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Sample records for alcohol catalytic chemical

  1. Tip-growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on cobalt catalyst supported by alumina using alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistamam, Mohd Shahril Amin; Azam, Mohd Asyadi

    Metal oxide layer helps to support carbon nanotubes (CNTs) aligned perpendicular as well as preventing the tip-growth which takes place due to the strong adhesion force between the catalyst and metal oxide. However, in this work we discovered tip-growth of aligned CNTs with Co as catalyst on thermally oxidized Al/SiO2/Si substrate system using simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique.

  2. Enzymatic Catalytic Beds For Oxidation Of Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    Modules containing beds of enzymatic material catalyzing oxidation of primary alcohols and some other organic compounds developed for use in wastewater-treatment systems of future spacecraft. Designed to be placed downstream of multifiltration modules, which contain filters and sorbent beds removing most of non-alcoholic contaminants but fail to remove significant amounts of low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionic compounds like alcohols. Catalytic modules also used on Earth to oxidize primary alcohols and other compounds in wastewater streams and industrial process streams.

  3. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Chemical and catalytic properties of elemental carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Brodzinsky, R.; Gundel, L.A.; Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    Elemental carbon particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel are one of the major constituents of airborne particulate matter. These particles are a chemically and catalytically active material and can be an effective carrier for other toxic air pollutants through their adsorptive capability. The chemical, adsorptive, and catalytic behaviors of carbon particles depend very much on their crystalline structure, surface composition, and electronic properties. This paper discusses these properties and examines their relevance to atmospheric chemistry.

  6. Direct catalytic olefination of alcohols with sulfones.

    PubMed

    Srimani, Dipankar; Leitus, Gregory; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis of terminal, as well as internal, olefins was achieved by the one-step olefination of alcohols with sulfones catalyzed by a ruthenium pincer complex. Furthermore, performing the reaction with dimethyl sulfone under mild hydrogen pressure provides a direct route for the replacement of alcohol hydroxy groups by methyl groups in one step. PMID:25163718

  7. Green, Catalytic Oxidation of Alcohols in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, Gerd-Jan; Arends, Isabel W. C. E.; Sheldon, Roger A.

    2000-03-01

    Alcohol oxidations are typically performed with stoichiometric reagents that generate heavy-metal waste and are usually run in chlorinated solvents. A water-soluble palladium(II) bathophenanthroline complex is a stable recyclable catalyst for the selective aerobic oxidation of a wide range of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids in a biphasic water-alcohol system. The use of water as a solvent and air as the oxidant makes the reaction interesting from both an economic and environmental point of view.

  8. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonitatibus, Peter J.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Doherty, Mark D.; Siclovan, Oltea; Jones, William D.; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2015-01-01

    Reversibility of a dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalytic reaction has been an elusive target for homogeneous catalysis. In this report, reversible acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols and diols on iron pincer complexes and reversible oxidative dehydrogenation of primary alcohols/reduction of aldehydes with separate transfer of protons and electrons on iridium complexes are shown. This reactivity suggests a strategy for the development of reversible fuel cell electrocatalysts for partial oxidation (dehydrogenation) of hydroxyl-containing fuels. PMID:25588879

  9. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  10. Catalytic Hydrogenolysis of 5-Carbon Sugar Alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Zacher, Alan H.; Frye, John G.; Werpy, Todd A.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2005-01-01

    PNNL, in cooperation with the USDOE and CRADA partners, National Corn Growers Association and Archer Daniels Midland, has developed a new class of catalysts based on Nickel and Rhenium with very effective performance for highly selective, high conversion hydrogenolysis of five–carbon sugar alcohols to useful glycols. The Ni-Re catalyst appears to exhibit preferential hydrogenolysis of the carbon-carbon bonds of secondary carbons over primary carbons of the 5-carbon sugar alcohols tested. In addition, the catalyst has demonstrated significant and unique primary C-O bond hydrogenolysis activity in its ability to convert glycerol into 1,2- propylene glycol, which is then stable in the presence of this class of catalysts. The rhenium containing catalysts are found to have higher activity and better selectivity to desired glycols than previously reported catalysts. A continuous flow reactor lifetime test of over 1500 hours also demonstrated the requisite high stability for an industrially attractive process.

  11. Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-28

    The objectives of this contract are to discover and evaluate the catalytic properties of novel homogeneous, heterogeneous, or combination catalytic systems for the production of alcohol fuel extenders from syngas, to evaluate analytically and on the bench scale novel reactor concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products, and to develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for conversion of syngas to liquid fuel products. Methanol production and heterogeneous catalysis utilizing transition elements supported on metal oxides with spinel structure are discussed. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  13. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  14. ALCOHOL OXIDATION - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alco...

  15. Catalytic combustion of alcohols for microburner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Douglas A.; Lee, Ivan C.; Waits, C. Michael

    The combustion of energy dense liquid fuels in a catalytic micro-combustor, whose temperatures can be used in energy conversion devices, is an attractive alternative to cumbersome batteries. To miniaturize the reactor, an evaporation model was developed to calculate the minimum distance required for complete droplet vaporization. By increasing the ambient temperature from 298 to 350 K, the distance required for complete evaporation of a 6.5 μm droplet decreases from 3.5 to 0.15 cm. A platinum mesh acted as a preliminary measurement and demonstrated 75% conversion of ethanol. We then selected a more active rhodium-coated alumina foam with a larger surface area and attained 100% conversion of ethanol and 95% conversion of 1-butanol under fuel lean conditions. Effluent post-combustion gas analysis showed that varying the equivalence ratio results in three possible modes of operation. A regime of high carbon selectivity for CO 2 occurs at low equivalence ratios and corresponds to complete combustion with a typical temperature of 775 K that is ideal for PbTe thermoelectric energy conversion devices. Conversely for equivalence ratios greater than 1, carbon selectivity for CO 2 decreases as hydrogen, olefin and paraffin production increases. By tuning the equivalence ratio, we have shown that a single device can combust completely for thermoelectric applications, operate as a fuel reformer to produce hydrogen gas for fuel cells or perform as a bio-refinery for paraffin and olefin synthesis.

  16. Catalytic purification of wastewaters containing formaldehyde, methyl alcohol, and acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Rachkovskaya, L.N.; Anisiforov, G.I.; Levitskii, E.A.; Kundo, N.N.

    1982-01-10

    A catalytic method for purification of wastewaters containing alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones is described in the literature. A current of steam containing gaseous organic compounds is passed over a complete-oxidation catalyst at temperatures of 250-700/sup 0/C. The organic compounds are oxidized to carbon dioxide. The main drawback of this method is that the wastewater must be evaporated and the vapor heated to high temperatures, involving a high consumption of fuel. Methods of liquid-phase catalytic oxidation under pressure are free from this drawback. A patent describes liquid-phase oxidation of phenol, analine, nitrobenzene, glycol, and dimethylformamide at temperatures of 275-300/sup 0/C under air pressures up to 100 atm in presence of oxides of copper, chromium, and zinc; a metallic catalyst consisting of copper, chromium, and manganese; copper oxide deposited on magnesium silicate. In a contact time of 8-10 min the degree of oxidation is 90-99%. It is known that liquid-phase oxidation of formaldehyde without a catalyst at 200/sup 0/C and 120 atm with a contact time of 4 h results in 80% oxidation of formaldehyde to methyl formate undergoes 10% conversion into acetic acid, while methyl alcohol is not oxidized at all. In this communication we describe liquid-phase catalytic oxidation of model wastewater containing formaldehyde, methyl alcohol, and acetone at temperatures up to 250/sup 0/C and oxygen pressures up to 20 atm.

  17. Catalytic Oxidation of Alcohol via Nickel Phosphine Complexes with Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Charles J.; Das, Partha Pratim; Higgins, Deanna LM; Helm, Monte L.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-09-05

    Nickel complexes were prepared with diphosphine ligands that contain pendant amines, and these complexes catalytically oxidize primary and secondary alcohols to their respective aldehydes and ketones. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of these prospective electrocatalysts were performed to understand what influences the catalytic activity. For the oxidation of diphenylmethanol, the catalytic rates were determined to be dependent on the concentration of both the catalyst and the alcohol. The catalytic rates were found to be independent of the concentration of base and oxidant. The incorporation of pendant amines to the phosphine ligand results in substantial increases in the rate of alcohol oxidation with more electron-donating substituents on the pendant amine exhibiting the fastest rates. We thank Dr. John C. Linehan, Dr. Elliott B. Hulley, Dr. Jonathan M. Darmon, and Dr. Elizabeth L. Tyson for helpful discussions. Research by CJW, PD, DLM, and AMA was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Research by MLH was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  18. The catalytic decomposition of silver coated cinnamyl alcohol during water exposure and the formation of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, S.; Höfft, O.; Viöl, W.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.

    2014-03-01

    Metastable Induced Electron Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (He I), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry are employed to study the interaction of water with Ag nanoparticles on cinnamyl alcohol films. The films have been prepared on Au(111) substrates by thermal evaporation. The water adsorption does not result in any chemical interaction with the silver nanoparticles at all, but the cinnamyl alcohol changes its chemical structure significantly. While water molecules induce a reduction of the organic groups, the film thickness seems to decrease. Thus, a decomposition of the cinnamyl alcohol films is proposed. Since no effects are observed during water interaction with pure cinnamyl alcohol films at all, a catalytic reaction appears to take place. No decomposition is found for cinnamyl alcohol adsorbed on a closed silver film, indicating that Ag nanoparticles are required for this catalytical decomposition. The MIES and UPS spectra indicate the existence of a closed metallic film directly after silver adsorption on cinnamyl alcohol, while they suggest the presence of silver nanoparticles after the exposure to water. The formation of silver nanoparticles therefore seems to happen concurrently to the catalytic decomposition of cinnamyl alcohol.

  19. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  20. Enhanced performance of the catalytic conversion of allyl alcohol to 3-hydroxypropionic acid using bimetallic gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Falletta, Ermelinda; Della Pina, Cristina; Rossi, Michele; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-01-01

    One of the strategic building blocks in organic synthesis is 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which is particularly important for the manufacture of high performance polymers. However, to date, despite many attempts using both biological and chemical routes, no large scale effective process for manufacturing 3-hydroxypropionic acid has been developed. One potentially useful starting point is from allyl alcohol, as this can be obtained in principle from the dehydration of glycerol, thereby presenting a bio-renewable green pathway to this important building block. The catalytic transformation of allyl alcohol to 3-hydroxypropionic acid presents interesting challenges in catalyst design, particularly with respect to the control of selectivity among the products that can be expected, as acrylic acid, acrolein and glyceric acid can also be formed. In this paper, we present a novel eco-sustainable catalytic pathway leading to 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which highlights the outstanding potential of gold-based and bimetallic catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of allyl alcohol. PMID:22455056

  1. Liquid-phase catalytic processing of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chheda, Juben N; Huber, George W; Dumesic, James A

    2007-01-01

    Biomass has the potential to serve as a sustainable source of energy and organic carbon for our industrialized society. The focus of this Review is to present an overview of chemical catalytic transformations of biomass-derived oxygenated feedstocks (primarily sugars and sugar-alcohols) in the liquid phase to value-added chemicals and fuels, with specific examples emphasizing the development of catalytic processes based on an understanding of the fundamental reaction chemistry. The key reactions involved in the processing of biomass are hydrolysis, dehydration, isomerization, aldol condensation, reforming, hydrogenation, and oxidation. Further, it is discussed how ideas based on fundamental chemical and catalytic concepts lead to strategies for the control of reaction pathways and process conditions to produce H(2)/CO(2) or H(2)/CO gas mixtures by aqueous-phase reforming, to produce furan compounds by selective dehydration of carbohydrates, and to produce liquid alkanes by the combination of aldol condensation and dehydration/hydrogenation processes. PMID:17659519

  2. Catalytic Dealkylation of Ethers to Alcohols on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Biao; Lin, Haiping; Miao, Kangjian; Zhu, Pan; Liang, Liangbo; Sun, Kewei; Zhang, Haiming; Fan, Jian; Meunier, Vincent; Li, Youyong; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng

    2016-08-16

    On-surface synthesis has prompted much interest in recent years because it provides an alternative strategy for controlling chemical reactions and allows for the direct observation of reaction pathways. Herein, we combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory to provide extensive evidence for the conversion of alkoxybenzene-containing ethers into alcohols by means of surface synthesis. The reported dealkylation reactions are finely controlled by the annealing parameters, which govern the onset of successive alkyl chains dissociations. Moreover, density functional theory calculations elucidate the details of the reaction pathways, showing that dealkylation reactions are surface-assisted and very different from their homogeneous analogues in solution. PMID:27432690

  3. Catalytic production of biofuels (butene oligomers) and biochemicals (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol) from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jaewon; Han, Jeehoon

    2016-07-01

    A strategy is presented that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels (butene oligomers (BO)) from cellulose (C6) fraction and commodity chemicals (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA)) from hemicellulose (C5) of corn stover based on catalytic conversion technologies using 2-sec-butylphenol (SBP) solvents. This strategy integrates the conversion subsystems based on experimental studies and separation subsystems for recovery of biomass derivatives and SBP solvents. Moreover, a heat exchanger network is designed to reduce total heating requirements to the lowest level, which is satisfied from combustion of biomass residues (lignin and humins). Based on the strategy, this work offers two possible process designs (design A: generating electricity internally vs. design B: purchasing electricity externally), and performs an economic feasibility study for both the designs based on a comparison of the minimum selling price (MSP) of THFA. This strategy with the design B leads to a better MSP of $1.93 per kg THFA. PMID:27030955

  4. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  5. SOLVENT-FREE TETRAHYDROPYRANYLATION (THP) OF ALCOHOLS AND PHENOLS AND THEIR REGENERATION BY CATALYTIC ALUMINUM CHLORIDE HEXAHYDRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalytic amount of aluminum chloride hexahydrate enables solvent-free tetrahydropyranylation (THP) of alcohols and phenols at moderate temperatures. A simple addition of methanol helps to regenerate the corresponding alcohols and phenols thus rendering these protection and depro...

  6. Guiding Catalytically Active Particles with Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, W. E.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2016-07-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemiosmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemiosmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemiosmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials or follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  7. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  8. Catalytic Asymmetric Generation of (Z)-Disubstituted Allylic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Luca; Jeon, Sang-Jin; Fisher, Ethan L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    A one-pot method for the direct preparation of enantioenriched (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols is introduced. Hydroboration of 1-halo-1-alkynes with dicyclohexylborane, reaction with t-BuLi, and transmetallation with dialkylzinc reagents generates (Z)-disubstituted vinylzinc intermediates. In situ reaction of these reagents with aldehydes in the presence of a catalyst derived from (−)-MIB generates (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols. It was found that the resulting allylic alcohols were racemic, most likely due to a rapid addition reaction promoted by LiX (X = Br and Cl). To suppress the LiX promoted reaction, a series of inhibitors was screened. It was found that 20–30 mol % tetraethylethylene diamine (TEEDA) inhibited LiCl without inhibiting the chiral zinc-based Lewis acid. In this fashion, (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols were obtained with up to 98% ee. The asymmetric (Z)-vinylation could be coupled with tandem diastereoselective epoxidation reactions to provide epoxy alcohols and allylic epoxy alcohols with up to three contiguous stereogenic centers, enabling the rapid construction of complex building blocks with high levels of enantio- and diastereoselectivity. PMID:18052173

  9. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Bingham, Laura M.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  10. Long-chain terminal alcohols through catalytic CO hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yizhi; Chitry, Véronique; Liddicoat, Peter; Felfer, Peter; Cairney, Julie; Ringer, Simon; Kruse, Norbert

    2013-05-15

    We show that long-chain 1-alcohols can be produced with high selectivities using heterogeneous CO hydrogenation catalysis. This breakthrough is achieved through the targeted design of "CoCuMn" nanosized core-shell particles using co-precipitation of metal salts into oxalate precursors and subsequent thermal decomposition. Using stoichiometric CO/H2 feeds, the selectivities to 1-alcohols or combined 1-alcohols/1-alkenes are usually higher than 60% and occasionally up to 95%. The Anderson-Schulz-Flory chain-lengthening probabilities for these products are higher than 0.6, but usually below 0.9 so as to optimize the C8-C14 slate as feedstock for plasticizers, lubricants, or detergents. PMID:23634891

  11. Investigation of polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide composite films for photo-catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Hongyang; Song, Yuanqing; Zhang, Jianling; Yang, Haigang; Jiang, Long; Dan, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide (PPy/PVA-TiO2) composite films used as photo-catalysts were fabricated by combining TiO2 sol with PPy/PVA solution in which PPy was synthesized by in situ polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and loaded on glass. The prepared photo-catalysts were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and photoluminescence (PL). The results indicate that the composites have same crystal structure as the TiO2 and extend the optic absorption from UV region to visible light region. By detecting the variation ratio, detected by ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, of model pollutant rhodamine B (RhB) solution in the presence of the composite films under both UV and visible light irradiation, the photo-catalytic performance of the composite films was investigated. The results show that the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite films show better photo-catalytic properties than TiO2 film both under UV and visible light irradiation, and the photo-catalytic degradation of RhB follows the first-order kinetics. The effects of the composition of composite films and the concentration of RhB on the photo-catalytic performance, as well as the possible photo-catalytic mechanism, were also discussed. By photo-catalytic recycle experiments, the structure stability of the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite film was investigated and the results show that the photo-catalytic activity under both UV and visible light irradiation have no significant decrease after four times of recycle experiments, suggesting that the photo-catalyst film is stable during the photo-catalytic process, which was also confirmed by the XRD pattern and FT-IR spectra of the composite film before and after photo-catalytic.

  12. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Minahan, D.M.; Nagaki, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This project is focused on the discovery and evaluation of novel heterogeneous catalyst for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. Catalysts have been studied and optimized for the production of methanol and isobutanol mixtures which may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. Higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) from syngas was studied; the alcohols that are produced in this process may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. This work has resulted in the discovery of a catalyst system that is highly selective for isobutanol compared with the prior art. The catalysts operate at high temperature (400{degrees}C), and consist of a spinel oxide support (general formula AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, where A=M{sup 2+} and B = M{sup 3+}), promoted with various other elements. These catalysts operate by what is believed to be an aldol condensation mechanism, giving a product mix of mainly methanol and isobutanol. In this study, the effect of product feed/recycle (methanol, ethanol. n-propanol, isopropanol, carbon dioxide and water) on the performance of 10-DAN-55 (spinel oxide based catalyst) at 400{degrees}C, 1000 psi, GHSV = 12,000 and syngas (H{sub 2}/CO) ratio = 1:2 (alcohol addition) and 1:1 (carbon dioxide and water addition) was studied. The effect of operation at high temperatures and pressures on the performance of an improved catalyst formulation was also examined.

  13. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  14. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  15. Catalytic activity of carbon nanotubes in the conversion of aliphatic alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Tveritinova, E. A.; Chernyak, S. A.; Savilov, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) obtained via the catalytic pyrolysis of hexane at 750°C were studied as the catalysts in conversion of C2-C4 alcohols. The efficiency of CNTs as catalysts in dehydration and dehydrogenation of ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and tert-butanol was studied by means of pulse microcatalysis. The surface and structural characteristics of CNTs are investigated via SEM, TEM, DTA, BET, and XPS. CNTs are shown to be effective catalysts in the conversion of alcohols and do not require additional oxidative treatment. The regularities of the conversion of aliphatic alcohols, related to the properties of the CNTs surface and the structure of the alcohols are identified.

  16. Direct Growth Properties of Graphene Layers on Sapphire Substrate by Alcohol-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Miyasaka, Yuta; Temmyo, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    Few nanometers thick graphene layers were directly grown on a-plane (11bar 20) sapphire substrates by alcohol-chemical vapor deposition (alcohol-CVD) using ethanol as a carbon source and without any catalytic metal on the substrate surface. The growth relationship between the graphene layer and substrate was analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The growth rate of graphene layers with different growth temperatures revealed that the Al atom act as a catalyst for synthesizing a graphitic material during the decomposition of ethanol. An optical transmittance and a sheet resistance of the graphene sheet directly grown on sapphire substrate were observed. SiO2/Si and n-6H-SiC substrates were also examined for graphene direct growth to discuss the catalytic behavior of Si atoms compared with Al atoms.

  17. Solvent-free catalytic dehydrative etherification of benzyl alcohol over graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huiyou; Wang, Xinde; Zhu, Yuanshuai; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jian-guo

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), prepared from oxidation of graphite powders using a modified Hummers method, exhibits a promising catalytic activity and a high selectivity for the solvent-free catalytic dehydrative etherification of benzyl alcohol (BA). A maximum yield (85.4%) of dibenzyl ether (DE) was achieved at 150 °C for 24 h when the BA/GO ration was 20 ml/g under solvent-free condition. This discovery provided a new insight into the development of GO as a carbocatalysts for a variety of applications in carbocatalysis.

  18. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  19. Catalytic reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol with alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Avetisyan, K.G.; Matnishyan, A.A.

    1987-01-10

    The cyclic ketal 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-bis(3-phenyl-2-propynyloxy)-1,4-dioxane was obtained by the reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1=ol with propargyl alcohol in the presence of the HgO-BF/sub 3/ O(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/ catalytic system. The transformation of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol and its ethers in methanol and ethanol by the action of the above-mentioned catalytic system leads to 1-phenyl-3-alkoxy-1-propanone, 1-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxypropane, and 1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one. The intermediate organomercury compound, which is the product from regioselective addition of mercuric oxide and the saturated alcohol at the triple bond, was isolated. Its protodemercuration led to the above-mentioned linear products. The formation of the cyclic ketal is presumably due to the preferred formation of mercury bis-hydroxypropargylide.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of water and alcohols by a robust iron(iii) complex bearing a cross-bridged cyclam ligand.

    PubMed

    Tan, Peng; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2015-08-01

    An iron(iii) complex bearing a cross-bridged cyclam ligand (4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane) is an efficient catalyst for the oxidation of both water and alcohols using sodium periodate as the oxidant. In catalytic water oxidation a maximum turnover number (TON) of 1030 is achieved, while in catalytic alcohol oxidation >95% conversions and yields can be obtained. PMID:26126521

  1. Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Xia, Xi; Lin, Chun-Xiang; Tong, Dong-Shen; Beltramini, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and bio-renewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. This critical review provides insights into the state-of the-art accomplishments in the chemocatalytic technologies to generate fuels and value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, with an emphasis on its major component, cellulose. Catalytic hydrolysis, solvolysis, liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation are the major processes presently studied. Regarding catalytic hydrolysis, the acid catalysts cover inorganic or organic acids and various solid acids such as sulfonated carbon, zeolites, heteropolyacids and oxides. Liquefaction and fast pyrolysis of cellulose are primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts. Reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts are the prime factors that affect the yield and composition of the target products. Most of processes yield a complex mixture, leading to problematic upgrading and separation. An emerging technique is to integrate hydrolysis, liquefaction or pyrolysis with hydrogenation over multifunctional solid catalysts to convert lignocellulosic biomass to value-added fine chemicals and bio-hydrocarbon fuels. And the promising catalysts might be supported transition metal catalysts and zeolite-related materials. There still exist technological barriers that need to be overcome (229 references). PMID:21863197

  2. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to chemicals in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tao, Furong; Song, Huanling; Chou, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    A simple and effective route for the production of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and furfural from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) has been developed. CoSO(4) in an ionic liquid, 1-(4-sulfonic acid) butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (IL-1), was found to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrolysis of cellulose at 150°C, which led to 84% conversion of MCC after 300min reaction time. In the presence of a catalytic amount of CoSO(4), the yields of HMF and furfural were up to 24% and 17%, respectively; a small amount of levulinic acid (LA) and reducing sugars (8% and 4%, respectively) were also generated. Dimers of furan compounds were detected as the main by-products through HPLC-MS, and with the help of mass spectrometric analysis, the components of gas products were methane, ethane, CO, CO(2,) and H(2). A mechanism for the CoSO(4)-IL-1 hydrolysis system was proposed and IL-1 was recycled for the first time, which exhibited favorable catalytic activity over five repeated runs. This catalytic system may be valuable to facilitate energy-efficient and cost-effective conversion of biomass into biofuels and platform chemicals. PMID:21092940

  3. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Osman A. B. S. M.; Adekoya, Olayiwola A.; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2008-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that might be possible when inhibitors bind to the enzyme cofactor complex, were constructed. The binding of the two alcohol competitive inhibitors were studied using automatic docking by the Internal Coordinate Mechanics program, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with the AMBER program package, calculation of the free energy of ligand binding by the linear interaction energy method, and the hydropathic interactions force field. The calculations indicated that deprotonated Tyr acts as a strong base in the binary enzyme-NAD+ complex. Molecular dynamic simulations for 5 ns confirmed that deprotonated Tyr is essential for anchoring and orientating the inhibitors at the active site, which might be a general trend for the family of SDRs. The findings here have implications for the development of therapeutically important SDR inhibitors. PMID:17981907

  4. Catalytic and Molecular Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo

    PubMed Central

    Zarnt, Grit; Schräder, Thomas; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    The quinohemoprotein tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol dehydrogenase (THFA-DH) from Ralstonia eutropha strain Bo was investigated for its catalytic properties. The apparent kcat/Km and Ki values for several substrates were determined using ferricyanide as an artificial electron acceptor. The highest catalytic efficiency was obtained with n-pentanol exhibiting a kcat/Km value of 788 × 104 M−1 s−1. The enzyme showed substrate inhibition kinetics for most of the alcohols and aldehydes investigated. A stereoselective oxidation of chiral alcohols with a varying enantiomeric preference was observed. Initial rate studies using ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates revealed that a ping-pong mechanism can be assumed for in vitro catalysis of THFA-DH. The gene encoding THFA-DH from R. eutropha strain Bo (tfaA) has been cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence showed an identity of up to 67% to the sequence of various quinoprotein and quinohemoprotein dehydrogenases. A comparison of the deduced sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence previously determined by Edman degradation analysis suggested the presence of a signal sequence of 27 residues. The primary structure of TfaA indicated that the protein has a tertiary structure quite similar to those of other quinoprotein dehydrogenases. PMID:11222593

  5. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC CHEMICALS: CATALYTIC HYDRODECHLORINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED PESTICIDES AND RELATED SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study has been undertaken of the catalytic conversion of chlorinated pesticides and other environmentally undesirable chlorinated materials into acceptable compounds. The results of this study show that chlorine can be catalytically removed and replaced by hydrogen to produce r...

  6. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  7. Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Dry Syngas to Ethanol and Higher Alcohols on Cu-Based Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mayank; Smith, Miranda L.; Spivey, James J.

    2011-04-19

    Ethanol and higher alcohols have been identified as potential fuel additives or hydrogen carriers for use in fuel cells. One method of ethanol production is catalytic conversion of syngas (a mixture of CO, H₂, CO₂, and H₂O), derived from biomass, coal, or natural gas. Thermodynamics of CO hydrogenation shows that ethanol is favored as the sole product at conditions of practical interest, but if methane is allowed as product in this analysis, essentially no ethanol is formed at equilibrium. The kinetics of ethanol formation must therefore be maximized. Although rhodium-based catalysts give C{sup 2+} oxygenates with high selectivity, their prohibitive cost has spurred research on less expensive copper-based alternatives. Copper-based catalysts require an optimum amount of promoter to suppress undesired reactions and maximize the yields of ethanol and higher alcohols. Common promoters include alkali, transition metals and their oxides, and rare earth oxides. Careful selection of operating variables is also necessary to achieve the desired activity and selectivity. This review describes the effects of promoters, supports, and operating conditions on the performance of copper-based catalysts for conversion of dry syngas to ethanol and higher alcohols. Proposed mechanisms from the literature for ethanol and higher-alcohol synthesis are outlined.

  8. Catalytic alcohol oxidation by an unsymmetrical 5-coordinate copper complex: electronic structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zueva, Ekaterina; Walton, Paul H; McGrady, John E

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory reveals the detailed mechanism of alcohol oxidation by a model copper complex, Cu(II)L, L = cis-1-(3',5'-dimethoxy-benzylideneamino)-3,5-[2-hydroxy-(3',5'-di-tert-butyl)benzylideneimino]cyclohexane. Despite the obvious structural and functional parallels between the title compound and the enzyme galactose oxidase, the details of the catalytic pathway are fundamentally different. In the enzyme, coordination of the substrate produces an active form containing a Cu(II) centre and a tyrosyl radical, the latter being responsible for the abstraction of hydrogen from the substrate. In the model system, in marked contrast, the active form contains a Cu(II) centre, but the ligand radical character is localised on the substrate (alcoholate) oxygen, rather than the phenolate ligand. The result is a significantly higher barrier to hydrogen-atom abstraction compared to the enzyme itself. The origin of these significant differences is traced to the rigid nature of the pentadentate ligand, which resists changes in coordination number during the catalytic cycle. PMID:16357972

  9. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Parlett, Christopher M A; Isaacs, Mark A; Beaumont, Simon K; Bingham, Laura M; Hondow, Nicole S; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions. PMID:26569475

  10. Effect Size Estimates in Chemical Aversion Treatments of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Steven

    1985-01-01

    Reports that aggregate studies on alcohol aversion therapy tended to support a moderate level of treatment impact that may have noteworthy practical import. Emetics appeared to generate fairly consistent findings; a paralysis-inducing chemical may produce variable results. (Author/NRB)

  11. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Chemical Models for Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2008-12-12

    Bio-oil (product liquids from fast pyrolysis of biomass) is a complex mixture of oxygenates derived from the thermal breakdown of the bio-polymers in biomass. In the case of lignocellulosic biomass, the structures of three major components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, are well represented by the bio-oil components. In order to study the chemical mechanisms of catalytic hydroprocessing of bio-oil, three model compounds were chosen to represent those components. Guaiacol represents the large number of mono- and di-methoxy phenols found in bio-oil derived from softwood or hardwood, respectively. Furfural represents a major pyrolysis product group from cellulosics. Acetic acid is a major product from biomass pyrolysis, derived from the hemicellulose, which has important impacts on the further processing of the bio-oil because of the acidic character. These three compounds were processed using palladium or ruthenium catalyst over a temperature range from 150°C to 300°C. The batch reactor was sampled during each test over a period of four hours. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with both a mass selective detector and a flame ionization detector. The products were determined and the reaction pathways for their formation are suggested based on these results. Both temperature and catalyst metal have significant effects on the product composition.

  12. The chemical origin and catalytic activity of coinage metals: from oxidation to dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Syu, Cih-Ying; Yang, Hao-Wen; Hsu, Fu-Hsing; Wang, Jeng-Han

    2014-04-28

    The high oxidation activity of coinage metals (Cu, Ag and Au) has been widely applied in various important reactions, such as oxidation of carbon monoxide, alkenes or alcohols. The catalytic behavior of those inert metals has mostly been attributable to their size effect, the physical effect. In the present study, the chemical effects on their high oxidation activity have been investigated. We mechanistically examine the direct and oxidative dehydrogenation (partial oxidation) reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde on a series of transition metals (groups 9, 10 and 11) with identical physical characteristics and varied chemical origins using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electronic structure analyses at the GGA-PW91 level. The energetic results show that coinage metals have much lower activation energies and higher exothermicities for the oxidative dehydrogenation steps although they have higher energy for the direct dehydrogenation reaction. In the electronic structure analyses, coinage metals with saturated d bands can efficiently donate electrons to O* and OH*, or other electronegative adspecies, and better promote their p bands to higher energy levels. The negatively charged O* and OH* with high-lying p bands are responsible for lowering the energies in oxidative steps. The mechanistic understanding well explains the better oxidation activity of coinage metals and provides valuable information on their utilization in other useful applications, for example, the dehydrogenation process. PMID:24626959

  13. Catalytic asymmetric reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes: enantioselective synthesis of allylic alcohols and alpha-hydroxy ketones.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen M; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Jamison, Timothy F

    2003-03-26

    A highly enantioselective method for catalytic reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes is described. Allylic alcohols are afforded with complete E/Z selectivity, generally >95:5 regioselectivity, and in up to 96% ee. In conjunction with ozonolysis, this process is complementary to existing methods of enantioselective alpha-hydroxy ketone synthesis. PMID:12643701

  14. Pd@[nBu₄][Br] as a Simple Catalytic System for N-Alkylation Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Cacciuttolo, Bastien; Pascu, Oana; Aymonier, Cyril; Pucheault, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles, simply and briefly generated in commercial and cheap onium salts using supercritical carbon dioxide, have been found to be an effective catalytic system for additive free N-alkylation reaction using alcohols via cascade oxidation/condensation/reduction steps. PMID:27517898

  15. Catalytic conversion of alcohols. 28. Product selectivities for 2-methylcyclohexanol conversion with metal oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, H.A.; Hughes, C.G.; Davis, B.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Metal oxides exhibit a range of selectivities (dehydration percentage, alkene distribution and alcohol isomerization) for the conversion of a 2-methylcyclohexanol isomer. For many metal oxide catalysts, trans-2-methylcyclohexanol produces a predominance of the less stable 3-methylcyclohexene isomer. The grouping of metal oxides based on the production of the less stable alkene isomers from 2-octanol is similar to that for trans-2-methlycyclohexanol. It is proposed that the same catalytic properties determine the selectivity for both reactants: for smaller metal cations the product selectivity is determined by steric crowding in the transition state, and for the larger cations the product selectivity is determined by the basicity of the oxygen anion and the relative acidity of the {beta}-hydrogens that are eliminated to produce water.

  16. Catalytic conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Yongwu; Yu, Fei; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jian

    2012-04-12

    Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was synthesized by the co-precipitation method. Mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas was studied in a half-inch tubular reactor system after the catalyst was reduced. Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The liquid phase products (alcohol phase and hydrocarbon phase) were analyzed by GC-MS and the gas phase products were analyzed by GC. The results showed that Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst had high catalytic activity and high alcohol selectivity. The maximal CO conversion rate was 72%, and the yield of alcohol and hydrocarbons were also very high. Cumore » (111) was the active site for mixed alcohols synthesis, Fe2C (101) was the active site for olefin and paraffin synthesis. The reaction mechanism of mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was proposed. Here, Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst can be regarded as a potential candidate for catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas to mixed alcohols.« less

  17. Catalytic conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yongwu; Yu, Fei; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jian

    2012-04-12

    Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was synthesized by the co-precipitation method. Mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas was studied in a half-inch tubular reactor system after the catalyst was reduced. Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The liquid phase products (alcohol phase and hydrocarbon phase) were analyzed by GC-MS and the gas phase products were analyzed by GC. The results showed that Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst had high catalytic activity and high alcohol selectivity. The maximal CO conversion rate was 72%, and the yield of alcohol and hydrocarbons were also very high. Cu (111) was the active site for mixed alcohols synthesis, Fe2C (101) was the active site for olefin and paraffin synthesis. The reaction mechanism of mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was proposed. Here, Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst can be regarded as a potential candidate for catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas to mixed alcohols.

