,...

  9. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21 of... property being under the influence of or using or possessing any narcotic drug, marijuana, hallucinogen... influence of alcoholic beverages; (d) Bringing alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens,...

  10. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21 of... property being under the influence of or using or possessing any narcotic drug, marijuana, hallucinogen... influence of alcoholic beverages; (d) Bringing alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens,...

  11. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21 of... property being under the influence of or using or possessing any narcotic drug, marijuana, hallucinogen... influence of alcoholic beverages; (d) Bringing alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens,...

  12. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment for other types of drug-induced respiratory depression. The actions of alcohol, pentobarbital, bicuculline, and the ampakine CX717, alone and in combination, were measured via 1) ventral root recordings from newborn rat brain stem-spinal cord preparations and 2) plethysmographic recordings from unrestrained newborn and adult rats. We found that ethanol caused a modest suppression of respiratory drive in vitro (50 mM) and in vivo (2 g/kg ip). Pentobarbital induced an ∼50% reduction in respiratory frequency in vitro (50 μM) and in vivo (28 mg/kg for pups and 56 mg/kg for adult rats ip). However, severe life-threatening apnea was induced by the combination of the agents in vitro and in vivo via activation of GABA(A) receptors, which was exacerbated by hypoxic (8% O(2)) conditions. Administration of the ampakine CX717 alleviated a significant component of the respiratory depression in vitro (50-150 μM) and in vivo (30 mg/kg ip). Bicuculline also alleviated ethanol-/pentobarbital-induced respiratory depression but caused seizure activity, whereas CX717 did not. These data demonstrated that ethanol and pentobarbital together caused severe respiratory depression, including lethal apnea, via synergistic actions that blunt chemoreceptive responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia and suppress central respiratory rhythmogenesis. The ampakine CX717 markedly reduced the severity of respiratory depression.

  13. Barbiturate intoxication and overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... barbiturate intoxication and overdose include: Altered level of consciousness Difficulty in thinking Drowsiness or coma Faulty judgment ... who use them on purpose to alter their consciousness The second group is among the most difficult ...

  14. Amphetamine sensitization and cross-sensitization with acute restraint stress: impact of prenatal alcohol exposure in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy L.; Bodnar, Tamara; Yu, Wayne K.; Weinberg, Joanne; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) are at increased risk for substance use disorders (SUD). In typically developing individuals, susceptibility to SUD is associated with alterations in dopamine and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) systems, and their interactions. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) alters dopamine and HPA systems, yet effects of PAE on dopamine-HPA interactions are unknown. Amphetamine-stress cross-sensitization paradigms were utilized to investigate sensitivity of dopamine and stress (HPA) systems, and their interactions following PAE. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley offspring from PAE, pair-fed, and ad libitum-fed control groups were assigned to amphetamine-(1–2mg/kg) or saline-treated conditions, with injections every other day for 15 days. 14 days later, all animals received an amphetamine challenge (1mg/kg) and 5 days later, hormones were measured under basal or acute stress conditions. Amphetamine sensitization (augmented locomotion, days 1–29) and cross-sensitization with acute restraint stress (increased stress hormones, day 34) were assessed. Results PAE rats exhibited a lower threshold for amphetamine sensitization compared to controls, suggesting enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic systems to stimulant-induced changes. Cross-sensitization between amphetamine (dopamine) and stress (HPA hormone) systems was evident in PAE, but not in control rats. PAE males exhibited increased dopamine receptor expression (mPFC) compared to controls. Conclusions PAE alters induction and expression of sensitization/cross-sensitization, as reflected in locomotor, neural, and endocrine changes, in a manner consistent with increased sensitivity of dopamine and stress systems. These results provide insight into possible mechanisms that could underlie increased prevalence of SUD, as well as the impact of widely prescribed stimulant medications among adolescents with FASD. PMID:25420606

  15. Amphetamine derivative related deaths.

    PubMed

    Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodríguez, A

    1997-02-28

    Amphetamine its methylendioxy (methylendioxyamphetamine methylenedioxymethylamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine) and methoxy derivatives (p-methoxyamphetamine and p-methoxymethylamphetamine) are widely abused in Spanish society. We present here the results of a systematic study of all cases of deaths brought to the attention of the Madrid department of the Instituto Nacional de Toxicologia from 1993 to 1995 in which some of these drugs have been found in the cadaveric blood. The cases were divided into three categories: amphetamine and derivatives, amphetamines and alcohol, amphetamines and other drugs. Data on age, sex, clinical symptoms, morphological findings, circumstances of death, when known, and concentration of amphetamine derivatives, alcohol and other drugs in blood are given for each group. The information provided here may prove to be useful for the forensic interpretation of deaths which are directly or indirectly related to abuse of amphetamine derivatives.

  16. The effects of perceived quality on the behavioural economics of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy purchases.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jon C; Goudie, Andrew J; Field, Matt; Loverseed, Anne-Claire; Charlton, Sarah; Sumnall, Harry R

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has indicated that non-dependent polydrug users are willing to pay more money to buy good quality drugs as their income increased. This study sought to examine whether altering the perceived quality of controlled drugs would affect drug purchases if the monetary price remained fixed. A random sample of 80 polydrug users were recruited. All participants were administered an anonymous questionnaire consisting of the Drug Abuse Screening Test for Adolescents (DAST-A), the Severity of Dependence Scale for cannabis (SDS), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and questions about their drug use. Participants then completed a simulation of controlled drug purchases where the price of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy remained the same but their perceived quality changed (i.e. unit price increased as the perceived quality decreased). The demand for alcohol was quality inelastic and alcohol quality had no effects on the purchase of any other controlled drug. Demand for cannabis was quality elastic and alcohol substituted for cannabis as its unit price increased. Demand for cocaine was quality elastic and alcohol, cannabis, and ecstasy substituted for cocaine as its unit price increased. Demand for ecstasy was quality elastic and alcohol and cocaine both substituted for ecstasy as its unit price increased. These results suggest that perceived quality influences the demand for controlled drugs and that monitoring the perceived quality of controlled drugs may provide a warning of potential public health problems in the near future.

  17. The effects of price and perceived quality on the behavioural economics of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy purchases.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew J; Sumnall, Harry R; Field, Matt; Clayton, Hannah; Cole, Jon C

    2007-07-10

    Behavioural economic models of substance use describe the relationship between changes in unit price and consumption. However, these models rarely take account of the perceived quality (i.e. potency) of controlled drugs. Therefore we investigated the effects of both price and quality on the decision to purchase controlled drugs by polysubstance misusers. Forty current polysubstance misusers (29 males, 11 females; mean age 23.8) were recruited into the study. Participants were asked to hypothetically purchase drugs from a price list of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine and ecstasy at different levels of quality and price (i.e. better quality drugs cost more money). The disposable income available for those purchases was systematically varied in order to determine the impact of income on the decision to purchase drugs. Demand for both normal and strong alcohol was income inelastic. Demand for both poor and average quality cannabis and ecstasy was income inelastic, but demand for good quality cannabis and ecstasy was income elastic. The demand for poor quality cocaine was income inelastic, with the demand for both average and good quality cocaine being income elastic. Participants reported too few purchases of amphetamine, which precluded behavioural economic analysis. These results suggest that, like other goods, controlled drugs are purchased based upon the consumer's interpretations of their relative value. Therefore, it is probable that the purchase and subsequent use of controlled drugs by polysubstance misusers will be heavily influenced by the economic environment.

  18. Orexinergic neurons and barbiturate anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kushikata, T; Hirota, K; Yoshida, H; Kudo, M; Lambert, D G; Smart, D; Jerman, J C; Matsuki, A

    2003-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) regulate sleep with possible interactions with brain noradrenergic neurons. In addition, noradrenergic activity affects barbiturate anesthesia. As we have also recently reported that OXs selectively evoke norepinephrine release from rat cerebrocortical slices we hypothesized that barbiturate anesthesia may result from of an interaction with central orexinergic systems. To test this hypothesis, we performed a series of in vivo and in vitro studies in rats. In vivo, the effects of i.c.v. OX A, B and SB-334867-A (OX1 receptor antagonist) on pentobarbital, thiopental or phenobarbital-induced anesthesia times (loss of righting reflex) was assessed. In vitro effects of barbiturates and SB-334867-A on OX-evoked norepinephrine release from cerebrocortical slice was examined. In Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human OX1/OX2 receptors OX A- and B-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ were measured with and without barbiturates. OX A and B significantly decreased pentobarbital, thiopental and phenobarbital anesthesia times by 15-40%. SB-334867-A increased thiopental-induced anesthesia time by approximately by 40%, and reversed the decrease produced by OX A. In vitro, all anesthetic barbiturates inhibited OX-evoked norepinephrine release with clinically relevant IC50 values. A GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, did not modify the inhibitory effects of thiopental and the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not inhibit norepinephrine release. In addition there was no interaction of barbiturates with either OX1 or OX2 receptors. Collectively our data suggest that orexinergic neurons may be an important target for barbiturates, and GABAA, OX1 and OX2 receptors may not be involved in this interaction.

  19. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  20. Amphetamine Challenge: A Marker of Brain Function That Mediates Risk for Drug and Alcohol Abuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-05

    drug and behavioral control was evaluated. First, 10-mg damphetamine was administered to healthy young men and women and groups of individuals with...this characteristic is sometimes associated with poor control. One possibility is that the same neural system—namely, the mesolimbic dopamine system...drugs. Substantial evidence implicates the mesocorticolimbic dopamine pathway as a mediator of the stimulant effects of amphetamine. In this

  1. New method for spectrophotometric determination of quinones and barbituric acid through their reaction. A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1996-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of p-benzoquinone, p-chloranil and 1.4-naphthoquinone. The method is based on the reaction between quinones and barbituric acid, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption between 485 and 555 nm in 50% methyl alcohol-water mixture. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range 0.025-05 mM of orginal quinone. The kinetics of the reaction between p-benzoquinone and barbituric acid was studied in a range of methyl alcohol-water mixtures. The reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rate increases with increasing dielectric constant. The method was applied for determination of barbituric acid with p-benzoquinone in the concentration range of 0.025-0.345 mM. Other barbiturates do not interfere.

  2. A Preliminary Investigation of Individual Differences in Subjective Responses to D-Amphetamine, Alcohol, and Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Using a Within-Subjects Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Margaret C.; Marcus, Benjamin A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Polydrug use is common, and might occur because certain individuals experience positive effects from several different drugs during early stages of use. This study examined individual differences in subjective responses to single oral doses of d-amphetamine, alcohol, and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in healthy social drinkers. Each of these drugs produces feelings of well-being in at least some individuals, and we hypothesized that subjective responses to these drugs would be positively correlated. We also examined participants’ drug responses in relation to personality traits associated with drug use. In this initial, exploratory study, 24 healthy, light drug users (12 male, 12 female), aged 21–31 years, participated in a fully within-subject, randomized, counterbalanced design with six 5.5-hour sessions in which they received d-amphetamine (20mg), alcohol (0.8 g/kg), or THC (7.5 mg), each paired with a placebo session. Participants rated the drugs’ effects on both global measures (e.g. feeling a drug effect at all) and drug-specific measures. In general, participants’ responses to the three drugs were unrelated. Unexpectedly, “wanting more” alcohol was inversely correlated with “wanting more” THC. Additionally, in women, but not in men, “disliking” alcohol was negatively correlated with “disliking” THC. Positive alcohol and amphetamine responses were related, but only in individuals who experienced a stimulant effect of alcohol. Finally, high trait constraint (or lack of impulsivity) was associated with lower reports of liking alcohol. No personality traits predicted responses across multiple drug types. Generally, these findings do not support the idea that certain individuals experience greater positive effects across multiple drug classes, but instead provide some evidence for a “drug of choice” model, in which individuals respond positively to certain classes of drugs that share similar subjective effects, and dislike other

  3. A Preliminary Investigation of Individual Differences in Subjective Responses to D-Amphetamine, Alcohol, and Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Using a Within-Subjects Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Margaret C; Marcus, Benjamin A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Polydrug use is common, and might occur because certain individuals experience positive effects from several different drugs during early stages of use. This study examined individual differences in subjective responses to single oral doses of d-amphetamine, alcohol, and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in healthy social drinkers. Each of these drugs produces feelings of well-being in at least some individuals, and we hypothesized that subjective responses to these drugs would be positively correlated. We also examined participants' drug responses in relation to personality traits associated with drug use. In this initial, exploratory study, 24 healthy, light drug users (12 male, 12 female), aged 21-31 years, participated in a fully within-subject, randomized, counterbalanced design with six 5.5-hour sessions in which they received d-amphetamine (20mg), alcohol (0.8 g/kg), or THC (7.5 mg), each paired with a placebo session. Participants rated the drugs' effects on both global measures (e.g. feeling a drug effect at all) and drug-specific measures. In general, participants' responses to the three drugs were unrelated. Unexpectedly, "wanting more" alcohol was inversely correlated with "wanting more" THC. Additionally, in women, but not in men, "disliking" alcohol was negatively correlated with "disliking" THC. Positive alcohol and amphetamine responses were related, but only in individuals who experienced a stimulant effect of alcohol. Finally, high trait constraint (or lack of impulsivity) was associated with lower reports of liking alcohol. No personality traits predicted responses across multiple drug types. Generally, these findings do not support the idea that certain individuals experience greater positive effects across multiple drug classes, but instead provide some evidence for a "drug of choice" model, in which individuals respond positively to certain classes of drugs that share similar subjective effects, and dislike other types of drugs.

  4. Amphetamines and Barbiturates: The Up and Down Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  5. Substance use - amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - amphetamines; Drug abuse - amphetamines; Drug use - amphetamines ... Amphetamine: goey, louee, speed, uppers, whiz Dextroamphetamine (ADHD medicine used illegally): dexies, kiddie-speed, pep pills, uppers; ...

  6. Amphetamine Challenge: A Marker of Brain Function that Mediates Risk for Drug and Alcohol Abuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Develop and submit protocol, informed consent documents, and other supporting materials, including questionnaires and other study forms, to IRB. DONE...7. Questionnaires . Based on a review of the literature, we compiled a battery of questionnaires that assess characteristics related to behavioral...control and implicated in risk for alcohol and drug abuse. We will administer these questionnaires on the web (the MPQ) and at the health- screening

  7. 38 CFR 1.218 - Security and law enforcement at VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited. Entering property under the influence of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana... property of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine (unless prescribed by...

  8. 38 CFR 1.218 - Security and law enforcement at VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited. Entering property under the influence of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana... property of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine (unless prescribed by...

  9. 38 CFR 1.218 - Security and law enforcement at VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited. Entering property under the influence of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana... property of any narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate, or amphetamine (unless prescribed by...

  10. A Fatal Adverse Effect of Barbiturate Coma Therapy: Dyskalemia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyun Mook; Baek, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Pyung

    2016-01-01

    The management guideline for traumatic brain injury (TBI) recommends high-dose barbiturate therapy to control increased intracranial pressure refractory to other therapeutic options. High-dose barbiturate therapy, however, may cause many severe side effects; the commonly recognized ones include hypotension, immunosuppression, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and prolonged decrease of cortical activity. Meanwhile, dyskalemia remains relatively uncommon. In this study, we report the case of a hypokalemic patient with severe rebound hyperkalemia, which occurred as a result of barbiturate coma therapy administered for TBI treatment. PMID:27857927

  11. Extracorporeal treatment for barbiturate poisoning: recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup.

    PubMed

    Mactier, Robert; Laliberté, Martin; Mardini, Joelle; Ghannoum, Marc; Lavergne, Valery; Gosselin, Sophie; Hoffman, Robert S; Nolin, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    The EXTRIP (Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning) Workgroup conducted a systematic review of barbiturate poisoning using a standardized evidence-based process to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in patients with barbiturate poisoning. The authors reviewed all articles, extracted data, summarized key findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A 2-round modified Delphi method was used to reach a consensus on voting statements, and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. 617 articles met the search inclusion criteria. Data for 538 patients were abstracted and evaluated. Only case reports, case series, and nonrandomized observational studies were identified, yielding a low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Using established criteria, the workgroup deemed that long-acting barbiturates are dialyzable and short-acting barbiturates are moderately dialyzable. Four key recommendations were made. (1) The use of ECTR should be restricted to cases of severe long-acting barbiturate poisoning. (2) The indications for ECTR in this setting are the presence of prolonged coma, respiratory depression necessitating mechanical ventilation, shock, persistent toxicity, or increasing or persistently elevated serum barbiturate concentrations despite treatment with multiple-dose activated charcoal. (3) Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred mode of ECTR, and multiple-dose activated charcoal treatment should be continued during ECTR. (4) Cessation of ECTR is indicated when clinical improvement is apparent. This report provides detailed descriptions of the rationale for all recommendations. In summary, patients with long-acting barbiturate poisoning should be treated with ECTR provided at least one of the specific criteria in the first recommendation is present.

  12. The history of barbiturates a century after their clinical introduction

    PubMed Central

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Ucha-Udabe, Ronaldo; Alamo, Cecilio

    2005-01-01

    The present work offers an analysis of the historical development of the discovery and use of barbiturates in the field of psychiatry and neurology, a century after their clinical introduction. Beginning with the synthesis of malonylurea by von Baeyer in 1864, and up to the decline of barbiturate therapy in the 1960s, it describes the discovery of the sedative properties of barbital, by von Mering and Fischer (1903), the subsequent synthesis of phenobarbital by this same group (1911), and the gradual clinical incorporation of different barbiturates (butobarbital, amobarbital, secobarbital, pentobarbital, thiopental, etc). We describe the role played in therapy by barbiturates throughout their history: their traditional use as sedative and hypnotic agents, their use with schizophrenic patients in so-called “sleep cures” (Klaesi, Cloetta), the discovery of the antiepileptic properties of phenobarbital (Hauptmann) and their use in the treatment of epilepsy, and the introduction of thiobarbiturates in intravenous anesthesia (Lundy, Waters). We also analyze, from the historical perspective, the problems of safety (phenomena of dependence and death by overdose) which, accompanied by the introduction of a range of psychoactive drugs in the 1950s, brought an end to barbiturate use, except in specific applications, such as the induction of anesthesia and the treatment of certain types of epileptic crisis. PMID:18568113

  13. Amphetamines, Barbiturates and Hallucinogens; An Analysis of Use, Distribution, and Control. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlothlin, William H.

    This report is the third of three monographs to provide perspectives on the use, distribution, and control of illicit drugs. The first, conducted in 1971, described the prevalence, use patterns, sources, distribution, and economics of the marihuana market. The second (1972) estimated the cost, benefits, and potential of approaches to narcotic…

  14. The Combined Effects of Ethanol and Amphetamine Sulfate on Performance of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lolita; Taylor, Jack D.; Nash, Charles W.; Cameron, Donald F.

    1966-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and amphetamine on the performance of selected tests were evaluated. No differences were shown between the effects of ethanol-amphetamine and ethanol-lactose on the performance of balance, skipping, Minnesota manipulation, Purdue peg board, Maudsley Personality Inventory, pursuit rotor or digit span tests; but ethanol plus amphetamine produced less impairment of performance of coding, mental addition, and trail making tests than did ethanol plus a placebo. Ethanol increased the errors in performance of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but the simultaneous administration of amphetamine did not reduce this effect. Conversely, amphetamine reduced the test-retest reliability of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but alcohol appeared to counteract this effect of amphetamine. These experiments indicate that, when ethanol and amphetamine are used together, each drug modifies some of the effects produced by the other in a manner that cannot be predicted on the assumption that a depressant versus stimulant competition is operative. PMID:5324976

  15. Comparative Actions of Barbiturates Studied by Pollen Grain Germination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kordan, Herbert A.; Mumford, Pauline M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple experimental system whereby the comparative actions of long, medium, and short-acting barbiturates can be demonstrated in a relatively short period of time under optical microscopy using pollen grains as the biological test or assay system. (Author/HM)

  16. Self-injection of barbiturates and benzodiazepines in baboons.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R R; Lukas, S E; Bradford, L D; Brady, J V; Snell, J D

    1981-01-01

    Self-injection of three barbiturates, six benzodiazepines, and chlorpromazine was examined in baboons. Intravenous injections of drug were dependent upon completion of 160 lever presses (a 160-response fixed-ratio schedule). A 3-h time-out period followed each injection, permitting a maximum of eight injections per day. Prior to testing each dose of drug, self-injection performance was established with cocaine. Subsequently, a test dose was substituted for cocaine. Amobarbital, pentobarbital, and secobarbital maintained the highest levels of self-injection, which were similar to those maintained by cocaine. Clonazepam, clorazepate, diazepam, flurazepam, medazepam, and midazolam maintained relatively modest levels of self-injection, while chlorpromazine maintained only low levels, which were in the range of vehicle control. Of the six benzodiazepines, midazolam produced the highest levels of self-injection. At the highest self-injected doses, the barbiturates produced anesthesia in contrast to the benzodiazepines, which produced only sedation. None of the drugs affected food intake except for chlorpromazine, which produced dose-related decreases. The differences among the drug classes (i.e., barbiturate, benzodiazepine, phenothiazine) with respect to the maintenance of self-injection correspond well with the results of previous animal and human drug self-administration studies.

  17. Genes and pathways co-associated with the exposure to multiple drugs of abuse, including alcohol, amphetamine/methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, morphine, and/or nicotine: a review of proteomics analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Yuan, Wenji; Li, Ming D

    2011-12-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic neuronal disease. In recent years, proteomics technology has been widely used to assess the protein expression in the brain tissues of both animals and humans exposed to addictive drugs. Through this approach, a large number of proteins potentially involved in the etiology of drug addictions have been identified, which provide a valuable resource to study protein function, biochemical pathways, and networks related to the molecular mechanisms underlying drug dependence. In this article, we summarize the recent application of proteomics to profiling protein expression patterns in animal or human brain tissues after the administration of alcohol, amphetamine/methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, morphine/heroin/butorphanol, or nicotine. From available reports, we compiled a list of 497 proteins associated with exposure to one or more addictive drugs, with 160 being related to exposure to at least two abused drugs. A number of biochemical pathways and biological processes appear to be enriched among these proteins, including synaptic transmission and signaling pathways related to neuronal functions. The data included in this work provide a summary and extension of the proteomics studies on drug addiction. Furthermore, the proteins and biological processes highlighted here may provide valuable insight into the cellular activities and biological processes in neurons in the development of drug addiction.

  18. Amphetamine margin in sports

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1981-10-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seem clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both humans and rats. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogs of such performances have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  19. Amphetamines and Sports Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooter, G. Rankin

    1980-01-01

    A large number of athletes have resorted to drugs to improve performance in competition. Research literature on the use of amphetamines, both pro and con, is currently confounded with poor research designs and lack of controls, and further research is needed. (CJ)

  20. Toxicity of amphetamines: an update.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Márcia; Carmo, Helena; Costa, Vera Marisa; Capela, João Paulo; Pontes, Helena; Remião, Fernando; Carvalho, Félix; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes

    2012-08-01

    Amphetamines represent a class of psychotropic compounds, widely abused for their stimulant, euphoric, anorectic, and, in some cases, emphathogenic, entactogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. These compounds derive from the β-phenylethylamine core structure and are kinetically and dynamically characterized by easily crossing the blood-brain barrier, to resist brain biotransformation and to release monoamine neurotransmitters from nerve endings. Although amphetamines are widely acknowledged as synthetic drugs, of which amphetamine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) are well-known examples, humans have used natural amphetamines for several millenniums, through the consumption of amphetamines produced in plants, namely cathinone (khat), obtained from the plant Catha edulis and ephedrine, obtained from various plants in the genus Ephedra. More recently, a wave of new amphetamines has emerged in the market, mainly constituted of cathinone derivatives, including mephedrone, methylone, methedrone, and buthylone, among others. Although intoxications by amphetamines continue to be common causes of emergency department and hospital admissions, it is frequent to find the sophism that amphetamine derivatives, namely those appearing more recently, are relatively safe. However, human intoxications by these drugs are increasingly being reported, with similar patterns compared to those previously seen with classical amphetamines. That is not surprising, considering the similar structures and mechanisms of action among the different amphetamines, conferring similar toxicokinetic and toxicological profiles to these compounds. The aim of the present review is to give an insight into the pharmacokinetics, general mechanisms of biological and toxicological actions, and the main target organs for the toxicity of amphetamines. Although there is still scarce knowledge from novel amphetamines to draw mechanistic insights, the long-studied classical

  1. New barbiturates and thiobarbiturates as potential enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ashfaq M; Mumtaz, Saira; Rauf, Abdul; Ashraf, Muhammad; Nasar, Rumana; Chohan, Zahid H

    2015-02-01

    A series of 27 new barbiturates and thiobarbiturates have been synthesized by a convenient multi-component reaction in overall excellent yields (87-96%). All the synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, EIMS and elemental analysis (C, H, N and S). Furthermore, all compounds were screened for in vitro antioxidant (DPPH radical scavenging), lipoxygenase, chymotrypsin, α-glucosidase and anti-urease activities. Out of the series, 23 in DPPH, 14 in lipoxygenase, 2 in chymotrypsin have shown appreciable IC50 values.

  2. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's how many accidents occur. continue What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  3. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  4. The Influence of Environmental Factors on Behavioural Problems in 8-Year-Old Children Exposed to Amphetamine during Fetal Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billing, Lars; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-five children born to Swedish women who used amphetamines during pregnancy were followed to the age of eight years. Statistical correlations were seen between the extent of amphetamine exposure and psychometric tests, aggressive behavior, adjustment, and general assessment. Alcohol use during pregnancy and attitude toward pregnancy also…

  5. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A What's in this article? ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  6. Concurrent use of amphetamine stimulants and antidepressants by undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Kim; Neafsey, Patricia J; Lin, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate students were recruited to participate in an online survey to report their use of amphetamine stimulants and other drugs. Significant differences were found between students reporting (n=79; 4.0%) and not reporting (n=1,897; 96%) amphetamine-stimulant use in the past month – in terms of race/ethnicity, class standing, residence, health symptoms, self-health report – in addition to alcohol, tobacco, pain-reliever, and antidepressant use. Health symptoms reported more often by stimulant users included depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, fatigue, dizziness, difficulty concentrating, and nicotine craving. Health care providers of college students should query these patients about symptoms that could be related to depression and amphetamine use. In particular, they should provide education at the point of care around the risks of amphetamine use in general and the specific risks in those students who have symptoms of depression and/or are taking antidepressant medication. Prevention programs should also target the risks of concurrent use of amphetamines, antidepressants, and other drugs among college students. PMID:25653508

  7. Survey of opioid and barbiturate prescriptions in patients attending a tertiary care headache center

    PubMed Central

    Minen, Mia T.; Wells, Rebecca E.; Suzuki, Joji; Grudzen, Corita; Balcer, Laura; Loder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective To educate physicians about appropriate acute migraine treatment guidelinesby determining 1. Where headache patients were first prescribed opioids and barbiturates, and 2. The characteristics of the patient population who had been prescribed opioids and barbiturates. Background Several specialty societies issued recommendations that caution against the indiscriminate use of opioids or barbiturate containing medications for the treatment of migraine. These medications are still being prescribed in various medical settings and could put headache specialists in a difficult position when patients request these agents. Methods Patients presenting to a headache center comprised of eight physicians were asked to complete a survey that assessed headache types, comorbid conditions, and whether they had ever been prescribed opioids or barbiturates. If they responded affirmatively to the latter question, they were asked about the prescribing doctor, medication effectiveness, and whether they were currently on the medication. Data collection took place over a one month period. Results 244 patients were given the survey and 218 of these patients completed it. The predominant diagnosis was migraine (83.9%). More than half of the patients reported having been prescribed an opioid (54.8%) or a barbiturate (56.7%). About one fifth were on opioids (19.4%) or barbiturates (20.7%) at the time of completing the survey. Most patients reported being on opioids for more than two years (24.6%) or less than one week (32.1%). The reasons most frequently cited for stopping opioids were that the medications did not help (30.9%) or that they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them (29.4%). Among patients who had previously been on barbiturates, 32.2% had been on these for over 2 years. Most patients (61.8%) stopped barbiturates because they did not find the medication helpful, while 17.6% said they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them. The physician specialty most

  8. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents and other adults use alcohol socially — having beer or wine with dinner, for example — alcohol seems ... besides just hanging out in someone's basement drinking beer all night. Plan a trip to the movies, ...

  9. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  10. Amphetamine withdrawal and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gossop, M R; Bradley, B P; Brewis, R K

    1982-01-01

    Sleep duration and indices of disturbed sleep, such as night-time waking and day-time sleep, were investigated in amphetamine users following hospital admission and withdrawal from the drug. Compared to controls, the amphetamine group showed an initial period of oversleeping and, towards the end of the first week, they showed a considerable degree of reduced sleep which persisted for the 20 days of this study. There was greater variability in sleep duration within the amphetamine group on almost all nights, and the variability in sleep duration from one night to the next was also greater. More night-time sleep disturbance was evident among the amphetamine ex-users. These results are discussed with respect to previous work and the pattern is seen to be more complex than had been imagined. A tentative neurochemical model is suggested and clinical implications are considered.

  11. Amphetamine Use Among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Josephine M.; Means, Richard K.

    1971-01-01

    The data contained evidence of unqualified use of amphetamines; however, differences observed among the stratified random sample were believed to be attributable to chance alone. Indication of trends was not advised. (Author/BY)

  12. Barbiturates as protective agents in brain ischemia and as free radical scavengers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D S; Rehncrona, S; Siesjö, B K

    1980-01-01

    Barbiturates protect the brain in several types of ischemia. The exact mechanism(s) by which they afford protection are unknown. Interest has been focused for the most part on their effects as metabolic depressants, but a slowing energy consumption rate in the ischemic brain cannot explain protection in all ischemic situations. Other propositions for the protective mechanisms of barbiturates include alterations in blood flow distribution, membrane stabilization as well as antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. We have studied the inhibitory effects of various barbiturates on iron- and ascorbic acid-stimulated lipid peroxidation in brain tissue in vitro. While thiopental was highly efficient, other barbiturates had no (phenobarbital, pentobarbital) or only minor (methohexital) inhibitory effects. The findings were confirmed by studies of the scavenging properties of these barbiturates with a different system (1,1 diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl). Since all tested barbiturates protect in brain ischemia in vivo, our results do not support the hypothesis that they protect by acting as free radical scavengers.

  13. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  14. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  15. Barbiturate competition for TRH receptors in mouse brain: neuromodulation of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, M D

    1983-01-01

    In vitro thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) radioligand binding assays were performed using purified presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes derived from various regions of mouse brain. These studies revealed the pattern of central distribution of specific TRH binding sites. The highest concentrations of both types of membrane receptors were localized in the limbic forebrain. The brain stem contained a high density of only presynaptic receptors, and the cerebral cortex contained a moderate-high level of only postsynaptic receptors. Barbiturate analogues effectively competed for all forebrain and brain stem, but not cortical, TRH receptors, thus implicating these specific receptors in the neuromodulation of barbiturate anesthesia. The results of in vivo radioligand binding assays for [3H] TRH disposition after central infusions concomitant with barbiturate vs. saline challenges further support this viewpoint.

  16. Comparison of the distribution of convulsant/barbiturate and benzodiazepine receptors using light microscopic autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wamsley, J.K.; Gee, K.W.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1983-12-05

    Some convulsant drugs elicit CNS excitation by blocking neuronal activitty at GABAergic synapses whereas depressant compounds may result in the enhancement of GABAergic transmission. These effects are thought to involve drug actions at a multireceptor complex involving a benzodiazepine receptor, GABA receptor, picrotoxin receptor and a chloride ionophore. A radiolabeled convulsant, (/sup 35/S) t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)-TBT) has been developed and used to characterize the binding to the ''picrotoxin'' or convulsant/barbiturate site. The microscopic distribution of the convulsant/barbiturate sites are reported in this communication, as demonstrated by receptor autoradiography after labeling tissue sections with (/sup 35/S)-TBT. Comparison of the distribution of these sites with those of the benzodiazepine receptors show a close regional correlation in many areas. The convulsant/barbiturate sites and the benzodiazepine receptors, however, are unevenly distributed in the cerebellum and exist in separate lamina.

  17. Barbiturates Bind in the GLIC Ion Channel Pore and Cause Inhibition by Stabilizing a Closed State*♦

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Zaineb; Ruza, Reinis Reinholds; Laverty, Duncan; Drège, Emmanuelle; Delarue-Cochin, Sandrine; Joseph, Delphine; Koehl, Patrice; Smart, Trevor; Delarue, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Barbiturates induce anesthesia by modulating the activity of anionic and cationic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Despite more than a century of use in clinical practice, the prototypic binding site for this class of drugs within pLGICs is yet to be described. In this study, we present the first X-ray structures of barbiturates bound to GLIC, a cationic prokaryotic pLGIC with excellent structural homology to other relevant channels sensitive to general anesthetics and, as shown here, to barbiturates, at clinically relevant concentrations. Several derivatives of barbiturates containing anomalous scatterers were synthesized, and these derivatives helped us unambiguously identify a unique barbiturate binding site within the central ion channel pore in a closed conformation. In addition, docking calculations around the observed binding site for all three states of the receptor, including a model of the desensitized state, showed that barbiturates preferentially stabilize the closed state. The identification of this pore binding site sheds light on the mechanism of barbiturate inhibition of cationic pLGICs and allows the rationalization of several structural and functional features previously observed for barbiturates. PMID:27986812

  18. Barbiturate bearing aroylhydrazine derivatives: Synthesis, NMR investigations, single crystal X-ray studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giziroglu, Emrah; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Aygün, Muhittin; Basbulbul, Gamze; Soyleyici, H. Can; Firinci, Erkan; Kirkan, Bulent; Alkis, Ayse; Saylica, Tayfur; Biyik, Halil

    2016-03-01

    A series of barbituric acid aroylhydrazine derivatives have been prepared from their corresponding 1,3-dimethyl-5-acetyl barbituric acid and aroylhydrazines. All compounds have been fully characterized by using FT-IR, multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C) and Mass (MS) spectrometry. We also describe the X-ray crystal structure of 3a, which crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group. The crystal structure is stabilized with infinite linear chains of dimeric units. Furthermore, all compounds were investigated for their tyrosinase inhibition, antioxidative and antimicrobial activies. The results from biological activity assays have shown that all of compounds have excellent antioxidant, significant tyrosinase inhibition and moderate antimicrobial activity.

  19. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  20. Preventing the Consequences of Alcohol Abuse: Identification of Soldiers at High Risk for Fatal and Serious Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Abstract follows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Army, alcohol, injury, hospitalization, repeat injuries, death...morphine-like effects, with alcohol hypnotic dependence, with alcohol 304.2C - Single-drug dependence - barbiturates, with alcohol 304.24 - Cocaine...dependence, with alcohol 304.2D - Single-drug dependence - other hypnotics and 304.34 - Cannabis dependence, with alcohol sedatives or tranquilizers, with

  1. An NMR study of merocyanine-type dyes derived from barbituric acid.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Marcos Caroli; Flores, Patricio; Guerrero, Juan; Villarroel, Luis

    2004-06-01

    The 13C NMR of two solvatochromic dyes derived from a barbituric acid acceptor and dimethylaminophenyl donor fragments, compound 1 and the related merocyanine 2, were recorded in various solvents. The observed chemical-shift variations were used to interpret their structural differences and solvatochromic behavior in solution.

  2. Barbituric acid-based magnetic N-halamine nanoparticles as recyclable antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Dong, Alideertu; Sun, Yue; Lan, Shi; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qian; Qi, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Yanling; Gao, Ge; Liu, Fengqi; Harnoode, Chokto

    2013-08-28

    Novel recyclable bactericidal materials, barbituric acid-based magnetic N-halamine nanoparticles (BAMNH NPs), were fabricated by coating of magnetic silica nanoparticles (MS NPs) with barbituric acid-based N-halamine by the aid of the radical polymerization. The sterilizing effect on the bacterial strain is investigated by incubating Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). The as-prepared BAMNH NPs exhibit higher biocidal activity than the bulk powder barbituric acid-based N-halamine due to the high activated surface area. The structural effect of N-halamine on antimicrobial performance was fully clarified through the comparison between BAMNH NPs and hydantoin-based magnetic N-halamine nanoparticles (HMNH NPs). BAMNH NPs exhibited promising stability toward repeated washing and long-term storage. BAMNH NPs with different chlorine content were comparatively chosen to investigate the influence of chlorine content on the antimicrobial activity. An antibacterial recycle experiment revealed that no significant change occurred in the structure and antibacterial efficiency of BAMNH NPs after five recycle experiments. The combination of barbituric acid-based N-halamine with magnetic component results in an obvious synergistic effect and facilitates the repeated antibacterial applications, providing potential and ideal candidates for sterilization or even for the control of disease.

  3. Effects of barbiturates, phencyclidine, ketamine and analogs on cerebral circulation and cerebrovascular muscle.

    PubMed

    Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    1984-04-01

    Although barbiturates are often effective as therapeutic agents in several types of brain ischemia, there is no consensus as to their mechanisms of action. Exactly why other intravenous anesthetics such as ketamine are not effective therapies in brain ischemia is not known. Structural analogs of ketamine such as phencyclidine (PCP) not only exert potent hallucinogenic properties and are widely abused drugs, but often result in hypertensive encephalopathies and death. In view of the paucity of information on the cerebral circulatory actions of barbiturates, ketamine and PCP (and analogs), in-vivo (microcirculatory) and in-vitro studies were undertaken. Barbiturates, in anesthetic concentrations (e.g., 10(-5) to 10(-4) M), were found to exert direct vasodilator actions on cerebral arterial smooth muscle; these relaxant actions appear to be related to inhibition of calcium ion (Ca2+) influx in cerebral vessels. The latter may be important in the salutory actions of barbiturates in brain ischemia, head trauma and cerebrovasospasm. Unlike barbiturates, ketamine was found to exert spasmogenic actions on cerebral arteries, which may aid in explaining the inability of this anesthetic to be of therapeutic value in brain ischemia. PCP and its analogs, as well as other hallucinogenic molecules (e.g., LSD, mescaline) produced spasms in cerebral arterioles, venules and arteries in concentrations which mimic their hallucinogenic potencies. Distinct PCP-like receptors which subserve contraction appear to exist on large as well as microscopic cerebral blood vessels. Spasms induced by PCP, its analogs and ketamine can be readily reversed or prevented completely by calcium channel blockers. The latter agents could be quite useful, clinically, in prevention of cerebral infarction, hypertension and fatality associated with PCP (and analogs) intoxication.

  4. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and concomitant fatal botulism of one.

    PubMed

    Williams, J H; Bester, L; Venter, L; Pretorius, D; Greyling, F

    2011-12-01

    Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay neutralisation test, confirming

  5. Gold Standard Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    salbutamol (albuterol) may demonstrate values greater than one suggesting gas trapping. reversible airflow obstruction suggestive of asthma or...halo blue Alcohol (amyl) + 11 ________ Amphetamines ______ _____ blue 136 DRUG CHROMA- DEFICIT TINGE OR NOTES TOPSIA TYPE HALO Barbiturates

  6. Anti-motion-sickness therapy. [amphetamine preparation effects in human acceleration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Neither alterations in environmental temperature nor moderate intake of alcohol was found to alter susceptibility to motion sickness in subjects exposed to rotation in the Pensacola slow rotation room. Scopolamine with d-amphetamine was found to be the most effective preparation for the prevention of motion sickness under the experimental conditions of the studies reported here. Promethazine in combination with d-amphetamine was in the same range of effectiveness. Drug actions suggest that acetylcholine and norepinephrine may be involved in motion sickness.

  7. Amphetamine's Paradoxical Effects May Be Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentall, Sydney S.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    1976-01-01

    It is suggested that the so-called paradoxical calming or depressant effects of amphetamine on hyperactive children can be accounted for by the proposition that amphetamines increase arousal when the initial arousal level is low but decrease arousal when the initial level is high. (Author)

  8. Amphetamine. Report Series 28, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    This report, prepared by the National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information, presents substantial information on the use and abuse of the drug "family" known as amphetamines. A brief history of the drug is given, along with its basic pharmacology. The current medical uses for amphetamines include: (1) short-term treatment of obesity,…

  9. Amphetamine abuse in Sweden: subject demographics, changes in blood concentrations over time, and the types of coingested substances.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2013-04-01

    Amphetamine is a major drug of abuse in Sweden and in the other Nordic countries. The demographics of amphetamine abusers in Sweden and the concentrations of this stimulant in blood are reported for 10 years of forensic blood samples (2001-2010). Using a forensic toxicology database (TOXBASE), we studied 1183 amphetamine-related deaths, 20,452 users of illicit drugs, and 47,366 people arrested for driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). Most amphetamine abusers were male (82%-87%), and their average age was 33 to 39 years with males being 2 to 3 years older than females (P < 0.001). Mean (median) concentrations of amphetamine in blood were 1.25 (0.40) mg/L in autopsy cases, 0.61 (0.40) mg/L in users of illicit drugs, and 0.76 (0.58) mg/L in DUID suspects. Median concentration in DUID suspects was significantly higher than in the other forensic materials (P < 0.001). Women also had higher median concentrations of amphetamine in blood than male abusers of this central stimulant (P < 0.001). The major coingested drugs were benzodiazepines (41%), cannabis (26%), opiates (21%), and alcohol (18%) in autopsy cases. Polydrug use was less common in DUID suspects and users of illicit drugs, although benzodiazepines (13%), tetrahydrocannabinol (12%), and opiates (5%) were often identified along with amphetamine. Because median concentration of amphetamine was higher in living subjects (DUID suspects) compared with amphetamine-related deaths, this points toward toxicity of coingested drugs or adverse drug-drug interaction as being responsible for death.

  10. Supramolecular chiral host-guest nanoarchitecture induced by the selective assembly of barbituric acid derivative enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien; Maurel, Francois; Dong, Changzhi

    2016-10-01

    Barbituric acid derivatives are prochiral molecules, i.e. they are chiral upon adsorption on surfaces. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that barbituric acid derivatives self-assemble into a chiral guest-host supramolecular architecture at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. The host nanoarchitecture has a sophisticated wavy shape pattern and paired guest molecules are nested insides the cavities of the host structure. Each unit cell of the host structure is composed of both enantiomers with a ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, the wavy patterns of the nanoarchitecture are formed from alternative appearance of left- and right-handed chiral building blocks, which makes the network heterochiral. The functional guest-host nanoarchitecture is the result of two-dimensional chiral amplification from single enantiomers to organizational heterochiral supramolecular self-assembly.

  11. The unusual solvatochromism and solvatofluorochromism of longwave absorbing and emitting barbiturate merocyanine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Kulinich, Andrii V.

    2016-09-01

    Spectral-fluorescent properties of a series of merocyanine dyes comprising the barbituric acid residue as the electron-accepting terminal group are investigated in comparison with those of their N,N-methylated analogues in media of various polarity. It is revealed that in polar aprotic solvents the electronic absorption spectra of the studied compounds are influenced dramatically by the formation of hydrogen bonds between the NH-groups of barbituric residue and solvent molecules. An effect of such nucleophilic solvation on the electronic structure of the studied dyes is analysed using both the spectral data obtained and the DFT/B3LYP quantum chemical simulation. It is found also, that solvation has comparatively weak influence on the shape and position of the fluorescence bands of the studied merocyanines while the fluorescence quantum yield changes substantially in solvents of various polarity.

  12. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary. PMID:26998366

  13. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Archana; Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary.

  14. Amphetamine-induced incentive sensitization of sign-tracking behavior in adolescent and adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Spear, Linda P

    2011-08-01

    Age-specific behavioral and neural characteristics may predispose adolescents to initiate and escalate use of alcohol and drugs. Adolescents may avidly seek novel experiences, including drugs of abuse, because of enhanced incentive motivation for drugs and natural rewards, perhaps especially when that incentive motivation is sensitized by prior drug exposure. Using a Pavlovian conditioned approach (PCA) procedure, sign-tracking (ST) and goal-tracking (GT) behavior was examined in amphetamine-sensitized and control adolescent and adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, with expression of elevated ST behavior used to index enhanced incentive motivation for reward-associated cues. Rats were first exposed to a sensitizing regimen of amphetamine injections (3.0 mg/kg/ml d-amphetamine per day) or given saline (0.9% wt/vol) once daily for 4 days. Expression of ST and GT was then examined over 8 days of PCA training consisting of 25 pairings of an 8-s presentation of an illuminated lever immediately followed by response-independent delivery of a banana-flavored food pellet. Results showed that adults clearly displayed more ST behavior than adolescents, reflected via both more contacts with, and shorter latencies to approach, the lever. Prior amphetamine sensitization increased ST (but not GT) behaviors regardless of age. Thus, when indexed via ST, incentive motivation was found to be greater in adults than adolescents, with a prior history of amphetamine exposure generally sensitizing incentive motivation for cues predicting a food reward regardless of age.

  15. Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital: An Unusually Potent Enantioselective and Photoreactive Barbiturate General Anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E.; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Forman, Stuart A.; Miller, Keith W.; Bruzik, Karol S.

    2013-01-01

    We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by x-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the 3H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(−)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC50 approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is tenfold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(−)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human α1β2/3γ2L GABAA receptors. Finally, R-(−)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both α1 and β3 subunits of human α1β3 GABAA receptors. These results indicate R-(−)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors. PMID:22734650

  16. Green Synthesis and Urease Inhibitory Activity of Spiro-Pyrimidinethiones/Spiro-Pyrimidinones-Barbituric Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi; Asadi, Shima; Faramarzi, Sakineh; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid functionalized SBA-15 (SBA-Pr-SO3H) with pore size 6 nm as an efficient heterogeneous nanoporous solid acid catalyst exhibited good catalytic activity in the Biginelli-like reaction in the synthesis of spiroheterobicyclic rings with good yield and good recyclability. Spiro-pyrimidinethiones/spiro-pyrimidinones-barbituric acid derivatives were synthesized in a simple and efficient method using the one-pot three-component reaction of a cyclic 1,3- dicarbonyl compounds (barbituric acid), an aromatic aldehyde and urea or thiourea in the presence of nanoporous silica SBA-Pr-SO3H under solvent free conditions. Urease inhibitory activity of spiro compounds were tested against Jack bean urease using Berthelot alkaline phenol–hypochlorite method. Five of 13 compounds were inhibitor and two of them were enzyme activators. Analysis of the docking results showed that, in most of the spiro molecules, one of the carbonyl groups is coordinated with both nickel atoms, while the other one is involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds with important active-site residues. The effect of inserting two methyl groups on N atoms of barbiturate ring, S substituted, ortho, meta and para substituted compounds were investigated too. PMID:26664377

  17. Barbiturates block sodium and potassium conductance increases in voltage-clamped lobster axons.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, M P

    1968-03-01

    Sodium pentobarbital and sodium thiopental decrease both the peak initial (Na) and late steady-state (K) currents and reduce the maximum sodium and potassium conductance increases in voltage-clamped lobster giant axons. These barbiturates also slow the rate at which the sodium conductance turns on, and shift the normalized sodium conductance vs. voltage curves in the direction of depolarization along the voltage axis. Since pentobarbital (pK(a) = 8.0) blocks the action potential more effectively at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.7, the anionic form of the drug appears to be active. The data suggest that these drugs affect the axon membrane directly, rather than secondarily through effects on intermediary metabolism. It is suggested that penetration of the lipid layer of the membrane by the nonpolar portion of the barbiturate molecules may cause the decrease in membrane conductances, while electrostatic interactions involving the anionic group on the barbiturate, divalent cations, and "fixed charges" in the membrane could account for the slowing of the rate of sodium conductance turn-on and the shift of the normalized conductance curves along the voltage axis.

  18. ESERINE AND AMPHETAMINE: INTERACTIVE EFFECTS ON SLEEPING TIME IN MICE.

    PubMed

    BARNES, C D; MEYERS, F H

    1964-06-05

    The sleeping time of mice given pentobarbital was found to be significantly shortened by the injection of eserine or amphetamine. When both eserine and amphetamine were given with pentobarbital the sleeping time, though much shortened, was significantly longer than with the addition of amphetamine alone. Though possessing an analeptic effect of its own, eserine appears to antagonize the analeptic effect of amphetamine.

  19. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply...

  20. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply...

  1. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply...

  2. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply...

  3. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply...

  4. Amphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a limited period of time (a few weeks) along with a reduced calorie diet and an ... dose gradually, not more often than once every week. Follow these directions carefully.The medication in each ...

  5. Amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    ... paranoia severe dental problems ("meth mouth") when using methamphetamine mood disturbances and delusions similar to those felt ... Problem. What Should I Do? School Counselors Cocaine Methamphetamine (Meth) Ketamine Drugs: What to Know Contact Us ...

  6. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery.

  7. Occupational conditions and the risk of the use of amphetamines by truck drivers

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia; de Souza, Letícia Maria de Araújo; Barroso, Lúcia Pereira; Gouvêa, Marcela Júlio César; de Almeida, Carlos Vinícius Dias; Muñoz, Daniel Romero; Leyton, Vilma

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether the occupational conditions of professional truck drivers are associated with amphetamine use after demographic characteristics and ones regarding mental health and drug use are controlled for. METHODS Cross-sectional study, with a non-probabilistic sample of 684 male truck drivers, which was collected in three highways in Sao Paulo between years 2012 and 2013. Demographic and occupational information was collected, as well as data on drug use and mental health (sleep quality, emotional stress, and psychiatric disorders). A logistic regression model was developed to identify factors associated with amphetamine use. Odds ratio (OR; 95%CI) was defined as the measure for association. The significance level was established as p < 0.05. RESULTS The studied sample was found to have an average age of 36.7 (SD = 7.8) years, as well as low education (8.6 [SD = 2.3] years); 29.0% of drivers reported having used amphetamines within the twelve months prior to their interviews. After demographic and occupational variables had been controlled for, the factors which indicated amphetamine use among truck drivers were the following: being younger than 38 years (OR = 3.69), having spent less than nine years at school (OR = 1.76), being autonomous (OR = 1.65), working night shifts or irregular schedules (OR = 2.05), working over 12 hours daily (OR = 2.14), and drinking alcohol (OR = 1.74). CONCLUSIONS Occupational aspects are closely related to amphetamine use among truck drivers, which reinforces the importance of closely following the application of law (Resting Act (“Lei do Descanso”); Law 12,619/2012) which regulates the workload and hours of those professionals. Our results show the need for increased strictness on the trade and prescription of amphetamines in Brazil. PMID:26398875

  8. Occupational conditions and the risk of the use of amphetamines by truck drivers.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia; de Souza, Letícia Maria de Araújo; Barroso, Lúcia Pereira; Gouvêa, Marcela Júlio César; de Almeida, Carlos Vinícius Dias; Muñoz, Daniel Romero; Leyton, Vilma

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether the occupational conditions of professional truck drivers are associated with amphetamine use after demographic characteristics and ones regarding mental health and drug use are controlled for.METHODS Cross-sectional study, with a non-probabilistic sample of 684 male truck drivers, which was collected in three highways in Sao Paulo between years 2012 and 2013. Demographic and occupational information was collected, as well as data on drug use and mental health (sleep quality, emotional stress, and psychiatric disorders). A logistic regression model was developed to identify factors associated with amphetamine use. Odds ratio (OR; 95%CI) was defined as the measure for association. The significance level was established as p < 0.05.RESULTS The studied sample was found to have an average age of 36.7 (SD = 7.8) years, as well as low education (8.6 [SD = 2.3] years); 29.0% of drivers reported having used amphetamines within the twelve months prior to their interviews. After demographic and occupational variables had been controlled for, the factors which indicated amphetamine use among truck drivers were the following: being younger than 38 years (OR = 3.69), having spent less than nine years at school (OR = 1.76), being autonomous (OR = 1.65), working night shifts or irregular schedules (OR = 2.05), working over 12 hours daily (OR = 2.14), and drinking alcohol (OR = 1.74).CONCLUSIONS Occupational aspects are closely related to amphetamine use among truck drivers, which reinforces the importance of closely following the application of law (Resting Act ("Lei do Descanso"); Law 12,619/2012) which regulates the workload and hours of those professionals. Our results show the need for increased strictness on the trade and prescription of amphetamines in Brazil.

  9. Multi-Component synthesis and computational studies of three novel thio-barbituric acid carbohydrate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Stuti; Khare, Naveen K.

    2017-01-01

    The thio-barbituric acid is convenient starting compound for the preparation of fused heterocycles and its 5-substituted derivatives which are pharmacologically one of the most important classes of compounds. The fused compounds of thio-barbituric acid, 4-(1R,2S,3S,4S)-1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydroxy pentyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (1), 4-(1S,2S,3S,4S)-1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydroxy pentyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (2), 3-(1R,2S,3S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy butyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (3) have been synthesized in single step by the condensation of thio-barbituric acid with sugars (L-rhamnose, L-fucose and L-arabinose) & aniline using para-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as an effective acid catalyst under refluxing conditions. The molecular structure and detailed spectroscopic analysis of all three novel synthesized thiones derivatives have been performed using experimental techniques like 1H, 13C NMR, 2D (COSY, HSQC, DEPT-135 and DEPT-90) as well as theoretical calculations by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP and 6-311G + (d, p) basis set. The strength and nature of weak intramolecular interactions have been studied by atom in molecule (AIM) approach. Global reactivity descriptors have been computed to predict reactivity and reactive sites in the molecule.

  10. Facile synthesis of a fullerene-barbituric acid derivative and supramolecular catalysis of its photoinduced dimerization.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Nathan D; Absalon, Christelle; Bassani, Dario M

    2003-10-29

    A straightforward synthesis of a fullerene derivative appended with a barbituric acid molecular recognition motif is described. The presence of two nonself-complementary hydrogen-bonding sites is shown to be conducive to the construction of supramolecular assemblies. In the presence of a melamine derivative possessing complementary hydrogen-bonding sites, enhanced efficiency toward photodimerization of the fullerene moiety is observed. This represents the first example of intermolecular photodimerization of a fullerene derivative in homogeneous solution, made possible by the formation of supramolecular assemblies in which the fullerenes are maintained in close proximity.

  11. Effect of sodium succinate on gas exchange in rats with barbiturate-induced coma.

    PubMed

    Shefer, T V; Ivnitskii, Yu Yu; Malakhovskii, V N

    2003-04-01

    Injection of sodium succinate in doses of 5 or 10 mmol/kg (but not 1 mmol/kg) intensified oxygen consumption in rats with sodium thiopental-induced coma. Injection of SDH inhibitor (sodium malonate) inhibited gas exchange and abolished the effect of sodium succinate. The effect of succinate on rat survival was positive, while that of malonate was negative, but manifested only as a trend. The critical role of succinate oxidation in preventing lethal complications of barbiturate-induced coma is proved.

  12. 4-Methyl-amphetamine: a health threat for recreational amphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Blanckaert, P; van Amsterdam, Jgc; Brunt, Tm; van den Berg, Jdj; Van Durme, F; Maudens, K; van Bussel, Jch

    2013-09-01

    4-Methylamphetamine (4-MA) was originally developed as an appetite suppressant, but development was halted due to side effects. It has recently resurfaced as a new psychoactive substance in Europe, and is mostly found together with amphetamine. Around 11.5% of tested Dutch speed samples were positive for 4-MA. In Belgium, 4-MA was also found in speed samples. In 2011 and 2012, several fatal incidents after amphetamine use were observed in Belgium, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands. In all victims, toxicological analysis confirmed the presence of 4-MA, in addition to amphetamine. The observed blood amphetamine levels were too low to be fatal. Contrary to amphetamine, which displays noradrenergic and dopaminergic activity, 4-MA also shows serotonergic activity, which may contribute to the observed toxicity. Other mechanisms of toxicity are put forward in this paper as well. To conclude, the observed toxicity is most likely the result of the combined dopaminergic activity of amphetamine and the serotonergic activity of 4-MA. In addition, the presence of 4-MA may have dampened the psychoactive effects of amphetamine by attenuation of the amphetamine-induced dopamine release, potentially inclining users to ingest higher doses of contaminated speed. Also, slower metabolism of 4-MA and its MAO-inhibiting properties can also contribute to the unusual high toxicity of 4-MA.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling study of exocyclic carbon-carbon double bond polarization in benzylidene barbiturates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-Villar, J. Daniel; Vieira, Andreia A.

