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Sample records for alcohol catalytic chemical

  1. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis of alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process for single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomie, Takashi; Inoue, Shuhei; Iba, Yushi; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2012-05-01

    In situ mass spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the growth mechanism of single-walled carbon nanotube grown by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. When catalysts were used, pyrolysis could be accomplished at a temperature of 600 °C; without the use of catalysts, successful pyrolysis required a temperature of more than 800 °C. Ethylene and acetylene are important products for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, and fusion of the metal catalyst is the cause of failure of synthesis at high temperatures. This fact indicates that the degradation and polymerization of ethanol are not the cause of the failure of synthesis.

  2. Enzymatic Catalytic Beds For Oxidation Of Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    Modules containing beds of enzymatic material catalyzing oxidation of primary alcohols and some other organic compounds developed for use in wastewater-treatment systems of future spacecraft. Designed to be placed downstream of multifiltration modules, which contain filters and sorbent beds removing most of non-alcoholic contaminants but fail to remove significant amounts of low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionic compounds like alcohols. Catalytic modules also used on Earth to oxidize primary alcohols and other compounds in wastewater streams and industrial process streams.

  3. Catalytic Amination of Alcohols, Aldehydes, and Ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuev, M. V.; Khidekel', M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the catalytic amination of alcohols and carbonyl compounds are examined, the catalysts for these processes are described, and the problems of their effectiveness, selectivity, and stability are discussed. The possible mechanisms of the reactions indicated are presented. The bibliography includes 266 references.

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  6. Green, Catalytic Oxidation of Alcohols in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, Gerd-Jan; Arends, Isabel W. C. E.; Sheldon, Roger A.

    2000-03-01

    Alcohol oxidations are typically performed with stoichiometric reagents that generate heavy-metal waste and are usually run in chlorinated solvents. A water-soluble palladium(II) bathophenanthroline complex is a stable recyclable catalyst for the selective aerobic oxidation of a wide range of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids in a biphasic water-alcohol system. The use of water as a solvent and air as the oxidant makes the reaction interesting from both an economic and environmental point of view.

  7. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  8. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonitatibus, Peter J.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Doherty, Mark D.; Siclovan, Oltea; Jones, William D.; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2015-01-01

    Reversibility of a dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalytic reaction has been an elusive target for homogeneous catalysis. In this report, reversible acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols and diols on iron pincer complexes and reversible oxidative dehydrogenation of primary alcohols/reduction of aldehydes with separate transfer of protons and electrons on iridium complexes are shown. This reactivity suggests a strategy for the development of reversible fuel cell electrocatalysts for partial oxidation (dehydrogenation) of hydroxyl-containing fuels. PMID:25588879

  9. Catalytic Hydrogenolysis of 5-Carbon Sugar Alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Zacher, Alan H.; Frye, John G.; Werpy, Todd A.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2005-01-01

    PNNL, in cooperation with the USDOE and CRADA partners, National Corn Growers Association and Archer Daniels Midland, has developed a new class of catalysts based on Nickel and Rhenium with very effective performance for highly selective, high conversion hydrogenolysis of five–carbon sugar alcohols to useful glycols. The Ni-Re catalyst appears to exhibit preferential hydrogenolysis of the carbon-carbon bonds of secondary carbons over primary carbons of the 5-carbon sugar alcohols tested. In addition, the catalyst has demonstrated significant and unique primary C-O bond hydrogenolysis activity in its ability to convert glycerol into 1,2- propylene glycol, which is then stable in the presence of this class of catalysts. The rhenium containing catalysts are found to have higher activity and better selectivity to desired glycols than previously reported catalysts. A continuous flow reactor lifetime test of over 1500 hours also demonstrated the requisite high stability for an industrially attractive process.

  10. ALCOHOL OXIDATION - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alco...

  11. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  13. Catalytic combustion of alcohols for microburner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Douglas A.; Lee, Ivan C.; Waits, C. Michael

    The combustion of energy dense liquid fuels in a catalytic micro-combustor, whose temperatures can be used in energy conversion devices, is an attractive alternative to cumbersome batteries. To miniaturize the reactor, an evaporation model was developed to calculate the minimum distance required for complete droplet vaporization. By increasing the ambient temperature from 298 to 350 K, the distance required for complete evaporation of a 6.5 μm droplet decreases from 3.5 to 0.15 cm. A platinum mesh acted as a preliminary measurement and demonstrated 75% conversion of ethanol. We then selected a more active rhodium-coated alumina foam with a larger surface area and attained 100% conversion of ethanol and 95% conversion of 1-butanol under fuel lean conditions. Effluent post-combustion gas analysis showed that varying the equivalence ratio results in three possible modes of operation. A regime of high carbon selectivity for CO 2 occurs at low equivalence ratios and corresponds to complete combustion with a typical temperature of 775 K that is ideal for PbTe thermoelectric energy conversion devices. Conversely for equivalence ratios greater than 1, carbon selectivity for CO 2 decreases as hydrogen, olefin and paraffin production increases. By tuning the equivalence ratio, we have shown that a single device can combust completely for thermoelectric applications, operate as a fuel reformer to produce hydrogen gas for fuel cells or perform as a bio-refinery for paraffin and olefin synthesis.

  14. Catalytic Oxidation of Alcohol via Nickel Phosphine Complexes with Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Charles J.; Das, Partha Pratim; Higgins, Deanna LM; Helm, Monte L.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-09-05

    Nickel complexes were prepared with diphosphine ligands that contain pendant amines, and these complexes catalytically oxidize primary and secondary alcohols to their respective aldehydes and ketones. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of these prospective electrocatalysts were performed to understand what influences the catalytic activity. For the oxidation of diphenylmethanol, the catalytic rates were determined to be dependent on the concentration of both the catalyst and the alcohol. The catalytic rates were found to be independent of the concentration of base and oxidant. The incorporation of pendant amines to the phosphine ligand results in substantial increases in the rate of alcohol oxidation with more electron-donating substituents on the pendant amine exhibiting the fastest rates. We thank Dr. John C. Linehan, Dr. Elliott B. Hulley, Dr. Jonathan M. Darmon, and Dr. Elizabeth L. Tyson for helpful discussions. Research by CJW, PD, DLM, and AMA was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Research by MLH was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  15. Catalytic hydration of terminal alkenes to primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C M; Trogler, W C

    1986-09-05

    Direct catalytic hydration of terminal alkenes to primary alcohols would be an inexpensive route to industrially useful alcohols and a convenient synthetic route for the synthesis of terminal alcohols in general. The reaction between trans- PtHCl(PMe(3))(2) (where Me = CH(3)) and sodium hydroxide in a one-to-one mixture of water and 1-hexene yields a species that, at 60 degrees C and in the presence of the phasetransfer catalyst benzyltriethylammonium chloride, catalyzes selective hydration of 1-hexene to n-hexanol at a rate of 6.9 +/- 0.2 turnovers per hour. Hydration of 1-dodecene to n-dodecanol occurs at a rate of 8.3 +/- 0.4 turnovers per hour at 100 degrees C. Deuterium labeling experiments with trans-PtDCl(PMe(3))(2) show that hydration involves reductive elimination of a C-H bond. At low hydroxide concentrations (<8 equivalents), hydration of the water-soluble olefin 3-butene-1-ol to 1,4-butanediol exhibited a first-order dependence on hydroxide concentration for loss of catalytic activity. This suggests that hydroxide attacks the coordinated alkene slowly. At high hydroxide concentrations, the rate of catalysis was hydroxide-independent and first order in alkene. Substitution of coordinated water (k(1) = 9.3 +/- 0.5 x 10(-3) liters per mol per second) appears to be limitng under these conditions.

  16. Enhanced heterogeneous catalytic conversion of furfuryl alcohol into butyl levulinate.

    PubMed

    Demma Carà, Piera; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi; Pagliaro, Mario

    2014-03-01

    We study the catalytic condensation of furfuryl alcohol with 1-butanol to butyl levulinate. A screening of several commercial and as-synthesized solid acid catalysts shows that propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica outperforms the state-of-the-art phosphotungstate acid catalysts. The catalyst is prepared via template-assisted sol-gel polycondensation of TEOS and MPTMS. It gives 96 % yield (and 100 % selectivity) of butyl levulinate in 4 h at 110 °C. Reaction profiles before and after a hot filtration test confirm that the active catalytic species do not leach into the solution. The catalyst synthesis, characterization, and mode of operation are presented and discussed.

  17. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect.

  18. Catalytic Deoxydehydration of Carbohydrates and Polyols to Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-15

    As the world's fossil fuel resources are being depleted and their costs increase, there is an urgent need to discover and develop new processes for the conversion of renewable, biomass resources into fuels and chemical feedstocks. Research and development in this area have been given high priority by both governmental agencies and industry. To increase the energy content and decrease the boiling points of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to the useful liquid range it is necessary to chemically remove water (dehydrate) and, preferably, oxygen (deoxygenate/reduce). The poly-hydroxylic nature of carbohydrates is attractive for their use as functionalized chemical building blocks, but it presents a daunting challenge for their selective conversion to single product chemicals or fuels. The long term, practical objective of this project is to develop catalytic processes for the deoxydehydration (DODH) of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to produce unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons of value as chemical feedstocks and fuels; DODH: polyol + reductant --(LMOx catalyst)--> unsaturate + oxidized reductant + H2O. Limited prior studies have established the viability of the DODH process with expensive phosphine reductants and rhenium-catalysts. Initial studies in the PI's laboratory have now demonstrated: 1) the moderately efficient conversion of glycols to olefins by the economical sulfite salts is catalyzed by MeReO3 and Z+ReO4-; 2) effective phosphine-based catalytic DODH of representative glycols to olefins by cheap LMoO2 complexes; and 3) computational studies (with K. Houk, UCLA) have identified several Mo-, W-, and V-oxo complexes that are likely to catalyze glycol DODH. Seeking practically useful DODH reactions of complex polyols and new understanding of the reactivity of polyoxo-metal species with biomass-oxygenates we will employ a two-pronged approach: 1) investigate experimentally the reactivity, both stoichiometric and catalytic, of polyoxo

  19. Synergetic Effects of Alcohol/Water Mixing on the Catalytic Reductive Fractionation of Poplar Wood

    SciTech Connect

    Renders, Tom; Van den Bosch, Sander; Vangeel, Thijs; Ennaert, Thijs; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso; Van den Bossche, Gil; Courtin, Christophe M.; Schutyser, Wouter; Sels, Bert F.

    2016-12-05

    One of the foremost challenges in lignocellulose conversion encompasses the integration of effective lignin valorization in current carbohydrate-oriented biorefinery schemes. Catalytic reductive fractionation (CRF) of lignocellulose offers a technology to simultaneously produce lignin-derived platform chemicals and a carbohydrate-enriched pulp via the combined action of lignin solvolysis and metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis. Herein, the solvent (composition) plays a crucial role. In this contribution, we study the influence of alcohol/water mixtures by processing poplar sawdust in varying MeOH/water and EtOH/water blends. The results show particular effects that strongly depend on the applied water concentration. Low water concentrations enhance the removal of lignin from the biomass, while the majority of the carbohydrates are left untouched (scenario A). Contrarily, high water concentrations favor the solubilization of both hemicellulose and lignin, resulting in a more pure cellulosic residue (scenario B). For both scenarios, an evaluation was made to determine the most optimal solvent composition, based on two earlier introduced empirical efficiency descriptors (denoted LFDE and LFFE). According to these measures, 30 (A) and 70 vol % water (B) showed to be the optimal balance for both MeOH/water and EtOH/water mixtures. This successful implementation of alcohol/water mixtures allows operation under milder processing conditions in comparison to pure alcohol solvents, which is advantageous from an industrial point of view.

  20. Catalytic production of biofuels (butene oligomers) and biochemicals (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol) from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jaewon; Han, Jeehoon

    2016-07-01

    A strategy is presented that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels (butene oligomers (BO)) from cellulose (C6) fraction and commodity chemicals (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA)) from hemicellulose (C5) of corn stover based on catalytic conversion technologies using 2-sec-butylphenol (SBP) solvents. This strategy integrates the conversion subsystems based on experimental studies and separation subsystems for recovery of biomass derivatives and SBP solvents. Moreover, a heat exchanger network is designed to reduce total heating requirements to the lowest level, which is satisfied from combustion of biomass residues (lignin and humins). Based on the strategy, this work offers two possible process designs (design A: generating electricity internally vs. design B: purchasing electricity externally), and performs an economic feasibility study for both the designs based on a comparison of the minimum selling price (MSP) of THFA. This strategy with the design B leads to a better MSP of $1.93 per kg THFA.

  1. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hirotaka; Kitaoka, Takuya; Isogai, Akira

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  2. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  3. SOLVENT-FREE TETRAHYDROPYRANYLATION (THP) OF ALCOHOLS AND PHENOLS AND THEIR REGENERATION BY CATALYTIC ALUMINUM CHLORIDE HEXAHYDRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalytic amount of aluminum chloride hexahydrate enables solvent-free tetrahydropyranylation (THP) of alcohols and phenols at moderate temperatures. A simple addition of methanol helps to regenerate the corresponding alcohols and phenols thus rendering these protection and depro...

  4. Computational design of chemically propelled catalytic nanorotors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanping; Shi, Yunfeng

    2013-08-14

    We designed catalytic nanorotors and investigated the rotational motion and energy conversion efficiency using reactive molecular dynamics in two dimensions. First, a two-arm nanorotor was constructed by decorating a slender beam with catalysts asymmetrically on its two long edges, while fixing the beam center as the rotational axis. Autonomous rotation was observed for the two-arm nanorotor immersing in a fuel environment. Here fuel molecules undergo exothermic combination reaction facilitated by the catalysts. It was found that the angular velocity increases with the catalyst coverage parabolically, while the rotary nanomotor efficiency stays roughly constant. These observations are consistent with a single-collision-momentum-transfer-based propulsion model. Furthermore, multi-arm nanorotors (up to eight arms) were constructed by carving radially distributed arms followed by decorating catalysts. For multi-arm nanorotors, both the angular velocity and the efficiency decrease as the number of arms increases. These behaviors contradict the aforementioned model, which are likely due to the deceleration from secondary collisions between products and the nanorotor arms. Our simulation results show that the optimal design for a nanorotor that maximizes its angular velocity and the motor efficiency is a two-arm nanorotor with nearly full coverage of catalysts.