  18. Catalytic thermal treatment (catalytic thermolysis) of a rice grain-based biodigester effluent of an alcohol distillery plant.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Abhinesh Kumar; Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar; Mazumdar, Bidyut; Choudhary, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic thermolysis (CT) process is an effective and novel approach to treat rice grain-based biodigester effluent (BDE) of the distillery plant. CT treatment of rice grain-based distillery wastewater was carried out in a 0.5 dm(3) thermolytic batch reactor using different catalysts such as CuO, copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate. With the CuO catalyst, a temperature of 95°C, catalyst loading of 4 g/dm(3) and pH 5 were found to be optimal, obtaining a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal of 80.4% and 72%, respectively. The initial pH (pHi) was an important parameter to remove COD and colour from BDE. At higher pHi (pH 9.5), less COD and colour reduction were observed. The settling characteristics of CT-treated sludge were also analysed at different temperatures. It was noted that the treated slurry at a temperature of 80°C gave best settling characteristics. Characteristics of residues are also analysed at different pH. PMID:25833556

  19. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered. PMID:23450281

  20. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing –SH, –SSR, and –SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered. PMID:23450281

  1. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  2. Theoretical Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of N-Heterocyclic Olefins in Carboxylative Cyclization of Propargyl Alcohol with CO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyi; Yang, Na; Lyu, Yajing

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of carboxylative cyclization of propargyl alcohol with CO2 catalyzed by N-heterocyclic olefins (NHOs) has been studied by density functional theory calculations. The calculations reveal that the catalytic reaction tends to proceed via the NHO-mediated basic ionic pair mechanism, in which free NHO primarily acts as a basic precursor to trigger the carboxylation of propargyl alcohol with CO2, leading to a [NHOH](+)[carbonate](-) ion pair intermediate. Then, the catalytic cycle proceeds, including isomerization of the [NHOH](+)[carbonate](-) ion pair intermediate, intramolecular nucleophilic addition of the carbonate oxygen anion to the alkynyl group, and protonation of the alkenyl carbon anion with an external propargyl alcohol molecule. Molecule orbital and nature population analysis discloses that the preference for the basic ionic pair mechanism is due to the favorable orbital and charge interactions between the α-carbon atom of NHO and the hydroxyl hydrogen of propargyl alcohol. The [NHOH](+) cation has proven to be crucial for stabilizing the [carbonate](-) anion, which allows the reaction to proceed through a more thermodynamically stable pathway. The investigations of the effect of substituents of NHOs predict that N-substituents with a strong electron donating effect and a bulky steric effect might improve the catalytic activity of NHOs for the reaction. PMID:27266858

  3. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. PMID:27144965

  4. DFT studies on the mechanism of alcohol oxidation by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Li, Jie; Zhang, Qiancheng; Ma, Lisha; Yang, Jucai

    2015-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate the oxidation of alcohol to acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system. Three pathways (path A, path B and path C) are presented. Our calculations indicate that path B is the favourable pathway. In path B, the alcohol coordinating to the Cu(I) center provides a H atom to TEMPO to form TEMPOH. Another TEMPO then replaces TEMPOH to abstract the H atom from the Cα-H of the alcoholate (RCH2O(-)) to generate the aldehyde product. On the basis of the studied pathway, a possible mechanism is presented to explain the experimental observations. PMID:25799480

  5. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources. PMID:27329206

  6. Self-propulsion and interactions of catalytic particles in a chemically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic "machines," such as catalytic rods or colloids, can self-propel and interact by generating gradients of their substrates. We theoretically investigate the behaviors of such machines in a chemically active environment where their catalytic substrates are continuously synthesized and destroyed, as occurs in living cells. We show how the kinetic properties of the medium modulate self-propulsion and pairwise interactions between machines, with the latter controlled by a tunable characteristic interaction range analogous to the Debye screening length in an electrolytic solution. Finally, we discuss the effective force arising between interacting machines and possible biological applications, such as partitioning of bacterial plasmids.

  7. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new base catalyzed C-alkylation reaction that employs a mixture of n-butyllithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane to produce coal anions that are subsequently treated with n-alkyl halides at 0{degree}C has been developed. Almost quantitative pyridine solubilization was achieved by C-octylation of a Lower Kittanning coal, PSOC 1197. C-Octylation was less successful for the solubilization of bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal, APCSP 3, and subbituminous Wyodak coal, APCSP 2, which gave 35 and 33% soluble material, respectively. Their O-methyl derivatives yielded 43 and 20% soluble material in the same reaction. The observations are in accord with the concept of Ouchi and his associates that higher rank coals, although more aromatic in character, have a lower degree of polymerization than low rank coals. Relatively mild chemical reactions, such as Calkylation, that lead to modest changes in molecular dimensions, can disrupt intermolecular forces and accomplish solubilization.

  8. Chemicals from Lignin by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, from Product Control to Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Custodis, Victoria; Hemberger, Patrick; Bährle, Christian; Vogel, Frédéric; Jeschk, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of lignin into renewable and value-added chemicals by thermal processes, especially pyrolysis, receives great attention. The products may serve as feedstock for chemicals and fuels and contribute to the development of a sustainable society. However, the application of lignin conversion is limited by the low selectivity from lignin to the desired products. The opportunities for catalysis to selectively convert lignin into useful chemicals by catalytic fast pyrolysis and our efforts to elucidate the mechanism of lignin pyrolysis are discussed. Possible research directions will be identified. PMID:26598403

  9. Alloyed Crystalline Au-Ag Hollow Nanostructures with High Chemical Stability and Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renxiao; Guo, Jianhua; Ma, Gang; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Donghui; Li, Dexing; Chen, Lan; Guo, Yuting; Ge, Guanglu

    2016-07-01

    For bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs), the degree of alloying is beginning to be recognized as a significant factor affecting the NP properties. Here, we report an alloyed crystalline Au-Ag hollow nanostructure that exhibits a high catalytic performance, as well as structural and chemical stability. The Au-Ag alloyed hollow and porous nanoshell structures (HPNSs) with different morphologies and subnanoscale crystalline structures were synthesized by adjusting the size of the sacrificial Ag NPs via a galvanic replacement reaction. The catalytic activities of the nanomaterials were evaluated by the model reaction of the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol by NaBH4 to p-aminophenol. The experimental results show that the subnanoscale crystalline structure of the Au-Ag bimetallic HPNSs has much greater significance than the apparent morphology does in determining the catalytic ability of the nanostructures. The Au-Ag alloyed HPNSs with better surface crystalline alloying microstructures and open morphologies were found to exhibit much higher catalytic reaction rates and better cyclic usage efficiencies, probably because of the better dispersion of active Au atoms within these materials. These galvanic replacement-synthesized alloyed Au-Ag HPNSs, fabricated by a facile method that avoids Ag degradation, have potential applications in catalysis, nanomedicine (especially in drug/gene delivery and cancer theranostics), and biosensing. PMID:27268019

  10. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Alcohol KidsHealth > For Teens > Alcohol Print A A A ... you can make an educated choice. What Is Alcohol? Alcohol is created when grains, fruits, or vegetables ...

  11. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Liquefaction of coal by depolymerization in an organic solvent has been studied for several years. The liquefied coal extract which results from such a process is far more suitable for conversion into liquid fuel by hydrogenolysis than is the untreated coal. Investigations on the chemical structure and the reactive sites of coal can help to select useful reactions for the production of liquids from coal. Sternberg et al. demonstrated that the reductive alkylation method transforms bituminous coal into an enormously soluble substance, irrespective of the mild reaction conditions. The effectiveness of newly introduced alkyl groups for the disruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sheets in coal macromolecules has been recognized. It has been reported by Ignasiak et al. that a C-alkylabon reaction using sodium or potassium amide in liquid ammonia can be used to introduce alkyl groups at acidic carbon sites. A method has been developed recently in this laboratory for the solubilization of high rank coals. In the previous reports it was shown that n-butyl lithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane produced coal anions which could be alkylated with different alkyl halides. Such alkylated coals were soluble up to 92% in solvents like pyridine. Though the solubilization of coal depended very much on the length of the alkyl group, it also depended very much on the nature of the base used. Strong bases like n-butyl lithium (pKa=42) can cause proton abstraction from aromatic structures, if the more acidic benzylic protons are absent. The utility of this procedure, initially developed and used by Miyake and Stock, has now been tested with the high oxygen containing, low rank Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals.

  12. Heat-Resistant Co-W Catalytic Metals for Multilayer Graphene Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Satoru; Baba, Shotaro; Hanai, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sakuma, Naoshi; Kajita, Akihiro; Sakai, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) is expected to be a low-resistance and high-reliability interconnect material replacing copper (Cu) in nanoscale interconnects. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is expected as a practical method for MLG deposition. To obtain high-quality MLG films without catalyst agglomeration by CVD, heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals were investigated. The agglomeration of the Co-W catalytic metals was suppressed by increasing the W composition; however, MLG deposition was suppressed at the same time. The effects of W addition on the MLG growth were discussed from the viewpoints of the crystallographic change of the Co-W catalysts and chemical reactions. It was found that the Co grain size was reduced and the fcc Co formation was suppressed by W addition. In addition, graphite formation was supposed to be suppressed by W addition owing to the formation of phases other than fcc Co according to the Co-W-C phase diagram. With the optimum W concentration, MLG crystallinity was improved by high-temperature CVD using the heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals (0.7 at. %) without agglomeration, compared with that in the case of using pure-Co catalysts.

  13. Effect of size of catalytically active phases in the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the challenging selective oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2011-09-01

    The size of the active phase is one of the most important factors in determining the catalytic behaviour of a heterogeneous catalyst. This Feature Article focuses on the size effects in two types of reactions, i.e., the metal nanoparticle-catalysed dehydrogenation of alcohols and the metal oxide nanocluster-catalysed selective oxidation of hydrocarbons (including the selective oxidation of methane and ethane and the epoxidation of propylene). For Pd or Au nanoparticle-catalysed oxidative or non-oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols, the size of metal nanoparticles mainly controls the catalytic activity by affecting the activation of reactants (either alcohol or O(2)). The size of oxidic molybdenum species loaded on SBA-15 determines not only the activity but also the selectivity of oxygenates in the selective oxidation of ethane; highly dispersed molybdenum species are suitable for acetaldehyde formation, while molybdenum oxide nanoparticles exhibit higher formaldehyde selectivity. Cu(II) and Fe(III) isolated on mesoporous silica are highly efficient for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde, while the corresponding oxide clusters mainly catalyse the complete oxidation of methane. The lattice oxygen in iron or copper oxide clusters is responsible for the complete oxidation, while the isolated Cu(I) or Fe(II) generated during the reaction can activate molecular oxygen forming active oxygen species for the selective oxidation of methane. Highly dispersed Cu(I) and Fe(II) species also function for the epoxidation of propylene by O(2) and N(2)O, respectively. Alkali metal ions work as promoters for the epoxidation of propylene by enhancing the dispersion of copper or iron species and weakening the acidity. PMID:21629889

  14. Catalytic activity of platinum on ruthenium electrodes with modified (electro)chemical states.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2005-07-21

    Using Pt on Ru thin-film electrodes with various (electro)chemical states designed by the sputtering method, the effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt was investigated. The chemical and electrochemical properties of Pt/Ru thin-film samples were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Pt nanoparticles on Ru metal or oxide for an actual fuel cell system showed an effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt in methanol electrooxidation. Finally, it was concluded that such an enhancement of methanol electrooxidation on the Pt is responsible for Ru metallic and/or oxidation sites compared to pure Pt without any Ru state. PMID:16852701

  15. Graphene-Semiconductor Catalytic Nanodiodes for Quantitative Detection of Hot Electrons Induced by a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Changhwan; Choi, Hongkyw; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Direct detection of hot electrons generated by exothermic surface reactions on nanocatalysts is an effective strategy to obtain insight into electronic excitation during chemical reactions. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel catalytic nanodiode based on a Schottky junction between a single layer of graphene and an n-type TiO2 layer that enables the detection of hot electron flows produced by hydrogen oxidation on Pt nanoparticles. By making a comparative analysis of data obtained from measuring the hot electron current (chemicurrent) and turnover frequency, we demonstrate that graphene's unique electronic structure and extraordinary material properties, including its atomically thin nature and ballistic electron transport, allow improved conductivity at the interface between the catalytic Pt nanoparticles and the support. Thereby, graphene-based nanodiodes offer an effective and facile way to approach the study of chemical energy conversion mechanisms in composite catalysts with carbon-based supports. PMID:26910271

  16. Chemical process for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde and other organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The invention discusses a chemical process for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde and other organic compounds contained in a dilute aqueous solution, particularly waste water. The inventive feature resides in the use of a cobalt catalyst to increase the rate of oxidation of the organic compounds when hypochlorous acid is the oxidant. The latter may be provided by a chlorine compound, such as sodium hypochlorite, calcium hypochlorite or chlorine gas dissolved in water.

  17. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase by Chemical Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Meekrathok, Piyanat; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase) is a chitinolytic enzyme responsible for the successive degradation of chitin fragments to GlcNAc monomers, activating the onset of the chitin catabolic cascade in marine Vibrios. Methods Two invariant acidic pairs (Asp303-Asp304 and Asp437-Glu438) of VhGlcNAcase were mutated using a site-directed mutagenesis strategy. The effects of these mutations were examined and the catalytic roles of these active-site residues were elucidated using a chemical rescue approach. Enhancement of the enzymic activity of the VhGlcNAcase mutants was evaluated by a colorimetric assay using pNP-GlcNAc as substrate. Results Substitution of Asp303, Asp304, Asp437 or Glu438 with Ala/Asn/Gln produced a dramatic loss of the GlcNAcase activity. However, the activity of the inactive D437A mutant was recovered in the presence of sodium formate. Our kinetic data suggest that formate ion plays a nucleophilic role by mimicking the β-COO-side chain of Asp437, thereby stabilizing the reaction intermediate during both the glycosylation and the deglycosylation steps. Conclusions Chemical rescue of the inactive D437A mutant of VhGlcNAcase by an added nucleophile helped to identify Asp437 as the catalytic nucleophile/base, and hence its acidic partner Glu438 as the catalytic proton donor/acceptor. General Significance Identification of the catalytic nucleophile of VhGlcNAcases supports the proposal of a substrate-assisted mechanism of GH20 GlcNAcases, requiring the catalytic pair Asp437-Glu438 for catalysis. The results suggest the mechanistic basis of the participation of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase in the chitin catabolic pathway of marine Vibrios. PMID:26870945

  18. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fourteenth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The project objectives are: (1) To discover, study, and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. In particular, novel heterogeneous catalysts will be studied and optimized for the production of: (a) C{sub 1}-C{sub 5} alcohols using conventional methanol synthesis conditions, and (b) methanol and isobutanol mixtures which may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. (2) To explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. (3) To develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, catalyst, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for the conversion of syngas to liquid products. The authors have prepared a comparative Zn/Cr spinel oxide support that contains excess ZnO and have looked at the catalytic performance of (a) the bare support, (b) a potassium traverse on the bare support to determine the effect of alkali addition in the absence of Pd and (c) a potassium traverse on the support impregnated with 6 wt% Pd. The bare support is an inefficient methanol catalyst. Alkali addition results in an increase in selectivity to total alcohols vs. the bare support and a dramatic increase higher alcohol synthesis. Pd addition results in further improvements in performance. Selectivities increase with K loading. The 5 wt% K, 5.9 wt% Pd catalyst produces > 100 g/kg-hr of isobutanol at 440 C and 1,000 psi, with 85% selectivity to total alcohols and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of <2. The authors intend to continue formulation screening using K/Pd formulations on ZnO and ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared conventionally and via controlled pH precipitation. They will also examine the effect of Cs in place of K as the alkali promoter and the use of Rh instead of Pd as a promoter.

  19. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Alcohol Wondering if alcohol is off limits with diabetes? Most people with diabetes can have a moderate amount of alcohol. Research has shown that there can be some ...

  20. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  1. Identification of Catalytic Amino Acid Residues by Chemical Modification in Dextranase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jin-A; Nam, Seung-Hee; Kim, Doman; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-28

    A novel endodextranase isolated from Paenibacillus sp. was found to produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of 7-14 from dextran. To determine the active site, the enzyme was modified with 1-ethyl-3-[3- (dimethylamino)-propyl]-carbodiimide (EDC) and α-epoxyalkyl α-glucosides (EAGs), an affinity labeling reagent. The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification using EDC and EAGs indicated that carboxyl groups are essential for the enzymatic activity. Three Asp and one Glu residues were identified as candidate catalytic amino acids, since these residues are completely conserved across the GH family of 66 enzymes. Replacement of Asp189, Asp340, or Glu412 completely abolished the enzyme activity, indicating that these residues are essential for catalytic activity. PMID:26907761

  2. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M; Ramesh, R

    2015-03-01

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E=P or As; X=Cl or Br; L=NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d(5)) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx≠gy≠gz) at 77K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(IV)-Ru(IV); Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(II)-Ru(II)) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent Ru(V)O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle. PMID:25498823

  3. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-03-01

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d5) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) at 77 K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (RuIII-RuIII/RuIV-RuIV; RuIII-RuIII/RuII-RuII) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86 V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent RuVdbnd O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  4. Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Biobased Chemicals into Liquid Fuels in the Aqueous Phase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kejing; Wu, Yulong; Chen, Yu; Chen, Hao; Wang, Jianlong; Yang, Mingde

    2016-06-22

    Different biobased chemicals are produced during the conversion of biomass into fuels through various feasible technologies (e.g., hydrolysis, hydrothermal liquefaction, and pyrolysis). The challenge of transforming these biobased chemicals with high hydrophilicity is ascribed to the high water content of the feedstock and the inevitable formation of water. Therefore, aqueous-phase processing is an interesting technology for the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of biobased chemicals. Different reactions, such as dehydration, isomerization, aldol condensation, ketonization, and hydrogenation, are applied for the conversion of sugars, furfural/hydroxymethylfurfural, acids, phenolics, and so on over heterogeneous catalysts. The activity, stability, and reusability of the heterogeneous catalysts in water are summarized, and deactivation processes and several strategies are introduced to improve the stability of heterogeneous catalysts in the aqueous phase. PMID:27158985

  5. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  6. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A Text Size What's in ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  7. Physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of borided cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    1987-01-01

    Unsupported and alumina-supported borided cobalt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of anhydrous cobalt acetate at 25/sup 0/C using B/sub 2/H/sub 6//THF or NaBH/sub 4//diglyme solution as the reducing agent. These catalysts were further activated in H/sub 2/ at 250/sup 0/C prior to use. The physical and chemical properties of these catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis, BET surface area measurements, H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption measurements, X-ray Diffraction, and Temperature Programmed Desorption of CO. The catalytic properties of these catalysts for hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons were investigated at 160 - 300/sup 0/C, 1 and 10 atm, and H/sub 2//CO ratio of 2 in a differential conversion range of less than 8%. The data show that unsupported, Na-free, borided cobalt is much more active than Na-containing borided cobalt and pure cobalt on a site basis. Similarly, CoB/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ but has similar selectivity; its selectivity for C/sub 5//sup +/ hydrocarbons, however, is very high (> 75 wt%) at low reaction temperatures (e.g. 170/sup 0/C) or at low H/sub 2//CO ratios (e.g. less than or equal to 1). The observed changes in catalytic and adsorption behavior are consistent with an electron-donor model in which boron atoms donate electrons to cobalt. Na was found to lower catalytic activity of cobalt while increasing selectivity for light hydrocarbons, olefins, and CO/sub 2/ products.

  8. Catalytic transformation of alcohols to carboxylic acid salts and H2 using water as the oxygen atom source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraman, Ekambaram; Khaskin, Eugene; Leitus, Gregory; Milstein, David

    2013-02-01

    The oxidation of alcohols to carboxylic acids is an important industrial reaction used in the synthesis of bulk and fine chemicals. Most current processes are performed by making use of either stoichiometric amounts of toxic oxidizing agents or the use of pressurized dioxygen. Here, we describe an alternative dehydrogenative pathway effected by water and base with the concomitant generation of hydrogen gas. A homogeneous ruthenium complex catalyses the transformation of primary alcohols to carboxylic acid salts at low catalyst loadings (0.2 mol%) in basic aqueous solution. A consequence of this finding could be a safer and cleaner process for the synthesis of carboxylic acids and their derivatives at both laboratory and industrial scales.

  9. Chemical and physical properties of ultrafine diesel exhaust particles sampled downstream of a catalytic trap.

    PubMed

    Grose, Melissa; Sakurai, Hiromu; Savstrom, Jake; Stolzenburg, Mark R; Watts, Winthrop F; Morgan, Christopher G; Murray, Ian P; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B; McMurry, Peter H

    2006-09-01

    The chemical and physical properties of exhaust particles produced by a Caterpillar 3176 C-12 heavy duty diesel engine equipped with a catalytic trap (CRT) are reported. The engine was operated at 600 Nm and 1500 rpm, using fuels containing 15 and 49 ppm sulfur. A two-stage dilution tunnel designed to simulate the reactions that occur when hot combustion products mix with cooler atmospheric air was used. Particle size distributions were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and nano-scanning mobility particle sizer (nano SMPS); a nanomicro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (nano MOUDI) collected size-resolved samples for gravimetric and chemical analysis. A nanometer tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano TDMA) was used to measure the volatility and hygroscopicity of 4-15 nm particles. These measurements confirm that the particles consisted primarily of sulfates. PMID:16999131

  10. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Catalytic conversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to biofuels in supercritical alcohols over zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Ma, Rui; Ma, Zewei; Li, Yongdan

    2016-06-01

    Microalgae have been considered as the feedstock for the third generation biofuels production, given its high lipid content and fast productivity. Herein, a catalytic approach for microalgae liquefaction to biocrude is examined in a temperature range of 250-300°C in methanol and ethanol over zeolites. Higher biocrude yield was achieved in ethanol and at lower temperatures, while better quality biocrude with higher light biocrude ratio and lower average molecular weight (Mw) was favored in methanol and at higher temperatures. Application of zeolites improves the biocrude quality significantly. Among the catalysts, HY shows the strongest acidity and performs the best to produce high quality biocrude. Solid residues have been extensively explored with thermal gravity analysis and elemental analysis. It is reported for the first time that up to 99wt.% of sulfur is deposited in the solid residue at 250°C for both solvents. PMID:26990399

  12. Alcohol and Other Chemicals. Adolescent Alcoholism: Recognizing, Intervening, and Treating Series No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gougelet, Robert M.; Nelson, E. Don

    This document is one of seven publications contained in a series of materials for physicians on recognizing, intervening with, and treating adolescent alcoholism. The materials in this unit of study are designed to help the physician know the different classes of drugs, recognize common presenting symptoms of drug overdose, and place use and abuse…

  13. The top 50 commodity chemicals: Impact of catalytic process limitations on energy, environment, and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkovich, A.L.Y.; Gerber, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The production processes for the top 50 U.S. commodity chemicals waste energy, generate unwanted byproducts, and require more than a stoichiometric amount of feedstocks. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has quantified this impact on energy, environment, and economics for the catalytically produced commodity chemicals. An excess of 0.83 quads of energy per year in combined process and feedstock energy is required. The major component, approximately 54%, results from low per-pass yields and the subsequent separation and recycle of unreacted feedstocks. Furthermore, the production processes, either directly or through downstream waste treatment steps, release more than 20 billion pounds of carbon dioxide per year to the environment. The cost of the wasted feedstock exceeds 2 billion dollars per year. Process limitations resulting from unselective catalysis and unfavorable reaction thermodynamic constraints are the major contributors to this waste. Advanced process concepts that address these problems in an integrated manner are needed to improve process efficiency, which would reduce energy and raw material consumption, and the generation of unwanted byproducts. Many commodity chemicals are used to produce large volume polymer products. Of the energy and feedstock wasted during the production of the commodity chemicals, nearly one-third and one-half, respectively, represents chemicals used as polymer precursors. Approximately 38% of the carbon dioxide emissions are generated producing polymer feedstocks.

  14. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well as injuries, liver disease, heart disease, cancer, and other health problems. It can also cause problems at home, at work, and with friends. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  15. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  16. Inhibition and deactivation effects in catalytic wet oxidation of high-strength alcohol-distillery liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Belkacemi, K.; Larachi, F.; Hamoudi, S.; Turcotte, G.; Sayari, A.

    1999-06-01

    The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) from raw high-strength alcohol-distillery waste liquors was evaluated using three different treatments: thermolysis (T), noncatalytic wet oxidation (WO), and solid-catalyzed wet oxidation (CWO). The distillery liquors (TOC = 22,500 mg/l, sugars = 18,000 mg/l, and proteins = 13,500 mg/l) were produced by alcoholic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates from steam-exploded timothy grass. TOC-abatement studies were conducted batchwise in a stirred autoclave to evaluate the influence of the catalyst (7:3, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} mixed oxide), oxygen partial pressure (0.5--2.5 MPa), and temperature (453--523 K) on T, WO, and CWO processes. Although CWO outperformed T and WO, TOC conversions did not exceed {approximately}60% at the highest temperature used. Experiments provided prima facie evidence for a gradual fouling of the catalyst and a developing inhibition in the liquors which impaired deep TOC removals. Occurrence of catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proven experimentally through quantitative and qualitative experiments such as elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Inhibition toward further degradation of the liquors was ascribed to the occurrence of highly stable antioxidant intermediates via the Maillard reactions between dissolved sugars and proteins. A lumping kinetic model involving both reaction inhibition by dissolved intermediates and catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proposed to account for the distribution of carbon in the liquid, solid, and the vapor phases.

  17. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, Jr, H W; Wentworth, W E

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  18. Deprotonation Induced Ligand Oxidation in a Ni(II) Complex of a Redox Noninnocent N(1)-(2-Aminophenyl)benzene-1,2-diamine and Its Use in Catalytic Alcohol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sikari, Rina; Sinha, Suman; Jash, Upasona; Das, Siuli; Brandão, Paula; de Bruin, Bas; Paul, Nanda D

    2016-06-20

    Two nickel(II)-complexes, [Ni(II)(H3L)2](ClO4)2 ([1](ClO4)2) and [Ni(II)(HL)2] (2), containing the redox-active tridentate ligand N(1)-(2-aminophenyl)benzene-1,2-diamine (H3L) have been synthesized. Complex [1](ClO4)2 is octahedral containing two neutral H3L ligands in a facial coordination mode, whereas complex 2 is a singlet diradical species with approximately planar configuration at the tetracoordinate metal atom with two pendant NH2 side arms from each of the coordinated ligands. Both complexes are found to be chemically interconvertible; complex [1](2+) gets converted to complex 2 when exposed to base and oxygen via simultaneous deprotonation and oxidation of the coordinated ligands. Molecular and electronic structures of the isolated complexes are scrutinized thoroughly by various spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray crystallography, and density functional theory. The observed dissociation of a ligand arm upon oxidation of the ligand was exploited to bring about catalytic alcohol oxidation using coordinatively saturated complex [1](ClO4)2 as a catalyst precursor. Both the complexes [1](ClO4)2and 2 were tested for catalytic oxidation of both primary and secondary alcohols. PMID:27267427

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A; Spivey, James J

    2013-05-01

    Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

  20. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  1. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds. PMID:20825023

  2. Pretreatment of empty palm fruit bunch for production of chemicals via catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Misson, Mailin; Haron, Roslindawati; Kamaroddin, Mohd Fadhzir Ahmad; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2009-06-01

    The effect of chemical pretreatments using NaOH, H(2)O(2), and Ca(OH)(2) on Empty Palm Fruit Bunches (EPFB) to degrade EPFB lignin before pyrolysis was investigated. Spectrophotometer analysis proved consecutive addition of NaOH and H(2)O(2) decomposed almost 100% of EPFB lignin compared to 44% for the Ca(OH)(2), H(2)O(2) system while NaOH and Ca(OH)(2) used exclusively could not alter lignin much. Next, the pretreated EPFB was catalytically pyrolyzed. Experimental results indicated the phenolic yields over Al-MCM-41 and HZSM-5 catalysts were 90 wt% and 80 wt%, respectively compared to 67 wt% yield for the untreated sample under the same set of conditions. Meanwhile, the experiments with HY zeolite yielded 70 wt% phenols. PMID:19232488

  3. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yae, Shinji; Morii, Yuma; Fukumuro, Naoki; Matsuda, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium.

  4. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium. PMID:22738277

  5. Modification of tubular ceramic membranes with carbon nanotubes using catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc Trung; Thieffry, Guillemette; Jacob, Matthieu; Batiot-Dupeyrat, Catherine; Teychene, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully grown on tubular ceramic membranes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. CNTs were synthesized at 650°C for 3-6 h under a 120 mL min(-1) flow of C2H6 on ceramic membranes impregnated with iron salt. The synthesis procedure was beforehand optimized in terms of catalyst amount, impregnation duration and reaction temperature, using small pieces of tubular ceramic membranes. The yield, size and structure of the CNTs produced were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis and microscopic imaging techniques. Afterwards, preliminary filtration tests with alginate and phenol were performed on two modified tubular membranes. The results indicate that the addition of CNTs on the membrane material increased the permeability of ceramic membrane and its ability to reject alginate and adsorb phenol, yet decreased its fouling resistance. PMID:26465312

  6. Evaluation of alcoholic hydroxyl derivatives for chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kikuo; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2009-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most favorable process as next-generation lithography. For the development of EUV resists, phenolic materials such as poly (4-hydroxystyrene) have been investigated. Phenolic hydroxyl groups of polymers play an important role in acid diffusion, dissolution kinetics, and adhesion to substrates. Besides these important roles, phenolic hydroxyl groups are also an effective proton source in acid generation in EUV resists. However, the roles of alcohol hydroxyl groups have not been well-studied. To clarify the difference between phenolic and alcoholic hydroxyl groups upon exposure to EUV radiation, we synthesized acrylic terpolymers containing alcoholic hydroxyl groups as model photopolymers and exposed the resist samples based on these polymers to EUV radiation. On the basis of the lithographic performances of these resist samples, we evaluated the characteristics of alcoholic hydroxyl groups upon exposure to EUV radiation. We discuss the relationship between the chemical structures of these derivatives and lithographic performance.

  7. Bond dissociation mechanism of ethanol during carbon nanotube synthesis via alcohol catalytic CVD technique: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Tomoya; Shimamura, Kohei; Shibuta, Yasushi; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Yamaguchi, Shu

    2014-03-01

    Dissociation of ethanol on a nickel cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation to reveal the bond dissociation mechanism of carbon source molecules during carbon nanotube synthesis. C-C bonds in only CHxCO fragments are dissociated on the nickel cluster, whereas there is no preferential structure among the fragments for C-O bond dissociation. The dissociation preference is uncorrelated with the bond dissociation energy of corresponding bonds in freestanding molecules but is correlated with the energy difference between fragment molecules before and after dissociation on the nickel surface. Moreover, carbon-chain formation occurs after C-C bond dissociation in a continuous simulation. What determines the chirality of CNTs? What happens at the dissociation stage of carbon source molecules? Regarding the former question, many researchers have pointed out the good epitaxial relationship between a graphite network and a close-packed facet (i.e., fcc(1 1 1) or hcp(0 0 0 1)) of transition metals [17-19]. Therefore, the correlation between the chirality of CNTs and the angle of the step edge on metal (or metal carbide) surfaces has been closely investigated [20-22]. In association with this geometric matching, the epitaxial growth of graphene on Cu(1 1 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces has recently been achieved via CCVD technique [23-25], which is a promising technique for the synthesis of large-area and monolayer graphene.Regarding the latter question, it is empirically known that the yield and quality of CNT products strongly depend on the choice of carbon source molecules and additives. For example, it is well known that the use of ethanol as carbon source molecules yields a large amount of SWNTs without amorphous carbons (called the alcohol CCVD (ACCVD) technique) compared with the CCVD process using hydrocarbons [4]. Moreover, the addition of a small amount of water dramatically enhances the activity and lifetime of the catalytic metal (called the

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis-gc/ms of spirulina: evaluation of a highly proteinaceous biomass source for production of fuels and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis of microalgae offers a pathway towards the production of compounds derived from the thermal decomposition of triglycerides, proteins as well as lignocelluloses and their combinations thereof. When catalytically induced, this could lead to the production of fuels and chemicals including aro...

  9. Catalytic activity of lignin peroxidase and partition of veratryl alcohol in AOT/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Huang, Xirong; Li, Yuezhong; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji

    2006-04-01

    The activity of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and the partition of its optimum substrate veratryl alcohol (VA) in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles were studied in this paper to understand the microheterogeneous effect of the medium on the catalytic properties of LiP hosted in the reverse micelle. Results showed that LiP from Phanerochaete chrysosporium could express its activity in the reverse micelles, but its activity depended, to a great extent, on the composition of the reverse micelles. Optimum activity occurred at a molar ratio of water to AOT (omega0) of 11, a pH value of 3.6, and a volume ratio of isooctane to toluene of 7-9. Under optimum conditions, the half-life of LiP was circa 12 h. The dependence of LiP activity on the volume fraction of water in the medium (theta), at a constant omega0 value of 11, indicated that VA was mainly solubilized in the pseudophase of the reverse micelle. Based on the pseudobiphasic model and the corresponding kinetic method, a linear line can be obtained in a plot of apparent Michaelis constant of VA vs theta, and the partition coefficient of VA between the pseudophase and the organic solvent phase was determined to be 35.8, which was higher than that (22.3) between bulk water and the corresponding mixed organic solvent. H2O2 inhibited LiP at concentrations higher than 80 microM; this concentration value seems to be different from that in aqueous solution (about 3 mM). The differences mentioned above should be ascribed to the microheterogeneity and the interface of the AOT reverse micelle. PMID:16080008

  10. Role of support-nanoalloy interactions in the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering for tuning catalytic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-09-12

    The understanding of the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in supported nanosized alloy particles is fundamental for achieving active catalysts by design. This report shows how such knowledge can be obtained by a combination of techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based x-ray fine structure absorption spectroscopy and high-energy x-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis, and how the support-nanoalloy interaction influences the catalytic activity of a ternary nanoalloy (platinum-nickel-cobalt) particles on three different supports: carbon, silica and titania. The reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen is employed as a probe of the catalytic activity. This ternary composition, in combination with the different support materials, is demonstrated to be capable of fine-tuning the catalytic activity and stability. The support-nanoalloy interaction is shown to influence structural and chemical ordering in the nanoparticles, leading to support-tunable active sites on the nanoalloys for oxygen activation in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. A nickel/cobalt-tuned catalytic site on the surface of nanoalloy was revealed for oxygen activation, which differs from the traditional oxygen-activation sites known for oxide-supported noble metal catalysts. The discovery of such support-nanoalloy interaction enabled oxygen-activation sites introduces a very promising strategy for designing active catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

  11. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering. PMID:11429307

  12. Catalytic lignin valorization process for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Jongerius, Anna L; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-08-01

    With dwindling reserves of fossil feedstock as a resource for chemicals production, the fraction of chemicals and energy supplied by alternative, renewable resources, such as lignin, can be expected to increase in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrate a catalytic process to valorize lignin (exemplified with kraft, organosolv, and sugarcane bagasse lignin) using a mixture of cheap, bio-renewable ethanol and water as solvent. Ethanol/water mixtures readily solubilize lignin under moderate temperatures and pressures with little residual solids. The molecular weight of the dissolved lignins was shown to be reduced by gel permeation chromatography and quantitative HSQC NMR methods. The use of liquid-phase reforming of the solubilized lignin over a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at 498 K and 58 bar is introduced to yield up to 17 % combined yield of monomeric aromatic oxygenates such as guaiacol and substituted guaiacols generating hydrogen as a useful by-product. Reduction of the lignin dissolved in ethanol/water using a supported transition metal catalyst at 473 K and 30 bar hydrogen yields up to 6 % of cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics. PMID:22740175

  13. Artisanal alcohol production in Mayan Guatemala: chemical safety evaluation with special regard to acetaldehyde contamination.