    2013-02-01

    Benzylidene barbiturates are important materials for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds with potential for the development of new drugs. The reactivity of benzylidene barbiturates is mainly controlled by their exocyclic carbon-carbon double bond. In this work, the exocyclic double bond polarization was estimated experimentally by NMR and correlated with the Hammett σ values of the aromatic ring substituents and the molecular modeling calculated atomic charge difference. It is demonstrated that carbon chemical shift differences and NBO charge differences can be used to predict their reactivity.

  14. Structure-energy relationship in barbituric acid: a calorimetric, computational, and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Roux, María Victoria; Temprado, Manuel; Notario, Rafael; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2008-08-14

    This paper reports the value of the standard (p(o) = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the gas phase at T = 298.15 K for barbituric acid. The enthalpies of combustion and sublimation were measured by static bomb combustion calorimetry and transference (transpiration) method in a saturated N2 stream and a gas-phase enthalpy of formation value of -(534.3 +/- 1.7) kJ x mol(-1) was determined at T = 298.15 K. G3-calculated enthalpies of formation are in very good agreement with the experimental value. The behavior of the sample as a function of the temperature was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, and a new polymorph of barbituric acid at high temperature was found. In the solid state, two anhydrous forms are known displaying two out of the six hydrogen-bonding patterns observed in the alkyl/alkenyl derivatives retrieved from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database. The stability of these motifs has been analyzed by theoretical calculations. X-ray powder diffraction technique was used to establish to which polymorphic form corresponds to the commercial sample used in this study and to characterize the new form at high temperature.

  15. SUBSTANTIA NIGRA PARS RETICULATA IS CRUCIALLY INVOLVED IN BARBITURATE AND ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2011-01-01

    Sedative-hypnotic CNS depressant drugs are widely prescribed to treat a variety of disorders, and are abused for their sedative and euphoric effects. Physiological dependence and associated withdrawal episodes are thought to constitute a motivational force that sustains their use/abuse and may contribute to relapse in dependent individuals. Although no animal model duplicates depressant dependence, models for specific factors, like withdrawal, are useful for identifying potential neural determinants of liability in humans. Recent analyses implicate the caudolateral substantia nigra pars reticulata (clSNr) in withdrawal following acute and repeated ethanol exposures in mice, but did not assess its impact on withdrawal from other sedative-hypnotics or whether intrinsic neurons or fibers of passage are involved. Here, we demonstrate that bilateral chemical (ibotenic acid) lesions of the clSNr attenuate barbiturate (pentobarbital) and ethanol withdrawal. Chemical lesions did not affect convulsions in response to pentylenetetrazol, which blocks GABAA receptor-mediated transmission. Our results demonstrate that the clSNr nucleus itself rather than fibers of passage is crucial to its effects on barbiturate and ethanol withdrawal. These findings support suggest that clSNr could be one of the shared neural substrates mediating withdrawal from sedative-hypnotic drugs. PMID:20974184

  16. Synthesis, characterization, thermal behaviour and single crystal X-ray analysis of two new insensitive high energy density materials [8-hydroxyquinolinium 5-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)barbiturate (I) and 8-hydroxyquinolinium 5-(5-chloro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)-1,3-dimethyl barbiturate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickkam, V.; Devi, P. Poornima; Kalaivani, D.

    2014-12-01

    Barbiturates I and II have been synthesized as maroon red and red orange coloured solids by mixing the ethanolic solutions of 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene ( TNCB), pyrimidine-2,4,6(1 H,3 H,5 H)-trione [barbituric acid ( BA)] and 8-hydroxyquinoline and 1,3-dichloro-4,6-dinitrobenzene ( DCDNB), 1,3-dimethylpyrimidine-2,4,6(1 H,3 H,5 H)-trione(1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid) and 8-hydroxyquinoline respectively. The structures of these two barbiturates have been predicted from the spectral studies (UV-VIS, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass) and elemental analysis. Qualitative tests have been carried out to infer the presence of nitrogen and nitro groups and also chlorine atom in barbiturate II. Slow evaporation of ethanol-dimethylsulphoxide/ethanol solutions of barbiturate I/barbiturate II at 293 K yielded good for X-Ray diffraction crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals further confirm the putative structures of the barbiturates. The asymmetric unit of the barbiturate I comprises of 8-hydroxyquinolinium cation, 5-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) barbiturate anion and a molecule of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), which is used as a recrystallizing solvent. It crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group (centrosymmetric). Barbiturate II crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group P212121 (non-centrosymmetric). Barbiturates I and II are stable towards an impact sensitivity test, when a weight of 2 kg mass hammer is dropped from a height of 160 cm of the instrument. TGA/ DTA analyses at four different heating rates (5, 10, 20, and 40 K/min) imply that they undergo exothermic decomposition (˜85%) in three different stages between 273 and 873 K. Activation energies for these decomposition processes have been calculated by employing Kissinger and Ozawa plots. Impact sensitivity test and activation energies have revealed that the titled barbiturates are insensitive high energy density materials ( IHEDMS).

  17. Synthesis of 5-alkylated barbituric acids and 3-alkylated indoles via microwave-assisted three-component reactions in solvent-free conditions using Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines as reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Biswajita; Seetham Naidu, P; Borah, Pallabi; Bhuyan, Pulak J

    2012-05-01

    Reaction of barbituric acids with aldehydes and dihydropyridines in one pot under microwave (MW) irradiation in the absence of solvent, affords 55–82% of the 5-benzylated barbituric acids. Use of alkyl nitriles or barbituric acids with indole-3-aldehyde and dihydropyridine (DHP) afforded 3-alkylated indoles in 57–76 % yield. In each case DHPs are converted to pyridines.

  18. [In vitro tests for the reduction of high norepinephrine, barbiturate and bromide concentrations in blood by hemofiltration (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Beer, H; Franken, W; Greuer, W

    1978-01-01

    In vitro tests have shown that a treatment of blood according to the principle of hemofiltration is suitable both for the normalisation of excessive norepinephrine plasma level, e.g. following severe burns, and also for the elimination of toxic quantities of barbiturate and bromide resulting from poisoning by sedatives.

  19. [Substitution therapy tested against amphetamine dependence].

    PubMed

    Bloniecki Kallio, Victor; Guterstam, Joar; Franck, Johan

    2016-01-06

    Amphetamine dependence is relatively common in Sweden and it is the most frequently used substance among patients with intravenous drug abuse. Current treatment options are limited but recently substitution therapy with psychostimulant medication has been evaluated in several clinical trials. Such treatment is controversial in Sweden, perhaps due to the failure of experimental prescription of psychostimulants in the 1960s. Recent clinical trials however indicate that structured treatment programs with psychostimulants might have positive effects, although the results are inconsistent and the evidence base is still limited. Future research is needed in order to determine the potential role of substitution therapy for amphetamine dependence in clinical practice.

  20. Blunted Endogenous Opioid Release Following an Oral Amphetamine Challenge in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Inge; Myers, Jim; Ramos, Anna C; Stokes, Paul R A; Erritzoe, David; Colasanti, Alessandro; Gunn, Roger N; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Searle, Graham E; Waldman, Adam D; Parkin, Mark C; Brailsford, Alan D; Galduróz, José C F; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Clark, Luke; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2016-01-01

    Pathological gambling is a psychiatric disorder and the first recognized behavioral addiction, with similarities to substance use disorders but without the confounding effects of drug-related brain changes. Pathophysiology within the opioid receptor system is increasingly recognized in substance dependence, with higher mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability reported in alcohol, cocaine and opiate addiction. Impulsivity, a risk factor across the addictions, has also been found to be associated with higher MOR availability. The aim of this study was to characterize baseline MOR availability and endogenous opioid release in pathological gamblers (PG) using [11C]carfentanil PET with an oral amphetamine challenge. Fourteen PG and 15 healthy volunteers (HV) underwent two [11C]carfentanil PET scans, before and after an oral administration of 0.5 mg/kg of d-amphetamine. The change in [11C]carfentanil binding between baseline and post-amphetamine scans (ΔBPND) was assessed in 10 regions of interest (ROI). MOR availability did not differ between PG and HV groups. As seen previously, oral amphetamine challenge led to significant reductions in [11C]carfentanil BPND in 8/10 ROI in HV. PG demonstrated significant blunting of opioid release compared with HV. PG also showed blunted amphetamine-induced euphoria and alertness compared with HV. Exploratory analysis revealed that impulsivity positively correlated with caudate baseline BPND in PG only. This study provides the first evidence of blunted endogenous opioid release in PG. Our findings are consistent with growing evidence that dysregulation of endogenous opioids may have an important role in the pathophysiology of addictions. PMID:26552847

  1. [Blood gases and pH value in swine anesthetized with barbiturate].

    PubMed

    Thielscher, H H; Steinhardt, M; Schwarze, N

    1994-05-01

    The influence of short term anaesthesia with the N-methyl barbiturate Eunarcon on the pH and blood gases was investigated in 19 clinical healthy male castrated pigs of the breed Large White, three months old and with a mean body weight of 30 kg. The factors of oxygen in the blood--content, saturation of hemoglobin, O2 partial pressure--are diminished continuously during anaesthesia, with a decrease of pO2 on 77% of the initial value. The pCO2 increased, and the peak value of 11% above the initial level was seen already 10 minutes after starting the anaesthesia. The pH value like a seismograph of the ionic balance is not changed significantly. The results are discussed in connection with problems of medication and control of intravenous anaesthesia.

  2. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  3. Amphetamine and fenproporex levels following multidose administration of fenproporex.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S; Stillman, S

    1999-01-01

    Drugs that are metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially of significant concern in the interpretation of positive drug-testing results for amphetamines. A number of different drugs have been reported to produce amphetamine in the urine of users. One of these compounds, fenproporex, has been shown to be metabolized to amphetamine, and previous reports indicated the parent compound could be detected at low levels for up to 48 h. Administration of fenproporex for seven days (one 10-mg dose per day) to five healthy volunteers resulted in amphetamine being detected in the urine of all subjects. Peak concentrations of amphetamine ranged from approximately 2850 to 4150 ng/mL. Amphetamine could be detected (> or = 5 ng/mL) in the urine for up to nearly 170 h after the last dose. Analysis of the metabolically produced amphetamine showed the presence of both enantiomers, which can be helpful in the differentiation of some illicit amphetamine use from the use of this precursor drug. In addition, evaluation of the enantiomeric composition of the metabolite (amphetamine) can be a valuable tool in the interpretation of time since last dose. More significantly, all samples that contained amphetamine at a concentration of > or = 500 ng/mL were shown to also contain detectable amounts of the parent compound.

  4. Enantioselective degradation of amphetamine-like environmental micropollutants (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA and MDA) in urban water.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sian E; Bagnall, John; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to understand enantioselective transformation of amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine) and MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) during wastewater treatment and in receiving waters. In order to undertake a comprehensive evaluation of the processes occurring, stereoselective transformation of amphetamine-like compounds was studied, for the first time, in controlled laboratory experiments: receiving water and activated sludge simulating microcosm systems. The results demonstrated that stereoselective degradation, via microbial metabolic processes favouring S-(+)-enantiomer, occurred in all studied amphetamine-based compounds in activated sludge simulating microcosms. R-(-)-enantiomers were not degraded (or their degradation was limited) which proves their more recalcitrant nature. Out of all four amphetamine-like compounds studied, amphetamine was the most susceptible to biodegradation. It was followed by MDMA and methamphetamine. Photochemical processes facilitated degradation of MDMA and methamphetamine but they were not, as expected, stereoselective. Preferential biodegradation of S-(+)-methamphetamine led to the formation of S-(+)-amphetamine. Racemic MDMA was stereoselectively biodegraded by activated sludge which led to its enrichment with R-(-)-enantiomer and formation of S-(+)-MDA. Interestingly, there was only mild stereoselectivity observed during MDMA degradation in rivers. This might be due to different microbial communities utilised during activated sludge treatment and those present in the environment. Kinetic studies confirmed the recalcitrant nature of MDMA.

  5. Amphetamines in the Treatment of Hyperkinetic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinspoon, Lester; Singer, Susan B.

    1973-01-01

    Article is a literature review, but a literature review with definite policy implications. It concerns the widespread use of amphetamines in the nation's schools to control a syndrome which doctors and medical researchers call "hyperkinetic behavior disorder," or "minimal brain dysfunction," and which teachers and parents know as "hyperactivity".…

  6. PKCβ Inhibitors Attenuate Amphetamine-Stimulated Dopamine Efflux.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Mikelman, Sarah R; Kennedy, Robert T; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2016-06-15

    Amphetamine abuse afflicts over 13 million people, and there is currently no universally accepted treatment for amphetamine addiction. Amphetamine serves as a substrate for the dopamine transporter and reverses the transporter to cause an increase in extracellular dopamine. Activation of the beta subunit of protein kinase C (PKCβ) enhances extracellular dopamine in the presence of amphetamine by facilitating the reverse transport of dopamine and internalizing the D2 autoreceptor. We previously demonstrated that PKCβ inhibitors block amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in synaptosomes from rat striatum in vitro. In this study, we utilized in vivo microdialysis in live, behaving rats to assess the effect of the PKCβ inhibitors, enzastaurin and ruboxistaurin, on amphetamine-stimulated locomotion and increases in monoamines and their metabolites. A 30 min perfusion of the nucleus accumbens core with 1 μM enzastaurin or 1 μM ruboxistaurin reduced efflux of dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine induced by amphetamine by approximately 50%. The inhibitors also significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated extracellular levels of norepinephrine. The stimulation of locomotor behavior by amphetamine, measured simultaneously with the analytes, was comparably reduced by the PKCβ inhibitors. Using a stable isotope label retrodialysis procedure, we determined that ruboxistaurin had no effect on basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, or GABA. In addition, normal uptake function through the dopamine transporter was unaltered by the PKCβ inhibitors, as measured in rat synaptosomes. Our results support the utility of using PKCβ inhibitors to reduce the effects of amphetamine.

  7. Adderall® (amphetamine-dextroamphetamine) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    The American Psychiatric Association estimates that 3-7% of US school-aged children exhibit attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Adderall(®) (amphetamine dextroamphetamine) and a variety of brand names and generic versions of this combination are available by prescription to treat ADHD and narcolepsy. Both immediate and sustained release products are used as are single agent amphetamine medication. Knowing the exact agent ingested can provide information of dose labeled and length of clinical effects. These drugs are used off label by college students for memory enhancement, test taking ability, and for study marathons. These agents are DEA Schedule II controlled substances with high potential for abuse. For humans with ADHD or narcolepsy, standard recommended dosage is 5-60 mg daily. Amphetamine and its analogues stimulate the release of norepinephrine affecting both α- and β-adrenergic receptor sites. α-Adrenergic stimulation causes vasoconstriction and an increase in total peripheral resistance. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation leads to an increase in heart rate, stroke volume, and skeletal muscle blood flow. Clinical signs of Adderall(®) overdose in humans and dogs include hyperactivity, hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, mydriasis, tremors, and seizures. In addition, Adderall intoxication in dogs has been reported to cause hyperthermia, hypoglycemia, hypersegmentation of neutrophils, and mild thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis can be confirmed by detecting amphetamine in stomach contents or vomitus, or by positive results obtained in urine tests for illicit drugs. Treatment is directed at controlling life-threatening central nervous system and cardiovascular signs. Seizures can be controlled with benzodiazepines, phenothiazines, pentobarbital, and propofol. Cardiac tachyarrhythmias can be managed with a β-blocker such as propranolol. Intravenous fluids counter the hyperthermia, assist in maintenance of renal function, and help promote the

  8. From unexpected reactions to a new family of ionic co-crystals: the case of barbituric acid with alkali bromides and caesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Prosperi, Susanna; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R

    2010-11-07

    Pressing solid barbituric acid with KBr to prepare samples for IR spectroscopy leads to the formation of an ionic co-crystal, in which the co-former is a classical ionic salt; co-crystal formation is also obtained with the other alkali bromides (LiBr, NaBr, RbBr and CsBr) and with caesium iodide. The simultaneous presence of alkali and halide ions affects the dissolution properties of barbituric acid in water.

  9. Radical-Radical Cyclization Cascades of Barbiturates Triggered by Electron-Transfer Reduction of Amide-Type Carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan-Ming; Procter, David J

    2016-06-22

    Radical-radical cyclization cascades, triggered by single-electron transfer to amide-type carbonyls by SmI2-H2O, convert simple achiral barbiturates in one step to hemiaminal- or enamine-containing tricyclic scaffolds containing up to five contiguous stereocenters (including quaternary stereocenters). Furthermore, we describe the surprising beneficial effect of LiBr on the most challenging of the radical-radical cyclization cascades. An alternative fragmentation-radical cyclization sequence of related substrates allows access to bicyclic uracil derivatives. The radical-radical cyclization process constitutes the first example of a radical cascade involving ET reduction of the amide carbonyl. Products of the cascade can be readily manipulated to give highly unusual and medicinally relevant bi- and tricyclic barbiturates.

  10. IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Mirijello, Antonio; D’Angelo, Cristina; Ferrulli, Anna; Vassallo, Gabriele; Antonelli, Mariangela; Caputo, Fabio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome may develop within 6–24 hours after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for alcohol withdrawal syndrome is represented by benzodiazepines. Among them, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as alpha2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and beta-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptics can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for alcohol withdrawal syndrome have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin, and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents will be discussed in the text. PMID:25666543

  11. The Nonmedical Use of Amphetamines among the College Age Group: Recent Research concerning Epidemiology and Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Amphetamines have a significant role in nontherapeutic drug use by college students. A brief history of amphetamine use by college students is presented. Considerable data implicate amphetamines in producing serious psychological and biological adverse effects. (Author/DF)

  12. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  13. Separation of Enantiomeric Barbiturates by Capillary Electrophoresis Using a Cyclodextrin Containing Run Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contradi, S.; Vogt, Carla; Rohde, E.

    1997-09-01

    In the last few years capillary electrophoresis (CE) was successfully applied to a variety of analytical problems in the field of chiral separations. This article is intended to demonstrate the potential of CE for the determination of enantiomers. The separation is based on the addition of a suitable chiral selector to the buffer. Cyclodextrins perform as excellent selectors forming diastereomeric complexes of different stability with the enantiomeric forms of the analyte. Barbiturates were chosen for chiral electrophoretic separation. They are found in a variety of pharmaceuticals such as sedatives, hypnotics and antiepileptics and are mostly processed as racemic mixtures. Cyclodextrins were applied as chiral selectors. The complex formation depends essentially on the structure of the selector and the analyte, this fact is discussed extensively in the paper. The influence of pH, the type and the concentration of the chiral selector on the separation were investigated. The described experiment offers students an introduction to chiral separations by CE. The simple and fast method development along with the potential to solve difficult analytical problems make CE very attractive.

  14. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    PubMed Central

    George, Pravin; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Ahrens, Christine; Hantus, Stephen; Sarwal, Aarti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted. PMID:28182114

  15. The expression of amphetamine sensitization is dissociable from anxiety and aversive memory: Effect of an acute injection of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Rafael Ignacio; Pérez-Valenzuela, Enzo; Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; Fuentealba, José Antonio

    2017-01-18

    The repeated administration of amphetamine can lead to locomotor sensitization. Although the repeated administration of amphetamine has been associated with anxiety and impaired working memory, it is uncertain if expression of amphetamine sensitization is associated with modifications of emotional memories. To address this issue, rats were injected once daily with amphetamine for five consecutive days (1.5mg/kg). After four days of withdrawal, rats were delivered an acute amphetamine injection to assess the expression of sensitization. A single exposure to an elevated plus maze (EPM), 24h after the last injection of amphetamine, showed that amphetamine sensitization is not accompanied by anxiety. Next, aversive memory was assessed using an 11day inter-trial interval between the EPM Trial 1 and EPM Trial 2. Rats administered with saline showed a percentage of open arms time (% OAT) in Trial 2 that was comparable to Trial 1, demonstrating a reduction in the retrieval of aversive memory. However, rats sensitized after the EPM Trial 1 showed a significant decrease in the % OAT in Trial 2. Importantly, a decrease in the % OAT in Trial 2 compared to Trial 1 was also observed after a single injection of amphetamine 24h before Trial 2. These results show a facilitation in the retrieval of aversive memory, and suggest that a previous amphetamine injection is enough to produce a protracted activation of neural circuits necessary for the retrieval of aversive memory.

  16. 21 CFR 862.3100 - Amphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure amphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in plasma and urine. Measurements obtained... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amphetamine test system. 862.3100 Section 862.3100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3100 - Amphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure amphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in plasma and urine. Measurements obtained... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amphetamine test system. 862.3100 Section 862.3100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3100 - Amphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure amphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in plasma and urine. Measurements obtained... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amphetamine test system. 862.3100 Section 862.3100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3100 - Amphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure amphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in plasma and urine. Measurements obtained... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amphetamine test system. 862.3100 Section 862.3100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3100 - Amphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure amphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in plasma and urine. Measurements obtained... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amphetamine test system. 862.3100 Section 862.3100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  1. Barbiturate Induction for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation after Pediatric Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Haruna; Kimoto, Ayako; Beppu, Yuki; Yoshimura, Maki; Kojima, Toshiyuki; Fukano, Taku

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Emergence agitation (EA) is a common and troublesome problem in pediatric patients recovering from general anesthesia. The incidence of EA is reportedly higher after general anesthesia maintained with sevoflurane, a popular inhalational anesthetic agent for pediatric patients. We conducted this prospective, randomized, double-blind study to test the effect of an intravenous ultra-short–acting barbiturate, thiamylal, administered during induction of general anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients recovering from Sevoflurane anesthesia. METHODS: Fifty-four pediatric patients (1 to 6 years of age) undergoing subumbilical surgeries were randomized into 2 groups. Patients received either intravenous thiamylal 5mg/kg (Group T) or inhalational Sevoflurane 5% (Group S) as an anesthetic induction agent. Following induction, general anesthesia was maintained with Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O) in both groups. To control the intra- and post-operative pain, caudal block or ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric block was performed. The incidence and severity of EA were evaluated by using the Modified Objective Pain Scale (MOPS: 0 to 6) at 15 and 30 min after arrival in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after arrival in the PACU, the incidence of EA in Group T (28%) was significantly lower than in Group S (64%; p = 0.023) and the MOPS in Group T (median 0, range 0 to 6) was significantly lower than in Group S (median 4, range 0 to 6; p = 0.005). The interval from discontinuation of Sevoflurane to emergence from anesthesia was not significantly different between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Thiamylal induction reduced the incidence and severity of EA in pediatric patients immediately after Sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26472953

  2. Stability of efferent-mediated protection against acoustic overexposure with long maintenance under barbiturate anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rajan, R

    1996-01-01

    When anaesthetized animals are maintained over a long period, crossed-cochlear suppressive and enhancement-in-noise effects mediated by the olivocochlear bundle (OCB), as well as some OCB neuronal responses, show time-dependent variations. The present study determined if there were any such changes in OCB-mediated crossed-cochlear protection against compound action potential (CAP) threshold losses caused by a standard loud sound exposure at 11 kHz, presented under conditions either not evoking OCB-mediated protection (i.e. monaural exposure) or evoking protection (binaural exposure). Maintaining animals for periods up to approximately 30 h from initial anaesthetization resulted in non-significant changes in pre-exposure CAP thresholds. There were also only small changes over select frequency ranges in threshold losses caused by the monaural or binaural loud sound, after a single exposure as well as when the testing of OCB function was extended to examine effects after dual successive exposures, the latter result being determined by application of a previously described additivity model. The features of OCB-mediated protection also showed good stability over the long maintenance. These results are discussed as providing further circumstantial evidence that protection is mediated by a different OCB subcomponent to that/those responsible for other OCB-mediated crossed-cochlear effects. In general, the results show that the barbiturate anaesthetic used here does not significantly modulate the crossed-cochlear OCB effect of protection, even though it has been shown elsewhere to significantly depress other crossed-cochlear OCB effects.

  3. False-positive amphetamine/ecstasy (MDMA/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) (CEDIA) and ecstasy (MDMA/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) (DRI) test results with fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Yusuf Cem; Erol, Almla; Karadaş, Barş

    2012-10-01

    This case report describes a false-positive amphetamine/ecstasy [3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)] and ecstasy (MDMA) screen after therapeutic use of antihyperlipidemic drug, fenofibrate. A 60-year-old male patient was admitted to inpatient psychiatry unit with the diagnosis of alcohol dependency. He was prescribed diazepam 30 mg/day, thiamine 300 mg/day, and naltrexone 50 mg/day. He had also been using fenofibrate 267 mg/day for 3 years for hyperlipidemia and trazodone 100 mg/day for 5 months for insomnia. On routine, urine drugs-of-abuse screening amphetamine/MDMA (CEDIA) test was positive for 4 different occasions and MDMA (DRI) test was positive on 5 different occasions. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry confirmation of the first positive 3 samples were negative for amphetamine and MDMA. After discontinuation of fenofibrate, amphetamine/MDMA, and MDMA immunoassay results turned out to be negative. Caution should be given to interpretation of amphetamine/MDMA (CEDIA) and MDMA (DRI) tests in patients taking fenofibrate. Specific confirmation with a suitable method should be used to prevent erroneous interpretations.

  4. Amphetamine toxicities Classical and emerging mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Moszczynska, Anna; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    The drugs of abuse, methamphetamine and MDMA, produce long-term decreases in markers of biogenic amine neurotransmission. These decreases have been traditionally linked to nerve terminals and are evident in a variety of species, including rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. Recent studies indicate that the damage produced by these drugs may be more widespread than originally believed. Changes indicative of damage to cell bodies of biogenic and nonbiogenic amine–containing neurons in several brain areas and endothelial cells that make up the blood–brain barrier have been reported. The processes that mediate this damage involve not only oxidative stress but also include excitotoxic mechanisms, neuroinflammation, the ubiquitin proteasome system, as well as mitochondrial and neurotrophic factor dysfunction. These mechanisms also underlie the toxicity associated with chronic stress and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, both of which have been shown to augment the toxicity to methamphetamine. Overall, multiple mechanisms are involved and interact to promote neurotoxicity to methamphetamine and MDMA. Moreover, the high coincidence of substituted amphetamine abuse by humans with HIV and/or chronic stress exposure suggests a potential enhanced vulnerability of these individuals to the neurotoxic actions of the amphetamines. PMID:20201848

  5. Narcolepsy Treated with Racemic Amphetamine during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Inger; Wikner, Birgitta Norstedt; Beck, Olof; Sarman, Ihsan

    2015-08-01

    This case report describes a woman with narcolepsy treated with racemic amphetamine (rac-amphetamine) during pregnancy and breastfeeding with follow-up on the infant's development up to 10 months of age. The pregnancy outcome and the pharmacokinetics of rac-amphetamine were studied during breastfeeding. The pregnancy and the delivery were uneventful. Concentrations of rac-amphetamine were determined in the plasma of the mother and infant, and in the breast milk with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Samples were obtained at 2, 5, and 9 weeks postpartum. The transfer of rac-amphetamine to the breast milk was extensive (mean milk/maternal plasma concentration ratio approximately 3). The breastfed infant had a low plasma concentration of rac-amphetamine (about 9% of the maternal plasma level) and the calculated relative infant dose was low (2%). No adverse effects were observed in the breastfed infant. The infant's somatic and psychomotor development up to 10 months of age was normal. Further studies of amphetamine prescribed for medical reasons during pregnancy and lactation are needed.

  6. Prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission is decreased in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L.; Douaihy, Antoine B.; Frankle, W. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such working memory, attention, inhibitory control and risk/reward decisions--all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies in alcoholics that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, we hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in alcoholism. To test this hypothesis, we used amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography (PET) to measure cortical dopamine transmission in a group of 21 recently abstinent alcoholics and matched healthy controls. Methods [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (BPND) was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg−1 of d-amphetamine. Results Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (Δ BPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in alcoholics compared to healthy controls. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in alcoholics included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Conclusions The results of this study for the first time unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism. PMID:24874293

  7. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on ‘Alcohol withdrawal syndrome’ in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  8. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  9. African American Female Basketball Players: An Examination of Alcohol and Drug Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Beverly L.; Martin, Malissa

    1999-01-01

    Investigated alcohol and drug use by African-American female college basketball players. Surveys indicated that three-quarters of the women consumed alcohol. Nearly half had engaged in binge drinking. Very few reported using weight-loss or tobacco products. There were no reports of amphetamine or anabolic steroid use. Respondents appeared aware of…

  10. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a review of the results of experimental and clinical research on both I-amphetamine derivatives and pH-shift agents. Virtually all relevant working groups from the USA and Europe have contributed to this volume. The pharmacology of amphetamine and the corresponding receptor theories are described in detail, whereas other chapters deal with the labeling as well as the metabolic process of this drug. In addition to this, new amphetamine derivatives are presented together with other essential products which play a significant role in scintigraphy of the brain function. Finally, there are two chapters on instrumentation problems followed by eight contributions on the clinical results of amphetamine scintigraphy in cerebral vascular diseases, epilepsy, migraine and brain tumors.

  11. Amphetamine enhances retrieval following diverse sources of forgetting.

    PubMed

    Quartermain, D; Judge, M E; Jung, H

    1988-01-01

    The generality of amphetamine-induced retrieval enhancement was investigated by determining whether pretest administration could alleviate different types of forgetting. Thirsty mice were punished for licking a water tube following a period of free drinking. Forgetting of the conditioned drink suppression was induced in different groups of animals by; protein synthesis inhibition, cholinergic receptor blockade, inhibition of norepinephrine synthesis, stimulation of serotonin receptors, electroconvulsive shock, a 2.5 month training to test interval and the use of senescent animals with an endogenous memory defect. Thirty min prior to testing mice were injected with either saline or with 2 mg/kg d-amphetamine sulphate. Results showed that amphetamine produced a highly significant improvement in remembering in all of the forgetting treatment groups. It is concluded that amphetamine can alleviate forgetting caused by widely diverse etiologies probably by activating a nonspecific general retrieval system.

  12. Amphetamine Containing Dietary Supplements and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hritani, Abdulwahab; Antoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss is one of the most researched and marketed topics in American society. Dietary regimens, medications that claim to boost the metabolism, and the constant pressure to fit into society all play a role in our patient's choices regarding new dietary products. One of the products that are well known to suppress appetite and cause weight loss is amphetamines. While these medications suppress appetite, most people are not aware of the detrimental side effects of amphetamines, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and in certain instances acute myocardial infarction. Here we present the uncommon entity of an acute myocardial infarction due to chronic use of an amphetamine containing dietary supplement in conjunction with an exercise regimen. Our case brings to light further awareness regarding use of amphetamines. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of use of these substances when young patients with no risk factors for coronary artery disease present with acute arrhythmias, heart failure, and myocardial infarctions. PMID:27516911

  13. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  14. Occurrence and Potential Biological Effects of Amphetamine on Stream Communities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sylvia S; Paspalof, Alexis M; Snow, Daniel D; Richmond, Erinn K; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kelly, John J

    2016-09-06

    The presence of pharmaceuticals, including illicit drugs in aquatic systems, is a topic of environmental significance because of their global occurrence and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health, but few studies have examined the ecological effects of illicit drugs. We conducted a survey of several drug residues, including the potentially illicit drug amphetamine, at 6 stream sites along an urban to rural gradient in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. We detected numerous drugs, including amphetamine (3 to 630 ng L(-1)), in all stream sites. We examined the fate and ecological effects of amphetamine on biofilm, seston, and aquatic insect communities in artificial streams exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg L(-1)) of amphetamine. The amphetamine parent compound decreased in the artificial streams from less than 1 μg L(-1) on day 1 to 0.11 μg L(-1) on day 22. In artificial streams treated with amphetamine, there was up to 45% lower biofilm chlorophyll a per ash-free dry mass, 85% lower biofilm gross primary production, 24% greater seston ash-free dry mass, and 30% lower seston community respiration compared to control streams. Exposing streams to amphetamine also changed the composition of bacterial and diatom communities in biofilms at day 21 and increased cumulative dipteran emergence by 65% and 89% during the first and third weeks of the experiment, respectively. This study demonstrates that amphetamine and other biologically active drugs are present in urban streams and have the potential to affect both structure and function of stream communities.

  15. Mitochondria: key players in the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Capela, João Paulo; Feio-Azevedo, Rita; Teixeira-Gomes, Armanda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix

    2015-10-01

    Amphetamines are a class of psychotropic drugs with high abuse potential, as a result of their stimulant, euphoric, emphathogenic, entactogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. Although most amphetamines are synthetic drugs, of which methamphetamine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy") represent well-recognized examples, the use of natural related compounds, namely cathinone and ephedrine, has been part of the history of humankind for thousands of years. Resulting from their amphiphilic nature, these drugs can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and elicit their well-known psychotropic effects. In the field of amphetamines' research, there is a general consensus that mitochondrial-dependent pathways can provide a major understanding concerning pathological processes underlying the neurotoxicity of these drugs. These events include alterations on tricarboxylic acid cycle's enzymes functioning, inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain's complexes, perturbations of mitochondrial clearance mechanisms, interference with mitochondrial dynamics, as well as oxidative modifications in mitochondrial macromolecules. Additionally, other studies indicate that amphetamines-induced neuronal toxicity is closely regulated by B cell lymphoma 2 superfamily of proteins with consequent activation of caspase-mediated downstream cell death pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms at mitochondrial level involved in amphetamines' neurotoxicity can help in defining target pathways or molecules mediating these effects, as well as in developing putative therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat the acute- or long-lasting neuropsychiatric complications seen in human abusers.

  16. Identification and management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mirijello, Antonio; D'Angelo, Cristina; Ferrulli, Anna; Vassallo, Gabriele; Antonelli, Mariangela; Caputo, Fabio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) may develop within 6-24 h after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for AWS is with benzodiazepines (BZDs). Among the BZDs, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed-dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as α2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and β-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptic agents can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for AWS have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents are discussed.

  17. An N-ethylated barbituric acid end-capped bithiophene as an electron-acceptor material in fullerene-free organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Paul; Collis, Gavin E; Rochford, Luke A; Arantes, Junior Ferreira; Kemppinen, Peter; Jones, Tim S; Winzenberg, Kevin N

    2015-04-11

    A new evaporable electron acceptor material for organic photovoltaics based on N-ethyl barbituric acid bithiophene (EBB) has been demonstrated. Bilayer devices fabricated with this non-fullerene acceptor and boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) donor produce power conversion efficiencies as high as 2.6% with an extremely large open-circuit voltage approaching 1.4 V.

  18. Combined effects of modafinil and d-amphetamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Quisenberry, Amanda J; Prisinzano, Thomas; Baker, Lisa E

    2013-09-01

    Modafinil is a novel wake-promoting drug with FDA approval for the treatment of sleep-related disorders that has recently been investigated as a potential agonist replacement therapy for psychostimulant dependence. Previous research in animals and humans indicates modafinil has a lower abuse liability than traditional psychostimulants, although few studies have carefully assessed modafinil's stimulus properties in combination with other psychostimulants. The current study trained male Sprague-Dawley rats to discriminate subcutaneous injections of 0.3 mg/kg (n=8) or 1.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine (n=8) from saline under an FR 20 schedule of food reinforcement and substitution tests were administered with d-amphetamine (0.03-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), modafinil (32-256 mg/kg, i.g.), and a low modafinil dose (32 mg/kg, i.g.) in combination with d-amphetamine (0.03-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) to determine if these drugs have additive effects. The selective D2 dopamine agonist, PNU-91356A, was also tested as a positive control and ethanol and morphine were tested as negative controls. Results indicate that modafinil produced dose-dependent and statistically significant d-amphetamine-lever responding in both groups and nearly complete substitution in animals trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine. Modafinil pretreatment slightly increased the discrimination of low d-amphetamine doses in animals trained to discriminate 0.3 mg/kg d-amphetamine. These results support previous findings that modafinil and d-amphetamine may have additive effects. In consideration of recent interests in modafinil as an agonist treatment for psychostimulant dependence, additional preclinical investigations utilizing other methodologies to examine modafinil in combination with other stimulants, such as behavioral sensitization paradigms or drug self-administration, may be of interest.

  19. Occurrence of a barbiturate-inducible catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 dalton cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Fulco, A J; Ruettinger, R T

    1987-05-04

    In a recent publication (Narhi, L.O. and Fulco, A.J.[1986] J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7160-7169) we described the characterization of a catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 Dalton cytochrome P-450 fatty acid monooxygenase (P-450BM-3) induced by barbiturates in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581. We have now examined cell-free preparations from 12 distinct strains of B. megaterium and from one or two strains each of B. alvei, B. brevis, B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. pumilis and B. subtilis for the presence of this inducible enzyme. Using Western blot analyses in combination with assays for fatty acid hydroxylase activity and cytochrome P-450, we were able to show that 11 of the 12 B. megaterium strains contained not only a strongly pentobarbital-inducible fatty acid monooxygenase identical to or polymorphic with P-450BM-3 but also significant levels of two smaller P-450 cytochromes that were the same as or similar to cytochromes P-450BM-1 and P-450BM-2 originally found in ATCC 14581. Unlike the 119,000 Dalton P-450, however, the two smaller P-450s were generally easily detectable in cultures grown to stationary phase in the absence of barbiturates and, with some exceptions, were not strongly induced by pentobarbital. None of the non-megaterium species of Bacillus tested exhibited significant levels of either fatty acid monooxygenase activity or cytochrome P-450. The one strain of B. megaterium that lacked inducible P-450BM-3 was also negative for BM-1 and BM-2. However, this strain (ATCC 13368) did contain a small but significant level of another P-450 cytochrome that others have identified as the oxygenase component of a steroid 15-beta-hydroxylase system. Our evidence suggests that the BM series of P-450 cytochromes is encoded by chromosomal (rather than by plasmid) DNA.

  20. Abuse of Amphetamines and Structural Abnormalities in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Steven; O’Neill, Joseph; Fears, Scott; Bartzokis, George; London, Edythe D.

    2009-01-01

    We review evidence that structural brain abnormalities are associated with abuse of amphetamines. A brief history of amphetamine use/abuse, and evidence for toxicity is followed by a summary of findings from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of human subjects who had abused amphetamines and children who were exposed to amphetamines in utero. Evidence comes from studies that used a variety of techniques that include manual tracing, pattern matching, voxel-based, tensor-based, or cortical thickness mapping, quantification of white matter signal hyperintensities, and diffusion tensor imaging. Ten studies compared controls to individuals who were exposed to methamphetamine. Three studies assessed individuals exposed to 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Brain structural abnormalities were consistently reported in amphetamine abusers, as compared to control subjects. These included lower cortical gray matter volume and higher striatal volume than control subjects. These differences might reflect brain features that could predispose to substance dependence. High striatal volumes might also reflect compensation for toxicity in the dopamine-rich basal ganglia. Prenatal exposure was associated with striatal volume that was below control values, suggesting that such compensation might not occur in utero. Several forms of white matter abnormality are also common, and may involve gliosis. Many of the limitations and inconsistencies in the literature relate to techniques and cross-sectional designs, which cannot infer causality. Potential confounding influences include effects of pre-existing risk/protective factors, development, gender, severity of amphetamine abuse, abuse of other drugs, abstinence, and differences in lifestyle. Longitudinal designs in which multimodal datasets are acquired and are subjected to multivariate analyses would enhance our ability to provide general conclusions regarding the associations between amphetamine abuse and brain

  1. Amphetamines, the pregnant woman and her children: a review.

    PubMed

    Oei, J L; Kingsbury, A; Dhawan, A; Burns, L; Feller, J M; Clews, S; Falconer, J; Abdel-Latif, M E

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study is to review and summarize available evidence regarding the impact of amphetamines on pregnancy, the newborn infant and the child. Amphetamines are neurostimulants and neurotoxins that are some of the most widely abused illicit drugs in the world. Users are at high risk of psychiatric co-morbidities, and evidence suggests that perinatal amphetamine exposure is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, but data is confounded by other adverse factors associated with drug-dependency. Data sources are Government data, published articles, conference abstracts and book chapters. The global incidence of perinatal amphetamine exposure is most likely severely underestimated but acknowledged to be increasing rapidly, whereas exposure to other drugs, for example, heroin, is decreasing. Mothers known to be using amphetamines are at high risk of psychiatric co-morbidity and poorer obstetric outcomes, but their infants may escape detection, because the signs of withdrawal are usually less pronounced than opiate-exposed infants. There is little evidence of amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and long-term neurodevelopmental impact, as data is scarce and difficult to extricate from the influence of other factors associated with children living in households where one or more parent uses drugs in terms of poverty and neglect. Perinatal amphetamine-exposure is an increasing worldwide concern, but robust research, especially for childhood outcomes, remains scarce. We suggest that exposed children may be at risk of ongoing developmental and behavioral impediment, and recommend that efforts be made to improve early detection of perinatal exposure and to increase provision of early-intervention services for affected children and their families.

  2. Abuse of amphetamines and structural abnormalities in the brain.

    PubMed

    Berman, Steven; O'Neill, Joseph; Fears, Scott; Bartzokis, George; London, Edythe D

    2008-10-01

    We review evidence that structural brain abnormalities are associated with abuse of amphetamines. A brief history of amphetamine use/abuse and evidence for toxicity is followed by a summary of findings from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of human subjects who had abused amphetamines and children who were exposed to amphetamines in utero. Evidence comes from studies that used a variety of techniques including manual tracing, pattern matching, voxel-based, tensor-based, or cortical thickness mapping, quantification of white matter signal hyperintensities, and diffusion tensor imaging. Ten studies compared controls to individuals who were exposed to methamphetamine. Three studies assessed individuals exposed to 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Brain structural abnormalities were consistently reported in amphetamine abusers, as compared to control subjects. These included lower cortical gray matter volume and higher striatal volume than control subjects. These differences might reflect brain features that could predispose to substance dependence. High striatal volumes might also reflect compensation for toxicity in the dopamine-rich basal ganglia. Prenatal exposure was associated with striatal volume that was below control values, suggesting that such compensation might not occur in utero. Several forms of white matter abnormality are also common and may involve gliosis. Many of the limitations and inconsistencies in the literature relate to techniques and cross-sectional designs, which cannot infer causality. Potential confounding influences include effects of pre existing risk/protective factors, development, gender, severity of amphetamine abuse, abuse of other drugs, abstinence, and differences in lifestyle. Longitudinal designs in which multimodal datasets are acquired and are subjected to multivariate analyses would enhance our ability to provide general conclusions regarding the associations between amphetamine abuse and brain

  3. Effects of d-amphetamine upon psychosocial stress responses.

    PubMed

    Childs, Emma; Bershad, Anya K; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-07-01

    Psychostimulant drugs alter the salience of stimuli in both laboratory animals and humans. In animals, stimulants increase rates of responding to conditioned incentive stimuli, and in humans, amphetamine increases positive ratings of emotional images. However, the effects of stimulants on real-life emotional events have not been studied in humans. In this study, we examined the effect of d-amphetamine on responses to acute psychosocial stress using a public speaking task. Healthy volunteers (N=56) participated in two experimental sessions, one with a psychosocial stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test) and one with a non-stressful control task. They were randomly assigned to receive d-amphetamine (5 mg n=18, 10 mg n=20) or placebo (n=18) on both sessions under double blind conditions. Salivary cortisol, subjective mood, and vital signs were measured at regular intervals during the session. Subjects also provided cognitive appraisals of the tasks before and after their performances. Amphetamine produced its expected mood and physiological effects, and the Trier Social Stress Test produced its expected effects on cortisol and mood. Although neither dose of amphetamine altered cardiovascular or hormonal responses to stress, amphetamine (10 mg) increased participants' pre-task appraisals of how challenging the task would be, and it increased post-task ratings of self-efficacy. Paradoxically, it also increased ratings of how stressful the task was, and prolonged aversive emotional responses. These findings suggest that amphetamine differentially affects stress response components: it may increase participants' appraisals of self-efficacy without dampening the direct emotional or physiological responses to the stress.

  4. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of methylenedioxy amphetamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangqin; Shen, Jingling

    2008-03-01

    Experimental measurement and theoretical analysis of THz spectrum for methylenedioxy amphetamine are introduced. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of the sample were observed by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) technique in the range of 0.2~2.6 THz. It exhibits obvious absorption feature at 1.40 THz and weak THz absorption at around 1.68 and 2.21 THz. The spectral absorption characteristic in THz band was useful for the inspection and identification of drugs using THz-TDS. The theoretical calculation was performed using Density functional theory (DFT) with the GAUSSIAN 03 software package. Fully geometry optimization and frequency analysis of the optimized structure were performed at the B3LYP/6-21G levels. The simulated absorption spectrum was in agreement with the experimental data, and can hence be used for the assignment of observed THz spectrum. The theoretical simulation result showed that absorption peaks mainly result from intra-molecule and inter-molecule vibrations, different absorption peaks are corresponding to different vibrational modes and intensity. So the combination of the THz-TDS and DFT is an effective way to investigate characteristic spectra of illicit drugs.

  5. Stereoselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, John; Malia, Louis; Lubben, Anneke; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Here presented for the first time is the enantioselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosm bioreactors. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mechanisms governing the fate of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the environment are mostly stereoselective and biological in nature. Several bioreactors were studied over the duration of 15 days (i) in both biotic and abiotic conditions, (ii) in the dark or exposed to light and (iii) in the presence or absence of suspended particulate matter. Bioreactor samples were analysed using SPE-chiral-LC-(QTOF)MS methodology. This investigation has elucidated the fundamental mechanism for degradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine as being predominantly biological in origin. Furthermore, stereoselectivity and changes in enantiomeric fraction (EF) were only observed under biotic conditions. Neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine appeared to demonstrate adsorption to suspended particulate matter. Our experiments also demonstrated that amphetamine and methamphetamine were photo-stable. Illicit drugs are present in the environment at low concentrations but due to their pseudo-persistence and non-racemic behaviour, with two enantiomers revealing significantly different potency (and potentially different toxicity towards aquatic organisms) the risk posed by illicit drugs in the environment should not be under- or over-estimated. The above results demonstrate the need for re-evaluation of the procedures utilised in environmental risk assessment, which currently do not recognise the importance of the phenomenon of chirality in pharmacologically active compounds.

  6. Disruptive effect of amphetamines on Pavlovian to instrumental transfer.

    PubMed

    Hall, Darien A; Gulley, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Reward-seeking behavior can be powerfully modulated by exposure to a conditioned stimulus (CS) that was previously associated with that reward. This can be demonstrated in a Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) task where presentation of a CS (e.g., tone and light) previously paired with a rewarding unconditioned stimulus (US; e.g., food) leads to increases in a behavioral response, such as a lever press, that was also paired with the same US. The transfer effect can be enhanced in rats by exposing them repeatedly to amphetamine after they have undergone Pavlovian conditioning and instrumental training. However, it is not clear if amphetamine injections given immediately after Pavlovian conditioning, which are predicted to enhance memory consolidation for the CS-US association, would also enhance the transfer effect. We tested this hypothesis by giving male, Sprague-Dawley rats i.p. injections of saline or drug (0.5, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg amphetamine or methamphetamine) immediately following Pavlovian conditioning sessions. We found that amphetamine, but not methamphetamine, enhanced Pavlovian approach behavior. During a subsequent PIT test done under extinction conditions, we found that rats given either drug, particularly at the highest dose, exhibited deficits in PIT relative to saline-treated controls. These results suggest that treatment with amphetamines after Pavlovian conditioning sessions, when memory consolidation of the CS-US association is hypothesized to occur, inhibits the ability of the CS to subsequently elicit reward-seeking behavior.

  7. Amphetamine positive urine toxicology screen secondary to atomoxetine.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, Joshua L; Stratton, Amy N; Domingo, Jennifer S; Matthews, Gerald O; Tan, Christopher D

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the first case of atomoxetine leading to false-positive urine drug screen. An otherwise healthy 27-year-old female with a history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treated with atomoxetine had an acute onset tonic-clonic seizure. On arrival to the hospital, a urine toxicological drug screen with immunochemical cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) was performed. Results were positive for amphetamines; however, the presence of these substances could not be confirmed with urine gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). She denied any illicit drug use, herbal medications, or supplements, and her other prescription medications have not been previously known to cause a false-positive result for amphetamines. While stimulant treatments for ADHD could certainly result in a positive result on urine screen for amphetamines, there have been no reports of false-positive results for amphetamines secondary to patients using atomoxetine. We implicate atomoxetine, and/or its metabolites, as a compound or compounds which may interfere with urine drug immunoassays leading to false-positive results for amphetamines CEDIA assays.

  8. Behavioral effects of amphetamine in streptozotocin-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Koek, Wouter; Daws, Lynette C.; Owens, William Anthony; Galli, Aurelio; France, Charles P.

    2009-01-01

    Experimentally-induced diabetes can modify the behavioral and neurochemical effects of drugs acting on dopamine systems, possibly through insulin-related regulation of dopamine transporter activity. In this study, several behavioral procedures were used to examine possible changes in sensitivity to amphetamine and other drugs in rats rendered diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin. Conditioned place preference developed to food (Froot Loops®) in both control and diabetic rats, demonstrating that conditioned place preference with tactile stimuli can occur in streptozotocin-treated rats. Baseline locomotion was lower in streptozotocin-treated as compared to control rats, although amphetamine significantly increased locomotion in all rats. Conditioned place preference developed to amphetamine regardless of whether rats had received streptozotocin or saline. A second study compared the potency of drugs to decrease lever pressing maintained by food, before and after streptozotocin treatment. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate and amphetamine were less potent after streptozotocin while the potency of raclopride, quinpirole, ketamine, haloperidol and cocaine was not significantly changed by streptozotocin. While markedly affecting locomotion, body weight and blood glucose, streptozotocin only modestly affected sensitivity to the behavioral effects of amphetamine and other drugs; these results fail to confirm previous reports of decreased behavioral actions of stimulants in diabetic rats. PMID:18155695

  9. Behavioral effects of amphetamine in streptozotocin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Sevak, Rajkumar J; Koek, Wouter; Daws, Lynette C; Owens, William Anthony; Galli, Aurelio; France, Charles P

    2008-02-26

    Experimentally-induced diabetes can modify the behavioral and neurochemical effects of drugs acting on dopamine systems, possibly through insulin-related regulation of dopamine transporter activity. In this study, several behavioral procedures were used to examine possible changes in sensitivity to amphetamine and other drugs in rats rendered diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin. Conditioned place preference developed to food (Froot Loops) in both control and diabetic rats, demonstrating that conditioned place preference with tactile stimuli can occur in streptozotocin-treated rats. Baseline locomotion was lower in streptozotocin-treated as compared to control rats, although amphetamine significantly increased locomotion in all rats. Conditioned place preference developed to amphetamine regardless of whether rats had received streptozotocin or saline. A second study compared the potency of drugs to decrease lever pressing maintained by food, before and after streptozotocin treatment. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate and amphetamine were less potent after streptozotocin while the potency of raclopride, quinpirole, ketamine, haloperidol and cocaine was not significantly changed by streptozotocin. While markedly affecting locomotion, body weight and blood glucose, streptozotocin only modestly affected sensitivity to the behavioral effects of amphetamine and other drugs; these results fail to confirm previous reports of decreased behavioral actions of stimulants in diabetic rats.

  10. Amphetamine and methamphetamine have a direct and differential effect on BV2 microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Shanks, R A; Anderson, J R; Taylor, J R; Lloyd, S A

    2012-12-01

    A comparative analysis of the direct effects of amphetamine and methamphetamine exposure on BV2 microglia cells in the presence and absence of cellular debris was performed. A significant dose-dependent and treatment-dependent effect of amphetamine and methamphetamine on BV2 cells was demonstrated: methamphetamine, but not amphetamine, inhibited phagocytosis, and a differential regulation of cytokines was observed in response to amphetamine and methamphetamine.

  11. Reduced ethanol consumption and preference in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Armando G; Nguyen, Chinh T Q; Ahmadi-Tehrani, Dara; Morrisett, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a neuropeptide implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Several studies have characterized the role of CART in addiction to psychostimulants, but few have examined the role of CART in alcohol use disorders including alcoholism. The current study utilized a CART knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the role of CART in ethanol appetitive behaviors. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol appetitive behaviors between CART wild type (WT) and KO mice. The mice were presented with an ethanol solution (3%-21%) and water, each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of quinine (bitter) and saccharin (sweet) solutions was measured following the ethanol preference tests. In addition, ethanol metabolism rates and ethanol sensitivity were compared between genotypes. CART KO mice consumed and preferred ethanol less than their WT counterparts in both sexes. This genotype effect could not be attributed to differences in bitter or sweet taste perception or ethanol metabolism rates. There was also no difference in ethanol sensitivity in male mice; however, CART KO female mice showed a greater ethanol sensitivity than the WT females. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for CART in ethanol appetitive behaviors and as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence enhancement.

  12. Preservice Drug Usage Among Naval Recruits: A 5-Year Trend Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    collections.’ The drop of 4 percentage points reported in the use of peyote, psilocybin , and mescaline between 1971 and 1975 resulted in a significant overall...significant increase in usage of amphetamines and barbiturates, a significant decrease in peyote/ psilocybin /mescaline and opium/codeine[i and no...Amphetamines, pep pills, "uppers," bennies A. No 17. Peyote, psilocybin , mescaline B. Yes 18. Alcohol--beer, wine, hard liquors 19. Heroin 20

  13. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects. PMID:25542076

  14. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects.

  15. Review article: amphetamines and related drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Greene, Shaun L; Kerr, Fergus; Braitberg, George

    2008-10-01

    Acute amphetamine toxicity is a relatively common clinical scenario facing the Australasian emergency medicine physician. Rates of use in Australasia are amongst the highest in the world. Clinical effects are a consequence of peripheral and central adrenergic stimulation producing a sympathomimetic toxidrome and a spectrum of central nervous system effects. Assessment aims to detect the myriad of possible complications related to acute amphetamine exposure and to institute interventions to limit associated morbidity and mortality. Meticulous supportive care aided by judicial use of benzodiazepines forms the cornerstone of management. Beta blockers are contraindicated in managing cardiovascular complications. Agitation and hyperthermia must be treated aggressively. Discharge of non-admitted patients from the emergency department should only occur once physiological parameters and mental state have returned to normal. All patients should receive education regarding the dangers of amphetamine use.

  16. Corticosterone levels determine individual vulnerability to amphetamine self-administration.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, P V; Maccari, S; Deminière, J M; Le Moal, M; Mormède, P; Simon, H

    1991-01-01

    Individual vulnerability to the reinforcing properties of drugs appears to be an essential characteristic predisposing humans to addiction. In animals, a greater behavioral reactivity to a mild stress, such as exposure to a novel environment, is an index of the vulnerability to acquire amphetamine self-administration. Biological responses to stress as well as behavioral reactivity may predict such a vulnerability. In the present study, rats with a longer duration of corticosterone secretion after exposure to novelty showed facilitation of acquisition of amphetamine self-administration. Furthermore, corticosterone administration in nonpredisposed individuals increased the reinforcing value of the drug and facilitated the acquisition of amphetamine self-administration. These results indicate that the stress-related activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction. PMID:2006148

  17. Epigenetic landscape of amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godino, Arthur; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction is described by specific behavioral alterations, suggesting long-lasting changes in gene and protein expression within specific brain subregions involved in the reward circuitry. Given the persistence of the addiction phenotype at both behavioral and transcriptional levels, several studies have been conducted to elucidate the epigenetic landscape associated with persistent effects of drug use on the mammalian brain. This review discusses recent advances in our comprehension of epigenetic mechanisms underlying amphetamine- or methamphetamine-induced behavioral, transcriptional, and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence demonstrated that drug exposure induces major epigenetic modifications-histone acetylation and methylation, DNA methylation-in a very complex manner. In rare instances, however, the regulation of a specific target gene can be correlated to both epigenetic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Work is now needed to clarify and validate an epigenetic model of addiction to amphetamines. Investigations that include genome-wide approaches will accelerate the speed of discovery in the field of addiction.