  5. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  6. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Bingham, Laura M.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  7. Catalytic Asymmetric Generation of (Z)-Disubstituted Allylic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Luca; Jeon, Sang-Jin; Fisher, Ethan L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    A one-pot method for the direct preparation of enantioenriched (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols is introduced. Hydroboration of 1-halo-1-alkynes with dicyclohexylborane, reaction with t-BuLi, and transmetallation with dialkylzinc reagents generates (Z)-disubstituted vinylzinc intermediates. In situ reaction of these reagents with aldehydes in the presence of a catalyst derived from (−)-MIB generates (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols. It was found that the resulting allylic alcohols were racemic, most likely due to a rapid addition reaction promoted by LiX (X = Br and Cl). To suppress the LiX promoted reaction, a series of inhibitors was screened. It was found that 20–30 mol % tetraethylethylene diamine (TEEDA) inhibited LiCl without inhibiting the chiral zinc-based Lewis acid. In this fashion, (Z)-disubstituted allylic alcohols were obtained with up to 98% ee. The asymmetric (Z)-vinylation could be coupled with tandem diastereoselective epoxidation reactions to provide epoxy alcohols and allylic epoxy alcohols with up to three contiguous stereogenic centers, enabling the rapid construction of complex building blocks with high levels of enantio- and diastereoselectivity. PMID:18052173

  8. Reaction-driven surface restructuring and selectivity control in allylic alcohol catalytic aerobic oxidation over Pd.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam F; Ellis, Christine V; Naughton, James N; Newton, Mark A; Parlett, Christopher M A; Wilson, Karen

    2011-04-20

    Synchronous, time-resolved DRIFTS/MS/XAS cycling studies of the vapor-phase selective aerobic oxidation of crotyl alcohol over nanoparticulate Pd have revealed surface oxide as the desired catalytically active phase, with dynamic, reaction-induced Pd redox processes controlling selective versus combustion pathways.

  9. Catalytic Friedel-Crafts Reactions of Highly Electronically Deactivated Benzylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Vuk D; Richmond, Edward; Wolf, Eléna; Moran, Joseph

    2017-03-06

    Highly electronically deactivated benzylic alcohols, including those with a CF3 group adjacent to the OH-bearing carbon, undergo dehydrative Friedel-Crafts reactions upon exposure to catalytic Brønsted acid in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) solvent. Titration and kinetic experiments support the involvement of higher order solvent/acid clusters in catalysis.

  10. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  11. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  12. Chemical Imaging of Catalytic Solids with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    A Beale; S Jacques; B Weckhuysen

    2011-12-31

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a term normally used to describe a group of catalytic processes, yet it could equally be employed to describe the catalytic solid itself. A better understanding of the chemical and structural variation within such materials is thus a pre-requisite for the rationalising of structure-function relationships and ultimately to the design of new, more sustainable catalytic processes. The past 20 years has witnessed marked improvements in technologies required for analytical measurements at synchrotron sources, including higher photon brightness, nano-focusing, rapid, high resolution data acquisition and in the handling of large volumes of data. It is now possible to image materials using the entire synchrotron radiative profile, thus heralding a new era of in situ/operando measurements of catalytic solids. In this tutorial review we discuss the recent work in this exciting new research area and finally conclude with a future outlook on what will be possible/challenging to measure in the not-too-distant future.

  13. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Minahan, D.M.; Nagaki, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This project is focused on the discovery and evaluation of novel heterogeneous catalyst for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. Catalysts have been studied and optimized for the production of methanol and isobutanol mixtures which may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. Higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) from syngas was studied; the alcohols that are produced in this process may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. This work has resulted in the discovery of a catalyst system that is highly selective for isobutanol compared with the prior art. The catalysts operate at high temperature (400{degrees}C), and consist of a spinel oxide support (general formula AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, where A=M{sup 2+} and B = M{sup 3+}), promoted with various other elements. These catalysts operate by what is believed to be an aldol condensation mechanism, giving a product mix of mainly methanol and isobutanol. In this study, the effect of product feed/recycle (methanol, ethanol. n-propanol, isopropanol, carbon dioxide and water) on the performance of 10-DAN-55 (spinel oxide based catalyst) at 400{degrees}C, 1000 psi, GHSV = 12,000 and syngas (H{sub 2}/CO) ratio = 1:2 (alcohol addition) and 1:1 (carbon dioxide and water addition) was studied. The effect of operation at high temperatures and pressures on the performance of an improved catalyst formulation was also examined.

  14. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi; Okumura, Kazu; Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  15. Catalytic activity of carbon nanotubes in the conversion of aliphatic alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Tveritinova, E. A.; Chernyak, S. A.; Savilov, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) obtained via the catalytic pyrolysis of hexane at 750°C were studied as the catalysts in conversion of C2-C4 alcohols. The efficiency of CNTs as catalysts in dehydration and dehydrogenation of ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and tert-butanol was studied by means of pulse microcatalysis. The surface and structural characteristics of CNTs are investigated via SEM, TEM, DTA, BET, and XPS. CNTs are shown to be effective catalysts in the conversion of alcohols and do not require additional oxidative treatment. The regularities of the conversion of aliphatic alcohols, related to the properties of the CNTs surface and the structure of the alcohols are identified.

  16. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to chemicals in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tao, Furong; Song, Huanling; Chou, Lingjun

    2011-01-03

    A simple and effective route for the production of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and furfural from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) has been developed. CoSO(4) in an ionic liquid, 1-(4-sulfonic acid) butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (IL-1), was found to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrolysis of cellulose at 150°C, which led to 84% conversion of MCC after 300min reaction time. In the presence of a catalytic amount of CoSO(4), the yields of HMF and furfural were up to 24% and 17%, respectively; a small amount of levulinic acid (LA) and reducing sugars (8% and 4%, respectively) were also generated. Dimers of furan compounds were detected as the main by-products through HPLC-MS, and with the help of mass spectrometric analysis, the components of gas products were methane, ethane, CO, CO(2,) and H(2). A mechanism for the CoSO(4)-IL-1 hydrolysis system was proposed and IL-1 was recycled for the first time, which exhibited favorable catalytic activity over five repeated runs. This catalytic system may be valuable to facilitate energy-efficient and cost-effective conversion of biomass into biofuels and platform chemicals.

  17. Tuning the catalytic CO hydrogenation to straight- and long-chain aldehydes/alcohols and olefins/paraffins

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yizhi; Kruse, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic CO hydrogenation is one of the most versatile large-scale chemical syntheses leading to variable chemical feedstock. While traditionally mainly methanol and long-chain hydrocarbons are produced by CO hydrogenation, here we show that the same reaction can be tuned to produce long-chain n-aldehydes, 1-alcohols and olefins, as well as n-paraffins over potassium-promoted CoMn catalysts. The sum selectivity of aldehydes and alcohols is usually >50 wt% whereof up to ∼97% can be n-aldehydes. While the product slate contains ∼60% n-aldehydes at /pCO=0.5, a 65/35% slate of paraffins/alcohols is obtained at a ratio of 9. A linear Anderson–Schulz–Flory behaviour, independent of the /pCO ratio, is found for the sum of C4+ products. We advocate a synergistic interaction between a Mn5O8 oxide and a bulk Co2C phase, promoted by the presence of potassium, to be responsible for the unique product spectra in our studies. PMID:27708269

  18. Tuning the catalytic CO hydrogenation to straight- and long-chain aldehydes/alcohols and olefins/paraffins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yizhi; Kruse, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    The catalytic CO hydrogenation is one of the most versatile large-scale chemical syntheses leading to variable chemical feedstock. While traditionally mainly methanol and long-chain hydrocarbons are produced by CO hydrogenation, here we show that the same reaction can be tuned to produce long-chain n-aldehydes, 1-alcohols and olefins, as well as n-paraffins over potassium-promoted CoMn catalysts. The sum selectivity of aldehydes and alcohols is usually >50 wt% whereof up to ~97% can be n-aldehydes. While the product slate contains ~60% n-aldehydes at /pCO=0.5, a 65/35% slate of paraffins/alcohols is obtained at a ratio of 9. A linear Anderson-Schulz-Flory behaviour, independent of the /pCO ratio, is found for the sum of C4+ products. We advocate a synergistic interaction between a Mn5O8 oxide and a bulk Co2C phase, promoted by the presence of potassium, to be responsible for the unique product spectra in our studies.

  19. Tuning the catalytic CO hydrogenation to straight- and long-chain aldehydes/alcohols and olefins/paraffins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yizhi; Kruse, Norbert

    2016-10-06

    The catalytic CO hydrogenation is one of the most versatile large-scale chemical syntheses leading to variable chemical feedstock. While traditionally mainly methanol and long-chain hydrocarbons are produced by CO hydrogenation, here we show that the same reaction can be tuned to produce long-chain n-aldehydes, 1-alcohols and olefins, as well as n-paraffins over potassium-promoted CoMn catalysts. The sum selectivity of aldehydes and alcohols is usually >50 wt% whereof up to ∼97% can be n-aldehydes. While the product slate contains ∼60% n-aldehydes at /pCO=0.5, a 65/35% slate of paraffins/alcohols is obtained at a ratio of 9. A linear Anderson-Schulz-Flory behaviour, independent of the /pCO ratio, is found for the sum of C4+ products. We advocate a synergistic interaction between a Mn5O8 oxide and a bulk Co2C phase, promoted by the presence of potassium, to be responsible for the unique product spectra in our studies.

  20. PNP pincer osmium polyhydrides for catalytic dehydrogenation of primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Marcello; Choualeb, Aldjia; Gusev, Dmitry G; Lough, Alan J; Major, Quinn; Moore, Brandon

    2011-09-21

    This paper reports the synthesis, structure, and properties of a series of PNP pincer complexes of osmium OsH(3)Cl[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (1), OsH(3)[N(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (2), OsH(4)[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (3), and OsH(2)(PMe(3))[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (4). The tetrahydride 3 operates as an efficient catalyst at 0.1 mol% loading for the reactions of amination and dehydrogenative coupling of primary alcohols, producing secondary amines and symmetrical esters, respectively. The catalyst 3 is distinguished by outstanding stability, and it can be used in an aqueous environment at temperatures as high as 200 °C.

  1. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  2. Catalytic reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol with alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Avetisyan, K.G.; Matnishyan, A.A.

    1987-01-10

    The cyclic ketal 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-bis(3-phenyl-2-propynyloxy)-1,4-dioxane was obtained by the reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1=ol with propargyl alcohol in the presence of the HgO-BF/sub 3/ O(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/ catalytic system. The transformation of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol and its ethers in methanol and ethanol by the action of the above-mentioned catalytic system leads to 1-phenyl-3-alkoxy-1-propanone, 1-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxypropane, and 1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one. The intermediate organomercury compound, which is the product from regioselective addition of mercuric oxide and the saturated alcohol at the triple bond, was isolated. Its protodemercuration led to the above-mentioned linear products. The formation of the cyclic ketal is presumably due to the preferred formation of mercury bis-hydroxypropargylide.

  3. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  4. Catalytic conversion of aliphatic alcohols on carbon nanomaterials: The roles of structure and surface functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Chernyak, S. A.; Arkhipova, E. A.; Savilov, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials with the structure of graphene and different compositions of the surface groups are used as catalysts for the conversion of C2-C4 aliphatic alcohols. The conversions of ethanol, propanol- 1, propanol-2, butanol-1, butanol-2, and tert-butanol on carbon nanotubes, nanoflakes, and nanoflakes doped with nitrogen are investigated. Oxidized and nonoxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes, nanoflakes, and nanoflakes doped with nitrogen are synthesized. X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electronic microscopies, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, derivatographic analyses, and the pulsed microcatalytic method are used to characterize comprehensively the prepared catalysts. It was established that all of the investigated carbon nanomaterials (with the exception of nondoped carbon nanoflakes) are bifunctional catalysts for the conversion of aliphatic alcohols, and promote dehydration reactions with the formation of olefins and dehydrogenation reactions with the formation of aldehydes or ketones. Nanoflakes doped with nitrogen are inert with respect to secondary alcohols and tert-butanol. The role of oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing surface groups, and of the geometrical structure of the carbon matrix of graphene nanocarbon materials in the catalytic conversion of aliphatic alcohols, is revealed. Characteristics of the conversion of aliphatic alcohols that are associated with their structure are identified.

  5. Catalytic Conversion of Renewable Resources into Bulk and Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Johannes G

    2016-12-01

    Several strategies can be chosen to convert renewable resources into chemicals. In this account, I exemplify the route that starts with so-called platform chemicals; these are relatively simple chemicals that can be produced in high yield, directly from renewable resources, either via fermentation or via chemical routes. They can be converted into the existing bulk chemicals in a very efficient manner using multistep catalytic conversions. Two examples are given of the conversion of sugars into nylon intermediates. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) can be prepared in good yield from fructose. Two hydrogenation steps convert HMF into 1,6-hexanediol. Oppenauer oxidation converts this product into caprolactone, which in the past, has been converted into caprolactam in a large-scale industrial process by reaction with ammonia. An even more interesting platform chemical is levulinic acid (LA), which can be obtained directly from lignocellulose in good yield by treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 200°C. Hydrogenation converts LA into gamma-valerolactone, which is ring-opened and esterified in a gas-phase process to a mixture of isomeric methyl pentenoates in excellent selectivity. In a remarkable selective palladium-catalysed isomerising methoxycarbonylation, this mixture is converted in to dimethyl adipate, which is finally hydrolysed to adipic acid. Overall selectivities of both processes are extremely high. The conversion of lignin into chemicals is a much more complicated task in view of the complex nature of lignin. It was discovered that breakage of the most prevalent β-O-4 bond in lignin occurs not only via the well-documented C3 pathway, but also via a C2 pathway, leading to the formation of highly reactive phenylacetaldehydes. These compounds went largely unnoticed as they immediately recondense on lignin. We have now found that it is possible to prevent this by converting these aldehydes in a tandem reaction, as they are formed. For this purpose, we have used

  6. Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Dry Syngas to Ethanol and Higher Alcohols on Cu-Based Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mayank; Smith, Miranda L.; Spivey, James J.