    PubMed

    Kanteres, Fotis; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2009-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition, production, distribution, and consumption of artisanal alcohol, particularly in the developing world. In Nahualá, an indigenous Mayan municipality located in highland Guatemala, heavy alcohol consumption appears to have had a significant negative impact on health, a major role in cases of violence and domestic abuse, and a link to street habitation. Cuxa, an artisanally, as well as commercially produced sugarcane alcohol, is widely consumed by heavy drinkers in this community. Cuxa samples from all distribution points in the community were obtained and chemically analyzed for health-relevant constituents and contaminants including methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols, and metals. From those, only acetaldehyde was confirmed to be present in unusually high levels (up to 126 g/hl of pure alcohol), particularly in samples that were produced clandestinely. Acetaldehyde has been evaluated as "possibly carcinogenic" and has also been identified as having significant human exposure in a recent risk assessment. This study explores the reasons for the elevated levels of acetaldehyde, through both sampling and analyses of raw and intermediary products of cuxa production, as well as interviews from producers of the clandestine alcohol. For further insight, we experimentally produced this alcohol in our laboratory, based on the directions provided by the producers, as well as materials from the town itself. Based on these data, the origin of the acetaldehyde contamination appears to be due to chemical changes induced during processing, with the major causative factors consisting of poor hygiene, aerobic working conditions, and inadequate yeast strains, compounded by flawed distillation methodology that neglects separation of the first fractions of the distillate. These results indicate a preventable public health concern for consumers, which can be overcome through education about good manufacturing practices, as well

  14. Catalytic Conversion of Carbon-Containing Compounds into Valuable Chemicals and Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhuo

    Conversion of carbon-containing compounds, especially C1 compounds such as carbon dioxide and methane, to valuable chemicals and fuels will hopefully address concerns over decreasing supplies of fossil fuels and mitigate the eects of greenhouse gas emissions on global climate change. Many challenges, however, remain to be addressed before these technologies may be adopted on an industrial scale. Chiefly, catalysts must be developed to activate carbon-containing compounds from their thermodynamically stable ground states, using hydrogen, electrons, or heat as energy sources. We chose as model catalytic systems: 1) Metathesis of ethene and 2-butene; 2) Methane dehydrogenation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We developed three computational methodologies to study these processes across a range of length and time scales. First, we investigated how electronic structure affects the properties and reactivity of these catalyst systems; by computing the partial electronic density of states, electronic localization function, and excess spin density, we showed how redox supports, such as ceria, promote electron transfer reactions. We applied this to the studies of methane activation and carbon dioxide activation. Second, we developed a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach to calculate energies of activation at nite temperatures, based on the Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi principle and the Nudged Elastic Band method. Third, we developed an approach to numerically compute heat capacities and other thermodynamic properties on extended catalytic systems that are comparable in accuracy and precision to methods that have been well-developed for gas-phase molecules. We applied these to the studies of metathesis propagation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We gained mechanistic, thermodynamic, and kinetic insight into the elementary steps that comprise larger reaction networks of interest to the broader catalysis community. Ultimately, these theoretical and computational predictions

  15. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  16. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  17. Synchronizing steric and electronic effects in {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes: the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weickmann, Daniel; Frey, Wolfgang; Plietker, Bernd

    2013-02-18

    A series of new hexacoordinated {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes was prepared from [RuCl(2)(R(3)P)(3)]. Their structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic potential of this new class of complexes was tested in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. In this test reaction, the influence of the counteranion plus electronic influences at the tetradentate ligand and the phosphine ligand were examined. The electrochemistry of all complexes was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the substituent at the ligand backbone, the complexes showed a different behavior. For all N-benzyl substituted complexes, reversible Ru(II/III) redox potentials were observed, whereas the N-methyl substituted complex possessed an irreversible oxidation event at small scan rates. Furthermore, the electronic influence of different substituents at the ligand scaffold and at the phosphine on the Ru(II/III) redox potential was investigated. The measured E(0) values were correlated to the theoretically determined HOMO energies of the complexes. In addition, these HOMO energies correlated well with the reactivity of the single complexes in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. The exact balance of redox potential and reactivity appears to be crucial for synchronizing the multiple hydrogen-transfer events. The optimized catalyst structure was applied in a screening on scope and limitation in the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols. PMID:23292940

  18. Surface engineering on CeO2 nanorods by chemical redox etching and their enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Li, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications.Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Diameter distributions of as-prepared and etched samples, optical images, specific catalytic data of CO oxidation and comparison of CO oxidation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01846c

  19. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  20. Catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds with chemical liquid deposition (CLD) modified ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyan; Luo, Mengmeng; Xiao, Rui; Shao, Shanshan; Jin, Baosheng; Xiao, Guomin; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2014-03-01

    Chemical liquid deposition (CLD) with KH550, TEOS and methyl silicone oil as the modifiers was used to modify ZSM-5 and deposit its external acid sites. The characteristics of modified catalysts were tested by catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds. The effects of different modifying conditions (deposited amount, temperature, and time) on the product yields and selectivities were investigated. The results show KH550 modified ZSM-5 (deposited amount of 4%, temperature of 20°C and time of 6h) produced the maximum yields of aromatics (24.5%) and olefins (16.5%), which are much higher than that obtained with original ZSM-5 catalyst (18.8% aromatics and 9.8% olefins). The coke yield decreased from 44.1% with original ZSM-5 to 26.7% with KH550 modified ZSM-5. The selectivities of low-molecule-weight hydrocarbons (ethylene and benzene) decreased, while that of higher molecule-weight hydrocarbons (propylene, butylene, toluene, and naphthalene) increased comparing with original ZSM-5. PMID:24413482

  1. Growth and morphology of carbon nanostructures on nickel oxide nanoparticles in catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, M.; Sil, A.; Ray, S.

    2014-07-01

    The present study explores the conditions favorable for the growth of cylindrical carbon nanostructures such as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and carbon nanofiber by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method using nickel oxide-based catalyst nanoparticles of different average sizes as well as different levels of doping by copper oxide. The role of doping and the average size have been related to the observed melting behavior of nanoparticles of nickel oxide by thermal and diffraction analysis, and the importance of melting has been highlighted in the context of growth of cylindrical nanostructures. In the reducing environment prevailing in the CCVD chamber due to decomposition of flowing acetylene gas at elevated temperature, there is extensive reduction of oxide nanoparticles. Lack of melting and faster flow of carbon-bearing gases favor the formation of a carbon deposit cover over the catalyst nanoparticles giving rise to the formation of nanobeads. Melting allows rapid diffusion of carbon from the surface to inside catalyst particles, and reduced flow of gas lowers the rate of carbon deposit, both creating conditions favorable for the formation of cylindrical nanostructures, which grows around the catalyst particles. Smaller particle size and lower doping favor growth of MWCNT, while growth of fiber is commonly observed on larger particles having relatively higher level of doping.

  2. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  3. High-value alcohols and higher-oxidation-state compounds by catalytic Z-selective cross-metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ming Joo; Khan, R. Kashif M.; Torker, Sebastian; Yu, Miao; Mikus, Malte S.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Olefin metathesis catalysts provide access to molecules that are indispensable to physicians and researchers in the life sciences. A persisting problem, however, is the dearth of chemical transformations that directly generate acyclic Z allylic alcohols, including products that contain a hindered neighbouring substituent or reactive functional units such as a phenol, an aldehyde, or a carboxylic acid. Here we present an electronically modified ruthenium-disulfide catalyst that is effective in generating such high-value compounds by cross-metathesis. The ruthenium complex is prepared from a commercially available precursor and an easily generated air-stable zinc catechothiolate. Transformations typically proceed with 5.0 mole per cent of the complex and an inexpensive reaction partner in 4-8 hours under ambient conditions; products are obtained in up to 80 per cent yield and 98:2 Z:E diastereoselectivity. The use of this catalyst is demonstrated in the synthesis of the naturally occurring anti-tumour agent neopeltolide and in a single-step stereoselective gram-scale conversion of a renewable feedstock (oleic acid) to an anti-fungal agent. In this conversion, the new catalyst promotes cross-metathesis more efficiently than the commonly used dichloro-ruthenium complexes, indicating that its utility may extend beyond Z-selective processes.

  4. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, M.R.; Minahan, D.M.; Nagaki, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    As stated last quarter, we discovered potassium as an impurity in the mixed metal oxides. The potassium was probably incorporated into the solid during the coprecipitation using K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Currently NH{sub 4}OH is being used as the precipitating base. We have discovered that the precipitation agent influences the surface composition of the mixed-metal oxides. Chemical analysis of the surface and bulk compositions showed significant differences in surface compositions of the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}OH precipitated catalysts. In TPR experiments we have discovered that the precipitating pH markedly affects the reducibility of the ZnMnCr oxides. This shows that the choice of base as well as the pH strongly affects the surface composition of the mixed metal catalysts. Additional studies are in progress in which we are studying how the precipitating agents affect the surface composition of the mixed metal oxide catalysts and how the different surface compositions affect their chemical properties and their interactions with the supported metal particles. Catalysts from our last design show a total selectivity to alcohols of 86%, a 3:1 ratio of methanol to isobutanol and an isobutanol productivity of 30--38 g/kg-hr. Process conversion is estimated to be 7--8%. These are encouraging results, and it is hoped that manipulation of process variables such as temperature, pressure, syngas ratio and space velocity will lead to further improved performance.

  5. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  6. Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Allylic Alcohols by Catalytic Asymmetric Substitution of the OH Group with Monosubstituted Hydrazines.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Xu, Jing-Kun; Huang, Chao-Fan; He, Zeng-Yang; Xu, Ya-Nan; Tian, Shi-Kai

    2016-09-01

    A new strategy has been established for the kinetic resolution of racemic allylic alcohols through a palladium/sulfonyl-hydrazide-catalyzed asymmetric OH-substitution under mild conditions. In the presence of 1 mol % [Pd(allyl)Cl]2 , 4 mol % (S)-SegPhos, and 10 mol % 2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonyl hydrazide, a range of racemic allylic alcohols were smoothly resolved with selectivity factors of more than 400 through an asymmetric allylic alkylation of monosubstituted hydrazines under air at room temperature. Importantly, this kinetic resolution process provided various allylic alcohols and allylic hydrazine derivatives with high enantiopurity. PMID:27339655

  7. Development Of Hot Surface Polysilicon-Based Chemical Sensor And Actuator With Integrated Catalytic Micropatterns For Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.

    2009-05-01

    Over the last twenty years, we have followed a rapid expansion in the development of chemical sensors and microreactors for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds. However, for many of the developed gas sensors poor sensitivity and selectivity, and high-power consumption remain among one of the main drawbacks. One promising approach to increase selectivity at lower power consumption is calorimetric sensing, performed in a pulsed regime and using specific catalytic materials. In this work, we study kinetics of various catalytic oxidation reactions using micromachined hot surface polysilicon-based sensor containing sensitive and selective catalysts. The sensor acts as both thermal actuator of chemical and biochemical reactions on hot-surfaces and detector of heats (enthalpies) associated with these reactions. Using novel deposition techniques we integrated selective catalysts in an array of hot plates such that they can be thermally actuated and sensed individually. This allows selective detection and analysis of dangerous gas compounds in a mixture, specifically hydrocarbons at concentrations down to low ppm level. In this contribution we compare various techniques for the local immobilization of catalytic material on hot spots of the sensor in terms of process compatibility, mechanical stress, stability and cost.

  8. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg(2+)-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C-O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface. PMID:27619990

  9. Chemical ablation of the gallbladder using alcohol in cholecystitis after palliative biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang-Heum; Kim, Sang Pil; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Chang Kyun; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical ablation of the gallbladder is effective in patients at high risk of complications after surgery. Percutaneous gallbladder drainage is an effective treatment for cholecystitis; however, when the drain tube cannot be removed because of recurrent symptoms, retaining it can cause problems. An 82-year-old woman presented with cholecystitis and cholangitis caused by biliary stent occlusion and suspected tumor invasion of the cystic duct. We present successful chemical ablation of the gallbladder using pure alcohol, through a percutaneous gallbladder drainage tube, in a patient who developed intractable cholecystitis with obstruction of the cystic duct after receiving a biliary stent. Our results suggest that chemical ablation therapy is an effective alternative to surgical therapy for intractable cholecystitis. PMID:19399941

  10. Role of alkyl alcohol on viscosity of silica-based chemical gels for decontamination of highly radioactive nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. S.; Yoon, S. B.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Silica-based chemical gel for the decontamination of nuclear facilities was prepared by using fumed silica as a viscosifier, a 0.5 M Ce (IV) solution dissolved in concentrated nitric acid as a chemical decontamination agent, and tripropylene glycol butyl ether (TPGBE) as a co-viscosifier. A new effective strategy for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the alkyl alcohols as organic solvents to effectively dissolve the co-viscosifier. The mixture solution of the co-viscosifier and alkyl alcohols was more effective in the control of viscosity than that of the co-viscosifier only in gel. Here, the alkyl alcohols played a key role as an effective dissolution solvent for the co-viscosifier in the preparation of the chemical gel, resulting in a reducing of the amount of the co-viscosifier and gel time compared with that of the chemical gel prepared without the alkyl alcohols. It was considered that the alkyl alcohols contributed to the effective dissolution of the co-viscosifier as well as the homogeneous mixing in the formation of the gel, while the co-viscosifier in an aqueous media of the chemical decontamination agent solution showed a lower solubility. The decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels prepared in this work using a multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed a high decontamination efficiency of over ca. 94% and ca. 92% for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on surface of the stainless steel 304, respectively. (authors)

  11. Effect of crystallization time on the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of the hierarchical porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Ma, Yuanyuan; Ding, Wenli; Guan, Jingqi; Wu, Shujie; Kan, Qiubin

    2010-09-15

    A series of hierarchical porous materials were prepared by a dual template method. The effect of different crystallization time on the channel architecture, morphology, acid performance of the hierarchical porous materials was investigated. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance were performed to obtain information on the physico-chemical properties of the materials. It was shown that the change in crystallization time could influence the structure/texture and surface acid properties of the hierarchical porous materials. In addition, alkylation of phenol with tert-butanol reaction was carried out to investigate the catalytic performance of the hierarchical porous materials. The results showed that the catalytic activity of the hierarchical porous materials and the selectivity to the bulkly product 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol decreased with processing time.

  12. Chemical Engineering of Enzymes: Altered Catalytic Activity, Predictable Selectivity and Exceptional Stability of the Semisynthetic Peroxidase Seleno-Subtilisin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring, Dietmar; Schreier, Peter

    The increasing demand for enzymes as highly selective, mild, and environmentally benign catalysts is often limited by the lack of an enzyme with the desired catalytic activity or substrate selectivity and by their instability in biotechnological processes. The previous answers to these problems comprised genetically engineered enzymes and several classes of enzyme mimics. Here we describe the potential of chemical enzyme engineering: native enzymes can be modified by merely chemical means and basic equipment yielding so-called semisynthetic enzymes. Thus, the high substrate selectivity of the enzymatic peptide framework is combined with the catalytic versatility of a synthetic active site. We illustrate the potential of chemically engineered enzymes with the conception of the semisynthetic peroxidase seleno-subtilisin. First, the serine endoprotease subtilisin was crystallized and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to give cross-linked enzyme crystals which were found to be insoluble in water or organic solvents and highly stable. Second, serine 221 in the active site (Enz-OH) was chemically converted into an oxidized derivative of selenocystein (Enz-SeO2H). As a consequence, the former proteolytic enzyme gained peroxidase activity and catalyzed the selective reduction of hydroperoxides. Due to the identical binding sites of the semisynthetic peroxidase and the protease, the substrate selectivity of seleno-subtilisin was predictable in view of the well-known selectivity of subtilisin.

  13. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  14. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  15. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  16. Phase and chemical equilibria in the transesterification reaction of vegetable oils with supercritical lower alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. I.; Stepanov, D. A.; Ermakova, A.

    2011-08-01

    Calculations of thermodynamic data are performed for fatty acid triglycerides, free fatty acids, and fatty acid methyl esters, participants of the transesterification reaction of vegetable oils that occurs in methanol. Using the obtained thermodynamic parameters, the phase diagrams for the reaction mixture are constructed, and the chemical equilibria of the esterification reaction of free fatty acids and the transesterification reaction of fatty acid triglycerides attained upon treatment with supercritical methanol are determined. Relying on our analysis of the obtained equilibria for the esterification reaction of fatty acids and the transesterification reaction of triglycerides attained upon treatment with lower alcohols, we select the optimum conditions for performing the reaction in practice.

  17. Functional carbons and carbon nanohybrids for the catalytic conversion of biomass to renewable chemicals in the condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, John; Hoff, Thomas; Liu, Chi; Pueschel, Charles; Rao, Radhika; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides opportunities to synthesize chemicals with new functionalities and grow a more sustainable chemical industry. However, new challenges emerge as research transitions from petrochemistry to biorenewable chemistry. Compared to petrochemisty, the selective conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates requires most catalytic reactions to take place at low temperatures (< 300°C) and in the condensed phase to prevent reactants and products from degrading. The stability of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid water above the normal boiling point represents one of the major challenges to overcome. Herein, we review some of the latest advances in the field with an emphasis on the role of carbon materials and carbon nanohybrids in addressing this challenge.

  18. Preconception care: caffeine, smoking, alcohol, drugs and other environmental chemical/radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As providing health education, optimizing nutrition, and managing risk factors can be effective for ensuring a healthy outcome for women and her yet un-conceived baby, external influences play a significant role as well. Alcohol, smoking, caffeine use and other similar lifestyle factors, have now become an integral part of the daily life of most men and women, who use/misuse one or more of these harmful substances regularly despite knowledge of their detrimental effects. The adverse health outcomes of these voluntary and involuntary exposures are of even greater concern in women of child bearing age where the exposure has the potential of inflicting harm to two generations. This paper is examining the available literature for the possible effects of caffeine consumption, smoking, alcohol or exposure to chemicals may have on the maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH). Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception usage of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol and other illicit drugs; and exposure to environmental chemicals and radiant on MNCH outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Results Heavy maternal preconception caffeine intake of >300mg/d significantly increase the risk of a subsequent fetal loss by 31% (95% CI: 8-58%). On the other hand, preconception alcohol consumption leads to non-significant 30% increase in spontaneous abortion (RR 1.30; 95% CI: 0.85-1.97). Preconception counselling can lead to a significant decrease in the consumption of alcohol during the first trimester (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.08-2.97). Periconception smoking, on the other hand, was found to be associated with an almost 3 times increased risk of congenital heart defects

  19. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  20. Cross-hetero-dehydrogenative coupling reaction of phosphites: a catalytic metal-free phosphorylation of amines and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhineshkumar, Jayaraman; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorylation of amines, alcohols, and sulfoximines are accomplished using molecular iodine as a catalyst and H2O2 as the sole oxidant under mild reaction conditions. This method provides an easy route for synthesizing a variety of phosphoramidates, phosphorus triesters and sulfoximine-derived phosphoramidates which are of biological importance. PMID:24219013

  1. Chemical Analysis and Risk Assessment of Diethyl Phthalate in Alcoholic Beverages with Special Regard to Unrecorded Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Jenny; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Phthalates are synthetic compounds with a widespread field of applications. For example, they are used as plasticizers in PVC plastics and food packaging, or are added to personal care products. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) may be used to denature alcohol, e.g., for cosmetic purposes. Public health concerns of phthalates include carcinogenic, teratogenic, hepatotoxic and endocrine effects. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for determining phthalates in alcohol samples and to provide a risk assessment for consumers of such products. Methodology/Principal Findings A liquid-liquid extraction procedure was optimized by varying the following parameters: type of extraction solvent (cyclohexane, n-hexane, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane), the ratio extraction solvent/sample volume (1∶1 to 50∶1) and the number of extraction repetitions (1–10). The best extraction yield (99.9%) was achieved with the solvent 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, an extraction solvent volume/sample volume ratio of 10∶1 and a double extraction. For quantification, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with deuterated internal standards was used. The investigated samples were alcoholic beverages and unrecorded alcohol products from different countries (n = 257). Two unrecorded alcohol samples from Lithuania contained diethyl phthalate in concentrations of 608 mg/L and 210 mg/L. Conclusions/Significance The consumption of the phthalate-positive unrecorded alcohols would exceed tolerable daily intakes as derived from animal experiments. Both positive samples were labelled as cosmetic alcohol, but had clearly been offered for human consumption. DEP seems to be unsuitable as a denaturing agent as it has no effect on the organoleptic properties of ethanol. In light of our results that DEP might be consumed by humans in unrecorded alcohols, the prohibition of its use as a denaturing agent should be considered. PMID:19956573

  2. Transient and sustained elementary flux mode networks on a catalytic string-based chemical evolution model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José A

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical models designed to test the metabolism-first hypothesis for prebiotic evolution have yield strong indications about the hypothesis validity but could sometimes use a more extensive identification between model objects and real objects towards a more meaningful interpretation of results. In an attempt to go in that direction, the string-based model SSE ("steady state evolution") was developed, where abstract molecules (strings) and catalytic interaction rules are based on some of the most important features of carbon compounds in biological chemistry. The system is open with a random inflow and outflow of strings but also with a permanent string food source. Although specific catalysis is a key aspect of the model, used to define reaction rules, the focus is on energetics rather than kinetics. Standard energy change tables were constructed and used with standard formation reactions to track energy flows through the interpretation of equilibrium constant values. Detection of metabolic networks on the reaction system was done with elementary flux mode (EFM) analysis. The combination of these model design and analysis options enabled obtaining metabolic and catalytic networks showing several central features of biological metabolism, some more clearly than in previous models: metabolic networks with stepwise synthesis, energy coupling, catalysts regulation, SN2 coupling, redox coupling, intermediate cycling, coupled inverse pathways (metabolic cycling), autocatalytic cycles and catalytic cascades. The results strongly suggest that the main biological metabolism features, including the genotype-phenotype interpretation, are caused by the principles of catalytic systems and are prior to modern genetic systems principles. It also gives further theoretical support to the thesis that the basic features of biologic metabolism are a consequence of the time evolution of a random catalyst search working on an open system with a permanent food source. The importance

  3. Carbon Dioxide Conversion to Valuable Chemical Products over Composite Catalytic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Hu, Jianli; Jones, Susanne B.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Frye, John G.; White, J. F.; Jiang, Juyuan; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Presented is an experimental study on catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Catalysts having different catalytic functions were synthesized and combined in different ways to enhance selectivity to desired products. The combined catalyst system possessed the following functions: methanol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, water-gas-shift and hydrogenation. Results showed that the methods of integrating these catalytic functions played important role in achieving desired product selectivity. It was speculated that if methanol synthesis sites were located adjacent to the C-C chain growth sites, the formation rate of C2 oxygenates would be enhanced. The advantage of using high temperature methanol catalyst PdZnAl in the combined catalyst system was demonstrated. In the presence of PdZnAl catalyst, the combined catalyst system was stable at temperature of 380oC. It was observed that, at high temperature, kinetics favored oxygenate formation. Results implied that the process can be intensified by operating at high temperature using Pd-based methanol synthesis catalyst. Steam reforming of the byproduct organics was demonstrated as a means to provide supplemental hydrogen. Preliminary process design, simulation, and economic analysis of the proposed CO2 conversion process were carried out. Economic analysis indicates how ethanol production cost was affected by the price of CO2 and hydrogen.

  4. Catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis of biomass in non-inert environments for production of deoxygenated bio-oil and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis processes are among the most effective methods for liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass. Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) over HZSM-5 or other zeolites and/or utilization of reactive atmospheres such as in the non-catalytic Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TRGP) process, a recent patent...

  5. Correlating Acid Properties and Catalytic Function: A First-Principles Analysis of Alcohol Dehydration Pathways on Polyoxometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, Michael J.; Macht, Josef; Iglesia, Enrique; Neurock, Matthew

    2009-02-05

    Density functional theory calculations and reactivity data were used to examine the mechanism of alcohol dehydration on Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) catalysts and the influence of the POM composition and the degree of substitution of the alcohol on kinetically relevant elimination steps. Dehydration was found to proceed through E1 pathways in which the alcohol CsO bond is cleaved heterolytically via a carbeniumion transition state. Dehydration rates were found to depend on the elimination rate constant and the equilibrium constant for the formation of unreactive alcohol dimers. E2-type elimination transition states, involving concerted CsH and CsO bond cleavage, were not found. The extent of substitution at the R-carbon on the alcohol was found to lead to marked effects on elimination barriers, because substitution increases the proton affinity of the alcohol and the stability of the carbenium-ion transition state. Changes in the central and addenda atoms of the POM cluster and the presence of n-donors, a support, vicinal POM clusters, or charge-compensating cations were found to lead to changes in the deprotonation energy (DPE) of the POM cluster, activation barriers to dehydration, and the stability of the unreactive dimer. These effects are all captured in a general linear relation between activation barriers and deprotonation energy, a rigorous measure of acid strength. The explicit dependence of the E1 activation barrier on the acid deprotonation energy is much weaker than that on reactant proton affinity. This results from the more effective compensation between the acid deprotonation energy and the interaction energy between the cationic hydrocarbon fragment and the anionic POM cluster at the transition state. The direct interactions between the POM protons and the support, other POM clusters, n-donors, base probe molecules, and charge-compensating cations increased the negative charge of the oxide shell of the W12O40 conjugate base, which increased the

  6. Water-soluble metal nanoparticles stabilized by plant polyphenols for improving the catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.; Liao, Y.; Ma, J.; Zhao, S. L.; Huo, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic conditions, the as-prepared BWT-Pt colloid catalyst exhibited high activity in a series of biphasic oxidation of aromatic alcohols and aliphatic alcohols. As for the cycling stability, the BWT-Pt catalyst showed no obvious decrease during the 7 cycles, revealing superior cycling stability as compared with the counterparts using PVP or PEG as the stabilizer.Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic

  7. A non-chemically selective top-down approach towards the preparation of hierarchical TS-1 zeolites with improved oxidative desulfurization catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuting; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sun, Qiming; Wang, Ning; Jia, Mingjun; Valtchev, Valentin; Yu, Jihong

    2016-02-28

    Hierarchical TS-1 zeolites with secondary macropores have been successfully prepared by using two different fluoride-containing chemical etching post-treated routes. Hierarchical TS-1 zeolites exhibited a chemical composition similar to that of the parent material and showed remarkably enhanced catalytic activity in oxidative desulfurization reaction. PMID:26846586

  8. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-01

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions. PMID:18537227

  9. 2-Chloro-1,4-Dimethoxybenzene as a Novel Catalytic Cofactor for Oxidation of Anisyl Alcohol by Lignin Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Teunissen, Pauline J. M.; Field, Jim A.

    1998-01-01

    2-Chloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (2Cl-14DMB) is a natural compound produced de novo by several white rot fungi. This chloroaromatic metabolite was identified as a cofactor superior to veratryl alcohol (VA) in the oxidation of anisyl alcohol (AA) by lignin peroxidase (LiP). Our results reveal that good LiP substrates, such as VA and tryptophan, are comparatively poor cofactors in the oxidation of AA. Furthermore, we show that a good cofactor does not necessarily serve a role in protecting LiP against H2O2 inactivation. 2Cl-14DMB was not a direct mediator of AA oxidation, since increasing AA concentrations did not inhibit the oxidation of 2Cl-14DMB at all. However, the high molar ratio of anisaldehyde formed to 2Cl-14DMB consumed, up to 13:1, indicates that a mechanism which recycles the cofactor is present. PMID:16349526

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. Our current targets for isobutanol-producing catalysts are to produce an equimolar mixture of methanol and isobutanol with a productivity for isobutanol of > 50 g/Kg-hr. Reactor system modifications, undertaken to improve data quality, have been completed. The changes should help eliminate differences between the two reactors and allow for more accurate determination of higher molecular weight products. To calibrate our new reactor system, we have retested our ``best`` isobutanol catalyst, 10-DAN-54 (a promoted Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide). Under standard test conditions (400{degrees}C, 1000 psi, 12000 GHSV and syngas ratio = 1:1), this catalyst produces 200--252 g/kg-hr of total alcohols (total alcohol selectivities of 57--68%) with an isobutanol rate of 94--130 g/kg-hr and a MeOH/i-BuOH product mole ratio of 3. These results compare with a productivity of 112 g/kg-hr of total alcohols (total alcohol selectivity of 86%) with an isobutanol rate of 38 g/kg-hr and a MeOH/i-BuOH product mole ratio of 3 observed in the original microreactor system configuration. It should be remembered that the test apparatus is designed for screening only. Detailed, more reliable data for kinetic modeling must be generated using larger catalyst charges (> 10g) and in larger scale test equipment.

  11. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. Among our previous best catalysts was the family consisting of potassium-promoted Pd on a Zn/Cr spinel oxide prepared via controlled pH precipitation. We have now examined the effect of potassium promotion on (1) a Zn/Cr/O spinel and (2) on ZnO; these two individual components are used together to make our best support. The presence of excess zinc oxide has a beneficial effect on the performance of Zn/Cr spinel oxide catalysts (1) promoted with cesium and (2) promoted with both cesium and palladium. The presence of the excess zinc oxide results in a more active and selective catalyst to total alcohols and increased isobutanol rates, demonstrating the effectiveness of zinc oxide addition to the spinel support. Potassium addition promotes higher alcohol synthesis on a commercial Zn/Cr spinel oxide methanol synthesis catalyst. Incremental potassium levels (1, 3 and 5 wt%) result in an increase in total alcohol selectivity, while isobutanol. rates are maximized at 1 wt% potassium. The commercial catalyst promoted with potassium is slightly less active for isobutanol synthesis and less selective to total alcohols when compared with our spinel formulation promoted with potassium and containing excess ZnO. Surface science studies have shown that the surface of these catalysts is predominately ZnO and alkali. With use, the ZnO is reduced to Zn metal, and Cr migrates to the surface giving increased surface acidity. In addition tends to lower the overall acidity. Hydrogen can be observed on the catalyst surface by surface science studies. Hydrogen on the active catalyst is associated with the palladium.

  12. Water-soluble metal nanoparticles stabilized by plant polyphenols for improving the catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Mao, H; Liao, Y; Ma, J; Zhao, S L; Huo, F W

    2016-01-14

    Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic conditions, the as-prepared BWT-Pt colloid catalyst exhibited high activity in a series of biphasic oxidation of aromatic alcohols and aliphatic alcohols. As for the cycling stability, the BWT-Pt catalyst showed no obvious decrease during the 7 cycles, revealing superior cycling stability as compared with the counterparts using PVP or PEG as the stabilizer. PMID:26662453

  13. Mesoporous MgO: Synthesis, physico-chemical, and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerle, A. A.; Kasyanov, I. A.; Moskovskaya, I. F.; Romanovsky, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous MgO was obtained via the hydrothermal synthesis using both ionogenic and non-ionogenic surfactants as structure-directing templates. The materials prepared were characterized by SEM, BET-N2, XRD, and TG-DTA techniques. MgO particles are spherical 20-μm aggregates of primary oxide particles well shaped as rectangular parallelepipeds. Magnesium oxide samples have the specific surface area of 290-400 m2/g and pore sizes of 3.3-4.1 nm. Their mesoporous structure remained unchanged after calcination up to 350°C. Catalytic activity of mesoporous MgO was studied in acetone condensation reaction.

  14. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  15. Size-controlled synthesis of NiFe2O4 nanospheres via a PEG assisted hydrothermal route and their catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols by periodic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bappi; Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Dhar, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-05-01

    A novel and facile approach for synthesis of spinel nickel ferrites (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) employing homogeneous chemical precipitation followed by hydrothermal heating is reported. The synthesis involves use of tributylamine (TBA) as a hydroxylating agent in synthesis of nickel ferrites. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 was used as surfactant. As-synthesized NiFe2O4 NPs were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm (BET) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The XRD pattern revealed formation of cubic face-centered NiFe2O4 and TEM image showed spherical particles of sizes 2-10 nm. These NiFe2O4 NPs were used as magnetically recoverable catalyst in oxidation of cyclic alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes by periodic acid. This eco-friendly procedure affords products in very high yield and selectivity. The reusability of the catalyst is proved to be noteworthy as the material exhibits no significant changes in its catalytic activity even after five cycles of reuse.

  16. The Influence of Process Conditions on the Chemical Composition of Pine Wood Catalytic Pyrolysis Oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pereira, J.; Agblevor, F. A.; Beis, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Pine wood samples were used as model feedstock to study the properties of catalytic fast pyrolysis oils. The influence of two commercial zeolite catalysts (BASF and SudChem) and pretreatment of the pine wood with sodium hydroxide on pyrolysis products were investigated. The pyrolysis oils were first fractionated using column chromatography and characterized using GC-MS. Long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, levoglucosan, aldehydes and ketones, guaiacols/syringols, and benzenediols were the major compounds identified in the pyrolysis oils. The catalytic pyrolysis increased the polycyclic hydrocarbons fraction. Significant decreases in phthalate derivatives using SudChem and long chain aliphatics using BASF catalyst were observed. Significant amountsmore » of aromatic heterocyclic hydrocarbons and benzene derivatives were formed, respectively, using BASF and SudChem catalysts. Guaiacyl/syringyl and benzenediols derivatives were partly suppressed by the zeolite catalysts, while the sodium hydroxide treatment enriched phenolic derivatives. Zeolite catalyst and sodium hydroxide were employed together; they showed different results for each catalyst.« less

  17. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have prepared an improved version of 10-DAN-54, a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide promoted with Pd and K. This material (16-DMM-68) has acceptable elemental analysis for the expected composition and possesses the desired high surface area of >80 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst has extra added potassium vs. the standard catalyst, 10-DAN-54, as previous work had indicated that more potassium is required for optimal performance. In tests under standard conditions (400 C, 1,000 psi, GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1), this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 84% and produces > 100 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 4.7. The authors have tested 16-DMM-68 at temperatures above 400 C and pressures up to 1,500 psi (GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1). At 440 C and 1500 psi, this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 64% and produces 179 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 2.2. This is their best overall performance to data. The catalyst operates at syngas conversions up to 28% with good selectivity to total alcohols due to the extra added alkali. This performance can be compared with 10-DAN-54, which could only operate up to 20% conversion before hydrocarbon formation became a serious inefficiency.

  18. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fifteenth quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The previous best catalysts consisted of potassium-promoted Pd on a Zn/Cr spinel oxide prepared via controlled pH precipitation. The authors have now examined the effect of cesium addition to the Zn/Cr spinel oxide support. Surprisingly, cesium levels required for optimum performance are similar to those for potassium on a wt% basis. The addition of 3 wt% cesium gives isobutanol rates > 170 g/kg-hr at 440 C and 1,500 psi with selectivity to total alcohols of 77% and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of 1.4: this performance is as good as their best Pd/K catalyst. The addition of both cesium and palladium to a Zn/Cr spinel oxide support gives further performance improvements. The 5 wt% cesium, 5.9 wt% Pd formulation gives isobutanol rates > 150 g/kg-hr at 440 C and only 1,000 psi with a selectivity to total alcohols of 88% and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of 0.58: this is their best overall performance to date. The addition of both cesium and palladium to a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide support that contains excess Zn has also been examined. This spinel was the support used in the synthesis of 10-DAN-54, the benchmark catalyst. Formulations made on this support show a lower overall total alcohol rate than those using the spinel without Mn present, and require less cesium for optimal performance.

  19. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANOPARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seetala V. Naidu; Upali Siriwardane

    2005-05-24

    We have developed and streamlined the experimental systems: (a) Laser-induced solution deposition (LISD) photosynthesis, ball-milling, and chemical synthesis of Fe, Co, and Cu nanoparticle catalysts; (b) Sol-gel method for mesoporous {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, hybrid alumina/silica granular supports; (c) Three sol-gel/oil-drop catalyst preparation methods to incorporate metal nanoparticles into mesoporous 1 mm granular supports; (d) Low-cost GC-TCD system with hydrogen as carrier gas for the determination of wide spectrum of alkanes produced during the F-T reactions; and (e) Gas-flow reactor and microchannel reactor for fast screening of catalysts. The LISD method could produce Co, Cu, and Fe (5 nm) nanoparticles, but in milligram quantities. We could produce nanoparticles in gram quantities using high-energy ball milling and chemical synthesis methods. Ball milling gave wide particle size distribution compared to the chemical synthesis method that gave almost uniform size ({approx}5 nm) particles. Metal nanoparticles Cu, Co, Fe, Cu/Co, Cu/Fe and Co/Fe were loaded (2-12 wt%) uniformly into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, or alumina/silica hybrid supports by combined sol-gel/oil-drop methods followed by calcination and hydrogenation steps, prior to syngas FT reaction studies. The properties of metal loaded {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} granules were compared for the two precursors: aluminum tri-sec-butoxide (ALTSB) and aluminum tri-iso-propoxide (ALTIP). The effect of solgel supports alumina, silica, and alumina/silica hybrid were examined on catalytic properties. Metal loading efficiencies for pure metal catalysts increased in the order Co, Cu and Fe in agreement with solubility of metal hydroxides. In case of mixed metals, Co and Cu seams to interfere and reduce Fe metal loading when metal nitrate solutions are used. The solubility differences of metal hydroxides would not allow precise control of metal loading. We have overcome this problem by

  20. Synthesis of high yield single helical carbon microsprings by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and an experimental investigation of their growth mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Jining; Varadan, V. K.

    2007-06-01

    A type of single helical carbon microsprings (SHCMSs) was synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. The as-prepared SHCMSs were characterized by a number of techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental results indicate that during the synthesis both morphology change and crystalline phase transformation occur for cobalt catalytic particles and certain chemical bonding form between cobalt and sulfur atoms. Based on the data from this study, a possible growth mechanism of SHCMSs was discussed.