  18. America’s First Amphetamine Epidemic 1929–1971

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Using historical research that draws on new primary sources, I review the causes and course of the first, mainly iatrogenic amphetamine epidemic in the United States from the 1940s through the 1960s. Retrospective epidemiology indicates that the absolute prevalence of both nonmedical stimulant use and stimulant dependence or abuse have reached nearly the same levels today as at the epidemic’s peak around 1969. Further parallels between epidemics past and present, including evidence that consumption of prescribed amphetamines has also reached the same absolute levels today as at the original epidemic’s peak, suggest that stricter limits on pharmaceutical stimulants must be considered in any efforts to reduce amphetamine abuse today. PMID:18445805

  19. Identifying Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Flakka (alpha-PVP) Amphetamines Barbiturates Bath Salts Benzodiazepines Cocaine DXM (Dextromethorphan) Ecstasy or MDMA (also known as ... Flakka (alpha-PVP) Amphetamines Barbiturates Bath Salts Benzodiazepines Cocaine DXM (Dextromethorphan) Ecstasy or MDMA (also known as ...

  20. [Selected Readings for the Professional Working with Drug Related Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison.

    A bibliography of selected readings compiled at the University of Wisconsin for the National Drug Education Training Program. These selected readings include information on narcotics, amphetamines, mescaline, psilogybin, hallucinogens, LSD, barbiturates, alcohol, and other stimulants. The intended user of this bibliography is the professional…

  1. Medical Readings on Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Oliver E.

    Summaries are presented of over 150 articles in the recent medical and psychiatric literature. Topics covered are: effects of drugs, tobacco, alcohol, drugs used in medicine, vapor sniffing, marijuana, barbiturates, tranquilizers, amphetamines, methamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, other hallucinogens, heroin and the opiates, psychiatric…

  2. Substance Use by Fourth-Year Students at 13 U.S. Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conard, Scott; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study investigated drug use by fourth-year medical students in 13 schools and compared drug use patterns with those of an age- and sex-matched cohort. Medical students reported less use of marijuana, cocaine, cigarettes, LSD, barbiturates, and amphetamines, similar use of opiates, and slightly more use of tranquilizers and alcohol. (MSE)

  3. Efficacy of Adjunctive Sleep Interventions for PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    CBC, diabetes & liver func.), EKG, urine drug screens for amphetamines, marijuana , heroin, barbiturate, PCP alcohol and other narcotics, pregnancy ...opportunities to collaborate effective with our colleagues at the VAPHS to facilitate and enhance recruitment of military veterans with sleep disturbances to...study will contribute to the development of effective therapeutic strategies for post-deployment mental health difficulties, and provide novel

  4. Analyses Related to the Development of DSM-5 Criteria for Substance Use Related Disorders: 1. Toward Amphetamine, Cocaine and Prescription Drug Use Disorder Continua Using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tulshi D.; Compton, Wilson M.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon; Ruan, W. June; Huang, Boji; Pickering, Roger P.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior research has demonstrated the dimensionality of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis use disorders criteria. The purpose of this study was to examine the unidimensionality of DSM-IV cocaine, amphetamine and prescription drug abuse and dependence criteria and to determine the impact of elimination of the legal problems criterion on the information value of the aggregate criteria. Methods Factor analyses and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to explore the unidimensionality and psychometric properties of the illicit drug use criteria using a large representative sample of the U.S. population. Results All illicit drug abuse and dependence criteria formed unidimensional latent traits. For amphetamines, cocaine, sedatives, tranquilizers and opioids, IRT models fit better for models without legal problems criterion than models with legal problems criterion and there were no differences in the information value of the IRT models with and without the legal problems criterion, supporting the elimination of that criterion. Conclusion Consistent with findings for alcohol, nicotine and cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine, sedative, tranquilizer and opioid abuse and dependence criteria reflect underlying unitary dimensions of severity. The legal problems criterion associated with each of these substance use disorders can be eliminated with no loss in informational value and an advantage of parsimony. Taken together, these findings support the changes to substance use disorder diagnoses recommended by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 Substance and Related Disorders Workgroup. PMID:21963414

  5. Bupropion interference with immunoassays for amphetamines and LSD.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Christian; Skripuletz, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    A 50-year-old male patient suddenly had lost consciousness, although he had previously been healthy. On arrival at hospital seizures arose. The authors investigated a urine sample of the patient, and performed toxicological drug screening with immunochemical Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay (CEDIA) assays. Positive findings for amphetamines and LSD could not be confirmed. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), the authors identified bupropion, a drug used to aid in smoking cessation, as the interfering compound, which may cause false-positive results for amphetamines and LSD using the CEDIA assays.

  6. Modafinil treatment of amphetamine abuse in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Mann, N; Bitsios, P

    2009-06-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent co-morbid condition of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment with conventional psychostimulants in adult ADHD with co-morbid stimulant abuse may be problematic. In this study, we report the case of a patient with adult ADHD with co-morbid amphetamine abuse who was treated successfully with the non-stimulant alertness-promoting drug modafinil. The drug resolved both the inattention/hyperactivity symptoms as well as the amphetamine abuse. Modafinil may be a suitable candidate treatment for adults with ADHD and stimulant abuse.

  7. Acute d-Amphetamine Pretreatment Does Not Alter Stimulant Self-Administration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent clinical research indicates that d-amphetamine is effective in treating cocaine and methamphetamine dependence. There is concern, however, with the use of d-amphetamine as a pharmacotherapy because acute administration of d-amphetamine decreases inhibition in cocaine-using individuals and may increase drug-taking behavior. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether acute d-amphetamine pretreatment would alter the reinforcing, subject-rated, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine. To this end, 7 human volunteers first sampled doses of oral d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). These doses engender moderate drug taking and were selected to avoid a ceiling or floor effect. Volunteers were then allowed to self-administer these sampled doses using a modified-progressive ratio procedure in two sessions in which they received pretreatments with either 0 or 15 mg oral d-amphetamine 2 hours prior to completing the modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased ratings of stimulated, elevated blood pressure) and maintained responding on the modified progressive-ratio schedule. Pretreatment with 15 mg oral d-amphetamine also produced prototypical stimulant-like effects, but failed to alter break points for d-amphetamine on the modified progressive-ratio procedure relative to placebo pretreatment. These results indicate that acute d-amphetamine pretreatment does not increase stimulant self-administration. PMID:17490738

  8. D-Amphetamine reinstates behavior previously maintained by food: importance of context.

    PubMed

    Odum, A L; Shahan, T A

    2004-11-01

    The drug self-administration reinstatement procedure provides an important animal model of relapse. While the procedure is widely used, there has been little investigation of the basic processes involved. This experiment determined the specificity of reinstatement by examining reinstatement of food seeking by D-amphetamine. During training, 24 rats pressed levers for food. Eight rats received 3.0 mg/kg D-amphetamine before and saline after sessions. Eight rats received saline before and after sessions. The final eight rats received saline before and 3.0 mg/kg D-amphetamine after sessions. All rats then experienced saline injections and extinction. During a reinstatement test, all rats received 3.0 mg/kg D-amphetamine. D-Amphetamine significantly increased lever pressing for rats with prior exposure to amphetamine as a predictive cue for food (pre-session) and for rats with no prior exposure to amphetamine. The effect was larger for rats with pre-session exposure to amphetamine than for rats with no previous exposure. Rats with exposure to amphetamine but not as a predictive cue for food (after sessions) did not show significant reinstatement of lever pressing. Therefore, the reinstating effects of amphetamine are not restricted to behavior previously maintained by amphetamine self-administration. In animal models of relapse, reinstatement of drug seeking could be due, in part, to discriminative and direct effects of self-administered drug.

  9. Amphetamine modulates excitatory neurotransmission through endocytosis of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Suzanne M; Wheeler, David S; Li, Minghua; Watts, Spencer D; Ingram, Susan L; Amara, Susan G

    2014-07-16

    Amphetamines modify the brain and alter behavior through mechanisms generally attributed to their ability to regulate extracellular dopamine concentrations. However, the actions of amphetamine are also linked to adaptations in glutamatergic signaling. We report here that when amphetamine enters dopamine neurons through the dopamine transporter, it stimulates endocytosis of an excitatory amino acid transporter, EAAT3, in dopamine neurons. Consistent with this decrease in surface EAAT3, amphetamine potentiates excitatory synaptic responses in dopamine neurons. We also show that the process of internalization is dynamin- and Rho-mediated and requires a unique sequence in the cytosolic C terminus of EAAT3. Introduction of a peptide based on this motif into dopamine neurons blocks the effects of amphetamine on EAAT3 internalization and its action on excitatory responses. These data indicate that the internalization of EAAT3 triggered by amphetamine increases glutamatergic signaling and thus contributes to the effects of amphetamine on neurotransmission.

  10. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  11. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  12. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

  13. The Effect of Variant Dosages of Amphetamine Upon Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melvin H.; Thompson, John

    The purpose of this study was to provide basic information concerning the acute effects of a small, moderate, and large dose of d-amphetamine sulfate upon muscular endurance; a secondary purpose involved the effect upon resting (R), and submaximal, and maximal (MAX) heart rate (HR). Twelve male university students underwent four separate trials of…

  14. ANN expert system screening for illicit amphetamines using molecular descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, S.; Praisler, M.; Dorohoi, D. O.

    2007-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and an artificial neural network (ANN) based on computed descriptors, which would be able to classify the molecular structures of potential illicit amphetamines and to derive their biological activity according to the similarity of their molecular structure with amphetamines of known toxicity. The system is necessary for testing new molecular structures for epidemiological, clinical, and forensic purposes. It was built using a database formed by 146 compounds representing drugs of abuse (mainly central stimulants, hallucinogens, sympathomimetic amines, narcotics and other potent analgesics), precursors, or derivatized counterparts. Their molecular structures were characterized by computing three types of descriptors: 38 constitutional descriptors (CDs), 69 topological descriptors (TDs) and 160 3D-MoRSE descriptors (3DDs). An ANN system was built for each category of variables. All three networks (CD-NN, TD-NN and 3DD-NN) were trained to distinguish between stimulant amphetamines, hallucinogenic amphetamines, and nonamphetamines. A selection of variables was performed when necessary. The efficiency with which each network identifies the class identity of an unknown sample was evaluated by calculating several figures of merit. The results of the comparative analysis are presented.

  15. The neurotoxicity of amphetamines during the adolescent period.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Gomes, Armanda; Costa, Vera Marisa; Feio-Azevedo, Rita; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix; Capela, João Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Amphetamine-type psychostimulants (ATS), such as amphetamine (AMPH), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methamphetamine (METH) are psychoactive substances widely abused, due to their powerful central nervous system (CNS) stimulation ability. Young people particularly use ATS as recreational drugs. Moreover, AMPH is used clinically, particularly for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and has the ability to cause structural and functional brain alterations. ATS are known to interact with monoamine transporter sites and easily diffuse across cellular membranes, attaining high levels in several tissues, particularly the brain. Strong evidence suggests that ATS induce neurotoxic effects, raising concerns about the consequences of drug abuse. Considering that many teenagers and young adults commonly use ATS, our main aim was to review the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines, namely AMPH, MDMA, and METH, in the adolescence period of experimental animals. Reports agree that adolescent animals are less susceptible than adult animals to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines. The susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of ATS seems roughly located in the early adolescent period of animals. Many authors report that the age of exposure to ATS is crucial for the neurotoxic outcome, showing that the stage of brain maturity has a strong importance. Moreover, recent studies have been undertaken in young adults and/or consumers during adolescence that clearly indicate brain or behavioural damage, arguing for long-term neurotoxic effects in humans. There is an urgent need for more studies during the adolescence period, in order to unveil the mechanisms and the brain dysfunctions promoted by ATS.

  16. Small volume liquid extraction of amphetamines in saliva.

    PubMed

    Meng, Pinjia; Wang, Yanyan

    2010-04-15

    The present study introduced a procedure of small volume liquid extraction of amphetamines, including amphetamine (AM); methamphetamine (MA); 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA); 3,4-methylenemethamphtamine (MDMA), in saliva. Extraction efficiencies were compared between the conventional volume liquid phase extraction (LPE) and the small volume one, in which <100 microL solvent was used instead of several milliliters in LPE. Conditions such as types and volumes of organic solvent used in the extraction and concentrations of target analytes in aqueous samples were examined. Results showed that small volume liquid extraction had an enrichment effect on the analytes. After extraction, the organic phase was either directly drawn out for GC analysis, or partially transferred to another vial for derivatization. Detection limits were less than 5 ng/mL in saliva using GC/MS-SIM after derivatization. RSD (of peak area ratios) was less than 15% at all drug concentrations. The method was used in the analyses of saliva collected from amphetamine abusers, and was proven to be practical for detecting trace amounts of amphetamines in saliva.

  17. Amphetamines modulate prefrontal γ oscillations during attention processing.

    PubMed

    Franzen, John D; Wilson, Tony W

    2012-08-22

    Amphetamine-based medications robustly suppress symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but their exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent hemodynamic imaging studies have suggested that amphetamines may modulate the prefrontal and anterior cingulate brain regions, although few studies have been published and the results have not been entirely consistent. Meanwhile, several electrophysiological studies have shown that abnormal fast oscillations (in the γ range) may be closely linked to inattention and other cardinal symptoms of ADHD. In this study, we utilized magnetoencephalography to examine how amphetamines modulate high-frequency brain activity in adults with ADHD. Participants performed an auditory attention task, which required sustained attention in one block and passive listening in a separate block. Participants completed the task twice in the on-medication and off-medication states. All data were analyzed using beamforming techniques to resolve cortical regions showing event-related synchronizations and desynchronizations. Our primary findings indicated that oral administration of amphetamine decreased γ-band event-related desynchronization activity significantly in the medial prefrontal area and decreased event-related synchronization in bilateral superior parietal areas, left inferior parietal, and the left inferior frontal gyrus. These results suggest that psychostimulants strongly modulate γ activity in frontal and parietal cortical areas, which are known to be central to the brain's core attentional networks.

  18. Amphetamines in washed hair of demonstrated users and workplace subjects.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Thomas; Hill, Virginia; Schaffer, Michael; Thistle, William

    2004-10-29

    In a study of volunteer subjects from drug rehabilitation programs, methamphetamine and amphetamine levels were determined in the hair of 40 subjects who had produced MS-confirmed methamphetamine-positive urine results. The samples were tested by radioimmunoassay and analyzed by LC/MS/MS after being washed with the 3.75-h wash procedure developed by this laboratory. In addition, results of non-user and workplace samples are presented. In workplace samples, levels of methamphetamine, amphetamine, methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), and methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), are reported. The range of methamphetamine levels in the clinical samples (170-34,400 pg/mg hair) was not different from the workplace population (from less than the cutoff of 500 pg/mg to >20,000 pg/mg hair), but the workplace population had a lower percentage of high levels of drug. Amphetamine levels were found to vary widely in both populations, at all levels of methamphetamine. In the clinical population, no samples were positive for MDMA; in MDMA-positive workplace samples, the levels ranged from below the cutoff of 500 to >20,000 pg/mg, with MDA levels varying widely, similar to amphetamine levels in methamphetamine-positive samples.

  19. Impurities in Illicit Drug Preparations: Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Verweij, A M

    1989-06-01

    In this review, attention is paid to chromatographic and mass spectral properties of already identified impurities found to be present in frequently abused drug preparations of illegal origin of amphetamine and methamphetamine. The most commonly employed methods of synthesis of drugs of this type are briefly described. Special emphasis is given to the Leuckart route, found to be the preferred method, in the illicit production of amphetamine. Furthermore, some isolation and preconcentration methods for the contaminants are discussed. The importance of identifying impurities present in amphetamine or methamphetamine cannot be overestimated. These impurities originate mostly from the improper purification in the end stage of the different syntheses used in the clandestine manufacture of the substances; it is possible to differentiate between the several kinds of illegal drug preparations, synthesized by various methods, by means of so-called "route specific" impurities. Finally, a survey is given of the impurities already known to be present in amphetamine and methamphetamine, together with their mass spectral and some chromatographic properties.

  20. Time-dependent effects of amphetamine on feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    White, Wesley; Sherrill, Luke K.; White, Ilsun M.

    2007-01-01

    Following administration of a moderate dose of amphetamine, rats appear to pass through a sequence of physiological/ psychological states, including stimulant and depressant states. The present research evaluated whether these states could be inferred from time-dependent changes in feeding-related measures. Male rats were housed in individual stations (light-dark 12-12 hr, free access to water) where, at three hour intervals, they could respond for food for one hour. The work requirement was fixed ratio 1, and each lever press produced 6 94-mg food pellets. When the pattern of responding for food stabilized across the light-dark cycle, a series of 6 or 7 tests was run. During each test, rats received a saline treatment (1.0 ml/ kg, subcutaneously) followed by a 48-hour monitoring period, and then they received an amphetamine treatment (2.0 mg/ kg, subcutaneously) followed by a 72-hour monitoring period. Different groups were treated at either light onset or light offset. Lever presses and head-in-feeding-bin responses were monitored throughout these tests. Administration of amphetamine at light onset and at light offset produced cumulative food intake functions having four regions: post-treatment hours 1-6 (hypophagia), 7-12 (normal intake), 13-27 (hypophagia), and 28 and beyond (normal intake). The sequence, duration, and quality of the amphetamine-induced changes in food intake resembled those formerly seen in cue state and activity, and provided further evidence of a transient withdrawal state 20-24 hr post-amphetamine treatment. Section: Regulatory Systems PMID:17764665

  1. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of Alcoholism Why can some people have a ... to an increased risk of alcoholism. Cutting-Edge Genetic Research in Alcoholism Although researchers already have made ...

  2. [The urinary screening and identification of amphetamines in clinical toxicology laboratory--VGH].

    PubMed

    Lin, W L; Deng, J F; Chou, L J; Hung, D Z; Tsai, W J

    1991-10-01

    Amphetamines abuse has recently become a problem in this country. Four case identification, we used Emit-d.a.u. amphetamine assay to screen the amphetamines in human urine, and then confirmed them by gas chromatography-ion trap detector (GC-ITD). From January 1989 to August 1990, 267 urinary samples were requested by the physicians for amphetamine identification. Six samples were accompanied with drug powders used by the patients. Among the 267 samples, 79 were confirmed for the presence for both of methamphetamine and amphetamine. Neither the presence of amphetamine nor methamphetamine itself was detected. Among the six packs of drug powder tested, methamphetamine but not amphetamine was detected in four. We found that fenfluramine and diethylpropion would have false positive amphetamine reactions in Emit-d.a.u. assay. All the samples originated from 34 hospitals were widely distributed in the country. Other drugs concomitantly used included ethanol, morphine, flunitrazepam and ephedrine. Since methamphetamine can be metabolized to amphetamine but not vers versa, our study confirmed the abuse of methamphetamine not amphetamine in this country.

  3. Enhanced stress-induced dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex of amphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, T; Fibiger, H C

    1993-06-11

    This study examined the extent to which chronic d-amphetamine administration sensitizes animals to some behavioral and neurochemical effects of foot shock stress. Rats received daily injections of saline for 14 days or d-amphetamine (2 mg/kg 7 days and 4 mg/kg 7 days). After a 7 day drug abstinent period, extracellular dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid concentrations were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. The behavioral responses to mild foot shock stress were enhanced in the d-amphetamine-pretreated subjects. Concomitant with this behavioral sensitization, d-amphetamine-pretreated subjects showed greater stress-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex than in controls. d-Amphetamine (2 mg/kg)-induced stereotyped behavior was also enhanced in the amphetamine-pretreated animals compared to controls; however, d-amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex were not enhanced in the amphetamine-pretreated group. These results suggest that the mesocortical dopaminergic system is involved in cross-sensitization between d-amphetamine and stress, but not in d-amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

  4. In Vivo Amphetamine Action is Contingent on αCaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Mus, Liudmilla; Eisenrauch, Birgit; Constantinescu, Andreea; Leo, Damiana; Konrad, Lisa; Rickhag, Mattias; Sørensen, Gunnar; Efimova, Evgenia V; Kong, Eryan; Willeit, Matthäus; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Kudlacek, Oliver; Gether, Ulrik; Freissmuth, Michael; Pollak, Daniela D; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants (ie, amphetamines and cocaine) imposes a major socioeconomic burden. Prevention and treatment represent unmet medical needs, which may be addressed, if the mechanisms underlying psychostimulant action are understood. Cocaine acts as a blocker at the transporters for dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT), and norepinephrine (NET), but amphetamines are substrates that do not only block the uptake of monoamines but also induce substrate efflux by promoting reverse transport. Reverse transport has been a focus of research for decades but its mechanistic basis still remains enigmatic. Recently, transporter-interacting proteins were found to regulate amphetamine-triggered reverse transport: calmodulin kinase IIα (αCaMKII) is a prominent example, because it binds the carboxyl terminus of DAT, phosphorylates its amino terminus, and supports amphetamine-induced substrate efflux in vitro. Here, we investigated whether, in vivo, the action of amphetamine was contingent on the presence of αCaMKII by recording the behavioral and neurochemical effects of amphetamine. Measurement of dopamine efflux in the dorsal striatum by microdialysis revealed that amphetamine induced less dopamine efflux in mice lacking αCaMKII. Consistent with this observation, the acute locomotor responses to amphetamine were also significantly blunted in αCaMKII-deficient mice. In addition, while the rewarding properties of amphetamine were preserved in αCaMKII-deficient mice, their behavioral sensitization to amphetamine was markedly reduced. Our findings demonstrate that amphetamine requires the presence of αCaMKII to elicit a full-fledged effect on DAT in vivo: αCaMKII does not only support acute amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux but is also important in shaping the chronic response to amphetamine. PMID:24871545

  5. Genetic inactivation of pleiotrophin triggers amphetamine-induced cell loss in the substantia nigra and enhances amphetamine neurotoxicity in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Gramage, E; Rossi, L; Granado, N; Moratalla, R; Herradón, G

    2010-09-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a neurotrophic factor with important effects in survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons that has been suggested to play important roles in drug of abuse-induced neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we have studied the effects of amphetamine (10 mg/kg, four times, every 2 h) on the nigrostriatal pathway of PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) mice. We found that amphetamine causes a significantly enhanced loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum of PTN-/- mice compared to wild type (WT+/+) mice. In addition, we found a significant decrease ( approximately 20%) of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons only in the substantia nigra of amphetamine-treated PTN-/- mice, whereas this area of WT+/+ animals remained unaffected after amphetamine treatment. This effect was accompanied by enhanced amphetamine-induced astrocytosis in the substantia nigra of PTN-/- mice. Interestingly, we found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation levels of p42 extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK2) in both saline- and amphetamine-treated PTN-/- mice, whereas phosphorylation of p44 ERK (ERK1) was almost abolished in the striatum of PTN-/- mice compared to WT+/+ mice, suggesting that basal deficiencies in the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 could underlie the higher vulnerability of PTN-/- mice to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. The data suggest an important role of PTN in the protection of nigrostriatal pathways against amphetamine insult.

  6. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (P<0.01). Less potent nootropics, D-levetiracetam and D-pyroglutamate, have higher antagonist Ki's against pentobarbital inhibition of glucose transport than more potent L-stereoisomers (P<0.001). Piracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  7. In vivo oxidative damage in rats is associated with barbiturate response but not other cytochrome P450 inducers.

    PubMed

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Brooks, Joshua D; Hardy, Klarissa D; Milne, Ginger L; Moore, Megan M; Sharma, Sameer; Morrow, Jason D; Guengerich, F Peter

    2007-12-01

    Previously published studies have shown that cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme systems can produce reactive oxygen species and suggest roles of P450s in oxidative stress. However, most of the studies have been done in vitro, and the potential link between P450 induction and in vivo oxidative damage has not been rigorously explored with validated biomarkers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with typical P450 inducers (beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital (PB), Aroclor 1254, isoniazid, pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, and clofibrate) or the general P450 inhibitor 1-aminobenztriazole; induction of P4501A, -2B, -2E, -3A, and -4A subfamily enzymes was confirmed by immunoblotting and the suppression of P450 by 1-aminobenztriazole using spectral analysis. PB and Aroclor 1254 significantly enhanced malondialdehyde and H2O2 generation and NADPH oxidation in vitro and significantly enhanced formation in vivo, in both liver and plasma. Some of the other treatments changed in vitro parameters but none did in vivo. The PB-mediated increases in liver and plasma F2-isoprostanes could be ablated by 1-aminobenztriazole, implicating the PB-induced P450(s) in the F2-isoprostane elevation. The markers of in vivo oxidative stress were influenced mainly by PB and Aroclor 1254, indicative of an oxidative damage response only to barbiturate-type induction and probably related to 2B subfamily enzymes. These studies define the contribution of P450s to oxidative stress in vivo, in that the phenomenon is relatively restricted and most P450s do not contribute substantially.

  8. Efficacy of Low Dose Barbiturate Coma Therapy for the Patients with Intractable Intracranial Hypertension Using the Bispectral™ Index Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    An, Hung-Shik; Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Moon-Kyu; Oh, Sae-Moon; Park, Se-Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    Objective Barbiturate coma therapy (BCT) is a useful method to control increased intracranial pressure (IICP) patients. However, the complications such as hypotension and hypokalemia have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. The complications of low dose BCT with Bispectral™ index (BIS) monitoring and those of high dose BCT without BIS monitoring have been compared to evaluate the efficacy of low dose BCT with BIS monitoring. Methods We analyzed 39 patients with high dose BCT group (21 patients) and low dose BCT group (18 patients). Because BIS value of 40-60 is general anesthesia score, we have adjusted the target dose of thiopental to maintain the BIS score of 40-60. Therefore, dose of thiopental was kept 1.3 to 2.6 mg/kg/hour during low dose BCT. However, high dose BCT consisted of 5 mg/kg/hour without BIS monitoing. Results The protocol of BCT was successful in 72.2% and 38.1% of low dose and high dose BCT groups, respectively. The complications such as QT prolongation, hypotension and cardiac arrest have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. Hypokalemia showed the highest incidence rate in complications of both BCT. The descent in potassium level were 0.63 ± 0.26 in low dose group, and 1.31 ± 0.48 in high dose group. The treatment durations were 4.89 ± 1.68 days and 3.38 ± 1.24 days in low dose BCT and high dose BCT, respectively. Conclusion It was proved that low dose BCT showed less severe complications than high dose BCT. Low dose BCT with BIS monitoring provided enough duration of BCT possible to control ICP. PMID:20461164

  9. Class identity assignment for amphetamines using neural networks and GC-FTIR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, S.; Praisler, M.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; De Leenheer, A. P.; Massart, D. L.

    2006-08-01

    An exploratory analysis was performed in order to evaluate the feasibility of building of neural network (NN) systems automating the identification of amphetamines necessary in the investigation of drugs of abuse for epidemiological, clinical and forensic purposes. A first neural network system was built to distinguish between amphetamines and nonamphetamines. A second, more refined system, aimed to the recognition of amphetamines according to their toxicological activity (stimulant amphetamines, hallucinogenic amphetamines, nonamphetamines). Both systems proved that discrimination between amphetamines and nonamphetamines, as well as between stimulants, hallucinogens and nonamphetamines is possible (83.44% and 85.71% correct classification rate, respectively). The spectroscopic interpretation of the 40 most important input variables (GC-FTIR absorption intensities) shows that the modeling power of an input variable seems to be correlated with the stability and not with the intensity of the spectral interaction. Thus, discarding variables only because they correspond to spectral windows with weak absorptions does not seem be not advisable.

  10. Class identity assignment for amphetamines using neural networks and GC-FTIR data.

    PubMed

    Gosav, S; Praisler, M; Van Bocxlaer, J; De Leenheer, A P; Massart, D L

    2006-08-01

    An exploratory analysis was performed in order to evaluate the feasibility of building of neural network (NN) systems automating the identification of amphetamines necessary in the investigation of drugs of abuse for epidemiological, clinical and forensic purposes. A first neural network system was built to distinguish between amphetamines and nonamphetamines. A second, more refined system, aimed to the recognition of amphetamines according to their toxicological activity (stimulant amphetamines, hallucinogenic amphetamines, nonamphetamines). Both systems proved that discrimination between amphetamines and nonamphetamines, as well as between stimulants, hallucinogens and nonamphetamines is possible (83.44% and 85.71% correct classification rate, respectively). The spectroscopic interpretation of the 40 most important input variables (GC-FTIR absorption intensities) shows that the modeling power of an input variable seems to be correlated with the stability and not with the intensity of the spectral interaction. Thus, discarding variables only because they correspond to spectral windows with weak absorptions does not seem be not advisable.

  11. Dexamethasone mimicks the antimotion sickness effects of amphetamine and scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    1986-01-01

    Based on preliminary suggestions that individual differences in susceptibility to stressful motion might be related to physiological differences in responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the efficacy of dexamethasone and metyrapone is tested in subjects exposed to cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation on a rotating chair. Subjects given 0.5 mg of dexamethasone every 6 h for 48 h could endure 80 percent more stressful motion (P = 0.03) in a within-subjects design study, whereas, no improvement followed treatment with 750 mg of metryapone every 4 h for 24 h. The efficacy of dexamethasone might be explained in terms of its neurochemical actions on several neurotransmitter systems which are also modulated by such classical antimotion sickness drugs as amphetamine and scopolamine. Because dexamethasone induces adaptive changes within the central nervous system it may prove superior to scopolamine and amphetamine which possess significant side effects, are short acting, and rapidly tolerated.

  12. Amphetamines induce ubiquitin-positive inclusions within striatal cells.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Lazzeri, G; Lenzi, P; Gesi, M; Ferrucci, M; Soldani, P; Pellegrini, A; Capobianco, L; De Blasi, A; Ruggieri, S; Paparelli, A

    2003-10-01

    The present study explores whether effects induced by amphetamine derivatives on striatal GABA cells might be connected with effects on dopamine (DA) metabolism. Methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") were administered to C57Black mice following a dosage regimen in which various doses of both drugs were injected i.p. at 2-h intervals. Neuronal inclusions produced under these experimental conditions were examined under electron microscopy. Drugs reducing DA availability prevented inclusion formation; conversely we observed that increasing DA synthesis or impairing physiological DA degradation enhanced the number of inclusions. The present study indicates that the presence of extracellular striatal DA is essential for the production of subcellular alterations induced by amphetamine derivatives. This is in line with a recent hypothesis connecting striatal DA release with degeneration of striatal GABA neurons.

  13. Dexamethasone mimicks the antimotion sickness effects of amphetamine and scopolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    Based on preliminary suggestions that individual differences in susceptibility to stressful motion might be related to physiological differences in responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we tested the efficacy of dexamethasone and metyrapone in subjects exposed to cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation on a rotating chair. Subjects given 0.5 mg of dexamethasone every 6 h for 48 h could endure 80% more stressful motion ( P = 0.03) in a within-subjects design study, whereas, no improvement followed treatment with 750 mg of metryapone every 4 h for 24 h. The efficacy of dexamethasone might be explained in terms of its neurochemical actions on several neurotransmitter systems which are also modulated by such classical antimotion sickness drugs as amphetamine and scopolamine. Because dexamethasone induces adaptive changes within the central nervous system it may prove superior to scopolamine and amphetamine which possess significant side effects, are short acting, and rapidly tolerated.

  14. Emotional traits predict individual differences in amphetamine-induced positive mood in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Goldenson, Nicholas I.; Kapadia, Nahel; Kahler, Christopher W.; de Wit, Harriet; Swift, Robert M.; McGeary, John E.; Sussman, Steve; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research on emotional correlates of individual differences in subjective responses to d-amphetamine has focused on relatively broad personality traits. Yet, emotional functioning is best characterized by several narrow subcomponents, each of which may contribute uniquely to amphetamine response. Here, we examine several specific subdomains of emotional functioning in relation to acute amphetamine response. METHOD At a baseline session, healthy stimulant-naïve volunteers (N=97) completed measures of several subdomains of baseline trait emotional functioning, and then completed two counterbalanced experimental sessions during which they received a single dose of 20-mg oral d-amphetamine or placebo. Acute subjective drug response measures were completed at repeated intervals before and after drug administration. Data from subjective measures that were significantly modulated by amphetamine were reduced using principal components analysis (amphetamine – placebo) into three higher-order factors of “Positive Mood,” “Arousal,” and “Drug High.” Amphetamine did not significantly alter any “negative” subjective states. Separate multiple regression analyses were conducted regressing these three drug factors on baseline trait emotional functioning scales. RESULTS The combined set of trait emotional functioning indicators accounted for approximately 22% of the variance in acute amphetamine-induced positive mood changes. Greater anticipatory pleasure and greater anxious distress each uniquely predicted greater amphetamine-induced Positive Mood. Trait emotional functioning did not significantly predict amphetamine-induced changes in Arousal or Drug High. DISCUSSION Emotional traits appear to moderate drug-induced positive mood but not other dimensions of amphetamine effects. Different facets of emotional functioning may differentially modulate amphetamine's subjective effect profile. PMID:26429791

  15. Attenuation of reinforcing and psychomotor stimulant effects of amphetamine by aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Bäckström, Pia; Etelälahti, Tiina J; Hyytiä, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Partial dopamine agonists are potential medications for the treatment of amphetamine addiction. They have been hypothesized to stabilize the dopamine system by acting as antagonists during high dopaminergic tone resulting from amphetamine use and as agonists during withdrawal. Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic that acts as a partial D2 dopamine and a serotonin 5-HT₁(A) agonist and a serotonin 5-HT₂(A) antagonist. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of aripiprazole on behaviors induced and maintained by d-amphetamine. To this end, intravenous d-amphetamine self-administration [fixed ratio 3 (FR3) schedule, 0.02 mg/infusion] and d-amphetamine-induced (0, 1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) locomotor activity, as well as spontaneous locomotor activity and sucrose pellet selfadministration (FR3 schedule) were studied in male Wistar rats after aripiprazole (0, 0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg i.p.) administration. Aripiprazole pre-treatment resulted in bidirectional effects on amphetamine self-administration. The 1 mg/kg dose increased, and the highest dose decreased the number of amphetamine infusions. In the locomotor activity experiments, aripiprazole attenuated amphetamine-induced activity dose-dependently and tended to suppress spontaneous activity. The highest aripiprazole doses decreased also sucrose pellet self-administration. The increase in amphetamine self-administration with the intermediate aripiprazole dose, as well as the decrease in amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, suggests that aripiprazole acted as a dopamine antagonist. Suppression of amphetamine and sucrose self-administration by the highest aripiprazole dose was probably caused by non-specific effects. Together, these results indicate that under conditions of dopaminergic stimulation, aripiprazole attenuates the reinforcing and psychomotor stimulant effects of d-amphetamine, but the dose range for this effect is rather limited.

  16. Detection of amphetamine and methamphetamine-type materials in pharmaceutical and biological fluids by fluorometric labeling.

    PubMed

    Hopen, T J; Briner, R C; Sadler, H G; Smith, R L

    1976-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for detecting amphetamine and methamphetamine in drug preparations and biological fluids has been developed. Amphetamine and methamphetamine in pharmaceutical and clandestine drug preparations can be easily screened from other contaminating drugs and readily identified by their fluorescence, with subsequent separation accomplished by TLC. The same general procedure can also be used to detect amphetamine and methamphetamine in human urine at concentrations of 0.1 mug/ml.

  17. Enhanced appetitive conditioning following repeated pretreatment with d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harmer, C J; Phillips, G D

    1998-07-01

    The behavioural response to psychomotor stimulants is augmented with repeated exposure to these drugs. Enhanced stimulated dopamine overflow within the nucleus accumbens and amygdala has been found to accompany this behavioural sensitization. In the present experiment, rats received 2 mg/kg d-amphetamine or 1 ml/kg physiological saline once per day for 5 days. Five days later, a behavioural assay confirmed that prior repeated d-amphetamine treatment markedly enhanced the locomotor activating effects of a d-amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) challenge. Training on a Pavlovian conditioning task began six days subsequently. In Stage 1, a stimulus (light or tone, S-) was presented negatively correlated with a sucrose reward. In Stage 2, presentation of the alternative counterbalanced stimulus (light or tone, S+) was paired with the availability of a 10% sucrose solution. There were no differences between the two groups in their response to the the S- stimulus. However, sensitized animals showed a selective enhancement in the acquisition of conditioned responding to S+, relative to vehicle-injected controls. No differences in behaviour were recorded during the prestimulus periods, nor during presentations of sucrose. Levels of activity within the operant chamber extraneous to alcove approach were also similar in both groups of animals. The conditioned instrumental efficacy of S+, relative to S- was assessed in Stage 3, in which stimulus availability was made contingent on a novel lever-pressing response. Both groups showed a similar preference for the S+ over the S- stimulus. Hence, rats sensitized by prior repeated d-amphetamine showed enhanced appetitive Pavlovian conditioning, without subsequent effect on conditioned reward efficacy. These data are discussed in light of possible changes in mesoamygdaloid dopamine functioning.

  18. GABAergic drugs inhibit amphetamine-induced distractibility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A; Medrano, A; Garrido, N; Alonso, P

    1997-09-01

    Drugs facilitating GABAergic neurotransmission have been reported to block some behavioral actions of dopaminergic stimulation but not others. The present experiments were performed with the purpose to extend the range of behaviors in which the interaction between GABA and dopamine have been studied. The ability of the GABAB agonist baclofen and the GABA transaminase inhibitor sodium valproate to block the enhanced distractibility produced by amphetamine was evaluated in a procedure especially designed for analyzing drugs' effects on distractibility. Briefly, rats were trained to traverse a straight runway with a sucrose solution as reinforcement. Once the response had been acquired, an additional runway ending in an empty box was connected. The time spent investigating this additional runway is the measure of distractibility. Male rats treated with amphetamine, 1 mg/kg, displayed an increase of the time spent in the additional runway. Baclofen, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, and sodium valproate, 100 and 200 mg/kg, had no effect on distraction behavior when administered alone. However, when these drugs were administered together with amphetamine, 1 mg/kg, they completely inhibited the effects of the stimulant on distractibility. These data show that distractibility is similar to discrimination learning with regard to the capacity of GABAergic drugs to block the effects of dopaminergic stimulation. It is different from locomotor activity, however, where GABAergic drugs are ineffective in this respect.

  19. Epigenetic landscape of amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Godino, Arthur; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction is described by specific behavioral alterations, suggesting long-lasting changes in gene and protein expression within specific brain subregions involved in the reward circuitry. Given the persistence of the addiction phenotype at both behavioral and transcriptional levels, several studies have been conducted to elucidate the epigenetic landscape associated with persistent effects of drug use on the mammalian brain. This review discusses recent advances in our comprehension of epigenetic mechanisms underlying amphetamine- or methamphetamine-induced behavioral, transcriptional, and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence demonstrated that drug exposure induces major epigenetic modifications—histone acetylation and methylation, DNA methylation—in a very complex manner. In rare instances, however, the regulation of a specific target gene can be correlated to both epigenetic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Work is now needed to clarify and validate an epigenetic model of addiction to amphetamines. Investigations that include genome-wide approaches will accelerate the speed of discovery in the field of addiction. PMID:26023847

  20. Intermediates of Krebs cycle correct the depression of the whole body oxygen consumption and lethal cooling in barbiturate poisoning in rat.

    PubMed

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju; Schäfer, Timur V; Malakhovsky, Vladimir N; Rejniuk, Vladimir L

    2004-10-01

    Rats poisoned with one LD50 of thiopental or amytal are shown to increase oxygen consumption when intraperitoneally given sucinate, malate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, dimethylsuccinate or glutamate (the Krebs cycle intermediates or their precursors) but not when given glucose, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate or nicotinate (energy substrates of other metabolic stages etc). Survival was increased with succinate or malate from control groups, which ranged from 30-83% to 87-100%. These effects were unrelated to respiratory depression or hypoxia as judged by little or no effect of succinate on ventilation indices and by the lack of effect of oxygen administration. Body cooling of comatose rats at ambient temperature approximately 19 degrees C became slower with succinate, the rate of cooling correlated well with oxygen consumption decrease. Succinate had no potency to modify oxygen consumption and body temperature in intact rats. A condition for antidote effect of the Krebs intermediate was sufficiently high dosage (5 mmol/kg), further dose increase made no odds. Repeated dosing of succinate had more marked protective effect, than a single one, to oxygen consumption and tended to promote the attenuation of lethal effect of barbiturates. These data suggest that suppression of whole body oxygen consumption with barbiturate overdose could be an important contributor to both body cooling and mortality. Intermediates of Krebs cycle, not only succinate, may have a pronounced therapeutic effect under the proper treatment regimen. Availability of Krebs cycle intermediates may be a limiting factor for the whole body oxygen consumption in barbiturate coma, its role in brain needs further elucidation.

  1. Amphetamine-induced psychosis - a separate diagnostic entity or primary psychosis triggered in the vulnerable?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Use of amphetamine and methamphetamine is widespread in the general population and common among patients with psychiatric disorders. Amphetamines may induce symptoms of psychosis very similar to those of acute schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. This has been an argument for using amphetamine-induced psychosis as a model for primary psychotic disorders. To distinguish the two types of psychosis on the basis of acute symptoms is difficult. However, acute psychosis induced by amphetamines seems to have a faster recovery and appears to resolve more completely compared to schizophrenic psychosis. The increased vulnerability for acute amphetamine induced psychosis seen among those with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality and, to a certain degree other psychiatric disorders, is also shared by non-psychiatric individuals who previously have experienced amphetamine-induced psychosis. Schizophrenia spectrum disorder and amphetamine-induced psychosis are further linked together by the finding of several susceptibility genes common to both conditions. These genes probably lower the threshold for becoming psychotic and increase the risk for a poorer clinical course of the disease. The complex relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis has received much attention but is still not adequately explored. Our paper reviews the literature in this field and proposes a stress-vulnerability model for understanding the relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis. PMID:23216941

  2. D-AMPHETAMINE MORTALITY AND RELATED LEVELS IN TISSUE OF RATS EXPOSED TO ALTITUDE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMPHETAMINES, MORTALITY RATES ), (*HIGH ALTITUDE, PHARMACOLOGY), TISSUES(BIOLOGY), DISTRIBUTION, DOSAGE, EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY), TOXIC TOLERANCES, SPACE FLIGHT, BIOCHEMISTRY, LABELED SUBSTANCES, RATS, TOXICITY

  3. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  4. Interactions between alcohol and other drugs on open-field and temperature measurements in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Järbe, T U; Ohlin, G C

    1977-05-01

    Open-field activity and rectal temperature were measured in mongolian gerbils treated with alcholol (1 and 2 g/kg) only and when alcohol was combined with bemegride (20 and 40 mg/kg), DH-524 (20 mg/kg), or d-amphetamine (8 mg/kg). None of the purported antagonists normalized the alcholol-produced changes in the open-field test, nor did they reverse the alcohol-induced hypothermia. However, alcohol offered protection against bemegride-induced convulsion and death. When compared with pervious data (1) it is suggested that alcohol is differentiated from pentobarbital and diazepam on the basis of their interactional effects with bemegride.

  5. Interactions between radiation and amphetamine in taste aversion learning and the role of the area postrema in amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1987-08-01

    Three experiments were run to assess the role of the area postrema in taste aversion learning resulting from combined treatment with subthreshold unconditioned stimuli and in the acquisition of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion. In the first experiment, it was shown that combined treatment with subthreshold radiation (15 rad) and subthreshold amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg, IP) resulted in the acquisition of a taste aversion. The second experiment showed that lesions of the area postrema blocked taste aversion learning produced by two subthreshold doses of amphetamine. In the third experiment, which looked at the dose-response curve for amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning in intact rats and rats with area postrema lesions, it was shown that both groups of rats acquired taste aversions following injection of amphetamine, although the rats with lesions showed a less severe aversion than the intact rats. The results are interpreted as indicating that amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning may involve area postrema-mediated mechanisms, particularly at the lower doses, but that an intact area postrema is not a necessary condition for the acquisition of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion.

  6. Interactions between radiation and amphetamine in taste-aversion learning and the role of the area postrema in amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1987-01-01

    Three experiments were run to assess the role of the area postrema in taste-aversion learning resulting from combined treatment with subthreshold unconditioned stimuli and in the acquisition of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion. In the first experiment, it was shown that combined treatment with subthreshold radiation (15 rad) and subthreshold amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg, IP) resulted in the acquisition of a taste aversion. The second experiment showed that lesions of the area postrema blocked taste aversion learning produced by two subthreshold doses of amphetamine. In the third experiment, which looked at the dose-response curve for amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning to intact rats and rats with area postrema lesions, it was shown that both groups of rats acquired taste aversions following injection of amphetamine, although the rats with lesions showed a less-severe aversion than the intact rats. The results are interpreted as indicating that amphetamine-induced taste-aversion learning may involve area post-remamediated mechanisms, particularly at the lower doses, but an intact area postrema is not a necessary condition of the acquisition of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion.

  7. Molecular structure and spectroscopic investigations combined with hypoglycemic/anticancer and docking studies of a new barbituric acid derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Assem; Soliman, Saied M.; Elshaier, Yaseen A. M. M.; Ali, M.; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Ghabbour, Hazem A.

    2017-04-01

    The one-pot synthesis reaction of barbituric acid derivative, 1,3-cyclohexandione, and 4-fluorobenzaldehyde in water mediated by NHEt2 as base afforded 4 with excellent yield. The synthesized compound was characterized by spectrophotometric tools as well as X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. The stability of the nine possible isomers of the synthesized compound was studied using the B3LYP method and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The electronic and spectroscopic properties of the most stable isomer were predicted. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum displayed two bands at 203 and 257 nm in the solvent chloroform. The latter was calculated at 235.6 nm (f = 0.1995) in the gas phase due to H-2→L (42%) and H-1→L+2 (14%) excitations. In solution, using chloroform as a solvent, a slight bathochromic shift to 237.6 nm with an increase in the absorption intensity (f = 0.2898) was predicted. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of this transition band was characterized mainly by π-π* transitions. The 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts correlated well with the experimental data. The correlations had higher correlation coefficients (R2) when solvent effects were considered. The atomic charges were calculated using natural population analysis and the charged regions were presented using a molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map. The synthesized compound was examined as a hypoglycemic agent via inhibition of α-glucosidase and β-glucuronidase enzymes. Its inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase was 10 times greater than the inhibitory activity of the standard drug acarbose (IC50 77.9 ± 0.3 μM and 840 ± 1.73 μM, respectively). Moreover, the target compound was evaluated for anticancer activity against MCF-7, H460, 3T3, and Hela cell lines. It demonstrated inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 and H460 cell lines with IC50 5.80 ± 0.12 and 19.6 ± 0.5 μM, respectively, in comparison to doxorubicin. The docking study was performed using the OpenEye program.

  8. Potential adverse effects of amphetamine treatment on brain and behavior: a review.

    PubMed

    Berman, S M; Kuczenski, R; McCracken, J T; London, E D

    2009-02-01

    Amphetamine stimulants have been used medically since early in the twentieth century, but they have a high abuse potential and can be neurotoxic. Although they have long been used effectively to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, amphetamines are now being prescribed increasingly as maintenance therapy for ADHD and narcolepsy in adults, considerably extending the period of potential exposure. Effects of prolonged stimulant treatment have not been fully explored, and understanding such effects is a research priority. Because the pharmacokinetics of amphetamines differ between children and adults, reevaluation of the potential for adverse effects of chronic treatment of adults is essential. Despite information on the effects of stimulants in laboratory animals, profound species differences in susceptibility to stimulant-induced neurotoxicity underscore the need for systematic studies of prolonged human exposure. Early amphetamine treatment has been linked to slowing in height and weight growth in some children. Because the number of prescriptions for amphetamines has increased several fold over the past decade, an amphetamine-containing formulation is the most commonly prescribed stimulant in North America, and it is noteworthy that amphetamines are also the most abused prescription medications. Although early treatment does not increase risk for substance abuse, few studies have tracked the compliance and usage profiles of individuals who began amphetamine treatment as adults. Overall, there is concern about risk for slowed growth in young patients who are dosed continuously, and for substance abuse in patients first medicated in late adolescence or adulthood. Although most adult patients also use amphetamines effectively and safely, occasional case reports indicate that prescription use can produce marked psychological adverse events, including stimulant-induced psychosis. Assessments of central toxicity and adverse

  9. Centrally administered vasopressin cross-sensitizes rats to amphetamine and drinking hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed

    McBride, Shawna M; Flynn, Francis W

    2007-09-01

    Prior sodium restriction cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor effects of amphetamines and vice versa. Repeated central injections of vasopressin (VP) induce a psychomotor sensitization similar to amphetamine sensitization and repeated sodium deficiency. Thus brain VP signaling may be a common mechanism involved in mediating these two motivational systems. In experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that rats previously sensitized to central VP would show enhanced psychomotor responses to amphetamine. Rats were administered saline, VP (50 ng), or amphetamine (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg) on days 1 and 2, and given saline or amphetamine on day 3. Amphetamine produced psychomotor arousal in all groups. However, amphetamine on day 3 elicited a significantly greater psychomotor response in rats that had prior injections of amphetamine or VP than in rats previously treated with saline. In experiment 2, the hypothesis that prior experience with central VP would cross-sensitize rats to drinking hypertonic sodium (NaCl) solutions was tested. Rats were administered VP (50 ng) or saline for 3 days. On the fourth day, nondeprived rats were given access to 0.3 M NaCl and water for 1 h. Control and saline-treated rats only drank 1 ml of 0.3 M NaCl, but rats previously exposed to central VP drank significantly more hypertonic saline (4 ml). These results show that prior experience with central VP cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor stimulant effects of amphetamine and the ingestion of concentrated NaCl solutions. This pattern of cross-sensitization links central VP signaling, amphetamine, and sodium deficiency, and therefore it may play a role in the cross-sensitization between sodium appetite and amphetamines.

  10. Maintenance of amphetamine-induced place preference does not correlate with astrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Yasmina B; Gramage, Esther; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2013-01-15

    Astrocytosis, a process in which astrocytes undergo proliferation and enhancement of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, has been suggested to play important roles in the maintenance of dependence to amphetamine and its derivatives. It was previously shown that mice with genetic deletion of pleiotrophin (PTN), a neurotrophic factor upregulated in different brain areas after administration of amphetamine, show a longer lasting amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) when compared to wild type mice. In this work, we aimed to pursue the possibility of a different astrocytic response induced by amphetamine in PTN-/- and PTN+/+ mice, which could underlie the higher vulnerability of PTN-/- mice to maintain amphetamine CPP. In confirmation of previous studies, we found that PTN-/- mice significantly maintained amphetamine (3mg/kg)-induced CPP 5 days after the last drug administration compared to PTN+/+ mice. Interestingly, the number of astrocytes in nucleus accumbens (NAcc), cingulate cortex (CG) and caudate putamen (CPu) did not differ between mice that maintained and did not maintain amphetamine-induced CPP independently of the genotype considered. However, we found that PTN-/- mice showed significantly decreased numbers of astrocytes in CG and CPu compared to PTN+/+ mice independently of whether they maintained amphetamine-induced CPP 5 days after the last drug administration or not. The data demonstrate that maintenance of amphetamine-induced CPP depends on the endogenous expression of PTN. The data tend to discard a correlation between activated astrocytes and maintenance of amphetamine conditioning effects and suggest PTN as a potential modulator of activation of astrocytes after amphetamine treatment.

  11. Daily Isoflurane Exposure Increases Barbiturate Insensitivity in Medullary Respiratory and Cortical Neurons via Expression of ε-Subunit Containing GABA ARs

    PubMed Central

    Hengen, Keith B.; Nelson, Nathan R.; Stang, Kyle M.; Johnson, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephanie M.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Behan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:25748028

  12. 3D-QSAR Studies on Barbituric Acid Derivatives as Urease Inhibitors and the Effect of Charges on the Quality of a Model.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Ashraf, Sajda; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Barakat, Assem

    2016-04-30

    Urease enzyme (EC 3.5.1.5) has been determined as a virulence factor in pathogenic microorganisms that are accountable for the development of different diseases in humans and animals. In continuance of our earlier study on the helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by barbituric acid derivatives, 3D-QSAR (three dimensional quantitative structural activity relationship) advance studies were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Different partial charges were calculated to examine their consequences on the predictive ability of the developed models. The finest developed model for CoMFA and CoMSIA were achieved by using MMFF94 charges. The developed CoMFA model gives significant results with cross-validation (q²) value of 0.597 and correlation coefficients (r²) of 0.897. Moreover, five different fields i.e., steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic, H-bond acceptor and H-bond donors were used to produce a CoMSIA model, with q² and r² of 0.602 and 0.98, respectively. The generated models were further validated by using an external test set. Both models display good predictive power with r²pred ≥ 0.8. The analysis of obtained CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided detailed insight for the promising modification of the barbituric acid derivatives with an enhanced biological activity.

  13. 3D-QSAR Studies on Barbituric Acid Derivatives as Urease Inhibitors and the Effect of Charges on the Quality of a Model

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Ashraf, Sajda; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Barakat, Assem

    2016-01-01

    Urease enzyme (EC 3.5.1.5) has been determined as a virulence factor in pathogenic microorganisms that are accountable for the development of different diseases in humans and animals. In continuance of our earlier study on the helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by barbituric acid derivatives, 3D-QSAR (three dimensional quantitative structural activity relationship) advance studies were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Different partial charges were calculated to examine their consequences on the predictive ability of the developed models. The finest developed model for CoMFA and CoMSIA were achieved by using MMFF94 charges. The developed CoMFA model gives significant results with cross-validation (q2) value of 0.597 and correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.897. Moreover, five different fields i.e., steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic, H-bond acceptor and H-bond donors were used to produce a CoMSIA model, with q2 and r2 of 0.602 and 0.98, respectively. The generated models were further validated by using an external test set. Both models display good predictive power with r2pred ≥ 0.8. The analysis of obtained CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided detailed insight for the promising modification of the barbituric acid derivatives with an enhanced biological activity. PMID:27144563

  14. HIV Risk Behavior among Amphetamine Injectors at U.S. Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braine, Naomi; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Goldblatt, Cullen; Zadoretzky, Cathy; Turner, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare HIV risk behaviors of amphetamine and non-amphetamine injectors at syringe exchange programs (SEP) in the United States and to identify factors associated with injection risk. This analysis is based on data from a random cross-section of participants at 13 SEPs in different parts of the country. All interviews…

  15. Treatment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with Amphetamine: Short-Term Effects on Family Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafsson, Peik; Hansson, Kjell; Eidevall, Lena; Thernlund, Gunilla; Svedin, Carl Goran

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This research seeks to study the impact on family function after 3 months of treatment with amphetamine. Method: A total of 43 children, 6 to 11 years of age, with ADHD were treated with amphetamine for 3 months. Family function was studied before and after treatment by parent self-rating and independent observer ratings of videotaped…

  16. Functional neuroimaging of amphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Gramage, Esther; Desco, Manuel; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-03-30

    Amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects have traditionally been studied using immunohistochemistry and other post-mortem techniques, which have proven invaluable for the definition of amphetamine-induced dopaminergic damage in the nigrostriatal pathway. However, these approaches are limited in that they require large numbers of animals and do not provide the temporal data that can be collected in longitudinal studies using functional neuroimaging techniques. Unfortunately, functional imaging studies in rodent models of drug-induced neurotoxicity are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the changes in brain glucose metabolism caused by amphetamine in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse (PTN-/-), a genetic model with increased vulnerability to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. We showed that administration of amphetamine causes a significantly greater loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase content in PTN-/- mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, [(18)F]-FDG-PET shows that amphetamine produces a significant decrease in glucose metabolism in the striatum and prefrontal cortex in the PTN-/- mice, compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that [(18)F]-FDG uptake measured by PET is useful for detecting amphetamine-induced changes in glucose metabolism in vivo in specific brain areas, including the striatum, a key feature of amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Actions of amphetamine and antagonists on pupil diameter in the chronic sympathectomized dog.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, L G; Pickworth, W B; Martin, W R

    1977-07-18

    The left superior cervical ganglia were removed from 5 dogs. Beginning 30 days postoperatively, epinephrine (10 microgram/kg/min), norepinephrine (10 microgram/kg/min), and d-amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) were infused i.v. for 10 min following either vehicle, phenoxybenzamine, pimozide, or haloperidol. Epinephrine and norepinephrine dilated the pupil and retracted the nictitating membrane of the denervated side, whereas amphetamine dilated both pupils and retracted both nictitating membranes. Phenoxybenzamine (4 mg/kg) constricted primarily the pupil of the innervated iris and completely antagonized the effects of the catecholamines on the irides and amphetamine on the nictitating membranes, but only partially antagonized amphetamine-induced mydriasis. Haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg) constricted both pupils, possessed only modest alpha-adrenergic blocking activity, and was as effective as phenoxybenzamine in antagonizing amphetamine-induced mydriasis. Pimozide (0.1 mg/kg) constricted both pupils, had no significant alpha-adrenergic blocking activity, and did not antagonize amphetamine-induced mydriasis. Pimozide and haloperidol, but not phenoxybenzamine, blocked amphetamine-induced stereotyped head bobbing. These results suggest that amphetamine produces mydriasis in the dog through a peripheral sympathetic action and also through a central mechanism involving inhibition of the oculomotor nucleus. However, the role of dopamine is not clear.