    2011-04-19

    Ethanol and higher alcohols have been identified as potential fuel additives or hydrogen carriers for use in fuel cells. One method of ethanol production is catalytic conversion of syngas (a mixture of CO, H₂, CO₂, and H₂O), derived from biomass, coal, or natural gas. Thermodynamics of CO hydrogenation shows that ethanol is favored as the sole product at conditions of practical interest, but if methane is allowed as product in this analysis, essentially no ethanol is formed at equilibrium. The kinetics of ethanol formation must therefore be maximized. Although rhodium-based catalysts give C{sup 2+} oxygenates with high selectivity, their prohibitive cost has spurred research on less expensive copper-based alternatives. Copper-based catalysts require an optimum amount of promoter to suppress undesired reactions and maximize the yields of ethanol and higher alcohols. Common promoters include alkali, transition metals and their oxides, and rare earth oxides. Careful selection of operating variables is also necessary to achieve the desired activity and selectivity. This review describes the effects of promoters, supports, and operating conditions on the performance of copper-based catalysts for conversion of dry syngas to ethanol and higher alcohols. Proposed mechanisms from the literature for ethanol and higher-alcohol synthesis are outlined.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the catalytic reaction between alcohols and dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Koledin, S. N.; Shchadneva, N. A.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between alcohols and dimethyl carbonate, catalyzed by dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, is studied by means of mathematical modeling. Kinetic models for possible schemes of chemical transformations are constructed at different initial concentrations of the catalyst. Based on a comparative analysis of activation energies of possible stages of chemical transformations, possible reaction pathways are determined and an appropriate mechanism is selected.

  8. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Chemical Models for Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2008-12-12

    Bio-oil (product liquids from fast pyrolysis of biomass) is a complex mixture of oxygenates derived from the thermal breakdown of the bio-polymers in biomass. In the case of lignocellulosic biomass, the structures of three major components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, are well represented by the bio-oil components. In order to study the chemical mechanisms of catalytic hydroprocessing of bio-oil, three model compounds were chosen to represent those components. Guaiacol represents the large number of mono- and di-methoxy phenols found in bio-oil derived from softwood or hardwood, respectively. Furfural represents a major pyrolysis product group from cellulosics. Acetic acid is a major product from biomass pyrolysis, derived from the hemicellulose, which has important impacts on the further processing of the bio-oil because of the acidic character. These three compounds were processed using palladium or ruthenium catalyst over a temperature range from 150°C to 300°C. The batch reactor was sampled during each test over a period of four hours. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with both a mass selective detector and a flame ionization detector. The products were determined and the reaction pathways for their formation are suggested based on these results. Both temperature and catalyst metal have significant effects on the product composition.

  9. Catalytic photooxidation of alcohols by an unsymmetrical tetra(pyridyl)pyrazine-bridged dinuclear Ru complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Rein, Francisca N; Scott, Brian L; Rocha, Reginaldo C

    2011-05-09

    The dinuclear complexes [(tpy)Ru(tppz)Ru(bpy)(L)](n+) (where L is Cl(-) or H(2)O, tpy and bpy are the terminal ligands 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and 2,2'-bipyridine, and tppz is the bridging backbone 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) were prepared and structurally and electronically characterized. The mononuclear complexes [(tpy)Ru(tppz)](2+) and [(tppz)Ru(bpy)(L)](m+) were also prepared and studied for comparison. The proton-coupled, multi-electron photooxidation reactivity of the aquo dinuclear species was shown through the photocatalytic dehydrogenation of a series of primary and secondary alcohols. Under simulated solar irradiation and in the presence of a sacrificial electron acceptor, the photoactivated chromophore-catalyst complex (in aqueous solutions at room temperature and ambient pressure conditions) can perform the visible-light-driven conversion of aliphatic and benzylic alcohols into the corresponding carbonyl products (i.e., aldehydes or ketones) with 100% product selectivity and several tens of turnover cycles, as probed by NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Moreover, for aliphatic substrates, the activity of the photocatalyst was found to be highly selective toward secondary alcohols, with no significant product formed from primary alcohols. Comparison of the activity of this tppz-bridged complex with that of the analogue containing a back-to-back terpyridine bridge (tpy-tpy, i.e., 6',6''-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,2':4',4'':2'',2'''-quaterpyridine) demonstrated that the latter is a superior photocatalyst toward the oxidation of alcohols. The much stronger electronic coupling with significant delocalization across the strongly electron-accepting tppz bridge facilitates charge trapping between the chromophore and catalyst centers and therefore is presumably responsible for the decreased catalytic performance.

  10. Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase: catalytic site metal coordination geometry and protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsen, L; Bauer, R; Bjerrum, M J; Zeppezauer, M; Adolph, H W; Formicka, G; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, E

    1995-05-30

    The coordination geometry of the catalytic site in Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) has been investigated as a function of pH using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma-rays (PAC). LADH in solution fully loaded with cadmium, including radioactive 111mCd in the catalytic site [Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH], was studied over the pH range 7.9-11.5. Analysis of the PAC spectra showed the ionization of a group with pKa of 11. This pKa value is about 2 pH units higher than that of native zinc-containing LADH. A pKa of 9.6 was found for the binary complex of Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH with NAD+. This value is also about 2 pH units higher than that of the binary complex of native zinc-containing enzyme and NAD+. No pH dependency was detected for the binary complex of Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH with NADH within the pH range measured (pH 8.3-11.5). Assuming that metal-coordinated water is the ionizing group [Kvassman, J., & Pettersson, G. (1979) Eur. J. Biochem. 100, 115-123], we conclude that the larger ionic radius of Cd(II) relative to Zn(II) in the catalytic site causes the elevated pKa values of metal-bound water. Interpretation of nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters derived from PAC spectra is based on the use of the angular overlap model, using the coordinates for the catalytic zinc site from the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of the ternary complex between LADH, NADH, and dimethyl sulfoxide as a model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Catalytic conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Yongwu; Yu, Fei; Hu, Jin; ...

    2012-04-12

    Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was synthesized by the co-precipitation method. Mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas was studied in a half-inch tubular reactor system after the catalyst was reduced. Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The liquid phase products (alcohol phase and hydrocarbon phase) were analyzed by GC-MS and the gas phase products were analyzed by GC. The results showed that Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst had high catalytic activity and high alcohol selectivity. The maximal CO conversion rate was 72%, and the yield of alcohol and hydrocarbons were also very high. Cumore » (111) was the active site for mixed alcohols synthesis, Fe2C (101) was the active site for olefin and paraffin synthesis. The reaction mechanism of mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was proposed. Here, Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst can be regarded as a potential candidate for catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas to mixed alcohols.« less

  12. Catalytic conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yongwu; Yu, Fei; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jian

    2012-04-12

    Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was synthesized by the co-precipitation method. Mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas was studied in a half-inch tubular reactor system after the catalyst was reduced. Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The liquid phase products (alcohol phase and hydrocarbon phase) were analyzed by GC-MS and the gas phase products were analyzed by GC. The results showed that Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst had high catalytic activity and high alcohol selectivity. The maximal CO conversion rate was 72%, and the yield of alcohol and hydrocarbons were also very high. Cu (111) was the active site for mixed alcohols synthesis, Fe2C (101) was the active site for olefin and paraffin synthesis. The reaction mechanism of mixed alcohols synthesis from syngas over Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst was proposed. Here, Zn-Mn promoted Cu-Fe based catalyst can be regarded as a potential candidate for catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas to mixed alcohols.

  13. Catalytic thermal treatment (catalytic thermolysis) of a rice grain-based biodigester effluent of an alcohol distillery plant.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Abhinesh Kumar; Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar; Mazumdar, Bidyut; Choudhary, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic thermolysis (CT) process is an effective and novel approach to treat rice grain-based biodigester effluent (BDE) of the distillery plant. CT treatment of rice grain-based distillery wastewater was carried out in a 0.5 dm(3) thermolytic batch reactor using different catalysts such as CuO, copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate. With the CuO catalyst, a temperature of 95°C, catalyst loading of 4 g/dm(3) and pH 5 were found to be optimal, obtaining a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal of 80.4% and 72%, respectively. The initial pH (pHi) was an important parameter to remove COD and colour from BDE. At higher pHi (pH 9.5), less COD and colour reduction were observed. The settling characteristics of CT-treated sludge were also analysed at different temperatures. It was noted that the treated slurry at a temperature of 80°C gave best settling characteristics. Characteristics of residues are also analysed at different pH.

  14. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-07

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  15. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  16. Radiation-chemical preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, Anastasia V.; Kitaeva, Natalia K.; Duflot, Vladimir R.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports the usage of method of radiation-chemical synthesis to prepare cross-linked hydrogels from poly(vinyl alcohol) modified with glycidyl methacrylate. Synthesis kinetics of modified poly(vinyl alcohol) and properties of hydrogels were studied. The gel fraction, swelling, mechanical properties, and water content of the hydrogels were measured. It was found that gel fraction increases with increasing radiation dose, concentration of modified poly(vinyl alcohol), and reaches 60%. It was established by differential scanning calorimetry that a fraction of the "bound" water in hydrogels is 50-70% and independent of gel fraction content. In addition to "bound" and "free" states, water in hydrogels is also present in the intermediate state.

  17. Enhanced catalytic properties of mesoporous mordenite for benzylation of benzene with benzyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Sandeep K.; Viswanadham, Nagabhatla

    2017-01-01

    Zeolite mordenite has been treated with nitric acid at different severities so as to facilitate the framework dealumination and optimization of the textural properties such as acidity and porosity. The samples obtained have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, SEM, TEM, surface area, porosity by N2 adsorption and ammonia TPD. The resultant samples have been evaluated towards the bulky alkylation reaction of benzylation of benzene with benzyl alcohol. The studies indicated the improvement in the textural properties such as surface area, pore volume and acidity of the samples after the acid treatment. While, the phenomenon of enhancement in properties was exhibited by all the acid treated mordenite samples, the highest improvement in properties was observed at a particular condition of acid treatment (SM-2 sample). This particular sample also exhibited highest acidity and the presence of ∼10 nm size pores that resulted in the effective catalytic activity towards the bulky alkylation reaction of benzene with benzyl alcohol to produce high yields of di-phenyl methane.

  18. Catalytic decomposition of diazomethane as a general method for the methylenation of chemical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilov, Yury V.; Dokitchev, V. A.; Dzhemilev, Usein M.; Nefedov, Oleg M.

    1993-09-01

    The principal advances and trends in the application of diazomethane as a methylenating agent in synthetic chemistry using transition and non-transition metal compounds as catalysts are surveyed and analysed. The catalytic reactions of diazomethane with olefins, acethylenes, aromatic compounds, ketones, alcohols and amines are examined. A systematic account is given of data concerning the influence of the structure of the initial substrates and of the nature of the catalyst components on the regio- and stereo-selectivity of the reactions considered. The possibilities of the catalytic conversion by diazomethane (generated in situ) of unsaturated compounds into cyclopropane derivatives are considered. The bibliography includes 284 references.

  19. Solar photochemical oxidation of alcohols using catalytic hydroquinone and copper nanoparticles under oxygen: oxidative cleavage of lignin models.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna J; Moody, Christopher J

    2014-11-21

    Alcohols are converted into to their corresponding carbonyl compounds using catalytic amounts of 1,4-hydroquinone with a copper nanoparticle electron transfer mediator with oxygen as the terminal oxidant in acetone as solvent under visible light irradiation. These conditions employing biorenewable hydroquinone as reagent were developed from initial experiments using stoichiometric amounts of 1,4-benzoquinone as oxidant. A range of benzylic and aliphatic primary and secondary alcohols are oxidized, affording the corresponding aldehydes or ketones in moderate to excellent yields. The methodology is also applicable to the oxidative degradation of lignin model compounds that undergo C-C bond cleavage to give simple aromatic compounds.

  20. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-08

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation.

  1. Work function shifts of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas visualized by terahertz chemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiwa, Toshihiko; Hagiwara, Takafumi; Shinomiya, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Kenji; Tsukada, Keiji

    2012-05-21

    Terahertz chemical microscopy (TCM) was applied to visualize the distribution of the work function shift of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas. TCM measures the chemical potential on the surface of a SiO(2)/Si/sapphire sensing plate without any contact with the plate. By controlling the bias voltage between an electrode on the SiO(2)/ surface and the Si layer, the relationship between the voltage and the THz amplitude from the sensing plate can be obtained. As a demonstration, two types of structures were fabricated on the sensing plate, and the work function shifts due to catalytic reactions were visualized.

  2. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal's structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  3. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal`s structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  4. Catalytic conversion of renewable biomass resources to fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; West, Ryan M; Dumesic, James A

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is renewable and cheap, and it has the potential to displace fossil fuels in the production of fuels and chemicals. Biomass-derived carboxylic acids are important compounds that can be used as platform molecules for the production of a variety of important chemicals on a large scale. Lactic acid, a prototypical biomass derivative, and levulinic acid, an important chemical feedstock produced by hydrolysis of waste cellulosic materials, can be upgraded using bifunctional catalysts (those containing metal and acid sites), which allows the integration of several transformations (e.g., oxygen removal and C-C coupling) in a single catalyst bed. This coupling between active sites is beneficial in that it reduces the complexity and cost of the biomass conversion processes. Deoxygenation of biomass derivatives is a requisite step for the production of fuels and chemicals, and strategies are proposed to minimize the consumption of hydrogen from an external source during this process.