  1. Model of the catalytic mechanism of human aldose reductase based on quantum chemical calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Cachau, R. C.; Howard, E. H.; Barth, P. B.; Mitschler, A. M.; Chevrier, B. C.; Lamour, V.; Joachimiak, A.; Sanishvili, R.; Van Zandt, M.; Sibley, E.; Moras, D.; Podjarny, A.; UPR de Biologie Structurale; National Cancer Inst.; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Inst. for Diabetes Discovery, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose Reductase is an enzyme involved in diabetic complications, thoroughly studied for the purpose of inhibitor development. The structure of an enzyme-inhibitor complex solved at sub-atomic resolution has been used to develop a model for the catalytic mechanism. This model has been refined using a combination of Molecular Dynamics and Quantum calculations. It shows that the proton donation, the subject of previous controversies, is the combined effect of three residues: Lys 77, Tyr 48 and His 110. Lys 77 polarises the Tyr 48 OH group, which donates the proton to His 110, which becomes doubly protonated. His 110 then moves and donates the proton to the substrate. The key information from the sub-atomic resolution structure is the orientation of the ring and the single protonafion of the His 110 in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. This model is in full agreement with all available experimental data.

  2. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Richard; Brown, Heather; Li, Joanne; Holladay, John; Cooper, Alan; Rao, Tony

    2012-04-13

    This project provides critical innovations and fundamental understandings that enable development of an economically-viable process for catalytic conversion of biomass (sugar) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). A low-cost ionic liquid (Cyphos 106) is discovered for fast conversion of fructose into HMF under moderate reaction conditions without any catalyst. HMF yield from fructose is almost 100% on the carbon molar basis. Adsorbent materials and adsorption process are invented and demonstrated for separation of 99% pure HMF product and recovery of the ionic liquid from the reaction mixtures. The adsorbent material appears very stable in repeated adsorption/regeneration cycles. Novel membrane-coated adsorbent particles are made and demonstrated to achieve excellent adsorption separation performances at low pressure drops. This is very important for a practical adsorption process because ionic liquids are known of high viscosity. Nearly 100% conversion (or dissolution) of cellulose in the catalytic ionic liquid into small molecules was observed. It is promising to produce HMF, sugars and other fermentable species directly from cellulose feedstock. However, several gaps were identified and could not be resolved in this project. Reaction and separation tests at larger scales are needed to minimize impacts of incidental errors on the mass balance and to show 99.9% ionic liquid recovery. The cellulose reaction tests were troubled with poor reproducibility. Further studies on cellulose conversion in ionic liquids under better controlled conditions are necessary to delineate reaction products, dissolution kinetics, effects of mass and heat transfer in the reactor on conversion, and separation of final reaction mixtures.

  3. Effect of additions of C/sub 2/-C/sub 4/ alcohols on the catalytic activity of silver in the oxidation of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kurina, L.N.; Zeile, L.E.; Filicheva, O.D.; Roznina, M.I.

    1988-02-20

    The authors give the results of a study of the partial oxidation of methanol on a pumice-silver catalyst in the presence of ethyl, isopropyl, and isobutyl alcohol impurities that are contained in the methanol feedstock. The choice of alcohols as the materials of the investigation is related to the fact that in the rectification of the methanol feedstock the recovered methanol-fusel oil-water fraction, containing up to 33% water, 5% ethanol, and up to 13% higher alcohols, is burned, i.e., is irretrievably lost for industry, while this valuable chemical raw material can be used for formaldehyde synthesis. The gaseous reaction products were analyzed for CO, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/ contents; the amount of the obtained formaldehyde was determined by the sulfite method, the acidity of the formaldehyde solution was determined titrimetrically, and the content of the unreacted methanol was determined chromatographically. The results of the analysis were used to calculate the yields of formaldehyde and gases and the selectivity as the ratio of the amount of methanol consumed for formaldehyde formation to all the reacted methanol.

  4. Catalytic hydrothermal conversion of carboxymethyl cellulose to value-added chemicals over metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al).

    PubMed

    Zi, Guoli; Yan, Zhiying; Wang, Yangxia; Chen, Yongjuan; Guo, Yunlong; Yuan, Fagui; Gao, Wenyu; Wang, Yanmei; Wang, Jiaqiang

    2015-01-22

    Catalytic hydrolysis of biomass over solid catalysts can be one of the most efficient pathways for a future sustainable society dependent on cellulose biomass. In this work metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) without any functionalization was directly employed as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the hydrolysis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to 5-hydroxymethyl-furaldehyde (5-HMF) in aqueous phase. A 5-HMF molar yield of 40.3% and total reducing sugar (TRS) molar yield of 54.2% were obtained with water as single solvent at 473 K for 4 h. The catalyst could be reused three times without losing activity to a greater extent. With the remarkable advantages such as the use of water as single solvent and MIL-53(Al) as a novel heterogeneous green catalyst, the work provides a new platform for the production of value added chemicals and liquid fuels from biomass. PMID:25439879

  5. [Forensic chemical investigation of alcohol-containing liquids contained polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride and diethylphthalate].

    PubMed

    Tsisanova, E S; Salomatin, E M

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholism remains one of the main causes of premature death in the population of Russia. Hence, the importance of the problem of uncontrolled distribution and consumption of surrogate alcoholic products, such as alcohol-containing liquids of uncertain origin. The objective of the present study was to detect ethyl alcohol, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride, and diethylphthalate in disinfectant liquids, biological fluids and human tissues and to analyse qualitative and quantitative composition of these materials. PMID:20821990

  6. Efficient Access to Multifunctional Trifluoromethyl Alcohols through Base-Free Catalytic Asymmetric C-C Bond Formation with Terminal Ynamides.

    PubMed

    Cook, Andrea M; Wolf, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The asymmetric addition of terminal ynamides to trifluoromethyl ketones with a readily available chiral zinc catalyst gives CF3 -substituted tertiary propargylic alcohols in up to 99 % yield and 96 % ee. The exclusion of organozinc additives and base as well as the general synthetic utility of the products are key features of this reaction. The value of the β-hydroxy-β-trifluoromethyl ynamides is exemplified by selective transformations to chiral Z- and E-enamides, an amide, and N,O-ketene acetals. The highly regioselective hydration, stereoselective reduction, and hydroacyloxylation reactions proceed with high yields and without erosion of the ee value of the parent β-hydroxy ynamides. PMID:26806871

  7. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Thirteenth quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have tested a number of K/Pd promoted Zn/Mn/Cr spinel oxide catalysts within an experimental design to determine the effect of K, Pd, temperature and pressure on catalyst performance. High temperature operation (at 440 C) results in drastic loss in selectivities to total alcohols (down to 18--30%), and this obscures the effect of the catalyst formulation variables. It appears that at higher temperatures, the tube walls can also catalyze syngas conversion with a more hydrogen-rich syngas mix. Comparison with tests in a copper-lined tube with 1:1 syngas confirm this hypothesis. The design suggested that higher Pd loadings would be beneficial for isobutanol synthesis. The 6 wt% and a 9 wt% Pd formulation were tested with 1:2 syngas in copper-lined tubes. The 6 wt% Pd catalyst, at 440 C and 1,500 psi, produced 71 g/kg-hr of isobutanol with a methanol/isobutanol product mole ratio < 1. Under the same conditions, the 9 wt% Pd catalyst is again inferior, producing 52 g/kg-hr of isobutanol with a methanol/isobutanol product mole ratio = 1.7. Of particular interest here is that the 6 wt% Pd catalyst produces more higher alcohols than methanol on a molar basis at good rates using a syngas mix that could be derived from a Shell gasifier.

  8. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Cage-like copper(II) silsesquioxanes: transmetalation reactions and structural, quantum chemical, and catalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Dronova, Marina S; Yalymov, Alexey I; Lamaty, Frédéric; Bantreil, Xavier; Martinez, Jean; Bizet, Christelle; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Arkhipov, Dmitry E; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shubina, Elena S; Kirillov, Alexander M; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2015-06-01

    The transmetalation of bimetallic copper-sodium silsesquioxane cages, namely, [(PhSiO1.5 )10 (CuO)2 (NaO0.5 )2 ] ("Cooling Tower"; 1), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 ] ("Globule"; 2), and [(PhSiO1.5 )6 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 (PhSiO1.5 )6 ] ("Sandwich"; 3), resulted in the generation of three types of hexanuclear cylinder-like copper silsesqui- oxanes, [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H9 OH)2 (C2 H5 OH)6 ] (4), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H8 O2 )4 (PhCN)2 (MeOH)4 ] (5), and [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (NaCl)(C4 H8 O2 )12 (H2 O)2 ] (6). The products show a prominent "solvating system-structure" dependency, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Topological analysis of cages 1-6 was also performed. In addition, DFT theory was used to examine the structures of the Cooling Tower and Cylinder compounds, as well as the spin density distributions. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 were applied as catalysts for the direct oxidation of alcohols and amines into the corresponding amides. Compound 6 is an excellent catalyst in the oxidation reactions of benzene and alcohols. PMID:25950426

  10. Enantioselective Alcohol C-H Functionalization for Polyketide Construction: Unlocking Redox-Economy and Site-Selectivity for Ideal Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiajie; Kasun, Zachary A; Krische, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The development and application of stereoselective and site-selective catalytic methods that directly convert lower alcohols to higher alcohols are described. These processes merge the characteristics of transfer hydrogenation and carbonyl addition, exploiting alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants as redox pairs, which upon hydrogen transfer generate transient carbonyl-organometal pairs en route to products of C-C coupling. Unlike classical carbonyl additions, stoichiometric organometallic reagents and discrete alcohol-to-carbonyl redox reactions are not required. Additionally, due to a kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, the site-selective modification of glycols and higher polyols is possible, streamlining or eliminating use of protecting groups. The total syntheses of several iconic type I polyketide natural products were undertaken using these methods. In each case, the target compounds were prepared in significantly fewer steps than previously achieved. PMID:27113543

  11. Chemical Components of Noncommercial Alcohol Beverage Samples: A Study With the Viewpoint of Toxic Components in Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dadpour, Bita; Hedjazi, Arya; Ghorbani, Hamideh; Khosrojerdi, Hamid; Vaziri, Seyed Mohsen; Malek Zadeh, Haleh; Habibi Tamijani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background Iran has one of the lowest alcoholic beverage use rates in comparison with other countries, because it is legally forbidden and because of religious beliefs. Even so, unrecorded and noncommercial alcohol remains a considerable concern, which needs special attention. Objectives In the current research, we have studied the general composition of noncommercial alcohol samples to identify potentially toxic components in the context of the city of Mashhad in IR Iran. Patients and Methods Using a descriptive study, chemical composition records of alcohol samples obtained from Mashhad and its suburbs (from March 2013 to March 2014) were evaluated in terms of ethanol percentage and methanol percentage using gas chromatography. Likewise, the pH of the alcohol and the location of the sample were also considered. Some substances, such as inorganic elements, were not included because there was no information about these substances in the records. Results Of 877 reports of alcohol samples, more than 50% were obtained from Mashhad and the rest were from the suburbs. Of the reports, 57.5% were in the spring and summer, followed by 42.5% in the fall and winter. The mean (min-max) of ethanol percentage was 30.04% (0 - 98.4). In four cases, methanol was detected. The mean (min-max) of methanol percentage was 23% (4 - 95).The majority of the samples had an acidic pH. Conclusions The composition of unrecorded samples did not raise major toxicological concern beyond ethanol in alcohol products. However, concentration levels of methanol in some unrecorded alcohol samples made these samples detrimental for human consumption. PMID:27622171

  12. Chemical modification of Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase and its catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Samia A.; El-Shayeb, Nefisa M.A.; Hashem, Abdel-Gawad M.; Saleh, Shireen A.A.; Abdel-Fattah, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase was modified by covalent coupling to periodate activated polysaccharides (glycosylation). The conjugated enzyme to activated starch showed the highest specific activity (128.5 U/mg protein). Compared to the native enzyme, the conjugated form exhibited: a higher optimal reaction temperature, a lower Ea (activation energy), a higher K m (Michaelis constant) and Vmax (maximal reaction rate), and improved thermal stability. The calculated t 1/2 (half-life) values of heat in-activation at 60 °C and 70 °C were 245.7 and 54.5 min respectively, whereas at these temperatures the native enzyme was less stable (t 1/2 of 200.0 and 49.5 min respectively). The conjugated enzyme retained 32.3 and 29.7%, respectively from its initial activity in presence of 5 mM Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) and p -Chloro Mercuri Benzoate ( p -CMB), while the native enzyme showed a remarkable loss of activity (retained activity 1.61 and 13.7%, respectively). The present work has established the potential of glycosylation to enhance the catalytic properties of β-glucosidase enzyme, making this enzyme potentially feasible for biotechnological applications. PMID:26221085

  13. In-situ Observation of Raman Scattering from Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Growth Stage during Alcohol Catalytic CVD Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiashi, Shohei; Murakami, Yoichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Einarsson, Erik; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2004-03-01

    In-situ observation of Raman scattering of SWNTs in the growth stage was performed using the alcohol catalytic CVD (ACCVD) method. SWNTs were generated in a vacuum chamber, which was built with AFM system and Raman scattering measurement capabilities. Fe/Co metal particles supported with zeolite were dispersed on a silicon plate, which was located inside the vacuum chamber. After evacuating the chamber, an AC voltage was supplied to the silicon plate, which was heated by Joule heating ( ˜800 ^oC). Ethanol gas (1.0 Torr) was then introduced into the chamber. Before the heating, there is only one silicon peak in the Raman scattering spectrum. This peak was shifted and decreased in its intensity, when heated. The G-band peak from SWNTs appeared around 1560 cm-1, after supplying ethanol gas, and its intensity gets larger and larger, while that of silicon is almost constant. After stopping the flow of ethanol gas and cooling, the intensities of both the G-band and the silicon peak increased, and their peaks were up-shifted rapidly due to the decrease in temperature. Generation mechanism of SWNTs will be discussed.

  14. Transmission of photo-catalytic function in a self-replicating chemical system: in situ amphiphile production over two protocell generations.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, A N; Maurer, S E; Nielsen, K A; Monnard, P-A

    2014-08-18

    Glass microsphere supported protocells were built to investigate the transmission of catalytic function during replication. The chemical system's replication was driven through in situ amphiphile production that resulted in the formation of free bilayers, the system's second "generation". It was demonstrated that both generations, once separated, still exhibited the ability to convert amphiphile precursors. This result shows that transmission of function in chemical systems is possible during self-replication. PMID:24983026

  15. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. First quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate. novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The project is being pursued as two concurrent tasks. Task 1 involves catalyst research and development and is being largely conducted by catalyst chemists and analytical specialists. Task 2 is largely an engineering activity, and includes process conceptualization and economics and bench-scale process evaluation of systems developed in Task 1. Work this quarter has concentrated largely on literature work, revamping laboratory and reactor systems, and planning specific experiments to pursue the objectives of the program. A systematic search of the literature has been initiated to ensure that our literature base on conversion of syngas to higher alcohols is current. This activity will be continued throughout the project. Variables in catalyst formulation and preparation will be examined by a fractional factorial designed experiment. The variables are based upon previous work at UCC on a catalyst system that gave a product rich in isobutanol. The ranges of some of the fixed and free variables are being identified by a preliminary 3 {times} 3 designed set. The precipitation pH and its effects on surface area, porosity, and thermal characteristics of the resulting precipitate will also be investigated. Potentiometric titrations during coprecipitation are being used to aid in improving this catalyst preparation procedure. A microreactor system has been prepared for use in screening heterogeneous catalysts in this project. It will allow the independent control of three fixed bed reactor tubes except for reaction temperature. Appropriate temperature, pressure, and flow ranges are attainable with this system.

  16. Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonate—this process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

  17. Transformation of chemical constituents of lychee wine by simultaneous alcoholic and malolactic fermentations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dai; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2016-04-01

    This work examined for the first time the impact of malolactic fermentation (MLF) on the chemical constituents of lychee wine. Oenococcus oeni Viniflora Oenos (MLF inducer) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae MERIT.ferm were co-inoculated into lychee juice to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and MLF. MLF did not affect sugar utilisation and ethanol production statistically (8.54% v/v for MLF and 9.27% v/v for AF). However, MLF resulted in dramatic degradation of malic and citric acids with concomitant increases of lactic acid, ethyl lactate and pH. The final concentrations of acetic and succinic acids between AF and MLF wines had no significant difference. The MLF wine contained significantly higher amounts of amino acids than the AF wine. More importantly, MLF significantly elevated the levels of potent aroma-active compounds including isoamyl acetate, linalool, geraniol and cis-rose oxide (to levels above or near respective detection thresholds), suggesting that MLF is an effective way of retaining the original lychee flavour. PMID:26593581

  18. Microbial production of fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fillet, Sandy; Adrio, José L

    2016-09-01

    Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50 g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8 g/L of C16-C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols. PMID:27465852

  19. Catalytically enhanced thermal decomposition of chemically grown silicon oxide layers on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, F.; Passanante, T.; Cheynis, F.; Curiotto, S.; Bussmann, E. B.; Müller, P.

    2016-03-01

    The thermal decomposition of Si dioxide layers formed by wet chemical treatment on Si(001) has been studied by low-energy electron microscopy. Independent nucleations of voids occur into the Si oxide layers that open by reaction at the void periphery. Depending on the voids, the reaction rates exhibit large differences via the occurrence of a nonlinear growth of the void radius. This non-steady state regime is attributed to the accumulation of defects and silicon hydroxyl species at the SiO2/Si interface that enhances the silicon oxide decomposition at the void periphery.

  20. Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2014-09-15

    A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder. PMID:25056451

  1. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The project is being pursued as two concurrent tasks. Task 1 involves catalyst research and development and is being largely conducted by catalyst chemists and analytical specialists. Task 2 is largely an engineering activity, and includes process conceptualization and economics and bench-scale process evaluation of systems developed in Task 1. Our current targets for isobutanol-producing catalysts are to produce a 50/50 split in selectivity between methanol and iso-butanol, a productivity for isobutanol of >50 g/Kg-hr and an overall process conversion of 40%. We have continued to study how preparation variables affect the catalysts` chemical and physical properties.

  2. Hydrodeoxygenation processes: advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    De, Sudipta; Saha, Basudeb; Luque, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C-C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed. PMID:25443804

  3. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Ninth quarterly report, October, November, December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1989-12-31

    A new base catalyzed C-alkylation reaction that employs a mixture of n-butyllithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane to produce coal anions that are subsequently treated with n-alkyl halides at 0{degree}C has been developed. Almost quantitative pyridine solubilization was achieved by C-octylation of a Lower Kittanning coal, PSOC 1197. C-Octylation was less successful for the solubilization of bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal, APCSP 3, and subbituminous Wyodak coal, APCSP 2, which gave 35 and 33% soluble material, respectively. Their O-methyl derivatives yielded 43 and 20% soluble material in the same reaction. The observations are in accord with the concept of Ouchi and his associates that higher rank coals, although more aromatic in character, have a lower degree of polymerization than low rank coals. Relatively mild chemical reactions, such as Calkylation, that lead to modest changes in molecular dimensions, can disrupt intermolecular forces and accomplish solubilization.

  4. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  5. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  6. Reduction of CO2 to low carbon alcohols on CuO FCs/Fe2O3 NTs catalyst with photoelectric dual catalytic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peiqiang; Wang, Huying; Xu, Jinfeng; Jing, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Han, Haixiang; Lu, Fusui

    2013-11-01

    cm-2 after 6 h, respectively. This high-efficiency catalyst with photoelectric dual catalytic interfaces has a great guidance and reference significance for CO2 reduction to liquid carbon fuels. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Reduction of CO2 to low carbon alcohols on CuO FCs/Fe2O3 NTs catalyst with photoelectric dual catalytic interfaces. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03352j

  7. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  8. Catalytic oxidation of biorefinery lignin to value-added chemicals to support sustainable biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruoshui; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Transforming plant biomass to biofuel is one of the few solutions that can truly sustain mankind's long-term needs for liquid transportation fuel with minimized environmental impact. However, despite decades of effort, commercial development of biomass-to-biofuel conversion processes is still not an economically viable proposition. Identifying value-added co-products along with the production of biofuel provides a key solution to overcoming this economic barrier. Lignin is the second most abundant component next to cellulose in almost all plant biomass; the emerging biomass refinery industry will inevitably generate an enormous amount of lignin. Development of selective biorefinery lignin-to-bioproducts conversion processes will play a pivotal role in significantly improving the economic feasibility and sustainability of biofuel production from renewable biomass. The urgency and importance of this endeavor has been increasingly recognized in the last few years. This paper reviews state-of-the-art oxidative lignin depolymerization chemistries employed in the papermaking process and oxidative catalysts that can be applied to biorefinery lignin to produce platform chemicals including phenolic compounds, dicarboxylic acids, and quinones in high selectivity and yield. The potential synergies of integrating new catalysts with commercial delignification chemistries are discussed. We hope the information will build on the existing body of knowledge to provide new insights towards developing practical and commercially viable lignin conversion technologies, enabling sustainable biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass to be competitive with fossil fuel. PMID:25272962

  9. Hydrophobic properties of polytetrafluoroethylene thin films fabricated at various catalyzer temperatures through catalytic chemical vapor deposition using a tungsten catalyzer.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeong Ok; Yeo, Seung Jun; Pode, Ramchandra; Ahn, Jeung Sun

    2011-07-01

    Using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) method, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films were fabricated on Si(100) substrates at various catalyzer temperatures, using a tungsten catalyzer, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm the fabrication of the films. An atomic-force microscope (AFM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to study the correlation between the wettability and surface morphology of the samples. It was found that the wettability of the PTFE thin films fabricated via Cat-CVD is strongly correlated with the sizes of the film surfaces' nanoprotrusions, and that superhydrophobic PTFE thin-film surfaces can be easily achieved by controlling the sizes of the nanoprotrusions through the catalyzer temperature. The comparison of the wettability values and surface morphologies of the films confirmed that nanoscale surface roughness enhances the hydrophobic properties of PTFE thin films. Further, the detailed analysis of the films' surface morphologies from their AFM images with the use of the Wenzel and Cassie models confirmed that the nanoscale surface roughness enhanced the hydrophobic property of the PTFE films. Further, the variations of the wettability of the PTFE thin films prepared via Cat-CVD are well explained by the Cassie model. It seems that the increase in the trapping air and the reduction of the liquid-solid contact area are responsible for the superhydrophobicity of the PTFE thin films prepared via Cat-CVD. PMID:22121615

  10. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Fifth quarterly report, October--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1988-12-31

    Liquefaction of coal by depolymerization in an organic solvent has been studied for several years. The liquefied coal extract which results from such a process is far more suitable for conversion into liquid fuel by hydrogenolysis than is the untreated coal. Investigations on the chemical structure and the reactive sites of coal can help to select useful reactions for the production of liquids from coal. Sternberg et al. demonstrated that the reductive alkylation method transforms bituminous coal into an enormously soluble substance, irrespective of the mild reaction conditions. The effectiveness of newly introduced alkyl groups for the disruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sheets in coal macromolecules has been recognized. It has been reported by Ignasiak et al. that a C-alkylabon reaction using sodium or potassium amide in liquid ammonia can be used to introduce alkyl groups at acidic carbon sites. A method has been developed recently in this laboratory for the solubilization of high rank coals. In the previous reports it was shown that n-butyl lithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane produced coal anions which could be alkylated with different alkyl halides. Such alkylated coals were soluble up to 92% in solvents like pyridine. Though the solubilization of coal depended very much on the length of the alkyl group, it also depended very much on the nature of the base used. Strong bases like n-butyl lithium (pKa=42) can cause proton abstraction from aromatic structures, if the more acidic benzylic protons are absent. The utility of this procedure, initially developed and used by Miyake and Stock, has now been tested with the high oxygen containing, low rank Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals.

  11. Label-Free Chemical Imaging of Catalytic Solids by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and Synchrotron-Based Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kox, M.; Domke, K; Day, J; Rago, G; Stavitski, E; Bonn, M; Weckhuysen, B

    2009-01-01

    Take a look inside: The combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and synchrotron-based IR microscopy during the catalytic conversion of thiophene derivatives on zeolite crystals yields space- and time-resolved chemically specific information without the need for labeling (see picture). The thiophene reactant is mostly present in the center of the crystal, and the product is aligned within the straight pores of the zeolites.

  12. Catalytic ethanolysis and gasification of kraft lignin into aromatic alcohols and H2-rich gas over Rh supported on La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Chunze; Wang, Yuanyuan; Dai, Liyi

    2016-10-01

    Efficient catalytic ethanolysis and gasification of kraft lignin were conducted over a versatile supported catalyst Rh/La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2 to give high-value aromatic alcohols and H2-rich gas. The removal of phenolic hydroxyl group was the most prevalent reaction, and importantly, almost no phenols, undesired char and saturating the aromatic ring were detected. Meanwhile, the feedstock and solvent both played key roles in H2 generation that contributed to the hydrodeoxygenation of liquid components and made the whole catalytic process out of H2 supply. Reusability tests of catalyst indicated that the crystalline phase transition and agglomeration of support, the loss of noble metal Rh and carbon deposition were the possible reasons for its deactivation in supercritical ethanol. Comparing with water, methanol and isopropanol system, ethanol was the only effective solvent for the depolymerization process. PMID:27441830

  13. Quantum-chemical modeling of energy parameters and vibrational spectra of chain and cyclic clusters of monohydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, P.; Doroshenko, I.; Pogorelov, V.

    2014-05-01

    The specific peculiarities of alcohols such as heightened viscosity, boiling temperature and surface tension can be explained by the capability of their molecules to form relatively stable associates named clusters due to hydrogen bonding. In present work the stability of different chain-like and cyclic clusters of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol was investigated by means of quantum-chemical simulation and particular by recently developed DFT exchange-correlation functional M06-2X. The relative stability of the cluster structure was evaluated by the total energy per molecule at low temperatures (where all alcohols exist in solid state) and by the changing of the free Gibbs energy upon cluster formation at the room temperature. For the verification of revealed results the conformity of calculated IR spectra of the most stable cluster structures with the experimental IR spectra at different temperatures was analyzed.

  14. Graphite Thin Films Consisting of Nanograins of Multilayer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates Directly Grown by Alcohol Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Yuta; Nakamura, Atsushi; Temmyo, Jiro

    2011-04-01

    Graphene has been attracting a strong interest as a transparent electrode as well as a THz nanoelectronic device owing to its unique properties. To date, large-area graphene growth has been realized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with a catalyst metal. To avoid the transfer of segregated graphene, we have examined directly graphite thin film growth on nonpolar a-sapphire substrates without any catalyst metal by alcohol CVD. Graphite thin films consisting of nanograins of multilayer graphene on a-sapphire substrates were verified by a combination of transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM), and Raman analyses, and optical transparent and sheet resistance measurements.

  15. Proceedings of the international conference on (fuel) alcohols and chemicals from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 selections. Some of the titles are: Specialty genetics in maize breeding as it relates to product design; Recovery of glycerol from still bottoms; Technology of the rum industry; The use of immobilized enzyme/yeast product for the continuous production of ethanol from liquefied starch; and Current national and international issues in the fuel alcohol industry.

  16. Bimetallic catalyst for synthesizing quasi-aligned, well-graphitized multiwalled carbon nanotube bundles on a large scale by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Kingsuk; Mathur, Gyanesh Narayan

    2002-04-01

    An effective method of growth by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) to get a large-scale yield of carbon nanotubes is reported. In this method, acetylene is decomposed catalytically over well-dispersed metal particles (Co-Fe and Co-Ni) embedded in commercially available zeolite at a lower temperature (600-700 degrees C). The two binary-metal catalysts (Co-Fe and Co-Ni) used are compared by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Crucial reaction parameters, such as reaction time, temperature, and the effect of purity of gas to obtain optimum production of the nanotubes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, are also reported. PMID:12908309

  17. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. Azadirachta indica plant-assisted green synthesis of Mn3O4 nanoparticles: Excellent thermal catalytic performance and chemical sensing behavior.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jitendra Kumar; Srivastava, Pratibha; Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Singh, Gurdip; Yadava, Sudha

    2016-06-15

    The leaf extract of Azadirachta indica (Neem) plant was utilized as reducing agent for the green synthesis of Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The crystalline analysis demonstrated the typical tetragonal hausmannite crystal structure of Mn3O4, which confirmed the formation of Mn3O4 NPs without the existence of other oxides. Green synthesized Mn3O4 NPs were applied for the catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and as working electrode for fabricating the chemical sensor. The excellent catalytic effect for the thermal decomposition of AP was observed by decreasing the decomposition temperature by 175 °C with single decomposing step. The fabricated chemical sensor based on green synthesized Mn3O4 NPs displayed high, reliable and reproducible sensitivity of ∼569.2 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) with reasonable limit of detection (LOD) of ∼22.1 μM and the response time of ∼10 s toward the detection of 2-butanone chemical. A relatively good linearity in the ranging from ∼20 to 160 μM was detected for Mn3O4 NPs electrode based 2-butanone chemical sensor. PMID:27038784

  19. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Setala V. Naidu

    2003-01-01

    We have produced Co, Cu, and Fe nano-particles by Laser-induced solution deposition (LISD) as evidenced by TEM investigations. Sizes of the nano-particles created are in the order of 5 nm. The LISD system could generate nano-particles in quantities only in the order of a milligram. This may be mainly due to the limited photo induced reactions taking place on the surface of the solutions. We have designed experiments to use drop flow technique with LISD for nano-particle deposition on microreactors. Preliminary work has been done on Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors. We are also investigating the catalytic properties of nano-particles of FeO and CoO prepared by ball milling and dispersed into sol-gel prepared alumina granules. We have continued our investigation of catalytic reactions of Cu, Co, Fe, Cu/Co, Cu/Fe and Co/Fe on alumina support. The metal oxides were first reduced with hydrogen and used for the conversion of CO/H{sub 2}. The surface area of the catalysts has been determined by nitrogen disorption. They are in the range of 200-300 m{sup 2}/g. Cu, Co, Fe, Co/Fe, Cu/Co and Cu/Fe showed increasing order of catalytic activity for CO/H{sub 2} conversion. We are also studying catalytic conversion rates for CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures using these catalysts. Our investigations of Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors showed higher CO/H{sub 2} conversion for Fe compared to Co. We have used vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to study the magnetic characteristics of as prepared, reduced, post-reaction catalysts. Comparative study of the ferromagnetic component of these samples gives the reduction efficiency and the changes in metal centers during catalytic reactions. Magnetic studies of post-reaction Co and Fe micro-reactors show that more carbide formation occurs for iron compared to cobalt.

  20. Novel Dextranase Catalyzing Cycloisomaltooligosaccharide Formation and Identification of Catalytic Amino Acids and Their Functions Using Chemical Rescue Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Min; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Muraki, Tomoe; Kang, Min-Sun; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Saburi, Wataru; Lang, Weeranuch; Kang, Hee-Kwon; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Funane, Kazumi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Momma, Mitsuru; Fujimoto, Zui; Oguma, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Mikihiko; Kim, Doman; Kimura, Atsuo

    2012-01-01

    A novel endodextranase from Paenibacillus sp. (Paenibacillus sp. dextranase; PsDex) was found to mainly produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides (CIs) with a degree of polymerization of 7–14 from dextran. The 1,696-amino acid sequence belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 66 (GH-66) has a long insertion (632 residues; Thr451–Val1082), a portion of which shares identity (35% at Ala39–Ser1304 of PsDex) with Pro32–Ala755 of CI glucanotransferase (CITase), a GH-66 enzyme that catalyzes the formation of CIs from dextran. This homologous sequence (Val837–Met932 for PsDex and Tyr404–Tyr492 for CITase), similar to carbohydrate-binding module 35, was not found in other endodextranases (Dexs) devoid of CITase activity. These results support the classification of GH-66 enzymes into three types: (i) Dex showing only dextranolytic activity, (ii) Dex catalyzing hydrolysis with low cyclization activity, and (iii) CITase showing CI-forming activity with low dextranolytic activity. The fact that a C-terminal truncated enzyme (having Ala39–Ser1304) has 50% wild-type PsDex activity indicates that the C-terminal 392 residues are not involved in hydrolysis. GH-66 enzymes possess four conserved acidic residues (Asp189, Asp340, Glu412, and Asp1254 of PsDex) of catalytic candidates. Their amide mutants decreased activity (11,500 to 140,000 times), and D1254N had 36% activity. A chemical rescue approach was applied to D189A, D340G, and E412Q using α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride with NaN3. D340G or E412Q formed a β- or α-isomaltotetraosyl azide, respectively, strongly indicating Asp340 and Glu412 as a nucleophile and acid/base catalyst, respectively. Interestingly, D189A synthesized small sized dextran from α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride in the presence of NaN3. PMID:22461618

  1. Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogel Irradiated and Acetalized for Osteochondral Defect Repair: Mechanical, Chemical, and Histological Evaluation after Implantation in Rat Knees

    PubMed Central

    Batista, N. A.; Rodrigues, A. A.; Bavaresco, V. P.; Mariolani, J. R. L.; Belangero, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) hydrogel plugs were implanted in artificial osteochondral defects on the trochlear groove of rat knees. After 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of followup, samples containing the implants were mechanically evaluated by creep indentation test, chemically, and histologically by optical microscopy. The mechanical test pointed towards an increase of the implant creep modulus and the chemical analysis exhibited an increasing concentration of calcium and phosphorus within the implants over time. Optical microscopy showed no foreign body reaction and revealed formation, differentiation, and maintenance of new tissue at the defect/implant interface. The absence of implant wear indicated that the natural articular lubrication process was not disturbed by the implant. The performance of the irradiated and acetalized PVA was considered satisfactory for the proposed application. PMID:23197982

  2. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECT OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and Cu, Mo, V, Cr and Mn metal oxides, and mixed metal oxides support on y-alumina as catalysts ov...

  3. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECTS OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and activities of Cu, Mo, Cr and Mn oxides, and mixed metal oxides supported on -alumina, were tes...

  4. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiN{sub x} films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Trinh Cham Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-07-28

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH{sub 3} molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN{sub x} passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN{sub x} films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  5. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  6. Effect of Hydroxyl Concentration on Chemical Sensitivity of Polyvinyl Alcohol/Carbon-Black Composite Chemiresistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Robert C.; Patel, Sanjay V.; Yelton, W. Graham

    1999-05-19

    The sensitivity and selectivity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / carbon black composite films have been found to vary depending upon the hydroxylation percentage ("-OH") of the polymer. These chemiresistors made from PVA films whose polymer backbone is 88% hydroxylated (PVA88) have a high sensitivity to water, while chemiresistors made from PVA75 have a higher sensitivity to methanol. The minor differences in polymer composition result in films with different Hildebrand volubility parameters. The relative responses of several different PVA-based chemiresistors to solvents with different volubility parameters are presented. In addition, polyvinyl acetate (PVAC) films with PVA88 are used in an array to distinguish the responses to methanol-water mixtures.

  7. A nucleation and growth model of vertically-oriented carbon nanofibers or nanotubes by plasma-enhanced catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, C S; Senger, A; Le Normand, F

    2006-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers are grown by direct current and hot filaments-activated catalytic chemical vapor deposition while varying the power of the hot filaments. Observations of these carbon nanofibers vertically oriented on a SiO2 (8 nm thick)/Si(100) substrate covered with Co nanoparticles (10-15 nm particle size) by Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies show the presence of a graphitic "nest" either on the surface of the substrate or at the end of the specific nanofiber that does not encapsulate the catalytic particle. Strictly in our conditions, the activation by hot filaments is required to grow nanofibers with a C2H2 - H2 gas mixture, as large amounts of amorphous carbon cover the surface of the substrate without using hot filaments. From these observations as well as data of the literature, it is proposed that the nucleation of carbon nanofibers occurs through a complex process involving several steps: carbon concentration gradient starting from the catalytic carbon decomposition and diffusion from the surface of the catalytic nanoparticles exposed to the activated gas and promoted by energetic ionic species of the gas phase; subsequent graphitic condensation of a "nest" at the interface of the Co particle and substrate. The large concentration of highly reactive hydrogen radicals mainly provided by activation with hot filaments precludes further spreading out of this interfacial carbon nest over the entire surface of the substrate and thus selectively orientates the growth towards the condensation of graphene over facets that are perpendicular to the surface. Carbon nanofibers can then be grown within the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid process. Thus the effect of energetic ions and highly reactive neutrals like atomic hydrogen in the preferential etching of carbon on the edge of graphene shells and on the broadening of the carbon nanofiber is underlined. PMID:16792361

  8. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or ... brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of ...