  18. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  19. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  20. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  1. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  2. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  3. Literature Review: Update on Amphetamine Neurotoxicity and Its Relevance to the Treatment of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advokat, Claire

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A review of amphetamine treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was conducted, to obtain information on the long-term neurological consequences of this therapy. Method: Several databases were accessed for research articles on the effects of amphetamine in the brain of laboratory animals and ADHD diagnosed…

  4. GABAB receptor stimulation decreases amphetamine-induced behavior and neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenxia; Mailloux, Adam W; Jung, Bruce J; Edmunds, Hayward S; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2004-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether GABA(B) receptor activation blocks acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity, dopamine release, and neuropeptide mRNA expression in the striatum. Systemic administration of R-(+)-baclofen (1.25 mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter total distance traveled or vertical rearing induced by amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). At 2.5 mg/kg, baclofen did not alter spontaneous motor activity or total distance traveled, but completely blocked vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. At 5.0 mg/kg, baclofen completely blocked both total distance traveled and vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. Quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the ability of amphetamine to increase preprodynorphin (PPD), preprotachykinin (PPT), preproenkephalin (PPE), and secretogranin II (SGII) mRNA levels in the striatum without altering the basal levels of these signals. Baclofen also blocked the amphetamine-induced rise in SGII mRNA in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens and cingulate cortex. In a separate experiment, systemic baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) decreased the amphetamine-induced increase in dialysate dopamine levels in the striatum. These results suggest that reduced striatal dopamine release contributes to the ability of GABA(B) receptor activation to decrease acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity and striatal neuropeptide gene expression.

  5. Amphetamine stereotypy: the influence of environmental factors and prepotent behavioral patterns on its topography and development.

    PubMed

    Ellinwood, E H; kilbey, M M

    1975-02-01

    This report describes a series of experiments, all of which demonstrate a strong contribution of the behavioral pattern manifested at the time of initial amphetamine injection to the topography and development of the stereotypy that develops with chronic amphetamine intoxication. These initial behavioral patterns reflect (i) learned behaviors, (ii) species-specific behaviors, (iii) behaviors associated with amphetamine arousal, and (iv) novel behaviors reflecting unique environmental circumstances prevailing at the time of administration. In an experiment using eight dogs administered amphetamine in a situation which allowed interaction between the animals, the behavioral stereotypies that developed were comprised of the social interaction patterns ongoing at the time of initial drug effects. Experiments with rats have demonstrated that the configuration of the enclosure in which they are injected influences the initial behavioral reactions to amphetamine and thus modifies the stereotypy. In experiments with cats pressing a lever to self-administer amphetamine, investigatory behavior at the lever-press operandi becomes incorporated as does the learned behavior response into the stereotypy. The behavioral patterns originally associated with amphetamine arousal eventually supersede the learned response component of the stereotypy. Finally, monkeys incorporate components of the initial behaviors associated with amphetamine administration into a wider range of stereotype patterns over months of chronic intoxication, and eventually the stereotypy may evolve into a specific dyskinesia involving movements of the original behavioral component.

  6. Mechanisms of amphetamine action illuminated through optical monitoring of dopamine synaptic vesicles in Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Freyberg, Zachary; Sonders, Mark S.; Aguilar, Jenny I.; Hiranita, Takato; Karam, Caline S.; Flores, Jorge; Pizzo, Andrea B.; Zhang, Yuchao; Farino, Zachary J.; Chen, Audrey; Martin, Ciara A.; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Fei, Hao; Hu, Gang; Lin, Yi-Ying; Mosharov, Eugene V.; McCabe, Brian D.; Freyberg, Robin; Wimalasena, Kandatege; Hsin, Ling-Wei; Sames, Dalibor; Krantz, David E.; Katz, Jonathan L.; Sulzer, David; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamines elevate extracellular dopamine, but the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Here we show in rodents that acute pharmacological inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) blocks amphetamine-induced locomotion and self-administration without impacting cocaine-induced behaviours. To study VMAT's role in mediating amphetamine action in dopamine neurons, we have used novel genetic, pharmacological and optical approaches in Drosophila melanogaster. In an ex vivo whole-brain preparation, fluorescent reporters of vesicular cargo and of vesicular pH reveal that amphetamine redistributes vesicle contents and diminishes the vesicle pH-gradient responsible for dopamine uptake and retention. This amphetamine-induced deacidification requires VMAT function and results from net H+ antiport by VMAT out of the vesicle lumen coupled to inward amphetamine transport. Amphetamine-induced vesicle deacidification also requires functional dopamine transporter (DAT) at the plasma membrane. Thus, we find that at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, amphetamines must be actively transported by DAT and VMAT in tandem to produce psychostimulant effects. PMID:26879809

  7. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  8. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  9. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  10. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  11. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  12. The pharmacology and clinical outcomes of amphetamines to treat ADHD: does composition matter?

    PubMed

    Hodgkins, Paul; Shaw, Monica; McCarthy, Suzanne; Sallee, Floyd R

    2012-03-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment options include pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches. In North America, psychostimulants (amphetamine and methylphenidate) are considered first-line pharmacological treatments for patients (children, adolescents and adults) with ADHD. However, in the UK, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines have placed short-acting d-amphetamine as a third-line treatment option due to a lack of contemporary, published clinical trials on its efficacy and the concerns from clinical and patient experts regarding the potential for increased abuse and/or misuse compared with methylphenidate. These guidelines do not account for some of the more recent amphetamine products that have been developed to alleviate some of these concerns, but that are not currently approved in the UK or other European countries. The purpose of this review is to describe the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of various amphetamine compositions, as well as to explore the apparent differences in these compositions and their associated risks and benefits. A PubMed literature search was conducted to investigate amphetamine pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety and ADHD outcomes in the published literature from 1980 through March 2011. Search terms included the keywords 'ADHD' or 'ADD' or 'hyperkinetic disorder' and any of the following keywords combined with 'or': 'amphetamine', 'dexamphetamine', 'mixed amphetamine salts', 'lisdexamfetamine' and 'methamphetamine'. The search included English-language primary research articles and review articles but excluded editorial articles and commentaries. The literature search resulted in 330 articles. Pertinent articles relating to amphetamine pharmacology, compositions, clinical efficacy and safety, effectiveness and tolerability, ADHD outcomes and abuse liability were included in this review. The different delivery profiles of amphetamine compositions result in

  13. Conditioned activity and the interaction of amphetamine experience with morphine's activity effects.

    PubMed

    Krank, M D; Bennett, D

    1987-11-01

    This experiment assessed the transfer effect of Pavlovian conditioning with d-amphetamine sulfate (1 mg/kg) on morphine's activity effects. Prior experience with amphetamine resulted in higher levels of activity when challenged with morphine (10 and 20 mg/kg). This interactive effect of amphetamine, however, was present only in those animals who had experienced amphetamine paired with the activity test situation. Animals who had received equivalent doses of amphetamine unpaired with the testing environment did not differ from drug-naive control animals. Analysis of predrug activity levels revealed a conditioned activity response in paired animals compared to the controls. These findings suggest that the response interaction between drug conditioned responses and drug unconditioned responses is an important determinant of cross-drug effects between drugs of different pharmacological classes.

  14. An unusual case of silent acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction following amphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Chia-Yu Chang, Julia; Peng, Chian-Ze; How, Chorng-Kuang; Huang, Mu-Shun

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of silent acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction associated with amphetamine use in a 62 years old diabetic man. The patient was devoid of chest pain and had a normal cardiac enzyme analysis at the initial presentation. A routine electrocardiogram demonstrated acute inferior wall ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography confirmed a total occlusion of the posterior lateral branch of right coronary artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with stent placement. Amphetamine abuse may play a role in acute myocardial infarction. Adverse cardiovascular manifestations of amphetamine can occur with sudden overt chest pain or present insidiously. In view of the potential association of amphetamine and myocardial infarction, physicians should not rely only upon clinical symptoms. This report highlights the diabetic patients with amphetamine abuse should undergo a routine electrocardiogram in such circumstances.

  15. Differential phosphoproteome of the striatum from pleiotrophin knockout and midkine knockout mice treated with amphetamine: correlations with amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gramage, Esther; Herradón, Gonzalo; Martín, Yasmina B; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Rojo, Loreto; Gnekow, Heike; Barbero, Aurora; Pérez-García, Carmen

    2013-04-05

    The neurotrophic factors pleiotrophin (PTN) and midkine (MK) have been shown to modulate amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Accordingly, PTN-/- and MK-/- mice show an increased vulnerability to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. In an effort to uncover new pharmacological targets to prevent amphetamine neurotoxic effects, we have now used a proteomic approach to study protein phosphorylation, in which we combined phosphoprotein enrichment, by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, in order to identify the phosphoproteins regulated in the striatum of PTN-/-, MK-/- and wild type (WT) mice treated with amphetamine. We identified 13 differentially expressed phosphoproteins that are judged to be relevant in the neuroprotective roles of PTN and MK against amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. It is very interesting to note that 4 of these phosphoproteins, annexin A7 (ANXA7), COP9 signalosome subunit 5 (COPS5), aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 (ALDH1A1) and creatine kinase U-type (CKMT1), are known to be involved in Parkinson's disease, a result of significant importance since PTN and MK have been also demonstrated to limit Parkinson's disease (PD) progress and have been suggested to be among the important genetic factors possibly preventing the development of PD in methamphetamine abusers. The data identify phosphoproteins differentially regulated by amphetamine treatment and/or the presence of endogenous PTN/MK which may be relevant mediators of PTN/MK neuroprotective effects against amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. The data support further studies to validate the phosphoproteins here identified as possible new pharmacological targets to prevent amphetamine neurotoxic effects.

  16. Amphetamine withdrawal differentially affects hippocampal and peripheral corticosterone levels in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Bray, Brenna; Scholl, Jamie L; Tu, Wenyu; Watt, Michael J; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-08-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal is associated with heightened anxiety-like behavior, which is directly driven by blunted stress-induced glucocorticoid receptor-dependent serotonin release in the ventral hippocampus. This suggests that glucocorticoid availability in the ventral hippocampus during stress may be reduced during amphetamine withdrawal. Therefore, we tested whether amphetamine withdrawal alters either peripheral or hippocampal corticosterone stress responses. Adult male rats received amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, ip) or saline for 14 days followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal. Contrary to our prediction, microdialysis samples from freely-moving rats revealed that restraint stress-induced corticosterone levels in the ventral hippocampus are enhanced by amphetamine withdrawal relative to controls. In separate groups of rats, plasma corticosterone levels increased immediately after 20min of restraint and decreased to below stress-naïve levels after 1h, indicating negative feedback regulation of corticosterone following stress. However, plasma corticosterone responses were similar in amphetamine-withdrawn and control rats. Neither amphetamine nor stress exposure significantly altered protein expression or enzyme activity of the steroidogenic enzymes 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) or hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) in the ventral hippocampus. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that amphetamine withdrawal potentiates stress-induced corticosterone in the ventral hippocampus, which may contribute to increased behavioral stress sensitivity previously observed during amphetamine withdrawal. However, this is not mediated by either changes in plasma corticosterone or hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Establishing enhanced ventral hippocampal corticosterone as a direct cause of greater stress sensitivity may identify the glucocorticoid system as a novel target for treating behavioral symptoms of amphetamine withdrawal.

  17. Nicotine Modifies Corticostriatal Plasticity and Amphetamine Rewarding Behaviors in Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Granville P.; Heimbigner, Lauren; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Bamford, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticostriatal signaling participates in sensitized responses to drugs of abuse, where short-term increases in dopamine availability provoke persistent, yet reversible, changes in glutamate release. Prior studies in mice show that amphetamine withdrawal promotes a chronic presynaptic depression in glutamate release, whereas an amphetamine challenge reverses this depression by potentiating corticostriatal activity in direct pathway medium spiny neurons. This synaptic plasticity promotes corticostriatal activity and locomotor sensitization through upstream changes in the activity of tonically active cholinergic interneurons (ChIs). We used a model of operant drug-taking behaviors, in which mice self-administered amphetamine through an in-dwelling catheter. Mice acquired amphetamine self-administration under fixed and increasing schedules of reinforcement. Following a period of abstinence, we determined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modified drug-seeking behavior and associated alterations in ChI firing and corticostriatal activity. Mice responding to conditioned reinforcement showed reduced ChI and corticostriatal activity ex vivo, which paradoxically increased following an amphetamine challenge. Nicotine, in a concentration that increases Ca2+ influx and desensitizes α4β2*-type nicotinic receptors, reduced amphetamine-seeking behaviors following abstinence and amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization. Nicotine blocked the depression of ChI firing and corticostriatal activity and the potentiating response to an amphetamine challenge. Together, these results demonstrate that nicotine reduces reward-associated behaviors following repeated amphetamine and modifies the changes in ChIs firing and corticostriatal activity. By returning glutamatergic activity in amphetamine self-administering mice to a more stable and normalized state, nicotine limits the depression of striatal activity in withdrawal and the increase in activity following

  18. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  19. Dimethylamylamine: a drug causing positive immunoassay results for amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Vorce, Shawn P; Holler, Justin M; Cawrse, Brian M; Magluilo, Joseph

    2011-04-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) operates six forensic urine drug-testing laboratories that screen close to 5 million urine samples for amphetamines yearly. Recently, the DoD laboratories have observed a significant decrease in the confirmation rates for amphetamines because of specimens screening positive by two separate immunoassays and confirming negative by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Previous studies conducted by the Division of Forensic Toxicology, Armed Force Institute of Pathology (AFIP) utilizing a GC-MS basic drug screen and a designer drug screen revealed no common compound or compound classes as to the cause of the immunoassay-positive results. Additional information obtained from an immunoassay vendor suggested the anorectic compound dimethylamylamine (DMAA) may be the cause of the false-positive screens. An additional 134 false-positive samples were received and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) for DMAA. LC-MS-MS analysis revealed the presence of DMAA in 92.3% of the false-positive samples at a concentration of approximately 6.0 mg/L DMAA, causing a positive screen on both immunoassay kits.

  20. Miniaturized sample preparation method for determination of amphetamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Manami; Namera, Akira; Yashiki, Mikio; Kimura, Kojiro

    2004-07-16

    A simple and miniaturized sample preparation method for determination of amphetamines in urine was developed using on-column derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Urine was directly applied to the extraction column that was pre-packed with Extrelut and sodium carbonate. Amphetamine (AP) and methamphetamine (MA) in urine were adsorbed on the surface of Extrelut. AP and MA were then converted to a free base and derivatized to N-propoxycarbonyl derivatives using propylchloroformate on the column. Pentadeuterated MA was used as an internal standard. The recoveries of AP and MA from urine were 100 and 102%, respectively. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range of 0.50-50 microg/mL for AP and MA in urine. When urine samples containing two different concentrations (0.50 and 5.0 microg/mL) of AP and MA were determined, the intra-day and inter-day coefficients of variation were 1.4-7.7%. This method was applied to 14 medico-legal cases of MA intoxication. The results were compared and a good agreement was obtained with a HPLC method.

  1. Microglial activation is a pharmacologically specific marker for the neurotoxic amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Dowgiert, Jennifer; Geddes, Timothy J; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina; Liu, Xiuli; Kuhn, Donald M

    2004-09-09

    Neurotoxic amphetamines cause damage to monoamine nerve terminals of the striatum by unknown mechanisms. Microglial activation contributes to the neuronal damage that accompanies injury, disease, and inflammation, but a role for these cells in amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has received little attention. We show presently that D-methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), D-amphetamine, and p-chloroamphetamine, each of which has been linked to dopamine (DA) or serotonin nerve terminal damage, result in microglial activation in the striatum. The non-neurotoxic amphetamines l-methamphetamine, fenfluramine, and DOI do not have this effect. All drugs that cause microglial activation also increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). At a minimum, microglial activation serves as a pharmacologically specific marker for striatal nerve terminal damage resulting only from those amphetamines that exert neurotoxicity. Because microglia are known to produce many of the reactive species (e.g., nitric oxide, superoxide, cytokines) that mediate the neurotoxicity of the amphetamine-class of drugs, their activation could represent an early and essential event in the neurotoxic cascade associated with high-dose amphetamine intoxication.

  2. The trazodone metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine can cause false-positive urine amphetamine immunoassay results.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jason M; Griggs, David A; Nixon, Andrea L; Long, William H; Flood, James G

    2011-07-01

    Amphetamines and methamphetamines are part of an important class of drugs included in most urine drugs of abuse screening panels, and a common assay to detect these drugs is the Amphetamines II immunoassay (Roche Diagnostics). To demonstrate that meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), a trazodone metabolite, cross-reacts in the Amphetamines II assay, we tested reference standards of m-CPP at various concentrations (200 to 20,000 g/L). We also tested real patient urine samples containing m-CPP (detected and quantified by HPLC) with no detectable amphetamine, methamphetamine, or MDMA (demonstrated by GC MS). In both the m-CPP standards and the patient urine samples, we found a strong association between m-CPP concentration and Amphetamines II immunoreactivity (r = 0.990 for the urine samples). Further, we found that patients taking trazodone can produce urine with sufficient m-CPP to result in false-positive Amphetamines II results. At our institution, false-positive amphetamine results occur not infrequently in patients taking trazodone with at least 8 trazodone-associated false-positive results during a single 26-day period. Laboratories should remain cognizant of this interference when interpreting results of this assay.

  3. The GABAB agonist baclofen blocks the expression of sensitisation to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the possible influence of baclofen, a GABAB agonist, on the long-term sensitisation to amphetamine in rats. As expected, chronic amphetamine treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to amphetamine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.), when the animals were challenged 20 days after the end of repeated treatment. Baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p.), administered before the test session, did not significantly modify the spontaneous locomotor activity of rats, but decreased the normal and, to a greater extent, the sensitised locomotor response to amphetamine; thus baclofen prevented the expression of sensitisation to amphetamine. Moreover a previous chronic treatment with baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) attenuated the amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in sensitised, but not in control animals. This effect was observed 20 days after the last baclofen administration. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that GABAB receptors play an important role in the expression of the sensitised behavioural response to amphetamine and further support a potential role of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  4. Reinforcing Effects of d-Amphetamine: Influence of Novel Ratios on a Progressive-Ratio Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E.A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive-ratio schedules are useful for studying reinforcing effects of drugs. Previous human laboratory studies showed that d-amphetamine significantly increased break points relative to placebo levels. However, the magnitude of the increase was modest, which may be attributable to rather high levels of placebo responding. We utilized novel response requirements under the modified progressive-ratio schedule and hypothesized that the altered range of response requirements would decrease responding for placebo and increase responding for d-amphetamine. Eight participants completed the study. The participants first sampled oral doses of d-amphetamine (0, 8, 16 and 24 mg). In subsequent sessions, participants were offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure with response requirements ranging from 400 to 1800 mouse clicks. A battery of participant-rated drug-effect questionnaires, a performance measure and cardiovascular measures were included in orderto characterize more fully the effects of d-amphetamine. Placebo maintained low levels of responding. The intermediate dose of d-amphetamine increased responding significantly above placebo levels. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated effects that were an orderly function of dose. The present data suggest that the modified response requirements resulted in lower levels of placebo taking and a larger separation between number of placebo and d-amphetamine capsules earned. PMID:20944503

  5. Comparative symptomatological and evoked potential studies with d-amphetamine, thioridazine, and placebo in hyperkinetic children.

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Simeon, J; Viamontes, G; Itil, T M

    1975-06-01

    In a double-blind study, 62 hyperkinetic children were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of treatment with either placebo, thioridazine, or d-amphetamine. The overall clinical symptomatology improved with all three substances, although d-amphetamine was significantly superior to placebo and thioridazine. Out of eight symptom clusters rated by the parents, two improved significantly with placebo, one with thioridazine, and six with d-amphetamine. The d-amphetamine was superior to placebo in reducing muscular tension and superior to thioridazine in decreasing hyperactive-impulsive behavior, psychosomatic problems, and muscular tension. Out of four teachers' symptom clusters, inattentive-passive behavior was significantly improved by thioridazine (which was also superior to placebo), while hyperactivity was reduced by d-amphetamine. Quantitative evaluation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) revealed an increase in latencies and decrease in amplitudes during thioridazine treatment. Paradoxically, d-amphetamine also increased latencies, while tending to augment amplitudes. Regression and correlation analysis of clinical symptomatology with VEP variables showed that the shorter the pretreatment latencies and the higher the amplitudes, the more disturbed was the child. Short latencies and small amplitudes in the pretreatment period were predictors of good therapeutic outcome with subsequent thioridazine treatment, while short latencies and high amplitudes were indicative of such with d-amphetamine treatment. During therapy, the greater the drug-induced augmentation of latencies, the greater the clinical improvement. Finally, VEP differences between therapy-responsive and -resistant patients were explored and discussed.

  6. Atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and sulpiride do not antagonise amphetamine-induced stereotyped locomotion.

    PubMed

    Moore, S; Kenyon, P

    1994-02-01

    An automated tracking system which converted an animal's path between quadrants of a circular open field into a series of trips was used to analyse stereotyped locomotion in amphetamine treated rats. Amphetamine (3.5 mg/kg) increased the horizontal distance moved and the number and proportion of thigmotaxic trips around the perimeter of the apparatus (length 4 trips). To investigate the hypothesis that classic antipsychotics, but not atypical antipsychotics, would antagonise the repetitive boundary patrolling associated with amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, animals were pretreated with haloperidol (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075 mg/kg), clozapine (5, 10, 20 mg/kg) or (+/-)sulpiride (10, 20, 50 mg/kg) 30 min before 3.5 mg/kg amphetamine. The results showed that the classic antipsychotic haloperidol antagonised both hyperactivity and the increased proportion of length 4 trips. In marked contrast, the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and sulpiride antagonised hyperactivity but did not reduce the proportion of length 4 trips. The inability of atypical antipsychotics to reduce the repetitive boundary patrolling associated with amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is consistent with the action of these drugs on other forms of amphetamine-induced stereotyped behaviour, and indicates that locomotor routes under amphetamine are stereotyped. The measurement of trip lengths provides a sensitive tool for examining drug action on the spatial distribution of open field locomotion.

  7. The respiratory response to CO2 and O2 in patients with coma due to voluntary intoxication with barbiturates and carbamates.

    PubMed

    Launois, S; Fleury, B; Similowski, T; Aubier, M; Murciano, D; Housset, B; Pariente, R; Derenne, J P

    1990-05-01

    We have investigated the respiratory response to CO2 and to O2 in comatose subjects self intoxicated with barbiturates and carbamates. The chemical drive of 12 such patients with coma was compared with that of comparable normal subjects. The ventilatory response to CO2 was depressed but the P0.1 response was of the same order of magnitude as in normals. O2 had little effect on the ventilatory parameters and occlusion pressure. There was no difference between the two groups of patients, indicating that the respiratory changes observed were more dependent on the intensity of the intoxication than on the nature of the drugs. In addition, mechanical factors seem mainly responsible for the depressed ventilatory response to CO2.

  8. METHAMPHETAMINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN HUMANS DURING D-AMPHETAMINE MAINTENANCE

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W.; Hays, Lon R.; Glaser, Paul E. A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Agonist replacement may be a viable treatment approach for managing stimulant use disorders. This study sought to determine the effects of d-amphetamine maintenance on methamphetamine self-administration in stimulant using human participants. We predicted d-amphetamine maintenance would reduce methamphetamine self-administration. Eight participants completed the protocol, which tested two d-amphetamine maintenance conditions in counter-balanced order (0 and 40 mg/day). Participants completed 4 experimental sessions under each maintenance condition in which they first sampled one of four doses of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10, 20, or 30 mg). Participants then had the opportunity to respond on a computerized progressive ratio task to earn portions of the sampled methamphetamine dose. Subject-rated drug-effect and physiological measures were completed at regular intervals prior to and after sampling methamphetamine. Methamphetamine was self-administered as an orderly function of dose regardless of the maintenance condition. Methamphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated effects on 13 items of the drug-effects questionnaires, 10 of which were attenuated by d-amphetamine maintenance (e.g., increased ratings were attenuated on items such as Any Effect, Like Drug, and Willing to Take Again on the Drug Effect Questionnaire). Methamphetamine produced significant increases in systolic blood pressure, which were attenuated by d-amphetamine maintenance compared to placebo maintenance. Methamphetamine was well tolerated during d-amphetamine maintenance and no adverse events occurred. Although d-amphetamine attenuated some subject-rated effects of methamphetamine, the self-administration results are concordant with those of clinical trials showing that d-amphetamine did not reduce methamphetamine use. Unique pharmacological approaches may be needed for treating amphetamine use disorders. PMID:25154010

  9. Increased alcohol consumption in rats after subchronic antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Alén, Francisco; Orio, Laura; Gorriti, Miguel Á; de Heras, Raquel Gómez; Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Pozo, Miguel Ángel; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2013-09-01

    The use of antidepressants for alcoholism in humans has been a matter of controversy in recent years. Despite the existence of an important co-morbidity for depression and alcoholism, some studies suggest that the use of antidepressants could worsen the prognosis of alcoholism. However, there is a lack of studies in animal models exploring this phenomenon. In the present study, we show how the 15-d treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or venlafaxine (50 mg/kg) affected alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) and subsequent alcohol consumption. Initially, fluoxetine reduced ADE and venlafaxine did not affect it. However, in the following days, both antidepressants increased alcohol consumption, an effect that was found to last at least 5 wk. Fluoxetine treatment was shown to cause a locomotor sensitized response to a challenge dose of amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg), indicating the presence of a supersensitive dopaminergic transmission. In summary, antidepressant treatment may increase alcohol consumption in rats after a period of alcohol deprivation and this could be related to alterations in the reward circuitry. This finding confirms in an animal model previous reports in humans that may limit the use of antidepressants for alcoholism.

  10. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Awareness Month April is Alcohol Awareness Month Biosensor Challenge Learn more College Drinking Learn More Alcohol Dependence Get the facts Alcohol Awareness Month Biosensor Challenge College Drinking Alcohol Dependence Latest News New & ...

  11. Alcohols toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  12. Studies on the metabolism and the detectability of 4-methyl-amphetamine and its isomers 2-methyl-amphetamine and 3-methyl-amphetamine in rat urine using GC-MS and LC-(high-resolution)-MSn.

    PubMed

    Welter, Jessica; Meyer, Markus R; Kavanagh, Pierce; Maurer, Hans H

    2014-03-01

    4-Methyl-amphetamine (1-(4-methylphenyl)propane-2-amine; 4-MA) and its isomers 2-methyl-amphetamine (2-MA) and 3-methyl-amphetamine (3-MA) belong to the group of amphetamine-type stimulants and of new psychoactive substances. Several studies showed similar potencies in releasing noradrenalin and dopamine, but higher potencies in releasing serotonin than amphetamine. In March 2013, the EU Council decided on an EU-wide control based on the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction risk assessment report documenting that 4-MA was sold as amphetamine on the illicit market and detected in several fatal cases. Therefore, 4-MA and its isomers should be covered by drug testing in clinical and forensic toxicology. The aims of the presented work were to study the metabolism and detectability of each isomer in urine samples. For metabolism studies, rat urine samples were isolated by solid-phase extraction without and after enzymatic cleavage of conjugates. The phase I metabolites were separated and identified after acetylation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and/or liquid chromatography-high resolution-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-HR-MS(n)) and the phase II metabolites by LC-HR-MS(n). From the identified phase I and II metabolites, the following main metabolic pathways were deduced: aromatic hydroxylation, hydroxylation of the phenylmethyl group followed by oxidation to the corresponding carboxylic acid, hydroxylation of the side chain, and glucuronidation and/or sulfation of the hydroxy and carboxy groups. CYP2D6 was involved in the aromatic hydroxylation. Finally, the intake of a commonly used dose of the MAs could be confirmed in rat urine using the authors' GC-MS and the LC-MS(n) standard urine screening approaches. Differentiation of the isomers to confirm the intake of a specific isomer was possible with an additional workup in rat urine.

  13. Alcohol Use Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... less effect than before? Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such ...

  14. Experimental Investigation on Terahertz Spectra of Amphetamine Type Stimulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jin-Hai; Shen, Jing-Ling; Liang, Lai-Shun; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2005-12-01

    The spectral absorption features of three amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) belonging to illicit drugs have been studied with terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the characteristic absorption spectra (fingerprint spectra) are obtained in the range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. Fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs in terahertz band are bases to detect and to inspect nondestructively illicit drugs with terahertz technique. With fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs and strong penetrability for cloths, paper bags and leathered or plastic luggage terahertz technique would be better than other techniques in illicit drugs detection and inspection. Thus, this work would contribute to the building of corresponding fingerprint spectra database of illicit drugs and provide experimental bases for using of terahertz detection apparatus in drugs nondestructive detection and inspection in the future.

  15. Exendin-4 Decreases Amphetamine-induced Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erreger, Kevin; Davis, Adeola R.; Poe, Amanda M.; Greig, Nigel H.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released in response to nutrient ingestion and is a regulator of energy metabolism and consummatory behaviors through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, however little is known about how GLP-1Rs regulate ambulatory behavior. The abused psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) promotes behavioral locomotor activity primarily by inducing the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Here, we identify the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) as a modulator of behavioral activation by AMPH. We report that in rats a single acute administration of Ex-4 decreases both basal locomotor activity as well as AMPH-induced locomotor activity. Ex-4 did not induce behavioral responses reflecting anxiety or aversion. Our findings implicate GLP-1R signaling as a novel modulator of psychostimulant-induced behavior and therefore a potential therapeutic target for psychostimulant abuse. PMID:22465309

  16. The potentiating effect of sertraline and fluoxetine on amphetamine-induced locomotor activity is not mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Sills, T L; Greenshaw, A J; Baker, G B; Fletcher, P J

    1999-04-01

    Sertraline dose-dependently increased the locomotor stimulating effect of amphetamine. At the highest dose, 20 mg/kg sertraline had a biphasic effect on amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, producing an initial reduction in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity that was later followed by an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in the last hour of the 3-h test. Sertraline, at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, produced an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity over the last 2 h of the 3-h test session. Further, there was an increase in the concentration of amphetamine in the brain in rats pretreated with 5 mg/kg sertraline. Both sertraline (5 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) produced an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity that was unaltered by a serotonergic lesion of the median and dorsal raphe nuclei that resulted in a greater than 90% depletion of serotonin in hippocampus, striatum, and nucleus accumbens. Further, both sertraline and fluoxetine inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity and this effect was also unaltered by the depletion of serotonin. Thus, serotonergic neurotransmission is not essential for the effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotion. It is probable that sertraline and fluoxetine augment the locomotor stimulatory effect of amphetamine by decreasing the metabolism of amphetamine, perhaps via actions on cytochrome P450 isozymes.

  17. In vitro effects of 'designer' amphetamines on human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes proliferation and on natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, L; Lacroix, F; Chan, J; Buttar, H S

    1992-12-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) proliferation was measured in the presence or absence of amphetamines. Proliferation in response to T-cell mitogen PHA was suppressed from 22 to 34% by d- and dl-amphetamine, respectively, contrarily to 1-form which did not affect proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBML. The 'designer' amphetamines appeared to be more potent inhibitors of PBML proliferation induced by both PHA and PWM stimulation than those of the racemic and isomeric forms of amphetamine. A wide variation was seen in the suppressive actions of the 'designer' amphetamines, and the mean percentages of suppression varied from 12 to 45% compared with the control values. 4-Propoxy-amphetamine (4-PA) was found to be the most active among the 'designer' drugs. In vitro effects of d-, 1- and dl-amphetamine were also studied on natural killer (NK) cell activity. A marked increase in the NK cell activity was observed only in the presence of very low concentrations (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) of dl-amphetamine, however, the activity of the NK cell remained within the control limits in the presence of d- or 1-forms. The findings suggest that the abuse of amphetamines, especially the 'designer' drugs, may adversely affect the activity of immunoregulatory cells and might lead to a compromised immune system in amphetamine abusers.

  18. Relationship between discriminative stimulus effects and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels of intramuscular methamphetamine in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Smith, Douglas A; Kisor, David F; Poklis, Justin L

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a globally abused drug that is metabolized to amphetamine, which also produces abuse-related behavioral effects. However, the contributing role of methamphetamine metabolism to amphetamine in methamphetamine's abuse-related subjective effects is unknown. This preclinical study was designed to determine 1) the relationship between plasma methamphetamine levels and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects and 2) the contribution of the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys. Adult male rhesus monkeys (n=3) were trained to discriminate 0.18mg/kg intramuscular (+)-methamphetamine from saline in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure. Time course of saline, (+)-methamphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg), and (+)-amphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg) discriminative stimulus effects were determined. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in the same monkeys to determine plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration and amphetamine levels after amphetamine administration for correlation with behavior in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine produced full, ≥90%, methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects. Amphetamine displayed a slightly, but significantly, longer duration of action than methamphetamine in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine behavioral effects were related to methamphetamine and amphetamine plasma levels by a clockwise hysteresis loop indicating acute tolerance had developed to the discriminative stimulus effects. Furthermore, amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration were absent when methamphetamine stimulus effects were greatest and peaked when methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects returned to saline-like levels. Overall, these results demonstrate the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine does not contribute to

  19. Liquid chromatographic method for the determination of enantiomeric composition of amphetamine and methamphetamine in hair samples.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Karen W; Sander, Lane C

    2004-01-01

    Interest in hair analysis as an alternative or complementary approach to urinalysis for drug abuse detection has grown in recent years. Hair analysis can be particularly advantageous for drugs such as amphetamine and methamphetamine that are rapidly excreted. Confirmation of abuse of these stimulants is complicated by the fact that some forms are found in legitimate medications. Examination of the enantiomeric composition of amphetamine and methamphetamine in hair samples can provide valuable assistance in interpreting drug testing results. In this work, we developed a liquid chromatographic method for the separation of amphetamine and methamphetamine enantiomers isolated from human hair samples. The drug enantiomers were separated on a chiral stationary phase after derivatization with an achiral fluorescent agent. The methodology was evaluated with a Standard Reference Material that contained several drugs of abuse including amphetamine and methamphetamine.

  20. D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the response to amphetamine in a mouse model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of psychostimulants in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are not well understood, but indirect evidence implicates D2 dopamine receptors. Here we dissect the components of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the hyperactive mouse mutant coloboma to identify pre- and postsynaptic elements essential for the effects of amphetamine in these mice. Amphetamine treatment reduced locomotor activity in coloboma mice, but induced a robust increase in dopamine overflow suggesting that abnormal regulation of dopamine efflux does not account for the behavioral effect. However, the D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists haloperidol and raclopride, but not the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390, blocked the amphetamine-induced reduction in locomotor activity in coloboma mice, providing direct evidence that D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the effect of amphetamine in these mice. With the precedent established that it is possible to directly antagonize this response, this strategy should prove useful for identifying novel therapeutics in ADHD. PMID:17291774

  1. Differential Effect of Amphetamine Optical Isomers on Bender Gestalt Performance of the Minimally Brain Dysfunctioned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, L. Eugene; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The differential effect of amphetamine optical isomers on Bender Gestalt performance was examined in 31 hyperkinetic minimally brain dysfunctioned children between the ages of 4 and 12 years, using a double-blind Latin-square crossover comparison. (Author)

  2. Stimulant therapy in the management of ADHD: mixed amphetamine salts (extended release).

    PubMed

    Faraone, Stephen V

    2007-09-01

    The efficacy of amphetamines in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. However, their value in improving the symptoms of ADHD has been compromised by concerns about compliance, abuse potential and adverse events. An extended-release formulation of mixed amphetamine salts (MAS XR) provided the first long-acting amphetamine formulation, and thus, filled an important gap in available treatments for ADHD. MAS XR has been shown to improve ADHD symptoms in children, adolescents and adults in both short- and long-term studies. The drug is generally well tolerated in clinical trials. Although its safety profile in patients with concomitant cardiovascular conditions in a real-world setting has yet to be fully evaluated, a tolerability study of mixed amphetamine salts in adults with ADHD who were being treated for primary essential hypertension showed that these patients can be safely treated with MAS XR.

  3. Amphetamine-induced sensitization and reward uncertainty similarly enhance incentive salience for conditioned cues.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Anselme, Patrick; Suchomel, Kristen; Berridge, Kent C

    2015-08-01

    Amphetamine and stress can sensitize mesolimbic dopamine-related systems. In Pavlovian autoshaping, repeated exposure to uncertainty of reward prediction can enhance motivated sign-tracking or attraction to a discrete reward-predicting cue (lever-conditioned stimulus; CS+), as well as produce cross-sensitization to amphetamine. However, it remains unknown how amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress interact with uncertainty in controlling CS+ incentive salience attribution reflected in sign-tracking. Here rats were tested in 3 successive phases. First, different groups underwent either induction of amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress, or else were not sensitized or stressed as control groups (either saline injections only, or no stress or injection at all). All next received Pavlovian autoshaping training under either certainty conditions (100% CS-UCS association) or uncertainty conditions (50% CS-UCS association and uncertain reward magnitude). During training, rats were assessed for sign-tracking to the CS+ lever versus goal-tracking to the sucrose dish. Finally, all groups were tested for psychomotor sensitization of locomotion revealed by an amphetamine challenge. Our results confirm that reward uncertainty enhanced sign-tracking attraction toward the predictive CS+ lever, at the expense of goal-tracking. We also reported that amphetamine sensitization promoted sign-tracking even in rats trained under CS-UCS certainty conditions, raising them to sign-tracking levels equivalent to the uncertainty group. Combining amphetamine sensitization and uncertainty conditions did not add together to elevate sign-tracking further above the relatively high levels induced by either manipulation alone. In contrast, repeated restraint stress enhanced subsequent amphetamine-elicited locomotion, but did not enhance CS+ attraction.

  4. Contextual conditioning enhances the psychostimulant and incentive properties of d-amphetamine in humans.

    PubMed

    Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-11-01

    Learned associations between drugs and the places they are used are critical to the development of drug addiction. Contextual conditioning has long been studied in animals as an indirect measure of drug reward, but little is known about the process in humans. Here, we investigated de novo contextual conditioning with d-amphetamine in healthy humans (n = 34). Volunteers underwent four conditioning sessions conducted in two testing rooms with double-blind, alternating d-amphetamine (20 mg) and placebo administration. Before conditioning procedures began, they rated the two rooms to examine pre-existing preferences. One group (Paired, n = 19) always received d-amphetamine in their least preferred room and placebo in the other during conditioning sessions. Another group (Unpaired, n = 15) received d-amphetamine and placebo in both rooms. Subjective drug effects were monitored at repeated times. At a separate re-exposure test, preference ratings for the drug-associated room were increased among the Paired group only, and more subjects in the Paired than the Unpaired group switched their preference to their initially least preferred room. Also, ratings of d-amphetamine drug liking independently predicted room liking at test among the Paired group only. Further, Paired group subjects reported greater stimulation and drug craving after d-amphetamine on the second administration, relative to the first. This study supports preliminary findings that humans, like animals, develop a preference for a place associated with d-amphetamine that is related to its subjective effects. These findings also suggest that experiencing d-amphetamine in a consistent environment produces context-dependent changes in its subjective effects, including an enhanced rewarding efficacy and abuse potential.

  5. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients.

  6. Dopaminergic Actions of D-Amphetamine on Schedule-Induced Polydipsia in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellon, Ricardo; Ruiz, Ana; Rodriguez, Cilia; Flores, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia in rats was developed by means of a fixed-time 60-s schedule of food presentation. The acute administration of d-amphetamine sulfate (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent decrease in the rate of licking. D-Amphetamine shifted to the left the temporal distribution of adjunctive drinking within interfood intervals.…

  7. Schizophrenia, amphetamine-induced sensitized state and acute amphetamine exposure all show a common alteration: increased dopamine D2 receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background All antipsychotics work via dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs), suggesting a critical role for D2Rs in psychosis; however, there is little evidence for a change in receptor number or pharmacological nature of D2Rs. Recent data suggest that D2Rs form dimers in-vitro and in-vivo, and we hypothesized that schizophrenia, as well as preclinical models of schizophrenia, would demonstrate altered dimerization of D2Rs, even though the overall number of D2Rs was unaltered. Methods We measured the expression of D2Rs dimers and monomers in patients with schizophrenia using Western blots, and then in striatal tissue from rats exhibiting the amphetamine-induced sensitized state (AISS). We further examined the interaction between D2Rs and the dopamine transporter (DAT) by co-immunoprecipitation, and measured the expression of dopamine D2High receptors with ligand binding assays in rat striatum slices with or without acute amphetamine pre-treatment. Results We observed significantly enhanced expression of D2Rs dimers (277.7 ± 33.6%) and decreased expression of D2Rs monomers in post-mortem striatal tissue of schizophrenia patients. We found that amphetamine facilitated D2Rs dimerization in both the striatum of AISS rats and in rat striatal neurons. Furthermore, amphetamine-induced D2Rs dimerization may be associated with the D2R-DAT protein-protein interaction as an interfering peptide that disrupts the D2R-DAT coupling, blocked amphetamine-induced up-regulation of D2Rs dimerization. Conclusions Given the fact that amphetamine induces psychosis and that the AISS rat is a widely accepted animal model of psychosis, our data suggest that D2R dimerization may be important in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and may be a promising new target for novel antipsychotic drugs. PMID:20813060

  8. Evaluation of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and phenylpropanolamine concentrations in human urine samples and a comparison of the specificity of DRI amphetamines and Abuscreen online (KIMS) amphetamines screening immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; Horn, Carl K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of two amphetamine class screening reagents to exclude ephedrine (EPH), pseudoephedrine (PSEPH), and phenylpropanolamine (PPA) from falsely producing positive immunoassay screening results. The study also sought to characterize the prevalence and concentration distributions of EPH, PSEPH, and PPA in samples that produced positive amphetamine screening results. Approximately 27,400 randomly collected human urine samples from Navy and Marine Corps members were simultaneously screened for amphetamines using the DRI and Abuscreen online immunoassays at a cutoff concentration of 500 ng/mL. All samples that screened positive were confirmed for amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MTH), 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), EPH, PSEPH, and PPA by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The DRI AMP immunoassay identified 1,104 presumptive amphetamine positive samples, of which only 1.99% confirmed positive for the presence of AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA. In contrast, the online AMP reagent identified 317 presumptive amphetamine positives with a confirmation rate for AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA of 7.94%. The presence of EPH, PSEPH, or PPA was confirmed in 833 of the 1,104 samples that failed to confirm positive for AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA; all of the 833 samples contained PSEPH. When compared to the entire screened sample set, PSEPH was present in approximately 3%, EPH in 0.9%, and PPA in 0.8% of the samples. The results indicate that cross reactivities for EPH, PSEPH, and PPA are greater than reported by the manufacturer of these reagents. The distribution of concentrations indicates that very large concentrations of EPH, PSEPH, and PPA are common.

  9. Dopamine receptor antagonist blocks the release of glycine, GABA, and taurine produced by amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Porras, A; Mora, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of systemic injections of amphetamine sulfate on the extracellular levels of glycine, GABA, and taurine in the neostriatum of awake rats were studied using a push-pull perfusion system. Amphetamine produced a dose-related increase in glycine levels. Amphetamine also produced an enhancement on GABA and taurine levels, although these increases did not follow a dose-related curve. The percentage increase of amino acids produced by the highest dose of amphetamine (5 mg/kg) at the peak effect was: GLY 235.9%; GABA 218%, and TAU 177%. All these effects were blocked by the D1-D2 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. It is suggested that dopamine, released by amphetamine, induces the release of inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters in the neostriatum. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of dopamine playing a role of an amplifier of the activity of different neurochemical circuits. The results are also in accord with the idea that dopamine could mediate the neurotoxic effects produced by amphetamines through an interplay between excitatory and inhibitory amino acids.

  10. Adolescent mice are more vulnerable than adults to single injection-induced behavioral sensitization to amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Sonia R; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Trombin, Thaís F; Procópio-Souza, Roberta; Patti, Camilla L; Hollais, André W; Calzavara, Mariana B; Abílio, Vanessa C; Ribeiro, Rosana A; Tufik, Sergio; D'Almeida, Vânia; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    Drug-induced behavioral sensitization in rodents has enhanced our understanding of why drugs acquire increasing motivational and incentive value. Compared to adults, human adolescents have accelerated dependence courses with shorter times from first exposure to dependence. We compared adolescent and adult mice in their ability to develop behavioral sensitization to amphetamine following a single injection. Adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (45-day-old) male Swiss mice received an acute intraperitoneal injection of saline or amphetamine (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg/kg). Seven days later, half of the mice from the saline group received a second injection of saline. The remaining animals were challenged with 2.0 mg/kg amphetamine. Following all of the injections, mice were placed in activity chambers and locomotion was quantified for 45 min. The magnitude of both the acute and sensitized locomotor stimulatory effect of amphetamine was higher in the adolescent mice. Previous experience with the test environment inhibited the acute amphetamine stimulation in both adolescent and adult mice, but facilitated the detection of elevated spontaneous locomotion in adolescent animals. These results support the notion that the adolescent period is associated with an increased risk for development of drug abuse. Additionally, they indicate a complex interaction between the environmental novelty, adolescence and amphetamine.

  11. GABA(B) receptors: altered coupling to G-proteins in rats sensitized to amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Tarazi, F I; Campbell, A; Baldessarini, R J

    2000-01-01

    Modified dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission in discrete brain regions is implicated in stimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. Release of both neurotransmitters is influenced by GABA(B) metabotropic receptors for the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Accordingly, GABA(B) receptors were examined in rats sensitized to amphetamine by measuring receptor density and coupling to G-proteins indicated as [(3)H]baclofen binding and baclofen-mediated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Repeated treatment with (+)-amphetamine (5mg/kg per day, i.p., for five days) sensitized the rats to amphetamine challenge (1mg/kg) at 14 days, but not one day, later. GABA(B) receptor density was not altered at either time. Baclofen-mediated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, however, was selectively augmented in the prefrontal cortex and attenuated in the nucleus accumbens at 14 days, but not one day, after amphetamine treatment. Changes in GABA(B) receptor coupling to G-proteins in rats sensitized to amphetamine, but not in similarly treated but unsensitized rats, lead us to suggest that altered GABA(B) receptor functioning may contribute to the expression of amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

  12. Food consumption and weight gain after cessation of chronic amphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Caitlin A; Ginton, Guy; Shimp, Kristy G; Avena, Nicole M; Gold, Mark S; Setlow, Barry

    2014-07-01

    Cessation of drug use often coincides with increased food consumption and weight gain in recovering addicts. However, it is not known whether this phenomenon (particularly the weight gain) is uniquely human, or whether it represents a consequence of drug cessation common across species. To address this issue, rats (n = 10/group) were given systemic injections of D-amphetamine (3 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline vehicle for 9 consecutive days. Beginning 2 days after the final injection, rats were given free access to a highly palatable food mixture (consisting of sugar and butter) along with their standard chow diet, and food consumption and body weight were measured every 48 h for 30 days. Consistent with clinical observations, amphetamine-treated rats showed a greater increase in body weight over the course of the 30 days relative to vehicle-treated rats. Surprisingly, there was no difference in highly palatable food consumption between amphetamine- and vehicle-treated groups, but the amphetamine-treated group consumed significantly more standard chow than the control group. The finding that a history of chronic amphetamine exposure increases food consumption is consistent with previous work in humans showing that withdrawal from drugs of abuse is associated with overeating and weight gain. The current findings may reflect amphetamine-induced sensitization of mechanisms involved in reward motivation, suggesting that weight gain following drug cessation in humans could be due to similar mechanisms.

  13. Comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of six immunoassays for the detection of amphetamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Alain G; Heyden, Fien V

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed 225 urine samples with FPIA (Abbott Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II on ADx and AxSYM), EMIT (Emit II Plus Monoclonal Amphetamine/Metamphetamine assay and EMIT II Plus Amphetamines assay, EMIT N), and KIMS (standard protocol and MDMA protocol, KIMS and KIMS X, respectively) immunoassays and compared their sensitivity and specificity. All assays were calibrated and used semi-quantitatively. All samples that screened positive by any amphetamine screening method and 15% of the negative samples were confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). A sample was considered positive for amphetamines if amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedio-xyethylamphetamine, or methylenedioxyamphetamine was present at 250 ng/mL. Ninety (40%) of the samples were positive by LC-MS-MS. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve varied between 0.972 (KIMS X) and 1.000 (ADx). The optimal cut-off concentrations varied between 271 ng/mL (EMIT N) and 723 ng/mL (AxSYM). The sensitivity was 100% for ADx and between 93 and 95% for the other assays. The specificity varied between 88% (KIMS) and 100% (EMIT N). Use of a 500 ng/mL screening cut-off would have resulted in identical or very similar results for ADx and KIMS X and large increases in the false positives for AxSYM and EMIT and the false negatives for EMIT N and KIMS.

  14. Effect of amphetamine on behavior maintained by sucrose: interaction of reinforcement schedule and food restriction.

    PubMed

    Slawecki, C J; Samson, H H

    1996-07-01

    A multiple schedule (Mult FR 10 VI 30") was employed to examine the interaction of reinforcement schedule and food restriction on amphetamine's effects on lever pressing behavior. High response rates were observed in fixed ratio (FR) 10 components. Significantly lower response rates were observed under the variable interval (VI) 30" schedule. In the nonrestricted feeding condition, significant decreases in high rate FR 10 responding occurred after administration of 1.0 mg/kg amphetamine while lower rates under the same schedule were increased by 0.30 and 1.0 mg/kg amphetamine. In contrast, VI 30" responding was minimally effected at any amphetamine dose. Food restriction resulted in significant increases in responding in both schedule components. Under food restriction, significant decreases in responding were observed only in the FR 10 components at the highest amphetamine dose. The data indicate that amphetamine produced rate-convergent effects and the susceptibility of the animal to these effects was dependent on the schedule of reinforcement and food restriction.

  15. Dose-dependent effects of differential rearing on amphetamine-induced hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Cain, Mary E; Mersmann, Marian G; Gill, Margaret J; Pittenger, Steven T

    2012-12-01

    Differential rearing decreases psychostimulant-induced hyperactivity. In general, environmental enrichment decreases the locomotor response to low unit doses of psychostimuluants, whereas isolation increases the response. It is not clear whether the changes in locomotor activity are due to an enrichment-induced decrease or an isolation-induced increase. Therefore, the current experiments examined the ability of enrichment rearing, as compared with isolation and standard rearing, to attenuate amphetamine-induced hyperactivity following acute administration, repeated administration, and sensitization of a low (0.3 mg/kg) and moderate (1.0 mg/kg) dose of amphetamine. Rats were reared under enriched, isolated, or standard conditions. Enrichment slowed the acquisition of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and attenuated the expression of amphetamine-induced sensitization, but only at the low unit dose. Enrichment did not protect against the expression of conditioned hyperactivity at either of the doses tested. The behavior of standard condition rats was generally closer to that of isolated condition rats than enriched condition rats, suggesting that the enrichment attenuates the response to amphetamine as opposed to isolation rearing increasing the response to amphetamine. These results suggest that the effects of enrichment are because of enrichment manipulation and not simply a contrast from the effects of isolation.

  16. The ugly side of amphetamines: short- and long-term toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy'), methamphetamine and D-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H; Montgomery, Therese

    2011-01-01

    Amphetamine ('Speed'), methamphetamine ('Ice') and its congener 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'Ecstasy') are illicit drugs abused worldwide for their euphoric and stimulant effects. Despite compelling evidence for chronic MDMA neurotoxicity in animal models, the physiological consequences of such toxicity in humans remain unclear. In addition, distinct differences in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of MDMA between species and different strains of animals prevent the rationalisation of realistic human dose paradigms in animal studies. Here, we attempt to review amphetamine toxicity and in particular MDMA toxicity in the pathogenesis of exemplary human pathologies, independently of confounding environmental factors such as poly-drug use and drug purity.

  17. Amphetamine increases aversive conditioning to diffuse contextual stimuli and to a discrete trace stimulus when conditioned at higher footshock intensity.

    PubMed

    Norman, C; Cassaday, H J

    2003-03-01

    Amphetamine can increase conditioning to poor predictors of reinforcement in selective learning tasks (e.g. latent inhibition, LI). In the present study, a noise stimulus was contiguous with footshock or presented at a trace interval. A flashing light background stimulus was used to measure contextual conditioning. Experiment 1 used 1.5 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg dl-amphetamine. Experiments 2 and 3 used 0.5 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine. Unconditioned stimuli parameters (intensity, number, duration) were also manipulated from one experiment to the next. Amphetamine consistently increased conditioning to the background stimulus, and increased conditioning to the trace stimulus at higher footshock intensity (Experiment 3). Thus, amphetamine increased conditioning only to relatively uninformative predictors. The effect on conditioning to trace conditioned stimuli depended on the level of reinforcer but increased conditioning to background did not. Throughout, there was no effect of amphetamine on conditioning of the contiguous stimulus. Thus, the results did not simply arise because amphetamine increased conditioning under any condition in which conditioning without amphetamine was poor. The results are discussed in terms of amphetamine effects on breadth of attention and LI to context.

  18. The effects of metoclopramide, sulpiride, and the stereoisomers of baclofen on amphetamine-induced behavior in the marmoset.

    PubMed

    Ridley, R M; Scraggs, P R; Baker, H F

    1980-04-01

    We have studied the effects on amphetamine-induced behavior in a primate species of drugs (other than the classic neuroleptics) sometimes used in the treatment of psychosis. Marmosets were treated with either saline (control animals) or amphetamine followed after 18 min by doses of either metoclopramide, sulpiride, or the d- or l-isomers of baclofen. Metoclopramide antagonized amphetamine-induced behavior at low doses while also causing sedation at higher doses in control animals. Neither sulpiride nor baclofen specifically antagonized amphetamine-induced behavior.

  19. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    It is reported that Savannah Foods and Industries, in a joint venture with United States Sugar Corporation have applied for a loan guarantee for the production of alcohol from agricultural commodities. The two phase program calls for research and development, before a prototype plant will be built for the conversion of cellulosic compounds found in bagasse into alcohol for use as a fuel.

  20. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug Use Hurts ... This Section Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Effects of Alcohol on Brains and Bodies Previous ... Treatment Work? Treatment and Rehab Resources About the ...

  1. Alcoholism & depression.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa

    2012-10-01

    One out of 2 Americans report drinking on a routine basis, making the excessive consumption of alcohol the third leading cause of preventable death in America (). Alcoholism and depression are common comorbidities that home healthcare professionals frequently encounter. To achieve the best patient outcomes, alcoholism should be addressed initially. Although all age groups are at risk, alcoholism and depression occur in more than 8 percent of older adults. Prevention through identifying alcohol use early in adolescence is vital to reduce the likelihood of alcohol dependence. This article provides an overview of the long-term effects of alcohol abuse, including alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnostic criteria for substance dependence and ideas for nonthreatening screening questions to use with patients who are adolescent or older are discussed. While providing patient care, home healthcare nurses share the patient's intimate home environment. This environment is perceived as a safe haven by the patient and home care nurses can take advantage of counseling and treatment opportunities in this nonthreatening environment.