  5. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  6. Correlation between the microstructures of graphite oxides and their catalytic behaviors in air oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Geng, Longlong; Wu, Shujie; Zou, Yongcun; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2014-05-01

    A series of graphite oxide (GO) materials were obtained by thermal treatment of oxidized natural graphite powder at different temperatures (from 100 to 200 °C). The microstructure evolution (i.e., layer structure and surface functional groups) of the graphite oxide during the heating process is studied by various characterization means, including XRD, N2 adsorption, TG-DTA, in situ DRIFT, XPS, Raman, TEM and Boehm titration. The characterization results show that the structures of GO materials change gradually from multilayer sheets to a transparent ultrathin 2D structure of the carbon sheets. The concentration of surface COH and HOCO groups decrease significantly upon treating temperature increasing. Benzyl alcohol oxidation with air as oxidant source was carried out to detect the catalytic behaviors of different GO materials. The activities of GO materials decrease with the increase of treating temperatures. It shows that the structure properties, including ultrathin sheets and high specific surface area, are not crucial factors affecting the catalytic activity. The type and amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups of GO materials tightly correlates with the catalytic performance. Carboxylic groups on the surface of GO should act as oxidative sites for benzyl alcohol and the reduced form could be reoxidized by molecular oxygen.

  7. Self-propulsion and interactions of catalytic particles in a chemically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic "machines," such as catalytic rods or colloids, can self-propel and interact by generating gradients of their substrates. We theoretically investigate the behaviors of such machines in a chemically active environment where their catalytic substrates are continuously synthesized and destroyed, as occurs in living cells. We show how the kinetic properties of the medium modulate self-propulsion and pairwise interactions between machines, with the latter controlled by a tunable characteristic interaction range analogous to the Debye screening length in an electrolytic solution. Finally, we discuss the effective force arising between interacting machines and possible biological applications, such as partitioning of bacterial plasmids.

  8. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  9. Chemicals from Lignin by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, from Product Control to Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Custodis, Victoria; Hemberger, Patrick; Bährle, Christian; Vogel, Frédéric; Jeschk, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of lignin into renewable and value-added chemicals by thermal processes, especially pyrolysis, receives great attention. The products may serve as feedstock for chemicals and fuels and contribute to the development of a sustainable society. However, the application of lignin conversion is limited by the low selectivity from lignin to the desired products. The opportunities for catalysis to selectively convert lignin into useful chemicals by catalytic fast pyrolysis and our efforts to elucidate the mechanism of lignin pyrolysis are discussed. Possible research directions will be identified.

  10. Catalytic gold nanoparticle driven pH specific chemical locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Panda, Biswa Ranjan; Paul, Anumita; Basu, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticle (Au NP) catalyzed decomposition of alkaline hydrogen peroxide has been utilized in driving chemical locomotives in a liquid. Au NPs deposited on spherical micron sized polymer resin beads catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) in the pH range 9.1-10.8. The O(2) gas bubbles produced in the decomposition moved the beads upward with average velocities that depended on the pH of the solution. The measured average velocity of the bead increased with the increase in pH in the range 9.1-10.8. Above this pH, the self-decomposition of H(2)O(2) produced sufficient bubbles in the medium that made the motion haphazard and thus prevented a clear measurement of the velocity. The observed accelerated motion of the locomotive has been explained by considering the time-dependent growth of O(2) gas bubbles on the polymer, while taking into consideration desorption and other factors.

  11. Catalytic performance of carbon nanotubes in H2O2 decomposition: experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Voitko, Katerina; Tóth, Ajna; Demianenko, Evgenij; Dobos, Gábor; Berke, Barbara; Bakalinska, Olga; Grebenyuk, Anatolij; Tombácz, Etelka; Kuts, Volodymyr; Tarasenko, Yurij; Kartel, Mykola; László, Krisztina

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface chemistry was studied in the decomposition reaction of H2O2 at various values of pH and temperature. A comparative analysis of experimental and quantum chemical calculation results is given. It has been shown that both the lowest calculated activation energy (∼18.9 kJ/mol) and the highest rate constant correspond to the N-containing CNT. The calculated chemisorption energy values correlate with the operation stability of MWCNTs. Based on the proposed quantum chemical model it was found that the catalytic activity of carbon materials in electron transfer reactions is controlled by their electron donor capability.

  12. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase by Chemical Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Meekrathok, Piyanat; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase) is a chitinolytic enzyme responsible for the successive degradation of chitin fragments to GlcNAc monomers, activating the onset of the chitin catabolic cascade in marine Vibrios. Methods Two invariant acidic pairs (Asp303-Asp304 and Asp437-Glu438) of VhGlcNAcase were mutated using a site-directed mutagenesis strategy. The effects of these mutations were examined and the catalytic roles of these active-site residues were elucidated using a chemical rescue approach. Enhancement of the enzymic activity of the VhGlcNAcase mutants was evaluated by a colorimetric assay using pNP-GlcNAc as substrate. Results Substitution of Asp303, Asp304, Asp437 or Glu438 with Ala/Asn/Gln produced a dramatic loss of the GlcNAcase activity. However, the activity of the inactive D437A mutant was recovered in the presence of sodium formate. Our kinetic data suggest that formate ion plays a nucleophilic role by mimicking the β-COO-side chain of Asp437, thereby stabilizing the reaction intermediate during both the glycosylation and the deglycosylation steps. Conclusions Chemical rescue of the inactive D437A mutant of VhGlcNAcase by an added nucleophile helped to identify Asp437 as the catalytic nucleophile/base, and hence its acidic partner Glu438 as the catalytic proton donor/acceptor. General Significance Identification of the catalytic nucleophile of VhGlcNAcases supports the proposal of a substrate-assisted mechanism of GH20 GlcNAcases, requiring the catalytic pair Asp437-Glu438 for catalysis. The results suggest the mechanistic basis of the participation of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase in the chitin catabolic pathway of marine Vibrios. PMID:26870945

  13. Catalytic hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols with complete retention of configuration.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Tamura, Riku; Takeda, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-06-25

    Rh-MoOx/SiO2 is an effective heterogeneous catalyst for selective hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols in a water solvent. MoOx modification of Rh drastically enhanced the activity and improved the selectivity and ee. Various amino alcohols were obtained in high yields (90-94%) with complete retention of configuration.

  14. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light. PMID:27656687

  15. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle A; Zahran, Elsayed M; Wilbon, Azaan S; Besmer, Alexander V; Cendan, Vincent J; Ranson, William A; Lawrence, Randy L; Cohn, Joshua L; Bachas, Leonidas G; Knecht, Marc R

    2016-07-31

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light.

  16. Catalytic regioselective introduction of allyl alcohol into the nonpolar polyolefins: development of one-pot synthesis of hydroxyl-capped polyolefins mediated by a new metallocene IF catalyst.

    PubMed

    Imuta, Jun-ichi; Kashiwa, Norio; Toda, Yoshihisa

    2002-02-20

    A new catalytic regioselective one-pot synthesis of hydroxyl-capped polyolefins is reported. This synthesis employs a new stereorigid bridged metallocene having an indenyl and a fluorenyl ligand named IF catalyst 1, exhibiting high catalytic performances. Here, we report on (1) the first example of allyl alcohol incorporation into the nonpolar polymer backbone using IF catalyst 1 and methylaluminoxane with high activity, high molecular weight, and high polar monomer uptake at high temperature, and (2) the first example of predominant end-site-selective introduction of an alcohol group into the polyolefins. Moreover, we observed the mixed regioselectivity by the type of alkylaluminum.

  17. The study of synergistic effects of alcohols on the catalytic hydrogenation of brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Kartseva, N.V.

    1998-12-31

    The hydrogenation of brown coal in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol containing medium in the presence of catalysts was studied. The effects of different catalysts, alcohols, the proportion between the quantity of hydrogen, alcohols and tetralin on the conversion of coal, product yields, composition and molecular weight of solubles were analyzed. The synergistic effects of the mixtures of methanol and ethanol with tetralin and with hydrogen on the conversion of brown coal were observed at 380 C and 430 C in the presence of supported Fe, Fe-Mo, Ni, and Co hydroxide catalysts. Small amounts of methanol and ethanol additives induced the improved coal swelling and conversion into soluble products with diminished molecular weight. Synergistic effect was found to depend on the catalyst concentration, hydrogen pressure and alcohol structure. Coal swelling, hydrogenation and alkylation reactions were evaluated. The nature of the promoting effect of alcohols on coal liquefaction is discussed.

  18. Inferring Alcoholism SNPs and Regulatory Chemical Compounds Based on Ensemble Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Sun, Jiatong; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Xianyue; Wu, Lingxiang; Wu, Wei; Wang, Qh

    2016-12-20

    The disturbance of consciousness is one of the most common symptoms of those have alcoholism and may cause disability and mortality. Previous studies indicated that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) increase the susceptibility of alcoholism. In this study, we utilized the Ensemble Bayesian Network (EBN) method to identify causal SNPs of alcoholism based on the verified GAW14 data. Thirteen out of eighteen SNPs directly connected with alcoholism were found concordance with potential risk regions of alcoholism in OMIM database. As a number of SNPs were found contributing to alteration on gene expression, known as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), we further sought to identify chemical compounds acting as regulators of alcoholism genes captured by causal SNPs. Chloroprene and valproic acid were identified as the expression regulators for genes C11orf66 and SALL3 which were captured by alcoholism SNPs, respectively.

  19. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fourteenth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The project objectives are: (1) To discover, study, and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. In particular, novel heterogeneous catalysts will be studied and optimized for the production of: (a) C{sub 1}-C{sub 5} alcohols using conventional methanol synthesis conditions, and (b) methanol and isobutanol mixtures which may be used for the downstream synthesis of MTBE or related oxygenates. (2) To explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. (3) To develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, catalyst, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for the conversion of syngas to liquid products. The authors have prepared a comparative Zn/Cr spinel oxide support that contains excess ZnO and have looked at the catalytic performance of (a) the bare support, (b) a potassium traverse on the bare support to determine the effect of alkali addition in the absence of Pd and (c) a potassium traverse on the support impregnated with 6 wt% Pd. The bare support is an inefficient methanol catalyst. Alkali addition results in an increase in selectivity to total alcohols vs. the bare support and a dramatic increase higher alcohol synthesis. Pd addition results in further improvements in performance. Selectivities increase with K loading. The 5 wt% K, 5.9 wt% Pd catalyst produces > 100 g/kg-hr of isobutanol at 440 C and 1,000 psi, with 85% selectivity to total alcohols and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of <2. The authors intend to continue formulation screening using K/Pd formulations on ZnO and ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared conventionally and via controlled pH precipitation. They will also examine the effect of Cs in place of K as the alkali promoter and the use of Rh instead of Pd as a promoter.

  20. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  1. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M; Ramesh, R

    2015-03-05

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E=P or As; X=Cl or Br; L=NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d(5)) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx≠gy≠gz) at 77K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(IV)-Ru(IV); Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(II)-Ru(II)) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent Ru(V)O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  2. Catalytic enantioselective amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology: cooperative catalysis by iridium and a chiral phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Lim, Ching-Si; Sim, Derek Sui Boon; Pan, Hui-Jie; Zhao, Yu

    2014-01-27

    The catalytic asymmetric reduction of ketimines has been explored extensively for the synthesis of chiral amines, with reductants ranging from Hantzsch esters, silanes, and formic acid to H2 gas. Alternatively, the amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology has proven a highly atom economical and green method for the production of amines without an external reductant, as the alcohol substrate serves as the H2 donor. A catalytic enantioselective variant of this process for the synthesis of chiral amines, however, was not known. We have examined various transition-metal complexes supported by chiral ligands known for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions, in combination with chiral Brønsted acids, which proved essential for the formation of the imine intermediate and the transfer-hydrogenation step. Our studies led to an asymmetric amination of alcohols to provide access to a wide range of chiral amines with good to excellent enantioselectivity.

  3. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  4. The chemical and catalytic properties of nanocrystalline metal oxides prepared through modified sol-gel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnes, Corrie Leigh

    The goal of this research was to synthesize, characterize and study the chemical properties of nanocrystalline metal oxides. Nanocrystalline (NC) ZnO, CuO, NiO, Al2O3, and the binary Al2O 3/MgO and ZnO/CuO were prepared through modified sol gel methods. These NC metal oxides were studied in comparison to the commercial (CM) metal oxides. The samples were characterized by XRD, TGA, FTIR, BET, and TEM. The NC samples were all accompanied by a significant increase in surface area and decrease in crystallite size. Several chemical reactions were studied to compare the NC samples to the CM samples. One of the reactions involved a high temperature reaction between carbon tetrachloride and the oxide to form carbon dioxide and the corresponding metal chloride. A similar high temperature reaction was conducted between the metal oxide and hydrogen sulfide to form water and the corresponding metal sulfide. A room temperature gas phase adsorption was studied where SO2 was adsorbed onto the oxide. A liquid phase adsorption conducted at room temperature was the destructive adsorption of paraoxon (a toxic insecticide). In all reactions the NC samples exhibited greater activity, destroying or adsorbing a larger amount of the toxins compared to the CM samples. To better study surface area effects catalytic reactions were also studied. The catalysis of methanol was studied over the nanocrystalline ZnO, CuO, NiO, and ZnO/CuO samples in comparison to their commercial counterparts. In most cases the NC samples proved to be more active catalysts, having higher percent conversions and turnover numbers. A second catalytic reaction was also studied, this reaction was investigated to look at the support effects. The catalysis of cyclopropane to propane was studied over Pt and Co catalysts. These catalysts were supported onto NC and CM alumina by impregnation. By observing differences in the catalytic behavior, support effects have become apparent.