  9. Chemical derivatization for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 1. Alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines

    SciTech Connect

    Quirke, J.M.E.; Adams, C.L.; Van Berkel, G.J. )

    1994-04-15

    Derivatization strategies and specific derivatization reactions for conversion of simple alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines to ionic or solution-ionizable derivatives, that is [open quotes]electrospray active[close quotes] (ES-active) forms of the analyte, are presented. Use of these reactions allows detection of analytes among those listed that are not normally amenable to analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES-MS). In addition, these reactions provide for analysis specificity and flexibility through functional group specific derivatization and through the formation of derivatives that can be detected in positive ion or in negative ion mode. For a few of the functional groups, amphoteric derivatives are formed that can be analyzed in either positive or negative ion modes. General synthetic strategies for transformation of members of these five compound classes to ES-active species are presented along with illustrative examples of suitable derivatives. Selected derivatives were prepared using model compounds and the ES mass spectra obtained for these derivatives are discussed. The analytical utility of derivatization for ES-MS analysis is illustrated in three experiments: (1) specific detection of the major secondary alcohol in oil of peppermint, (2) selective detection of phenols within a synthetic mixture of phenols, and (3) identification of the medicinal amines within a commercially available cold medication as primary, secondary or tertiary. 65 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  11. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seetala V. Naidu; Upali Siriwardane

    2005-01-14

    We have developed effective nanoparticle incorporated heterogeneous F-T catalysts starting with the synthesis of Fe, Co, Cu nanoparticles using Fe(acac){sub 3}, Co(acac){sub 2}, and Cu(acac){sub 2} precursors and incorporating the nanoparticles into alumina sol-gel to yield higher alkanes production. SEM/EDX, XRD, BET, VSM and SQUID experimental techniques were used to characterize the catalysts, and GC/MS were used for catalytic product analysis. The nanoparticle oxide method gave the highest metal loading. In case of mixed metals it seems that Co or Cu interferes and reduces Fe metal loading. The XRD pattern for nanoparticle mixed metal oxides show alloy formation between cobalt and iron, and between copper and iron in sol-gel prepared alumina granules. The alloy formation is also supported by DTA and VMS data. The magnetization studies were used to estimate the catalyst activity in pre- and post-catalysts. A lower limit of {approx}40% for the reduction efficiency was obtained due to hydrogenation at 450 C for 4 hrs. About 85% of the catalyst has become inactive after 25 hrs of catalytic reaction, probably by forming carbides of Fe and Co. The low temperature (300 K to 4.2 K) SQUID magnetometer results indicate a superparamagnetic character of metal nanoparticles with a wide size distribution of < 20 nm nanoparticles. We have developed an efficient and economical procedure for analyzing the F-T products using low cost GC-TCD system with hydrogen as a carrier gas. Two GC columns DC 200/500 and Supelco Carboxen-1000 column were tested for the separation of higher alkanes and the non-condensable gases. The Co/Fe on alumina sol-gel catalyst showed the highest yield for methane among Fe, Co, Cu, Co/Fe, Cu/Co, Fe/Cu. The optimization of CO/H{sub 2} ratio indicated that 1:1 ratio gave more alkanes distribution in F-T process with Co/Fe (6% each) impregnated on alumina mesoporous catalyst.

  12. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  13. Selective sensing of alcohols in water influenced by chemically Zeolite coatings on optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Marziyeh; Hill, Matthew R.; Duke, Mikel; Sidiroglou, Fotios; Collins, Stephen F.

    2014-05-01

    The application of a MFI type zeolite coating on the end of an optical fiber is presented. Zeolite coatings were directly grown on the freshly cleaved endface of optical fibers. It was found that the produced integrated zeolite-fiber sensors exhibit specific chemical sensitivity towards certain chemicals. The molecular adsorption induced change of zeolite refractive index was studied to understand the sensing mechanisms of the developed sensor system. This work can lead to a new class of portable zeolite thin film enabled miniaturized fiber optic sensors.

  14. Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

  15. On-matrix derivatization extraction of chemical weapons convention relevant alcohols from soil.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2013-10-11

    Present study deals with the on-matrix derivatization-extraction of aminoalcohols and thiodiglycols, which are important precursors and/or degradation products of VX analogues and vesicants class of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The method involved hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) mediated in situ silylation of analytes on the soil. Subsequent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of derivatized analytes offered better recoveries in comparison to the procedure recommended by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). Various experimental conditions such as extraction solvent, reagent and catalyst amount, reaction time and temperature were optimized. Best recoveries of analytes ranging from 45% to 103% were obtained with DCM solvent containing 5%, v/v HMDS and 0.01%, w/v iodine as catalyst. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) with selected analytes ranged from 8 to 277 and 21 to 665ngmL(-1), respectively, in selected ion monitoring mode. PMID:24016719

  16. Quantum chemical investigation on the catalytic mechanism of vanadium iodoperoxidase and the iodination of common organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, Óscar; Pacios, Luis F.

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric iodine has received considerable attention in the two past decades due to both its potential role in the catalytic destruction of ozone (1) and its contribution to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (2). It is generally assumed that iodine in the atmosphere has a natural origin since no anthropogenic sources are known. Seaweeds and marine phytoplankton release iodocarbons. In addition, IO and even I2, a major source of particle formation in coastal areas, are also detectable in the atmosphere above kelp beds. However, the reasons why iodocarbons are released by seaweeds and the mechanisms involved in their production remain largely unknown. It is currently well established that the general catalytic role of halide oxidation in marine algae is actually played by vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases enzymes, although relevant details such as protonation states of the vanadate cofactor or even key steps in the mechanism are still unknown. In this contribution, we focus on the iodoperoxidase VIPO enzyme. Quantum calculations on the vanadate cofactor were combined with structural analyses on a reliable three-dimensional model of the VIPO protein to investigate the steps along the catalytic mechanism that lead to the release of halide oxidation products. In addition, iodination reactions of several common organic compounds selected to account for representative volatile and non-volatile iodocarbons were thermodynamically studied by means of high-level ab initio correlated calculations. Free energies of reactions with the three possible iodinating species produced by the enzyme, namely HOI, I2, and I3- were calculated. Our results show that only hypoiodous acid give rise to clearly exoergonic iodination of organic substrates. (1) Saiz-Lopez, A.; Mahajan, A.S.; Salmon, R.A.; Bauguitte, J.B.; Jones, A.E.; Roscoe, H.K.; Plane, J.M.C. Science 2007, 317, 348-351 (2) O'Dowd, C.D.; Jimenez, J.L.; Bahreini, R.; Flagan, R.C.; Seinfeld, J.H.; Hämeri, K.; Pirjola

  17. Encapsulating Pd Nanoparticles in Double-Shelled Graphene@Carbon Hollow Spheres for Excellent Chemical Catalytic Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Fei; Xi, Jiangbo; Sun, Tai; Xiao, Shuang; Wang, Hairong; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2014-02-01

    Double-shelled hollow carbon spheres with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) as inner shell and carbon (C) layer as outer shell have been successfully designed and prepared. This tailor-making structure acts as an excellent capsule for encapsulating with ultrafine Pd nanoparticles (Pd NPs), which could effectively prevent Pd NPs from aggregation and leaching. As a result, the as-obtained RGO@Pd@C nanohybid exhibits superior and stable catalytic performance. With the aid of RGO@Pd@C, the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol with NaBH4 as reducing agent can be finished within only 30 s, even the content of Pd is as low as 0.28 wt%. As far as we know, RGO@Pd@C is one of the most effective catalyst for 4-NP reducing reaction up to now.

  18. Encapsulating Pd Nanoparticles in Double-Shelled Graphene@Carbon Hollow Spheres for Excellent Chemical Catalytic Property

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Fei; Xi, Jiangbo; Sun, Tai; Xiao, Shuang; Wang, Hairong; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2014-01-01

    Double-shelled hollow carbon spheres with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) as inner shell and carbon (C) layer as outer shell have been successfully designed and prepared. This tailor-making structure acts as an excellent capsule for encapsulating with ultrafine Pd nanoparticles (Pd NPs), which could effectively prevent Pd NPs from aggregation and leaching. As a result, the as-obtained RGO@Pd@C nanohybid exhibits superior and stable catalytic performance. With the aid of RGO@Pd@C, the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol with NaBH4 as reducing agent can be finished within only 30 s, even the content of Pd is as low as 0.28 wt%. As far as we know, RGO@Pd@C is one of the most effective catalyst for 4-NP reducing reaction up to now. PMID:24514577

  19. Hydrogenolysis goes bio: from carbohydrates and sugar alcohols to platform chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Agnieszka M; Weinberg, Kamil; Palkovits, Regina

    2012-03-12

    In view of the diminishing oil resources and the ongoing climate change, the use of efficient and environmentally benign technologies for the utilization of renewable resources has become indispensible. Therein, hydrogenolysis reactions offer a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. These reactions result in the cleavage of C-C and C-O bonds by hydrogen and allow direct access to valuable platform chemicals already integrated in today's value chains. Thus, hydrogenolysis bears the potential to bridge currently available technologies and future biomass-based refinery concepts. This Review highlights past and present developments in this field, with special emphasis on the direct utilization of cellulosic feedstocks. PMID:22374680

  20. Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the channels of iron loaded three dimensional mesoporous material by catalytic chemical vapour deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somanathan, T.; Gokulakrishnan, N.; Chandrasekar, G.; Pandurangan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was successfully achieved in the channels of three dimensional (3D) iron loaded mesoporous matrices (KIT-6) by employing catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) technique. The synthesised MWNTs, which were characterised by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy, consist of thick graphene layers of about 10 nm composed of 29 graphene sheets with inner and outer diameter of ∼17 nm and ∼37 nm, respectively. The Raman spectrum showed the formation of well-graphitised MWNTs with significantly higher IG/ID ratio of 1.47 compared to commercial MWNTs. Comparatively, 2 wt% Fe loaded KIT-6 material produced a better yield of 91%, which is also highest compared with the report of MWNTs synthesis using mesoporous materials reported so far.

  1. Diameter-dependent thermal-oxidative stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Yu, Fei; Yuan, Zhiwen; Chen, Junhong

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, purified single-walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) with three different diameters were synthesized using a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition method with ethanol as carbon feedstock, ferrocene as catalyst, and thiophene as growth promoter. The thermal-oxidative stability of different-diameter SWCNTs was studied by using thermal analysis (TG, DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results indicate that small diameter SWCNTs (˜1 nm) are less stable and burn at lower temperature (610 °C), however, the larger diameter SWCNTs (˜5 nm) survive after burning at higher temperature (685 °C), the oxidation rate varies inversely with the tube diameter of SWCNTs, which may be concluded that the higher oxidation-resistant temperature of larger diameter SWCNTs can be attributed to the lower curvature-induced strain by rolling the planar graphene sheet for the larger diameter, so small tubes will become thermodynamically unstable.

  2. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells. Part II. Exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Thompson, Levi T.; Li, Yongdan

    A methane catalytic decomposition reactor-direct carbon fuel cell-internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (MCDR-DCFC-IRSOFC) energy system is highly efficient for converting the chemical energy of methane into electrical energy. A gas turbine cycle is also used to output more power from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. In part I of this work, models of the fuel cells and the system are proposed and validated. In this part, exergy conservation analysis is carried out based on the developed electrochemical and thermodynamic models. The ratio of the exergy destruction of each unit is examined. The results show that the electrical exergy efficiency of 68.24% is achieved with the system. The possibility of further recovery of the waste heat is discussed and the combined power-heat exergy efficiency is over 80%.

  3. Defect termination on crystalline silicon surfaces by hydrogen for improvement in the passivation quality of catalytic chemical vapor-deposited SiNx and SiNx/P catalytic-doped layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cham Thi, Trinh; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the role of hydrogen (H) in the improvement in the passivation quality of silicon nitride (SiNx) prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) and Cat-CVD SiNx/phosphorus (P) Cat-doped layers on crystalline silicon (c-Si) by annealing. Both structures show promising passivation capabilities for c-Si with extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) on n-type c-Si. Defect termination by H is evaluated on the basis of defect density (Nd) determined by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and interface state density (Dit) calculated by the Terman method. The two parameters are found to be drastically decreased by annealing after SiNx deposition. The calculated average Dit at midgap (Dit-average) is 2.2 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 for the SiNx/P Cat-doped c-Si sample with a SRV of 2 cm/s, which is equivalent to 3.1 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 for the SiNx/c-Si sample with a SRV of 5 cm/s after annealing. The results indicate that H atoms play a critical role in the reduction in Dit for SiNx/c-Si and SiNx/P Cat-doped c-Si, resulting in a drastic reduction in SRV by annealing.

  4. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  5. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  6. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  8. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  9. Physico-Chemical Condition Optimization during Biosynthesis lead to development of Improved and Catalytically Efficient Gold Nano Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Madhuree; Mishra, Aradhana; Pandey, Shipra; Singh, Satyendra Pratap; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Shukla, Shatrunajay; Kakkar, Poonam; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has gained great attention in making the process cost-effective and eco-friendly, but there are limited reports which describe the interdependency of physical parameters for tailoring the dimension and geometry of nanoparticles during biological synthesis. In the present study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of various shapes and sizes were obtained by modulating different physical parameters using Trichoderma viride filtrate. The particles were characterized on the basis of visual observation, dynamic light scattering, UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X ray diffraction. While the size varied from 2–500 nm, the shapes obtained were nanospheres, nanotriangles, nanopentagons, nanohexagons, and nanosheets. Changing the parameters such as pH, temperature, time, substrate, and culture filtrate concentration influenced the size and geometry of nanoparticles. Catalytic activity of the biosynthesized GNP was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol which was strongly influenced by their structure and dimension. Common practices for biodegradation are traditional, expensive, require large amount of raw material, and time taking. Controlling shapes and sizes of nanoparticles could revolutionize the process of biodegradation that can remove all the hurdles in current scenario. PMID:27273371

  10. Catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced from different thermo-chemical conversion routes of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Wang, Bing; Xu, Yuping

    2015-06-01

    This study presents experimental results that compare the use of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), alcoholysis (Al), pyrolysis (Py) and hydropyrolysis (HPy) for the production of bio-oil from a microalga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and the catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced by these four conversion routes. The yields and compositions of bio-oil, solid residue, and gases were evaluated and compared. HTL resulted in a bio-oil that has a higher energy density and superior fuel properties, such as thermal and storage stabilities, compared with the other three conversion routes. The N in crude bio-oils produced from Py and HPy is more easily removed than that in the bio-oils produced from HTL and Al. The upgraded bio-oils contain reduced amounts of certain O-containing and N-containing compounds and significantly increased saturated hydrocarbon contents. All of the upgraded bio-oils have a larger fraction boiling below 350°C than their corresponding crude bio-oils. PMID:25802049

  11. Physico-Chemical Condition Optimization during Biosynthesis lead to development of Improved and Catalytically Efficient Gold Nano Particles.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Madhuree; Mishra, Aradhana; Pandey, Shipra; Singh, Satyendra Pratap; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Shukla, Shatrunajay; Kakkar, Poonam; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has gained great attention in making the process cost-effective and eco-friendly, but there are limited reports which describe the interdependency of physical parameters for tailoring the dimension and geometry of nanoparticles during biological synthesis. In the present study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of various shapes and sizes were obtained by modulating different physical parameters using Trichoderma viride filtrate. The particles were characterized on the basis of visual observation, dynamic light scattering, UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X ray diffraction. While the size varied from 2-500 nm, the shapes obtained were nanospheres, nanotriangles, nanopentagons, nanohexagons, and nanosheets. Changing the parameters such as pH, temperature, time, substrate, and culture filtrate concentration influenced the size and geometry of nanoparticles. Catalytic activity of the biosynthesized GNP was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol which was strongly influenced by their structure and dimension. Common practices for biodegradation are traditional, expensive, require large amount of raw material, and time taking. Controlling shapes and sizes of nanoparticles could revolutionize the process of biodegradation that can remove all the hurdles in current scenario. PMID:27273371

  12. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; Labouriau, Andrea

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate in the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.

  13. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; Labouriau, Andrea

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate inmore » the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.« less

  14. The usefulness of intermediate products of plum processing for alcoholic fermentation and chemical composition of the obtained distillates.

    PubMed

    Balcerek, Maria; Pielech-Przybylska, Katarzyna; Patelski, Piotr; Sapińska, Ewelina; Księżopolska, Mirosława

    2013-05-01

    In this study, an evaluation of intermediate products of plum processing as potential raw materials for distillates production was performed. Effects of composition of mashes on ethanol yield, chemical composition and taste, and flavor of the obtained spirits were determined. The obtained results showed that spontaneous fermentations of the tested products of plum processing with native microflora of raisins resulted in lower ethanol yields, compared to the ones fermented with wine yeast Saccharomyces bayanus. The supplementation of mashes with 120 g/L of sucrose caused an increase in ethanol contents from 6.2 ± 0.2 ÷ 6.5 ± 0.2% v/v in reference mashes (without sucrose addition, fermented with S. bayanus) to ca. 10.3 ± 0.3% v/v, where its highest yields amounted to 94.7 ± 2.9 ÷ 95.6 ± 2.9% of theoretical capacity, without negative changes in raw material originality of distillates. The concentrations of volatile compounds in the obtained distillates exceeding 2000 mg/L alcohol 100% v/v and low content of methanol and hydrocyanic acid, as well as their good taste and aroma make the examined products of plum processing be very attractive raw materials for the plum distillates production. PMID:23534414

  15. Quantum chemical analysis of thermodynamics of 2D cluster formation of alkanes at the water/vapor interface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Fainerman, V B; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2015-11-21

    Using the quantum chemical semi-empirical PM3 method it is shown that aliphatic alcohols favor the spontaneous clusterization of vaporous alkanes at the water surface due to the change of adsorption from the barrier to non-barrier mechanism. A theoretical model of the non-barrier mechanism for monolayer formation is developed. In the framework of this model alcohols (or any other surfactants) act as 'floats', which interact with alkane molecules of the vapor phase using their hydrophobic part, whereas the hydrophilic part is immersed into the water phase. This results in a significant increase of contact effectiveness of alkanes with the interface during the adsorption and film formation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. To test the model the thermodynamic and structural parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated for vaporous alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n(CH3) = 6-16) at the water surface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K. It is shown that the values of clusterization enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy per one monomer of the cluster depend on the chain lengths of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the alcohol molar fraction in the monolayers formed, and the shift of the alkane molecules with respect to the alcohol molecules Δn. Two possible competitive structures of mixed 2D film alkane-alcohol are considered: 2D films 1 with single alcohol molecules enclosed by alkane molecules (the alcohols do not form domains) and 2D films 2 that contain alcohol domains enclosed by alkane molecules. The formation of the alkane films of the first type is nearly independent of the surfactant type present at the interface, but depends on their molar fraction in the monolayer formed and the chain length of the compounds participating in the clusterization, whereas for the formation of the films of the second type the interaction between the hydrophilic parts of the surfactant is

  16. A novel approach for enhancing the catalytic efficiency of a protease at low temperature: reduction in substrate inhibition by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Parkin, Don M; Curmi, Paul M G; De Francisci, Davide; Poljak, Anne; Barrow, Kevin; Noble, Malcolm H; Trewhella, Jill; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-07-01

    The alkaline protease, savinase was chemically modified to enhance the productivity of the enzyme at low temperatures on a complex polymeric protein (azocasein) substrate. At 5 and 15 degrees C, savinase modified with ficol or dextran hydrolyzed fivefold more azocasein than the unmodified savinase. Kinetic studies showed that the catalytic improvements are associated with changes in uncompetitive substrate inhibition with K(i) values of modified savinases sixfold higher than the unmodified savinase. Modeling of small-angle scattering data indicates that two substrate molecules bind on opposing sides of the enzyme. The combined kinetic and structural data indicate that the polysaccharide modifier sterically blocks the allosteric site and reduces substrate inhibition. In contrast to the properties of cold-active enzymes that generally manifest as low activation enthalpy and high flexibility, this study shows that increased activity and productivity at low temperature can be achieved by reducing uncompetitive substrate inhibition, and that this can be achieved using chemical modification with an enzyme in a commercial enzyme-formulation. PMID:19288442

  17. Microwave-assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass for bio-oil production using chemical vapor deposition modified HZSM-5 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition with tetra-ethyl-orthosilicate as the modifier was applied to deposit the external acid sites of HZSM-5, and the modified HZSM-5 samples were used for the microwave-assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis (MACFP) of biomass for bio-oil production. The experimental results showed that the external acid sites of HZSM-5 decreased significantly when SiO2 deposited amount increased from 0% to 5.9%. For product distribution, the coke yield decreased, the oil fraction yield decreased at first and then increased, and the yields of water and gas first increased and then decreased over the range of SiO2 deposited amount studied. For chemical compositions in oil fraction, the relative contents of aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing aromatic compounds first increased to maximum values and then decreased, while the relative content of oxygen-containing aliphatic compounds first decreased and then increased with increasing SiO2 deposited amount. PMID:26318925

  18. Characterization of interface abruptness and material properties in catalytically grown III-V nanowires: exploiting plasmon chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizei, L. H. G.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.; Ugarte, D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the assessment of chemical composition changes in III-V heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) with nanometric spatial resolution using transmission electron microscopy methods. These materials represent a challenge for conventional spectroscopy techniques due to their high sensitivity to electron beam irradiation. Radiation damage strongly limits the exposure time to a few (5-10) s, which reduces the sensitivity of the traditionally used x-ray spectroscopy. The rather low counting statistics results in significant errors bars for EDS chemical quantification (5-10%) and interface width determination (few nanometers). Plasmon chemical shift is ideal in this situation, as its measurement requires very short exposure times (~100 ms) and the plasmon peak energy can be measured with high precision (~20 meV in this work). This high sensitivity allows the detection of subtle changes (1-2%) in composition or even the detection of a small plasmon energy (33 ± 7) meV change along usually assumed pure and homogeneous InAs segments. We have applied this approach to measure interface widths in heterostructure InAs/InP NWs grown using metal catalysts and also to determine the timescale (~10 s) in which beam irradiation induces material damage in these wires. In particular, we have detected small As concentrations (4.4 ± 0.5)% in the final InP segment close to the Au catalyst, which leads to the conclusion that As diffuses through the metal nanoparticle during growth.

  19. Characterization of interface abruptness and material properties in catalytically grown III-V nanowires: exploiting plasmon chemical shift.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Chiaramonte, T; Cotta, M A; Ugarte, D

    2010-07-23

    We have studied the assessment of chemical composition changes in III-V heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) with nanometric spatial resolution using transmission electron microscopy methods. These materials represent a challenge for conventional spectroscopy techniques due to their high sensitivity to electron beam irradiation. Radiation damage strongly limits the exposure time to a few (5-10) s, which reduces the sensitivity of the traditionally used x-ray spectroscopy. The rather low counting statistics results in significant errors bars for EDS chemical quantification (5-10%) and interface width determination (few nanometers). Plasmon chemical shift is ideal in this situation, as its measurement requires very short exposure times (approximately 100 ms) and the plasmon peak energy can be measured with high precision (approximately 20 meV in this work). This high sensitivity allows the detection of subtle changes (1-2%) in composition or even the detection of a small plasmon energy (33 +/- 7) meV change along usually assumed pure and homogeneous InAs segments. We have applied this approach to measure interface widths in heterostructure InAs/InP NWs grown using metal catalysts and also to determine the timescale (approximately 10 s) in which beam irradiation induces material damage in these wires. In particular, we have detected small As concentrations (4.4 +/- 0.5)% in the final InP segment close to the Au catalyst, which leads to the conclusion that As diffuses through the metal nanoparticle during growth. PMID:20585172

  20. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  1. Reduction of CO2 to low carbon alcohols on CuO FCs/Fe2O3 NTs catalyst with photoelectric dual catalytic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiqiang; Wang, Huying; Xu, Jinfeng; Jing, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Han, Haixiang; Lu, Fusui

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the CuO FCs/Fe2O3 NTs catalyst was obtained after Fe2O3 nanotubes (Fe2O3 NTs) were decorated with CuO flower clusters (CuO FCs) by the pulse electrochemical deposition method. The in situ vertically aligned Fe2O3 NTs were prepared on the ferrous substrate by a potentiostatic anodization method. The SEM result showed the volcano-like Fe2O3 NTs were arranged in order and the CuO FCs constituted of flaky CuO distributed on the Fe2O3 NTs surface uniformly. After CuO FCs were loaded on Fe2O3 NTs, the absorption of visible light was enhanced noticeably, and its band gap narrowed to 1.78 eV from 2.03 eV. The conduction band and valence band locating at -0.73 eV and 1.05 eV, respectively were further obtained. In the PEC reduction of CO2 process, methanol and ethanol were two major products identified by chromatography. Their contents reached 1.00 mmol L(-1) cm(-2) and 107.38 μmol L(-1) cm(-2) after 6 h, respectively. This high-efficiency catalyst with photoelectric dual catalytic interfaces has a great guidance and reference significance for CO2 reduction to liquid carbon fuels. PMID:24121703

  2. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form Search Alcohol & ... on a single aspect of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Please click on the desired publication for full ...

  3. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost. PMID:25246094

  4. Characterizing HfXZr1-XO2 by EXAFS: Relationship Between Bulk and Surface Composition, and Impact on Catalytic Selectivity for Alcohol Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.; Milling, M; Ji, Y; Patterson, P; Sparks, D; Davis, B

    2009-01-01

    A series of mixed Hf{sub X}Zr{sub 1-X}O{sub 2} oxide catalysts was prepared according to a recipe that yields the monoclinic structure. The samples were examined by EXAFS spectroscopy at the Zr K and Hf L{sub III} edges. A fitting model was used that simultaneously fits data from both edges, and makes use of an interdependent mixing parameter X mix to take into account substitution of the complementary atom in the nearest metal-metal shell. For XPS analysis, Scofield factors were applied to estimate the relative atomic surface concentrations of Zr and Hf. EXAFS results suggested that a solid bulk solution was formed over a wide range of X for Hf{sub X}Zr{sub 1-X}O{sub 2} binary oxides, and that the relative ratio was retained in the surface shell (i.e., including some subsurface layers by XPS) and the surface (e.g., by ISS). The increase in selectivity for the 1-alkene from dehydration of alcohols at high Zr content does not correlate smoothly with the tuned relative atomic concentration of Hf to Zr. The step change at high Zr content appears to be due to other indirect factors (e.g., surface defects, oxygen vacancies).

  5. Catalytic Activity of Nanosized CuO-ZnO Supported on Titanium Chips in Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ho-Geun; Lee, Hwan-Gyu; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kang, Byeong-Mo; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, titanium chips (TC) generated from industrial facilities was utilized as TiO2 support for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) over Cu-based catalysts. Nano-sized CuO and ZnO catalysts were deposited on TiO2 support using a co-precipitation (CP) method (CuO-ZnO/TiO2), where the thermal treatment of TC and the particle size of TiC2 are optimized on CO2 conversion under different reaction temperature and contact time. Direct hydrogenation of CO2 to CH3OH over CuO-ZnO/TiO2 catalysts was achieved and the maximum selectivity (22%) and yield (18.2%) of CH3OH were obtained in the range of reaction temperature 210-240 degrees C under the 30 bar. The selectivity was readily increased by increasing the flow rate, which does not affect much to the CO2 conversion and CH3OH yield. PMID:27433722

  6. Novel process and catalytic materials for converting CO2 and H2 containing mixtures to liquid fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Meiri, Nora; Dinburg, Yakov; Amoyal, Meital; Koukouliev, Viatcheslav; Nehemya, Roxana Vidruk; Landau, Miron V; Herskowitz, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and water are renewable and the most abundant feedstocks for the production of chemicals and fungible fuels. However, the current technologies for production of hydrogen from water are not competitive. Therefore, reacting carbon dioxide with hydrogen is not economically viable in the near future. Other alternatives include natural gas, biogas or biomass for the production of carbon dioxide, hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures that react to yield chemicals and fungible fuels. The latter process requires a high performance catalyst that enhances the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to higher hydrocarbons combined with an optimal reactor system. Important aspects of a novel catalyst, based on a Fe spinel and three-reactor system developed for this purpose published in our recent paper and patent, were investigated in this study. Potassium was found to be a key promoter that improves the reaction rates of the RWGS and FTS and increases the selectivity of higher hydrocarbons while producing mostly olefins. It changed the texture of the catalyst, stabilized the Fe-Al-O spinel, thus preventing decomposition into Fe3O4 and Al2O3. Potassium also increased the content of Fe5C2 while shifting Fe in the oxide and carbide phases to a more reduced state. In addition, it increased the relative exposure of carbide iron on the catalysts surface, the CO2 adsorption and the adsorption strength. A detailed kinetic model of the RWGS, FTS and methanation reactions was developed for the Fe spinel catalyst based on extensive experimental data measured over a range of operating conditions. Significant oligomerization activity of the catalyst was found. Testing the pelletized catalyst with CO2, CO and H2 mixtures over a range of operating conditions demonstrated its high productivity to higher hydrocarbons. The composition of the liquid (C5+) was found to be a function of the potassium content and the composition of the feedstock

  7. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  8. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  9. Antimicrobial, free radical scavenging activities and catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol by nano-silver synthesized from the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L.: a promenade towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, C.; Sivasubramanian, G.; Parthasarathi, Bera; Baskaran, K.; Balachander, R.; Parameswaran, V. R.

    2015-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized from aqueous silver nitrate through a simple route using the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L. (LAIL) which acted as a reducing as well as capping agent. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the synthesized silver particles have a face centred cubic structure. EDS predicted the presence of elemental silver. The SEM images showed the synthesis of spherically mono-dispersed particles, with nano dimensions accounted by the TEM images. Infra-red spectrum adopted to the different organic functionalities present at the surface of the particles. TGA indicated an overall 11 % weight loss up to 1000 °C, suggesting desorption of biomolecules from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed the presence of metallic silver nanoparticles. The prepared material was utilized as catalyst in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol with molecular oxygen as the oxidant in methanol, under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Also Ag-NPs showed good to moderate anti-microbial activity employing the Agar disc diffusion method against various strains using Ciprofloxacin and Fluconazole as standard. Free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1-diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS in vitro assays. The work presented here demonstrates the adaptability of the synthesized Ag-NPs in participating as a disinfectant agent, free radical scavenger and an effective oxidation catalyst. The basic premise of attaining sustainability through the green synthesis of smart multifaceted materials has been consciously addressed.

  10. Antimicrobial, free radical scavenging activities and catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol by nano-silver synthesized from the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L.: a promenade towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, C.; Sivasubramanian, G.; Parthasarathi, Bera; Baskaran, K.; Balachander, R.; Parameswaran, V. R.

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized from aqueous silver nitrate through a simple route using the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L. (LAIL) which acted as a reducing as well as capping agent. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the synthesized silver particles have a face centred cubic structure. EDS predicted the presence of elemental silver. The SEM images showed the synthesis of spherically mono-dispersed particles, with nano dimensions accounted by the TEM images. Infra-red spectrum adopted to the different organic functionalities present at the surface of the particles. TGA indicated an overall 11 % weight loss up to 1000 °C, suggesting desorption of biomolecules from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed the presence of metallic silver nanoparticles. The prepared material was utilized as catalyst in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol with molecular oxygen as the oxidant in methanol, under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Also Ag-NPs showed good to moderate anti-microbial activity employing the Agar disc diffusion method against various strains using Ciprofloxacin and Fluconazole as standard. Free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1-diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS in vitro assays. The work presented here demonstrates the adaptability of the synthesized Ag-NPs in participating as a disinfectant agent, free radical scavenger and an effective oxidation catalyst. The basic premise of attaining sustainability through the green synthesis of smart multifaceted materials has been consciously addressed.

  11. Structural Evolution of Chemically-Driven RuO2 Nanowires and 3-Dimensional Design for Photo-Catalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonmo; Lee, Jae Won; Ye, Byeong Uk; Chun, Sung He; Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyunwoong; Lee, Heon; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Myung Hwa; Baik, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    Growth mechanism of chemically-driven RuO2 nanowires is explored and used to fabricate three-dimensional RuO2 branched Au-TiO2 nanowire electrodes for the photostable solar water oxidation. For the real time structural evolution during the nanowire growth, the amorphous RuO2 precursors (Ru(OH)3·H2O) are heated at 180 °C, producing the RuO2 nanoparticles with the tetragonal crystallographic structure and Ru enriched amorphous phases, observed through the in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and the high-resolution transmission electron microscope images. Growth then proceeds by Ru diffusion to the nanoparticles, followed by the diffusion to the growing surface of the nanowire in oxygen ambient, supported by the nucleation theory. The RuO2 branched Au-TiO2 nanowire arrays shows a remarkable enhancement in the photocurrent density by approximately 60% and 200%, in the UV-visible and Visible region, respectively, compared with pristine TiO2 nanowires. Furthermore, there is no significant decrease in the device’s photoconductance with UV-visible illumination during 1 day, making it possible to produce oxygen gas without the loss of the photoactvity. PMID:26149583

  12. Altering the catalytic activity of thin metal catalyst films for controlled growth of chemical vapor deposited vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, Christopher M; Christen, Hans M; Cui, Hongtao; Eres, Gyula; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B

    2008-01-01

    The growth rate and terminal length of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs) grown by chemical vapor deposition have been dramatically improved through pulsed KrF-excimer laser pretreatments of multilayer metal catalyst films. Silicon wafers coated with Al, Mo, and Fe layers were laser processed in air with single laser shots of varying fluence through circular apertures, then heated to ~750C and exposed to acetylene and ferrocene-containing gas mixtures typically used to grow vertically-aligned nanotube arrays. In situ videography was used to record the growth kinetics of the nanotube arrays in both patterned and unpatterned regions to understand changes in catalytic activity, growth rates, and termination of growth. The height of the patterned regions varied with fluence, with the most successful treatment resulting in 1.4 cm-tall posts of nanotubes embedded in a 0.4 cm-tall nanotube carpet. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images from the nanotubes in the posts revealed fewer walls, smaller diameters, and a much narrower distribution of diameters compared to nanotubes grown in the carpet. This information, along with data obtained from weighing the material from each region, suggests that pulsed laser processing can also significantly increase the areal density of VANTAs.

  13. Effects of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of ZnO films grown by catalytic reaction-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Kanji Morioka, Makoto; Kanauchi, Shingo; Ohashi, Yuki; Kato, Takahiro; Tamayama, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-15

    The influence of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) films grown on a-plane (11–20) sapphire (a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates was investigated, using a chemical vapor deposition method based on the reaction between dimethylzinc and high-temperature H{sub 2}O produced by a catalytic H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction on platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. The addition of N{sub 2}O was found to increase the size of the crystalline facets and to improve the crystal orientation along the c-axis. The electron mobility at 290 K was also increased to 234 cm{sup 2}/Vs following the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.2 × 10{sup −3 }Pa. In addition, the minimum full width at half maximum of the most intense photoluminescence peak derived from neutral donor bound excitons at 10 K decreased to 0.6 meV by the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.1 × 10{sup −2 }Pa.