  2. Caffeine, tobacco, alcohol and drug consumption among medical students in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Laporte, J R; Cami, J; Gutiérrez, R; Laporte, J

    1977-07-19

    A survey of medical students was conducted at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in 1974. Out of 1029 students, 808 present at lectures (78.5%) returned properly completed questionnaires. These showed that mean caffeine consumption was 8.3 g per month and increased with the length of stay at the university. Tobacco consumption (general mean, 190 cigarettes per month, 216 for males and 150 for females) and alcohol consumption (8.8 litres/year for males and 4.1 litres/year for females) also increased with time spent at university. Alcohol consumption was not as high as in the general population. Amphetamine consumption was very high (22% of students had taken amphetamines on more than one occasion in the six months prior to the survey). Marihuana and hashish were by far the most commonly used drugs (9.6%), the use of these drugs being much less common than at other European universities. The use of "harder" drugs was very limited. Appraisal of alcohol, tobacco and amphetamine abuse is necessary, since the authorities have not employed adequate measures to stop or limit them.

  3. Decreased GABA(A) benzodiazepine binding site densities in postmortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Virpi; Storvik, Markus; Häkkinen, Merja; Akamine, Yumiko; Tupala, Erkki; Virkkunen, Matti; Tiihonen, Jari

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol modulates the GABA(A) receptor to cause sedative, anxiolytic and hypnotic effects that are qualitatively similar to benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The aim of this study was to explore if GABA(A) receptor density is altered in post-mortem brains of anxiety-prone Cloninger type 1 and socially hostile type 2 alcoholic subtypes when compared to controls. The GABA(A) binding site density was measured by whole-hemisphere autoradiography with tritium labeled flunitrazepam ([(3)H]flunitrazepam) from 17 alcoholic (nine type 1, eight type 2) and 10 non-alcoholic post-mortem brains, using cold flumazepam as a competitive ligand. A total of eight specific brain areas were examined. Alcoholics displayed a significantly (p < 0.001, bootstrap type generalizing estimating equations model) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density when compared to controls. When localized, type 2 alcoholics displayed a significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density in the internal globus pallidus, the gyrus dentatus and the hippocampus, whereas type 1 alcoholics differed from controls in the internal globus pallidus and the hippocampus. While previous reports have demonstrated significant alterations in dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors between type 1 and type 2 alcoholics among these same subjects, we observed no statistically significant difference in [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site densities between the Cloninger type 1 and type 2 alcoholics.

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of three barbiturates in pork by ion trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) following microwave assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Wang, Liping; Qiu, Yueming; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhong, Weike; Li, Xiang

    2007-03-14

    A new method was developed for the rapid screening and confirmation analysis of barbital, amobarbital and phenobarbital residues in pork by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with ion trap MSD. The residual barbiturates in pork were extracted by ultrasonic extraction, cleaned up on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) packed solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and applied acetone-ethyl acetate (3:7, v/v) mixture as eluting solvent and derivatized with CH3I under microwave irradiation. The methylated barbiturates were separated on a TR-5MS capillary column and detected with an ion trap mass detector. Electron impact ion source (EI) operating MS/MS mode was adopted for identification and external standard method was employed for quantification. One precursor ion m/z 169 was selected for analysis of barbital and amobarbital and m/z 232 was selected for phenobarbital. The product ions were obtained under 1.0 V excitation voltage. Good linearities (linear coefficient R > 0.99) were obtained at the range of 0.5-50 microg kg(-1). Limit of detection (LOD) of barbital was 0.2 microg kg(-1) and that of amobarbital and phenobarbital were both 0.1 microg kg(-1) (S/N > or = 3). Limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for three barbiturates (S/N > or = 10). Satisfying recoveries ranging from 75% to 96% of the three barbiturates spiked in pork were obtained, with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) in the range of 2.1-7.8%.

  5. Amphetamine use and its associated factors in body builders: a study from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Narenjiha, Hooman; Tayyebi, Behnoosh; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Ahmadi, Gelareh; Assari, Shervin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies on all types of illicit drug use among athletes are essential for both the sport community and drug control achievements. Here, we investigated the prevalence and associated factors of amphetamine use in body builders in Tehran, Iran, 2007. Material and methods This study is a secondary analysis of a substance use survey done in 103 randomly selected gymnasia in Tehran (capital city of Iran). The survey was conducted from November 2007 to January 2008 and included 843 randomly selected bodybuilders (aged 40 years or less). By interviews via questionnaires the following data were obtained: age, job, marital status, education level, housing status, average monthly family income, number of family members, gymnasium area (m2), number of trainers, number of gymnasium members, initiation time (months), weekly duration of the sporting activity (h), monthly cost of the sporting activity, purpose of participating in sporting activity, and history of anabolic steroid and amphetamine use. Results One hundred twenty (13.3%) body builders reported a history of amphetamine use. According to the results of regression analysis, being married (risk ratio – RR = 0.540), and participating in body building to enhance self-esteem (RR = 0.423) or to enhance sport performance (RR = 0.545) had protective effects on amphetamine use. However, having university qualifications (RR = 1.843), using anabolic steroids (RR = 1.803) and participating in sport to maintain fitness (RR = 2.472) were linked to increased risk of amphetamine use. Conclusions Well-educated bodybuilders were more likely to use amphetamines, and why this is so needs to be discovered. If further studies show that they are not aware of the dangers associated with amphetamine use, providing them with information should be considered. PMID:22662012

  6. Effects of amphetamine on pro-social ultrasonic communication in juvenile rats: Implications for mania models.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, K-Alexander; Fuchs, Eberhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Communication is the act of information transfer between sender and receiver. In rats, vocal communication can be studied through ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations, most notably juvenile play, likely expressing the sender׳s positive affective state. Such appetitive 50-kHz USV serve important pro-social communicative functions and elicit social exploratory and approach behavior in the receiver. Emission of 50-kHz USV can be induced pharmacologically by the administration of psychostimulant drugs, such as amphetamine. However, it is unknown whether amphetamine affects the pro-social communicative function of 50-kHz USV in the receiver. We therefore assessed dose-response effects of amphetamine (0.0mg/kg, 0.5mg/kg, 1.0mg/kg, 2.5mg/kg, 5.0mg/kg) on pro-social ultrasonic communication on both, sender and receiver, in juvenile rats. We found an inverted U-shaped effect of amphetamine on 50-kHz USV emission, with 50-kHz USV levels being strongly enhanced by moderate doses, yet less prominent effects were seen following the highest dose. Likewise, amphetamine exerted inverted U-shaped effects on social exploratory and approach behavior induced by playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV. Social approach was enhanced by moderate amphetamine doses, but completely abolished following the highest dose. Amphetamine further dose-dependently promoted the emission of 50-kHz USV following playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV, indicating more vigorous attempts to establish social proximity. Our results support an important role of dopamine in closing a perception-and-action-loop through linking mechanisms relevant for detection and production of social vocalizations. Moreover, our approach possibly provides a new means to study mania-like aberrant social interaction and communication in animal models for bipolar disorder.

  7. Development and evaluation of an improved method for screening of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Shindelman, J; Mahal, J; Hemphill, G; Pizzo, P; Coty, W A

    1999-10-01

    We developed a homogeneous immunoassay method to eliminate false-positive amphetamine results caused by cross-reactive substances, including over-the-counter allergy and cold medications. This method uses a neutralizing antibody that binds to amphetamines but does not bind to the labeled amphetamine conjugate used in the assay. The amount of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to reduce the assay signal resulting from authentic amphetamine and methamphetamine, but not the signal resulting from cross-reactants. This concept was implemented using the CEDIA DAU Amphetamines assay on Hitachi 747 and 717 clinical chemistry analyzers. Urine samples were tested using the standard, unmodified reagents in one channel and reagents containing the neutralizing antibody in a second channel. The difference in rate between the two tests was calculated by the analyzer; true-positive samples showed a significantly greater decrease in assay signal in response to neutralizing antibody as compared with false-positive samples. The neutralization method was evaluated in two studies using 448 samples that tested positive in the initial CEDIA DAU Amphetamines screening test. The samples were separated into categories of 154 true-positive samples and 294 false-positive samples based upon a secondary screen with the Abbott FPIA Amphetamines assay followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing using the HHS (SAMHSA) cutoff criteria. The CEDIA neutralization test successfully identified all 154 of the GC-MS confirmed positive samples. The test successfully identified as false positive 251 out of the 294 (85.4%) samples that failed to confirm by GC-MS.

  8. Intracerebral baclofen administration decreases amphetamine-induced behavior and neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenxia; Mailloux, Adam W; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2005-05-01

    In a previous study, systemic administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist, R-(+)-baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked acute amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced rearing and neuropeptide (preprodynorphin (PPD), preprotachykinin (PPT), preproenkephalin (PPE), and secretogranin II (SGII)) mRNA expression in the striatum (Zhou et al, 2004). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the site(s) of action of these baclofen effects in the dorsal and ventral striatal circuitries. Infusion of baclofen (75 ng/side) into the ventral tegmental area (VTA), substantia nigra (SN), nucleus accumbens (NA), caudate-putamen (Cpu), or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) had no effect on behavioral activity in saline-treated rats habituated to a photocell apparatus. However, intra-VTA infusion of baclofen (75 ng/side) completely blocked, whereas intra-NA and intra-SN infusion of baclofen attenuated, amphetamine-induced vertical activity without affecting amphetamine-induced total distance traveled. In contrast, intramedial PFC and intra-CPu infusion of baclofen had no effect on behavioral activity in amphetamine-treated rats. Infusion of baclofen into the VTA, NA, or SN decreased amphetamine-induced neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum. These results indicate that GABA(B) receptor stimulation within the ventral striatal circuitry is involved in mediating acute amphetamine-induced behaviors and neuropeptide gene expression in the dorsal and ventral striatum. The present study provides information on the potential targets in the brain for baclofen in the initial behavioral and genomic response to amphetamine.

  9. More Aroused, Less Fatigued: Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Gene Polymorphisms Influence Acute Response to Amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Dlugos, Andrea M; Hamidovic, Ajna; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Palmer, Abraham A; de Wit, Harriet

    2010-01-01

    Amphetamine is a stimulant drug that enhances attention and feelings of alertness. Amphetamine's effects are known to be modulated by endogenous cannabinoids, which are degraded by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In this study we investigated inter-individual differences in mood response to amphetamine in relation to four polymorphisms in the FAAH gene, including the FAAH missense variant rs324420C → A (Pro129Thr), which was previously found to be associated with street drug use and addictive traits. One hundred and fifty-nine healthy Caucasian volunteers participated in a three-session, double-blind crossover study receiving either placebo or oral d-amphetamine (10 and 20 mg). Associations between individual genotypes and levels of self-reported Arousal (Profile of Mood States) after d-amphetamine ingestion were investigated using two-way ANOVAs/ANCOVAs. Association analyses for haplotypes were performed using the adaptive permutation approach implemented in PLINK. Genotypes at rs3766246 and rs2295633 were significantly associated with increased ratings of Arousal (p<0.05) and Fatigue (p<0.01) after the 10-mg dose. Fatigue levels were also found to be associated with the haplotypes CCC and TAT formed from rs3766246, rs324420, and rs2295633 (p<0.05). These data suggest that the endocannabinoid system influences variation in subjective response to amphetamine. This has important implications for understanding the role of endogenous cannabinoids in response to amphetamine, studies of poly-substance abuse, and understanding the genetic determinants of inter-individual differences in stimulant effects and risk of abuse. PMID:19890266

  10. Deposition characteristics of methamphetamine and amphetamine in fingernail clippings and hair sections.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Liang; Yin, Rea-Ming; Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Ray H

    2004-09-01

    Fingernail clippings collected from 97 consenting females, who admitted amphetamines and/or opiates use and are currently under treatment, were quantitatively analyzed for the presence of methamphetamine and amphetamine. Sixty-two subjects were found positive for methamphetamine/amphetamine. Paired nail-hair specimens were collected from 6 of these subjects for a 12-week period and analyzed to determine the duration of detectability and deposition characteristics of amphetamines in fingernails; whether data derived from the analysis of nail clippings and hair sections are reflective of drug use patterns; and whether there is a relationship between the analytical data derived from the paired nail-hair specimens. Typical sample pre-treatment procedures and GC-MS protocols were evaluated to establish the validity of various analytical parameters and to ensure that the resulting data can be properly interpreted. Major findings include 1. Methamphetamine was found in the nails of 62 subjects collected in Week 0. The distribution of methamphetamine concentrations (ng/mg) in these nail samples are range, 0.46-61.50; mean, 9.96; and standard deviation: 13.33. The corresponding data for amphetamine are < 0.20-5.42, 0.93, and 1.01, respectively. 2. Sectional analyses of hair samples collected from 6 subjects in Week 0 show methamphetamine concentrations peak at different distances from the root. 3. The concentrations of methamphetamine and amphetamine in nail clippings are generally lower than the first 1.5-cm section of hair samples collected at the same time from the same individual. 4. Amphetamine/ methamphetamine concentration ratios in nail clippings and hair samples are comparable. 5. Methamphetamine concentration in the nail clippings collected at Weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 decreases in a pattern similar to that exhibited by the first 1.5-cm sections of the hair samples collected at the same time.

  11. The N terminus of monoamine transporters is a lever required for the action of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2010-04-02

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERT(T81A) and SERT(T81D), suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERT(T81A) (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERT(T81A) were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na(+) entry and accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport.

  12. Response of CEDIA amphetamines assay after a single dose of bitter orange.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, DiemThuy T; Bui, Linda T; Ambrose, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Bitter orange has recently been substituted as an ingredient in many "ephedra-free" dietary supplements used for weight loss. The primary active ingredient in bitter orange is synephrine. Previous reports have documented false-positive results from ephedrine with urine amphetamine assays. Because of the similarity in chemical structure of ephedrine and synephrine, it is hypothesized that ingestion of a bitter orange supplement may have the potential to cause false-positive results with urine amphetamine assays. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay after ingestion of bitter orange. Six healthy adult male volunteers were administered a single oral dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange, a 900-mg dietary supplement extract standardized to 6% synephrine. Urine specimens were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 hours post-administration. Additional urine specimens were collected from 1 subject at 9, 12, and 15 hours after administration. All specimens were analyzed by the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity and pH also were measured. All urine specimens demonstrated a negative response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity ranged from 1.007 to 1.028, and pH ranged from 5.0 to 7.0; thus, reducing the possibility that the negative results were caused by diluted specimens or reduced excretion of synephrine into alkaline urine. This information will be of value when health care providers or those who interpret drug screens are asked to provide consultation regarding the interference of bitter orange supplements with the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. A single-dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange was not found to cause a false-positive response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay in 6 healthy adult male volunteers.

  13. Frequency of false positive amphetamine screens due to bupropion using the Syva EMIT II immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Casey, Erica R; Scott, Mitchell G; Tang, Schirin; Mullins, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Bupropion is a commonly prescribed, monocyclic antidepressant often used as an aid for smoking cessation. Several case reports have described false positive amphetamine urine drug screens (UDS) associated with bupropion. We sought to determine whether false positive amphetamine UDS due to the use of bupropion would be a frequent occurrence. We conducted an IRB-approved, retrospective chart review of all emergency department patients who underwent UDS between 1 January 2006 and 31 July 2007. All urine samples were screened using Syva EMIT II Plus immunoassay reagents. All positive screens underwent confirmation by gas chromatography (GC). We reviewed the records of patients with positive amphetamine UDS. We documented prescription use of bupropion, other antidepressants, stimulants, antipsychotics, and anti-hypertensives. We recorded evidence of polysubstance abuse (PSA) as patients who had had a documented diagnosis or laboratory evidence of abuse of at least two substances (drugs or ethanol). Of 10,011 urine drug screens, 362 (3.6%) were positive for amphetamine. GC confirmed amphetamines in 234 (65%), but failed to confirm in 128 (35%). Among the 234 confirmed, records reflected use of bupropion in three (1.3%), other antidepressants in 38 (16%), antipsychotics in 17 (8%), and amphetamine in 50 (21%). Records indicated evidence of PSA in 55 (24%). Among the 128 which failed to confirm, records reflected prescription use of bupropion in 53 (41%). None whose drug screen failed to confirm had evidence of PSA. Therapeutic use of bupropion appears to be the most frequent cause of false positive urine drug screens for amphetamines in our population.

  14. Incentive sensitization by previous amphetamine exposure: increased cue-triggered "wanting" for sucrose reward.

    PubMed

    Wyvell, C L; Berridge, K C

    2001-10-01

    We reported previously that an amphetamine microinjection into the nucleus accumbens enables Pavlovian reward cues in a conditioned incentive paradigm to trigger excessive instrumental pursuit. Here we show that sensitization caused by previous amphetamine administration also causes reward cues to trigger excessive pursuit of their associated reward, even when sensitized rats are tested in a drug-free state. Rats learned to lever press for sucrose pellets, and they separately learned to associate sucrose pellets with Pavlovian cues (30 sec auditory cues). Amphetamine sensitization was induced by six daily injections of amphetamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.; controls received saline). Rats were tested for lever pressing under extinction conditions 10 d later, after a bilateral microinjection of intra-accumbens vehicle or amphetamine (5 microg/0.5 microl per side). Cue-triggered pursuit of sucrose reward was assessed by increases in pressing on the sucrose-associated lever during intermittent presentations of a free conditioned stimulus (CS+) sucrose cue. Sensitized rats pressed at normal levels during baseline and during the CS-, but the CS+ triggered 100% greater increases in pressing from sensitized rats than from control rats after vehicle microinjection. Sensitization therefore enhanced the incentive salience attributed to the CS+ even when rats were tested while drug-free. For control rats, a microinjection of intra-accumbens amphetamine was needed to produce the same enhancement of cue-triggered reward "wanting." The amphetamine microinjection also interacted synergistically in sensitized rats to produce intrusive cue-triggered pursuit behaviors (e.g., investigatory sniffing) that interfered with goal-directed lever pressing. These results support the incentive-sensitization theory postulate that sensitization causes excessive cue-triggered "wanting" for an associated reward.

  15. Long-lasting sensitization of reward-directed behavior by amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Ian A; Williams, Matthew T; Bhavsar, Atasi; Lu, Annie P; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2009-07-19

    Exposure to psychostimulant drugs of abuse such as amphetamine can result in long-lasting "sensitization" of reward-directed behavior, such that subjects display enhancements in behavior directed by and toward rewards and reward-predictive cues (i.e. "incentive sensitization"). The purpose of these experiments was to determine the degree to which such sensitization resulting from chronic amphetamine exposure influences both appetitive and consummatory food-motivated behavior. Adult male Long-Evans rats received daily i.p. injections of D-amphetamine (2.0 mg/kg) or saline vehicle for five consecutive days. This amphetamine exposure regimen produced lasting sensitization to the acute locomotor stimulant effect of the drug. One month after drug exposure rats were tested for instrumental responding (lever pressing) for food reward under various response schedules. Two months after drug exposure, rats were tested for food consumption in a discriminative Pavlovian context-potentiated eating task, involving pairings of one context with food and another context with no food. Amphetamine exposed rats showed significantly greater instrumental responding for food reward than saline controls, particularly under conditions of high response ratios. In the potentiated eating task, testing under conditions of food satiation revealed that amphetamine exposed rats ate significantly more than saline controls in the food-paired context. These experiments demonstrate that amphetamine exposure can cause enduring increases in both appetitive and consummatory aspects of natural reward-directed behavior. Such long-lasting incentive sensitization could account in part for the propensity for relapse in drug addiction, as well as for reported enhancements in non-drug reward-related behavior.

  16. Differential effects of endomorphin-1 and -2 on amphetamine sensitization: neurochemical and behavioral aspects.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C; Liang, K W; Huang, E Y

    2001-03-01

    Mu-opioid receptors are known to modulate mesolimbic dopaminergic activity in the ventral tegmental area via disinhibition of GABA-containing neurons. Recently, two novel tetrapeptides, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, were identified in the mammalian brain and reported to have high binding affinities toward mu-opioid receptors. To determine if endomorphins would modulate the development of amphetamine sensitization, we administered endomorphins locally into the rat brain followed by behavioral and neurochemical examinations. The results indicate that rats pretreated with endomorphin-1 or -2 (5 microg per side for 7 days) in the ventral tegmental area developed locomotor sensitization to the challenge injection of amphetamine (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, when endomorphins were given in the lateral ventricle (20 microg for 5 days) of amphetamine-sensitized rats (5 mg/kg x 14 days) during the withdrawal period (w5-w9), neither peptide had a modulatory effect on locomotor sensitization. Biochemical analyses revealed that treatment with endomorphins in the ventral tegmental area significantly increased the levels of glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral and dorsal striatum to levels comparable to those observed in the amphetamine-sensitized rats. In the same animals, endomorphins also caused decreases in the levels of serotonin and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, in the medial prefrontal cortex. Interestingly, although there was no behavioral significance, endomorphin-1 treatment in the lateral ventricle of control and amphetamine-sensitized rats during withdrawal resulted in decreases of GABA, aspartate, dopamine, and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the ventral striatum. We conclude that endomorphins, by stimulating the mu-opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area, could sensitize the behavioral response to amphetamine. The results also demonstrate that there are differential responses between endomorphin-1 and -2 on

  17. Determination of enantiomeric amphetamines as metabolites of illicit amphetamines and selegiline in urine by capillary electrophoresis using modified beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Heo, Y J; Whang, Y S; In, M K; Lee, K J

    2000-05-12

    The determination of enantiomeric amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine samples is important in order to distinguish use of the prescription drug selegiline (metabolized to R(-)-A and R(-)-MA) from the illicit use of S(+)-A and S(+)-MA. For the analysis of enantiomeric amphetamine (A) and methamphetamine (MA) in biological samples, the optimization of analytical condition was performed by capillary electrophoresis using chiral selectors including beta-cyclodextrin, carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We have examined the factors to obtain the best chiral resolutions, separation efficiency and sensitivity, and wide concentration linearity. Optimum resolutions were achieved using 100 mM phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, containing 10 mM of carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin. This method was applied for the quantitative determination of enantiomeric amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine samples obtained from patients taking illicit amphetamines or from rats and patients taking selegiline. Acceptable quantitative results in terms of resolution, precision, sensitivity and linearity were obtained from the real urine samples containing wide-ranging concentrations of A and MA by using two concentrations of internal standards, alpha(+)- (1 microg/ml) and beta-phenylethylamine (50 microg/ml).

  18. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 24059 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  19. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  20. Amphetamine-Enhanced Motor Training after Cervical Contusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Krisa, Laura; Frederick, Kelly L.; Canver, John C.; Stackhouse, Scott K.; Shumsky, Jed S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Individually, motor training, pharmacological interventions, and housing animals in an enriched environment (EE) following spinal cord injury (SCI) result in limited functional improvement but, when combined, may enhance motor function. Here, we tested amphetamine (AMPH)-enhanced skilled motor training following a unilateral C3–C4 contusion injury on the qualitative components of reaching and on skilled forelimb function, as assessed using single-pellet and staircase reaching tasks. Kinematic analysis evaluated the quality of the reach, and unskilled locomotor function was also tested. Animals receiving AMPH and skilled forelimb training performed better than operated control animals on qualitative reaching, but not on skilled reaching. Those that received the combination treatment and were housed in EE cages showed significantly less improvement in qualitative reaching and grasping. Kinematic analysis revealed a decrease in digit abduction during skilled reaching among all groups, with no differences among groups. Kinematics provided no evidence that improved function was related to improved quality of reach. There was no evidence of neuroprotection in the cervical spinal cord. The absence of evidence for kinematic improvement or neuroprotection suggested that AMPH-enhanced motor training is due primarily to supraspinal effects, an enhancement of attention during skilled motor training, or plasticity in supraspinal circuitry involved with motor control. PMID:21651384

  1. Amphetamine-enhanced motor training after cervical contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Krisa, Laura; Frederick, Kelly L; Canver, John C; Stackhouse, Scott K; Shumsky, Jed S; Murray, Marion

    2012-03-20

    Individually, motor training, pharmacological interventions, and housing animals in an enriched environment (EE) following spinal cord injury (SCI) result in limited functional improvement but, when combined, may enhance motor function. Here, we tested amphetamine (AMPH)-enhanced skilled motor training following a unilateral C3-C4 contusion injury on the qualitative components of reaching and on skilled forelimb function, as assessed using single-pellet and staircase reaching tasks. Kinematic analysis evaluated the quality of the reach, and unskilled locomotor function was also tested. Animals receiving AMPH and skilled forelimb training performed better than operated control animals on qualitative reaching, but not on skilled reaching. Those that received the combination treatment and were housed in EE cages showed significantly less improvement in qualitative reaching and grasping. Kinematic analysis revealed a decrease in digit abduction during skilled reaching among all groups, with no differences among groups. Kinematics provided no evidence that improved function was related to improved quality of reach. There was no evidence of neuroprotection in the cervical spinal cord. The absence of evidence for kinematic improvement or neuroprotection suggested that AMPH-enhanced motor training is due primarily to supraspinal effects, an enhancement of attention during skilled motor training, or plasticity in supraspinal circuitry involved with motor control.

  2. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  3. Amphetamine Conditioned Place Preference in High and Low Impulsive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Justin R.; Marusich, Julie A.; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulants such as d-amphetamine (AMPH) are used commonly to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but concerns have been raised regarding the use of AMPH due to its reinforcing and potentially addictive properties. The current study examined if individual differences in impulsive choice predict AMPH-induced hyperactivity and conditioned place preference (CPP). Rats were first tested in delay discounting using an adjusting delay procedure to measure impulsive choice and then were subsequently tested for AMPH CPP. High impulsive (HiI) and low impulsive (LoI) rats were conditioned across four sessions with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.5 mg/kg of AMPH. AMPH increased locomotor activity for HiI and LoI rats following 0.5 mg/kg but failed to increase activity following 0.1 and 1.5 mg/kg. CPP was established for HiI rats with both 0.5 and 1.5 mg/kg of AMPH, whereas LoI rats did not develop CPP following any dose of AMPH; HiI and LoI groups differed significantly following 0.5 mg/kg of AMPH. These results indicate that HiI rats are more sensitive to the rewarding effects of AMPH compared to LoI rats, which is consistent with research showing that high impulsive individuals may be more vulnerable to stimulant abuse. PMID:21807020

  4. The effects of d-govadine on conditioned place preference with d-amphetamine or food reward.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Maya O; Dias, Carine; Phillips, Anthony G

    2017-03-15

    Tetrahydroprotoberberines (THPB) have a high affinity for dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors and may provide a novel treatment for drug addiction. We assessed the effects of the THPB d-govadine on the acquisition, expression, extinction and reinstatement of d-amphetamine-(1.5mg/kg, i.p.) induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Furthermore, the effects of d-govadine on conditioned association between contextual stimuli and a natural reward were examined using food-induced CPP. In separate experiments, rats received d-govadine (0, 0.5 or 1.0mg/kg, i.p.) before a) each d-amphetamine injection during conditioning, b) expression of amphetamine-induced CPP, c) each extinction session, d) amphetamine-induced reinstatement of CPP, or e) placement into a compartment containing food during conditioning. Although d-govadine had no effect on acquisition of amphetamine CPP, treatment with d-govadine during acquisition dose-dependently extinguished a preference for the amphetamine-associated context more quickly than vehicle treatment. Moreover, d-govadine treatment facilitated the extinction of amphetamine CPP when given repeatedly throughout the extinction phase. Although the expression of amphetamine CPP was not affected by d-govadine administered prior to the expression test, amphetamine-induced reinstatement of CPP following an extinction period was blocked by d-govadine (1.0mg/kg). The intermediate dose of d-govadine blocked the acquisition of food CPP, whereas the high dose facilitated extinction of this preference as compared to vehicle-treated animals. Therefore, d-govadine attenuates the maintenance of conditioned associations between contextual stimuli and amphetamine or food reward, as well as amphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking behaviour. As such, d-govadine may be a candidate for further development as a pharmacological treatment of psychostimulant drug dependence.

  5. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  6. Prenatal amphetamine exposure effects on dopaminergic receptors and transporter in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gonzalo; de Jesús Gómez-Villalobos, María; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the influence of prenatal amphetamine exposure (PAE) on dopamine (DA) receptors, and dopamine transporter (DAT) in various striatal and limbic subregions and locomotor activity induced by novel environmental conditions and amphetamine at two postnatal ages, 35 days old (prepubertal) and 60 days old (postpubertal). Experiments were carried out on pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats, which were daily injected with either d-amphetamine sulfate (1 mg/kg) or saline solution (0.9%) for 11 days, from gestation day 11-21. In PAE rats compared to control we found the following: at pre-pubertal age, an enhancement of DA D1 in the dorsolateral area of the caudate-putamen (CPu), CPu-ventral and shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) with a decrement of the DA D3 receptors in NAcc, olfactory tubercle (OT), and the islands of Calleja (IoC); whereas at postpubertal age, an increase in the levels of DAT in the NAcc and fundus of the CPu, and OT along with a decrease in the expression of DA D2 receptors only in the NAcc shell were found in PAE rats compared to control. In addition, amphetamine induces a marked decrease in locomotor activity at postpubertal age in rats with PAE. These results suggest a differential effect of amphetamines on the DAT mechanism of the nervous system during embryonic development of animals with implications in behavior and drug addictions at adulthood age.

  7. Recreational amphetamine use and risk of HIV-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun; Jacobson, Lisa P; Tashkin, Donald; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Roth, Michael D; Margolick, Joseph B; Chmiel, Joan S; Holloway, Marcy N; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Detels, Roger

    2009-07-01

    The results of many laboratory studies suggest that amphetamine use may lead to altered immune function and cytokine expression, both of which are implicated in HIV-related lymphomagenesis. We examined the hypothesis that use of amphetamines modifies risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Data on amphetamine use were collected every six months during the follow-up period between 1984 and 2002. A total of 171 NHL cases were diagnosed from the 19,250 person-years accrued. Multivariable Cox models were used to estimate the effects of baseline exposures, time-varying recent exposures, and three years lagged exposures on risk of NHL adjusting for potential confounders such as demographics, use of other substances, and risky sexual behaviors. We found that weekly or more frequent use of amphetamines was associated with an increased risk of NHL, with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% CI = 0.81-3.77) for use at baseline, 4.73 (1.41-15.81) for recent use, and 3.05 (1.19-7.82) for three years prior use. Similar associations were observed when we separately examined systemic NHL and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Given these observations, the impact of amphetamines on lymphomagenesis among HIV-infected populations should be assessed more thoroughly.

  8. Reinforcer magnitude affects delay discounting and influences effects of d-amphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher A; Reilly, William J; Anderson, Karen G

    2016-09-01

    Impulsive choice in humans can be altered by changing reinforcer magnitude; however, this effect has not been found in rats. Current levels of impulsive choice can also influence effects of d-amphetamine. This study used a within-subject assessment to determine if impulsive choice is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and whether effects of d-amphetamine are related to current levels of impulsive choice. A discounting procedure in which choice was for a smaller reinforcer available immediately or a larger reinforcer available after a delay that increased within session was used. Reinforcer magnitude was manipulated between conditions and impulsive choice was quantified using area under the curve (AUC). In the Smaller-Magnitude (SM) Condition, choice was between one food pellet and three food pellets. In the Larger-Magnitude (LM) Condition, choice was between two food pellets and six food pellets. Impulsive choice was greater in the SM Condition compared to the LM Condition. Further, effects of d-amphetamine (0.1-1.8mg/kg) were related to differences in impulsive choice. d-Amphetamine increased impulsive choice in the LM Condition, but had no effect on impulsive choice in the SM Condition. Overall, these results show that impulsive choice in rats is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and that effects of d-amphetamine are influenced by current levels of impulsive choice.

  9. Caffeine and amphetamine produce cross-sensitization to nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eylem; Uzbay, I Tayfun; Karakas, Sirel

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization development is linked to the addictive potential of the drugs. The same mechanisms might play a role in sensitization development to the different addictive drugs. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of cross-sensitization to caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Caffeine (2.5-20 mg/kg), amphetamine (1-16 mg/kg) or saline were injected to Swiss-Webster mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Nicotine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Process was applied for 19 days, every other day (10 sessions). Caffeine (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) or saline were challenged to the different groups of nicotine-sensitized mice 2 days later on the last nicotine injection, and locomotor activity was recorded. Repetitive injections of nicotine (0.5-2 mg) produced locomotor sensitization in mice. After caffeine and amphetamine challenge injections, locomotor activity of the nicotine-sensitized mice was found to be significantly higher than saline-pretreated mice. Saline challenge did not produce any significant effect in nicotine- or saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that a cross-sensitization developed to both caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-sensitized mice. In conclusion, similar central mechanisms may be responsible for the development of addiction to these substances.

  10. The effect of amphetamine on regional cerebral blood flow during cognitive activation in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, D.G.; Weinberger, D.R.; Jones, D.W.; Zigun, J.R.; Coppola, R.; Handel, S.; Bigelow, L.B.; Goldberg, T.E.; Berman, K.F.; Kleinman, J.E. )

    1991-07-01

    To explore the role of monoamines on cerebral function during specific prefrontal cognitive activation, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of the effects of 0.25 mg/kg oral dextroamphetamine on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) as determined by 133Xe dynamic single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) during performance of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and a sensorimotor control task. Ten patients with chronic schizophrenia who had been stabilized for at least 6 weeks on 0.4 mg/kg haloperidol participated. Amphetamine produced a modest, nonsignificant, task-independent, global reduction in rCBF. However, the effect of amphetamine on task-dependent activation of rCBF (i.e., WCST minus control task) was striking. Whereas on placebo no significant activation of rCBF was seen during the WCST compared with the control task, on amphetamine significant activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) occurred (p = 0.0006). Both the mean number of correct responses and the mean conceptual level increased (p less than 0.05) with amphetamine relative to placebo. In addition, with amphetamine, but not with placebo, a significant correlation (p = -0.71; p less than 0.05) emerged between activation of DLPFC rCBF and performance of the WCST task. These findings are consistent with animal models in which mesocortical catecholaminergic activity modulates and enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of evoked cortical activity.

  11. Discriminative stimulus properties of amphetamine in a conditioned taste aversion paradigm.

    PubMed

    Herrera, F M; Velazquez Martinez, D N

    1997-10-01

    It has been proposed that the conditioned taste aversion paradigm may be used to achieve rapid training of subjects in drug discrimination studies. We report here that amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) may acquire discriminative control over the preference of rats for a distinctive flavour when its administration precedes access to a saccharin solution (0.15% w/v), versus the occasions when the injection of saline precedes no toxicosis after access to the same flavour. Other doses of amphetamine (0.18-1.0 mg/kg) or apomorphine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent generalization to the stimulus cue of amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg), and haloperidol (0.01-0.1 mg/kg) was able to prevent the stimulus control exerted by amphetamine. No stimulus control was seen in a control group where no distinctive outcomes followed the administration of either amphetamine or saline before the subjects had access to the saccharin-flavoured solution. In the experimental group only, changes in the preference for saccharin were observed, with no changes in the total amount of water and saccharin ingested. Taken together, the present results suggest the usefulness of the conditioned taste aversion procedure to train subjects in drug discrimination.

  12. Effects of cocaine and d-amphetamine on the repeated acquisition and performance of conditional discriminations.

    PubMed Central

    Moerschbaecher, J M; Boren, J J; Schrot, J; Fontes, J C

    1979-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of cocaine and d-amphetamine on food-reinforced behavior were investigated in pigeons responding on a two-component multiple schedule. In one component, the behavioral task consisted of the same chain of conditional discriminations each session (performance). In the other component, the chain of conditional discriminations was changed from session to session (learning). In comparison to control sessions, both acute cocaine and d-amphetamine increased errors in each component of the multiple schedule. Responding in the learning component, however, was generally disrupted at lower doses than those that affected responding in the performance component. At high doses, both drugs produced pauses in responding in each component in three of the four subjects. Pausing engendered by d-amphetamine was approximately twice as long as that under cocaine. Upon chronic administration, both the pausing and error-increasing effects of each drug diminished. Drug-induced changes in timeout responding, however, did not decrease during chronic administration. Redeterminations of the d-amphetamine dose-effect curves following chronic cocaine administration suggested the existence of cross-tolerance between cocaine and d-amphetamine. Both the acute and chronic data are consistent with the view that conditions of stimulus control may modulate the behavioral effects of drugs. PMID:429956

  13. A quantitative model of amphetamine action on the 5-HT transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sandtner, Walter; Schmid, Diethart; Schicker, Klaus; Gerstbrein, Klaus; Koenig, Xaver; Mayer, Felix P; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Amphetamines bind to the plasmalemmal transporters for the monoamines dopamine (DAT), noradrenaline (NET) and 5-HT (SERT); influx of amphetamine leads to efflux of substrates. Various models have been proposed to account for this amphetamine-induced reverse transport in mechanistic terms. A most notable example is the molecular stent hypothesis, which posits a special amphetamine-induced conformation that is not likely in alternative access models of transport. The current study was designed to evaluate the explanatory power of these models and the molecular stent hypothesis. Experimental Approach Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing human (h) SERT were voltage-clamped and exposed to 5-HT, p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) or methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA). Key Results In contrast to the currents induced by 5-HT, pCA-triggered currents through SERT decayed slowly in Xenopus laevis oocytes once the agonist was removed (consistent with the molecular stent hypothesis). However, when SERT was expressed in HEK293 cells, currents induced by 3 or 100 μM pCA decayed 10 or 100 times faster, respectively, after pCA removal. Conclusions and Implications This discrepancy in decay rates is inconsistent with the molecular stent hypothesis. In contrast, a multistate version of the alternative access model accounts for all the observations and reproduces the kinetic parameters extracted from the electrophysiological recordings. A crucial feature that explains the action of amphetamines is their lipophilic nature, which allows for rapid diffusion through the membrane. PMID:24251585

  14. Amphetamine decreases behavioral inhibition by stimulation of dopamine D2, but not D3, receptors.

    PubMed

    van Gaalen, Marcel M; Unger, Liliane; Jongen-Rêlo, Ana-Lucia; Schoemaker, Hans; Gross, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Behavioral disinhibition is a manifestation of impulsive behavior that is prominent in the psychopathology of various psychiatric disorders such as addiction, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, mania, and personality disorders. Impulsivity may be studied by measuring anticipatory responses made before the presentation of a food-predictive, brief light stimulus in a two-choice serial reaction time task. In such serial reaction time tasks, amphetamine has been shown to produce dose-dependent increases in premature responding in a manner dependent on dopamine D(2)-like receptor stimulation. So far, it is unknown whether it is the D(2) or D(3) receptor that is involved in this form of impulsivity. In this study, rats were trained in a two-choice serial reaction time task until baseline performance was stable. Next, effects of the dopamine D(2) preferring antagonist L-741,626 and selective D(3) antagonist SB-277011 were assessed alone and in the presence of amphetamine. Neither L-741,626 nor SB-277011 affected behavioral inhibition, although the latter significantly increased reaction time at 10 mg/kg. Amphetamine dose-dependently increased impulsivity. The effect of amphetamine was attenuated by L-741,626 (3 mg/kg), whereas SB-277011 (3 mg/kg) had no effect. Therefore, amphetamine-induced behavioral disinhibition depends on D(2), but not D(3), receptor stimulation.

  15. The risky cocktail: what combination effects can we expect between ecstasy and other amphetamines?

    PubMed

    Dias da Silva, Diana; Carmo, Helena; Silva, Elisabete

    2013-01-01

    The recreational and illicit use of amphetaminic designer compounds, specially 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy), is of concern worldwide. Such psychostimulating drugs are frequently present as complex mixtures in 'rave' pills, making concomitant polysubstance use a common trend. However, the understanding of possible combination effects with these substances is still scarce. The present study was aimed at predicting the cytotoxic effects of mixtures of four amphetaminic derivatives: MDMA, methamphetamine, 4-methylthioamphetamine and d-amphetamine in a human hepatoma cell line. Concentration-response curves for all single-mixture components were recorded by the MTT assay. Data obtained for individual agents were then used to compute the additivity expectations for mixtures of definite composition, using the pharmacological models of concentration addition (CA) and independent action. By comparing the predicted calculations with the experimentally observed effects, we concluded that CA accurately predicts the combination of amphetamines, which act together to generate additive effects over a large range of concentrations. Notably, we observed substantial mixture effects even when each drug was present at low concentrations, which individually produced unnoticeable effects. Nonetheless, for all tested mixtures, a small deviation from additivity was observed towards higher concentrations, particularly at high effect levels. A possible metabolic interaction, which could explain such deviation, was investigated, and it was observed that at higher mixture concentrations increased MDMA metabolism could be contributing to divergences from additivity. In conclusion, the present work clearly demonstrates that potentially harmful interactions among amphetaminic drugs are expected when these drugs are taken concomitantly.

  16. A rapid method for the extraction, enantiomeric separation and quantification of amphetamines in hair.

    PubMed

    Strano-Rossi, Sabina; Botrè, Francesco; Bermejo, Ana Maria; Tabernero, Maria Jesús

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a rapid and sensitive method for the determination and chiral separation of amphetamines and related designer drugs in hair samples. The substances are extracted from hair matrix by a 30 min treatment with a saturated carbonate buffer at pH 10 under ultrasonication. A commercial chiral derivatizing agent, trifluoroacetyl-prolyl chloride, is then added to the solution that is directly extracted with hexane and subsequently analyzed by GC/MS in SIM mode. R and S isomers of amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDA, MDMA and MDEA can be separated and detected with a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mg for amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDA, and of 0.2 ng/mg for MDMA and MDEA. The method was then applied to 12 samples from suspected amphetamines abusers, showing the presence of both isomers of amphetamine and MDMA in one sample (27 and 1.5 ng/mg, respectively) and of MDMA in further eight samples, in concentrations ranging from traces to 2.7 ng/mg. No differences were observed in the disposition of different isomers in hair.

  17. Determination of ketamine and amphetamines in hair by LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, María Jesús; Felli, Maria Linda; Bermejo, Ana María; Chiarotti, Marcello

    2009-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of ketamine (with its metabolite norketamine) and some amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). This method was developed to determine these compounds in hair and is able to simultaneously quantify all of them in human hair. Hair samples (20 mg) were washed and pulverized, and an extraction with formic acid (0.01%) and ultrasonication for 4 h was used. Deuterated analogs of the analytes were used as internal standards for quantification. Linearity from 0.5 to 25 ng/mg was obtained for both ketamine (and norketamine) and amphetamines with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification obtained were 0.1 and 0.5 ng/mg, respectively, for ketamine and amphetamines. A total of 25 hair samples from known drug abusers (relating to designer drug consumption or consumption of amphetamines) were examined by this validated method. The results show that the proposed method is suitable for testing these drugs in a single sample of hair. In addition, it is simpler and faster than analysis by conventional methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which usually require a more laborious extraction procedure and, in most of cases, an additional derivatization process.

  18. Determination of amphetamines in human urine by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Nikolaos; Christopoulou, Klio; Theodoridis, Georgios; Tsoukali, Heleni; Psaroulis, Dimitrios

    2003-06-05

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is under investigation for its usefulness in the determination of a widening variety of volatile and semivolatile analytes in biological fluids and materials. Semivolatiles are increasingly under study as analytical targets, and difficulties with small partition coefficients and long equilibration times have been identified. Amphetamines were selected as semivolatiles exhibiting these limitations and methods to optimize their determination were investigated. A 100- micro m polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated SPME fiber was used for the extraction of the amphetamines from human urine. Amphetamine determination was made using gas chromatography (GC) with flame-ionization detection (FID). Temperature, time and salt saturation were optimized to obtain consistent extraction. A simple procedure for the analysis of amphetamine (AMP) and methamphetamine (MA) in urine was developed and another for 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and GC-FID. Higher recoveries were obtained for amphetamine (19.5-47%) and methamphetamine (20-38.1%) than MDA (5.1-6.6%), MDMA (7-9.6%) and MDEA (5.4-9.6%).

  19. Frontline immunochromatographic device for on-site urine testing of amphetamines: laboratory validation using authentic specimens.

    PubMed

    Beck, O; Kraft, M; Moeller, M R; Smith, B L; Schneider, S; Wennig, R

    2000-03-01

    We evaluated a new test device for amphetamines and methamphetamines (Frontline, cut-off limit 300 ng/mL) using authentic clinical and forensic specimens. The device is based on immunochromatography and is dipped into urine and read visually by comparison with a colour scale after a few minutes. A total of 658 specimens were tested by comparing results of the screening procedure with established immunoassays. Discordant results were further investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry or gas chromatography (with flame ionization detector). The Frontline device had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 98%. When specimens were classified by urine amphetamine concentration, close agreement was obtained at concentrations below 150 ng/mL and above 1000 ng/mL. A small number of specimens with amphetamine concentrations between 300 and 1000 ng/mL tested negative in the Frontline test. This finding could to some extent be explained by the enantioselectivity of the antibodies in the Frontline test to d-amphetamine. We conclude that the performance of the Frontline test device for amphetamines is adequate for presumptive clinical and forensic screening.

  20. Hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction of amphetamine-type stimulants in human hair samples.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento Pantaleão, Lorena; Bismara Paranhos, Beatriz Aparecida Passos; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-09-07

    A fast method was optimized and validated in order to quantify amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, AMP; methamphetamine, MAMP; fenproporex, FPX; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA; and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, MDA) in human hair samples. The method was based in an initial procedure of decontamination of hair samples (50 mg) with dichloromethane, followed by alkaline hydrolysis and extraction of the amphetamines using hollow-fiber liquid-phase micro extraction (HF-LPME) in the three-phase mode. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for identification and quantification of the analytes. The LoQs obtained for all amphetamines (around 0.05 ng/mg) were below the cut-off value (0.2 ng/mg) established by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT). The method showed to be simple and precise. The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 10.6% and 11.4%, respectively, with the use of only two deuterated internal standards (AMP-d5 and MDMA-d5). By using the weighted least squares linear regression (1/x²), the accuracy of the method was satisfied in the lower concentration levels (accuracy values better than 87%). Hair samples collected from six volunteers who reported regular use of amphetamines were submitted to the developed method. Drug detection was observed in all samples of the volunteers.

  1. Alcoholics Anonymous

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help What's New Read Daily Reflections Make a Contribution Go to Online Bookstore Welcome to Alcoholics Anonymous ® ... and Twelve & Twelve | 75th Anniversary Edition | Make a contribution | Self-Support Press/Media | Archives & History | A.A. ...

  2. Alcohol Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other preservatives Chemicals, grains or other ingredients Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing In some ... in some people, possibly as a result of histamines contained in some alcoholic beverages. Your immune system ...

  3. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161. Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  4. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  5. One barbiturate and two solvated thiobarbiturates containing the triply hydrogen-bonded ADA/DAD synthon, plus one ansolvate and three solvates of their coformer 2,4-diaminopyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Egert, Ernst; Bolte, Michael

    2016-09-01

    A path to new synthons for application in crystal engineering is the replacement of a strong hydrogen-bond acceptor, like a C=O group, with a weaker acceptor, like a C=S group, in doubly or triply hydrogen-bonded synthons. For instance, if the C=O group at the 2-position of barbituric acid is changed into a C=S group, 2-thiobarbituric acid is obtained. Each of the compounds comprises two ADA hydrogen-bonding sites (D = donor and A = acceptor). We report the results of cocrystallization experiments of barbituric acid and 2-thiobarbituric acid, respectively, with 2,4-diaminopyrimidine, which contains a complementary DAD hydrogen-bonding site and is therefore capable of forming an ADA/DAD synthon with barbituric acid and 2-thiobarbituric acid. In addition, pure 2,4-diaminopyrimidine was crystallized in order to study its preferred hydrogen-bonding motifs. The experiments yielded one ansolvate of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine (pyrimidine-2,4-diamine, DAPY), C4H6N4, (I), three solvates of DAPY, namely 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-1,4-dioxane (2/1), 2C4H6N4·C4H8O2, (II), 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/1), C4H6N4·C4H9NO, (III), and 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one (1/1), C4H6N4·C5H9NO, (IV), one salt of barbituric acid, viz. 2,4-diaminopyrimidinium barbiturate (barbiturate is 2,4,6-trioxopyrimidin-5-ide), C4H7N4(+)·C4H3N2O3(-), (V), and two solvated salts of 2-thiobarbituric acid, viz. 2,4-diaminopyrimidinium 2-thiobarbiturate-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/2) (2-thiobarbiturate is 4,6-dioxo-2-sulfanylidenepyrimidin-5-ide), C4H7N4(+)·C4H3N2O2S(-)·2C3H7NO, (VI), and 2,4-diaminopyrimidinium 2-thiobarbiturate-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/2), C4H7N4(+)·C4H3N2O2S(-)·2C4H9NO, (VII). The ADA/DAD synthon was succesfully formed in the salt of barbituric acid, i.e. (V), as well as in the salts of 2-thiobarbituric acid, i.e. (VI) and (VII). In the crystal structures of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine, i.e. (I)-(IV), R2(2)(8) N-H...N hydrogen-bond motifs are preferred and, in two

  6. Enhancement of Auditory Fear Conditioning after Housing in a Complex Environment Is Attenuated by Prior Treatment with Amphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briand, Lisa A.; Robinson, Terry E.; Maren, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Prior exposure to drugs of abuse has been shown to occlude the structural plasticity associated with living in a complex environment. Amphetamine treatment may also occlude some cognitive advantages normally associated with living in a complex environment. To test this hypothesis we examined the influence of prior exposure to amphetamine on fear…

  7. Effects of Amphetamine-CNS Depressant Combinations and of Other CNS Stimulants in Four-Choice Drug Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mi; Wessinger, William D.; McMillan, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    Three pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg pentobarbital, 2 mg/kg amphetamine, a combination of these two drugs at these doses, and saline using a four-choice procedure (amphetamine--pentobarbital group). Three other pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg morphine, 2 mg/kg methamphetamine, a combination of these two drugs…

  8. Ranitidine interference with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Poklis, A; Hall, K V; Still, J; Binder, S R

    1991-01-01

    The interference of ranitidine with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay (ME) was investigated. Urine specimens collected from 23 patients receiving 150-300 mg of ranitidine daily were found to contain 7-271 mg/L of the drug when analyzed by Remedi automated high pressure liquid chromatography. Only patient specimens and urine samples with ranitidine added at concentrations greater than 91 mg/L gave false positive ME results. Of the 63 patient urine samples analyzed by ME, 12 gave false positive results. All false positive results occurred in the first or second void after ingestion. No false positive results occurred with the polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine or TDx amphetamine/methamphetamine II assays.

  9. Prohibition or coffee shops: regulation of amphetamine and methylphenidate for enhancement use by healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dubljević, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes appropriate public policies for enhancement use of two most important stimulant drugs: Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts). The author argues that appropriate regulation of cognition enhancement drugs cannot be a result of a general discussion on cognitive enhancements as such, but has to be made on a case-by-case basis. Starting from the recently proposed taxation approach to cognition enhancement drugs, the author analyzes available, moderately permissive models of regulation. After a thorough analysis of relevant characteristics of methylphenidate and amphetamine, the author concludes that a moderately liberal permissive regulation of enhancement use by healthy adults might be appropriate for extended release forms of methylphenidate. However, due to their danger profile, amphetamine and instant release forms of methylphenidate should not be made readily available to healthy adults and would need to be prohibited.

  10. Choosing between GC FTIR and GC MS spectra for an efficient intelligent identification of illicit amphetamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, S.; Dinica, R.; Praisler, M.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we are presenting a comparative analysis between several expert systems built for the identification of illicit amphetamines based on their GC-FTIR and GC-MS spectra. The systems were built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), and are dedicated to the recognition of amphetamines. Structure-activity relationships are incorporated into the knowledge base, allowing the systems to identify the amphetamines according to their toxicological activity (stimulant or hallucinogenic). The results show that GC-FTIR data are much more relevant for the efficiency of the expert systems, probably due to the fact that these spectra constitute a "fingerprint" of the molecular structures. We are also presenting a spectroscopic analysis in order to evaluate the relevance of each type of input variable (absorption and abundance) on which the recognition of an unknown sample is based.

  11. Application of solid-phase microextraction combined with derivatization to the enantiomeric determination of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Cháfer-Pericás, C; Campíns-Falcó, P; Herráez-Hernández, R

    2006-03-18

    The utility of combining chiral derivatization and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for the enantiomeric analysis of primary amphetamines by liquid chromatography has been investigated. Different derivatization/extraction strategies have been evaluated and compared using the chiral reagent o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA)-N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and fibres with a Carbowax-templated resin coating. Amphetamine, norephedrine and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) were used as model compounds. On the basis of the results obtained, a new method is presented based on the derivatization of the analytes in solution followed by SPME of the OPA-NAC derivatives formed. The proposed conditions have been applied to determine the compounds of interest at low ppm levels (amphetamine, norephedrine and MDA enantiomers in different kind of samples is also discussed.

  12. Analysis of amphetamine and methamphetamine as emerging pollutants in wastewater and wastewater-impacted streams.

    PubMed

    Boles, Tammy H; Wells, Martha J M

    2010-04-16

    The identification and quantitation of the non-ecstasy amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs) amphetamine and methamphetamine in lakes, rivers, wastewater treatment plant influents, effluents, and biosolids are reviewed. Neither monitoring nor reporting is required of these ATSs, which are considered emerging pollutants, but they have been identified in the environment. Amphetamine and methamphetamine enter our water supply by human excretion after legal or illegal consumption and via manufacturing in clandestine laboratories. Analytical methodology for sampling, sample preparation, separation, and detection of ATSs is discussed. Reported occurrences of ATSs in the environment and their use in municipal sewage epidemiology are noted. Future research needs that challenge applications of analytical techniques are discussed. The review focuses on research reported from 2004 to 2009.

  13. Determination of amphetamines in hair by GC/MS after small-volume liquid extraction and microwave derivatization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Pinjia; Zhu, Dan; He, Hongyuan; Wang, Yanyan; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Liang

    2009-09-01

    We report here on the results of a procedure for the determination of amphetamine drugs in hair. The procedure is simple and sensitive. The results from the procedure using small-volume extraction matches perfectly with those either from using the derivatization method or selected ion monitoring (SIM) detection. We validated our method using four different amine drugs, including amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxy-amphetamine and methylenedioxy-methamphetamine. The detection limit for these drugs is about 50 +/- 7.5 pg/mg in hair and the intra-day and inter-day reproducibility are within 15% at most drug concentrations. Moreover, we also showed the utility of the procedure in analyses of authentic hair samples taken from amphetamine abusers, and demonstrated that the method meets the requirement for the analysis of a trace amounts of amphetamines in human hair.

  14. Motor Recovery and Axonal Plasticity With Short-Term Amphetamine After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Catherine M.; Tsai, Shih-Yen; Guillen, Veronica; Ortega, Juan; Kartje, Gwendolyn L.; Wolf, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is considerable debate regarding the efficacy of amphetamine to facilitate motor recovery after stroke or experimental brain injury. Different drug dosing and timing schedules and differing physical rehabilitation strategies may contribute to outcome variability. The present study was designed to ascertain (1) whether short-term amphetamine could induce long-term functional motor recovery in rats after an ischemic lesion modeling stroke in humans; (2) how different levels of physical rehabilitation interact with amphetamine to enhance forelimb-related functional outcome; and (3) whether motor improvement was associated with axonal sprouting from intact corticoefferent pathways originating in the contralesional forelimb motor cortex. Methods After permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, rats received vehicle or amphetamine during the first postoperative week (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously on Postoperative Days 2, 5, and 8). In both treatment groups, separate cohorts of rats were exposed to different levels of “physical rehabilitation” represented by a control environment, enriched environment, or enriched environment with additional sessions of focused activity. Skilled forelimb performance was assessed using the forelimb reaching task and ladder rung walk test. Anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran amine was used to assess new fiber outgrowth to denervated motor areas. Results All treatment groups showed significant motor improvement as compared with control-housed, vehicle-treated animals. However, animals housed in an enriched environment that received amphetamine paired with focused activity sessions performed significantly better than any other treatment group and was the only group to achieve complete motor recovery (ie, reached preoperative performance) by 8 weeks. This recovery was associated with axonal sprouting into deafferentated subcortical areas from contralesional projection neurons. Conclusions This study

  15. Sewer epidemiology mass balances for assessing the illicit use of methamphetamine, amphetamine and tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim A

    2012-04-01

    In sewer epidemiology, mass balances are used to back-extrapolate measurements of wastewater influent concentrations of appropriate drug residues to assess the parent illicit drug's level of use in upstream populations. This study focussed on developing and refining mass balances for the use of illicit methamphetamine, amphetamine and tetrahydrocannabinol. As a first step, a multi-criteria evaluation was used to select unchanged methamphetamine, unchanged amphetamine and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol as the most appropriate drug residues to track a selected population's use of illicit methamphetamine, amphetamine and tetrahydrocannabinol, respectively. For each of these selected drug residues, mass balances were developed by utilizing all disposition data available for their release from all their respective sources, incorporating route-of-administration considerations where relevant, and accounting for variations in the metabolic capacity of users of the various relevant licit and illicit sources. Further, since the selected drug residues for the use of methamphetamine and amphetamine cannot only result from their use but numerous other licit and illicit sources, comprehensive general source models were developed for their enantiomeric-specific release to sewers. The relative importance of the sources identified in the general source model was evaluated by performing national substance flow analyses for a number of countries. Results suggested that licit sources of methamphetamine are expected to be only of significance in populations where its illicit use is minor. Similarly, in populations where the use of illicitly produced amphetamine is currently of relevance, licit contributions to the sewer loads of amphetamine are likely to be of negligible importance. Lastly, the study of tetrahydrocannabinol back-extrapolation mass balances suggested that further research is required to assess the importance of fecal elimination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol.