  5. Enhanced catalytic activity in strained chemically exfoliated WS₂ nanosheets for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Li, Junwen; Silva, Rafael; Alves, Diego C B; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Shenoy, Vivek B; Eda, Goki; Chhowalla, Manish

    2013-09-01

    Efficient evolution of hydrogen through electrocatalysis at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy. Hydrogen evolution can be easily achieved by electrolysis at large potentials that can be lowered with expensive platinum-based catalysts. Replacement of Pt with inexpensive, earth-abundant electrocatalysts would be significantly beneficial for clean and efficient hydrogen evolution. To this end, promising results have been reported using 2H (trigonal prismatic) XS₂ (where X  =  Mo or W) nanoparticles with a high concentration of metallic edges. The key challenges for XS₂ are increasing the number and catalytic activity of active sites. Here we report monolayered nanosheets of chemically exfoliated WS₂ as efficient catalysts for hydrogen evolution with very low overpotentials. Analyses indicate that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of WS₂ is associated with the high concentration of the strained metallic 1T (octahedral) phase in the as-exfoliated nanosheets. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated WS₂ nanosheets are interesting catalysts for hydrogen evolution.

  6. Thermal and chemical approaches for oxygen catalytic recombination evaluation on ceramic materials at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balat, M.; Czerniak, M.; Badie, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    During the atmospheric entry phase, the physico-chemical phenomena taking place on space shuttle walls can lead to an important excess of heating and damage of the protective materials. The aim of this work is the study of the catalytic recombination of atomic oxygen under plasma conditions chosen to simulate the atmospheric reentry. To do that, we have developed an experimental set-up MESOX (Moyen d'Essai Solaire d'OXydation), which associates a solar radiation concentrator and a microwave generator to reach high temperature, low enthalpy flow and low pressure plasma with an air gas flow. The study of atomic oxygen recombination on silicon- or aluminum-based ceramic materials, at high temperature (1000-1800 K) has been done for different pressures (200-2000 Pa) by a thermal and a chemical understanding. The results give a catalycity scale of materials (thermal recombination flux, qrec, and coefficient of atomic oxygen recombination, γ). The catalycity activity is weak for the sintered SiC target with atomic oxygen recombination flux reaching 35 kW/m 2, however, for a target of sintered Al 2O 3, catalytic effect is obtained with energy fluxes between 90 to 180 kW/m 2. The recombination coefficient γ confirms the catalycity scale of these ceramic materials.

  7. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's how many accidents occur. continue What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  8. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  9. Catalytic cascade hydroalkoxylation/isomerization/ [4 + 2] cycloaddition using enyne alcohols as latent dienes or dienophiles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Li, Kang-Nan; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2013-10-21

    Enyne alcohols can react as precursors of either dienes or dienophiles with different substrates after hydroxylation and isomerization by gold catalysis. As such, oxa-bridged tricyclo[5.2.2.02,6]-undec-8-ene-3,5-dione derivatives have been obtained by the Diels–Alder reaction and tetrahydro-1H-furo[3,4-c]pyran derivatives could be accessed by the hetero-Diels–Alder cycloaddition.

  10. Catalytic transformation of esters of 1,2-azido alcohols into α-amido ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongjin; Pak, Han Kyu; Rhee, Young Ho; Park, Jaiwook

    2016-05-05

    The esters of 1,2-azido alcohols were transformed into α-amido ketones without external oxidants through the Ru-catalyzed formation of N-H imines with the liberation of N2 followed by intramolecular migration of the acyl moiety. A wide range of α-amido ketones were obtained, and one-pot transformation into the corresponding oxazoles (or a thiazole) was demonstrated.

  11. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, Jr, H W; Wentworth, W E

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  12. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A What's in this article? ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  13. Catalytic conversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to biofuels in supercritical alcohols over zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Ma, Rui; Ma, Zewei; Li, Yongdan

    2016-06-01

    Microalgae have been considered as the feedstock for the third generation biofuels production, given its high lipid content and fast productivity. Herein, a catalytic approach for microalgae liquefaction to biocrude is examined in a temperature range of 250-300°C in methanol and ethanol over zeolites. Higher biocrude yield was achieved in ethanol and at lower temperatures, while better quality biocrude with higher light biocrude ratio and lower average molecular weight (Mw) was favored in methanol and at higher temperatures. Application of zeolites improves the biocrude quality significantly. Among the catalysts, HY shows the strongest acidity and performs the best to produce high quality biocrude. Solid residues have been extensively explored with thermal gravity analysis and elemental analysis. It is reported for the first time that up to 99wt.% of sulfur is deposited in the solid residue at 250°C for both solvents.

  14. The interaction of catalytic metal ions and ionizing groups in equilibrium studies and in transient intermediates of metal-substituted alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Maret, W; Gerber, M; Zeppezauer, M; Dunn, M F

    1985-01-01

    The step of ternary complex interconversion in the reaction catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase has been resolved into five distinct molecular species with the aid of metal-substitution studies in combination with rapid-scanning spectrophotometry. A correlation with electronic absorption spectra at equilibrium provides structural insights into these intermediates. In contrast to NADH, NAD+ only leads to a conformational change of the protein when a negative charge has been created in the vicinity of the catalytic metal ion. This paper presents also a reevaluation of previous assignments of catalytically important groups in the light of some recent results.

  15. Click on silica: systematic immobilization of Co(II) Schiff bases to the mesoporous silica via click reaction and their catalytic activity for aerobic oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Rana, Bharat S; Jain, Suman L; Singh, Bhawan; Bhaumik, Asim; Sain, Bir; Sinha, Anil K

    2010-09-07

    The systematic immobilization of cobalt(II) Schiff base complexes on SBA-15 mesoporous silica via copper catalyzed [3 + 2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click reaction" involving either step-wise synthesis of silica-bound Schiff base ligand followed by its subsequent complexation with cobalt ions, or by the direct immobilization of preformed Co(II) Schiff base complex to the silica support is described. The catalytic activity of the prepared complexes was studied for the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen as oxidant. The immobilized complexes were recycled for several runs without loss in catalytic activity and no leaching was observed during this course.

  16. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds.

  17. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  18. Cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma catalytic effect on chemical methods of silver nano-particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Zahra; Khani, Mohammad Reza; Shokri, Babak

    2016-11-01

    In this study, cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used to study the catalytic effect on chemical methods of silver nano-particles for the first time. In this method, the processing time is short and the temperature of reaction is low. Also, the reactor is very simple, inexpensive, and accessible. In this work, pure AgNO3 as the precursor agent and poly vinyl pyrrolidone as the macromolecular surfactant were dissolved in ethanol as the solvent. UV-Vis and XRD were used to identify the colloidal and powder nano-particles, respectively. Optical emission spectroscopy was also used to identify the active species in plasma. Effects of gas flow rate, voltage, volume of solution, and processing time were also studied. Moreover, TEM and SEM images presented the mean diameter of nano-particle size around 10 to 20 nm. The results have been very promising.

  19. Modification of tubular ceramic membranes with carbon nanotubes using catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc Trung; Thieffry, Guillemette; Jacob, Matthieu; Batiot-Dupeyrat, Catherine; Teychene, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully grown on tubular ceramic membranes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. CNTs were synthesized at 650°C for 3-6 h under a 120 mL min(-1) flow of C2H6 on ceramic membranes impregnated with iron salt. The synthesis procedure was beforehand optimized in terms of catalyst amount, impregnation duration and reaction temperature, using small pieces of tubular ceramic membranes. The yield, size and structure of the CNTs produced were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis and microscopic imaging techniques. Afterwards, preliminary filtration tests with alginate and phenol were performed on two modified tubular membranes. The results indicate that the addition of CNTs on the membrane material increased the permeability of ceramic membrane and its ability to reject alginate and adsorb phenol, yet decreased its fouling resistance.

  20. Pretreatment of empty palm fruit bunch for production of chemicals via catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Misson, Mailin; Haron, Roslindawati; Kamaroddin, Mohd Fadhzir Ahmad; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2009-06-01

    The effect of chemical pretreatments using NaOH, H(2)O(2), and Ca(OH)(2) on Empty Palm Fruit Bunches (EPFB) to degrade EPFB lignin before pyrolysis was investigated. Spectrophotometer analysis proved consecutive addition of NaOH and H(2)O(2) decomposed almost 100% of EPFB lignin compared to 44% for the Ca(OH)(2), H(2)O(2) system while NaOH and Ca(OH)(2) used exclusively could not alter lignin much. Next, the pretreated EPFB was catalytically pyrolyzed. Experimental results indicated the phenolic yields over Al-MCM-41 and HZSM-5 catalysts were 90 wt% and 80 wt%, respectively compared to 67 wt% yield for the untreated sample under the same set of conditions. Meanwhile, the experiments with HY zeolite yielded 70 wt% phenols.

  1. Inhibition and deactivation effects in catalytic wet oxidation of high-strength alcohol-distillery liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Belkacemi, K.; Larachi, F.; Hamoudi, S.; Turcotte, G.; Sayari, A.

    1999-06-01

    The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) from raw high-strength alcohol-distillery waste liquors was evaluated using three different treatments: thermolysis (T), noncatalytic wet oxidation (WO), and solid-catalyzed wet oxidation (CWO). The distillery liquors (TOC = 22,500 mg/l, sugars = 18,000 mg/l, and proteins = 13,500 mg/l) were produced by alcoholic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates from steam-exploded timothy grass. TOC-abatement studies were conducted batchwise in a stirred autoclave to evaluate the influence of the catalyst (7:3, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} mixed oxide), oxygen partial pressure (0.5--2.5 MPa), and temperature (453--523 K) on T, WO, and CWO processes. Although CWO outperformed T and WO, TOC conversions did not exceed {approximately}60% at the highest temperature used. Experiments provided prima facie evidence for a gradual fouling of the catalyst and a developing inhibition in the liquors which impaired deep TOC removals. Occurrence of catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proven experimentally through quantitative and qualitative experiments such as elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Inhibition toward further degradation of the liquors was ascribed to the occurrence of highly stable antioxidant intermediates via the Maillard reactions between dissolved sugars and proteins. A lumping kinetic model involving both reaction inhibition by dissolved intermediates and catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proposed to account for the distribution of carbon in the liquid, solid, and the vapor phases.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A.; Spivey, James J.

    2013-05-01

    Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

  3. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents and other adults use alcohol socially — having beer or wine with dinner, for example — alcohol seems ... besides just hanging out in someone's basement drinking beer all night. Plan a trip to the movies, ...

  4. Catalytic pyrolysis-gc/ms of spirulina: evaluation of a highly proteinaceous biomass source for production of fuels and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis of microalgae offers a pathway towards the production of compounds derived from the thermal decomposition of triglycerides, proteins as well as lignocelluloses and their combinations thereof. When catalytically induced, this could lead to the production of fuels and chemicals including aro...

  5. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  6. Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis-Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-26

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0321 Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Robert Rioux PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report...Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis-Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles” (FA9550-12-1-0204) Robert M. Rioux...report The results from “Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis-Induced

  7. Catalytic lignin valorization process for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Jongerius, Anna L; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-08-01

    With dwindling reserves of fossil feedstock as a resource for chemicals production, the fraction of chemicals and energy supplied by alternative, renewable resources, such as lignin, can be expected to increase in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrate a catalytic process to valorize lignin (exemplified with kraft, organosolv, and sugarcane bagasse lignin) using a mixture of cheap, bio-renewable ethanol and water as solvent. Ethanol/water mixtures readily solubilize lignin under moderate temperatures and pressures with little residual solids. The molecular weight of the dissolved lignins was shown to be reduced by gel permeation chromatography and quantitative HSQC NMR methods. The use of liquid-phase reforming of the solubilized lignin over a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at 498 K and 58 bar is introduced to yield up to 17 % combined yield of monomeric aromatic oxygenates such as guaiacol and substituted guaiacols generating hydrogen as a useful by-product. Reduction of the lignin dissolved in ethanol/water using a supported transition metal catalyst at 473 K and 30 bar hydrogen yields up to 6 % of cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics.

  8. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of a chemical plant wastewater over platinum-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Andrzej; Trawczyński, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) of wastewater (chemical oxygen demand [COD] = 1800 mg O2/dm3) from a fine chemicals plant was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor at T = 393-473 K under total pressure of 5.0 or 8.0 MPa. Catalysts containing 0.3% wt. of platinum deposited on two supports, mixed silica-titania (SM1) and carbon black composites (CBC) were used. The CBC-supported catalyst appeared to be more active than the SM1-supported one. A slow decrease of activity of the platinum on SM1 (Pt-SM1) during the long-term operation is attributed to recrystallization of titania and leaching of a support component, while the Pt-CBC catalyst is deteriorated, owing to combustion of the support component. The power-law-kinetic equations were used to describe the rate of COD removal at CWAO over the catalysts. The kinetic parameters of COD reduction for the wastewater were determined and compared with the kinetic parameters describing phenol oxidation over the same catalysts. Rates of COD removal for the wastewater were found higher than those for phenol oxidation over the same catalysts and under identical operating conditions.

  9. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering.