  14. Effect of temperature for synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes by catalytic chemical vapor deposition over Mo-Co-MgO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Zhiqiang; Fang Yan

    2008-06-03

    The influence of temperature on synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of methane over Mo-Co-MgO catalyst was studied by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Raman scattering. The Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst was prepared by decomposing the mixture of magnesium nitrate, ammonium molybdate, citric acid, and cobalt nitrate. The results show that Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst is effective to synthesize SWCNTs. By using Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst, generation of SWCNTs even at 940 K was demonstrated. The optimum temperature of synthesizing SWCNTs over Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst may be about 1123 K. At 1123 K, the diameters of SWCNTs are in the range of 0.75-1.65 nm. The content of SWCNTs is increased with the increase of temperature below 1123 K and the carbon yield rate is also increased with the increase of synthesis temperature. Therefore, the amount of SWCNTs increases with the increase of temperature below 1123 K. However, above 1123 K, the content of SWCNTs is decreased with the increase of temperature; therefore, it is not effective to increase the amount of SWCNTs through increasing synthesis temperature above 1123 K.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  16. Formation of alcohol conversion catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2001-01-01

    The method of the present invention involves a composition containing an intimate mixture of (a) metal oxide support particles and (b) a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, its method of manufacture, and its method of use for converting alcohols to aldehydes. During the conversion process, catalytically active metal oxide from the discrete catalytic metal oxide particles migrates to the oxide support particles and forms a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on the oxide support particle to form a catalyst composition having a higher specific activity than the admixed particle composition.

  17. QSPR models based on molecular mechanics and quantum chemical calculations. 1. Construction of Boltzmann-averaged descriptors for alkanes, alcohols, diols, ethers and cyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Dyekjaer, Jane; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Jónsdóttir, Svava

    2002-09-01

    Values for nine descriptors for QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationships) modeling of physical properties of 96 alkanes, alcohols, ethers, diols, triols and cyclic alkanes and alcohols in conjunction with the program Codessa are presented. The descriptors are Boltzmann-averaged by selection of the most relevant conformers out of a set of possible molecular conformers generated by a systematic scheme presented in this paper. Six of these descriptors are calculated with molecular mechanics and three with quantum chemical methods. Especially interesting descriptors are the relative van der Waals energies and the molecular polarizabilities, which correlate very well with boiling points. Five more simple descriptors that only depend on the molecular constitutional formula are also discussed briefly. PMID:12415333

  18. New Tetracopper(II) Cubane Cores Driven by a Diamino Alcohol: Self-assembly Synthesis, Structural and Topological Features, and Magnetic and Catalytic Oxidation Properties.

    PubMed

    Dias, Sara S P; Kirillova, Marina V; André, Vânia; Kłak, Julia; Kirillov, Alexander M

    2015-06-01

    Two new coordination compounds with tetracopper(II) cores, namely, a 1D coordination polymer, [Cu4(μ4-H2edte)(μ5-H2edte)(sal)2]n·10nH2O (1), and a discrete 0D tetramer, [Cu4(μ4-Hedte)2(Hpmal)2(H2O)]·7.5H2O (2), were easily self-assembled from aqueous solutions of copper(II) nitrate, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (H4edte), salicylic acid (H2sal), or phenylmalonic acid (H2pma). The obtained compounds were characterized by IR and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition to different dimensionalities, their structures reveal distinct single-open [Cu4(μ2-O)(μ3-O)3] (in 1) or double-open [Cu4(μ2-O)2(μ3-O)2] (in 2) cubane cores with 3M4-1 topology. In crystal structures, numerous crystallization water molecules are arranged into the intricate infinite 1D {(H2O)18}n water tapes (in 1) or discrete (H2O)9 clusters (in 2) that participate in multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions with the metal-organic hosts, thus extending the overall structures into very complex 3D supramolecular networks. After simplification, their topological analysis revealed the binodal 6,10- or 6,8-connected underlying 3D nets with unique or rare 6,8T2 topology in 1 and 2, respectively. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 were investigated in the 1.8-300 K temperature range, indicating overall antiferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent Cu(II) ions within the [Cu4O4] cores. The obtained compounds also act as bioinspired precatalysts for mild homogeneous oxidation, by aqueous hydrogen peroxide at 50 °C in an acidic MeCN/H2O medium, of various cyclic and linear C5-C8 alkanes to the corresponding alcohols and ketones. Overall product yields of up to 21% (based on alkane) were achieved, and the effects of various reaction parameters were studied. PMID:25974644

  19. Synthesis of higher alcohols over highly dispersed Cu-Fe based catalysts derived from layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinyou; Fang, Kegong; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Lu; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-05-15

    Highly dispersed Cu-Fe based catalysts with Fe/Cu molar ratios ranging from 0.2 to 1 were prepared via thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) precursors and tested for higher alcohol synthesis (HAS) via CO hydrogenation. The catalysts were characterized using different techniques such as XRD, TEM, XPS, and H2-TPR. It was demonstrated that the Cu and Fe ions were highly dispersed in the brucite-like layers of the LDHs. With increased Fe/Cu atomic ratio, the tetrahedrally coordinated Cu ion content, Cu reduction temperatures, and the spacing of layers initially increase until the Fe/Cu ratio reaches 0.5 and then decrease. In addition to the catalytic evaluation for CO hydrogenation and catalyst characterization, the relationships between the physical-chemical properties of the catalysts and their catalytic performances were also investigated. It was also found that the alcohols/hydrocarbons ratios correlate linearly with the tetrahedrally coordinated Cu ion content. Moreover, higher reduction temperatures of Cu species as well as larger spacing between the layers in the catalyst are favorable for the synthesis of alcohols. The incorporation of a suitable amount of Fe is beneficial for the production of higher alcohols, with the best catalytic performance (alcohol selectivity of 20.77% and C2+ alcohol selectivity of 48.06%) obtained from a Fe/Cu atomic ratio of 0.5. PMID:26943001

  20. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  1. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  2. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- www.al-anon.org/home National Institute on Alcohol ...

  3. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Ketoacidosis - alcoholic ... Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by very heavy alcohol use. It most often occurs in a malnourished person ... Symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis include: Nausea and vomiting ... Changed level of alertness, which may lead to coma Confusion ...

  4. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... raquo Alcohol Facts Alcohol Facts Listen Drinks like beer, malt liquor, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol. Alcohol is the ingredient that gets you drunk. Hard liquor—such as whiskey, rum, or gin—has more ...

  5. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  6. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation of acylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiawei; Oost, Rik; Desmarchelier, Alaric; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R

    2015-03-01

    The highly enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to acylsilanes is catalyzed by copper diphosphine complexes. This transformation affords α-silylated tertiary alcohols in up to 97% yield and 98:2 enantiomeric ratio. The competing Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction is suppressed by the use of a mixture of Lewis acid additives. The chiral catalyst can be recovered as a copper complex and used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25403641

  7. Conversion of isoamyl alcohol over acid catalysts: Reaction dependence on nature of active centers

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, G.P.; Murthy, R.S.; Krishnan, V.

    1997-02-01

    Acid catalysts are known to catalyze the dehydration of alcohols. In addition some oxide catalysts with basic properties have also been shown to play an important role in such dehydration reactions. The dehydration of aliphatic alcohols to olefins has been studied in detail using alumina silica-alumina and zeolite catalysts. The olefin products further undergo isomerization in presence of acidic sites. The reaction of isoamyl alcohol on catalytic surfaces has not been investigated in greater detail. The dehydration of isoamyl alcohol is of considerable interest in fine chemicals. Isoamyl alcohol may also undergo dehydrogenation as observed in the case of n-butanol. The scope of the present work is to identify the nature of the active sites selective for dehydration and dehydrogenation of isoamyl alcohol and to modify the active sites to promote isomerization of dehydrated products. Four catalytic surfaces on which the acidic strength can be varied, as well as selectively suppressed, are chosen for this study. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  9. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  10. 1H NMR spectra of alcohols and diols in chloroform: DFT/GIAO calculation of chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, John S

    2014-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of aliphatic alcohols in chloroform have been computed on the basis of density functional theory, the solvent being included by the integral-equation-formalism polarisable continuum model of Gaussian 09. Relative energies of all conformers are calculated at the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE)0/6-311+G(d,p) level, and NMR shifts by the gauge-including atomic orbital method with the PBE0/6-311+G(d,p) geometry and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The 208 computed CH proton NMR shifts for 34 alcohols correlate very well with the experimental values, with a gradient of 1.00 ± 0.01 and intercept close to zero; the overall root mean square difference (RMSD) is 0.08 ppm. Shifts for CH protons of diols in chloroform are well correlated with the theoretical values for (isotropic) benzene, with similar gradient and intercept (1.02 ± 0.01, -0.13 ppm), but the overall RMSD is slightly higher, 0.12 ppm. This approach generally gives slightly better results than the CHARGE model of Abraham et al. The shifts of unsaturated alcohols in benzene have been re-examined with Gaussian 09, but the overall fit for CH protons is not improved, and OH proton shifts are worse. Shifts of vinyl protons in alkenols are systematically overestimated, and the correlation of computed shifts against the experimental data for unsaturated alcohols follows a quadratic equation. Splitting the 20 compounds studied into two sets, and applying empirical scaling based on the quadratic for the first set to the second set, gives an RMSD of 0.10 ppm. A multi-standard approach gives a similar result. PMID:25199903

  11. Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals and industrial wastes as a Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is attributed to rising consumption of fossil fuels around the world. The development of solutions to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is one of the most urgent needs of today's society. One of the most stable and long-term solutions for storing CO2 is via carbon mineralization, where minerals containing metal oxides of Ca or Mg are reacted with CO2 to produce thermodynamically stable Ca- and Mg-carbonates that are insoluble in water. Carbon mineralization can be carried out in-situ or ex-situ. In the case of in-situ mineralization, the degree of carbonation is thought to be limited by both mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction kinetics, and must be well understood to predict the ultimate fate of CO2 within geological reservoirs. While the kinetics of in-situ mineral trapping via carbonation is naturally slow, it can be enhanced at high temperature and high partial pressure of CO2. The addition of weak organic acids produced from food waste has also been shown to enhance mineral weathering kinetics. In the case of the ex-situ carbon mineralization, the role of these ligand-bearing organic acids can be further amplified for silicate mineral dissolution. Unfortunately, high mineral dissolution rates often lead to the formation of a silica-rich passivation layer on the surface of silicate minerals. Thus, the use of novel solvent mixture that allows chemically catalyzed removal of this passivation layer during enhanced Mg-leaching surface reaction has been proposed and demonstrated. Furthermore, an engineered biological catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, has been developed and evaluated to accelerate the hydration of CO2, which is another potentially rate-limiting step of the carbonation reaction. The development of these novel catalytic reaction schemes has significantly improved the overall efficiency and sustainability of in-situ and ex-situ mineral carbonation technologies and allowed direct

  12. Comparative stability and catalytic and chemical properties of the sulfate-activating enzymes from Penicillium chrysogenum (mesophile) and Penicillium duponti (thermophile).

    PubMed Central

    Renosto, F; Schultz, T; Re, E; Mazer, J; Chandler, C J; Barron, A; Segel, I H

    1985-01-01

    ATP sulfurylases from Penicillium chrysogenum (a mesophile) and from Penicillium duponti (a thermophile) had a native molecular weight of about 440,000 and a subunit molecular weight of about 69,000. (The P. duponti subunit appeared to be a little smaller than the P. chrysogenum subunit.) The P. duponti enzyme was about 100 times more heat stable than the P. chrysogenum enzyme; k inact (the first-order rate constant for inactivation) at 65 degrees C = 3.3 X 10(-4) s-1 for P. duponti and 3.0 X 10(-2) s-1 for P. chrysogenum. The P. duponti enzyme was also more stable to low pH and urea at 30 degrees C. Rabbit serum antibodies to each enzyme showed heterologous cross-reaction. Amino acid analyses disclosed no major compositional differences between the two enzymes. The analogous Km and Ki values of the forward and reverse reactions were also essentially identical at 30 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, the physiologically important adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 4 U mg of protein-1, which is about half that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. The molybdolysis and ATP synthesis activities of the P. duponti enzyme at 30 degrees C were similar to those of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. At 50 degrees C, the APS synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 12 to 19 U mg of protein-1, which was higher than that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme at 30 degrees C (8 +/- 1 U mg of protein-1). Treatment of the P. chrysogenum enzyme with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) at 30 degrees C under nondenaturing conditions modified one free sulfhydryl group per subunit. Vmax was not significantly altered, but the catalytic activity at low magnesium-ATP or SO4(2-) (or MoO4(2-)) was markedly reduced. Chemical modification with tetranitromethane had the same results on the kinetics. The native P. duponti enzyme was relatively unreactive toward DTNB or tetranitromethane at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 or pH 9.0, but at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0, DTNB rapidly

  13. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  14. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W.; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  15. Chemical Analysis of Suspected Unrecorded Alcoholic Beverages from the States of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Negri, Giuseppina; Soares Neto, Julino Assunção Rodrigues; de Araujo Carlini, Elisaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Our study analyzed 152 samples of alcoholic beverages collected from the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The methanol content varied from 20 to 180 ppm in 28 samples, and the limit of the accepted level of 200 ppm was exceeded in only one sample. High content of cyanide derivatives and ethyl carbamate, above the accepted level of 150 ppb, was observed in 109 samples. Carbonyl compounds were also observed in 111 samples, showing hydroxy 2-propanone, 4-methyl-4-hepten-3-one, furfural, and 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate as main constituents. Copper was found at concentrations above 5 ppm in 26 samples; the maximum value observed was 28 ppm. This work evaluated the human health risk associated with the poor quality of suspected unrecorded alcohols beverages. PMID:26495155

  16. Chemical Analysis of Suspected Unrecorded Alcoholic Beverages from the States of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Giuseppina; Soares Neto, Julino Assunção Rodrigues; de Araujo Carlini, Elisaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Our study analyzed 152 samples of alcoholic beverages collected from the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The methanol content varied from 20 to 180 ppm in 28 samples, and the limit of the accepted level of 200 ppm was exceeded in only one sample. High content of cyanide derivatives and ethyl carbamate, above the accepted level of 150 ppb, was observed in 109 samples. Carbonyl compounds were also observed in 111 samples, showing hydroxy 2-propanone, 4-methyl-4-hepten-3-one, furfural, and 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate as main constituents. Copper was found at concentrations above 5 ppm in 26 samples; the maximum value observed was 28 ppm. This work evaluated the human health risk associated with the poor quality of suspected unrecorded alcohols beverages. PMID:26495155

  17. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  18. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcoholism is, and the presence of liver disease or ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  19. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... counseling to discuss the long-term issue of alcoholism Testing and treatment for other medical problems linked ... following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism: Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- ...

  20. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  1. The first chemical synthesis of novel MeO-3-GlcUA derivative of hyaluronan-based disaccharide to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of hyaluronic acid synthases (HASs)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guohua; Kumar, Vipin; Xue, Jun; Locke, Robert D.; Matta, Khushi L.

    2009-01-01

    The first chemical synthesis of MeO-3-GlcUAβ(1→3)GlcNAc-UDP to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of hyaluronic acid synthases (HASs) is described. Construction of the desired β(1→3)-linked disaccharide 10 was achieved very efficiently by coupling MeO-3-GlcUA donor 3 with the suitable protected GlcNTroc acceptor 4 using BF3.Et2O as Lewis acid. Chemoselective removal of anomeric NAP, phosphorylation, hydrogenation, coupling with UMP-morpholidate and finally complete deprotection gave the target compound 1 in good yield. PMID:20161585

  2. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method.

    PubMed

    Van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-01-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices. PMID:27616038

  3. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Forum, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The theme of this issue of a journal designed to focus on the prevention of various kinds of substance abuse is "children of alcoholics" (CoAs). The lead article, "Children of Chemical Dependency: Respecting Complexities and Building on Strengths," by Pamela Woll, examines chemically dependent family systems. The article begins by offering two…

  4. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  5. Catalytic, asymmetric difluorination of alkenes to generate difluoromethylated stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Banik, Steven M; Medley, Jonathan William; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-07-01

    Difluoromethyl groups possess specific steric and electronic properties that invite their use as chemically inert surrogates of alcohols, thiols, and other polar functional groups important in a wide assortment of molecular recognition processes. We report here a method for the catalytic, asymmetric, migratory geminal difluorination of β-substituted styrenes to access a variety of products bearing difluoromethylated tertiary or quaternary stereocenters. The reaction uses commercially available reagents (m-chloroperbenzoic acid and hydrogen fluoride pyridine) and a simple chiral aryl iodide catalyst and is carried out readily on a gram scale. Substituent effects and temperature-dependent variations in enantioselectivity suggest that cation-π interactions play an important role in stereodifferentiation by the catalyst. PMID:27365443

  6. Solvent-free aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons and alcohols with Pd@N-doped carbon from glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Gong, Yutong; Li, Haoran; Chen, Zhirong; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient systems for selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons and alcohols to produce more functional compounds (aldehydes, ketones, acids or esters) with atmospheric air or molecular oxygen is a grand challenge for the chemical industry. Here we report the synthesis of palladium nanoparticles supported on novel nanoporous nitrogen-doped carbon, and their impressive performance in the controlled oxidation of hydrocarbons and alcohols with air. In terms of catalytic activity, these catalysts afford much higher turnover frequencies (up to 863 turnovers per hour for hydrocarbon oxidation and up to ~210,000 turnovers per hour for alcohol oxidation) than most reported palladium catalysts under the same reaction conditions. This work provides great potential for the application of ambient air and recyclable palladium catalysts in fine-chemical production with high activity. PMID:23481401

  7. Suitability assessment of a continuous process combining thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single pilot-scale twin-screw extruder for six different biomass sources.

    PubMed

    Vandenbossche, Virginie; Brault, Julien; Hernandez-Melendez, Oscar; Evon, Philippe; Barzana, Eduardo; Vilarem, Gérard; Rigal, Luc

    2016-07-01

    A process has been validated for the deconstruction of lignocellulose on a pilot scale installation using six types of biomass selected for their sustainability, accessibility, worldwide availability, and differences of chemical composition and physical structure. The process combines thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single twin-screw extruder. Three treatment phases were sequentially performed: an alkaline pretreatment, a neutralization step coupled with an extraction-separation phase and a bioextrusion treatment. Alkaline pretreatment destructured the wall polymers after just a few minutes and allowed the initial extraction of 18-54% of the hemicelluloses and 9-41% of the lignin. The bioextrusion step induced the start of enzymatic hydrolysis and increased the proportion of soluble organic matter. Extension of saccharification for 24h at high consistency (20%) and without the addition of new enzyme resulted in the production of 39-84% of the potential glucose. PMID:27015021

  8. Formaldehyde in Alcoholic Beverages: Large Chemical Survey Using Purpald Screening Followed by Chromotropic Acid Spectrophotometry with Multivariate Curve Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jendral, Julien A.; Monakhova, Yulia B.; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2011-01-01

    A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L). 210 samples (41%) gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Calculation of UV-VIS and 13C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2–8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26%) contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0–14.4 mg/L). The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%), Asian spirits (59%), grape marc (54%), and brandy (50%). Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8%) had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L. PMID:21760790

  9. Design and fabrication of optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives based on fluorescence quenching of phenol red immobilized poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ali Reza; Ghazanchayi, Behnam

    2016-04-01

    The present study developed a new optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives in liquid phase. The method is based on the fluorescence quenching of phenol red as fluorophore in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane in the presence of nitroaromatic explosives as quenchers, e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 4-nitrotoluene (4-NT), 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and nitrobenzene (NB). For chemical immobilization of phenol red in PVA, phenol red reacted with formaldehyde to produce hydroxymethyl groups and then attached to PVA membrane through the hydroxymethyl groups. The optical sensor showed strong quenching of nitroaromatic explosives. A Stern-Volmer graph for each explosive was constructed and showed that the range of concentration from 5.0 × 10(-6) to 2.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) was linear for each explosive and sensitivity varied as TNB >TNT>2,4-DNT>NB>4-NT. The response time of the sensor was within 1 min. The proposed sensor showed good reversibility and reproducibility. PMID:26838395

  10. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes1,2. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication. PMID:23416793

  11. Iron Catalysis for Room-Temperature Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingguo; Zhang, Jiasheng; Ma, Shengming

    2016-07-13

    Oxidation from alcohols to carboxylic acids, a class of essential chemicals in daily life, academic laboratories, and industry, is a fundamental reaction, usually using at least a stoichiometric amount of an expensive and toxic oxidant. Here, an efficient and practical sustainable oxidation technology of alcohols to carboxylic acids using pure O2 or even O2 in air as the oxidant has been developed: utilizing a catalytic amount each of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O/TEMPO/MCl, a series of carboxylic acids were obtained from alcohols (also aldehydes) in high yields at room temperature. A 55 g-scale reaction was demonstrated using air. As a synthetic application, the first total synthesis of a naturally occurring allene, i.e., phlomic acid, was accomplished. PMID:27304226

  12. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication.

  13. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  14. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase the risk of certain cancers. It can cause damage to the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide. If you want to stop drinking, there is ...

  15. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  16. Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated sulfonamides determination.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Rosales, Luis E; Sancho, Juan V; Santos, F Javier; Moyano, Encarnación

    2015-09-25

    Ionization and in source-fragmentation behavior of four fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOH) (4:2 FTOH, 6:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH) and four N-alkyl fluorooctane sulfonamides/-ethanols (N-MeFOSA, N-EtFOSA, N-MeFOSE and N-EtFOSE) by APCI has been studied and compared with the traditionally used EI and CI. Protonated molecule was the base peak of the APCI spectrum in all cases giving the possibility of selecting it as a precursor ion for MS/MS experiments. Following, CID fragmentation showed common product ions for all FOSAs/FOSEs (C4F7 and C3F5). Nevertheless, the different functionality gave characteristic pattern fragmentations. For instance, FTOHs mainly loss H2O+HF, FOSAs showed the losses of SO2 and HF while FOSEs showed the losses of H2O and SO2. Linearity, repeatability and LODs have been studied obtaining instrumental LODs between 1 and 5fg. Finally, application to river water and influent and effluent waste water samples has been carried out in order to investigate the improvements in detection capabilities of this new source in comparison with the traditionally used EI/CI sources. Matrix effects in APCI have been evaluated in terms of signal enhancement/suppression when comparing standards in solvent and matrix. No matrix effects were observed and concentrations found in samples were in the range of 1-100pgL(-1) far below the LODs achieved with methods previously reported. Unknown related perfluoroalkyl substances, as methyl-sulfone and methyl-sulfoxide analogues for FTOHs, were also discovered and tentatively identified. PMID:26298605

  17. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nordvang, Emily C; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-11-23

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during catalytic testing with the single crystal in situ results. PMID:26463581

  18. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nordvang, Emily C; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during catalytic testing with the single crystal in situ results. PMID:26463581

  19. Catalytic, stereospecific syn-dichlorination of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-02-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Although the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. Here, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (selenium). With diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol%) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids.

  20. Catalytic, Stereospecific Syn-Dichlorination of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Whilst the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. In this Article, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (i.e., selenium). Thus, with diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol %) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source, and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids. PMID:25615668

  1. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  2. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  3. Intrinsic catalytic properties of extruded clay honeycomb monolith toward complete oxidation of air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Assebban, Mhamed; El Kasmi, Achraf; Harti, Sanae; Chafik, Tarik

    2015-12-30

    The present work highlights the intrinsic catalytic properties of extruded clay honeycomb monolith toward complete oxidation of various air pollutants namely CO, methane, propane, acetylene, propene, n-butene, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, acetone, dimethyl ether, benzene, toluene, o-xylene, monochlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Total catalytic conversion was achieved for all tested compounds with different behaviors depending on pollutants' structural and chemical nature. The comparison of T50 values obtained from light-off curves allowed the establishment of the following reactivity sequence: ketone>alcohol>ether>CO>alkyne>aromatic>alkene>chlorinated aromatic>alkane. The intrinsic catalytic performances of the natural clay was ascribed to the implication of a quite complex mixture constituted by OH groups (Brønsted acids) and coordinately-unsaturated cations, such as Al(3+), Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) (Lewis acids). Hence, the combination of the clay's intrinsic catalytic performances and easier extrudability suggests a promissory potential for application in air pollution control. PMID:26259164

  4. Alcohol fuels program technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

  5. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOEpatents

    Ross, David S.; Blessing, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  6. Examination of surface phenomena of V₂O₅ loaded on new nanostructured TiO₂ prepared by chemical vapor condensation for enhanced NH₃-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cha, Woojoon; Yun, Seong-Taek; Jurng, Jongsoo

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we describe the investigation and surface characterization of a chemical vapor condensation (CVC)-TiO2 support material used in a V2O5/TiO2 catalyst for enhanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity and confirm the mechanism of surface reactions. On the basis of previous studies and comparison with a commercial TiO2 catalyst, we examine four fundamental questions: first, the reason for increased surface V(4+) ion concentrations; second, the origin of the increase in surface acid sites; third, a basis for synergistic influences on improvements in SCR activity; and fourth, a reason for improved catalytic activity at low reaction temperatures. In this study, we have cited the result of SCR with NH3 activity for removing NOx and analyzed data using the reported result and data from previous studies on V2O5/CVC-TiO2 for the SCR catalyst. In order to determine the properties of suitable CVC-TiO2 surfaces for efficient SCR catalysis at low temperatures, CVC-TiO2 specimens were prepared and characterized using techniques such as XRD, BET, HR-TEM, XPS, FT-IR, NH3-TPD, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, H2-TPR, and cyclic voltammetry. The results obtained for the CVC-TiO2 materials were also compared with those of commercial TiO2. PMID:25045767

  7. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  8. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E; Stoppiello, Craig T; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor. PMID:27222094

  9. Propyl alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    Rubbing alcohol Alcohol swabs Skin and hair products Nail polish remover Note: This list may not be all ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ...

  10. Chemical composition, antioxidant properties and hepatoprotective effects of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract against alcohol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Souli, Abdelaziz; Hosni, Karim; Rtibi, Kais; Tebourbi, Olfa; El-Benna, Jamel; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    The present study assessed the chemical composition, antioxidant properties, and hepatoprotective effects of subacute pre-treatment with chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract (CDE) against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rats. The colorimetric analysis demonstrated that the CDE is rich in total polyphenols, total flavonoids and condensed tannins, and exhibited an important in vitro antioxidant activity. The use of LC/MS technique allowed us to identify 10 phenolic compounds in CDE. We found that CDE pretreatment, in vivo, protected against EtOH-induced liver injury evident by plasma transaminases activity and preservation of the hepatic tissue structure. The CDE counteracted EtOH-induced liver lipoperoxidation, preserved thiol -SH groups and prevented the depletion of antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). We also showed that acute alcohol administration increased tissue and plasma hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), calcium and free iron levels. More importantly, CDE pre-treatment reversed all EtOH-induced disturbances in intracellular mediators. In conclusion, our data suggest that CDE exerted a potential hepatoprotective effect against EtOH-induced oxidative stress in rat, at least in part, by negatively regulating Fenton reaction components such as H(2)O(2) and free iron, which are known to lead to cytotoxicity mediated by intracellular calcium deregulation. PMID:25816359

  11. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E.; Stoppiello, Craig T.; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor.A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction

  12. Application of integrated ozone and granular activated carbon for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand reduction of vinasse from alcohol distilleries.

    PubMed

    Hadavifar, Mojtaba; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar; Mahdad, Faezeh; Li, Qin; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the treatment of the distilleries vinasse using a hybrid process integrating ozone oxidation and granular activated carbons (GAC) in both batch and continuous operation mode. The batch-process studies have been carried out to optimize initial influent pH, GAC doses, the effect of the ozone (O3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal of the distilleries vinasse. The continuous process was carried out on GAC and ozone treatment alone as well as the hybrid process comb both methods to investigate the synergism effectiveness of the two methods for distilleries vinasse COD reduction and color removal. In a continuous process, the Yan model described the experimental data better than the Thomas model. The efficiency of ozonation of the distilleries vinasse was more effective for color removal (74.4%) than COD removal (25%). O3/H2O2 process was not considerably more effective on COD and color removal. Moreover, O3/GAC process affected negatively on the removal efficiency by reducing COD and color from distilleries vinasse. The negative effect decreased by increasing pH value of the influent. PMID:26789200

  13. Alcoholic hallucinosis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Pookala S; Ryali, Vssr; Srivastava, Kalpana; Kumar, Shashi R; Prakash, Jyoti; Singal, Ankit

    2012-07-01

    Alcoholic hallucinosis is a rare complication of chronic alcohol abuse characterized by predominantly auditory hallucinations that occur either during or after a period of heavy alcohol consumption. Bleuler (1916) termed the condition as alcohol hallucinosis and differentiated it from Delirium Tremens. Usually it presents with acoustic verbal hallucinations, delusions and mood disturbances arising in clear consciousness and sometimes may progress to a chronic form mimicking schizophrenia. One such case with multimodal hallucinations in a Defence Service Corps soldier is presented here. PMID:24250051

  14. Differences in the chemical and catalytic characteristics of two crystallographically 'identical' enzyme catalytic sites. Characterization of actinidin and papain by a combination of pH-dependent substrate catalysis kinetics and reactivity probe studies targeted on the catalytic-site thiol group and its immediate microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Salih, E; Malthouse, J P; Kowlessur, D; Jarvis, M; O'Driscoll, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) and papain (EC 3.4.22.2), two cysteine proteinases whose catalytic-site regions appear to superimpose to a degree that approaches atomic co-ordinate accuracy of both crystal structures, were evaluated by determining (a) the pH-dependence in acid media of the acylation process of the catalytic act (k+2/Ks) using N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-Bz-Arg-Nan) as substrate and (b) the sensitivity of the reactivity of the catalytic-site thiol group and its pH-dependence to structural change in small, thiol-specific, two-protonic-state reactivity probes (2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide) where enzyme-probe contacts should be restricted to areas close to the catalytic site. Distortion of the catalytic sites of the two enzymes at pH less than 4 was evaluated over time-scales appropriate for both stopped-flow reactivity probe kinetics (less than or equal to 1-2 s) and steady-state substrate catalysis kinetics (3-5 min) by using the 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide monocation as a titrant for non-distorted catalytic sites. This permitted a lower pH limit to be defined for valid kinetic analysis of both types. The behaviour of the enzymes at pH less than 4 requires a kinetic model in which the apparently biomolecular reaction of enzyme with probe reagent is separated from the process leading to loss of conformational integrity by a potentially reversible step. The acylation of actinidin with L-Bz-Arg-Nan in acidic media occurs in two protonic states, one produced by raising the pH across pKa less than 4 which probably characterizes the formation of -S-/-ImH+ ion pair (pKa approx. 3) and the other, of higher reactivity, produced by raising the pH across pKa 5.5, which may characterize rearrangement of catalytic-site geometry. The pH-dependence of the acylation of papain by L-Bz-Arg-Nan is quite different and is not influenced by protonic dissociation with pKa values in the range 5-6. The earlier

  15. Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Fals-Stewart, William

    2003-01-01

    We received 38 controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment. We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, (a) Al-Anon facilitation and referral help family members cope better; (b)…

  16. Synthesis and charge transport properties of CVD graphene films obtained by precipitation and catalytic formation on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Lewis; Zhang, Yi; Badmaev, Alexander; Wang, Chuan; Li, Zhen; Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition is considered a reliable approach to large-scale graphene, however the influence of aspects such as the graphene formation mechanism, carbon precursor and synthesis conditions, over the ultimate transport properties of the films remain to be explored. In this work we synthesized CVD graphene by catalytic formation and surface precipitation using methane and alcohol as carbon feedstock. AFM, SEM and TEM microscopy, as well as electron diffraction, XPS, Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements were employed to characterize the films, showing a strong influence of the carbon source and formation mechanism on the uniformity and defect density of the synthesized CVD graphene, and hence, on their charge transport properties.

  17. Surface coordination number and surface redox couples on catalyst oxides, a new approach of the interpretation of activity and selectivity III. Interpretation of chemical and catalytic oxidation reactions on some oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Y. P.

    The concepts of surface coordination number n, and of surface redox couples MO [ n] /MO ( n+1) presented previously, are exploited to explain experimental results. Two cases are considered: reactions of chemical gaseous species such as CO, CO 2, H 2, H 2O,N 2O, propene and methanol on the surface of the oxides NiO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3, in the absence of oxygen: activated catalytic reactions of oxygen on reductive species such as CO, H 2,C 2H 6, and CH 3OH. The knowledge of the potential of surface redox couples permits a rationalization of the study of these reactions. The efficiency of the two concepts is obvious in many cases. For example, the origin of an athermal oxidative process occurring for the oxidations of CO or H 2 on TiO 2 is easily understood, as well as those of the poisoning of the catalysts or of the inactivity of a surface saturated by oxygen. In addition, the study of chemical reactions on the oxides confirms and completes the theoretical approach used. Particularly, the existence of the surface states, which are postulated in the case of Cr 2O 3, is corroborated by experimental observations concerning the number of surface states and the value of the chemical potentials. Even though the theory is based upon thermodynamical and structural data, it also leads to a better understanding of kinetic features.

  18. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  19. Facts about Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leonard C.

    Recognition of alcoholism as a treatable illness is a result of public education based on scientific facts. This publication, a digest of a more detailed survey of research about drinking and alcoholism, presents information about alcohol and its effects on individuals and society. It provides facts about the short-term and long-term effects of…

  20. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo-Merello, Gonzalo; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Gallego-Delgado, Maria; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM. PMID:25228956

  1. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... other questions about alcohol. Here’s what we know: Alcohol’s effects vary from person to person, depending on a ...

  2. An examination of pentafluorobenzoyl derivatization strategies for the analysis of fatty alcohols using gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Ford, David A

    2011-05-15

    Gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/ECNICI-MS) combined with pentafluorobenzoyl derivatization (PFBoyl) is frequently used for the sensitive detection of fatty alcohols (FOH). However, this derivatization technique suffers from a lack of established reaction protocols, time-consuming reactions, and the presence of reagent artifacts or unwanted derivatization by-products which can hinder analyte detection. Here, strategies are presented to reduce the problems associated with PFBoyl-derivatization, including (1) the optimization of reaction conditions (derivatization time and temperature) for a variety of PFBoyl-derivatized FOH, (2) an investigation of microwave-accelerated derivatization (MAD) as a rapid alternative heating mechanism for the PFBoyl-derivatization of FOH, and (3) an analysis of an alternative strategy employing a solvent extraction procedure post-derivatization to reduce the detrimental effects commonly associated with PFBoyl derivatization reagents. The optimal reaction conditions for the PFBoyl-derivatization of FOH were determined to be 60°C for 45 min. The investigation in MAD demonstrated the potential of obtaining comparable PFBoyl-derivatizations to those obtained using traditional heating methods, albeit in a reaction time of 3 min. An examination of several solvents for post-derivatization extraction revealed improved relative response factors in comparison to those obtained without solvent extraction. The best solvents for the PFBoyl-FOH extraction, dichloromethane and tert-butyl methyl ether, were also compared to the no solvent extraction samples with standard response curves and PFBoyl-derivatized FOH in Bligh-Dyer extracted rat plasma. PMID:21094100

  3. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  4. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  6. ECUT: Energy Conversion and utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Generation of chemical intermediates by catalytic oxidative decarboxylation of dilute organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A rhodium-based catalyst was prepared and preliminary experiments were completed where the catalyst appeared to decarboxylate dilute acids at concentrations of 1 to 10 vol%. Electron spin resonance spectroscoy was used to characterize the catalyst as a first step leading toward modeling and optimization of rhodium catalysts. Also, a hybrid chemical/biological process for the production of hydrocarbons has been assessed. These types of catalysts could greatly increase energy efficiency of this process.