  16. Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, W.O. )

    1992-09-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

  17. Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Isomer Concentrations in Human Urine Following Controlled Vicks VapoInhaler Administration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC–MS method with >99% purity of R-(−)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC–MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0–1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT® II Plus, KIMS® II and DRI® had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT® II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation. PMID:25217541

  18. Methamphetamine and amphetamine isomer concentrations in human urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC-MS method with >99% purity of R-(-)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC-MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0-1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤ 4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT(®) II Plus, KIMS(®) II and DRI(®) had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT(®) II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation.

  19. Combination effects of amphetamines under hyperthermia - the role played by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Diana Dias; Silva, Elisabete; Carmo, Helena

    2014-06-01

    Rise in body temperature is a life-threatening consequence of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) abuse. We evaluated the impact of hyperthermia on the cytotoxicity of combinations of MDMA and three other amphetamines, often co-ingested. For this, Hep G2 cells were exposed to MDMA, d-amphetamine, methamphetamine and 4-methylthioamphetamine, individually or combined, at 40.5 °C. The results were compared with normothermia data (37.0 °C). Mixture additivity expectations were calculated by independent action and concentration addition (CA) models. To delineate the mechanism(s) underlying the elicited effects, a range of stress endpoints was evaluated, including quantification of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), lipid peroxidation, reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) changes. Our data show that, in hyperthermia, amphetamines acted additively and mixture effects were accurately predicted by CA. At 40.5 °C, even slight increases in the concentrations of each drug/mixture promoted significant rises in cytotoxicity, which quickly shifted from roughly undetectable to maximal mortality. Additionally, the increase of RNS/ROS production, decrease of GSH, ATP depletion and mitochondrial impairment were exacerbated under hyperthermia. Importantly, when equieffective cytotoxic concentrations of the mixture and individual amphetamines were compared for all tested stress endpoints, mixture effects did not deviate from those elicited by individual treatments, suggesting that these amphetamines have a similar mode of action, which is not altered in combination. Concluding, our data indicate that amphetamine mixtures produce deleterious effects, even when individual drugs are combined at negligible concentrations. These effects are strongly exacerbated in hyperthermia, emphasizing the potential increased risks of ecstasy intake, especially when hyperthermia occurs concurrently with polydrug abuse.

  20. D-Amphetamine remediates attentional performance in rats with dorsal prefrontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Y; Nathwani, F; Robbins, T W

    2005-03-07

    Although amphetamine treatment has been shown to promote recovery of motor function in animals with cortical ablations, the potential therapeutic effect of amphetamine on processes other than motor control, such as attention and working memory, has been relatively unexplored. Accordingly, we investigated the beneficial effect of D-amphetamine treatment in animals with dorsal prefrontal cortex lesions (dPFC) compared with sham controls on a novel combined attention-memory task (CAM) that simultaneously measures attention to a visual stimulus and memory for that stimulus. The dPFC group was impaired in their ability to correctly detect the visual stimulus. Although this deficit occurred together with increased omissions and slow response latencies, these associated deficits largely recovered within the 10 post-operative baseline sessions revealing a selective attentional deficit in this group of animals. Nonetheless, the dPFC lesion did not substantially affect the working memory component of the task. The systemic administration of d-amphetamine served to ameliorate the attentional deficit in the dPFC group at the low dose only (0.2 mg/kg). By contrast, the dPFC group were less sensitive to the detrimental effects of the high dose (0.8 mg/kg) on any aspect of task performance. However, despite improving attention to the visual stimulus, D-amphetamine did not improve memory for that stimulus which instead appeared to deteriorate. The results provide apparently the first demonstration that low doses of D-amphetamine can ameliorate an attentional deficit in animals with selective dPFC lesions and may be a useful model of cognitive deficit in ADHD, schizophrenia or frontal brain injury.

  1. Serotonin in the Ventral Hippocampus Modulates Anxiety-Like Behavior during Amphetamine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenyu; Cook, Ashley; Scholl, Jamie L.; Mears, Mackenzie; Watt, Michael J.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2014-01-01

    Withdrawal from amphetamine is associated with increased anxiety and sensitivity to stressors which are thought to contribute to relapse. Rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal fail to exhibit stress-induced increases in serotonin (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus and show heightened anxiety-like behaviors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that reduced 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus is a causal mechanism in increasing anxiety-like behaviors during amphetamine withdrawal. First, we tested whether reducing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus directly increases anxiety behavior. Male rats were bilaterally infused with 5,7-DHT into the ventral hippocampus, which produced a 83% decrease ventral hippocampus 5-HT content, and were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety-like behavior. Reducing ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels decreased the time spent in the open arms of the maze, suggesting diminished ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels increases anxiety-like behavior. Next, we tested whether increasing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus reverses anxiety behavior exhibited by rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal. Rats were treated daily with either amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, ip.) or saline for 2 weeks, and at 2 weeks withdrawal, were infused with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (0.5 μM) bilaterally into the ventral hippocampus and tested for anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. Rats pre-treated with amphetamine exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. This effect was reversed by ventral hippocampus infusion of paroxetine. Our results suggest that 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus is critical for regulating anxiety behavior. Increasing 5-HT levels during withdrawal may be an effective strategy for reducing anxiety-induced drug relapse. PMID:25241066

  2. Serotonin in the ventral hippocampus modulates anxiety-like behavior during amphetamine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Tu, W; Cook, A; Scholl, J L; Mears, M; Watt, M J; Renner, K J; Forster, G L

    2014-12-05

    Withdrawal from amphetamine is associated with increased anxiety and sensitivity to stressors which are thought to contribute to relapse. Rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal fail to exhibit stress-induced increases in serotonin (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus and show heightened anxiety-like behaviors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that reducing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus is a causal mechanism in increasing anxiety-like behaviors during amphetamine withdrawal. First, we tested whether reducing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus directly increases anxiety behavior. Male rats were bilaterally infused with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the ventral hippocampus, which produced a 83% decrease in ventral hippocampus 5-HT content, and were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety-like behavior. Reducing ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels decreased the time spent in the open arms of the maze, suggesting that diminished ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels increases anxiety-like behavior. Next, we tested whether increasing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus reverses anxiety behavior exhibited by rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal. Rats were treated daily with either amphetamine (2.5-mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 2weeks, and at 2weeks withdrawal, were infused with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (0.5μM) bilaterally into the ventral hippocampus and tested for anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. Rats pre-treated with amphetamine exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. This effect was reversed by ventral hippocampus infusion of paroxetine. Our results suggest that 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus are critical for regulating anxiety behavior. Increasing 5-HT levels during withdrawal may be an effective strategy for reducing anxiety-induced drug relapse.

  3. Microdialysis and SPECT measurements of amphetamine-induced dopamine release in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Laruelle, M; Iyer, R N; al-Tikriti, M S; Zea-Ponce, Y; Malison, R; Zoghbi, S S; Baldwin, R M; Kung, H F; Charney, D S; Hoffer, P B; Innis, R B; Bradberry, C W

    1997-01-01

    The competition between endogenous transmitters and radiolabeled ligands for in vivo binding to neuroreceptors might provide a method to measure endogenous transmitter release in the living human brain with noninvasive techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). In this study, we validated the measure of amphetamine-induced dopamine release with SPECT in nonhuman primates. Microdialysis experiments were conducted to establish the dose-response curve of amphetamine-induced dopamine release and to document how pretreatment with the dopamine depleter alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (alpha MPT) affects this response. SPECT experiments were performed with two iodinated benzamides, [123I]IBZM and [123I]IBF, under sustained equilibrium condition. Both radio-tracers are specific D2 antagonists, but the affinity of [123I]IBZM (KD-0.4 nM) is lower than that of [123I]IBF (KD 0.1 nM). With both tracers, we observed a prolonged reduction in binding to D2 receptors following amphetamine injection. [123I]IBZM binding to D2 receptors was more affected than [123I]IBF by high doses of amphetamine, indicating that a lower affinity increases the vulnerability of a tracer to endogenous competition. With [123I]IBZM, we observed an excellent correlation between reduction of D2 receptor binding measured with SPECT and peak dopamine release measured with microdialysis after various doses of amphetamine. Pretreatment with alpha MPT significantly reduced the effect of amphetamine on [123I]IBZM binding to D2 receptors, confirming that this effect was mediated by intrasynaptic dopamine release. Together, these results validate the use of this SPECT paradigm as a noninvasive measurement of intrasynaptic dopamine release in the living brain.

  4. Differential effects of amphetamines-induced neurotoxicity on appetitive and aversive Pavlovian conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Achat-Mendes, Cindy; Ali, Syed F; Itzhak, Yossef

    2005-06-01

    The abuse of substituted amphetamines such as methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA/Ecstasy) can result in neurotoxicity, manifested as the depletion of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT; serotonin) axon terminal markers in humans and animal models. Human METH and MDMA users exhibit impairments in memory and executive functions, which may be a direct consequence of the neurotoxic potential of amphetamines. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of amphetamines-induced neurotoxicity on Pavlovian learning. Using mouse models of selective DA neurotoxicity (METH; 5 mg/kg x 3), selective 5-HT neurotoxicity (fenfluramine /FEN; 25 mg/kg x 4) and dual DA and 5-HT neurotoxicity (MDMA; 15 mg/kg x 4), appetitive and aversive conditioning were investigated. Dopaminergic neurotoxicity significantly impaired METH and cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP), but had no effect on LiCl-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA). In contrast, serotonergic neurotoxicity significantly enhanced CPP, and had no effect on CPA. Dual dopaminergic/serotonergic neurotoxicity had no apparent effect on CPP; however, CPA was significantly attenuated. Postmortem analysis revealed that significantly diminished levels of DA and 5-HT markers persisted in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala. These findings suggest that amphetamines-induced dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity exert opposing influences on the affective state produced by subsequent drug reward, while dual dopaminergic/serotonergic neurotoxicity impairs associative learning of aversive conditioning. Furthermore, results revealed that amphetamines-induced DA and 5-HT neurotoxicity modulates appetitive Pavlovian conditioning similar to other DA and 5-HT neurotoxins. Modulation of Pavlovian conditioning by amphetamines-induced neurotoxicity may be relevant to compulsive drug-seeking behavior in METH and MDMA abusers.

  5. Acceleration of cardiovascular-biological age by amphetamine exposure is a power function of chronological age

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphetamine abuse is becoming more widespread internationally. The possibility that its many cardiovascular complications are associated with a prematurely aged cardiovascular system, and indeed biological organism systemically, has not been addressed. Methods Radial arterial pulse tonometry was performed using the SphygmoCor system (Sydney). 55 amphetamine exposed patients were compared with 107 tobacco smokers, 483 non-smokers and 68 methadone patients (total=713 patients) from 2006 to 2011. A cardiovascular-biological age (VA) was determined. Results The age of the patient groups was 30.03±0.51–40.45±1.15 years. This was controlled for with linear regression. The sex ratio was the same in all groups. 94% of amphetamine exposed patients had used amphetamine in the previous week. When the (log) VA was regressed against the chronological age (CA) and a substance-type group in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, models quadratic in CA were superior to linear models (both p<0.02). When log VA/CA was regressed in a mixed effects model against time, body mass index, CA and drug type, the cubic model was superior to the linear model (p=0.001). Interactions between CA, (CA)2 and (CA)3 on the one hand and exposure type were significant from p=0.0120. The effects of amphetamine exposure persisted after adjustment for all known cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.0001). Conclusions These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process. PMID:28243315

  6. Neuropharmacology of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS): Focus on the Rewarding and Reinforcing Properties of Cannabimimetics and Amphetamine-Like Stimulants

    PubMed Central

    Miliano, Cristina; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Rimondo, Claudia; Mereu, Maddalena; Marti, Matteo; De Luca, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are a heterogeneous and rapidly evolving class of molecules available on the global illicit drug market (e.g smart shops, internet, “dark net”) as a substitute for controlled substances. The use of NPS, mainly consumed along with other drugs of abuse and/or alcohol, has resulted in a significantly growing number of mortality and emergency admissions for overdoses, as reported by several poison centers from all over the world. The fact that the number of NPS have more than doubled over the last 10 years, is a critical challenge to governments, the scientific community, and civil society [EMCDDA (European Drug Report), 2014; UNODC, 2014b; Trends and developments]. The chemical structure (phenethylamines, piperazines, cathinones, tryptamines, synthetic cannabinoids) of NPS and their pharmacological and clinical effects (hallucinogenic, anesthetic, dissociative, depressant) help classify them into different categories. In the recent past, 50% of newly identified NPS have been classified as synthetic cannabinoids followed by new phenethylamines (17%) (UNODC, 2014b). Besides peripheral toxicological effects, many NPS seem to have addictive properties. Behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological evidence can help in detecting them. This manuscript will review existing literature about the addictive and rewarding properties of the most popular NPS classes: cannabimimetics (JWH, HU, CP series) and amphetamine-like stimulants (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone, and MDMA analogs). Moreover, the review will include recent data from our lab which links JWH-018, a CB1 and CB2 agonist more potent than Δ9-THC, to other cannabinoids with known abuse potential, and to other classes of abused drugs that increase dopamine signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) shell. Thus the neurochemical mechanisms that produce the rewarding properties of JWH-018, which most likely contributes to the greater incidence of dependence

  7. Neuropharmacology of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS): Focus on the Rewarding and Reinforcing Properties of Cannabimimetics and Amphetamine-Like Stimulants.

    PubMed

    Miliano, Cristina; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Rimondo, Claudia; Mereu, Maddalena; Marti, Matteo; De Luca, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are a heterogeneous and rapidly evolving class of molecules available on the global illicit drug market (e.g smart shops, internet, "dark net") as a substitute for controlled substances. The use of NPS, mainly consumed along with other drugs of abuse and/or alcohol, has resulted in a significantly growing number of mortality and emergency admissions for overdoses, as reported by several poison centers from all over the world. The fact that the number of NPS have more than doubled over the last 10 years, is a critical challenge to governments, the scientific community, and civil society [EMCDDA (European Drug Report), 2014; UNODC, 2014b; Trends and developments]. The chemical structure (phenethylamines, piperazines, cathinones, tryptamines, synthetic cannabinoids) of NPS and their pharmacological and clinical effects (hallucinogenic, anesthetic, dissociative, depressant) help classify them into different categories. In the recent past, 50% of newly identified NPS have been classified as synthetic cannabinoids followed by new phenethylamines (17%) (UNODC, 2014b). Besides peripheral toxicological effects, many NPS seem to have addictive properties. Behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological evidence can help in detecting them. This manuscript will review existing literature about the addictive and rewarding properties of the most popular NPS classes: cannabimimetics (JWH, HU, CP series) and amphetamine-like stimulants (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone, and MDMA analogs). Moreover, the review will include recent data from our lab which links JWH-018, a CB1 and CB2 agonist more potent than Δ(9)-THC, to other cannabinoids with known abuse potential, and to other classes of abused drugs that increase dopamine signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) shell. Thus the neurochemical mechanisms that produce the rewarding properties of JWH-018, which most likely contributes to the greater incidence of dependence associated

  8. Chapter 7. Narrative stories and discourses in an interview with a former amphetamine user.

    PubMed

    Lilja, My

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzes how an individual constructs his life as a former amphetamine user. The study has a methodological purpose, providing an example of how narrative analysis and discourse analysis can be conducted and combined. First, an interview with a former amphetamine user in his 50s was analyzed by the narrative method with a focus on identity construction. Second, it was then examined from a discourse analytical perspective. The article demonstrates how discourse analysis and narrative analysis could be combined when analyzing identity constructions.

  9. Stimulus effects of d-amphetamine II: DA, NE, and 5-HT mechanisms.

    PubMed

    West, W B; Van Groll, B J; Appel, J B

    1995-05-01

    Activation of dopaminergic (DA) systems is a necessary component of the behavior effects of d-amphetamine, but other neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) appear to modulate DA input; thus, they might have an important role in the stimulus (subjective) effects of this drug. Therefore, rats were trained to discriminate d-amphetamine (1 mg/kg) from saline and given combination (antagonism, potentiation) or substitution (generalization) tests with drugs that act through DA, noradrenergic, or serotonergic (5-HT) mechanisms. In the first of two experiments, the D1 antagonist SCH 39166 blocked the effects of d-amphetamine (1 mg/kg) at doses of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/kg. NE and 5-HT antagonists including prazosin (0.5-2 mg/kg), idazoxan (1.25-5 mg/kg), ketanserin (0.06-0.15 mg/kg), and metergoline (5-20 mg/kg) had no significant effects on the d-amphetamine cue. In the second experiment, neither the alpha 2-NE agonist clonidine (0.0025-0.1 mg/kg), the beta-NE agonist salbutamol (0.05-0.25 mg/kg), nor the NE uptake inhibitor nisoxetine (5-15 mg/kg) had d-amphetamine-like effects. The alpha 2-NE antagonist yohimbine (0.5-2 mg/kg) and the beta-NE antagonist propranolol (0.5-3 mg/kg) failed to alter the d-amphetamine cue. ICS 205-930 (10 mg/kg) neither mimicked nor blocked the effects of 1 mg/kg of d-amphetamine. Indeed, this 5-HT3 antagonist potentiated the actions of lower doses of d-amphetamine (0.25-0.4 mg/kg); the potentiation of the 0.25-mg/kg dose was blocked significantly by the alpha 1-NE antagonist prazosin (1 mg/kg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine in umbilical cord using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joseph; Rios, Rosemarie; Jones, Mary; Lewis, Douglas; Plate, Charles

    2009-11-01

    The use of meconium as a drug-screening matrix for newborns has been the gold standard of care for the past two decades. A recent study using matched pairs of meconium and umbilical cord demonstrated a high degree of agreement. The use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a means to confirm amphetamines presumptive positive umbilical cord specimens for amphetamine and methamphetamine is described here for the first time. The limit of detection for both compounds was 0.2 ng/g. The limit of quantitation for both compounds was 0.6 ng/g. The assay was linear for both compounds up to 100 ng/g.

  11. N-acetylcysteine prevents increased amphetamine sensitivity in social isolation-reared mice.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Ana P; Benvenutti, Radharani; Pilz, Luísa K; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2014-05-01

    Treating individuals at risk to develop schizophrenia may be strategic to delay or prevent transition to psychosis. We verified the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. C57 mice were reared in isolation or social groups and treated with NAC from postnatal day 42-70; the locomotor response to amphetamine was assessed at postnatal day 81. NAC treatment in isolated mice prevented the hypersensitivity to amphetamine, suggesting neuroprotection relevant to striatal dopamine. Considering its safety and tolerability profile, complementary studies are warranted to further evaluate the usefulness of NAC to prevent conversion to schizophrenia in at-risk individuals.

  12. Bursts of potential elicited by d-amphetamine in central snail neuron: effect of sodium azide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Lin; Lu, Kuan-Ling; Lee, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Yu-Chi; Chou, Hong-Nong; Tsai, Ming-Cheng

    2007-10-01

    Effects of sodium azide (NaN(3)) on spontaneously generated action potential and bursts of potential elicited by d-amphetamine (d-amphetamine-elicited BoP) were studied on the right parietal 4 (RP4) neuron of the snail Achatina fulica Ferussac in vitro. Sodium azide altered the spontaneous action potential of RP4 neuron in a concentration-dependent manner. In lower concentrations, neither NaN(3) (30, 100, 300 microM; 1 and 3 mM) nor d-amphetamine (135 microM) affect the resting membrane potential, amplitude and frequency of RP4 neurons, while in the higher concentrations NaN(3) (30 mM) did abolish the spontaneous action potential on RP4 neurons and depolarized the RP4 neurons reversibly. At lower concentration, NaN(3) (30 microM) facilitated the d-amphetamine-elicited BoP. The BoP elicited by NaN(3) (30 microM) and d-amphetamine (135 microM) were decreased following treatment with KT5720 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or intracellular injection of EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid]. However, the BoP was not affected by applying U73122 (1-[6-[((17beta)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione) or neomycin (phospholipase inhibitors). Voltage clamp studies revealed that NaN(3) (30 microM) did not alter the total fast inwards currents (70 msec.) and the steady-state outwards currents (5 sec.). It appeared that the BoP elicited by NaN(3) (30 microM) and d-amphetamine (135 microM) was mainly due to protein kinase A-related messenger system and intracellular calcium. It is concluded that d-amphetamine-elicited BoP was not mainly due to inhibition of the function of mitochondria in the neuron while the function of mitochondria did alter the BoP elicited by amphetamine.

  13. Amphetamine margin in sports. [Effects on performance of highly trained athletes

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seems clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both man and rat. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogues of such performance have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  14. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse - quitting drinking; Quitting drinking; Quitting alcohol; Alcoholism - deciding to quit ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol- ...

  15. The ugly side of amphetamines: short- and long-term toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘Ecstasy’), methamphetamine and d-amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.; Montgomery, Therese

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine (‘Speed’), methamphetamine (‘Ice’) and its congener 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ‘Ecstasy’) are illicit drugs abused worldwide for their euphoric and stimulant effects. Despite compelling evidence for chronic MDMA neurotoxicity in animal models, the physiological consequences of such toxicity in humans remain unclear. In addition, distinct differences in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of MDMA between species and different strains of animals prevent the rationalisation of realistic human dose paradigms in animal studies. Here, we attempt to review amphetamine toxicity and in particular MDMA toxicity in the pathogenesis of exemplary human pathologies, independently of confounding environmental factors such as poly-drug use and drug purity. PMID:21194370

  16. Amphetamines as potential inducers of fatalities: a review in the district of Ghent from 1976-2004.

    PubMed

    De Letter, Els A; Piette, Michel H A; Lambert, Willy E; Cordonnier, Jan A C M

    2006-01-01

    Abuse of amphetamine (AMP) and its derivatives, such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy'), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA, MDE), and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) is an important public issue. Fatalities following ingestion of these substances are not infrequent in current forensic practice. The aim of this study was twofold. Firstly, considering the wide range of blood levels reported in fatalities, to provide insight into the interpretation of a quantified blood level and, secondly, to examine and discuss possible causes, mechanisms and manners of death. All the medico-legal files between January 1976 and December 2004 were skimmed through to investigate whether amphetamine and/or derivatives were involved in the fatal outcome. Particularly, in addition to overdose cases due to or including amphetamines, all amphetamines-related fatalities were examined. In addition to AMP, MDMA, MDEA, and MDA, two other amphetamine derivatives, namely 4-methylthioamphetamine (4-MTA) and para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA) were considered. In 34 fatalities, amphetamines were involved and the majority were men, under the age of 25 years. A wide range of blood levels was found: e.g. MDMA blood concentrations in cases of 'pure' intoxication were found between 0.27 and 13.51 microg/ml. The age and sex distribution as well as the broad range of quantified amphetamines blood levels were in line with those reported in the literature. In our study group, 'pure' intoxications with amphetamines, polydrug overdoses, and the combination of amphetamines use and polytrauma were the most prominent causes of death. Considering the manner of death in these fatalities, unintentional overdoses were most frequent, though suicides, traffic accidents, and criminal offences associated with amphetamines use also accounted for significant percentages. Acute to subacute cardiopulmonary failure was the most frequent mechanism of death, followed by (poly)trauma, mechanical

  17. Alcoholic sialosis.

    PubMed

    Kastin, B; Mandel, L

    2000-01-01

    Sialosis (sialadenosis) is a term used to describe a disorder that involves both secretory and parenchymal changes of the major salivary glands, most commonly the parotid. Seen often in a dental office, it is recognized as an indolent, bilateral, non-inflammatory, non-neoplastic, soft, symmetrical, painless and persistent enlargement of the parotid glands. Four major entities have commonly been associated with this disorder. They are alcoholism, endocrinopathy (particularly diabetes mellitus), maLnutrition and idiopathic. We are reporting a case of alcoholic sialosis with its clinical and diagnostic aspects. It is important for the dental practitioner to recognize sialosis, because it often indicates the existence of an unsuspected systemic disease.

  18. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... group of defects in the baby known as fetal alcohol syndrome. Symptoms can include: Behavior and attention problems Heart ...

  19. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one of the ...

  20. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  1. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation.

  2. Imaging human intrasynaptic dopamine release by IV cocaine and amphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Hong, C.; Yokoi, F.

    1995-05-01

    Intrasynaptic dopamine (DA) release was measured with C-11 Raclopride (RAC) PET in 15 human subjects with two psychostimulant drugs, IV cocaine or IV amphetamine (AMPH). Eleven cocaine users received IV saline then cocaine with high specific activity (SA) tracer RAC by IV bolus. To determine the optimal timing of drug administration, subjects received 48mg cocaine at 0 min.(1 subject), 4 min.(3 subjects) or 10 min.(7 subjects) post injection (mpi). One received 32mg at 4 and 16mg at 10 mpi. In a separate paradigm, the effect of AMPH not only on the binding of Hi SA but also on the receptor density (B{sub max}) using Hi SA and low SA was examined. Four normals received 2 pairs of Hi SA and Low SA RAC PET scans, each pair separated by 1 week to estimate 2 B{sub max}`s, one affected by AMPH. Before the 2nd pair, 0.3mg/kg IV AMPH was given in the times corresponding to the AMPH times for the 1s B{sub max} measurement. All were scanned on a GE 4096WB+PET with 50 frames over 90 min with radial arterial plasma sampling and HPLC metabolite correction. Neuropsychological-endocrine testing was done concurrently. All subjects had a marked psychophysiological response for cocaine or AMPH (less with Low SA RAC). However, evidence of substantial DA release was not consistent with IV cocaine nor correlated with any timing of cocaine vs. RAC, except for an overall trend for RAC reduction with cocaine. The % change in k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} by graphical analysis ranged from +10 to -21%, with similar changes by other methods of quantification, such as k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} constrained to cerebellar K{sub 1}/k{sub 2}, and simple tissue ratios comparisons. IV AMPH showed DA release (19% {plus_minus} 2 (SEM) decrease) in all Hi SA RAC (k{sub 3}/k{sub 4}) by graphical analysis. The calculation of B{sub max} in putamen using Scatchard analysis (baseline B{sub max}29{plus_minus}2) showed 12 to 28% decreases following AMPH.

  3. Targeted deletion of the GABRA2 gene encoding alpha2-subunits of GABA(A) receptors facilitates performance of a conditioned emotional response, and abolishes anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines and barbiturates.

    PubMed

    Dixon, C I; Rosahl, T W; Stephens, D N

    2008-07-01

    Mice with point-mutated alpha2 GABA(A) receptor subunits (rendering them diazepam insensitive) are resistant to the anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepines (BZs) in the conditioned emotional response (CER) test, but show normal anxiolytic effects of a barbiturate. We investigated the consequence of deleting the alpha2-subunit on acquisition of the CER with increasing intensity of footshock, and on the anxiolytic efficacy of a benzodiazepine, diazepam, and a barbiturate, pentobarbital. alpha2 knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice were trained in a conditioned emotional response (CER) task, in which lever pressing for food on a variable interval (VI) schedule was suppressed during the presentation of a compound light/tone conditioned stimulus (CS+) that predicted footshock. The ability of diazepam and of pentobarbital to reduce suppression during the CS+ was interpreted as an anxiolytic response. There were no differences between the genotypes in shock sensitivity, as assessed by their flinch responses to increasing levels of shock. However, alpha2 KO mice showed a greater suppression of lever pressing than WT littermates in the presence of a compound cue signalling footshock. Diazepam (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiolytic-like effect in WT mice but no such effect was seen in KO mice. Similarly, although pentobarbital (20 mg/kg) reduced the ability of the CS+ to reduce lever pressing rates in WT mice, this effect was not seen in the KO. These findings suggest that alpha2-containing GABA(A) receptors mediate the anxiolytic effects of barbiturates, as well as benzodiazepines, and that they may be involved in neuronal circuits underlying conditioned anxiety.

  4. The influence of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands on anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Koltunowska, D; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Kotlinska, J H

    2013-08-01

    Chronic amphetamine use results in anxiety-like states after drug cessation. The aim of the study was to determine a role of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands in amphetamine-evoked withdrawal anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. In our study memantine (8 and 12 mg/kg), a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist did not reduce amphetamine withdrawal anxiety. Acamprosate (NMDA and metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGluR5) antagonist) at the dose 200 and 400mg/kg showed anxiolytic-like effect, thus increasing the percent of time spent in open arms and a number of open arm entries. mGluR5 selective antagonist, MTEP (3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine hydrochloride) and mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid), caused effects similar to acamprosate at doses 1.25-5mg/kg and 2.5-5mg/kg, respectively. None of the glutamate ligands influenced locomotor activity of rats when given to the saline-treated group. Taking into account the positive correlation between amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety and relapse to amphetamine taking, our results suggest that modulation of mGluRs may prevent relapse to amphetamine and might pose a new direction in amphetamine abuse therapy.

  5. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Voluntary exercise and tail shock have differential effects on amphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity in adult BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kirsten M; Wagner, George C

    2006-09-01

    Exercise exerts neuroprotective effects and facilitates neural recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In the present studies, effects of exercise on amphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity were assessed in mice housed individually either with or without access to run wheels. Mice in run wheel cages ran approximately 20 000 revolutions/day (over 10 km/day). Some mice received amphetamine (18.5 mg/kg x 4 injections) whereas controls received saline. Amphetamine caused a 90% dopamine depletion in mice housed either with or without run wheels. A precipitous drop was seen in run wheel activity following amphetamine, lasting at least 7 days. A significant decrease in food intake, water intake and body weight also occurred. The opportunity to exercise did not facilitate behavioral or neurochemical recovery at 1, 2 or 3 days, or 2 weeks after injections. Therefore, shock stress, a component of some forced exercise studies, was evaluated to determine whether stress without exercise provided neuroprotection against amphetamine. Results indicate that shock stress exerted neuroprotective effects, reducing the amphetamine-induced dopamine depletion. It is concluded that voluntary running does not afford either behavioral or neuroprotection nor facilitate recovery from amphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity; rather, elevated glucocorticoid levels following shock stress were associated with a reduction in the dopamine depletion.

  7. Withdrawal from repeated treatment with amphetamine reduces novelty-seeking behavior and enhances environmental habituation in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro, Daniela F; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Saito, Luis P; Costa, Jacqueline M; Josino, Fabiana S; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Anhedonia associated with a dysphoric state is an important feature of amphetamine withdrawal in humans. We aimed to investigate the effects of amphetamine withdrawal on two motivation-related behaviors in mice: novelty seeking and environmental habituation. Because anxiety can interfere with the behavioral outcome of other tasks, amphetamine-withdrawn mice were also evaluated in the elevated plus maze. Swiss male mice (three months old) were treated with 2.0mg/kg amphetamine for 13 days, every other day, in their home cages (a total of seven injections). Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from drug treatment, mice were tested in a free-choice novelty apparatus containing one familiar and one novel compartment or in the elevated plus maze. Novelty-seeking behavior was assessed by comparing the time spent in the novel compartment vs. the familiar compartment, whereas environmental habituation was concomitantly evaluated by the time-response curve of total locomotion (novel+familiar). Novelty seeking was decreased during amphetamine withdrawal, and this result was not associated with changes in the anxiety-like behavior of mice. Additionally, amphetamine withdrawal enhanced environmental habituation. The concomitant decrease in novelty seeking and the increase in environmental habituation seem to be related to amphetamine withdrawal-induced anhedonia. Thus, the model proposed here could be used as a tool for the study of mechanisms and potential treatment of the anhedonic behavioral consequences of psychostimulant withdrawal.

  8. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning.

  9. Effect of cyproheptadine and combinations of cyproheptadine and amphetamine on intermittently reinforced lever-pressing in rats.

    PubMed

    Graeff, F G

    1976-10-20

    Effects of the tryptamine antagonist, cyproheptadine, as well as of amphetamine, chlordiazepoxide, and combinations of cyproheptadine with amphetamine on lever-pressing behavior of rats were determined. A multiple, fixed-interval, 2 min fixed-ratio, 15 response schedule of water presentation was used. The three drugs affected fixed-interval fixed-ratio responding in a rate-dependent way, lower rates being more increased whereas higher rates were relatively more decreased. Cyproheptadine increased low response rates to a lesser extent than amphetamine, but increased high response rates that were little affected or only decreased by amphetamine. The combination of cyproheptadine and amphetamine increased response rates to a higher extent than either of the drugs alone. In addition, the rate-suppressant effects of the highest doses of amphetamine were also enhanced by cyproheptadine. These results show that cyproheptadine can increase nonpunished responding and suggest that cyproheptadine and amphetamine act synergistically, but through different mechanisms, upon multiple fixed-interval fixed-ratio performance.

  10. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  11. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  12. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  13. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  14. Roche DAT immunoassay: sensitivity and specificity testing for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Crooks, C Richard; Brown, Sue

    2010-03-01

    Laboratory testing of oral fluid for drugs of abuse continues to expand in the workplace, legal, treatment, and health settings. In this study, we assessed recently developed homogeneous Roche DAT screening assays for amphetamines, cocaine metabolite [benzoylecgonine (BZE)], methamphetamines, and opiates in oral fluid. Precision and accuracy were assessed using control samples at +/-25% of cutoff. Sensitivity, specificity, and agreement compared to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was assessed by analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from 994 subjects enrolled in a drug treatment or probation and parole drug-testing program. An additional 180 research specimens from Kroll Laboratories were analyzed for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Screening cutoff concentrations (ng/mL) were as follows: amphetamines, 40; cocaine metabolite, 3; methamphetamines, 40; and opiates, 10. LC-MS-MS analyses were performed with the following cutoff concentrations (ng/mL): amphetamine, 40; BZE, 2.0; methamphetamine, 40; and codeine or morphine, 10. The percent coefficient of variation ranged from 3.4% to 7.3%. Sensitivity and specificity of the Roche DAT assays compared to LC-MS-MS were > 94%, and agreement was > 96% for the four assays. The performance of the Roche DAT assays suggests these new homogeneous screening assays will be an attractive alternative to existing more labor-intensive enzyme immunoassays.

  15. Cross-reactivity of amphetamine analogues with Roche Abuscreen radioimmunoassay reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    Cross-reactivity of amphetamine analogues with the Abuscreen amphetamine radioimmunoassay reagents was determined for both the standard and high specificity antibody systems. Compounds tested included 2-methoxyamphetamine, 4-hydroxymethamphetamine, 2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine (DMA), 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine (DOB), 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxy-beta-phenethylamine (BDMPEA), 3,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), N,N-dimethyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and N-hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (N-OH MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), and 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine (mescaline). Blank negative reference material was spiked with 1,000 to 100,000 ng/mL of the amphetamine analogue and used as sample in the assays. MDA was the only analogue that showed cross reactivity equal to or greater than that of amphetamine. None of the other analogue compounds demonstrated a positive result at even the highest concentration; however several showed depressed counts at various concentration levels.

  16. Methylphenidate and Amphetamine Do Not Induce Cytogenetic Damage in Lymphocytes of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Kristine L.; Shelby, Michael D.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda; Faircloth, Melissa; Kissling, Grace E.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Ravi, Hima; Murli, Hemalatha; Mattison, Donald R.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2008-01-01

    The inducement of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receiving treatment with methylphenidate- or amphetamine-based drugs is investigated. Findings did not reveal significant increases in cytogenetic damage related to the treatment. The risk for cytogenetic damage posed by such products…

  17. Brain injury associated with widely abused amphetamines: neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2010-12-01

    Over the course of the 20(th) century, it became increasingly clear that amphetamine-like psychostimulants carried serious abuse liability that has resulted in sociological use patterns that have been described as epidemics. In fact, drug addiction is a brain disease with a high worldwide prevalence, and is considered the most expensive of the neuropsychiatric disorders. This review goes beyond the previously well-documented evidence demonstrating that amphetamines cause neuronal injury. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of psychostimulants drugs have been extensively described giving particular attention to the role of oxidative stress and metabolic compromise. Recently, it was shown that the amphetamine class of drugs of abuse triggers an inflammatory process, emerging as a critical concept to understand the toxic effects of these drugs. Moreover, it has been suggested that psychostimulants compromise the capacity of the brain to generate new neurons (neurogenesis), and can also lead to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Together, these effects may contribute to brain damage, allowing the entry of pathogens into the brain parenchyma and thus decreasing the endogenous brain repair resources. The overall objective of this review is to highlight experimental evidence in an attempt to clarify the role of neuroinflammation in amphetamines-induced brain dysfunction and the effect of these drugs on both neurogenesis and BBB integrity.

  18. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  19. Opposing effects of acute and chronic d-amphetamine on decision-making in rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Scott A; Thapa, Raj; Badenhorst, Cecilia A; Briggs, Alicia R; Sawada, Justan A; Gruber, Aaron J

    2017-03-14

    Amphetamine and other drugs of abuse have both short-term and long-lasting effects on brain function, and drug sensitization paradigms often result in chronic impairments in behavioral flexibility. Here we show that acute amphetamine administration temporarily renders rats less sensitive to reward omission, as revealed by a decrease in lose-shift responding during a binary choice task. Intracerebral infusions of amphetamine into the ventral striatum did not affect lose-shift responding but did increase impulsive behavior in which rats chose to check both reward feeders before beginning the next trial. In contrast to acute systemic and intracerebral infusions, sensitization through repeated exposure induced long-lasting increased sensitivity to reward omission. These treatments did not affect choices on trials following reward delivery (i.e. win-stay responding), and sensitization increased spine density in the sensorimotor striatum. The dichotomous effects of amphetamine on short-term and long-term loss sensitivity, and the null effect on win-stay responding, are consistent with a shift of behavioral control to the sensorimotor striatum after drug sensitization. These data provide a new demonstration of such a shift in a novel task unrelated to drug administration, and suggests that the dominance of sensorimotor control persists over many hundreds of trials after sensitization.

  20. Alleviation of Brain Injury-Induced Cerebral Metabolic Depression by Amphetamine: A Cytochrome Oxidase Histochemistry Study

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard L.; Hovda, David A.; Chen, Michael J.; Feeney, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of oxidative metabolic capacity following the ablation of rat sensorimotor cortex and ,he administration of amphetamine were examined to determine their effects on the metabolic dysfunction that follows brain injury. Twenty-four hours after surgery, rats sustaining either sham operations or unilateral cortical ablation were administered a single injection of D-amphetamine (2 mg/kg; i.p.) or saline and then sacrificed 24 h later. Brain tissue was processed for cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and 12 bilateral cerebral areas were measured, using optical density as an index of the relative amounts of the enzyme. Compared with that of the control groups, cytochrome oxidase in the injured animals was significantly reduced throughout the cerebral cortex and in 5 of II subcortical structures. This injury-induced depression of oxidative capacity was most pronounced in regions of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the ablation. Animals given D-amphetamine had less depression of oxidative capacity, which was most pronounced bilaterally in the cerebral cortex, red nucleus, and superior colliculus; and in the nucleus accumbens, caudateputamen, and globus pallidus ipsilaterai to the ablation. The ability of D-amphetamine to alleviate depressed cerebral oxidative metabolism following cortical injury may be one mechanism by which drugs increasing noradrenaline release accelerate functional recovery in both animals and humans. PMID:10709218

  1. Loss of tolerance to amphetamine-induced hypophagia in rats: homeostatic readjustment vs. instrumental learning.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K M; Popi, L; Wolgin, D L

    1999-09-01

    According to the homeostatic model, the loss of tolerance to amphetamine-induced hypophagia requires a period of unrestricted feeding in the drug-free state, which transforms the compensatory response mediating tolerance ("hyperhunger") into a functional disturbance to homeostasis. In the absence of such a disturbance, tolerance should be retained. To test this prediction, rats tolerant to amphetamine's hypophagic effect were given a 4-week tolerance retention period during which milk intakes were restricted and deprivation levels held relatively constant. During this period the rats were assigned to one of the following drug treatment conditions: 1) saline injections both before and after daily milk tests (saline group); 2) saline injections before, and amphetamine injections after, daily milk tests (after group); 3) no injections and no milk tests (no-treatment group); or 4) amphetamine injections before, and saline injections after, milk tests (before group). Despite the restricted feeding regimen, both the saline and after groups lost tolerance. These results do not support the homeostatic model, but are consistent with the instrumental learning model, which views drinking milk in the undrugged state as analogous to receiving noncontingent reinforcement.

  2. Ventral pallidal neurons code incentive motivation: amplification by mesolimbic sensitization and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Tindell, Amy J; Berridge, Kent C; Zhang, Jun; Peciña, Susana; Aldridge, J Wayne

    2005-11-01

    Neurons in ventral pallidum fire to reward and its predictive cues. We tested mesolimbic activation effects on neural reward coding. Rats learned that a Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS+1 tone) predicted a second conditioned stimulus (CS+2 feeder click) followed by an unconditioned stimulus (UCS sucrose reward). Some rats were sensitized to amphetamine after training. Electrophysiological activity of ventral pallidal neurons to stimuli was later recorded under the influence of vehicle or acute amphetamine injection. Both sensitization and acute amphetamine increased ventral pallidum firing at CS+2 (population code and rate code). There were no changes at CS+1 and minimal changes to UCS. With a new 'Profile Analysis', we show that mesolimbic activation by sensitization/amphetamine incrementally shifted neuronal firing profiles away from prediction signal coding (maximal at CS+1) and toward incentive coding (maximal at CS+2), without changing hedonic impact coding (maximal at UCS). This pattern suggests mesolimbic activation specifically amplifies a motivational transform of CS+ predictive information into incentive salience coded by ventral pallidal neurons. Our results support incentive-sensitization predictions and suggest why cues temporally proximal to drug presentation may precipitate cue-triggered relapse in human addicts.

  3. [Cardiogenic shock after ingestion of amphetamines on a ground of Mycoplasma myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Berger, K; Hérault, M-C; Danel, V; Vincent, F; Jacquot, C

    2008-03-01

    Amphetamines are considered as narcotics in France. Their use induces modifications of the central nervous system and of the cardiovascular, respiratory and urinary systems by a sympathomimetic indirect effect. Here is reported the observation of a young woman who absorbed amphetamines causing a cardiogenic shock on a ground of acute myocarditis. The constitution of haemodynamic, respiratory and neurologic distresses lead to the endotracheal intubation of the patient. The haemodynamic status remaining shaky, despite the use of vasoactive drugs, a circulatory assistance by intra-aortic counter pulsation balloon was carried out. The initial echocardiography showed a left ventricular ejection fraction lower than 20%. Amphetamine's toxicity mechanisms still remain complicated; on cardiovascular plan, some cases of coronary artery spasm have been described. The coronarography, not accomplished immediately, was normal. Toxicological samples revealed an abnormally high amphetamines concentration. The severity of the cardiac attack was amplified by a Mycoplasma pneumoniae myocarditis. There was a positive evolution in eight days. Intoxication and infection can difficultly be dissociated in this case of cardiogenic shock.

  4. Amphetamines in wastewater of the city Poznań (Poland)--estimation of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Piotr; Klos, Jolanta; Kokot, Zenon J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the profile of amphetamines consumed by a community in Poland. Amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA (ecstasy) were detected in wastewater samples collected from the main Wastewater Treatment Plant in the city of Poznań (about 687 000 people) using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Back-calculations used in the sewage epidemiology approach were applied to estimate the level of consumption of the drugs being analyzed. These types of studies were carried out for the first time in Poland for a considerable period--from June 2009 to December 2010. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed significant monthly differences in amphetamine consumption. The concentration of amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA in wastewater samples and the levels of their consumption were lower than reported in other European countries, but unexpectedly, the ratio of consumed methamphetamine to MDMA and the consumption level of methamphetamine were relatively high. This study shows that sewage epidemiology is a promising tool, especially when combined with classical methods, to estimate illicit drugs use in a particular population. Therefore, efforts should be made to monitor the profiles and consumption levels of drugs and to extend the scope of the research to other illicit substances, especially cannabinoids and cocaine.

  5. Determination of amphetamines in hair by integrating sample disruption, clean-up and solid phase derivatization.

    PubMed

    Argente-García, A; Moliner-Martínez, Y; Campíns-Falcó, P; Verdú-Andrés, J; Herráez-Hernández, R

    2016-05-20

    The utility of matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) for the direct analysis of amphetamines in hair samples has been evaluated, using liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence detection and precolumn derivatization. The proposed approach is based on the employment of MSPD for matrix disruption and clean-up, followed by the derivatization of the analytes onto the dispersant-sample blend. The fluorogenic reagent 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC) has been used for derivatization. Different conditions for MSPD, analyte purification and solid phase derivatization have been tested, using amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MET), ephedrine (EPE) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as model compounds. The results have been compared with those achieved by using ultrasound-assisted alkaline digestion and by MSPD combined with conventional solution derivatization. On the basis of the results obtained, a methodology is proposed for the analysis of amphetamines in hair which integrates sample disruption, clean-up and derivatization using a C18 phase. Improved sensitivity is achieved with respect to that obtained by the alkaline digestion or by the MSPD followed by solution derivatization methods. The method can be used for the quantification of the tested amphetamines within the 2.0-20.0ng/mg concentration interval, with limits of detection (LODs) of 0.25-0.75ng/mg. The methodology is very simple and rapid (the preparation of the sample takes less than 15min).

  6. Dietary sodium manipulation during critical periods in development sensitize adult offspring to amphetamines.

    PubMed

    McBride, Shawna M; Culver, Bruce; Flynn, Francis W

    2008-09-01

    This study examined critical periods in development to determine when offspring were most susceptible to dietary sodium manipulation leading to amphetamine sensitization. Wistar dams (n = 6-8/group) were fed chow containing low (0.12% NaCl; LN), normal (1% NaCl; NN), or high sodium (4% NaCl; HN) during the prenatal or early postnatal period (birth to 5 wk). Offspring were fed normal chow thereafter until testing at 6 mo. Body weight (BW), blood pressure (BP), fluid intake, salt preference, response to amphetamine, open field behavior, plasma adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), plasma corticosterone (Cort), and adrenal gland weight were measured. BW was similar for all offspring. Offspring from the prenatal and postnatal HN group had increased BP, NaCl intake, and salt preference and decreased water intake relative to NN offspring. Prenatal HN offspring had greater BP than postnatal HN offspring. In response to amphetamine, both prenatal and postnatal LN and HN offspring had increased locomotor behavior compared with NN offspring. In a novel open field environment, locomotion was also increased in prenatal and postnatal LN and HN offspring compared with NN offspring. ACTH and Cort levels 30 min after restraint stress and adrenal gland weight measurement were greater in LN and HN offspring compared with NN offspring. These results indicate that early life experience with low- and high-sodium diets, during the prenatal or early postnatal period, is a stress that produces long-term changes in responsiveness to amphetamines and to subsequent stressors.

  7. [Application of solid-phase microextraction technique to the detection of amphetamines in urine by GC].

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Shen, M

    1999-05-01

    A simple and rapid detection of nine amphetamines co-existing in urine was described. In the test, the method of solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) by GC technique was used. Urine (1.0 ml), NaCl (0.3 g) and 4-phenylbutylamine (internal standard) were added into a vial (1.5 ml), then the sample was adjusted to pH 12 with 10% NaOH and sealed with a teflon-coated septum. After immersion of the SPME fiber (100 PDME) in the sample for 15 min, the SPME needle was inserted into the injection port of the GC and extruded for 3 min. The result showed that each peak from nine amphetamines compounds and internal standard was clearly separated. The calibration curves were linear from 0.2 to 15 micrograms/ml for most of five amphetamines with r between 0.9928-0.9995. The CV were less 10%. It is concluded that the method is simple, quick, accurate and useful for the practical detection of urine concentration of amphetamines.

  8. [The detection of amphetamines in urine samples using immunochromatographic test strips].

    PubMed

    Shanin, I A; Khan, O Iu; Petukhov, A E; Smirnov, A V; Eremin, S A

    2012-01-01

    This study has demonstrated the possibility of using immunochromatographic test strips for the reliable qualitative detection of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the urine samples at a cut-off level of 300 ng/ml. The test strips obtained from different manufactures are shown to be slightly different in terms of specificity as appears from the frequency of cross-reactions with various pharmaceutical products and narcotic drugs. Also, the use of the immunochromatographic strips makes it possible to determine amphetamine in a range of concentrations from 100 to 1000 ng/ml by measuring the intensity of test-line colour with the help of a TotalLab TL120 programmer and special scanning programs. The analysis for amphetamine using the NrcoStop (Osiris S) immunochromatographic strips failed to confirm the presence of this substance in the urine samples from the subjects who had drunk 0.5 l of energy drinks, such as Adrenaline RUSH, Red Bull, and Burn. It means that the presence of amphetamine in the urine should not be attributed to the consumption of such drinks.

  9. Performance of immunoassays in screening for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines in post-mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yukiko; Ojanperä, Ilkka; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki

    2003-01-28

    Several immunoassay methods for screening of abused drugs in whole blood were evaluated in post-mortem forensic toxicology. Blood samples known to be positive or negative for opiates, cannabinoids or amphetamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analysed by EMIT II Plus and EMIT d.a.u., Syva RapidTest and Triage 8 after acetone precipitation. In these experiments, the EMIT immunoassay method was modified by using the Dade Behring VIVA analyser to detect substances more sensitively. Low concentrations of abused drugs were detected in blood samples. The sensitivities of the modified EMIT method for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines were 100, 86 and 98%, respectively, whereas the values were below 86% with the other methods. The specificities of all immunoassay methods for opiates and cannabinoids were 83% or above but 51-85% for amphetamines. Sample rejection occurred in a few cases with the EMIT amphetamine assays. The modified EMIT immunoassay system presented here seems to be useful for screening of drugs of abuse in post-mortem blood samples, especially when urine is not available.

  10. Effects of D-amphetamine on response acquisition with immediate and delayed reinforcement.

    PubMed

    LeSage, M G; Byrne, T; Poling, A

    1996-11-01

    The present study examined in 8-hour sessions the effects of d-amphetamine (1.0, 5.6, and 10 mg/kg) on the acquisition of lever-press responding in rats that were exposed to procedures in which water delivery was delayed by 0, 8, or 16 seconds relative to the response that produced it. Both nonresetting- and resetting-delay conditions were studied. Although neither shaping nor autoshaping occurred, substantial levels of operative-lever responding developed under all conditions in which responses produced water. The lowest dose (1.0 mg/kg) of d-amphetamine either had no effect on or increased operative-lever pressing, whereas higher doses typically produced an initial reduction in lever pressing. Nonetheless, overall rates of operative-lever pressing at these doses were as high as, or higher than, those observed with vehicle. Thus, response acquisition was observed under all reinforcement procedures at all drug doses. In the absence of the drug, most responding occurred on the operative lever when reinforcement was immediate. Such differential responding also developed under both nonresetting- and resetting-delay procedures when the delay was 8 seconds, but not when it was 16 seconds. d-Amphetamine did not affect the development of differential responding under any procedure. Thus, consistent with d-amphetamine's effects under repeated acquisition procedures, the drug had no detrimental effect on learning until doses that produced general behavioral disruption were administered.

  11. The effects of amphetamine and scopolamine on adjunctive drinking and wheel-running in rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; White, J M

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of rats were exposed to a fixed-interval 90 s schedule of food reinforcement. One group had access to a drinking tube containing water and the second had access to a running wheel. Amphetamine (0.3-10.0 mg/kg) and scopolamine (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) were assessed for their effects on lever-pressing, adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running. Low to moderate doses of amphetamine increased overall rates of lever-pressing, whereas the highest dose decreased them. Scopolamine decreased overall lever-pressing rates in a dose-dependent manner. Both drugs changed the within-interval pattern of lever-pressing from one of increasing probability through the interval to almost constant probability throughout. Overall rates of adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running were decreased by amphetamine and scopolamine. Amphetamine failed to alter the within-interval patterns of either drinking or wheel-running in any substantial manner. The effect of scopolamine was to make the probabilities of each adjunctive behaviour more even through the interval. Although the two drugs had different actions, there was little difference in the way drinking and wheel-running were affected by each.

  12. Increased lever pressing for amphetamine after pimozide in rats: implications for a dopamine theory of reward.

    PubMed

    Yokel, R A; Wise, R A

    1975-02-14

    Low and high doses of a dopamine blocking agent had effects on lever pressing for intravenous amphetamine reward which resembled the effects of reward reduction and reward termination, respectively. Noradrenaline blockade had no such effects. A role in central mediation of reward perception is suggested for dopamine but not for noradrenaline.

  13. Quantitation of amphetamine-type stimulants by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, Robert A; Homan, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamines or amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs) refer to a group of pharmacological and -toxicological agents that have a common phenethylamine structural backbone and typically impart effects that include, but are not limited to, vasoconstriction, anorexia, central nervous system stimulation, and/or hallucinations. While differences in side chain chemistry can impart different pharmacological or toxicological effects, for some compounds, e.g., MDMA (Ecstasy), alterations of the phenyl part of the molecule impart other significant effects. ATSs are used both therapeutically and recreationally, with significant abuse and addiction potential. Therapeutically, these agents are mainly used to treat hyperactivity disorders or aid in weight loss. Toxicological effects include hypertension, arrhythmia, excitability, aggressiveness, psychoses, coma, and death.Traditional analytical methods to analyze amphetamines include gas chromatography-mass spectrometry where derivatization is often required to facilitate analysis. Besides sample preparation issues, it has been demonstrated that injection port chemistry in the GC can lead to misleading results with some members of the amphetamine class. To circumvent these issues, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers the promise of a simpler sample preparation procedure and fewer analytical concerns. This chapter describes an LC-MS/MS technique for the analysis of 14 ATSs in blood, serum/plasma, and urine. The method is quantitative and has reporting limits in the low ng/mL range. Electrospray ionization is used in the positive ion mode. Two transitions for each compound are monitored along with ion ratios.

  14. Relation between blood- and urine-amphetamine concentrations in impaired drivers as influenced by urinary pH and creatinine.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Karlsson, L

    2005-12-01

    Amphetamine undergoes extensive renal excretion and significant amounts are present in urine as the unchanged parent drug. This prompted us to investigate whether a quantitative relationship existed between blood and urine concentrations of amphetamine in the body fluids of drug-impaired drivers apprehended in Sweden, where this stimulant is the major drug of abuse. The relationship between blood and urine concentrations of amphetamine was determined by multivariate analysis with urinary pH and creatinine as predictor variables. Amphetamine was determined in blood and urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with deuterium-labelled internal standards. The concentration of amphetamine in urine was about 200 times greater than the concentration in blood; the mean and median urine/blood ratios were 214 and 160, respectively, with large individual variations. The Pearson correlation coefficient between urine (y) and blood (x) amphetamine was r = 0.53, n = 48, which was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001), although the residual standard deviation (SD) was large (+/- 181 mg/L). The correlation coefficient increased (r = 0.60) when the concentration of amphetamine in urine was normalized for dilution by dividing with the creatinine content. When urinary pH and creatinine were both included as predictor variables, the correlation coefficient was even higher (r = 0.69), now explaining 48% (r2 = 0.48) of the variation in urine-amphetamine concentration. However, the partial regression coefficient for creatinine (53 +/- 28.7) was not statistically significant (t = 1.85, P > 0.05), whereas the corresponding regression coefficient for pH was highly significant and had a negative sign (-102 +/- 32.6, t= -3.12, P < 0.005). Other factors could impact on the urine-blood amphetamine relationship, such as route of administration, pattern of voiding and time elapsed after use of the drug.