  10. Catalytic Conversion of Carbon-Containing Compounds into Valuable Chemicals and Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhuo

    Conversion of carbon-containing compounds, especially C1 compounds such as carbon dioxide and methane, to valuable chemicals and fuels will hopefully address concerns over decreasing supplies of fossil fuels and mitigate the eects of greenhouse gas emissions on global climate change. Many challenges, however, remain to be addressed before these technologies may be adopted on an industrial scale. Chiefly, catalysts must be developed to activate carbon-containing compounds from their thermodynamically stable ground states, using hydrogen, electrons, or heat as energy sources. We chose as model catalytic systems: 1) Metathesis of ethene and 2-butene; 2) Methane dehydrogenation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We developed three computational methodologies to study these processes across a range of length and time scales. First, we investigated how electronic structure affects the properties and reactivity of these catalyst systems; by computing the partial electronic density of states, electronic localization function, and excess spin density, we showed how redox supports, such as ceria, promote electron transfer reactions. We applied this to the studies of methane activation and carbon dioxide activation. Second, we developed a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach to calculate energies of activation at nite temperatures, based on the Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi principle and the Nudged Elastic Band method. Third, we developed an approach to numerically compute heat capacities and other thermodynamic properties on extended catalytic systems that are comparable in accuracy and precision to methods that have been well-developed for gas-phase molecules. We applied these to the studies of metathesis propagation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We gained mechanistic, thermodynamic, and kinetic insight into the elementary steps that comprise larger reaction networks of interest to the broader catalysis community. Ultimately, these theoretical and computational predictions

  11. Catalytic activity of lignin peroxidase and partition of veratryl alcohol in AOT/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Huang, Xirong; Li, Yuezhong; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji

    2006-04-01

    The activity of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and the partition of its optimum substrate veratryl alcohol (VA) in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles were studied in this paper to understand the microheterogeneous effect of the medium on the catalytic properties of LiP hosted in the reverse micelle. Results showed that LiP from Phanerochaete chrysosporium could express its activity in the reverse micelles, but its activity depended, to a great extent, on the composition of the reverse micelles. Optimum activity occurred at a molar ratio of water to AOT (omega0) of 11, a pH value of 3.6, and a volume ratio of isooctane to toluene of 7-9. Under optimum conditions, the half-life of LiP was circa 12 h. The dependence of LiP activity on the volume fraction of water in the medium (theta), at a constant omega0 value of 11, indicated that VA was mainly solubilized in the pseudophase of the reverse micelle. Based on the pseudobiphasic model and the corresponding kinetic method, a linear line can be obtained in a plot of apparent Michaelis constant of VA vs theta, and the partition coefficient of VA between the pseudophase and the organic solvent phase was determined to be 35.8, which was higher than that (22.3) between bulk water and the corresponding mixed organic solvent. H2O2 inhibited LiP at concentrations higher than 80 microM; this concentration value seems to be different from that in aqueous solution (about 3 mM). The differences mentioned above should be ascribed to the microheterogeneity and the interface of the AOT reverse micelle.

  12. All electron quantum chemical calculation of the entire enzyme system confirms a collective catalytic device in the chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2006-01-26

    To elucidate the catalytic power of enzymes, we analyzed the reaction profile of Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM) by all electron quantum chemical calculations using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ab initio-based quantum chemical calculations of the entire enzyme system, where we provide a detailed analysis of the catalytic factors that accomplish transition-state stabilization (TSS). FMO calculations deliver an ab initio-level estimate of the intermolecular interaction between the substrate and the amino acid residues of the enzyme. To clarify the catalytic role of Arg90, we calculated the reaction profile of the wild-type BsCM as well as Lys90 and Cit90 mutant BsCMs. Structural refinement and the reaction path determination were performed at the ab initio QM/MM level, and FMO calculations were applied to the QM/MM refined structures. Comparison between three types of reactions established two collective catalytic factors in the BsCM reaction: (1) the hydrogen bonds connecting the Glu78-Arg90-substrate cooperatively control the stability of TS relative to the ES complex and (2) the positive charge on Arg90 polarizes the substrate in the TS region to gain more electrostatic stabilization.

  13. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  14. Synchronizing steric and electronic effects in {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes: the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weickmann, Daniel; Frey, Wolfgang; Plietker, Bernd

    2013-02-18

    A series of new hexacoordinated {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes was prepared from [RuCl(2)(R(3)P)(3)]. Their structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic potential of this new class of complexes was tested in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. In this test reaction, the influence of the counteranion plus electronic influences at the tetradentate ligand and the phosphine ligand were examined. The electrochemistry of all complexes was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the substituent at the ligand backbone, the complexes showed a different behavior. For all N-benzyl substituted complexes, reversible Ru(II/III) redox potentials were observed, whereas the N-methyl substituted complex possessed an irreversible oxidation event at small scan rates. Furthermore, the electronic influence of different substituents at the ligand scaffold and at the phosphine on the Ru(II/III) redox potential was investigated. The measured E(0) values were correlated to the theoretically determined HOMO energies of the complexes. In addition, these HOMO energies correlated well with the reactivity of the single complexes in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. The exact balance of redox potential and reactivity appears to be crucial for synchronizing the multiple hydrogen-transfer events. The optimized catalyst structure was applied in a screening on scope and limitation in the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols.

  15. Selective heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ketone (C═O) to alcohol (OH) by magnetite nanoparticles following Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Tariq; Balouch, Aamna; Rajar, Kausar; Sirajuddin; Brohi, Imdad Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and effectively employed as heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation of ketone moiety to alcohol moiety by NaBH4 under the microwave radiation process. The improvement was achieved in percent recovery of isopropyl alcohol by varying and optimizing reaction time, power of microwave radiations and amount of catalyst. The catalytic study revealed that acetone would be converted into isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 99.5% yield in short period of reaction time, using 10 μg of magnetite NPs (Fe3O4). It was observed that the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, followed second-order of reaction and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic mechanism, which elucidated that both reactants get adsorb onto the surface of silica coated magnetite nanocatalyst to react. Consequently, the rate-determining step was the surface reaction of acetone and sodium borohydride. The current study revealed an environment friendly conversion of acetone to IPA on the basis of its fast, efficient, and highly economical method of utilization of microwave irradiation process and easy catalyst recovery.

  16. Catalytic Conversion of Short-Chain Alcohols on Atomically Dispersed Au and Pd Supported on Nanoscale Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongyang

    With the development of technologies for cellulosic biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, bio-alcohols are among the main alternative feedstocks to fossil fuels. The research pursued in my thesis was the investigation of gold and palladium as catalysts for the application of short aliphatic alcohols to hydrogen generation and value-added chemicals production. Specifically, selective methanol steam reforming and non-oxidative ethanol dehydrogenation to hydrogen and acetaldehyde were investigated in this thesis work. A major aim of the thesis was to develop atomically efficient catalysts with tuned surface chemistry for the desired reactions, using suitable synthesis methods. Methanol steam reforming (SRM) for hydrogen production has recently been investigated on gold catalysts to overcome the drawbacks of copper catalysts (deactivation, pyrophoricity). Previous work at Tufts University has shown that both CeO2 and ZnO are suitable supports for gold. In this thesis, nanoscale composite oxides ZnZrOx were prepared by a carbon hard-template method, which resulted in homogeneous distribution of Zn species in the matrix of ZrO2. Tunable surface chemistry of ZnZrO x was demonstrated by varying the Zn/Zr ratio to suppress the strong Lewis acidity of ZrO2, which leads to undesired production of CO through methanol decomposition. With atomic dispersion of gold, Au/ZnZrO x catalyzes the SRM reaction exclusively via the methanol self-coupling pathway up to 375°C. The activity of Au/ZnZrOx catalysts was compared to Au/TiO2, which is another catalyst system demonstrating atomic dispersion of gold. Similarity in the apparent activation energy of SRM on all the supported gold catalysts studied in this thesis and in the literature further confirms the same single-site Au-Ox-MO centers as active sites for SRM with indirect effects of the supports exploited. With this fundamental understanding of gold-catalyzed C1 alcohol reforming, the Au/ZnZrOx catalyst was evaluated for the

  17. Immobilization of cobalt(II) Schiff base complexes on polystyrene resin and a study of their catalytic activity for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suman; Reiser, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed [3+2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition and the Staudinger ligation are readily applicable and highly efficient for the immobilization of cobalt Schiff base complexes onto polystyrene resins. Stepwise synthesis of polymer-bound Schiff bases followed by their subsequent complexation with metal ions were successfully carried out. Direct covalent attachment of preformed homogeneous cobalt Schiff base complexes to the resins was also possible. The catalytic efficiency of the so-prepared polystyrene-bound cobalt Schiff bases was studied for the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen as oxidant. The immobilized complexes were highly efficient and even more reactive than the corresponding homogenous analogues, thus affording better yields of oxidized products within shorter reaction times. The supported catalysts could easily be recovered from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and reused for subsequent experiments with consistent catalytic activity.

  18. Improved cellular response of chemically crosslinked collagen incorporated hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl) alcohol nanofibers scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Farah Hanani; Jahir Hussain, Fathima Shahitha; Abdull Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari; Mohd Yusoff, Mashitah

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop biocompatible nanofibrous mats using hydroxyethyl cellulose with improved cellular adhesion profiles and stability and use these fibrous mats as potential scaffold for skin tissue engineering. Glutaraldehyde was used to treat the scaffolds water insoluble as well as improve their biostability for possible use in biomedical applications. Electrospinning of hydroxyethyl cellulose (5 wt%) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (15 wt%) incorporated with and without collagen was blended at (1:1:1) and (1:1) ratios, respectively, and was evaluated for optimal criteria as tissue engineering scaffolds. The nanofibrous mats were crosslinked and characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the mean diameters of blend nanofibers were gradually increased after chemically crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out to understand chemical interactions in the presence of aldehyde groups. Thermal characterization results showed that the stability of hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) and hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen nanofibers was increased with glutaraldehyde treatment. Studies on cell-scaffolds interaction were carried out by culturing human fibroblast (hFOB) cells on the nanofibers by assessing the growth, proliferation, and morphologies of cells. The scanning electron microscope results show that better cell proliferation and attachment appeared on hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen substrates after 7 days of culturing, thus, promoting the potential of electrospun scaffolds as a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Driven chemical kinetics: Optimalization of catalytic action of membrane proteins by rectangular alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuliński, Andrzej

    1992-03-01

    The chemical kinetics driven by external force in the form of a train of alternating rectangular impulses is discussed. The model of the conformational transition of a membrane protein exposed to an ac electric field, proposed by R. D. Astumian and B. Robertson [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4891 (1989)], is reconsidered. On the example of this model we show that the use of the driving field in the form of rectangular impulses has two distinct advantages over the usual sinusoidal driving. The first one is that the use of a rectangular driving field makes it possible to obtain the exact solution of the basic kinetic equation of the system. This in turn enables one to write down the simple and very good approximate solution for any form of the driving field, better than the harmonic expansion used by Astumian and Robertson. A more important advantage is the greater flexibility of the rectangular driving, which makes possible the better optimalization of the process of interest. Astumian and Robertson demonstrated that the movement of charge within the catalytic cycle provides a mechanism for the enzyme to absorb energy from an ac electric field and to use that energy to enhance the catalyzed process. In this paper we show that the use of the driving ac field in the form of alternating rectangular impulses of variable duration and amplitude (instead of the usual sinusoidal modulation) leads to further optimalization of the process. The efficiency of the energy transduction, for example, can be increased from about 25% for sinusoidal driving to about 37% for suitably chosen alternating rectangular pulses.

  20. Water and catalytic isomerization of linear allylic alcohols by [RuCp(H2O-κO)(PTA)2](+) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane).

    PubMed

    Scalambra, Franco; Serrano-Ruiz, Manuel; Romerosa, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    A new water soluble complex [RuCp(H2O-κO)(PTA)2](+) (1) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) has been synthesized and fully characterized by NMR and IR. The crystal structure of 1(CF3SO3)·3.5H2O was characterized by single crystal X-ray determination. The catalytic activity of this complex was evaluated for the isomerisation of linear allylic alcohols from 3-buten-2-ol to 1-octen-3-ol into the correspondent ketones under both an inert atmosphere and in air, using as solvents: water, the substrate, mixtures of water/substrate, MeOH and mixtures of MeOH/water. An isomerization experiment on a mixture of all the studied allylic alcohols was also carried out.

  1. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  2. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  3. One-Pot Catalytic Enantio- and Diastereoselective Syntheses of anti-, syn-cis-Disubstituted, and syn-Vinyl Cyclopropyl Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Young; Salvi, Luca; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Highly enantio- and diastereoselective methods for the synthesis of a variety of cyclopropyl alcohols are reported. These methods represent the first one-pot approaches to syn-vinyl cyclopropyl alcohols, syn-cis-disubstituted cyclopropyl alcohols, and anti-cyclopropyl alcohols from achiral precursors. The methods begin with enantioselective C–C bond formations promoted by a MIB-based zinc catalyst to generate allylic alkoxide intermediates. The intermediates are then subjected to in situ alkoxide-directed cyclopropanation to provide cyclopropyl alcohols. In the synthesis of vinyl cyclopropyl alcohols, hydroboration of enynes is followed by transmetalation of the resulting dienylborane to zinc to provide dienylzinc reagents. Enantioselective addition to aldehydes generates the requisite dienyl zinc alkoxides, which are then subjected to in situ cyclopropanation to furnish vinyl cyclopropyl alcohols. Cyclopropanation occurs at the double bond allylic to the alkoxide. Using this method, syn-vinylcyclopropyl alcohols are obtained in 65–85% yield, 76–93% ee, and >19:1 dr. To prepare anti-cyclopropanols, enantioselective addition of alkylzinc reagents to conjugated enals provides allylic zinc alkoxides. Because direct cyclopropanation provides syn-cyclopropyl alcohols, the intermediate allylic alkoxides were treated with TMSCl/Et3N to generate intermediate silyl ethers. In situ cyclopropanation of the allylic silyl ether resulted in cyclopropanation to form the anti-cyclopropyl silyl ether. Workup with TBAF affords the anti-cyclopropyl alcohols in one-pot in 60–82% yield, 89–99% ee, and ≥10:1 dr. For the synthesis of cis-disubstituted cyclopropyl alcohols, in situ generated (Z)-vinyl zinc reagents were employed in asymmetric addition to aldehydes to generate (Z)-allylic zinc alkoxides. In situ cyclopropanation provides syn-cis-disubstituted cyclopropyl alcohols in 42–70% yield, 88–97% ee, and >19:1 dr. These one-pot procedures enable the synthesis of a

  4. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  5. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  6. High-value alcohols and higher-oxidation-state compounds by catalytic Z-selective cross-metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ming Joo; Khan, R. Kashif M.; Torker, Sebastian; Yu, Miao; Mikus, Malte S.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Olefin metathesis catalysts provide access to molecules that are indispensable to physicians and researchers in the life sciences. A persisting problem, however, is the dearth of chemical transformations that directly generate acyclic Z allylic alcohols, including products that contain a hindered neighbouring substituent or reactive functional units such as a phenol, an aldehyde, or a carboxylic acid. Here we present an electronically modified ruthenium-disulfide catalyst that is effective in generating such high-value compounds by cross-metathesis. The ruthenium complex is prepared from a commercially available precursor and an easily generated air-stable zinc catechothiolate. Transformations typically proceed with 5.0 mole per cent of the complex and an inexpensive reaction partner in 4-8 hours under ambient conditions; products are obtained in up to 80 per cent yield and 98:2 Z:E diastereoselectivity. The use of this catalyst is demonstrated in the synthesis of the naturally occurring anti-tumour agent neopeltolide and in a single-step stereoselective gram-scale conversion of a renewable feedstock (oleic acid) to an anti-fungal agent. In this conversion, the new catalyst promotes cross-metathesis more efficiently than the commonly used dichloro-ruthenium complexes, indicating that its utility may extend beyond Z-selective processes.