  7. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  8. Physicochemical Characterization of a Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Annalisa; Thorne, Natasha; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Xin; Shen, Min; D'Auria, Sabato; Auld, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we characterize an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PyAeADHII). We have previously found that PyAeADHII has no activity when standard ADH substrates are used but is active when α-tetralone is used as substrate. Here, to gain insights into enzyme function, we screened several chemical libraries for enzymatic modulators using an assay employing α-tetralone. The results indicate that PyAeADHII activity in the presence of α-tetralone was inhibited by compounds such as flunarizine. We also examined metal coordination of the enzyme in solution by performing metal substitution of the enzyme-bound zinc (Zn2+) with cobalt. The solution-based absorption spectra for cobalt substituted PyAeADHII supports substitution at the structural Zn2+ site. To gain structural insight, we obtained the crystal structure of both wild-type and cobalt-substituted PyAeADHII at 1.75 Å and 2.20 Å resolution, respectively. The X-ray data confirmed one metal ion per monomer present only at the structural site with otherwise close conservation to other ADH enzymes. We next determined the co-crystal structure of the NADPH-bound form of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution to help define the active site region of the enzyme and this data shows close structural conservation with horse ADH, despite the lack of a catalytic Zn2+ ion in PyAeADHII. Modeling of α-tetralone into the NADPH bound structure suggests an arginine as a possible catalytic residue. The data presented here can yield a better understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases lacking the catalytic zinc as well as the structural features inherent to thermostable enzymes. PMID:23755111

  9. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase. PMID:25640463

  10. Direct CIMS for the determination of mixtures of fatty alcohols from octanol to octadecanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligon, Axel Patrick; Gäb, Siegmar

    2005-07-01

    The possibility of using direct chemical-ionization mass spectrometry to determine fatty alcohols in technical mixtures was examined. CH4, i-C4H10, H2S, NH3 and (CH3)3-nNHn were examined as reactant gases. Methane, because its proton affinity is significantly lower than those of the alcohols, and isobutane lead to an overlapping pattern of fragment ions, which prevents evaluation of the spectra. H2S does not form such interfering fragment ions; it forms only the quasi-molecular ions [M - 17]+, which serve for the quantitative detection, and [M - 1]+ at low intensity. The detection limits of the alcohols in methanol are between 0.007 and 0.025%. NH3 and the amines (CH3)3-nNHn also generate no fragment ions. Instead, they form adduct ions of the form [ROH...Hn+1N(CH3)3-n]+, where n = 0-3. The catalytic action of the fatty alcohols in the formation of the dimers ((CH3)3-nNHn)2H+ does interfere here, however. The detection limits by NH3-CIMS of the alcohols in a mixture are between 0.01 and 0.02%.

  11. Oxo-rhenium catalyzed reductive coupling and deoxygenation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kasner, Gabrielle R; Boucher-Jacobs, Camille; Michael McClain, J; Nicholas, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Representative benzylic, allylic and α-keto alcohols are deoxygenated to alkanes and/or reductively coupled to alkane dimers by reaction with PPh3 catalyzed by (PPh3)2ReIO2 (1). The newly discovered catalytic reductive coupling reaction is a rare C-C bond-forming transformation of alcohols. PMID:27174412

  12. Catalytic properties of volcanic rocks in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Taran, Yu.A.; Novak, F.I.; Antoshchuk, I.A.; Bashkirov, A.N.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained from studying the catalytic properties of effusive rocks of various chemical compositions, extracted from lava flows of several Kamchatka volcanos, in the process of synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen, are presented. It was evident that samples of volcanic rock display catalytic properties in the process of synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ in which liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons and an insignificant amount of oxygen-containing compounds are formed as products of the reactions. At a synthesis temperature of 350/sup 0/C the catalytic activity of the samples is characterized by the conversion of CO at a level of 70 to 80%, and H/sub 2/ at 50 to 60%. The yield of oil, gasoline, and natural gas reached 40, 11, and 3 ml/m/sup 3/, respectively. The light synthetic products were presented based on saturated hydrocarbons of an aliphatic series with significant contents of olefins and insignificant quantities of alcohols and carbonyl compounds. The composition of gaseous products is characterized by significant unsaturation (approx. 33%) and a high content of butane-butylenic fractions (to approx. 55%). The data obtained showed that volcanic rocks were able to catalyze the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/. The sources of the catalytic properties of the rocks shown are evidently iron compounds, and the remaining ingredients of the rocks are able to fulfill the role of structural or chemical promoters influencing the properties of the catalysts and the composition of the reaction products formed. 2 tables. (DP)

  13. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  14. Doxasozin for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Kenna, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical evidence using prazosin indicates that a1-blockade may represent a new approach to treat alcohol dependence (AD). While most of the alcohol research on a1-blockade has been conducted testing prazosin, O’Neil and colleagues recently performed a set of preclinical experiments testing another a1-blocker, i.e. doxazosin that has a longer half-life that may enhance clinical utility. Doxazosin and prazosin share the same chemical structure, in which the central element is a piperazine ring. O’Neil et al.’s main results are that doxazosin significantly reduced alcohol intake without affecting locomotor activity. As such, O’Neil and colleagues provide the first preclinical evidence of the possible role of doxazosin in AD. Additional translational research is needed to further test this hypothesis. PMID:23278505

  15. Chemical speciation of PM emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particulate filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) retrofits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subhasis; Verma, Vishal; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    Four heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) in six retrofitted configurations (CRT ®, V-SCRT ®, Z-SCRT ®, Horizon, DPX and CCRT ®) and a baseline vehicle operating without after--treatment were tested under cruise (50 mph), transient UDDS and idle driving modes. As a continuation of the work by Biswas et al. [Biswas, S., Hu, S., Verma, V., Herner, J., Robertson, W.J., Ayala, A., Sioutas, C., 2008. Physical properties of particulate matter (PM) from late model heavy-duty diesel vehicles operating with advanced emission control technologies. Atmospheric Environment 42, 5622-5634.] on particle physical parameters, this paper focuses on PM chemical characteristics (Total carbon [TC], Elemental carbon [EC], Organic Carbon [OC], ions and water-soluble organic carbon [WSOC]) for cruise and UDDS cycles only. Size-resolved PM collected by MOUDI-Nano-MOUDI was analyzed for TC, EC and OC and ions (such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium and phosphate), while Teflon coated glass fiber filters from a high volume sampler were extracted to determine WSOC. The introduction of retrofits reduced PM mass emissions over 90% in cruise and 95% in UDDS. Similarly, significant reductions in the emission of major chemical constituents (TC, OC and EC) were achieved. Sulfate dominated PM composition in vehicle configurations (V-SCRT ®-UDDS, Z-SCRT ®-Cruise, CRT ® and DPX) with considerable nucleation mode and TC was predominant for configurations with less (Z-SCRT ®-UDDS) or insignificant (CCRT ®, Horizon) nucleation. The transient operation increases EC emissions, consistent with its higher accumulation PM mode content. In general, solubility of organic carbon is higher (average ˜5 times) for retrofitted vehicles than the baseline vehicle. The retrofitted vehicles with catalyzed filters (DPX, CCRT ®) had decreased OC solubility (WSOC/OC: 8-25%) unlike those with uncatalyzed filters (SCRT ®s, Horizon; WSOC/OC ˜ 60-100%). Ammonium was present predominantly in the

  16. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 14635 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  17. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 17728 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  18. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  19. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  20. Fine-tuning of catalytic tin nanoparticles by the reverse micelle method for direct deposition of silicon nanowires by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour technique.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard E J; Ng, Yan-Jing; Fawcett, Derek

    2010-12-15

    The reverse micelle method was used for the reduction of a tin (Sn) salt solution to produce metallic Sn nanoparticles ranging from 85 nm to 140 nm in diameter. The reverse micellar system used in this process was hexane-butanol-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The diameters of the Sn nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of the aqueous Sn salt solution. Thus, the size of the Sn nanoparticles can easily be controlled, enabling a simple, reproducible mechanism for the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Both the Sn nanoparticles and silicon nanowires were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Further characterisations of the SiNW's were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to investigate particle size distributions. This procedure demonstrates an economical route for manufacturing reproducible silicon nanowires using fine-tuned Sn nanoparticles for possible solar cell applications. PMID:20887996

  1. Chemical-physical properties of spinel CoMn2O4 nano-powders and catalytic activity in the 2-propanol and toluene combustion: Effect of the preparation method.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Salari, Dariush; Niaei, Aligholi; Deganello, Francesca; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Hojati, Pejman

    2011-01-01

    Spinel-type CoMn(2)O(4)nano-powders are prepared using sol-gel auto combustion (SGC) and co-precipitation (CP) methods and their catalytic activities are evaluated in combustion of 2-propanol and toluene. The chemical-physical properties of the oxides are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N(2)-adsorption-desorption, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After calcination at 700°C, CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC shows higher amounts of the normal-type spinel phase and is more crystalline than CoMn(2)O(4)-CP. Higher calcination temperatures (850°C) do not affect very much the weight percentage of the normal-type spinel phase; although the crystal size slightly increased. The TPR analysis evidences a large number of Mn(3+) cations in CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC compared to CoMn(2)O(4)-CP. This difference, together with the higher surface area, could justify the higher activity of CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC in both the investigated reactions. PMID:21308600

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. Role of chemical composition in the enhanced catalytic activity of Pt-based alloyed ultrathin nanowires for the hydrogen oxidation reaction under alkaline conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Zhou, Yuchen; Yue, Shiyu; Wang, Lei; Su, Dong; Tong, Xiao; Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2016-05-19

    With the increased interest in the development of hydrogen fuel cells as a plausible alternative to internal combustion engines, recent work has focused on creating alkaline fuel cells (AFC), which employ an alkaline environment. Working in alkaline as opposed to acidic media yields a number of tangible benefits, including (i) the ability to use cheaper and plentiful precious-metal-free catalysts, due to their increased stability, (ii) a reduction in the amount of degradation and corrosion of Pt-based catalysts, and (iii) a longer operational lifetime for the overall fuel cell configuration. However, in the absence of Pt, no catalyst has achieved activitiesmore » similar to those of Pt. Herein, we have synthesized a number of crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) (M = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, Au) in order to replace a portion of the costly Pt metal without compromising on activity while simultaneously adding in metals known to exhibit favorable synergistic ligand and strain effects with respect to the host lattice. In fact, our experiments confirm theoretical insights about a clear and correlative dependence between measured activity and chemical composition. We have conclusively demonstrated that our as-synthesized alloy NW catalysts yield improved hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activities as compared with a commercial Pt standard as well as with our as-synthesized Pt NWs. The Pt7Ru3 NW system, in particular, quantitatively achieved an exchange current density of 0.493 mA/cm2, which is higher than the corresponding data for Pt NWs alone. In addition, the HOR activities follow the same expected trend as their calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) values, thereby confirming the critical importance and correlation of HBE with the observed activities.« less

  19. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  20. Catalytic ceramic filters for flue gas cleaning. 1: Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Saracco, G.; Montanaro, L.

    1995-04-01

    This paper deals with the preparation and the characterization of ceramic porous filters, whose, pores were deposited with a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer via the so-called ``urea method``, in order to increase their specific surface area. Once activated with a suitable catalytic principle, these filters can find a potential application in flue gas cleaning according to a combined action: mechanical particulate removal + catalytic abatement of chemical pollutants (nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, etc.). Both the obtained filters and the bulk powder were characterized from either a structural (BET surface area measurement, Hg porosimetry, differential thermal analysis-thermal gravimetry analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, gas permeation) or a catalytic viewpoint. In this last context, isopropyl alcohol dehydration was chosen as a model reaction since it is directly catalyzed by {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A reaction mechanism is proposed for the test reaction, based on the existence of two types of active sites (A and B). On A-sites isopropyl alcohol gives an intermediate adsorbate and decomposes provided vicinal B-sites are available for water adsorption. A kinetic rate expression is worked out on the basis of experimental runs performed on a batch-operated differential reactor. The urea method is demonstrated to be a reliable tool to deposit a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer all over the pore walls of the filter, markedly increasing its specific surface area. Drawbacks of the procedure employed are through the occurrence of pore blocking after a few deposition cycles and the occasional presence of cracks in the deposited layer.

  1. Antisocial personality disorder, alcohol, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Moeller, F G; Dougherty, D M

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies and laboratory research consistently link alcohol use with aggression. Not all people, however, exhibit increased aggression under the influence of alcohol. Recent research suggests that people with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be more prone to alcohol-related aggression than people without ASPD. As a group, people with ASPD have higher rates of alcohol dependence and more alcohol-related problems than people without ASPD. Likewise, in laboratory studies, people with ASPD show greater increases in aggressive behavior after consuming alcohol than people without ASPD. The association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may result from biological factors, such as ASPD-related impairments in the functions of certain brain chemicals (e.g., serotonin) or in the activities of higher reasoning, or "executive," brain regions. Alternatively, the association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may stem from some as yet undetermined factor(s) that increase the risk for aggression in general. PMID:11496966

  2. Catalytic nanomotors: fabrication, mechanism, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-03-01

    Catalytic nanomotors are nano-to-micrometer-sized actuators that carry an on-board catalyst and convert local chemical fuel in solution into mechanical work. The location of this catalyst as well as the geometry of the structure dictate the swimming behaviors exhibited. The nanomotors can occur naturally in organic molecules, combine natural and artificial parts to form hybrid nanomotors or be purely artificial. Fabrication techniques consist of template directed electroplating, lithography, physical vapor deposition, and other advanced growth methods. Various physical and chemical propulsion mechanisms have been proposed to explain the motion behaviors including diffusiophoresis, bubble propulsion, interfacial tension gradients, and self-electrophoresis. The control and manipulation based upon external fields, catalytic alloys, and motion control through thermal modulation are discussed as well. Catalytic nanomotors represent an exciting technological challenge with the end goal being practical functional nanomachines that can perform a variety of tasks at the nanoscale.

  3. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  4. Alcoholism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that interferes with physical or mental health, and social, family or job responsibilities. This addiction can lead to liver, circulatory and neurological problems. Pregnant women who drink alcohol in any amount ...

  5. Catalytic nanomotors: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-06-01

    The fabrication of integrated nanomachinary systems can enable break-through applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, bioengineering, and drug delivery or disease treatment. Naturally occurring nanomotors are biological motor proteins powered by catalytic reactions, which convert the chemical energy from the environment into mechanical energy directly. It has been demonstrated recently that using a simple catalytic reaction and an asymmetric bimetallic nanorod, one can produce catalytic nanomotors that mimic the autonomous motions of bionanomotors. Yet the construction of artificial nanomachines remains a major contemporary challenge due to the lack of a flexible fabrication technique that can design the desired dynamic components. We use a design technique called dynamic shadowing growth that allows for the fabrication of a wide range of various geometries and the asymmetric placement of the catalyst is easily accomplished as well which is necessary for directed propulsion. Programming nanomotor behavior is possible through geometrically-focused design and by incorporating different materials into the nanomotor structure is a simple process as well. A propulsion mechanism based upon bubble ejection from the catalyst surface is introduced to explain the driving force, and the comparison of this driving mechanism with the self-electrophoresis mechanism is also studied. We have also successfully incorporated multiple parts to form complex nanomotor assemblies which exhibit motions not observed from individual parts by using magnetic interactions.

  6. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  7. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  8. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  9. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  10. Iridium-Catalyzed Selective Isomerization of Primary Allylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2016-06-21

    This Account presents the development of the iridium-catalyzed isomerization of primary allylic alcohols in our laboratory over the past 8 years. Our initial interest was driven by the long-standing challenge associated with the development of a general catalyst even for the nonasymmetric version of this seemingly simple chemical transformation. The added value of the aldehyde products and the possibility to rapidly generate molecular complexity from readily accessible allylic alcohols upon a redox-economical isomerization reaction were additional sources of motivation. Certainly influenced by the success story of the related isomerization of allylic amines, most catalysts developed for the selective isomerization of allylic alcohols were focused on rhodium as a transition metal of choice. Our approach has been based on the commonly accepted precept that hydrogenation and isomerization are often competing processes, with the latter being usually suppressed in favor of the former. The cationic iridium complexes [(Cy3P)(pyridine)Ir(cod)]X developed by Crabtree (X = PF6) and Pfaltz (X = BArF) are usually considered as the most versatile catalysts for the hydrogenation of allylic alcohols. Using molecular hydrogen to generate controlled amounts of the active form of these complexes but performing the reaction in the absence of molecular hydrogen enabled deviation from the typical hydrogenation manifold and favored exclusively the isomerization of allylic alcohols into aldehydes. Isotopic labeling and crossover experiments revealed the intermolecular nature of the process. Systematic variation of the ligand on the iridium center allowed us to identify the structural features beneficial for catalytic activity. Subsequently, three generations of chiral catalysts have been investigated and enabled us to reach excellent levels of enantioselectivity for a wide range of 3,3-disubstituted aryl/alkyl and alkyl/alkyl primary allylic alcohols leading to β-chiral aldehydes. The

  11. Preparation, characterization and catalytic activity of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable catalyst for selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and reduction of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba; Karimi, Hirbod

    2016-03-01

    The CoFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) performance was studied in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol (BzOH) to benzaldehyde (BzH) with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant under solvent-free conditions. The influences of reaction conditions like the amount of catalyst, the molar ratio of H2O2:BzOH, reaction temperature and times on the oxidation of BzOH by using CoFe2O4 NPs were investigated in details. Under optimum conditions, excellent result, >99% conversation of BzOH to BzH as the only product, was obtained. The nanocatalyst was also used for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), Congo red (CR), Methylene blue (MB) in water at room temperature. The magnetic properties of the catalyst provided a convenient and easy route for the separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture by an external bar magnet. No obvious loss of activity was observed when the spent catalyst reused in three consecutive runs. PMID:26674244

  12. Alcohol Abuse: Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... they quit drinking. What are the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome? Symptoms can be mild or severe, and may include: Shakiness Sweats Anxiety Irritability Fatigue Depression Headaches Insomnia Nightmares Decreased appetite More severe withdrawal symptoms ...

  13. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  14. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Chiral Allylic Esters

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jeffrey S.; Kirsch, Stefan F.; Overman, Larry E.

    2010-01-01

    A broadly useful catalytic enantioselective synthesis of branched allylic esters from prochiral (Z)-2-alkene-1-ols has been developed. The starting allylic alcohol is converted to its trichloroacetimidate intermediate by reaction with trichloroacetonitrile, either in situ or in a separate step, and this intermediate undergoes clean enantioselective SN2′ substitution with a variety of carboxylic acids in the presence of the palladium(II) catalyst (Rp,S)-di-μ -acetatobis[(η5-2-(2'-(4'-methylethyl)oxazolinyl)cyclopentadienyl,1-C,3'-N)(η4-tetraphenylcyclobutadiene)cobalt]dipalladium, (Rp,S)-[COP-OAc]2 or its enantiomer. The scope and limitations of this useful catalytic asymmetric allylic esterification are defined. PMID:15740118

  15. Catalytic bioscavengers in nerve agent poisoning: A promising approach?

    PubMed

    Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    The repeated use of the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria in 2013 emphasizes the continuing threat by chemical warfare agents. Multiple studies demonstrated a limited efficacy of standard atropine-oxime treatment in nerve agent poisoning and called for the development of alternative and more effective treatment strategies. A novel approach is the use of stoichiometric or catalytic bioscavengers for detoxification of nerve agents in the systemic circulation prior to distribution into target tissues. Recent progress in the design of enzyme mutants with reversed stereo selectivity resulting in improved catalytic activity and their use in in vivo studies supports the concept of catalytic bioscavengers. Yet, further research is necessary to improve the catalytic activity, substrate spectrum and in vivo biological stability of enzyme mutants. The pros and cons of catalytic bioscavengers will be discussed in detail and future requirements for the development of catalytic bioscavengers will be proposed. PMID:26200600

  16. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  17. Catalytic conversion of biomass to monofunctional hydrocarbons and targeted liquid-fuel classes.

    PubMed

    Kunkes, Edward L; Simonetti, Dante A; West, Ryan M; Serrano-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Gärtner, Christian A; Dumesic, James A

    2008-10-17

    It is imperative to develop more efficient processes for conversion of biomass to liquid fuels, such that the cost of these fuels would be competitive with the cost of fuels derived from petroleum. We report a catalytic approach for the conversion of carbohydrates to specific classes of hydrocarbons for use as liquid transportation fuels, based on the integration of several flow reactors operated in a cascade mode, where the effluent from the one reactor is simply fed to the next reactor. This approach can be tuned for production of branched hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds in gasoline, or longer-chain, less highly branched hydrocarbons in diesel and jet fuels. The liquid organic effluent from the first flow reactor contains monofunctional compounds, such as alcohols, ketones, carboxylic acids, and heterocycles, that can also be used to provide reactive intermediates for fine chemicals and polymers markets. PMID:18801970

  18. Alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Manasco, Anton; Chang, Shannon; Larriviere, Joseph; Hamm, L Lee; Glass, Marcia

    2012-11-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common clinical condition that has a variety of complications and morbidities. The manifestations can range from mild agitation to withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. The treatments for alcohol withdrawal include benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, beta-blockers and antihypertensives. Although benzodiazepines are presently a first-line therapy, there is controversy regarding the efficacies of these medications compared with others. Treatment protocols often involve one of two contrasting approaches: symptom-triggered versus fixed-schedule dosing of benzodiazepines. We describe these protocols in our review and examine the data supporting symptom-triggered dosing as the preferred method for most patients in withdrawal.The Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol scoring system for alcohol withdrawal streamlines care, optimizes patient management, and is the best scale available for withdrawal assessment. Quality improvement implications for inpatient management of alcohol withdrawal include increasing training for signs of withdrawal and symptom recognition, adding new hospital protocols to employee curricula, and ensuring manageable patient-to-physician and patient-to-nurse ratios. PMID:23128805

  19. Influence of Preparation Methods of Nano Au/MCM-41 Catalysts for Vapor Phase Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Vishwanathan, Venkataraman; Chary, V R

    2015-12-01

    The Au/MCM-41 nano catalysts were synthesized from four different methods, viz., homogeneous deposition-precipitation, micro-emulsion, impregnation and polyol and their catalytic activities were tested for the vapor phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, BET surface area, PSD, CO-chemisorption and XPS techniques. The effect of preparation methods, nature of the metal, support and the metal-support interaction in Au/MCM-41 catalysts were studied for the title reaction. The Au/MCM-41 catalysts synthesized from HDP method has shown higher and better catalytic activity as compared to the catalysts prepared by other methods. PMID:26682438

  20. Vanadium-substituted heteropolyacids immobilized on amine- functionalized mesoporous MCM-41: A recyclable catalyst for selective oxidation of alcohols with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xinbo; Wang, Danjun; Li, Kebin; Zhen, Yanzhong; Hu, Huaiming; Xue, Ganglin

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acids are immobilized on amine- functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 and the hybrid catalyst is proved to be a highly efficient solid catalyst for the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, featured by the high conversion and selectivity, easy recovery, and quite steady reuse. - Highlights: • Vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acid immobilized on amine-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 are prepared. • HPAs were fixed on the inner surface of mesoporous MCM-41 by chemical bonding to aminosilane groups. • The hybrid catalyst showed much higher catalytic activity than the pure HPAs. • The hybrid catalyst is a highly efficient recyclable solid catalyst for the selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols. - Abstract: New hybrid materials of vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acids (VHPW) immobilized on amine-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 (VHPW/MCM-41/NH{sub 2}) are prepared and characterized by FT-IR, XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption, elemental analysis, SEM and TEM for their structural integrity and physicochemical properties. It is found that the structure of the heteropolyacids is retained upon immobilization over mesoporous materials. The catalytic activities of these hybrid materials are tested in the selective oxidation of alcohols to the carbonyl products with 30% aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidant in toluene. The catalytic activities of different number of vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acid are investigated, and among the catalysts, H{sub 5}[PV{sub 2}W{sub 10}O{sub 40}] immobilized on amine-functionalized MCM-41 exhibits the highest activity with 97% conversion and 99% selectivity in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. The hybrid catalyst is proved to be a highly efficient recyclable solid catalyst for the selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  1. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells. PMID:24749422

  2. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  3. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity. PMID:26808460

  4. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  5. Naltrexone for Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Naltrexone for Alcoholism Naltrexone for Alcoholism Is alcoholism a disease? Yes. Most experts agree that alcoholism is a disease, just as high blood pressure, diabetes and ...

  6. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such ... alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, ...

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, Box... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and....1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH. (b) The ingredient meets...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  10. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  11. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  12. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  13. Self-assembled dicopper(II) diethanolaminate cores for mild aerobic and peroxidative oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Figiel, Paweł J; Kirillov, Alexander M; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Lasri, Jamal; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2010-11-01

    The new dicopper(ii) complexes [Cu(2)(μ-Hmdea)(2)(NCS)(2)] (1) and [Cu(2)(μ-Hedea)(2)(N(3))(2)]·(H(2)O)(0.25) (2) with the {Cu(2)(μ-O)(2)} diethanolaminate cores have been easily generated by aqueous medium self-assembly reactions of copper(ii) nitrate with N-methyl- or N-ethyldiethanolamine (H(2)mdea or H(2)edea, respectively), in the presence of sodium thiocyanate (for 1) or sodium azide (for 2) as ancillary ligands sources. They have been isolated as air-stable crystalline solids and fully characterized by IR and UV-vis spectroscopies, ESI-MS(+), elemental and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The latter complex also features a fourfold linkage of neighbouring dimeric units via strong intermolecular O-HO hydrogen bonds, giving rise to the formation of tetracopper aggregates. The catalytic activity of compounds 1 and 2 has been studied for the mild (50-80 °C) and selective oxidations of alcohols, namely for (i) the aerobic aqueous medium oxidation of benzyl alcohols to benzaldehydes, mediated by TEMPO radical, and for (ii) the solvent-free oxidation of secondary alcohols to ketones by t-BuOOH under microwave (MW) irradiation. Complex 2 shows the highest efficiency in both oxidation systems, resulting in up to 99% molar yields (based on the alcohol substrate) of products. In addition, remarkably high values of TON (1020) and TOF (4080 h(-1)) have been achieved in the MW-assisted peroxidative oxidation of 1-phenylethanol to acetophenone (model reaction). Attractive green features of these catalytic systems include the operation in aqueous or solvent-free reaction medium, under mild conditions and with high yields and selectivities, using Cu catalyst precursors that are readily available by self-assembly in water of simple chemicals. PMID:20844801

  14. Investigation of syngas interactions in alcohol synthesis catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Akundi, M.A.

    1998-04-15

    The primary objectives of the project are to (a) synthesize, by controlled sequential and co-impregnation techniques, three distinct composition metal clusters (consisting of Cu-Co-Cr and Cu-Fe-Zn): rich in copper (Methanol selective), rich in ferromagnetic metal (Co or Fe-Hydrocarbon selective) and intermediate range (mixed alcohol catalysts); (b) investigate the changes in the magnetic character of the systems due to interaction with CO, through Zero-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ZFNMR) study of cobalt and Magnetic character (saturation magnetization and coercive field) analysis of the composite catalyst of Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM); (c) examine the changes in syngas adsorption character of the catalyst as the composition changes, by FTIR Spectroscopic analysis of CO stretching frequencies; (d) determine the nature and size of these intermetallic clusters by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); and (e) perform catalytic runs on selected samples and analyze the correlations between the physical and chemical characteristics. The catalysts chosen have a greater promise for industrial application than the Rh and Mo based catalysts. Several groups preparing catalysts by synthetic routes have reported divergent results for activity and selectivity. Generally the research has followed an empirical path and less effort is devoted to analyze the mechanisms and the scientific basis. The primary intent of this study is to analyze the nature of the intermetallic and gas-metal interactions and examine the correlations to catalytic properties.

  15. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67. PMID:26743849

  16. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  17. Efficient conversion of furfuryl alcohol into alkyl levulinates catalyzed by an organic-inorganic hybrid solid acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehui; Dong, Kun; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2011-01-17

    A clean, facile, and environment-friendly catalytic method has been developed for the conversion of furfuryl alcohol into alkyl levulinates making use of the novel solid catalyst methylimidazolebutylsulfate phosphotungstate ([MIMBS]₃PW₁₂O₄₀). The solid catalyst is an organic-inorganic hybrid material, which consists of an organic cation and an inorganic anion. A study for optimizing the reaction conditions such as the reaction time, the temperature and the catalyst loading has been performed. Under optimal conditions, a high n-butyl levulinate yield of up to 93 % is obtained. Furthermore, the kinetics of the reaction pathways and the mechanism for the alcoholysis of furfuryl alcohol are discussed. This method is environmentally benign and economical for the conversion of biomass-based derivatives into fine chemicals. PMID:21226220

  18. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The API publication 4312 reports a detailed study carried out by Battelle on the energy balances for five alcohol-fuel-producing technologies. The results indicate that processes for producing ethanol from corn are net consumers of energy while ethanol from sugar cane and methanol from wood are net energy producers.

  19. Template syntheses of copper(II) complexes from arylhydrazones of malononitrile and their catalytic activity towards alcohol oxidations and the nitroaldol reaction: hydrogen bond-assisted ligand liberation and E/Z isomerisation.

    PubMed

    Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Mizar, Archana; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Mac Leod, Tatiana C O; Mahmudov, Kamran T; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2013-01-01

    A one-pot template condensation of 2-(2-(dicyanomethylene)hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonic acid (H(2)L(1), 1) or 2-(2-(dicyanomethylene)hydrazinyl)benzoic acid (H(2)L(2), 2) with methanol (a), ethylenediamine (b), ethanol (c) or water (d) on copper(II), led to a variety of metal complexes, that is, mononuclear [Cu(H(2)O)(2)(κO(1),κN(2)L(1a)] (3) and [Cu(H(2)O)(κO(1),κN(3)L(1b))] (4), tetranuclear [Cu(4)(1κO(1),κN(2):2κO(1)L(2a))(3)-(1κO(1), κN(2):2κO(2)L(2a))] (5), [Cu(2)(H(2)O)(1κO(1), κN(2):2κO(1)L(2c))-(1κO(1),1κN(2):2κO(1),2 κN(1)- L(2c))](2) (6) and [Cu(2)(H(2)O)(2)(κO(1),κN(2)- L(1dd))-(1κO(1),κN(2):2κO(1)L(1dd))(μ-H(2)O)](2·) 2H(2)O (7·2H(2)O), as well as polymer- ic [Cu(H(2)O)(κO(1),1κN(2):2κN(1)L(1c))](n) (8) and [Cu(NH(2)C(2)H(5))(κO(1),1κN(2):2κN(1)L(2a))](n) (9). The ligands 2-SO(3)H-C(6)H(4)-(NH)N=C{(CN)[C(NH(2))-(=NCH(2)CH(2)NH(2))]} (H(2)L(1b), 10), 2-CO(2)H-C(6)H(4)-(NH)N={C(CN)[C(OCH(3))-(=NH)]} (H(2)L(2a), 11) and 2-SO(3)H-C(6)H(4)-(NH)N=C{C(=O)-(NH(2))}(2) (H(2)L(1dd), 12) were easily liberated upon respective treatment of 4, 5 and 7 with HCl, whereas the formation of cyclic zwitterionic amidine 2-(SO(3)(−))-C(6)H(4)-N=NC(-C=(NH(+))CH(2)CH(2)NH)(=CNHCH(2)CH(2)NH) (13) was observed when 1 was treated with ethylenediamine. The hydrogen bond-induced E/Z isomerization of the (HL(1d))(−) ligand occurs upon conversion of [{Na(H(2)O)(2)(μ-H(2)O)(2)}(HL(1d))](n) (14) to [Cu(H(2)O)(6)][HL(1d)](2)·2H(2)O (15) and [{CuNa(H(2)O)-(κN(1),1κO(2):2κO(1)L(1d))(2)}K(0.5)(μ-O)(2)]n·H(2)O (16). The synthesized complexes 3–9 are catalyst precursors for both the selective oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols (to the corresponding carbonyl compounds) and the following diastereoselective nitroaldol (Henry) reaction, with typical yields of 80–99%. PMID:23180736

  20. Fluorous biphasic catalysis: synthesis and characterization of copper(I) and copper(II) fluoroponytailed 1,4,7-Rf-TACN and 2,2'-Rf-bipyridine complexes--their catalytic activity in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, olefins, and alcohols, including mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Contel, María; Izuel, Cristina; Laguna, Mariano; Villuendas, Pedro R; Alonso, Pablo J; Fish, Richard H

    2003-09-01

    In this contribution on fluorous biphasic catalysis (FBC), we present the synthesis and characterization of new copper complexes, and define their role, as precatalysts, in the FBC oxidation of hydrocarbons, olefins, and alcohols. Thus the previously reported, but poorly characterized, fluoroponytailed ligand, 2,2'-R(f)-bipyridine (R(f)=-(CH(2))(3)C(8)F(17)) 2, as well as the new Cu(II) fluoroponytailed carboxylate synthon complex [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)] 3, will be addressed. Moreover, the reaction of previously described ligands, 1,4,7-R(f)-TACN 1, or 2,2'-R(f)-bipyridine 2 with 3 afforded new perfluoroheptane-soluble Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)(R(f)-tacn)] 4 and [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)(R(f)-bpy)] 5, respectively. The reaction of 1 with [Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)]PF(6) or [CuCl] provided new Cu(I) complexes, which could be isolated and fully characterized as [Cu(R(f)-tacn)X']X, in which X=PF(6) (6) or X'=Cl (7) (soluble in perfluoroheptane). The Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes, 4-7, were characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and IR, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis, and EPR spectroscopies; complex 7 was also characterized by (1)H and (19)F[(1)H] NMR spectroscopy. Complexes 4 and 5, as well as 6 and 7 generated in situ, were evaluated as precatalysts for hydrocarbon and olefin functionalization. The oxidation reactions of these substrates in the presence of the necessary oxidants, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and oxygen gas, proceeded under FBC conditions for 5, 7, and Cu(I) salts with 2. However, the complexes with ligand 2 could not be recycled, owing to significant ligand dissociation. The Cu(II) complex 4, with the ligand 1, provide the oxidation of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol to 4-nitrobenzaldehyde under single-phase FBC conditions at 90 degrees C with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy) and O(2); the precatalyst 4, can be utilized for an additional four catalytic cycles without loss of activity. Plausible mechanisms

  1. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  2. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  3. Microreactors for chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, S H

    1999-06-01

    The advances of the past few years in microreactors have demonstrated that the miniaturization of chemistry has significant advantages with respect to cost, safety, throughput, kinetics and scale-up. The use of chemical microreactors for catalytic oxidations, heterocyclic syntheses and photochemical reactions has illustrated the utility and benefits for both chemical discovery and chemical development applications. PMID:10359719

  4. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  5. Alcohol-Related Brain Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Erdozain, Amaia M.; Morentin, Benito; Bedford, Lynn; King, Emma; Tooth, David; Brewer, Charlotte; Wayne, Declan; Johnson, Laura; Gerdes, Henry K.; Wigmore, Peter; Callado, Luis F.; Carter, Wayne G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol intoxications evoke cumulative damage to tissues and organs. We examined prefrontal cortex (Brodmann’s area (BA) 9) from 20 human alcoholics and 20 age, gender, and postmortem delay matched control subjects. H & E staining and light microscopy of prefrontal cortex tissue revealed a reduction in the levels of cytoskeleton surrounding the nuclei of cortical and subcortical neurons, and a disruption of subcortical neuron patterning in alcoholic subjects. BA 9 tissue homogenisation and one dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) proteomics of cytosolic proteins identified dramatic reductions in the protein levels of spectrin β II, and α- and β-tubulins in alcoholics, and these were validated and quantitated by Western blotting. We detected a significant increase in α-tubulin acetylation in alcoholics, a non-significant increase in isoaspartate protein damage, but a significant increase in protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase protein levels, the enzyme that triggers isoaspartate damage repair in vivo. There was also a significant reduction in proteasome activity in alcoholics. One dimensional PAGE of membrane-enriched fractions detected a reduction in β-spectrin protein levels, and a significant increase in transmembranous α3 (catalytic) subunit of the Na+,K+-ATPase in alcoholic subjects. However, control subjects retained stable oligomeric forms of α-subunit that were diminished in alcoholics. In alcoholics, significant loss of cytosolic α- and β-tubulins were also seen in caudate nucleus, hippocampus and cerebellum, but to different levels, indicative of brain regional susceptibility to alcohol-related damage. Collectively, these protein changes provide a molecular basis for some of the neuronal and behavioural abnormalities attributed to alcoholics. PMID:24699688

  6. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  7. Materials for high-temperature catalytic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Cox, J.L.; Parks, W.P. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Catalytic combustion systems for gas turbines must operate at temperatures of at least 1200{degrees}C. Support structure material must retain its integrity under prolonged exposure to high temperature, thermal cycling, and severe chemical conditions; and the material must be capable of being formed into thin sections. The performance requirements of a high-temperature stable ceramic support must be balanced with reasonable costs of preparation. An increasing number of materials have potential for successful exposure to high-temperature conditions. Two major problems of high-temperature catalyst systems are loss of surface area and catalytic activity. Incorporation of the catalytic component into the host lattice can circumvent this problem. Use of supporting active metal oxides on carrier materials with high thermal resistance appears to be a very promising way to make stable catalysts. The challenge will be to provide sufficient low-temperature activity and high-temperature stability; therefore, there exists a need to engineer catalytic materials for high-temperature combustion environments. Developments in catalytic materials and preparation procedures are reviewed. Future areas of research are discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10485 - Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10485 Reaction products of... significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of alcohols,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10485 - Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10485 Reaction products of... significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction products of alcohols,...