  15. Facilitation of amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice by GABA agonists and CCK-8.

    PubMed

    Boschi, G; Launay, N; Rips, R

    1991-04-01

    1. Amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice is facilitated by dopaminergic stimulation and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic inhibition. The present study was designed to investigate: (a) the involvement of other neuronal systems, such as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the opioid and the cholecystokinin (CCK-8) systems; (b) the possible contribution of hydroxylated metabolites of amphetamine to the hypothermia; (c) the capacity of dopamine itself to induce hypothermia and its mechanisms, in order to clarify the resistance of amphetamine-induced hypothermia to certain neuroleptics. 2. Pretreatment with the GABA antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin, did not inhibit amphetamine-induced hypothermia. The GABAB agonist, baclofen (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) potentiated this hypothermia, whereas the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not. gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) (40 mg kg-1, i.p.) and the neuropeptide CCK-8 (0.04 mg kg-1, i.p.) also induced potentiation. The opioid antagonist, naloxone, was without effect. 3. Dopamine itself (3, 9, 16 and 27 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced less hypothermia than the same doses of amphetamine. Sulpiride did not block dopamine-induced hypothermia, but pimozide (4 mg kg-1, i.p.), cis(z)flupentixol (0.25 mg kg-1, i.p.) and haloperidol (5 micrograms, i.c.v.) did. The direct dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, did not alter the hypothermia. Neither the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor blocker, cyproheptadine, nor the inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), modified dopamine-induced hypothermia. Fluoxetine, an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, had no effect, whereas quipazine (6 mg kg-1, i.p.), a 5-HT agonist, totally prevented the hypothermia. Hypothermia was unaffected by pretreatment with CCK-8. 4. These data indicate that the hypothermia induced by amphetamine involves not only dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic systems which are functionally antagonistic, but is also facilitated by direct or indirect GABA and CCK-8 receptor stimulation

  16. Pharmacological modulation of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia in transplanted hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gaynor A; Breger, Ludivine S; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    Foetal cell transplantation in patients with Parkinson's disease can induce motor complications independent of L-DOPA administration, known as graft-induced dyskinesia. In the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease, post-transplantation abnormal movements can develop in response to an amphetamine challenge, a behaviour which is used to model graft-induced dyskinesia. Although L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia has been well characterised pharmacologically, we lack knowledge on the modulation of post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia which may shed light on the mechanisms underlying graft-induced dyskinesia. We assessed a series of drugs effective at reducing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia against post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. Agents include: dopaminergic antagonists (D₁: CP94253; D₂: SCH-22390; D₃: nafadotride), serotonergic agonists (5-HT(1A): 8-OH-DPAT; 5-HT(1B): CP94253), opioid antagonist (μ: naloxone), cannabinoid agonist (CB₁: WIN55, 212-2), adrenergic antagonist (α₁ and α₂: yohimbine) and glutamatergic antagonists (NMDA: amantadine and MK-801; mGluR5: MTEP; AMPA: IEM1460). Abnormal involuntary movements in response to amphetamine were decreased by SCH-22390, raclopride, CP94253 and 8-OH-DPAT, yet were unaltered by naloxone, WIN55, 212-2, yohimbine, amantadine, MTEP and IEM1460. Unusually, MK-801 increased the appearance of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. The results suggest that dopaminergic, serotoninergic and glutamatergic systems are likely to have a fundamental role in the development of graft-induced dyskinesias, which are mechanistically distinct from L-DOPA-induced behvaviours. Importantly, the expression of D₁ and D₂ receptors was unrelated to the severity of AIMs.

  17. Performance on an impulse control task is altered in adult rats exposed to amphetamine during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Hankosky, Emily R.; Gulley, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs is associated with long-lasting changes in cognition, particularly in behavioral tasks that are sensitive to prefrontal cortex function. Adolescents may be especially vulnerable to these drug-induced cognitive changes because of the widespread adaptations in brain anatomy and function that are characteristic of normal development during this period. Here, we used a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding task in rats to determine if amphetamine exposure during adolescence would alter behavioral inhibition in adulthood. Between postnatal day 27 and 45, rats received every other day injections of saline or amphetamine (3 mg/kg). At postnatal day 125, rats were trained progressively through a series of four reinforcement schedules (DRL 5, 10, 15 and 30 sec) that required them to withhold responding for the appropriate amount of time before a lever press was reinforced. Relative to controls, amphetamine-treated rats displayed transient deficits in behavioral inhibition (i.e., decreases in efficiency ratio) that were only evident at DRL 5. In addition, they had increased responding during non-reinforced periods, which suggested increased perseveration and propensity to attribute incentive salience to reward-paired cues. Following challenge injections with amphetamine (0.25–1 mg/kg, i.p.), which were given 10 min before the start of DRL 30 test sessions, both groups exhibited dose-dependent decreases in efficiency. These results suggest that amphetamine-induced alterations in incentive-motivation and perseveration are more robust and longer-lasting than its effects on impulse control. PMID:22778047

  18. Multiresidual analysis of emerging amphetamine-like psychoactive substances in wastewater and river water.

    PubMed

    Senta, Ivan; Krizman, Ivona; Ahel, Marijan; Terzic, Senka

    2015-12-18

    Besides the common illicit drugs, such as cocaine, heroin, and marijuana, there is a growing concern about the use of modern "designer drugs" that have emerged in large numbers over the past few years. In this work, a sensitive and selective method for simultaneous determination of 25 synthetic amphetamine-like psychoactive compounds, including amphetamine, sympathomimetic substituted amphetamines, synthetic cathinones and ketamine, in raw wastewater (RW), secondary effluent (SE) and river water was developed. Samples were enriched by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on mixed-mode reversed-phase/strong cation-exchange sorbent (Oasis MCX) and analysed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The target compounds were separated on a Synergi Polar column and detected using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive ionisation mode. Accurate quantification was achieved by using several deuterated analogues as surrogate standards. Careful optimisation and validation of the procedure resulted in a reliable determination of all target analytes in low ng/L range for all matrices, which makes the method suitable for the application in wastewater-based epidemiology. The method was applied for assessment of selected compounds in municipal wastewater and river water from Croatia. It was shown that most of the wastewater samples contained detectable levels of the well-known synthetic illicit drugs, amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) (concentrations up to 545ng/L and 55ng/L in RW, respectively), as well as ephedrine (up to 108ng/L) and pseudoephedrine (up to 698ng/L), which are used as ingredients of popular over-the counter cough and cold medications. Other target amphetamine-like psychoactive substances, recently reported for their potential abuse, were detected only occasionally and in low concentrations (<10ng/L).

  19. Protective effects of amphetamine on gastric ulcerations induced by indomethacin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Vlaicu; Cuparencu, Barbu; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Birt, Mircea A; Krausz, Tibor L

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of amphetamine, an indirect-acting adrenomimetic compound on the indomethacin-induced gastric ulcerations in rats. METHODS: Male Wistar-Bratislava rats were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control), received an ulcerogenic dose of indomethacin (50 μmol/kg) and Groups 2, 3 and 4, treated with amphetamine (10, 25 and 50 μmol/kg). The drug was administered simultaneously with indomethacin and once again 4 h later. The animals were sacrificed 8 h after indomethacin treatment. The stomachs were opened and the incidence, the number of lesions and their severity were evaluated. The results were expressed as percentage and as mean ± standard error (mean ± SE). RESULTS: The incidence of ulceration in the control group was 100%. Amphetamine, at doses of 10, 25 and 50 μmol/kg, lowered the incidence to 88.89%, 77.78% and 37.5% respectively. The protection ratio was positive: 24.14%, 55.17% and 80.6% respectively. The total number of ulcerations/rat was 12.44 ± 3.69 in the control group. It decreased to 7.33 ± 1.89, 5.33 ± 2.38 and 2.25 ± 1.97 under the effects of the above-mentioned doses of amphetamine. CONCLUSION: Amphetamine affords a significant dose-dependent protection against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulcerations in rats. It is suggested that the adrenergic system is involved in the gastric mucosa protection. PMID:17131481

  20. Homeostatic regulation and Pavlovian conditioning in tolerance to amphetamine-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Poulos, C X; Wilkinson, D A; Cappell, H

    1981-10-01

    A series of experiments on the role of Pavlovian processes in tolerance to amphetamine-induced anorexia in rats was conducted. In Experiment 1A, tolerance to the suppressant effect of d-amphetamine (4.0 mg/kg) on milk consumption was substantially diminished in an environment not previously associated with drug administration. Experiment 1B supported the interpretation that Pavlovian compensatory conditioning rather than a nonassociative mechanism mediated this phenomenon. Experiment 2 examined the hypothesis that "contingent tolerance" results from an inadvertent manipulation of Pavlovian cues. As in previous research, tolerance was contingent in that it did not develop if the rats were not exposed to food under the influence of the drug. Tolerance developed only if access to food occurred under the influence of amphetamine, but as in Experiment 1A, it was substantially diminished in an environment not previously associated with drug administration. Thus, tolerance to amphetamine-induced anorexia was shown to be both contingent on previous experience with food in the drugged state and subject to Pavlovian control. No current explanation for the occurrence of contingent tolerance or for the control of tolerance by Pavlovian processes can at once account for both of these findings. Experiment 3 confirmed the hypothesis that interaction with the food stimulus would be necessary to extinguish tolerance. This finding is also problematic for any current behavioral theory of tolerance. It is proposed that interaction with food is necessary for the homeostatic regulation of disturbances in eating caused by amphetamine. When activated, this regulatory process operates by means of Pavlovian conditional compensatory processes.

  1. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  2. β-Methylphenylethylamines: common fragmentation pathways with amphetamines in electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Brown, David H; Hansson, Robert; Oosthuizen, Francois; Sumner, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    β-Methylphenylethylamines are positional isomers of amphetamines and have been discovered in sporting supplements. Although the fragmentation of the β-methylphenylethylamine and N-methyl-β-methylphenylethylamine in gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) systems is significantly different to their amphetamine and methylamphetamine isomers, under electrospray ionization commonly used in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) systems, the fragmentation of each of the isomeric pairs is almost identical. The similarities in fragmentation make it possible for the misidentification of the β-methylphenylethylamines as the illicit amphetamines. It is proposed that the similarities are due to a fragmentation pathway involving a common phenonium ion intermediate. By careful control of fragmentation energies in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) systems and/or close examination of the relative abundances of product ions formed by collision-induced dissociation (qualifier ratios), it is possible to distinguish the β-methylphenylethylamines from the amphetamines, even if significant retention time separation is not achieved. In liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time of flight (LC-ESI-QTOF) systems the mass spectra of the β-methylphenylethylamines are identical to their amphetamine isomers. In such systems, retention time separation of the isomers is critical to avoid misidentification. During this study β-methylphenylethylamine and N-methyl-β-methylphenylethylamine have been identified in commercially available sporting supplements and oral fluid samples taken during the course of road-side drugs-in-drivers and workplace testing programmes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Sensitization of midbrain dopamine neuron reactivity promotes the pursuit of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Vezina, Paul; Lorrain, Daniel S; Arnold, Gretchen M; Austin, Jennifer D; Suto, Nobuyoshi

    2002-06-01

    Stimulant drugs such as amphetamine are readily self-administered by humans and laboratory animals by virtue of their actions on dopamine (DA) neurons of the midbrain. Repeated exposure to this drug systemically or exclusively in the cell body region of these neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) leads to long-lasting changes in dopaminergic function that can be assessed by increased locomotor activity and enhanced DA overflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) after re-exposure to the drug. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the possibility that this enduring sensitized reactivity underlies compulsive drug self-administration. In all experiments, rats were pre-exposed to amphetamine and, starting 10 d later, their intravenous self-administration of the drug was assessed. In the first experiment, rats previously exposed to amphetamine systemically or exclusively in the VTA subsequently worked harder than untreated animals to obtain the drug when the work required to obtain successive infusions was increased progressively. In the second experiment, this progressively increasing workload was found to decrease the magnitude of amphetamine-induced DA overflow observed with successive infusions until responding ceased. Rats previously exposed to amphetamine were more resistant to this decline and more apt to maintain responding. Finally, in experiment three, a noncontingent priming injection of the drug produced a greater NAcc DA response and a greater parallel increase in lever pressing in drug compared with saline pre-exposed rats. Together, these results demonstrate a direct relation between drug-induced sensitization of midbrain dopamine neuron reactivity and the excessive pursuit and self-administration of an abused substance.

  4. Intravenous self-administration of amphetamine is increased in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Masini, Cher V; Primeaux, Stefany D; Garrett, Joshua L; Zellner, Andrew; Stogner, Kimberly S; Duncan, Alicia A; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2002-10-01

    Affective disorders and substance abuse frequently coexist, yet few previous studies have examined drug self-administration using animal models of depression. The olfactory-bulbectomized rat is a well-established model that exhibits a high degree of neurochemical similarity to depression. Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) increases dopamine receptor densities in the ventral striatum, which may increase the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Experiments were designed to test the hypotheses that acquisition and stable self-administration of amphetamine would be increased in bulbectomized rats. In the first experiment, rats underwent bilateral OBX or sham surgery and intravenous jugular catheters were implanted 12-14 days later. Acquisition was examined using a standard operant paradigm involving a nose-poke response for a very low dose of D-amphetamine sulfate (12 microg/infusion, IV). A separate group of rats received coinfusions of sulpiride. In a second experiment designed to minimize differences in acquisition and examine stable self-administration, lever pressing for a low (0.10 mg/kg, IV) or high (0.25 mg/kg, IV) dose of D-amphetamine sulfate was measured in rats pretrained to lever press for food. Bulbectomized rats acquired the self-administration of very low dose amphetamine faster than sham-operated rats and this effect was reversed by sulpiride coinfusion. Stable self-administration of the low dose of amphetamine was also markedly increased in bulbectomized rats. The findings reveal the utility of the OBX model for studying the neurobiological basis of depression and drug abuse comorbidity and support the hypothesis that neurochemical abnormalities associated with depression may enhance the addictive properties of some drugs of abuse.

  5. The 1.8-A crystal structure of a matrix metalloproteinase 8-barbiturate inhibitor complex reveals a previously unobserved mechanism for collagenase substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, H; Grams, F; Glitz, D; Lang, A; Huber, R; Bode, W; Krell, H W; Engh, R A

    2001-05-18

    The individual zinc endoproteinases of the tissue degrading matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family share a common catalytic architecture but are differentiated with respect to substrate specificity, localization, and activation. Variation in domain structure and more subtle structural differences control their characteristic specificity profiles for substrates from among four distinct classes (Nagase, H., and Woessner, J. F. J. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 21491-21494). Exploitation of these differences may be decisive for the design of anticancer or other drugs, which should be highly selective for their particular MMP targets. Based on the 1.8-A crystal structure of human neutrophil collagenase (MMP-8) in complex with an active site-directed inhibitor (RO200-1770), we identify and describe new structural determinants for substrate and inhibitor recognition in addition to the primary substrate recognition sites. RO200-1770 induces a major rearrangement at a position relevant to substrate recognition near the MMP-8 active site (Ala206-Asn218). In stromelysin (MMP-3), competing stabilizing interactions at the analogous segment hinder a similar rearrangement, consistent with kinetic profiling of several MMPs. Despite the apparent dissimilarity of the inhibitors, the central 2-hydroxypyrimidine-4,6-dione (barbiturate) ring of the inhibitor RO200-1770 mimics the interactions of the hydroxamate-derived inhibitor batimastat (Grams, F., Reinemer, P., Powers, J. C., Kleine, T., Pieper, M., Tschesche, H., Huber, R., and Bode, W. (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 228, 830-841) for binding to MMP-8. The two additional phenyl and piperidyl ring substituents of the inhibitor bind into the S1' and S2' pockets of MMP-8, respectively. The crystal lattice contains a hydrogen bond between the O(gamma) group of Ser209 and N(delta)1 of His207 of a symmetry related molecule; this interaction suggests a model for recognition of hydroxyprolines present in physiological substrates. We also identify a

  6. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... to alcohol use Get into trouble with the law, family members, friends, school, or dates because of alcohol THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL Alcoholic drinks have different amounts of alcohol in them. Beer is about 5% alcohol, although some beers can ...

  7. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  8. Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit by amphetamine through a mechanism involving an increased secretion of CCK in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Ming-Luen; Lu, Chien-Chen; Kau, Mei-Mei; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Chiao, Yu-Chung; Chen, Jiann-Jong; Yeh, Jiun-Yih; Lin, Ho; Huang, Seng-Wong; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Chang, Full-Young; Wang, Paulus S

    1998-01-01

    The effect of amphetamine on gastrointestinal (GI) transit and the plasma levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) were studied in male rats. Gastric emptying was inhibited both acutely and chronically by the administration of amphetamine. GI transit was decreased by the acute administration of amphetamine but not affected by the chronic administration of amphetamine. Plasma CCK levels were increased dose-dependently by amphetamine. Proglumide, a CCK receptor antagonist, prevented amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and the decrease in GI transit in male rats. The selective CCKA receptor antagonist, lorglumide, dose-dependently attenuated the amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying in male rats. In contrast, the selective CCKB receptor antagonist, PD 135,158, did not reverse the effect of amphetamine on gastric emptying. Both lorglumide and PD 135,158 reversed the inhibitory effect of amphetamine on GI transit in male rats. These results suggest that amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit is due in part to a mechanism associated with the hypersecretion of endogenous CCK. PMID:9720782

  9. Physicochemical studies of the reaction of 99mTc with 5,5‧-diethyl barbituric acid, adenine, D-glucose and thiobarbituric acid at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, M. S.; El-Shahat, M. F.; Elkholany, A. S.

    2014-06-01

    The reaction of 99mTc pertechnetate with 5,5‧-diethyl barbituric acid, adenine, D-glucose and thiobarbituric acid at different temperatures was studied. The solvent effect on the electronic absorption spectra of the reactions was recorded. The reaction mixtures have been analyzed at different times using TLC and a radiodetctor to show the peaks at the plates. 99mTc pertechnetate is obtained from the Mo generators. It is difficult to separate the complexes in the solid state. The percentage of 99mTc involved in the complexes can be determined. Characterization of the 99mTc complexes as well as the determination of the extent of radiolabeling was done by thin layer chromatography using 0.9% NaCl solution as a solvent. The Rf value of 99TcO4- is (≈1). The solvatochromism for the reaction of 99mTc with D-glucose was mainly affected by solute permanent dipole-solvent permanent dipole interaction, the dipolar interaction for the reaction of 99mTc with of 5,5‧-diethyl barbituric acid and for the reaction of 99mTc with adenine and thiobarbituric was solute-solvent hydrogen bonding.

  10. Comparison of the anorectic and motor activity effects of some aminoindanes, 2-aminotetralin and amphetamine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mrongovius, R I; Bolt, A G; Hellyer, R O

    1978-01-01

    1. The anorectic and motor activity effects of 1-aminoindane, 2-aminoindane, some N-substituted 2-aminoindanes, 2-aminotetralin, amphetamine and fenfluramine were determined in rats. 2. The two compounds with structures most like the extended conformation of amphetamine, 2-aminotetralin and 2-aminoindane, were potent anorectics. At dosages which halved the intake of food over 1 h, amphetamine increased motor activity, 2-aminotetralin had no effect, and 2-aminoindane reduced motor activity. 3. Both the anorectic and central stimulant actions of 2-aminoindane were absent in N-ethyl- and N-isopropyl-2-aminoindane. 4. 1-Aminoindane, whose structure is like the folded conformation of amphetamine, produced a small anorectic effect and depressed motor activity.

  11. D1 dopamine receptor blockade prevents the facilitation of amphetamine self-administration induced by prior exposure to the drug.

    PubMed

    Pierre, P J; Vezina, P

    1998-07-01

    Prior exposure to amphetamine leads to sensitized locomotor responding to subsequent injections and an enhanced predisposition to self-administer low doses of the drug. Because D1 dopamine (DA) receptors have been shown to play an important role in the development of sensitized locomotor responding to amphetamine, the present experiment assessed their contribution to the development of facilitated amphetamine self-administration produced by prior exposure to the drug. During a pre-exposure phase, rats were administered two injections on each of 10 consecutive days. The first injection (saline, 1 ml/kg, i.p., or the D1 DA receptor antagonist SCH23390, 0.04 mg/kg, s.c.) preceded the second (saline or amphetamine, 1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) by 30 min. Starting 10 days after the last injection, animals were given the opportunity to lever press for a low dose of amphetamine (10 microg/kg per infusion) in a two-lever (active versus inactive) continuous reinforcement operant task, in each of seven daily sessions. Consistent with previous reports, prior exposure to amphetamine resulted in an increase in active versus inactive lever pressing. Blocking D1 DA receptors with SCH23390 prior to each of the amphetamine pre-exposure injections prevented the development of this enhanced self-administration of amphetamine. When animals were grouped according to their locomotor response to a novel environment (assessed prior to the experiment), it was found, again in agreement with previous reports, that enhanced drug self-administration (as indicated by increased active versus inactive lever pressing as well as shorter latencies to emit the first active lever press, shorter inter-response times and more time-out responses on this lever) was observed only in amphetamine pre-exposed rats that had shown a locomotor response to novelty above the median of the subject sample (high responders). Preceding the amphetamine pre-exposure injections with SCH23390 blocked the development of enhanced drug

  12. Predisposition to self-administer amphetamine: the contribution of response to novelty and prior exposure to the drug.

    PubMed

    Pierre, P J; Vezina, P

    1997-02-01

    The present experiment examined the contribution of locomotor response to novelty and prior exposure to amphetamine to rats' predisposition to self-administer a low dose of the drug. Rats were screened for their locomotor response to a novel environment and divided into high (HR) or low (LR) responders based on whether their locomotor scores were above or below the median activity level of the subject sample. Animals were then pre-exposed to nine daily injections of either saline (1 ml/kg, i.p.) or amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Starting 1 week after pre-exposure, animals in the four different groups (HR pre-exposed to saline or amphetamine; LR pre-exposed to saline or amphetamine) were given the opportunity, in each of ten daily sessions, to lever press for a low dose of amphetamine (10 micrograms/kg per infusion) in a two lever (active versus inactive) continuous reinforcement operant task. Initial lever press performance revealed no difference in active versus inactive lever pressing between amphetamine and saline pre-exposed animals. However, in agreement with previous reports, with successive test sessions amphetamine pre-exposed rats maintained higher levels of active versus inactive lever pressing for drug while saline pre-exposed rats showed a progressive decrease in the pressing of either lever. Interestingly, this enhanced active lever pressing was observed in HR but not LR rats pre-exposed to amphetamine. In addition, HR saline pre-exposed animals showed initial active versus inactive lever pressing equivalent to that of HR amphetamine pretreated rats but this enhanced responding for drug diminished over days and by the last day of self-administration was indistinguishable from that of LR animals having been pre-exposed either to amphetamine or saline. These findings confirm that prior exposure to amphetamine promotes the subsequent self-administration of the drug and suggest that response to novelty may be a predictor more closely linked to an animal

  13. Quinpirole- and amphetamine-induced hyperdipsia: influence of fluid palatability and behavioral cost.

    PubMed

    Cioli, I; Caricati, A; Nencini, P

    2000-04-01

    Daily administration of moderate doses of amphetamine or of the dopaminergic D2 agonist quinpirole is associated with the development of excessive, non-regulatory drinking. Here we compared the influence of manipulating fluid palatability and behavioral cost on the development of this drinking augmentation. Experiment 1 was based on the phenomenon of contrafreeloading (CFL): animals work for a resource even though the same resource is freely available. The effects of 15 daily injections of amphetamine (1.0 and 1.7 mg/kg i.p. ) or quinpirole (0.1 and 0.56 mg/kg i.p.) were evaluated in mildly water-deprived rats. For the first 6 days the rats obtained water by lever pressing (FR3) only; over the following 9 days water was also freely available (CFL). Initially, 0.56 mg/kg quinpirole reduced lever pressing for water. A complete recover of responding was then obtained, and was followed by a progressive increment in the amount water obtained by lever pressing during the CFL phase (from 10 to 50%). Amphetamine did not affect percent CFL, but at the highest dose (1.7 mg/kg) reduced total water intake during the last 3 days of treatment. In experiment 2 the rats had free access to two bottles, one of which contained tap water, and the other contained either an ethanol (6%) or a sucrose (5%) solution. After habituation to this regimen, the rats received 10 daily i.p. injections of vehicle, amphetamine (1.0 or 3 mg/kg), or quinpirole (0.1 or 0.56 mg/kg). Quinpirole 0.56 mg/kg enhanced daily fluid intake under both sucrose and ethanol conditions, but selectively reduced ethanol preference. The higher amphetamine dose reduced fluid intake and sucrose preference. In conclusion, chronic exposure to a dopaminergic D2 agonist, but not to amphetamine, produced an increment of drinking that was resistant to manipulation of either palatability or the behavioral cost of the fluid.

  14. Tph2 gene deletion enhances amphetamine-induced hypermotility: effect of 5-HT restoration and role of striatal noradrenaline release.

    PubMed

    Carli, Mirjana; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Mainolfi, Pierangela; Anastasia, Alessia; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William

    2015-11-01

    Variants of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), the gene encoding enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT), have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, substance abuse and addiction. This study assessed the effect of Tph2 gene deletion on motor behavior and found that motor activity induced by 2.5 and 5 mg/kg amphetamine was enhanced in Tph2(-/-) mice. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique we found that the ability of amphetamine to stimulate noradrenaline (NA) release in the striatum was reduced by about 50% in Tph2(-/-) mice while the release of dopamine (DA) was not affected. Tph2 deletion did not affect the release of NA and DA in the prefrontal cortex. The role of endogenous 5-HT in enhancing the effect of amphetamine was confirmed showing that treatment with the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (10 mg/kg) restored tissue and extracellular levels of brain 5-HT and the effects of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. Treatment with the NA precursor dihydroxyphenylserine (400 mg/kg) was sufficient to restore the effect of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is attenuated by endogenous 5-HT through the inhibition of striatal NA release. Tph2(-/-) mice may be a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in the action of psychostimulants. Acute sensitivity to the motor effects of amphetamine has been associated to increased risk of psychostimulant abuse. Here, we show that deletion of Tph2, the gene responsible for brain 5-HT synthesis, enhances the motor effect of amphetamine in mice through the inhibition of striatal NA release. This suggests that Tph2(-/-) mice is a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in psychostimulants action. Tph2, tryptophan hydroxylase-2.

  15. Long-term effects of amphetamine neurotoxicity on tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, J F; Frame, L T; Clausing, P; Nagamoto-Combs, K; Osterhout, C A; Sterling, C R; Tank, A W

    1998-08-01

    Four injections (intraperitoneal) of 3 mg/kg amphetamine (2 hr apart) produced pronounced hyperthermia and sustained decreases in dopamine levels and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels in the striatum of 15-month-old male rats. A partial recovery of striatal dopamine levels was observed at 4 months after amphetamine. In contrast, TH mRNA and TH protein levels in the midbrain were unaffected at all time points tested up to 4 months after amphetamine treatment. The number of TH-immunopositive cells in the midbrain was also unchanged at 4 months after amphetamine, even though the number of TH-positive axons in the striatum remained dramatically decreased at this time point. Interestingly, TH-immunopositive cell bodies were observed 4 months after amphetamine in the lateral caudate/putamen, defined anteriorly by the genu of the corpus collosum and posteriorly by the junction of the anterior commissures; these striatal TH-positive cells were not observed in saline- or amphetamine-treated rats that did not become hyperthermic. In addition, low levels (orders of magnitude lower than that present in the midbrain) of TH mRNA were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in the striatum of these amphetamine-treated rats. Our results suggest that even though there is a partial recovery of striatal dopamine levels, which occurs within 4 months after amphetamine treatment, this recovery is not associated with increased TH gene expression in the midbrain. Furthermore, new TH-positive cells are generated in the striatum at this 4-month time point.

  16. [Out of addictions: Alcohol, or alcohol to alcohol].

    PubMed

    Simmat-Durand, L; Vellut, N; Lejeune, C; Jauffret-Roustide, M; Mougel, S; Michel, L; Planche, M

    2016-06-29

    Pathways from alcoholism to recovery are documented; less often are those from drug addiction to alcoholism. Biographical approaches allow analyzing how people change their uses and talk about their trajectories of recovery.

  17. Co-occurring amphetamine use and associated medical and psychiatric comorbidity among opioid-dependent adults: results from the clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Pilowsky, Daniel J; Wu, Li-Tzy; Burchett, Bruce; Blazer, Dan G; Woody, George E; Ling, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background In response to the rising rate of treatment admissions related to illicit use of amphetamines (eg, methamphetamine), we examined the prevalence of amphetamine use among treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent adults, explored whether amphetamine users were as likely as nonamphetamine users to enroll in opioid-dependence treatment trials, and determined whether amphetamine users manifested greater levels of medical and psychiatric comorbidity than nonusers. Methods The sample included 1257 opioid-dependent adults screened for participation in three-multisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-003), which studied the effectiveness of buprenorphine for opioid detoxification under varying treatment conditions. Patients were recruited from 23 addiction treatment programs across the US. Medical and psychiatric comorbidity were examined by past-month amphetamine use (current vs former) and route of administration. Five mutually exclusive groups were examined, ie, nonusers, current amphetamine injectors, current amphetamine noninjectors, former amphetamine injectors, and former amphetamine noninjectors. Results Of the sample (n = 1257), 22.3% had a history of regular amphetamine use. Of the 280 amphetamine users, 30.3% reported injection as their primary route. Amphetamine users were more likely than nonusers to be white and use more substances. Amphetamine users were as likely as nonusers to enroll in treatment trials. Bivariate analyses indicated elevated rates of psychiatric problems (depression, anxiety, hallucinations, cognitive impairment, violence, suicidal thoughts/attempts) and medical illnesses (dermatological, hepatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, seizure, allergy conditions) among amphetamine users. After adjusting for demographic variables and lifetime use of other substances: current amphetamine users and former injectors showed an increased likelihood of having medical illnesses and

  18. Influence of Chronic Amphetamine Treatment and Acute Withdrawal on Serotonin Synthesis and Clearance Mechanisms in the Rat Ventral Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Solanki, Rajeshwari R.; Watt, Michael J.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal in both humans and rats is associated with increased anxiety states, which are thought to contribute to drug relapse. Serotonin in the ventral hippocampus mediates affective behaviors, and reduced serotonin levels in this region are observed in rat models of high anxiety, including during withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. This goal of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which reduced ventral hippocampus serotonergic neurotransmission occurs during amphetamine withdrawal. Serotonin synthesis (assessed by accumulation of serotonin precursor as a measure of the capacity of in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), expression of serotonergic transporters, and in vivo serotonergic clearance using in vivo microdialysis, were assessed in the ventral hippocampus in adult male Sprague Dawley rats at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. Overall, results showed that diminished extracellular serotonin at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine was not accompanied by a change in capacity for serotonin synthesis (in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), nor serotonin transporter expression or function in the ventral hippocampus, but instead was associated with increased expression and function of organic cation transporters (low affinity, high capacity serotonin transporters). These findings suggest that 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine reduces the availability of extracellular serotonin in the ventral hippocampus by increasing organic cation transporter-mediated serotonin clearance, which may represent at future pharmacological target for reversing anxiety states during drug withdrawal. PMID:23157166

  19. Cocaine and Amphetamine Induce Overlapping but Distinct Patterns of AMPAR Plasticity in Nucleus Accumbens Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jedynak, Jakub; Hearing, Matthew; Ingebretson, Anna; Ebner, Stephanie R; Kelly, Matthew; Fischer, Rachel A; Kourrich, Saïd; Thomas, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine or amphetamine can promote drug-seeking and -taking behavior. In rodent addiction models, persistent changes in excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) appear to drive this drug-induced behavioral plasticity. To study whether changes in glutamatergic signaling are shared between or exclusive to specific psychostimulant drugs, we examined synaptic transmission from mice following repeated amphetamine or cocaine administration. Synaptic transmission mediated by AMPA-type glutamate receptors was potentiated in the NAc shell 10–14 days following repeated amphetamine or cocaine treatment. This synaptic enhancement was depotentiated by re-exposure to amphetamine or cocaine. By contrast, in the NAc core only repeated cocaine exposure enhanced synaptic transmission, which was subsequently depotentiated by an additional cocaine but not amphetamine injection during drug abstinence. To better understand the drug-induced depotentiation, we replicated these in vivo findings using an ex vivo model termed ‘challenge in the bath,' and showed that drug-induced decreases in synaptic strength occur rapidly (within 30 min) and require activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and protein synthesis in the NAc shell, but not NAc core. Overall, these data demonstrate the specificity of neuronal circuit changes induced by amphetamine, introduce a novel method for studying drug challenge-induced plasticity, and define NAc shell medium spiny neurons as a primary site of persistent AMPA-type glutamate receptor plasticity by two widely used psychostimulant drugs. PMID:26068728

  20. Individual differences in timing of peak positive subjective responses to d-amphetamine: Relationship to pharmacokinetics and physiology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher T; Weafer, Jessica; Cowan, Ronald L; Kessler, Robert M; Palmer, Abraham A; de Wit, Harriet; Zald, David H

    2016-04-01

    Rate of delivery of psychostimulants has been associated with their positive euphoric effects and potential addiction liability. However, information on individual differences in onset of d-amphetamine's effects remains scarce. We examined individual differences in the time to peak subjective and physiological effects and the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of oral d-amphetamine. We considered two independent studies that used different dosing regimens where subjects completed the drug effects questionnaire at multiple time points post d-amphetamine. Based on the observation of distinct individual differences in time course of drug effects questionnaire "feel", "high", and "like" ratings (DEQH+L+F) in Study 1, subjects in both studies were categorized as early peak responders (peak within 60 minutes), late peak responders (peak > 60 minutes) or nonresponders; 20-25% of participants were categorized as early peak responders, 50-55% as late peak responders and 20-30% as nonresponders. Physiological (both studies) and plasma d-amphetamine (Study 1) were compared among these groups. Early peak responders exhibited an earlier rise in plasma d-amphetamine levels and more sustained elevation in heart rate compared to late peak responders. The present data illustrate the presence of significant individual differences in the temporal pattern of responses to oral d-amphetamine, which may contribute to heightened abuse potential.

  1. Cocaine and Amphetamine Induce Overlapping but Distinct Patterns of AMPAR Plasticity in Nucleus Accumbens Medium Spiny Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Jakub; Hearing, Matthew; Ingebretson, Anna; Ebner, Stephanie R; Kelly, Matthew; Fischer, Rachel A; Kourrich, Saïd; Thomas, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine or amphetamine can promote drug-seeking and -taking behavior. In rodent addiction models, persistent changes in excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) appear to drive this drug-induced behavioral plasticity. To study whether changes in glutamatergic signaling are shared between or exclusive to specific psychostimulant drugs, we examined synaptic transmission from mice following repeated amphetamine or cocaine administration. Synaptic transmission mediated by AMPA-type glutamate receptors was potentiated in the NAc shell 10-14 days following repeated amphetamine or cocaine treatment. This synaptic enhancement was depotentiated by re-exposure to amphetamine or cocaine. By contrast, in the NAc core only repeated cocaine exposure enhanced synaptic transmission, which was subsequently depotentiated by an additional cocaine but not amphetamine injection during drug abstinence. To better understand the drug-induced depotentiation, we replicated these in vivo findings using an ex vivo model termed 'challenge in the bath,' and showed that drug-induced decreases in synaptic strength occur rapidly (within 30 min) and require activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and protein synthesis in the NAc shell, but not NAc core. Overall, these data demonstrate the specificity of neuronal circuit changes induced by amphetamine, introduce a novel method for studying drug challenge-induced plasticity, and define NAc shell medium spiny neurons as a primary site of persistent AMPA-type glutamate receptor plasticity by two widely used psychostimulant drugs.

  2. Routine analysis of amphetamine class drugs as their naphthaquinone derivatives in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Talwar, D; Watson, I D; Stewart, M J

    1999-12-10

    We describe a simple HPLC method which is suitable for the routine confirmation of immunoassay positive amphetamine urine samples. The precolumn derivisation method employing sodium naphthaquinone-4-sulphonate was found to have adequate sensitivity, selectivity and precision for the measurement of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) at 500 microg/l cutoff level for confirmatory analysis of amphetamines in urine. The specificity of the method is enhanced by detecting the peaks at two different wavelengths. The ratios of the peak heights measured at the two wavelengths were different for each of the 5 amphetamines analysed. There was no interference from other phenylethylamine analogues that are commonly found in "over the counter" preparations. The HPLC method is compared to a commercial TLC system for detecting amphetamines in urine of drug abusers attending drug rehabilitation programmes. The HPLC confirmatory method described is a viable alternative to GC or to the more complex and costly GC-MS techniques for confirming amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDA and MDEA in urine of drug abusers especially when used in a clinical care setting.

  3. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Barak, Larry S; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2005-08-01

    Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  4. Buflomedil interference with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Papa, P; Rocchi, L; Mainardi, C; Donzelli, G

    1997-05-01

    The interference of buflomedil with the monoclonal and polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine immunoassays was investigated. Urine samples collected from 20 patients taking 600 mg of buflomedil daily gave false positive results with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. assay, as did urine specimens collected 2 hours after the first oral dose of buflomedil. Conversely, no false positive results occurred with the polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine assay. Urine samples with buflomedil added at concentrations greater than 100 mg/l gave false positive results with the monoclonal immunoassay. Buflomedil concentrations found in the patient urines (56-400 mg/l) failed to correlate to EMIT assay responses: this result suggests that one or more buflomedil metabolites, besides the unchanged drug, probably interfere in the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. assay.

  5. Differential effects of scopolamine and amphetamine on microcomputer-based performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Odenheimer, Robert C.; Baltzley, Dennis R.; Dunlap, William P.; Wood, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of four weekly treatments with scopolamine (1.0 mg) and d-amphetamine (10 mg), separately or in combination, on human performance were investigated in 16 subjects undergoing nine performance tests from a menu of microcomputer-based tests administered after the treatment. It was d-amphetamine treatment that enhanced the results of motor and perceptual speed tests, while scopolamine had no effect on these tests. Two of the five cognitive tests showed reductions with scopolamine. The effects of scopolamine in this and other studies are considered in terms of a model which implies that the magnitude of the performance deficit depends on the performance type and the dosage level of the drug.

  6. Amphetamine-Type Stimulants: The Early History of Their Medical and Non-Medical Uses.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered as a drug in the late 1920s, and its pharmacological effects on attention and cognition, emotions, and appetite were explored thoroughly in the 1930s and 1940s. By the late 1940s, it had achieved medical and market success as an antidepressant and was quickly gaining such success as a diet medication. In contrast, both careful testing and extensive military experience had left the impression that the drugs' benefits for attention and cognition were more subjective than real and that any objective benefits were explained mainly by the drug's mood-elevating effects. Because of its unpatentable status, methamphetamine had been introduced for all the same uses by drug firms competing with the holder of the amphetamine patent. The drugs were being widely used nonmedically and their abuse potential was becoming recognized by medicine, eventually leading to their strict control internationally around 1970.

  7. Methylphenidate amplifies the potency and reinforcing effects of amphetamines by increasing dopamine transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Salahpour, Ali; Caron, Marc G; Jones, Sara R

    2013-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly diverted for recreational use, but the neurobiological consequences of exposure to MPH at high, abused doses are not well defined. Here we show that MPH self-administration in rats increases dopamine transporter (DAT) levels and enhances the potency of MPH and amphetamine on dopamine responses and drug-seeking behaviours, without altering cocaine effects. Genetic overexpression of the DAT in mice mimics these effects, confirming that MPH self-administration-induced increases in DAT levels are sufficient to induce the changes. Further, this work outlines a basic mechanism by which increases in DAT levels, regardless of how they occur, are capable of increasing the rewarding and reinforcing effects of select psychostimulant drugs, and suggests that individuals with elevated DAT levels, such as ADHD sufferers, may be more susceptible to the addictive effects of amphetamine-like drugs.

  8. Structural elucidation of an uncommon phenylethylamine analogue in urine responsible for discordant amphetamine immunoassay results.

    PubMed

    Marson, C; Schneider, S; Meys, F; Wennig, R

    2000-01-01

    The present paper describes investigations following the analysis of a urine specimen containing important amounts of an unknown substance detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. FPIA analysis was positive (cutoff 0.3 mg/L) and Triage 8 rapid test was negative (cutoff 1 mg/L) for amphetamines. Considering the GC-MS spectrum, two different molecules, for example, N-ethyl-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)ethylamine (1) or N-ethyl-4-methoxyamphetamine (2), have been suspected. Synthesis of these two compounds was carried out together with spectral (MS, 1H and 13C NMR, IR, UV) and chromatographic (GC) characterization as well as determination of immunological cross reactivities (FPIA and Triage 8). The unknown compound present in the urine specimen has been finally identified as N-ethyl-4-methoxyamphetamine (2), an uncommon amphetamine analogue.

  9. Effect of amphetamine on sucrose-reinforced lever pressing: interaction with food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Samson, H H

    1986-07-01

    Rats were trained to lever press on a Fixed Ratio Schedule 8 using sucrose reinforcement in one of two feeding conditions: ad lib food and water available in the home cage; reduced feeding in order to maintain the animals at 80% of their free feeding body weight. The effect of three doses of d-amphetamine (0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg) on lever pressing was examined for each feeding condition. A systematic decrease in responding as dose increased was found in the ad lib feeding condition while only the highest dose had any effect on responding in the food restricted animals. Thus, it appeared that the effect of food deprivation was to shift the amphetamine dose-response curve to the right.

  10. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome. Deutsches Arztebaltt International. 2013;110:703. Ungerer M, et al. In utero alcohol exposure, epigenetic changes and their consequences. Alcohol Research: Current Reviews. 2013;35:37. Coriale G, et al. ...

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  13. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor gene inactivation in dopamine-innervated areas selectively decreases behavioral responses to amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Parnaudeau, Sébastien; Dongelmans, Marie-louise; Turiault, Marc; Ambroggi, Frédéric; Delbes, Anne-Sophie; Cansell, Céline; Luquet, Serge; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Tronche, François; Barik, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The meso-cortico-limbic system, via dopamine release, encodes the rewarding and reinforcing properties of natural rewards. It is also activated in response to abused substances and is believed to support drug-related behaviors. Dysfunctions of this system lead to several psychiatric conditions including feeding disorders and drug addiction. These disorders are also largely influenced by environmental factors and in particular stress exposure. Stressors activate the corticotrope axis ultimately leading to glucocorticoid hormone (GCs) release. GCs bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed including within the meso-cortico-limbic tract. While GR within dopamine-innervated areas drives cocaine's behavioral responses, its implication in responses to other psychostimulants such as amphetamine has never been clearly established. Moreover, while extensive work has been made to uncover the role of this receptor in addicted behaviors, its contribution to the rewarding and reinforcing properties of food has yet to be investigated. Using mouse models carrying GR gene inactivation in either dopamine neurons or in dopamine-innervated areas, we found that GR in dopamine responsive neurons is essential to properly build amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. c-Fos quantification in the nucleus accumbens further confirmed defective neuronal activation following amphetamine injection. These diminished neuronal and behavioral responses to amphetamine may involve alterations in glutamate transmission as suggested by the decreased MK801-elicited hyperlocomotion and by the hyporeactivity to glutamate of a subpopulation of medium spiny neurons. In contrast, GR inactivation did not affect rewarding and reinforcing properties of food suggesting that responding for natural reward under basal conditions is preserved in these mice. PMID:24574986

  15. Keto Amphetamine Toxicity—Focus on the Redox Reactivity of the Cathinone Designer Drug Mephedrone

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Bjørnar; Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Ojanperä, Ilkka; Mervaala, Eero; Korpi, Esa Risto; Kankuri, Esko

    2014-01-01

    The β-keto amphetamine (cathinone, β-KA) designer drugs such as mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, 4-MMC) show a large degree of structural similarity to amphetamines like methamphetamine (METH). However, little is currently known about whether these substances also share the potential neurotoxic properties of their non-keto amphetamine counterparts, or what mechanisms could be involved. Here, we evaluate the cytotoxicity of β-KAs in SH-SY5Y cells using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, assess the redox potential of a range of β-KAs and non-keto amphetamines using the sensitive redox indicator 2-(4-Iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1), and explore the effect of 4-MMC on the formation of protein adducts using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOFMS) and on the mitochondrial respiratory chain using high-resolution respirometry. We show that treatment with β-KAs increases LDH release. Further, we demonstrate that even under physiological pH, β-KAs are effective and selective—as compared with their non-keto analogues—reductants in the presence of electron acceptors. Increased pH (range 7.6–8.0) greatly enhanced the reactivity up to sixfold. We found no evidence of protein adduct formation, suggesting the reactivity is due to direct electron transfer by the β-KAs. Finally, we show that 4-MMC and METH produce dissimilar effects on the respiratory chain. Our results indicate that β-KAs such as 4-MMC possess cytotoxic properties in vitro. Furthermore, in the presence of an electron-accepting redox partner, the ketone moiety of β-KAs is vital for pH-dependent redox reactivity. Further work is needed to establish the importance of β-KA redox properties and its potential toxicological importance in vivo. PMID:24913801

  16. Impulsive choice and environmental enrichment: effects of d-amphetamine and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer L; Stairs, Dustin J; Bardo, Michael T

    2008-11-03

    Individual differences in impulsive choice and rearing in differential environments are factors that predict vulnerability to drug abuse. The present study determined if rearing influences impulsive choice, and if d-amphetamine or methylphenidate alters impulsive choice in differentially reared rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were raised from 21 days of age in either an enriched condition (EC) or an isolated condition (IC) and were tested as young adults on an adjusting delay task. In this task, two levers were available and a response on one lever yielded one 45mg food pellet immediately, whereas a response on the other yielded three pellets after an adjusting delay. The delay was initially set at 6s, and it decreased or increased by 1s following responses on the immediate or delayed levers, respectively. A mean adjusted delay (MAD) was calculated upon completion of each daily session, and it served as the quantitative measure of impulsivity. Once MADs stabilized, rats were injected with saline, d-amphetamine (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0mg/kg, s.c.), or methylphenidate (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0mg/kg, s.c.) 15min prior to adjusting delay sessions. EC rats had higher baseline MADs (were less impulsive) than IC rats. Additionally, administration of d-amphetamine, but not methylphenidate, dose-dependently increased impulsive choice (decreased MADs) in EC rats. In IC rats, d-amphetamine and methylphenidate dose-dependently decreased impulsivity (increased MADs). These results indicate that rearing environment influences impulsive choice and moderates the effect of psychostimulants on impulsive choice. Specifically, psychostimulants may decrease environment-dependent impulsive choice in individuals with high levels of impulsivity (e.g., those with ADHD), whereas they may increase impulsive choice in individuals with low levels of impulsivity.

  17. Amphetamine sensitization alters reward processing in the human striatum and amygdala.

    PubMed

    O'Daly, Owen G; Joyce, Daniel; Tracy, Derek K; Azim, Adnan; Stephan, Klaas E; Murray, Robin M; Shergill, Sukhwinder S

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission is implicated in a number of psychiatric illnesses characterised by disruption of reward processing and goal-directed behaviour, including schizophrenia, drug addiction and impulse control disorders associated with chronic use of dopamine agonists. Amphetamine sensitization (AS) has been proposed to model the development of this aberrant dopamine signalling and the subsequent dysregulation of incentive motivational processes. However, in humans the effects of AS on the dopamine-sensitive neural circuitry associated with reward processing remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of acute amphetamine administration, following a sensitising dosage regime, on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in dopaminoceptive brain regions during a rewarded gambling task performed by healthy volunteers. Using a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design, we found clear evidence for sensitization to the subjective effects of the drug, while rewarded reaction times were unchanged. Repeated amphetamine exposure was associated with reduced dorsal striatal BOLD signal during decision making, but enhanced ventromedial caudate activity during reward anticipation. The amygdala BOLD response to reward outcomes was blunted following repeated amphetamine exposure. Positive correlations between subjective sensitization and changes in anticipation- and outcome-related BOLD signal were seen for the caudate nucleus and amygdala, respectively. These data show for the first time in humans that AS changes the functional impact of acute stimulant exposure on the processing of reward-related information within dopaminoceptive regions. Our findings accord with pathophysiological models which implicate aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal and amygdala activity in psychosis and drug-related compulsive disorders.

  18. Amphetamine sensitisation and memory in healthy human volunteers: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    O'Daly, Owen G; Joyce, Daniel; Tracy, Derek K; Stephan, Klaas E; Murray, Robin M; Shergill, Sukhwinder

    2014-09-01

    Amphetamine sensitisation (AS) is an established animal model of the hypersensitivity to psychostimulants seen in patients with schizophrenia. AS also models the dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine signalling which has been implicated in the development of psychotic symptoms. Recent data suggest that the enhanced excitability of mesolimbic dopamine neurons in AS is driven by a hyperactivity of hippocampal (subiculum) neurons, consistent with a strong association between hippocampal dysfunction and schizophrenia. While AS can be modelled in human volunteers, its functional consequences on dopaminoceptive brain regions (i.e. striatum and hippocampus) remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of a sensitising dosage pattern of dextroamphetamine on the neural correlates of motor sequence learning in healthy volunteers, within a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design. Behaviourally, sensitisation was characterised by enhanced subjective responses to amphetamine but did not change performance (i.e. learning rate) during an explicit sequence learning task. In contrast, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements showed that repeated intermittent amphetamine exposure was associated with increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal within the medial temporal lobe (MTL) (subiculum/entorhinal cortex) and midbrain, in the vicinity of the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) during sequence encoding. Importantly, MTL hyperactivity correlated with the sensitisation of amphetamine-induced attentiveness. The MTL-midbrain hyperactivity reported here mirrors observations in sensitised rodents and is consistent with contemporary models of schizophrenia and behavioural sensitisation. These findings of meso-hippocampal hyperactivity during AS thus link pathophysiological concepts of dopamine dysregulation to cognitive models of psychosis.

  19. Rapid GC-MS confirmation of amphetamines in urine by extractive acylation.

    PubMed

    Marais, Adriaan A S; Laurens, Johannes B

    2009-01-10

    Amphetamine and related derivatives are widely abused central- and psychostimulants. Detection of certain derivatives, such as methcathinone, by commonly available immunoassay screening techniques is insufficient. Multi-analyte confirmations for amphetamine type stimulants are therefore required, but traditional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods necessitate lengthy analytical procedures with prolonged sample turn-around times. A validated rapid GC-MS assay for urinary confirmation of amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone, ephedrine, norephedrine, methylenedioxyamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine and N-methyl-1-(3,4 methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine is reported. The method entailed in situ derivatization of urine specimens by extractive acylation with pentafluoropropionic anhydride, followed by rapid chromatography on a microbore capillary column. Analytes were separated in less than 3 min and quantified simultaneously by selected-ion monitoring using stable isotope substituted internal standards. The total instrument cycle-time was 6 min per sample. The limits of detection were between 1.5 ng/mL and 6.25 ng/mL for the various analytes. Intermediate precision and accuracy were in the range of 6.3-13.8% and 90.5-107.3% for the respective analytes at the lower limit of quantitation, and between 5.8-12.6% and 95.4-103.1% for the high control. Long-term storage of methcathinone positive specimens at -20 degrees C proved insufficient stability of this analyte. The proposed assay is precise and accurate for confirmation of amphetamine and derivatives in urine. The complementary approach of extractive-derivatization and fast GC-MS analysis is especially applicable in routine clinical settings where reduced sample turn-around times are required. Further investigation of cathinone as a possible metabolite of methcathinone is warranted, based on results from analyzed authentic urine samples.

  20. Amphetamine Sensitization Alters Reward Processing in the Human Striatum and Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    O’Daly, Owen G.; Joyce, Daniel; Tracy, Derek K.; Azim, Adnan; Stephan, Klaas E.; Murray, Robin M.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission is implicated in a number of psychiatric illnesses characterised by disruption of reward processing and goal-directed behaviour, including schizophrenia, drug addiction and impulse control disorders associated with chronic use of dopamine agonists. Amphetamine sensitization (AS) has been proposed to model the development of this aberrant dopamine signalling and the subsequent dysregulation of incentive motivational processes. However, in humans the effects of AS on the dopamine-sensitive neural circuitry associated with reward processing remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of acute amphetamine administration, following a sensitising dosage regime, on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in dopaminoceptive brain regions during a rewarded gambling task performed by healthy volunteers. Using a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design, we found clear evidence for sensitization to the subjective effects of the drug, while rewarded reaction times were unchanged. Repeated amphetamine exposure was associated with reduced dorsal striatal BOLD signal during decision making, but enhanced ventromedial caudate activity during reward anticipation. The amygdala BOLD response to reward outcomes was blunted following repeated amphetamine exposure. Positive correlations between subjective sensitization and changes in anticipation- and outcome-related BOLD signal were seen for the caudate nucleus and amygdala, respectively. These data show for the first time in humans that AS changes the functional impact of acute stimulant exposure on the processing of reward-related information within dopaminoceptive regions. Our findings accord with pathophysiological models which implicate aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal and amygdala activity in psychosis and drug-related compulsive disorders. PMID:24717936

  1. Autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immunological effects of ayahuasca: a comparative study with d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Valle, Marta; Bouso, José Carlos; Nomdedéu, Josep F; Rodríguez-Espinosa, José; McIlhenny, Ethan H; Barker, Steven A; Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi

    2011-12-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea combining the 5-HT2A agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and monoamine oxidase-inhibiting β-carboline alkaloids that render DMT orally active. The tea, obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, has traditionally been used for religious, ritual, and medicinal purposes by the indigenous peoples of the region. More recently, the syncretistic religious use of ayahuasca has expanded to the United States and Europe. Here we conducted a double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial to investigate the physiological impact of ayahuasca in terms of autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immunomodulatory effects. An oral dose of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (1.0 mg DMT/kg body weight) was compared versus a placebo and versus a positive control (20 mg d-amphetamine) in a group of 10 healthy volunteers. Ayahuasca led to measurable DMT plasma levels and distinct subjective and neurophysiological effects that were absent after amphetamine. Both drugs increased pupillary diameter, with ayahuasca showing milder effects. Prolactin levels were significantly increased by ayahuasca but not by amphetamine, and cortisol was increased by both, with ayahuasca leading to the higher peak values. Ayahuasca and amphetamine induced similar time-dependent modifications in lymphocyte subpopulations. Percent CD4 and CD3 were decreased, whereas natural killer cells were increased. Maximum changes occurred around 2 hours, returning to baseline levels at 24 hours. In conclusion, ayahuasca displayed moderate sympathomimetic effects, significant neuroendocrine stimulation, and a time-dependent modulatory effect on cell-mediated immunity. Future studies on the health impact of long-term ayahuasca consumption should consider the assessment of immunological status in regular users.

  2. Precursor medications as a source of methamphetamine and/or amphetamine positive drug testing results.

    PubMed

    Cody, John T

    2002-05-01

    Medical Review Officer interpretation of laboratory results is an important component of drug testing programs. The clinical evaluation of laboratory results to assess the possibility of appropriate medical use of a drug is a task with many different facets, depending on the drug class considered. This intercession prevents the reporting of positive results unless it is apparent that drugs were used illicitly. In addition to the commonly encountered prescribed drugs that yield positive drug testing results, other sources of positive results must be considered. This review describes a series of compounds referred to as "precursor" drugs that are metabolized by the body to amphetamine and/or methamphetamine. These compounds lead to positive results for amphetamines even though neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine were used, a possibility that must be considered in the review of laboratory results. Description of the drugs, their clinical indications, and results seen following administration are provided. This information allows for the informed evaluation of results with regard to the potential involvement of these drugs.