  7. Plasmonic and catalytic AuPd nanowheels for the efficient conversion of light into chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yongjia; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-06-03

    Reinventing the wheel: Bimetallic AuPd nanowheels, a freestanding form of 2D AuPd nanostructures, were synthesized in a one-pot process. The well-defined and tunable surface plasmon resonance displayed by these nanowheels was exploited in a unique catalytic process in which light energy was used to drive catalytic reactions, such as the Suzuki coupling, with much higher efficiency than that of the conventional heating process.

  8. Development Of Hot Surface Polysilicon-Based Chemical Sensor And Actuator With Integrated Catalytic Micropatterns For Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.

    2009-05-01

    Over the last twenty years, we have followed a rapid expansion in the development of chemical sensors and microreactors for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds. However, for many of the developed gas sensors poor sensitivity and selectivity, and high-power consumption remain among one of the main drawbacks. One promising approach to increase selectivity at lower power consumption is calorimetric sensing, performed in a pulsed regime and using specific catalytic materials. In this work, we study kinetics of various catalytic oxidation reactions using micromachined hot surface polysilicon-based sensor containing sensitive and selective catalysts. The sensor acts as both thermal actuator of chemical and biochemical reactions on hot-surfaces and detector of heats (enthalpies) associated with these reactions. Using novel deposition techniques we integrated selective catalysts in an array of hot plates such that they can be thermally actuated and sensed individually. This allows selective detection and analysis of dangerous gas compounds in a mixture, specifically hydrocarbons at concentrations down to low ppm level. In this contribution we compare various techniques for the local immobilization of catalytic material on hot spots of the sensor in terms of process compatibility, mechanical stress, stability and cost.

  9. Catalytic evaluation on liquid phase oxidation of vanillyl alcohol using air and H2O2 over mesoporous Cu-Ti composite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subrata; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Ali, Tammar Hussein

    2017-02-01

    A mesoporous, highly crystalline Cu-Ti composite oxide catalyst was prepared via facile, simple and modified solution method varying Cu and Ti ratio for selective liquid phase oxidation of vanillyl alcohol. Various spectroscopic procedures were employed to systematically characterize the catalyst structural and physicochemical properties. The defect chemistry of the catalyst was confirmed from the presence of surface defects revealed through HRTEM imagery between the TiO2 (101) and Cu3TiO4 (012) planes, complemented by the XRD profiling. Further, presence of oxygen vacancy evidenced by O 1s XPS spectra were observed on the catalyst surface. Moreover, the stoichiometry of Cu and Ti in the catalyst synthesis protocol was notably found to be the vital determinant to alter the redox properties of Cu-Ti composite oxide catalyst supported by H2-TPR. O2-TPD analysis. Moreover, a rational investigation was done using different oxidants such as air and H2O2 with variables reaction conditions. The catalyst was active for liquid phase oxidation of vanillyl alcohol to vanillin with performance of 66% conversion and 71% selectivity using H2O2 in base free condition. And also, catalytic activity was significantly improved by 94% conversion with 86% selectivity to vanillin in liquid phase aerobic oxidation at the optimum reaction conditions. To expand the superiority of the catalyst, three times reusability study was also examined with appreciable catalytic activity.

  10. Chemical Engineering of Enzymes: Altered Catalytic Activity, Predictable Selectivity and Exceptional Stability of the Semisynthetic Peroxidase Seleno-Subtilisin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring, Dietmar; Schreier, Peter

    The increasing demand for enzymes as highly selective, mild, and environmentally benign catalysts is often limited by the lack of an enzyme with the desired catalytic activity or substrate selectivity and by their instability in biotechnological processes. The previous answers to these problems comprised genetically engineered enzymes and several classes of enzyme mimics. Here we describe the potential of chemical enzyme engineering: native enzymes can be modified by merely chemical means and basic equipment yielding so-called semisynthetic enzymes. Thus, the high substrate selectivity of the enzymatic peptide framework is combined with the catalytic versatility of a synthetic active site. We illustrate the potential of chemically engineered enzymes with the conception of the semisynthetic peroxidase seleno-subtilisin. First, the serine endoprotease subtilisin was crystallized and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to give cross-linked enzyme crystals which were found to be insoluble in water or organic solvents and highly stable. Second, serine 221 in the active site (Enz-OH) was chemically converted into an oxidized derivative of selenocystein (Enz-SeO2H). As a consequence, the former proteolytic enzyme gained peroxidase activity and catalyzed the selective reduction of hydroperoxides. Due to the identical binding sites of the semisynthetic peroxidase and the protease, the substrate selectivity of seleno-subtilisin was predictable in view of the well-known selectivity of subtilisin.

  11. Non-catalytic direct synthesis of graphene on Si (111) wafers by using inductively-coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sung Won; Shin, Hyunho; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-01

    We employ inductively-coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition for non-catalytic growth of graphene on a Si (111) wafer or glass substrate, which is useful for practical device applications of graphene without transfer processes. At a RF power (P) of 500 W under C2H2 flow, defect-free 3 ˜ 5-layer graphene is grown on Si (111) wafers, but on glass substrate, the layer is thicker and defective, as characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The graphene is produced on Si (111) for P down to 190 W whereas it is almost not formed on glass for P < 250 W, possibly resulting from the weak catalytic-reaction-like effect on glass. These results are discussed based on possible growth mechanisms.

  12. Effect of crystallization time on the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of the hierarchical porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Ma, Yuanyuan; Ding, Wenli; Guan, Jingqi; Wu, Shujie; Kan, Qiubin

    2010-09-15

    A series of hierarchical porous materials were prepared by a dual template method. The effect of different crystallization time on the channel architecture, morphology, acid performance of the hierarchical porous materials was investigated. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance were performed to obtain information on the physico-chemical properties of the materials. It was shown that the change in crystallization time could influence the structure/texture and surface acid properties of the hierarchical porous materials. In addition, alkylation of phenol with tert-butanol reaction was carried out to investigate the catalytic performance of the hierarchical porous materials. The results showed that the catalytic activity of the hierarchical porous materials and the selectivity to the bulkly product 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol decreased with processing time.

  13. Photo-catalytic activity of Zn1-xMnxS nanocrystals synthesized by wet chemical technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinyl pyrrolidone capped Zn1-xMnxS (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) nanocrystals have been synthesized using wet chemical co-precipitation method. Crystallographic and morphological characterization of the synthesized materials have been done using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Crystallographic studies show the zinc blende crystals having average crystallite size approx. 3 nm, which is almost similar to the average particle size calculated from electron micrographs. Atomic absorption spectrometer has been used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of synthesized nanomaterials. Photo-catalytic activity has been studied using methylene blue dye as a test contaminant. Energy resolved luminescence spectra have been recorded for the detailed description of radiative and non-radiative recombination mechanisms. Photo-catalytic activity dependence on dopant concentration and luminescence quantum yield has been studied in detail. PMID:21711502

  14. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  15. Chemical composition of volatiles in Sardinian myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) alcoholic extracts and essential oils.

    PubMed

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Barra, Andrea; Angioni, Alberto; Sarritzu, Erika; Pirisi, Filippo M

    2006-02-22

    The chemical composition of the volatile fraction of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) alcoholic extracts and essential oils from leaves and berries collected in different places in Sardinia (Italy) was studied. A simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used to isolate volatile compounds from myrtle alcoholic extracts followed by GC and GC-MS analysis allowing the detection of 24 compounds. The volatile fraction was characterized by the terpenes fraction corresponding to that of the essential oils and by a fatty acid ethyl esters fraction. The variation during extraction of the volatile fraction in alcoholic extracts of berries and leaves was evaluated. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation, and the yields were on average 0.52 +/- 0.03% (v/w dried weight) and 0.02 +/- 0.00% for leaves and berries, respectively. The essential oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and a total of 27 components were detected, accounting for 90.6-98.7% of the total essential oil composition. Strong chemical variability depending on the origin of the samples was observed. The major compounds in the essential oils were alpha-pinene (30.0 and 28.5%), 1,8-cineole (28.8 and 15.3%), and limonene (17.5 and 24.1%) in leaves and berries, respectively, and were characterized by the lack of myrtenyl acetate.

  16. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; ...

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  17. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  18. Functional carbons and carbon nanohybrids for the catalytic conversion of biomass to renewable chemicals in the condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, John; Hoff, Thomas; Liu, Chi; Pueschel, Charles; Rao, Radhika; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides opportunities to synthesize chemicals with new functionalities and grow a more sustainable chemical industry. However, new challenges emerge as research transitions from petrochemistry to biorenewable chemistry. Compared to petrochemisty, the selective conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates requires most catalytic reactions to take place at low temperatures (< 300°C) and in the condensed phase to prevent reactants and products from degrading. The stability of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid water above the normal boiling point represents one of the major challenges to overcome. Herein, we review some of the latest advances in the field with an emphasis on the role of carbon materials and carbon nanohybrids in addressing this challenge.

  19. Self-sustainable production of hydrogen, chemicals, and energy from renewable alcohols by electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bambagioni, Valentina; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Bianchini, Claudio; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Vizza, Francesco; Shen, Pei Kang

    2010-07-19

    The selective and simultaneous production of hydrogen and chemicals from renewable alcohols, such as ethanol, glycerol, and ethylene glycol, can be accomplished by means of electrolyzers in which the anode electrocatalyst is appropriately designed to promote the partial and selective oxidation of the alcohol. In the electrolyzers described herein, the production of 1 kg of hydrogen from aqueous ethanol occurs with one-third the amount of energy required by a traditional H(2)/O(2) electrolyzer, by virtue of the much lower oxidation potential of ethanol to acetate vs. water to oxygen in alkaline media (E(0)=0.10 V vs. 1.23 V). The self-sustainability of H(2) production is ensured by the simultaneous production of 25 kg of potassium acetate for every kg of H(2), if the promoting co-electrolyte is KOH.

  20. Quantitative posturagraphy as an alternative noninvasive tool for alcohol/drug/chemical testing--preliminary thoughts.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A

    1999-02-01

    This article provides preliminary ideas regarding how the quantitative posturagraphy technique can be used as an alternative noninvasive tool to currently available blood/urine test for alcohol/drug/chemical exposure. It is argued that the urine or blood level of any chemical is highly dependent on the individual's metabolism without providing any insight into individual's task performance abilities under exposure to neurotoxic chemicals. On the other hand, the quantitative posturagraphy if carried out as proposed in this article will provide quantitative data regarding individual's ability to maintain "safe" upright balance while carrying out certain tasks. The proposed evaluation method is simple, portable, quick, and noninvasive and has been found to be sensitive to detecting low level solvent induced modifications in postural stability.

  1. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-09-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg2+-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C–O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface.

  2. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg2+-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C–O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface. PMID:27619990

  3. Dynamics of catalytic tubular microjet engines: Dependence on geometry and chemical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LiJ. X. L.; G. S. H. Contributed Equally To This Work., Jinxing; Huang, Gaoshan; Ye, Mengmeng; Li, Menglin; Liu, Ran; Mei, Yongfeng

    2011-12-01

    Strain-engineered tubular microjet engines with various geometric dimensions hold interesting autonomous motions in an aqueous fuel solution when propelled by catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The catalytically-generated oxygen bubbles expelled from microtubular cavities propel the microjet step by step in discrete increments. We focus on the dynamics of our tubular microjets in one step and build up a body deformation model to elucidate the interaction between tubular microjets and the bubbles they produce. The average microjet velocity is calculated analytically based on our model and the obtained results demonstrate that the velocity of the microjet increases linearly with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. The geometric dimensions of the microjet, such as length and radius, also influence its dynamic characteristics significantly. A close consistency between experimental and calculated results is achieved despite a small deviation due to the existence of an approximation in the model. The results presented in this work improve our understanding regarding catalytic motions of tubular microjets and demonstrate the controllability of the microjet which may have potential applications in drug delivery and biology.Strain-engineered tubular microjet engines with various geometric dimensions hold interesting autonomous motions in an aqueous fuel solution when propelled by catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The catalytically-generated oxygen bubbles expelled from microtubular cavities propel the microjet step by step in discrete increments. We focus on the dynamics of our tubular microjets in one step and build up a body deformation model to elucidate the interaction between tubular microjets and the bubbles they produce. The average microjet velocity is calculated analytically based on our model and the obtained results demonstrate that the velocity of the microjet increases linearly with the

  4. Phase and chemical equilibria in the transesterification reaction of vegetable oils with supercritical lower alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. I.; Stepanov, D. A.; Ermakova, A.

    2011-08-01

    Calculations of thermodynamic data are performed for fatty acid triglycerides, free fatty acids, and fatty acid methyl esters, participants of the transesterification reaction of vegetable oils that occurs in methanol. Using the obtained thermodynamic parameters, the phase diagrams for the reaction mixture are constructed, and the chemical equilibria of the esterification reaction of free fatty acids and the transesterification reaction of fatty acid triglycerides attained upon treatment with supercritical methanol are determined. Relying on our analysis of the obtained equilibria for the esterification reaction of fatty acids and the transesterification reaction of triglycerides attained upon treatment with lower alcohols, we select the optimum conditions for performing the reaction in practice.