  10. Highly Dispersed Gold Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Vapor Phase Aerobic Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Sreedhar, Bojja; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 are prepared by homogenous deposition-precipitation method (HDP) using urea as the precipitating agent. The structural features of the synthesized catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption (BET), pore size distribution (PSD), CO chemisorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity and stability of the Au/SBA-15 catalysts are investigated during the vapor phase aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The BJH pore size distribution results of SBA-15 support and Au/SBA-15 catalysts reveals that the formation of mesoporous structure in all the samples. TEM results suggest that Au nanoparticles are highly dispersed over SBA-15 and long range order of hexagonal mesopores of SBA-15 is well retained even after the deposition of Au metallic nanoparticles. XPS study reveals the formation of Au (0) after chemical reduction by NaBH4. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are well correlated with the TOF values of the reaction. Au/SBA-1 5 catalysts are found to show higher activity compare to Au/TiO2 and Au/MgO catalysts during the vapor phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The catalytic functionality are well substantiated with particle size measured from TEM. The crystallite size of Au in both fresh and spent catalysts were measured from X-ray diffraction. PMID:26353720

  11. Theoretical perspective of alcohol decomposition and synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Yixiong; White, Michael G.

    2013-06-01

    Advances in theoretical methods, in particular density functional theory (DFT), make it possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare with experiment in a meaningful way. The theoretical studies also describe chemical reaction networks and understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Such understanding allows the theoretical optimization for better catalysts. In the current report we discussed the theoretical studies in the past few years on decomposition and synthesis of methanol and ethanol on various catalyst surfaces. The knowledge of reactions including the intermediates and transition states along different reaction pathways together with kinetic modeling was demonstrated. The theoretical studies on alcohol synthesis help gain better understanding of the complex kinetics and the roles that each component of a catalyst plays. In general, moving from mono-functional catalysts to multi-functional catalysts by increasing the complexity offers new opportunities to tune the behavior of a catalyst. A good multi-functional catalyst is not necessary to compromise the binding strong enough to adsorb and dissociate reactants and weak enough to allow the formation of intermediates and removal of products; instead, it may take advantage of each component, which catalyzes different elementary steps depending on its unique activity. The synergy between the different components can enable the multi-functional catalyst a novel activity in catalysis. This is of great importance for rational design of better catalysts for alcohol renewal synthesis and efficient use.

  12. Theoretical perspective of alcohol decomposition and synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Yixiong; White, Michael G.

    2013-06-01

    Advances in theoretical methods, in particular density functional theory (DFT), make it possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare with experiment in a meaningful way. The theoretical studies also describe chemical reaction networks and understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Such understanding allows the theoretical optimization for better catalysts.In the current report we discussed the theoretical studies in the past few years on decomposition and synthesis of methanol and ethanol on various catalyst surfaces. The knowledge of reactions including the intermediates and transition states along different reaction pathways together with kinetic modeling was demonstrated. The theoretical studies on alcohol synthesis help gain better understanding of the complex kinetics and the roles that each component of a catalyst plays. In general, moving from mono-functional catalysts to multi-functional catalysts by increasing the complexity offers new opportunities to tune the behavior of a catalyst. A good multi-functional catalyst is not necessary to compromise the binding strong enough to adsorb and dissociate reactants and weak enough to allow the formation of intermediates and removal of products; instead, it may take advantage of each component, which catalyzes different elementary steps depending on its unique activity. The synergy between the different components can enable the multi-functional catalyst a novel activity in catalysis. This is of great importance for rational design of better catalysts for alcohol renewal synthesis and efficient use.

  13. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  14. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  15. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  16. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  17. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  18. Determining Catalytic Cycles in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Joachim; Boxe, Christopher; Grenfell, Lee; Lehmann, Ralph; Patzer, Beate; Rauer, Heike; Yung, Yuk

    2010-05-01

    Chemical trace species play an important role in the chemical composition of terrestrial planetary atmospheres. These species can operate in catalytic cycles, which critically affect the concentrations of major chemical constituents and hence the whole structure of the atmosphere itself. The determination of chemical pathways in such complex systems is generally a challenging task, so effective methods are desirable for the investigation of such problems. In order to address this question to the chemical catalytic cycles in the atmosphere of Mars, we use a new analysis tool (Pathway Analysis Program - PAP), which was originally developed and applied to automatically identify and quantify ozone and methane cycles in Earth's stratosphere. The implemented algorithm determines and quantifies all significant pathways by treating each species one after the other as a branching point. Pathways are formed by connecting shorter pathways producing those branching point species with pathways consuming them. Reaction rates are assigned to the pathways proportional to the branching probabilities. In order to identify and analyze the dominant chemical processes in the Martian atmosphere, we apply PAP to the CalTech photochemical column model. The methodology of the algorithm is presented and first results of our analysis are discussed in view of the relevant chemical trace species.

  19. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  20. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  1. Actinide-Catalyzed Intermolecular Addition of Alcohols to Carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Batrice, Rami J; Kefalidis, Christos E; Maron, Laurent; Eisen, Moris S

    2016-02-24

    The unprecedented actinide-catalyzed addition of alcohols to carbodiimides is presented. This represents a rare example of thorium-catalyzed transformations of an alcoholic substrate and the first example of uranium complexes showing catalytic reactivity with alcohols. Using the uranium and thorium amides U[N(SiMe3)2]3 and [(Me3Si)2N]2An[κ(2)-(N,C)-CH2Si(CH3)2N(SiMe3)] (An = Th or U), alcohol additions to unsaturated carbon-nitrogen bonds are achieved in short reaction times with excellent selectivities and high to excellent yields. Computational studies, supported by experimental thermodynamic data, suggest plausible models of the profile of the reaction which allow the system to overcome the high barrier of scission of the actinide-oxygen bond. Accompanied by experimentally determined kinetic parameters, a plausible mechanism is proposed for the catalytic cycle. PMID:26844823

  2. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  3. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  4. An overview on alcohol oxidases and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Pranab; Chinnadayyala, Soma Sekhar R; Chakraborty, Mitun; Kumar, Adepu Kiran; Kakoti, Ankana

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol oxidases (Alcohol: O₂ Oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.3.x) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with a concomitant release of hydrogen peroxide. Based on substrate specificity, alcohol oxidases may be categorized broadly into four different groups namely, (a) short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), (b) long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), (c) aromatic alcohol oxidase (AAO), and (d) secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO). The sources reported for these enzymes are mostly limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, plant, insect, and mollusks. However, the quantum of reports for each category of enzymes considerably varies across these sources. The enzymes belonging to SCAO and LCAO are intracellular in nature, whereas AAO and SAO are mostly secreted to the medium. SCAO and LCAO are invariably reported as multimeric proteins with very high holoenzyme molecular masses, but the molecular characteristics of these enzymes are yet to be clearly elucidated. One of the striking features of the alcohol oxidases that make them distinct from the widely known alcohol dehydrogenase is the avidly bound cofactor to the redox center of these enzymes that obviate the need to supplement cofactor during the catalytic reaction. These flavin-based redox enzymes have gained enormous importance in the development of various industrial processes and products primarily for developing biosensors and production of various industrially useful carbonyl compounds. The present review provides an overview on alcohol oxidases from different categories focusing research on these oxidases during the last decade along with their potential industrial applications. PMID:23525937

  5. Recharging Batteries Chemically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Rowlette, J.; Graf, J.

    1985-01-01

    Iron/air batteries recharged chemically by solution of strong base in alcohol or by basic alcohol solution of reducing agent. Although method still experimental, it has potential for batteries in electric automobiles or as energy system in remote applications. Also used in quiet operations where noise or infrared signature of diesel engine is not desired.

  6. Hybrid nanomotor: a catalytically/magnetically powered adaptive nanowire swimmer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Manesh, Kalayil Manian; Hua, Joe; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Wang, Joseph

    2011-07-18

    A synthetic hybrid nanomotor, which combines chemically powered propulsion and magnetically driven locomotion, is described. The new catalytic-magnetic nanomotor consists of a flexible multisegment Pt-Au-Ag(flex)-Ni nanowire, with the Pt-Au and Au-Ag(flex)-Ni portions responsible for the catalytic and magnetic propulsion modes, respectively. The experimental data and theoretical considerations indicate that the hybrid design only minimally compromises the individual propulsion modes. Rapid and convenient switching from the catalytic to the magnetic mode is illustrated. The resulting catalytic-magnetic adaptive nanomotor can address the fuel depletion and salt limitation common to chemically powered motors by switching to magnetic propulsion. Reversal of the motion direction is also achieved upon applying the magnetic field. Such use of two sources to power a hybrid device offers a broader scope of operation and holds considerable promise for designing adaptive nanovehicles that reconfigure their operation in response to environmental changes or unexpected events. PMID:21626685

  7. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst. PMID:27483759

  8. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  9. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  10. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  11. Mechanism of Copper(I)/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)CuI/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV–visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) “catalyst oxidation” in which CuI and TEMPO–H are oxidized by O2 via a binuclear Cu2O2 intermediate and (2) “substrate oxidation” mediated by CuII and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a CuII-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O2 is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  12. Mechanism of copper(I)/TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-02-13

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) "catalyst oxidation" in which Cu(I) and TEMPO-H are oxidized by O(2) via a binuclear Cu(2)O(2) intermediate and (2) "substrate oxidation" mediated by Cu(II) and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a Cu(II)-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O(2) is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  13. [Alcoholism and aging. 2. Alcoholic dementia or alcoholic cognitive impairment?].

    PubMed

    Pierucci-Lagha, Amira; Derouesné, Christian

    2003-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in considerable damage to many of the body's organs, and particularly to the brain. Beyond the confusional state occurring with acute intoxication or withdrawal, alcohol abuse is responsible of a constellation of neuropsychiatric syndromes including cognitive dysfunction, Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease and alcohol-related dementia, ARD. ARD would account for nearly 20% of all admissions to state mental hospitals in the United-States. According to the DSM-IV, ARD is defined by a dementia associated with alcohol abuse. However, the concept of a dementia directly related to the neurotoxicity of alcohol for brain neurons is still a matter of debate. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms of cognitive deficits related to chronic alcohol intoxication. This paper presents the epidemiological, neuropathological, neurochemical and clinical data on ARD. Alcoholism is responsible for cognitive deficits of various severity, which could be reversible or not with alcohol abstinence, but can also participate to the cognitive impairment related to other pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease. On account of this review, it is suggested that the term alcohol-related cognitive impairment should be more convenient than that of ARD, more restrictive and more confusing. Presently, there are no established treatment for alcohol-related cognitive impairment. Alcohol abstinence is a most important step. Psychosocial interventions are essential to support the patients in the daily life. PMID:15683959

  14. Nanosized CuO and ZnO Catalyst Supported on Honeycomb-Typed Monolith for Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Min; Ahn, Won-Ju; Jo, Woong-Kyu; Song, Jin-Hun; Oh, Chang-Yeop; Jeong, Young-Shin; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Sohn, Bo-Kyun; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin; Ahn, Byeong-Kwon; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most serious problems in the world. Conversion of CO2 to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) was studied using catalytic chemical methods. Honeycomb-typed monolith used as catalyst support was 400 cell/inch2. Pretreatment of the monolith surface was carried out by thermal treatment and acid treatment. Monolith-supported nanosized CuO-ZnO catalysts were prepared by wash-coat method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using SEM, TEM, and XRD. The catalytic activity for CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH was investigated using a flow-type reactor with varying reaction temperature, reaction pressure and contact time. Conversion of CO2 was increased with increasing reaction temperature, but selectivity to CH3OH was decreased. Optimum reaction temperature was about 250 degrees C under 20 atm. Because of the reverse water gas shift reaction. PMID:26328404

  15. Techno-Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit Dutta; Michael Talmadge; Jesse Hensley; Matt Worley; Doug Dudgeon; David Barton; Peter Groenendijk; Daniela Ferrari; Brien Stears; Erin Searcy; Christopher Wright; J. Richard Hess

    2012-07-01

    This techno-economic study investigates the production of ethanol and a higher alcohols coproduct by conversion of lignocelluosic biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas-to-liquids synthesis over a precommercial heterogeneous catalyst. The design specifies a processing capacity of 2,205 dry U.S. tons (2,000 dry metric tonnes) of woody biomass per day and incorporates 2012 research targets from NREL and other sources for technologies that will facilitate the future commercial production of cost-competitive ethanol. Major processes include indirect steam gasification, syngas cleanup, and catalytic synthesis of mixed alcohols, and ancillary processes include feed handling and drying, alcohol separation, steam and power generation, cooling water, and other operations support utilities. The design and analysis is based on research at NREL, other national laboratories, and The Dow Chemical Company, and it incorporates commercial technologies, process modeling using Aspen Plus software, equipment cost estimation, and discounted cash flow analysis. The design considers the economics of ethanol production assuming successful achievement of internal research targets and nth-plant costs and financing. The design yields 83.8 gallons of ethanol and 10.1 gallons of higher-molecular-weight alcohols per U.S. ton of biomass feedstock. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance.

  16. A critical view on catalytic pyrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Venderbosch, R H

    2015-04-24

    The rapid heating of biomass in an oxygen-free environment optimizes the yield of fast-pyrolysis liquids. This liquid comprises a mix of acids, (dehydrated) carbohydrates, aldehydes, ketones, lignin fragments, aromatics, and alcohols, limiting its use. Deoxygenation of these liquids to replace hydrocarbons represents significant challenges. Catalytic pyrolysis is seen as a promising route to yield liquids with a higher quality. In this paper, literature data on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass are reviewed and deoxygenation results correlated with the overall carbon yield. Evidence is given that in an initial stage of the catalytic process reactive components are converted to coke, gas, and water, and only to a limited extent to a liquid product. Catalysts are not yet good enough, and an appropriate combination of pyrolysis conditions, reactive products formed, and different reactions to take place to yield improved quality liquids may be practically impossible. PMID:25872757

  17. Benzyl alcohol oxidation in supercritical carbon dioxide: spectroscopic insight into phase behaviour and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caravati, Matteo; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Baiker, Alfons

    2005-01-21

    Selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with molecular oxygen over an alumina-supported palladium catalyst was performed with high rate at about 95% selectivity in supercritical carbon dioxide. The experiments in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor showed that the pressure has a strong influence on the reaction rate. A marked increase of the rate (turnover frequency) from 900 h(-1) to 1800 h(-1) was observed when increasing the pressure from 140 to 150 bar. Video monitoring of the bulk fluid phase behavior and the simultaneous investigation by transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy at two positions of the view cell showed that the sharp increase in activity is correlated to a transition from a biphasic to a monophasic reaction mixture. In the single phase region, both oxygen and benzyl alcohol are dissolved in the supercritical CO2 phase, which leads to a reduction of the mass transport resistances (both in the external fluid film and in the catalyst pores) and thus to the high reaction rate measured in the catalytic experiments. The phase transition could be effectively and easily monitored by transmission and ATR-IR spectroscopy despite the small concentration of the dense liquid like phase. Deposition of the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst on the ATR-crystal at the bottom of the view cell allowed to gain insight into the chemical changes and mass transfer processes occurring in the solid/liquid interface region during reaction. Analyzing the shift of the upsilon2 bending mode of CO2 gave information on the fluid composition in and outside the catalyst pores. Moreover, the catalytic reaction could be investigated in situ in this spectroscopic batch reactor cell by monitoring simultaneously the reaction progress, the phase behaviour and the catalytic interface. PMID:19785149

  18. Chemical dependence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse - resources; Resources - chemical dependence ... The following organizations are a good resource for information on drug dependence: National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence -- ncadd.org National Institute on Drug Abuse -- www.drugabuse.gov ...

  19. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  20. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  1. Insomnia, alcoholism and relapse.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2003-12-01

    Insomnia and alcoholism are significantly associated in community surveys and patient samples. Insomnia occurs in 36-72% of alcoholic patients and may last for weeks to months after initiating abstinence from alcohol. Some correlates of insomnia in alcoholic patients are identical to those observed in non-alcoholic insomniacs, including anxiety and depression, tobacco smoking, and the use of alcohol to aid sleep. Other studies suggest that as the severity of alcoholism increases, so does the likelihood of insomnia in alcoholic patients. In the sleep laboratory, alcoholic patients who complain of insomnia have disrupted sleep continuity when compared to alcoholic patients without insomnia complaints. Recently sober alcoholics are also more likely than non-alcoholics to have sleep-disordered breathing and increased periodic leg movements, which might contribute to insomnia in some alcoholic patients. The co-occurrence of insomnia and alcoholism is clinically significant because alcoholism can exacerbate the adverse consequences of insomnia (e.g. mood changes and performance decrements) and because insomnia among patients entering treatment for alcoholism has been significantly associated with subsequent alcoholic relapse. Baseline polysomnographic correlates of subsequent relapse include prolonged sleep latency, decreased sleep efficiency and total sleep time, increased rapid eye movement sleep pressure, and decreased slow wave sleep. Whether treatment of insomnia in alcoholic patients reduces relapse rates is unknown, but preliminary treatment guidelines that accommodate the special characteristics of alcoholic patients are provided, with a goal to reduce daytime impairment and psychological distress. PMID:15018094

  2. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  3. Selective bromochlorination of a homoallylic alcohol for the total synthesis of (−)-anverene

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Frederick J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The scope of a recently reported method for the catalytic enantioselective bromochlorination of allylic alcohols is expanded to include a specific homoallylic alcohol. Critical factors for optimization of this reaction are highlighted. The utility of the product bromochloride is demonstrated by the first total synthesis of an antibacterial polyhalogenated monoterpene, (−)-anverene. PMID:27559385

  4. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... the baby is in the womb and after birth Decreased muscle tone and ... Heart defects such as ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial ...

  5. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  6. Alcohol use disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are dealing with alcohol use. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA) Alcoholics Anonymous is a self-help group of ... approach. There are local chapters throughout the U.S. AA offers help 24 hours a day. AL-ANON ...

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  8. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  9. Catalytic properties of single layers of transition metal sulfide catalytic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, R.R.; Siadati, M.H.; De la Rosa, M.P.; Berhault, G.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Bearden, R.; Abrams, B.L.

    2006-01-15

    Single layer transition metal sulfides (SLTMS) such as MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, and ReS{sub 2}, play an important role in catalytic processes such as the hydrofining of petroleum streams, and are involved in at least two of the slurry-catalyst hydroconversion processes that have been proposed for upgrading heavy petroleum feed and other sources of hydrocarbon fuels such as coal and shale oils. Additional promising catalytic applications of the SLTMS are on the horizon. The physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of these materials are reviewed in this report. Also discussed are areas for future research that promise to lead to advanced applications of the SLTMS.

  10. Microgravity Compatible Reagentless Instrumentation for Detection of Dissolved Organic Acids and Alcohols in Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jan, Darrell L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Organic Acid and Alcohol Monitor (OAAM) program has resulted in the successful development of a computer controlled prototype analyzer capable of accurately determining aqueous organic acids and primary alcohol concentrations over a large dynamic range with high sensitivity. Formic, acetic, and propionic acid were accurately determined at concentrations as low as 5 to 10 micrograms/L in under 20 minutes, or as high as 10 to 20 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Methanol, ethanol, and propanol were determined at concentrations as low as 20 to 100 micrograms/L, or as high as 10 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Importantly for space based application, the OAAM requires no reagents or hazardous chemicals to perform these analyses needing only power, water, and CO2 free purge gas. The OAAM utilized two membrane processes to segregate organic acids from interfering ions. The organic acid concentration was then determined based upon the conductiometric signal. Separation of individual organic acids was accomplished using a chromatographic column. Alcohols are determined in a similar manner after conversion to organic acids by sequential biocatalytic and catalytic oxidation steps. The OAAM was designed to allow the early diagnosis of under performing or failing sub-systems within the Water Recovery System (WRS) baselined for the International Space Station (ISS). To achieve this goal, several new technologies were developed over the course of the OAAM program.

  11. Biocatalytic reduction of short-chain carboxylic acids into their corresponding alcohols with syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jose M; Richter, Hanno; Loftus, Sarah E; Angenent, Largus T

    2013-04-01

    Short-chain carboxylic acids generated by various mixed- or pure-culture fermentation processes have been considered valuable precursors for production of bioalcohols. While conversion of carboxylic acids into alcohols is routinely performed with catalytic hydrogenation or with strong chemical reducing agents, here, a biological conversion route was explored. The potential of carboxydotrophic bacteria, such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium ragsdalei, as biocatalysts for conversion of short-chain carboxylic acids into alcohols, using syngas as a source of electrons and energy is demonstrated. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, isobutyric acid, n-valeric acid, and n-caproic acid were converted into their corresponding alcohols. Furthermore, biomass yields and fermentation stoichiometry from the experimental data were modeled to determine how much metabolic energy C. ljungdahlii generated during syngas fermentation. An ATP yield of 0.4-0.5 mol of ATP per mol CO consumed was calculated in the presence of hydrogen. The ratio of protons pumped across the cell membrane versus electrons transferred from ferredoxin to NAD(+) via the Rnf complex is suggested to be 1.0. Based on these results, we provide suggestions how n-butyric acid to n-butanol conversion via syngas fermentation can be further improved. PMID:23172270

  12. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe₂O₃ nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts) and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in "green" environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials' development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis. PMID:26393550

  13. Scientists Toast the Discovery of Vinyl Alcohol in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    blocks for vinyl alcohol and other chemicals are able to form the necessary chemical bonds to make larger molecules - those containing as many as six or more atoms. "It has been an ongoing quest to understand exactly how these more complex molecules form and become distributed throughout the interstellar medium," said Turner. Since the 1970s, scientists have speculated that molecules could form on the microscopic dust grains in interstellar clouds. These dust grains are thought to trap the fast-moving molecules. The surface of these grains would then act as a catalyst, similar to a car's catalytic converter, and enable the chemical reactions that form vinyl alcohol and the other complex molecules. The problem with this theory, however, is that the newly formed molecules would remain trapped on the dust grains at the low temperature characteristic of most of interstellar space, and the energy necessary to "knock them off" would also be strong enough to break the chemical bonds that formed them. "This last process has not been well understood," explained Turner. "The current theory explains well how molecules like vinyl alcohol could form, but it doesn't address how these new molecules are liberated from the grains where they are born." To better understand how this might be accomplished, the scientists considered the volatile and highly energetic region of space where these molecules were detected. Turner and others speculate that since this cloud lies near an area of young, energetic star formation, the energy from these stars could evaporate the icy surface layers of the grains. This would liberate the molecules from their chilly nurseries, depositing them into interstellar space where they can be detected by sensitive radio antennas on Earth. Astronomers are able to detect the faint radio signals that these molecules emit as they jump between quantum energy states in the act of rotating or vibrating. Turner cautions, however, that even though this discovery has shed

  14. Third international symposium on alcohol fuels technology

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    At the opening of the Symposium, Dr. Sharrah, Senior Vice President of Continental Oil Company, addressed the attendees, and his remarks are included in this volume. The Symposium was concluded by workshops which addressed specific topics. The topical titles are as follows: alcohol uses; production; environment and safety; and socio-economic. The workshops reflected a growing confidence among the attendees that the alcohols from coal, remote natural gas and biomass do offer alternatives to petroleum fuels. Further, they may, in the long run, prove to be equal or superior to the petroleum fuels when the aspects of performance, environment, health and safety are combined with the renewable aspect of the biomass derived alcohols. Although considerable activity in the production and use of alcohols is now appearing in many parts of the world, the absence of strong, broad scale assessment and support for these fuels by the United States Federal Government was a noted point of concern by the attendees. The environmental consequence of using alcohols continues to be more benign in general than the petroleum based fuels. The exception is the family of aldehydes. Although the aldehydes are easily suppressed by catalysts, it is important to understand their production in the combustion process. Progress is being made in this regard. Of course, the goal is to burn the alcohols so cleanly that catalytic equipment can be eliminated. Separate abstracts are prepared for the Energy Data Base for individual presentations.

  15. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  16. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  17. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  18. Catalytic Antioxidants and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Tamara R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, or neuroinflammation, is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative conditions. Damage due to superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite has been observed in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as in acute conditions that lead to neuronal death, such as stroke and epilepsy. Antioxidant therapies to remove these toxic compounds have been of great interest in treating these disorders. Catalytic antioxidants mimic the activities of superoxide dismutase or catalase or both, detoxifying superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases, peroxynitrite and other toxic species as well. Several compounds have demonstrated efficacy in in vitro and in animal models of neurodegeneration, leading to optimism that catalytic antioxidants may prove to be useful therapies in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 555–569. PMID:18754709

  19. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  20. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  1. Catalytic combustion nears application

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This article is a brief review of efforts to develope a catalytic combustion system with emissions levels less than 10 ppm. Two efforts are discussed: (1) tests by General Electric using a GE Frame 7E/9E and 7F/9F gas turbine, and (2) tests by AES using a Kawasaki M1A-13A industrial gas turbine. The latter also employs a heat recovery steam generator and produces 3 MWe and 28,000 lbm/hr of steam.

  2. Organocatalytic Asymmetric Nucleophilic Addition to o-Quinone Methides by Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zengwei; Wang, Zhaobin; Sun, Jianwei

    2015-12-18

    The first catalytic asymmetric intermolecular alcohol conjugate addition to o-quinone methides (o-QMs) is disclosed. Due to reversible C-O bond formation and low nucleophilicity of alcohols, catalytic asymmetric oxa-Michael additions with simple alcohol nucleophiles to establish acyclic oxygenated carbon stereocenters remain scarce. The present reaction represents a rare example of this type. With a suitable chiral acid catalyst, the in situ formation of o-QMs and subsequent conjugate addition proceeded with high efficiency and enantioselectivity. The chiral ether products are versatile precursors to other chiral molecules. PMID:26637015

  3. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  4. Amidation of esters with amino alcohols using organobase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Nicola; Campbell, Peter S; Jamieson, Craig; Potjewyd, Frances; Simpson, Iain; Watson, Allan J B

    2014-10-01

    A catalytic protocol for the base-mediated amidation of unactivated esters with amino alcohol derivatives is reported. Investigations into mechanistic aspects of the process indicate that the reaction involves an initial transesterification, followed by an intramolecular rearrangement. The reaction is highly general in nature and can be extended to include the synthesis of oxazolidinone systems through use of dimethyl carbonate. PMID:25226088

  5. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

    1996-04-02

    A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

  6. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.; Chum, Helena L.; Evans, Robert J.; Rejai, Bahman; Bain, Richard L.; Overend, Ralph P.

    1996-01-01

    A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

  7. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, (Pt(triphos)OPh){sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

  8. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  9. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  10. A revolution in micropower : the catalytic nanodiode.

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, Karen Charlene; Heller, Edwin J.; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Creighton, James Randall; Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2010-11-01

    Our ability to field useful, nano-enabled microsystems that capitalize on recent advances in sensor technology is severely limited by the energy density of available power sources. The catalytic nanodiode (reported by Somorjai's group at Berkeley in 2005) was potentially an alternative revolutionary source of micropower. Their first reports claimed that a sizable fraction of the chemical energy may be harvested via hot electrons (a 'chemicurrent') that are created by the catalytic chemical reaction. We fabricated and tested Pt/GaN nanodiodes, which eventually produced currents up to several microamps. Our best reaction yields (electrons/CO{sub 2}) were on the order of 10{sup -3}; well below the 75% values first reported by Somorjai (we note they have also been unable to reproduce their early results). Over the course of this Project we have determined that the whole concept of 'chemicurrent', in fact, may be an illusion. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the current measured from our nanodiodes is derived from a thermoelectric voltage; we have found no credible evidence for true chemicurrent. Unfortunately this means that the catalytic nanodiode has no future as a micropower source.

  11. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  12. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  17. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  18. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    SciTech Connect

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T.

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell waste in a fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Bon Seok; Lee, Dong Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell was investigated in a fluidized bed with zsm-5 and equilibrium FCC (Ecat) catalysts. Catalytic pyrolysis oil yields were remarkably reduced and gas yields were increased due to the higher catalytic reaction of primary volatiles compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis. Char yields were affected by temperature and the pore structure of the catalysts. The pyrolysis oil was characterized by lower H/C and O/C molar ratios due to aromatization and deoxygenation of volatiles by the catalysts. The catalytic pyrolysis oils contained more oxygen and nitrogen and less sulfur than petroleum oils. The oils had a high concentration of nitriles, with a carbon number distribution similar to fatty acids. The catalytic pyrolysis oils featured high nitriles yield with Ecat and high aromatics yield in the light fraction with zsm-5, due to characteristics of the catalyst. The catalytic pyrolysis oils showed potentials as feedstocks for bio-diesel and chemicals. PMID:25006017

  20. From Catalytic Reaction Networks to Protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-12-01

    In spite of recent advances, there still remains a large gape between a set of chemical reactions and a biological cell. Here we discuss several theoretical efforts to fill in the gap. The topics cover (i) slow relaxation to equilibrium due to glassy behavior in catalytic reaction networks (ii) consistency between molecule replication and cell growth, as well as energy metabolism (iii) control of a system by minority molecules in mutually catalytic system, which work as a carrier of genetic information, and leading to evolvability (iv) generation of a compartmentalized structure as a cluster of molecules centered around the minority molecule, and division of the cluster accompanied by the replication of minority molecule (v) sequential, logical process over several states from concurrent reaction dynamics, by taking advantage of discreteness in molecule number.

  1. Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

  2. Alcohol in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorabaugh, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the history of alcohol use in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Discusses changes in public attitudes toward drinking. Explores attempts at prohibition, alcohol preferences, the relationship between alcohol consumption and economic prosperity, and the dichotomy of alcohol as a part of a European heritage that is…

  3. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  4. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy. PMID:24766933

  5. Developmental alcohol and circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Earnest, D J; Chen, W J; West, J R

    2001-01-01

    Studies in rats found that alcohol exposure during the early postnatal period, particularly during the brain-growth-spurt period, can result in cell loss in various brain regions and persistent behavioral impairments. Some investigators have speculated that the body's internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain, may also be affected by developmental alcohol exposure. For example, alcohol-induced damage to the SCN cells and their function could result in disturbances of the circadian timekeeping function, and these disturbances might contribute to the behavioral impairments and affective disorders observed in people prenatally exposed to alcohol. Preliminary findings of studies conducted in rats suggest that developmental alcohol exposure may indeed interfere with circadian clock function as evidenced by a shortened circadian sleep-wake cycle and changes in the release of certain brain chemicals (i.e., neuropeptides) by SCN cells. PMID:11584552

  6. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  7. [Alcohol and psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Bouzyk-Szutkiewicz, Joanna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2012-09-01

    Alcohol dependence and abuse is one of the most costly health problems in the world from both a social and an economic point of view. It is a widespread problem, focusing attention not only psychiatrists but also doctors of other specialties. Patterns of drinking appear to be changing throughout the world, with more women and young people drinking heavily. Even risky drinking is a potential health risk, while chronic alcohol abuse contribute to the serious physical and mental complications. Alcohol used disorders associated with alcohol-induced brain damage include: withdrawal state, delirium tremens, alcoholic hallucinosis, alcoholic paranoia, Korsakoffs psychosis, alcoholic dementia, alcoholic depression. On the other hand, mental disorders as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorder most frequently comorbid with alcohol abuse or they trigger alcohol. PMID:23157139

  8. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  9. Oxovanadium complex-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of propargylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasunari; Kakiuchi, Nobuyuki; Matsumura, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takahiro; Kawamura, Takashi; Uemura, Sakae

    2002-09-20

    A catalytic system consisting of vanadium oxyacetylacetonate [VO(acac)(2)] and 3 A molecular sieves (MS3A) in acetonitrile works effectively for the aerobic oxidation of propargylic alcohols [R(1)CH(OH)Ctbd1;CR(2)] to the corresponding carbonyl compounds under an atmospheric pressure of molecular oxygen. Although the reactivity of alpha-acetylenic alkanols (R(1) = alkyl) is lower compared to that of the alcohols of R(1) = aryl, alkenyl, and alkynyl, the use of VO(hfac)(2) as a catalyst and the addition of hexafluoroacetylacetone improve the product yield in these cases. A catalytic cycle involving a vanadium(V) alcoholate species and beta-hydrogen elimination from it has been proposed for this oxidation. PMID:12227802

  10. Enhanced detectability of fluorinated derivatives of N,N-dialkylamino alcohols and precursors of nitrogen mustards by gas chromatography coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis for verification of chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Garg, Prabhat; Purohit, Ajay; Tak, Vijay K; Dubey, D K

    2009-11-01

    N,N-Dialkylamino alcohols, N-methyldiethanolamine, N-ethyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine are the precursors of VX type nerve agents and three different nitrogen mustards respectively. Their detection and identification is of paramount importance for verification analysis of chemical weapons convention. GC-FTIR is used as complimentary technique to GC-MS analysis for identification of these analytes. One constraint of GC-FTIR, its low sensitivity, was overcome by converting the analytes to their fluorinated derivatives. Owing to high absorptivity in IR region, these derivatives facilitated their detection by GC-FTIR analysis. Derivatizing reagents having trimethylsilyl, trifluoroacyl and heptafluorobutyryl groups on imidazole moiety were screened. Derivatives formed there were analyzed by GC-FTIR quantitatively. Of these reagents studied, heptafluorobutyrylimidazole (HFBI) produced the greatest increase in sensitivity by GC-FTIR detection. 60-125 folds of sensitivity enhancement were observed for the analytes by HFBI derivatization. Absorbance due to various functional groups responsible for enhanced sensitivity were compared by determining their corresponding relative molar extinction coefficients ( [Formula: see text] ) considering uniform optical path length. The RSDs for intraday repeatability and interday reproducibility for various derivatives were 0.2-1.1% and 0.3-1.8%. Limit of detection (LOD) was achieved up to 10-15ng and applicability of the method was tested with unknown samples obtained in international proficiency tests. PMID:19796767

  11. Chemical monitoring and occurrence of alkylphenols, alkylphenol ethoxylates, alcohol ethoxylates, phthalates and benzothiazoles in sewage treatment plants and receiving waters along the Ter River basin (Catalonia, N. E. Spain).

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Raquel; Lacorte, Sílvia; Ginebreda, Antonio; Barceló, Damià

    2006-07-01

    This study presents a quantitative estimation of the analysis and fate of several emerging pollutants, some of them endocrine-disrupting compounds, in surface water samples collected at several locations along the Ter River and two of its tributaries. Influent and effluent waters and particulate matter from five sewage treatment plants (STP) that discharge into these rivers were also studied. The target compounds analyzed were: nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO), nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, alcohol ethoxylates (AEO) and benzothiazoles. Chemical analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using an electrospray interface (LC-ESI-MS) revealed the presence of low amounts (between 0.06 and 17.5 microg L(-1)) of the target compounds NPE(1+2)O and NP, which were detected in 100% and 84% of the samples respectively. Maximum concentrations occurred in the STPs associated with the municipalities of Vic and Girona. From the fate and behavior data obtained for the various compounds analyzed in the STP influent and effluent, we can conclude that the STPs are effective at removing large amounts (more than 70%) of the compounds studied from the water. PMID:16794817

  12. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  13. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  14. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  15. 27 CFR 19.326 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.326 Section 19.326 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.326 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals produced, including chemical...

  16. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  17. 27 CFR 24.320 - Chemical record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical record. 24.320... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.320 Chemical record. A proprietor who uses chemicals, preservatives, or other such materials shall maintain a record of the purchase, receipt...

  18. 27 CFR 24.320 - Chemical record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical record. 24.320... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.320 Chemical record. A proprietor who uses chemicals, preservatives, or other such materials shall maintain a record of the purchase, receipt...

  19. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  20. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.