  3. Khat use and appetite: An overview and comparison of amphetamine, khat and cathinone

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Andrine M.; Li, Bingshuo; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance To understand the role of khat (Catha edulis) use on the aberrations in appetite and weight which are common comorbidities for khat and other amphetamine users. Materials and methods We provide a comprehensive overview and conceptual summary of the historical cultural use of khat as a natural stimulant and describe the similarities and differences between cathinone (the main psychoactive constituent of khat) and amphetamine highlighting the limited literature on the neurophysiology of appetite and subsequent weight effects of khat. Results Animal and some human studies indicate that khat produces appetite suppression, although little is known about mechanisms of this effect. Both direct and indirect effects of khat stem from multiple factors including behavioral, chemical and neurophysiological effects on appetite and metabolism. Classic and newly identified appetite hormones have not been explored sufficiently in the study of appetite and khat use. Unique methodological challenges and opportunities are encountered when examining effects of khat and cathinone including khat-specific medical comorbidities, unique route of administration, differential patterns of behavioral effects relative to amphetamines and the nascent state of our understanding of the neurobiology of this drug. Conclusion A considerable amount of work remains in the study of the appetite effects of khat chewing and outline a program of research that could inform our understanding of this natural amphetamine’s appetite effects and help prepare health care workers for the unique health effects of this drug. PMID:25435289

  4. Use of diet pills and amphetamines to lose weight among smoking and nonsmoking high school seniors.

    PubMed

    Gritz, E R; Crane, L A

    1991-01-01

    Used data on 3,305 high school seniors collected as part of the 1984 Monitoring the Future project to examine the relationships among cigarette use, diet pill use, and use of amphetamines for weight loss. Results indicate that females were more likely than males to report use of all three substances. In addition, Whites were more likely than Blacks to use all three substances. Both female and male smokers were more likely than nonsmokers to use diet pills. Amphetamine use for weight loss was positively related to smoking among females, but not among males. The relationships between smoking and diet pill use, and smoking and amphetamine use to lose weight, were maintained when race, sex, and other drug use were controlled simultaneously. Two explanations for these relationships are considered. The first is that smoking is related to the use of most other licit and illicit drugs. The second explanation is that there is a greater preoccupation with weight among smokers, with weight concerns potentially motivating the initiation of smoking.

  5. A comparison of tyrosine against placebo, phentermine, caffeine, and D-amphetamine during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Waters, William F; Magill, Richard A; Bray, George A; Volaufova, Julia; Smith, Steven R; Lieberman, Harris R; Rood, Jennifer; Hurry, Mark; Anderson, Tai; Ryan, Donna H

    2003-08-01

    Sleep deprivation can impair alertness and cognitive and motor performance. We hypothesized that the amino acid tyrosine might reduce deleterious effects of sleep deprivation. Seventy-six healthy males, age 18-35 years, participated in a four-day protocol that included a habituation night, a baseline night, a 40.5 h period without sleep, and a recovery night. Tyrosine 150 mg/kg, caffeine 300 mg/70 kg, phentermine 37.5 mg, D-amphetamine 20 mg and placebo were administered in a double-blind, randomized fashion to compare their effects on the time it took to fall asleep, on endocrine responses during sleep deprivation, and on sleep quantity, quality and architecture as measured by polysomnography during recovery sleep. When given after 36 h without sleep, tyrosine had no significant effect on any parameter of sleep. D-amphetamine produced marked decrease in sleep drive but caused deleterious effects on many aspects of recovery sleep. Still, D-amphetamine was associated with increased alertness on the first recovery day. Phentermine and caffeine both decreased sleep drive during sleep deprivation, but phentermine impaired rapid-eye-movement (REM) recovery sleep. Tyrosine (when compared to placebo) had no effect on any sleep related measure, but it did stimulate prolactin release.

  6. Temporal concordance of anorectic, behavioral, cardiovascular and amphetamine receptor binding activity of phenethylamines in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Borrelli, A.; Blosser, J.; Barrantes, M.; Colombo, P.; Kinsolving, C.R.; Ordy, M.; Watkins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Although numerous studies have described the anorectic, cardiovascular, and behavioral effects of phenthylamines, a comparison of the pharmacological concordance of these properties in a single species is needed. The objectives of this study were to compare the anorectic potency of 13 phenethylamines following po administration with their effects on spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) and blood pressure (BP) in vivo and with amphetamine receptor affinity in vitro. The anorectic potencies (ED 50) ranged from 12 umol/kg (fenfluramine) to over 400 umol/kg (d-norephedrine and 1-pseudoephedrine). d-Amphetamine, phentermine, and d-norpseudoephedrine were among the most active and 1-pseudoephedrine and 1-nor-ephedrine the least active in increasing SLA. 1-Norephedrine, and d-norpseudoephedrine were the most active increasing BP while d-norephedrine produced a weak vasodepressor effect. A significant correlation (r = .80) was observed between anorectic potency and affinity (IC 50) for /sup 3/H-amphetamine binding sites in the hypothalamus. However, the stereoselectivity between pairs of enantiomers to inhibit food consumption was not paralleled in binding affinity. The rank order of concordance of phenethylamines in anorectic activity was most apparent in behavior and binding affinity.

  7. Performance enhancing, non-prescription use of Ritalin: a comparison with amphetamines and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Svetlov, Stanislay I; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Ritalin, known under chemical name methylphenidate (MPH), is a psychostimulant prescribed to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other conditions. Psychotropic effects and pharmacological pathways evoked by MPH are similar, but not identical to those produced by amphetamines and cocaine. Although not completely understood in detail, MPH psychostimulation is mediated by the increase of central dopamine (DA) and possibly norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (ST) due to decrease of their re-uptake via binding to and inhibition of DA, NE, and ST transporters. Despite similarity in psychopharmacological effects, the rewarding/ reinforcing ability of MPH appears to be significantly lower than amphetamines and especially cocaine. MPH and similar medications have been widely used on College campuses and by students preparing for exams. Nicknamed 'steroids for SATs,' MPH and related medications are purchased without prescription and their use may even be encouraged by parents and tutors. However, while widely and safely used and administered for over forty years, Ritalin generated significant controversy including MPH abuse and addiction, and adverse reactions. It is now clear that treatment of ADD/ADHD with psychostimulants prevents drug abuse and addictions. Use by those without any medical or psychiatric diagnosis is increasing. In this mini-review, we discuss psychopharmacological and behavioral aspects, and outline neurochemical mechanisms that may provoke Ritalin abuse, addiction and adverse effects compared to amphetamines and cocaine.

  8. Neurotoxicity of drugs of abuse--the case of methylenedioxyamphetamines (MDMA, ecstasy), and amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA, 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) and the stimulants methamphetamine (METH, speed) and amphetamine are popular drugs among young people, particularly in the dance scene. When given in high doses both MDMA and the stimulant amphetamines are clearly neurotoxic in laboratory animals. MDMA causes selective and persistent lesions of central serotonergic nerve terminals, whereas amphetamines damage both the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. In recent years, the question of ecstasy-induced neurotoxicity and possible functional sequelae has been addressed in several studies in drug users. Despite large methodological problems, the bulk of evidence suggests residual alterations of serotonergic transmission in MDMA users, although at least partial recovery may occur after long-term abstinence. However, functional sequelae may persist even after longer periods of abstinence. To date, the most consistent findings associate subtle cognitive impairments with ecstasy use, particularly with memory. In contrast, studies on possible long-term neurotoxic effects of stimulant use have been relatively scarce. Preliminary evidence suggests that alterations of the dopaminergic system may persist even after years of abstinence from METH, and may be associated with deficits in motor and cognitive performance. In this paper, we will review the literature focusing on human studies.

  9. Determination of amphetamines in biological samples using electro enhanced solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jingbin; Chen, Jingjing; Li, Min; Subhan, Fazle; Chong, Fayun; Wen, Chongying; Yu, Jianfeng; Cui, Bingwen; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC)/Nafion coated fiber for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was prepared and used as the working electrode for electro-enhanced SPME (EE-SPME) of amphetamines. The EE-SPME strategy is primarily based on the electro-migration and complementary charge interaction between fiber coating and ionic compounds. Compared with traditional SPME, EE-SPME exhibited excellent extraction efficiency for amphetamine (AP) and methamphetamine (MA) with an enhancement factor of 7.8 and 12.1, respectively. The present strategy exhibited good linearity for the determination of AP and MA in urine samples in the range of 10-1000ngmL(-1) and 20-1000ngmL(-1), respectively. The detection limits were found to be 1.2ngmL(-1) for AP and 4.8ngmL(-1) for MA. The relative standard deviations were calculated to be 6.2% and 8.5% for AP and MA, respectively. Moreover, the practical application of the proposed method was demonstrated by analyzing the amphetamines in urine and serum samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Application of solvent microextraction to the analysis of amphetamines and phencyclidine in urine.

    PubMed

    Casari, C; Andrews, A R

    2001-09-01

    A fast and simple method to detect some commonly abused illicit drugs, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-amphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylendioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) and phencyclidine (PCP) in urine using solvent microextraction (SME) combined with gas chromatography (GC) analysis has been developed. The extraction is conducted by suspending a 2 microl drop of chloroform in a 2 ml urine sample. Following 8 min of extraction, the organic solvent is withdrawn into the syringe and injected into a GC with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID). The effects of different extraction solvents and times, pH and sample preparation were studied. The optimized method was capable of detecting drugs in urine at concentrations below Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) established cut-off values for preliminary testing. Good linearity and reproducibility of extraction were obtained. The limits of detection were 0.5 microg/ml for amphetamine, 0.1 microg/ml for methamphetamine and MDA, 0.05 microg/ml for MDMA, 0.025 microg/ml for MDEA and 0.015 microg/ml for PCP. Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) values ranged between 5 and 20% for the studied drugs.

  11. Different reactivities of amphetamines with N-methyl-bis(trifluoroacetamide) in heated gas chromatographic injectors.

    PubMed

    Hidvégi, E; Hideg, Zs; Somogyi, G P

    2008-03-01

    A fast gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method has been developed earlier for the determination of amphetamine derivatives in human serum and urine. For derivatization, N-methyl-bis(trifluoroacetamide) (MBTFA) was used. Derivatization was performed using an on-line mode, since 1 microl of MBTFA and 1 microl sample extract, dissolved in toluene were injected simultaneously. In this study, the reactivity of the several amphetamine type analytes with MBTFA was investigated. MBTFA used for flash derivatization was applied undiluted on the one hand and diluted 4--4096-fold with acetonitrile on the other hand. Studying several amphetamines in the test sample spiked at the same concentrations we found that they could be divided into 3 groups based on relative target ion peak areas as a function of MBTFA dilution. Group 1, containing only primary amines showed an early increase of the relative peak areas if we increased MBTFA concentration, where group 2 (mainly N-methyl secondary amines) showed that relative peak areas started to increase intensively at higher MBTFA concentrations. Finally, MDEA as an N-ethyl secondary amine, representing group 3, showed significant increase if only slightly diluted MBTFA was used as a flash reagent. This phenomenon can be explained mainly with the less and less reactivity of amine groups in the case of groups 2 and 3, compared to group 1. These findings could help to optimise analytical methods involving flash derivatization processes.

  12. Neurotoxicity of amphetamine derivatives is mediated by caspase pathway activation in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Andrés; Jordà, Elvira G; Verdaguer, Ester; Pubill, David; Sureda, Francesc X; Canudas, Anna M; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jordi; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè

    2004-04-15

    The neurotoxic action of the abuse drugs methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on cerebellar granule neurones (CGNs) culture was examined. Treatment for 48 h with METH or MDMA (1-5 mM) induced a higher decrease in viability than 24 h treatment. z.VAD.fmk (100 microM) but not MK-801 nor NBQX recovered control viability values. In both cases, cell death was characterised as apoptotic rather than necrotic by morphology cell observation. Apoptosis measured by flow cytometry indicated an increase in the hypodiploid population after 48 h treatment with METH and MDMA. Apoptosis was reverted by the presence of z.VAD.fmk (100 microM) but not by 10 microM MK-801 or NBQX. Similar results were obtained by analysing nuclear chromatine condensation. These results ruled out excitotoxic participation in amphetamine derivative-induced neurotoxicity in CGNs. Participation of radical oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using alpha-tocopherol (1-15 microM) and cytometric studies. The co-treatment with 4 mM METH or MDMA for 48 h partially reverted neurotoxic action and apoptotic features, indicating ROS implication in CGNs death by amphetamine derivatives. Alteration of mitochondrial function induced cytochrome C (Cyt C) release after 48-h treatment with METH and MDMA (4 mM). There was also indication of caspase-3-like activation, measured by immunoanalysis and biochemically. Finally, neurodegenerative action caused by amphetamine derivatives may be prevented by using caspase inhibitors.

  13. Midkine Is a Novel Regulator of Amphetamine-Induced Striatal Gliosis and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence for a Stimulus-Dependent Regulation of Neuroinflammation by Midkine

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Gramage, Esther; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ramos, María P.

    2016-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a cytokine that modulates amphetamine-induced striatal astrogliosis, suggesting a possible role of MK in neuroinflammation induced by amphetamine. To test this hypothesis, we studied astrogliosis and microglial response induced by amphetamine (10 mg/kg i.p. four times, every 2 h) in different brain areas of MK−/− mice and wild type (WT) mice. We found that amphetamine-induced microgliosis and astrocytosis are enhanced in the striatum of MK−/− mice in a region-specific manner. Surprisingly, LPS-induced astrogliosis in the striatum was blocked in MK−/− mice. Since striatal neuroinflammation induced by amphetamine-type stimulants correlates with the cognitive deficits induced by these drugs, we also tested the long-term effects of periadolescent amphetamine treatment (3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) in a memory task in MK−/− and WT mice. Significant deficits in the Y-maze test were only observed in amphetamine-pretreated MK−/− mice. The data demonstrate for the first time that MK is a novel modulator of neuroinflammation depending on the inflammatory stimulus and the brain area considered. The data indicate that MK limits amphetamine-induced striatal neuroinflammation. In addition, our data demonstrate that periadolescent amphetamine treatment in mice results in transient disruption of learning and memory processes in absence of endogenous MK. PMID:28044069

  14. Midkine Is a Novel Regulator of Amphetamine-Induced Striatal Gliosis and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence for a Stimulus-Dependent Regulation of Neuroinflammation by Midkine.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Gramage, Esther; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ramos, María P; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a cytokine that modulates amphetamine-induced striatal astrogliosis, suggesting a possible role of MK in neuroinflammation induced by amphetamine. To test this hypothesis, we studied astrogliosis and microglial response induced by amphetamine (10 mg/kg i.p. four times, every 2 h) in different brain areas of MK-/- mice and wild type (WT) mice. We found that amphetamine-induced microgliosis and astrocytosis are enhanced in the striatum of MK-/- mice in a region-specific manner. Surprisingly, LPS-induced astrogliosis in the striatum was blocked in MK-/- mice. Since striatal neuroinflammation induced by amphetamine-type stimulants correlates with the cognitive deficits induced by these drugs, we also tested the long-term effects of periadolescent amphetamine treatment (3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) in a memory task in MK-/- and WT mice. Significant deficits in the Y-maze test were only observed in amphetamine-pretreated MK-/- mice. The data demonstrate for the first time that MK is a novel modulator of neuroinflammation depending on the inflammatory stimulus and the brain area considered. The data indicate that MK limits amphetamine-induced striatal neuroinflammation. In addition, our data demonstrate that periadolescent amphetamine treatment in mice results in transient disruption of learning and memory processes in absence of endogenous MK.

  15. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect.

  16. Monoamine transporter and receptor interaction profiles of novel psychoactive substances: para-halogenated amphetamines and pyrovalerone cathinones.

    PubMed

    Rickli, Anna; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-03-01

    The pharmacology of novel psychoactive substances is mostly unknown. We evaluated the transporter and receptor interaction profiles of a series of para-(4)-substituted amphetamines and pyrovalerone cathinones. We tested the potency of these compounds to inhibit the norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) transporters (NET, DAT, and SERT, respectively) using human embryonic kidney 293 cells that express the respective human transporters. We also tested the substance-induced efflux of NE, DA, and 5-HT from monoamine-loaded cells, binding affinities to monoamine receptors, and 5-HT2B receptor activation. Para-(4)-substituted amphetamines, including 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 4-ethylmethcathinone, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 4-fluoromethamphetamine, 4-fluoromethcatinone (flephedrone), and 4-bromomethcathinone, were relatively more serotonergic (lower DAT:SERT ratio) compared with their analogs amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methcathinone. The 4-methyl, 4-ethyl, and 4-bromo groups resulted in enhanced serotonergic properties compared with the 4-fluoro group. The para-substituted amphetamines released NE and DA. 4-Fluoramphetamine, 4-flouromethamphetamine, 4-methylmethcathinone, and 4-ethylmethcathinone also released 5-HT similarly to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. The pyrovalerone cathinones 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, pyrovalerone, α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone, 3,4-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinopropiophenone, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinobutiophenone potently inhibited the NET and DAT but not the SERT. Naphyrone was the only pyrovalerone that also inhibited the SERT. The pyrovalerone cathinones did not release monoamines. Most of the para-substituted amphetamines exhibited affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor but no relevant activation of the 5-HT2B receptor. All the cathinones exhibited reduced trace amine-associated receptor 1 binding compared with the non-β-keto-amphetamines. In conclusion, para-substituted amphetamines exhibited

  17. Testosterone attenuates and the selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotion in male rats.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Boerrigter, Danny; Allen, Katherine; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Karl, Tim; Djunaidi, Vanezha; Double, Kay L; Desai, Reena; Handelsman, David J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-04-01

    Although sex steroids are known to modulate brain dopamine, it is still unclear how testosterone modifies locomotor behaviour controlled, at least in part, by striatal dopamine in adolescent males. Our previous work suggests that increasing testosterone during adolescence may bias midbrain neurons to synthesise more dopamine. We hypothesised that baseline and amphetamine-induced locomotion would differ in adult males depending on testosterone exposure during adolescence. We hypothesised that concomitant stimulation of estrogen receptor signaling, through a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), raloxifene, can counter testosterone effects on locomotion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal day 45 were gonadectomised (G) or sham-operated (S) prior to the typical adolescent testosterone increase. Gonadectomised rats were either given testosterone replacement (T) or blank implants (B) for six weeks and sham-operated (i.e. intact or endogenous testosterone group) were given blank implants. Subgroups of sham-operated, gonadectomised and gonadectomised/testosterone-replaced rats were treated with raloxifene (R, 5mg/kg) or vehicle (V), daily for the final four weeks. There were six groups (SBV, GBV, GTV, SBR, GBR, GTR). Saline and amphetamine-induced (1.25mg/kg) locomotion in the open field was measured at PND85. Gonadectomy increased amphetamine-induced locomotion compared to rats with endogenous or with exogenous testosterone. Raloxifene increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in rats with either endogenous or exogenous testosterone. Amphetamine-induced locomotion was negatively correlated with testosterone and this relationship was abolished by raloxifene. Lack of testosterone during adolescence potentiates and testosterone exposure during adolescence attenuates amphetamine-induced locomotion. Treatment with raloxifene appears to potentiate amphetamine-induced locomotion and to have an opposite effect to that of testosterone in male rats.

  18. Enhanced acquisition of discriminative approach following intra-amygdala d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Hitchcott, P K; Harmer, C J; Phillips, G D

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the role of the mesoamygdaloid dopamine projection in stimulus-reward learning. Bilateral post-session intra-amygdala microinjections of d-amphetamine were carried out in rats during training in a discriminative approach task known to be sensitive to experimental manipulations of the amygdala. The experiment consisted of two phases: discriminative approach training, and a subsequent assessment of instrumental conditioned reward efficacy. During discriminative approach training, subjects were trained to associate a neutral stimulus with 10% w/v sucrose reward. Each trial consisted of a 1-s light stimulus followed by a 5-s presentation of the sucrose reward. Approach behaviour into the recess housing sucrose reward was measured during each trial. Inappropriate approach behaviour (approach outside of the trial periods) was punished by delaying the next trial. Intra-amygdala d-amphetamine (10 microg/side) enhanced the rate of acquisition of discriminative approach behaviour. This effect was most evident early during training (sessions 2-4) and by the tenth session both groups had reached similar asymptotic performance. Horizontal and vertical activity increased slightly across sessions, but there was no indication of a differential effect of d-amphetamine. Thus, intra-amygdala microinjections of d-amphetamine enhanced selectively the acquisition of the stimulus-reward association. During a subsequent test of instrumental conditioned reward, presentation of the conditioned light stimulus was made contingent upon performance of a novel lever-pressing response (probability 0.5). Responding on a second, control lever was without programmed consequences. Sucrose reward was not available at any point, and subjects were tested drug-free. In both groups the conditioned stimulus was found to possess significant conditioned rewarding efficacy. Extraneous behaviour was increased in the d-amphetamine group but the rewarding properties of the conditioned

  19. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy.

  20. Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the National Academies (IOM) diagnostic categories: 4 » Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) » Partial FAS (pFAS) » Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder ( ... 301.443.3860 Relevant Clinical Diagnoses IOM Diagnoses Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) was the first ...

  1. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  2. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krois, Deborah Helen

    Although alcoholism has long been considered a serious problem, the impact of parental alcoholism on children has only recently begun to receive attention from researchers and clinicians. A review of the empirical literature on children of alcoholics was conducted and it was concluded that children raised in an alcoholic family are at increased…

  3. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Our Funding Our Staff Jobs & Training Our Location Contact Us You are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Overview of Alcohol Consumption In this Section Alcohol Facts & Statistics What Is A Standard Drink? Drinking Levels Defined Overview of Alcohol Consumption ...

  4. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  5. Estimation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) co-consumption in serum samples of drivers positive for amphetamine or ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Lott, S; Musshoff, F; Madea, B

    2012-09-10

    There is no toxicological analysis of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) applied routinely in cases of driving under influence (DUI); therefore the extent of consumption of this drug might be underestimated. Its consumption is described as occurring often concurrently with amphetamine or ecstasy. This study examines 196 serum samples which were collected by police during road side testing for GHB. The samples subject to this study have already been found to be positive for amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and/or 3,4-methylenedioxyethamphetamine (MDEA). Analysis has been performed by LC/MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Due to its polarity, chromatographic separation of GHB was achieved by a HILIC column. To differentiate endogenous and exogenous levels of GHB, a cut-off concentration of 4μg/ml was applied. Of the 196 samples, two have been found to be positive for GHB. Of these samples, one sample was also positive for amphetamine and one for MDMA. Whilst other amphetamine derivates were not detected in these samples, both samples were found to be positive for cannabinoids. These results suggest that co-consumption of GHB with amphetamine or ecstasy is relatively low (1%) for the collective of this study.

  6. Acute quetiapine dose-dependently exacerbates anhedonia induced by withdrawal from escalating doses of d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; Potvin, Stéphane; Stip, Emmanuel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2010-10-01

    Recent clinical studies show that the atypical antipsychotic medication, quetiapine, may be beneficial in the treatment of substance abuse by alleviating the withdrawal-negative affect stage of addiction. Since the effect of quetiapine on central reward function is largely unknown we studied its effects on brain stimulation reward in animals under withdrawal from escalating doses of d-amphetamine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to produce an operant response to receive a short train of electrical stimulation to the lateral hypothalamus. Measures of reward threshold were determined with the curve-shift method in different groups of rats before, and during four days after treatment with escalating doses (1 to 10mg/kg, i.p.) of d-amphetamine or its vehicle. At 24h of withdrawal, the effects of two doses of quetiapine (2 and 10mg/kg i.p.) were tested. Animals treated with d-amphetamine showed a 25% reward deficit at 24h of withdrawal, an effect that decreased progressively over the next three days. Quetiapine attenuated reward in the vehicle-control animals, and amplified the anhedonia at the moderate, but not the low, dose in the animals under withdrawal. These results show that acute treatment with clinically relevant doses of quetiapine for the treatment of schizophrenia may exacerbate anhedonia induced by amphetamine withdrawal. Further research should investigate whether repeated treatment with quetiapine has the ability to reverse amphetamine withdrawal-induced anhedonia.

  7. Reinforcing, subject-rated, performance and physiological effects of methylphenidate and d-amphetamine in stimulant abusing humans.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Glaser, Paul E A; Fillmore, Mark T; Rush, Craig R

    2004-12-01

    Methylphenidate has potential for abuse because it produces behavioural effects similar to those observed with other abused stimulants, such as d-amphetamine and cocaine. The aim of this study was to further characterize the abuse potential of oral methylphenidate relative to oral d-amphetamine. Ten drug-abusing volunteers were recruited to participate in this study, which consisted of seven dose conditions: methylphenidate (16, 32 and 48 mg), d-amphetamine (8, 16 and 24 mg) and placebo. The reinforcing effects of these drugs were assessed during a self-administration session (preceded by a sampling session for each condition) with a modified progressive-ratio procedure. Subject-rated, performance and physiological effects were assessed concurrently during both the sampling and self-administration sessions. The intermediate dose of methylphenidate and d-amphetamine increased responding significantly above placebo levels. Both methylphenidate and d-amphetamine produced dose-dependent increases in stimulant-like subject ratings (e.g. Active, Alert, or Energetic and High), but the effects of these drugs were not isomorphic. These findings are consistent with epidemiological data and previous findings from laboratory studies that suggest methylphenidate has at least some abuse potential.

  8. Reversal of amphetamine-induced behaviours by MDL 100,907, a selective 5-HT2A antagonist.

    PubMed

    Moser, P C; Moran, P M; Frank, R A; Kehne, J H

    1996-01-01

    MDL 100,907 is a potent and selective antagonist of the 5-HT2A receptor which, unlike other antagonists at this receptor, has little affinity for the 5-HT2C receptor. We have investigated the antipsychotic potential of MDL 100,907 by examining its ability to antagonise different behavioural effects of amphetamine in rats. MDL 100,907 reversed the locomotor stimulant effects of amphetamine in rats without itself having any effect on locomotor activity. It also antagonised the disruptive effects of amphetamine on the development of latent inhibition. In contrast, MDL 100,907 had no effect on the discriminative stimulus properties of amphetamine, nor did it affect the ability of amphetamine to reduce the threshold required to sustain rewarding brain stimulation in the ventral tegmental area. This profile is different from that of typical and atypical neuroleptics, and also from other 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, which lack the selectivity of MDL 100,907. These results suggest that MDL 100,907 may have a unique interaction with dopaminergic systems and support the further development of selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonists as a novel therapeutic strategy for schizophrenia.

  9. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse.

  10. Separation mechanism of chiral impurities, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, found in amphetamine-type substances using achiral modifiers in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Holness, Howard K; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander; Almirall, José R

    2012-11-01

    A new mechanism is proposed that describes the gas-phase separation of chiral molecules found in amphetamine-type substances (ATS) by the use of high-resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Straight-chain achiral alcohols of increasing carbon chain length, from methanol to n-octanol, are used as drift gas modifiers in IMS to highlight the mechanism proposed for gas-phase separations of these chiral molecules. The results suggest the possibility of using these achiral modifiers to separate the chiral molecules (R,S) and (S,R)-ephedrine and (S,S) and (R,R)-pseudoephedrine which contain an internal hydroxyl group at the first chiral center and an amino group at the other chiral center. Ionization was achieved with an electrospray source, the ions were introduced into an IMS with a resolving power of 80, and the resulting ion clusters were characterized with a coupled quadrupole mass spectrometer detector. A complementary computational study conducted at the density functional B3LYP/6-31g level of theory for the electronic structure of the analyte-modifier clusters was also performed, and showed either "bridged" or "independent" binding. The combined experimental and simulation data support the proposed mechanism for gas-phase chiral separations using achiral modifiers in the gas phase, thus enhancing the potential to conduct fast chiral separations with relative ease and efficiency.

  11. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  12. Surface-activated chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry in the analysis of amphetamines in diluted urine samples.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, Simone; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Gerthoux, Piermario; Gonella, Elisabetta; Mocarelli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    A new ionization method, named surface-activated chemical ionization (SACI), was employed for the analysis of five amphetamines (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE), amphetamine and methamphetamine) by ion trap mass spectrometry. The results so obtained have been compared with those achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) using the same instrument, clearly showing that SACI is the most sensitive of the three. The limit of detection and linearity range for SACI were compared with those obtained using APCI and ESI, showing that the new SACI approach provides the best results for both criteria. SACI was used to analyze MDA, MDMA MDE, amphetamine and methamphetamine in four urine samples, and the quantitation results are compared with those achieved using ESI.

  13. The effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field and amphetamine on the reduced glutathione in the brain.

    PubMed

    Jelenković, Ankica; Janać, Branka; Pesić, Vesna; Jovanović, Marina D; Vasiljević, Ivana; Prolić, Zlatko

    2005-06-01

    Continuous exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF, 50 Hz, 0.5 mT) alone and combined with D-amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg) affected the reduced glutathione content in brain regions of rats. Compared to sham-exposed rats, the glutathione content in the forebrain cortex of the ELF-MF-exposed rats decreased (P < 0.001), but this reverted after giving amphetamine upon ELF-MF exposure. In this group, the glutathione content was increased in the brain stem and cerebellum (P < 0.05 compared to the sham-exposed, ELM-MF-exposed, and amphetamine-treated groups). It is suggested that biogenic monoamines are involved in the reduced glutathione changes observed. The changes are not uniform in the brain regions examined.

  14. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. I. Saturable sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; Goldberg, H.; Mccann, D.J.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Previous studies have identified a saturable site of d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine sequestration (AMSEQ) in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study characterized AMSEQ with respect to its subcellular, neuronal and regional distributions, ontogenetic development, pharmacological specificity and factors required for its maintenance. Although AMSEQ was reduced when assays were performed in Krebs' buffer incubated at 37{degree}C as compared to assays performed in isotonic Tris-sucrose buffer incubated at room temperature, the pharmacological profiles of AMSEQ were virtually identical under both conditions. AMSEQ was negligible in tissues outside the central nervous system, enriched in synaptosomes and partially reduced by striatal kainic acid lesion, indicating neuronal localization. The distribution of AMSEQ in the central nervous system was heterogenous. Highest levels were present in hypothalamus with progressively lower levels noted in parietal cortex, frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons-medulla and spinal cord. With regard to its ontogeny, AMSEQ increased early in neonatal life, reaching adult levels by postnatal day 14. Although the effects of amphetamine to abolish the transynaptosomal pH gradient suggest a possible role for this gradient in the maintenance of AMSEQ, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicates that other factors are involved. An interaction with an intrasynaptosomal acid, such as N-acetylaspartate, may account for AMSEQ maintenance. AMSEQ did not possess a stereospecific preference for either d-(IC50 = 177 microM) or I-amphetamine (IC50 = 173 microM). However, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicated structural specificity with antidepressants being relatively potent inhibitors. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Gestational Toluene Exposure Effects on Spontaneous and Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Michael H.; Batis, Jeffery C.; Hannigan, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of volatile organic solvents (inhalants) continues to be a major health concern throughout the world. Toluene, which is found in many products such as glues and household cleaners, is among the most commonly abused organic solvents. The neurobehavioral teratogenic sequelae of solvent abuse (i.e., repeated, brief inhalation exposures to very high concentrations of solvents) have not been examined thoroughly. In a preclinical model of inhalant abuse, timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 8,000, or 12,000 parts per million (ppm) for 15 min twice daily from gestation day 8 (GD8) through GD20. In the first experiment, separate groups of offspring were observed individually in an open-field on postnatal day 22 (PN22), PN42 or PN63. In the second experiment, other offspring given identical prenatal toluene exposures were observed in an “open-field” following an acute i.p. injection of amphetamine (0, 0.56, 1.78 mg/kg) on PN28. Automated measurements of distance traveled and ambulatory time were recorded. Prenatal toluene exposure resulted in small alterations in spontaneous activity compared to non-exposed rats. Prenatal exposure to 12,000 ppm toluene resulted in significant hyposensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of the amphetamine challenge in male but not female rats on PN28. The results demonstrate that prenatal exposure to abuse patterns of high concentrations of toluene through inhalation can alter spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotor behavior in rats. The expression of these effects also appears to depend upon the postnatal age of testing. These results imply that abuse of organic solvents during pregnancy in humans may also produce long-lasting effects on biobehavioral development. PMID:17112700

  16. Aminorex, a metabolite of the cocaine adulterant levamisole, exerts amphetamine like actions at monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Hofmaier, Tina; Luf, Anton; Seddik, Amir; Stockner, Thomas; Holy, Marion; Freissmuth, Michael; Ecker, Gerhard F; Schmid, Rainer; Sitte, Harald H; Kudlacek, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    Psychostimulants such as amphetamine and cocaine are illicitly used drugs that act on neurotransmitter transporters for dopamine, serotonin or norepinephrine. These drugs can by themselves already cause severe neurotoxicity. However, an additional health threat arises from adulterant substances which are added to the illicit compound without declaration. One of the most frequently added adulterants in street drugs sold as cocaine is the anthelmintic drug levamisole. We tested the effects of levamisole on neurotransmitter transporters heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Levamisole was 100 and 300-fold less potent than cocaine in blocking norepinephrine and dopamine uptake, and had only very low affinity for the serotonin transporter. In addition, levamisole did not trigger any appreciable substrate efflux. Because levamisole and cocaine are frequently co-administered, we searched for possible allosteric effects; at 30μM, a concentration at which levamisole displayed already mild effects on norepinephrine transport it did not enhance the inhibitory action of cocaine. Levamisole is metabolized to aminorex, a formerly marketed anorectic drug, which is classified as an amphetamine-like substance. We examined the uptake-inhibitory and efflux-eliciting properties of aminorex and found it to exert strong effects on all three neurotransmitter transporters in a manner similar to amphetamine. We therefore conclude that while the adulterant levamisole itself has only moderate effects on neurotransmitter transporters, its metabolite aminorex may exert distinct psychostimulant effects by itself. Given that the half-time of levamisole and aminorex exceeds that of cocaine, it may be safe to conclude that after the cocaine effect "fades out" the levamisole/aminorex effect "kicks in".

  17. EMIT-d.a.u. monoclonal amphetamine/methamphetamine assay. I. Stereoselectivity and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Poklis, A; Hall, K V; Eddleton, R A; Fitzgerald, R L; Saady, J J; Bogema, S C

    1993-04-01

    The stereoselectivity, cross-reactivity and clinical performance of the EMIT-d.a.u. monoclonal amphetamine(A)/methamphetamine (MA) immunoassay (EM) were evaluated. The cut-off calibrator of the assay was 1000 ng/ml S(+)MA. Analysis of drug-added urines and 72 clinical specimens demonstrated a cut-off for S(+)-amphetamine of approximately 400 ng/ml. The stereoisomeric selectivity of the assay was determined in a concentration vs. response manner by adding pure S(+) or R(-)isomers of A and MA, to drug free urine. The EM assay demonstrated a high selectivity for S(+)-isomers with only one of 16 urine specimens collected following excessive use of nasal inhalers yielding a positive result. This specimen contained 6000 ng/ml R(-)MA. Five-hundred clinical urine specimens were simultaneously analyzed for A or MA by the EM and EMIT-d.a.u. polyclonal (EP) amphetamine assay with 131 positive results confirmed by GC/MS. In five specimens negative by EM while positive by EP, MA was present at concentrations below the 1000 ng/ml cut-off. Two ME false positive results were apparently caused by chlorpromazine (CPZ) metabolites. A study of other phenothiazines or their metabolites gave no false positive results. The possible cross reactivity of the EM assay was further studied for phenyl-isopropylamine analogs or drugs previously reported to react with the EP assay. The EM assay showed much less cross-reactivity than EP to all drugs tested.

  18. The neurotoxicity of hallucinogenic amphetamines in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Capela, João Paulo; da Costa Araújo, Silvana; Costa, Vera Marisa; Ruscher, Karsten; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas; Carvalho, Félix

    2013-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) are hallucinogenic amphetamines with addictive properties. The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory and seems particularly vulnerable to amphetamine's neurotoxicity. We evaluated the neurotoxicity of DOI and MDMA in primary neuronal cultures of hippocampus obtained from Wistar rat embryos (E-17 to E-19). Mature neurons after 10 days in culture were exposed for 24 or 48 h either to MDMA (100-800 μM) or DOI (10-100 μM). Both the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and the tetrazolium-based (MTT) assays revealed a concentration- and time-dependent neuronal death and mitochondrial dysfunction after exposure to both drugs. Both drugs promoted a significant increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities. At concentrations that produced similar levels of neuronal death, DOI promoted a higher increase in the activity of both caspases than MDMA. In the mitochondrial fraction of neurons exposed 24h to DOI or MDMA, we found a significant increase in the 67 kDa band of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) by Western blot. Moreover, 24h exposure to DOI promoted an increase in cytochrome c in the cytoplasmatic fraction of neurons. Pre-treatment with an antibody raised against the 5-HT(2A)-receptor (an irreversible antagonist) greatly attenuated neuronal death promoted by 48 h exposure to DOI or MDMA. In conclusion, hallucinogenic amphetamines promoted programmed neuronal death involving both the mitochondria machinery and the extrinsic cell death key regulators. Death was dependent, at least in part, on the stimulation of the 5-HT(2A)-receptors.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of methylphenidate, amphetamines and atomoxetine in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Gary; Besag, Frank M C

    2010-10-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a very common condition in children and often extends into the adult years. Drugs such as methylphenidate, amphetamines and atomoxetine are frequently prescribed as part of management. The use of these drugs has been increasing and significant clinical benefit is achieved but safety has been questioned. In this review, the cardiovascular safety of these drugs is examined with regard to effects on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), ECG parameters and the risk of sudden death. Methylphenidate appears to cause minor increases in BP and HR. There are no strong data to suggest that methylphenidate increases the corrected QT interval (QTc). Amphetamines appear to cause minor increases in HR and BP over the long term. There is growing evidence to suggest that amphetamines do not cause statistically or clinically significant increases in QTc. Sudden death remains an extremely rare event and there is no clear evidence to attribute this to methylphenidate. Some data even suggest that the risk of sudden death in treated children may be less common than in the background population. Limited data suggest that atomoxetine may increase BP and HR in the short term; in the long term it appears to increase BP. The effects of atomoxetine on QTc remain uncertain. Use of this drug does not appear to be associated with sudden death. Because the current evidence is based on research that has not been specifically designed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of these drugs it is difficult to draw firm conclusions, and further work is required specifically to address these questions.

  20. Segmental analysis of amphetamines in hair using a sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Gerd; Kronstrand, Robert

    2014-06-01

    A sensitive and robust ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine in hair samples. Segmented hair (10 mg) was incubated in 2M sodium hydroxide (80°C, 10 min) before liquid-liquid extraction with isooctane followed by centrifugation and evaporation of the organic phase to dryness. The residue was reconstituted in methanol:formate buffer pH 3 (20:80). The total run time was 4 min and after optimization of UHPLC-MS/MS-parameters validation included selectivity, matrix effects, recovery, process efficiency, calibration model and range, lower limit of quantification, precision and bias. The calibration curve ranged from 0.02 to 12.5 ng/mg, and the recovery was between 62 and 83%. During validation the bias was less than ±7% and the imprecision was less than 5% for all analytes. In routine analysis, fortified control samples demonstrated an imprecision <13% and control samples made from authentic hair demonstrated an imprecision <26%. The method was applied to samples from a controlled study of amphetamine intake as well as forensic hair samples previously analyzed with an ultra high performance liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-TOF-MS) screening method. The proposed method was suitable for quantification of these drugs in forensic cases including violent crimes, autopsy cases, drug testing and re-granting of driving licences. This study also demonstrated that if hair samples are divided into several short segments, the time point for intake of a small dose of amphetamine can be estimated, which might be useful when drug facilitated crimes are investigated.

  1. Performance and subjective effects of diazepam and d-amphetamine in high and low sensation seekers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas H; Delzer, Timothy A; Martin, Catherine A; Harrington, Nancy G; Hays, Lon R; Bardo, Michael T

    2009-09-01

    Although sensation-seeking status is associated with age of initiation and amount of drug use among adolescents, and sensitivity to the behavioral and reinforcing effects of drugs among young adults, it is unclear whether sensation-seeking status among adolescents is predictive of sensitivity to the pharmacological effects of drugs (i.e. abuse potential) as adults. This study examined the acute behavioral effects of oral diazepam and d-amphetamine in young adults, ages 18-21 years, who had consistently scored in the highest or lowest third of their grade-based cohort on a modified Sensation Seeking Scale that was completed annually between ages 10 and 14 years. Healthy participants completed 16 7.5-h test days, with test days separated by a minimum of 48 h. Each day, assessments consisting of computer task performance, verbal report of drug effects, and cardiovascular measures were completed 0, 50, 110, 170, 230, and 290 min after drug administration. Placebo and three active doses of diazepam and d-amphetamine (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/70 kg) were tested under double-blind conditions according to a randomized-block design. Typical stimulant and sedative effects were obtained with d-amphetamine and diazepam, respectively. Drug effects varied as a function of sensation-seeking status, with magnitude of effects on cardiovascular function, task performance, and report of positive drug effects being greater among high sensation seekers, and report of negative drug effects being greater among low sensation seekers. Adolescents who report high levels of sensation seeking on a consistent basis are more sensitive to pharmacological effects of stimulant and sedative drugs that are associated with abuse potential as young adults.

  2. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  3. A Web-Based Intervention for Users of Amphetamine-Type Stimulants: 3-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McKetin, Rebecca; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Carron-Arthur, Bradley; Bennett, Anthony; Bennett, Kylie; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Background Among illicit drugs, the prevalence of amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) use is second only to cannabis. Currently, there are no approved pharmacotherapies for ATS problems, but some face-to-face psychotherapies are effective. Web-based interventions have proven to be effective for some substance use problems, but none has specifically targeted ATS users. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based intervention for ATS problems on a free-to-access site compared with a waitlist control group. Methods We used a randomized controlled trial design. The primary outcome measure was self-reported ATS use in the past three months assessed using the Alcohol, Smoking, Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Other measures included quality of life (EUROHIS score), psychological distress (K-10 score), days out of role, poly-drug use, general help-seeking intentions, actual help-seeking, and “readiness to change”. The intervention consisted of three fully automated, self-guided modules based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivation enhancement. The analysis was an intention-to-treat analysis using generalized estimating equation models, with a group by time interaction as the critical assessment. Results We randomized 160 people (intervention n=81, control n=79). At three months, 35/81 (43%) intervention and 45/79 (57%) control participants provided follow-up data. In the intervention group, 51/81 (63%) completed at least one module. The only significant group by time interaction was for days out of role. The pre/post change effect sizes showed small changes (range d=0.14 to 0.40) favoring the intervention group for poly-drug use, distress, actual help-seeking, and days out of role. In contrast, the control group was favored by reductions in ATS use, improvements in quality of life, and increases in help-seeking intentions (range d=0.09 to 0.16). Conclusions This Web-based intervention for ATS use produced few

  4. Six-Month Outcomes of a Web-Based Intervention for Users of Amphetamine-Type Stimulants: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McKetin, Rebecca; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Carron-Arthur, Bradley; Bennett, Anthony; Bennett, Kylie; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) places a large burden on health services. Objective The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-guided Web-based intervention (“breakingtheice”) for ATS users over 6 months via a free-to-access site. Methods We conducted a randomized trial comparing a waitlist control with a fully automated intervention containing 3 modules derived from cognitive behavioral therapy and motivation enhancement. The main outcome was self-reported ATS use in the past 3 months assessed at 3- and 6-month follow-ups using the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Secondary outcomes were help-seeking intentions (general help-seeking questionnaire), actual help seeking (actual help-seeking questionnaire), psychological distress (Kessler 10), polydrug use (ASSIST), quality of life (European Health Interview Survey), days out of role, and readiness to change. Follow-up data were evaluated using an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis with a group by time interaction. Results We randomized 160 people (intervention: n=81; control: n=79). At 6 months, 38 of 81 (47%) intervention and 41 of 79 (52%) control participants provided data. ATS scores significantly declined for both groups, but the interaction effect was not significant. There were significant ITT time by group interactions for actual help seeking (rate ratio [RR] 2.16; d=0.45) and help-seeking intentions (RR 1.17; d=0.32), with help seeking increasing for the intervention group and declining for the control group. There were also significant interactions for days completely (RR 0.50) and partially (RR 0.74) out of role favoring the intervention group. However, 37% (30/81) of the intervention group did not complete even 1 module. Conclusions This self-guided Web-based intervention encouraged help seeking associated with ATS use and reduced days out of role, but it did not reduce ATS use. Thus, this program provides a means of engaging with

  5. Serotonergic responses to stress are enhanced in the central amygdala and inhibited in the ventral hippocampus during amphetamine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Scholl, Jamie L; Tu, Wenyu; Hassell, James E; Watt, Michael J; Forster, Gina L; Renner, Kenneth J

    2014-12-01

    Withdrawal from amphetamine increases anxiety and reduces the ability to cope with stress, which are factors that are believed to contribute to drug relapse. Stress-induced serotonergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is associated with anxiety states and fear. Conversely, stress-induced increases in ventral hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels have been linked to coping mechanisms. The goal of this study was to investigate the neurobiological changes induced by amphetamine that contribute to stress sensitivity during withdrawal. We tested the hypothesis that limbic serotonergic responses to restraint stress would be altered in male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically pretreated with amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) and then subjected to 2 weeks of withdrawal. Amphetamine withdrawal resulted in increased stress-induced behavioral arousal relative to control treatment, suggesting that drug withdrawal induced greater sensitivity to the stressor. When microdialysis was used to determine the effects of restraint on extracellular 5-HT, stress-induced increases in 5-HT levels were abolished in the ventral hippocampus and augmented in the central amygdala during amphetamine withdrawal. Reverse dialysis of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone into the ventral hippocampus blocked the stress-induced increase in 5-HT levels in saline-pretreated rats, suggesting that glucocorticoid receptors mediate stress-induced increases in 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus. However, mifepristone had no effect on stress-induced increases in 5-HT levels in the central amygdala, indicating that stress increases 5-HT levels in this region independently of glucocorticoid receptors. During amphetamine withdrawal, the absence of stress-induced increases in ventral hippocampal 5-HT levels combined with enhanced stress-induced serotonergic responses in the central amygdala may contribute to drug relapse by decreasing stress-coping ability and heightening

  6. Multivariate Analysis of Subjective Responses to d-amphetamine In Healthy Volunteers Finds Novel Genetic Pathway Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yarosh, Haley L.; Meda, Shashwath A.; de Wit, Harriet; Hart, Amy B.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Researchers studying behavioral and physiologic effects of d-amphetamine have explored individual response differences to the drug. Concurrently, genome wide analyses have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with these traits. Univariate methods can identify SNPs associated with behavioral and physiological traits, but multivariate analyses allow identification of clusters of related biologically relevant SNPs and behavioral components. Objectives To identify clusters of related biologically relevant SNPs and behavioral components in the responses of healthy individuals to d-amphetamine using multivariate analysis. Methods Individuals (N=375) without substance abuse histories completed surveys and detailed cardiovascular monitoring during randomized, blinded sessions: d-amphetamine (10mg, 20mg), placebo. We applied parallel-independent component analysis (Para-ICA) to data previously analyzed with univariate approaches, revealing new associations between genes and behavioral responses to d-amphetamine. Results Three significantly associated (p<.001) phenotype-genotype pairs emerged. The first component included physiologic measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) along with SNPs in calcium and glutamatergic signaling pathways. The second associated components included the ‘Anger’ items from the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the Marijuana effects from the Addiction Research Center Inventory (Cuyas, Verdejo-Garcia et al.), with enriched genetic pathways involved in Cardiomyopathy and MAPK signaling. The final pair included ‘Anxious’, ‘Fatigue’, and ‘Confusion’ items from the POMS questionnaire, plus functional pathways related to cardiac muscle contraction and cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Multifactorial genetic networks related to calcium signaling, glutamatergic and dopaminergic synapse function and amphetamine addiction appear to mediate common

  7. [Use and abuse of alcohol and other psychoactive substances among Polish university students].

    PubMed

    Mellibruda, Jerzy; Nikodemska, Sabina; Fronczyk, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    The results of country-wide research on alcohol and psychoactive substances use among Polish students are presented. The survey was carried out in the year 2000 and included 9446 students from 8 major academic centres in Poland. Negative events linked with the use of alcohol and drugs were discovered - 40% of students (42% of men and 37% of women) during the last two weeks exceeded the limit of dangerous drinking. Large range of harmful consequences of binge drinking has been found - one in three men and one in four women committed acts under the influence of alcohol, which they regretted after. One in four men under influence of alcohol was involved in aggressive fights with peers and one in six has had serious trouble with studying and bad assessments. The scope of drug use was much smaller but also alarming. During the last 30 days 7% of the studied population reported use of marijuana and 1.5% amphetamine. Abuse of alcohol was correlated with use of drugs. This creates a serious risk of cross addiction and shows an important role of alcohol drinking as a gateway to drug use.

  8. Amphetamines and cannabinoids testing in hair: Evaluation of results from a two-year period.

    PubMed

    Burgueño, María José; Alonso, Amaya; Sánchez, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of a set of amphetamines and cannabinoids tests performed on head hair samples from the Medico-Legal sector at the Madrid Department of the Spanish National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences during the years 2013 and 2014. The hair samples were tested for five stimulant phenylalkylamine derivatives -amphetamine (AP), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDA), and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA)- and/or two cannabinoids-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinol (CBN)- by gas chromatography equipped with mass spectrometry detection in selected-ion monitoring mode, applying a method accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 standards. The test results were interpreted according to the confirmation cut-offs proposed by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT) to identify chronic drug use. The ratios of positive results were studied in relation to gender, age, hair colour, dyeing and length of the tested samples to assess the independence from these variables or the association with them. Low, medium and high ranges of concentration were also estimated for each drug. 21.94% of the 2954 hair samples tested for phenylalkylamine derivatives were positive for one or more substances. 16.38% of the samples were positive for AP, 12.09% for MDMA and only 0.44% for MA. 6.60% of the tested samples were positive for AP/MDMA combination. A total of 3178 samples were tested for cannabinoids, resulting in 53.40% positive for THC and CBN. Simultaneous tests for phenylalkylamine derivatives and cannabinoids were performed in 2931 of the samples; 14.94% of them were positive for THC, CBN, and one or more amphetamines. According to the results from the statistical analysis, the use of THC and MDMA vary with age and gender among the Medico-Legal sector in an extended area of Spain, while the use of AP appears to be independent of these variables. On the other hand, the results of THC in

  9. Pleiotrophin overexpression regulates amphetamine-induced reward and striatal dopaminergic denervation without changing the expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: Implications for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Rojo Gonzalez, Loreto; Gramage, Esther; Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Chen, Ying; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Bailey, Alexis; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    It was previously shown that mice with genetic deletion of the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN-/-) show enhanced amphetamine neurotoxicity and impair extinction of amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP), suggesting a modulatory role of PTN in amphetamine neurotoxicity and reward. We have now studied the effects of amphetamine (10mg/kg, 4 times, every 2h) in the striatum of mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain and in wild type (WT) mice. Amphetamine caused an enhanced loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, together with a highly significant aggravation of amphetamine-induced increase in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice compared to WT mice. Given the known contribution of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine, we also performed quantitative receptor autoradiography of both receptors in the brains of PTN-Tg and WT mice. D1 and D2 receptors binding in the striatum and other regions of interest was not altered by genotype or treatment. Finally, we found that amphetamine CPP was significantly reduced in PTN-Tg mice. The data demonstrate that PTN overexpression in the brain blocks the conditioning effects of amphetamine and enhances the characteristic striatal dopaminergic denervation caused by this drug. These results indicate for the first time deleterious effects of PTN in vivo by mechanisms that are probably independent of changes in the expression of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. The data also suggest that PTN-induced neuroinflammation could be involved in the enhanced neurotoxic effects of amphetamine in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice.

  10. Amphetamine concentrations in human urine following single-dose administration of the calcium antagonist prenylamine-studies using fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Thomas; Roditis, Susanne K; Peters, Frank T; Maurer, Hans H

    2003-03-01

    Prenylamine (R,S-N-(3,3-diphenylpropyl-methyl-2-phenethylamine), a World Health Organization class V calcium antagonist, is known to be metabolized to amphetamine. In this study, amphetamine concentrations after a single-dose administration of prenylamine were determined to check if they reached values that could be of analytical and/or pharmacological importance in clinical and forensic toxicology. Enantiomeric composition of amphetamine was also studied. Five volunteers received a single 120-mg oral dose of prenylamine. Urine samples were analyzed using the Abbott TDx immunoassay Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II and using our routine systematic toxicological analysis (STA) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure. For quantitation purposes, GC-MS was used in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode (ions m/z 118, 122, 240, 244) after solid-phase extraction (Isolute Confirm HCX) and derivatization (heptafluorobutyric anhydride). Amphetamine-d5 was used as internal standard (IS). Chiral separation of the heptafluorobutyrated amphetamine enantiomers was achieved using an Astec Chiraldex G-PN column. The TDx results showed a great variability for the different volunteers. A urine sample of one volunteer showed results as high as 3200 ng/mL, whereas the urine samples of another volunteer never gave results greater than the TDx detection limit (100 ng/mL). Using the STA procedure, the presence of amphetamine could be confirmed in all urine samples with TDx results greater than the cutoff value (300 ng/mL). Using the GC-MS SIM method, amphetamine concentrations up to 1280 ng/mL were determined. Chiral analysis revealed that both enantiomers of amphetamine were present in the samples with a surplus of the S(+)-enantiomer in the early phase of excretion. Forensic implications are discussed.

  11. Antagonism by baclophen of the d-amphetamine-induced disruption of a successive discrimination in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ahlenius, S; Carlsson, A; Engel, J

    1975-01-01

    Male rats were trained to performa conditioned avoidance response combined with a successive discrimination in a shuttle-box. The administration of -amphetamine, 4 mg/kg i.p., caused a disruption of the discriminative but not thee avoidance behavior. Baclophen (beta-[-4-clorophenyl]-psi-aminobutyric acid), a GBA-derivative, given in a dose (4 mg/kg i.p.) that had no effect per se on the behavior in this test situation antagonized the -amphetamine-induced hypermotility. The present findins that baclophen antagonized a biochemically induced abnormal behaviour point to an "antipsychotic" action of baclophen in a successive discrimination avoidance test.

  12. Mortality, causes of death and risk factors for death among primary amphetamine users in the Swedish criminal justice system.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emmy; Bradvik, Louise; Hakansson, Anders

    2014-02-01

    This study examined mortality and predictors of death in 1,396 primary amphetamine users (85% males) who were interviewed with the Addiction Severity Index in the Swedish criminal justice system during 2000-2006 and followed through 2008. Forty-nine clients deceased (standardized mortality ratio 4.1 [3.0-5.4]), at least 84% of deaths were violent or drug-related (12% suicides), and Cox regression analysis indicated that death was associated with frequent use of sedatives and less frequent use of amphetamine. No female deaths were observed; death and male gender were associated in binary analysis. Implications for diagnostics and treatment are discussed.

  13. Alcoholism and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Heine, M W

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the reproductive capacities of both men and women in alcoholism is presented. A historical evaluation indicates a resurgence of interest in this area. The effect of chronic alcohol consumption on both male fertility and potency is reported in conjunction with alcohol-mediated effects on the female subject. Emphasis is placed on pharmacokinetics, metabolism and drinking behavior of the alcoholic female. The adverse actions of some therapeutic drugs and chronic alcohol consumption is discussed in relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome and the accompanied mental and somatic abnormalities.

  14. Alcohol and fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.R.

    1984-01-10

    Alcohol/water mixtures, such as those produced by fermentation of biomass material, are separated by extraction of alcohol with a solvent, comprising a higher aliphatic alcohol in major amount and an aliphatic hydrocarbon in minor amount, especially suited to such extraction and to subsequent removal. The solvent alcohol desirably has a branched chain, or the hydrocarbon an unsaturated bond, or both. Conventional distillation steps to concentrate alcohol and eliminate water are rendered unnecessary at a considerable reduction in heat energy requirement (usually met with fossil fuel). Optional addition of gasoline between the solvent extraction and solvent recovery steps not only aids the latter separation but produces alcohol already denatured for fuel use.

  15. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  16. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Alcohol Use Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . FASD Homepage Facts Secondary Conditions Videos Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Questions & Answers Quiz Alcohol Screening & Brief Intervention Diagnosis Treatments Data & Statistics Alcohol Consumption Rates Research & Tracking Monitoring Alcohol ...

  17. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus.

  18. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  20. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafetz, Morris E.

    1979-01-01

    It is estimated that 29 million American children have alcoholic parents. The author documents the unstable environment and psychological consequences suffered by these children, who are at great risk to become alcoholics themselves. (Editor)