  5. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  6. Transient and sustained elementary flux mode networks on a catalytic string-based chemical evolution model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José A

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical models designed to test the metabolism-first hypothesis for prebiotic evolution have yield strong indications about the hypothesis validity but could sometimes use a more extensive identification between model objects and real objects towards a more meaningful interpretation of results. In an attempt to go in that direction, the string-based model SSE ("steady state evolution") was developed, where abstract molecules (strings) and catalytic interaction rules are based on some of the most important features of carbon compounds in biological chemistry. The system is open with a random inflow and outflow of strings but also with a permanent string food source. Although specific catalysis is a key aspect of the model, used to define reaction rules, the focus is on energetics rather than kinetics. Standard energy change tables were constructed and used with standard formation reactions to track energy flows through the interpretation of equilibrium constant values. Detection of metabolic networks on the reaction system was done with elementary flux mode (EFM) analysis. The combination of these model design and analysis options enabled obtaining metabolic and catalytic networks showing several central features of biological metabolism, some more clearly than in previous models: metabolic networks with stepwise synthesis, energy coupling, catalysts regulation, SN2 coupling, redox coupling, intermediate cycling, coupled inverse pathways (metabolic cycling), autocatalytic cycles and catalytic cascades. The results strongly suggest that the main biological metabolism features, including the genotype-phenotype interpretation, are caused by the principles of catalytic systems and are prior to modern genetic systems principles. It also gives further theoretical support to the thesis that the basic features of biologic metabolism are a consequence of the time evolution of a random catalyst search working on an open system with a permanent food source. The importance

  7. Carbon Dioxide Conversion to Valuable Chemical Products over Composite Catalytic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Hu, Jianli; Jones, Susanne B.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Frye, John G.; White, J. F.; Jiang, Juyuan; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Presented is an experimental study on catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Catalysts having different catalytic functions were synthesized and combined in different ways to enhance selectivity to desired products. The combined catalyst system possessed the following functions: methanol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, water-gas-shift and hydrogenation. Results showed that the methods of integrating these catalytic functions played important role in achieving desired product selectivity. It was speculated that if methanol synthesis sites were located adjacent to the C-C chain growth sites, the formation rate of C2 oxygenates would be enhanced. The advantage of using high temperature methanol catalyst PdZnAl in the combined catalyst system was demonstrated. In the presence of PdZnAl catalyst, the combined catalyst system was stable at temperature of 380oC. It was observed that, at high temperature, kinetics favored oxygenate formation. Results implied that the process can be intensified by operating at high temperature using Pd-based methanol synthesis catalyst. Steam reforming of the byproduct organics was demonstrated as a means to provide supplemental hydrogen. Preliminary process design, simulation, and economic analysis of the proposed CO2 conversion process were carried out. Economic analysis indicates how ethanol production cost was affected by the price of CO2 and hydrogen.

  8. Dynamics of catalytic tubular microjet engines: dependence on geometry and chemical environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Huang, Gaoshan; Ye, Mengmeng; Li, Menglin; Liu, Ran; Mei, Yongfeng

    2011-12-01

    Strain-engineered tubular microjet engines with various geometric dimensions hold interesting autonomous motions in an aqueous fuel solution when propelled by catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The catalytically-generated oxygen bubbles expelled from microtubular cavities propel the microjet step by step in discrete increments. We focus on the dynamics of our tubular microjets in one step and build up a body deformation model to elucidate the interaction between tubular microjets and the bubbles they produce. The average microjet velocity is calculated analytically based on our model and the obtained results demonstrate that the velocity of the microjet increases linearly with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. The geometric dimensions of the microjet, such as length and radius, also influence its dynamic characteristics significantly. A close consistency between experimental and calculated results is achieved despite a small deviation due to the existence of an approximation in the model. The results presented in this work improve our understanding regarding catalytic motions of tubular microjets and demonstrate the controllability of the microjet which may have potential applications in drug delivery and biology.

  9. Impact of active phase chemical composition and dispersity on catalytic behavior in PROX reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Paneva, D.; Todorova, S.; Kolev, H.; Shopska, M.; Yordanova, I.; Mitov, I.

    2014-04-01

    Iron and iron-platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon have been successfully synthesized by wet impregnation method and low-temperature treatment in inert atmosphere. The content of the supported phases corresponds to 10 wt % Fe and 0.5 wt % Pt. Four catalytic samples were synthesized: Sample A—activated carbon impregnated with Fe nitrate; Sample B—activated carbon impregnated with Pt salt; Sample C—activated carbon impregnated consequently with Fe and Pt salts; Sample D—activated carbon impregnated simultaneously with Fe and Pt salts. The as-prepared materials were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The spectra show that the activated carbon support and the preparation procedure give rise to the synthesis of isolated metal Pt ions and ultradispersed Fe and Pt oxide species. Probably the presence of different functional groups of activated carbon gives rise to registered very high dispersion of loaded species on support. The catalytic tests were carried out in PROX reaction. A lower activity of bimetallic Pt-Fe samples was explained with the increase in surface oxygen species as a result of predomination of iron oxide on the support leading to the increase in selectivity to the H2 oxidation. Partial agglomeration of supported iron oxide phase was registered after catalytic tests.

  10. A non-chemically selective top-down approach towards the preparation of hierarchical TS-1 zeolites with improved oxidative desulfurization catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuting; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sun, Qiming; Wang, Ning; Jia, Mingjun; Valtchev, Valentin; Yu, Jihong

    2016-02-28

    Hierarchical TS-1 zeolites with secondary macropores have been successfully prepared by using two different fluoride-containing chemical etching post-treated routes. Hierarchical TS-1 zeolites exhibited a chemical composition similar to that of the parent material and showed remarkably enhanced catalytic activity in oxidative desulfurization reaction.

  11. Catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis of biomass in non-inert environments for production of deoxygenated bio-oil and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis processes are among the most effective methods for liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass. Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) over HZSM-5 or other zeolites and/or utilization of reactive atmospheres such as in the non-catalytic Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TRGP) process, a recent patent...

  12. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-03

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  13. Cross-hetero-dehydrogenative coupling reaction of phosphites: a catalytic metal-free phosphorylation of amines and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhineshkumar, Jayaraman; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2013-12-06

    Phosphorylation of amines, alcohols, and sulfoximines are accomplished using molecular iodine as a catalyst and H2O2 as the sole oxidant under mild reaction conditions. This method provides an easy route for synthesizing a variety of phosphoramidates, phosphorus triesters and sulfoximine-derived phosphoramidates which are of biological importance.

  14. Mesoporous MgO: Synthesis, physico-chemical, and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerle, A. A.; Kasyanov, I. A.; Moskovskaya, I. F.; Romanovsky, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous MgO was obtained via the hydrothermal synthesis using both ionogenic and non-ionogenic surfactants as structure-directing templates. The materials prepared were characterized by SEM, BET-N2, XRD, and TG-DTA techniques. MgO particles are spherical 20-μm aggregates of primary oxide particles well shaped as rectangular parallelepipeds. Magnesium oxide samples have the specific surface area of 290-400 m2/g and pore sizes of 3.3-4.1 nm. Their mesoporous structure remained unchanged after calcination up to 350°C. Catalytic activity of mesoporous MgO was studied in acetone condensation reaction.

  15. Catalytic chemical amide synthesis at room temperature: one more step toward peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mohy El Dine, Tharwat; Erb, William; Berhault, Yohann; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    An efficient method has been developed for direct amide bond synthesis between carboxylic acids and amines via (2-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)phenyl)boronic acid as a highly active bench-stable catalyst. This catalyst was found to be very effective at room temperature for a large range of substrates with slightly higher temperatures required for challenging ones. This methodology can be applied to aliphatic, α-hydroxyl, aromatic, and heteroaromatic acids as well as primary, secondary, heterocyclic, and even functionalized amines. Notably, N-Boc-protected amino acids were successfully coupled in good yields with very little racemization. An example of catalytic dipeptide synthesis is reported.

  16. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  17. Quantum chemical study on the coordination environment of the catalytic zinc ion in matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suarez, Dimas; Sordo, Tomás L

    2006-11-30

    X-ray analyses of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown that the catalytic zinc ion (Zn1) can bind to one to three water molecules in addition to three conserved histidine residues. To estimate the relative stability of the possible Zn1 coordination structures in the active site of the MMPs, we carry out computational analyses on the coordination environment of the Zn1 ion in the gelatinase A enzyme (or matrix metalloproteinase 2; MMP-2). Four-, five-, and six-coordinated complexes representative of the Zn1 site are fully characterized by means of quantum mechanical (QM) methodologies. On one hand, B3LYP/LACVP* minimizations of various cluster models of the MMP-2 active site show that the trigonal bipyramidal geometry is energetically favored in the gas phase and that continuum solvent effects stabilize preferentially the tetrahedral complexes. On the other hand, B3LYP/OPLS-AA hybrid QM/molecular mechanical calculations in the solvated catalytic domain of the MMP-2 enzyme complemented with electrostatic Poisson-Boltzmann calculations show that the mature enzyme presents most likely a Zn1 ion coordinated by three histidine residues and two water molecules, while the active site glutamic acid is negatively charged. In consonance with X-ray diffraction data, other possible Zn1 configurations, a six-coordinated structure with Zn1-water as well as four- and five-coordinated complexes with a Zn1-bound hydroxide, are predicted to be very close in energy.

  18. Trace determination and chemical speciation of selenium in environmental water samples using catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Chand, Vimlesh; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-06-15

    A catalytic kinetic method is described for the determination of Se(IV), Se(VI) and total inorganic selenium in water based on the catalytic effect of Se(IV) on the reduction of bromate by hydrazine dihydrochloride in acidic media. The generated bromine decolorized methyl orange (MO) and the reaction was monitored spectrophotometrically at 507 nm as a function of time. The initial rate and fixed time methods were adopted for the determination and speciation of inorganic selenium. Under two optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear in the range 0-126.3 and 0-789.6 microg L(-1) of Se(IV) for the initial rate method and 0-315.8 and 0-789.6 microg L(-1) of Se(IV) for the fixed time method. The detection limits were 1.3 and 14.7 microg L(-1) for the initial rate and fixed time methods, respectively. The proposed methods were validated statistically and through recovery studies in environmental water samples. The relative standard deviation in the determination of 31.6-94.8 microg L(-1) of Se(IV) and Se(VI) was less than 6%. Analyses of standard reference materials for selenium using initial rate and fixed time methods showed that the proposed methods have good accuracy. Se(IV), Se(VI) and total inorganic selenium in environmental water samples have been successfully determined by this method after selective reduction of Se(VI) to Se(IV).

  19. The Influence of Process Conditions on the Chemical Composition of Pine Wood Catalytic Pyrolysis Oils

    DOE PAGES

    Pereira, J.; Agblevor, F. A.; Beis, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Pine wood samples were used as model feedstock to study the properties of catalytic fast pyrolysis oils. The influence of two commercial zeolite catalysts (BASF and SudChem) and pretreatment of the pine wood with sodium hydroxide on pyrolysis products were investigated. The pyrolysis oils were first fractionated using column chromatography and characterized using GC-MS. Long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, levoglucosan, aldehydes and ketones, guaiacols/syringols, and benzenediols were the major compounds identified in the pyrolysis oils. The catalytic pyrolysis increased the polycyclic hydrocarbons fraction. Significant decreases in phthalate derivatives using SudChem and long chain aliphatics using BASF catalyst were observed. Significant amountsmore » of aromatic heterocyclic hydrocarbons and benzene derivatives were formed, respectively, using BASF and SudChem catalysts. Guaiacyl/syringyl and benzenediols derivatives were partly suppressed by the zeolite catalysts, while the sodium hydroxide treatment enriched phenolic derivatives. Zeolite catalyst and sodium hydroxide were employed together; they showed different results for each catalyst.« less

  20. Water-soluble metal nanoparticles stabilized by plant polyphenols for improving the catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.; Liao, Y.; Ma, J.; Zhao, S. L.; Huo, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic conditions, the as-prepared BWT-Pt colloid catalyst exhibited high activity in a series of biphasic oxidation of aromatic alcohols and aliphatic alcohols. As for the cycling stability, the BWT-Pt catalyst showed no obvious decrease during the 7 cycles, revealing superior cycling stability as compared with the counterparts using PVP or PEG as the stabilizer.Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic

  1. Correlating Acid Properties and Catalytic Function: A First-Principles Analysis of Alcohol Dehydration Pathways on Polyoxometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, Michael J.; Macht, Josef; Iglesia, Enrique; Neurock, Matthew

    2009-02-05

    Density functional theory calculations and reactivity data were used to examine the mechanism of alcohol dehydration on Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) catalysts and the influence of the POM composition and the degree of substitution of the alcohol on kinetically relevant elimination steps. Dehydration was found to proceed through E1 pathways in which the alcohol CsO bond is cleaved heterolytically via a carbeniumion transition state. Dehydration rates were found to depend on the elimination rate constant and the equilibrium constant for the formation of unreactive alcohol dimers. E2-type elimination transition states, involving concerted CsH and CsO bond cleavage, were not found. The extent of substitution at the R-carbon on the alcohol was found to lead to marked effects on elimination barriers, because substitution increases the proton affinity of the alcohol and the stability of the carbenium-ion transition state. Changes in the central and addenda atoms of the POM cluster and the presence of n-donors, a support, vicinal POM clusters, or charge-compensating cations were found to lead to changes in the deprotonation energy (DPE) of the POM cluster, activation barriers to dehydration, and the stability of the unreactive dimer. These effects are all captured in a general linear relation between activation barriers and deprotonation energy, a rigorous measure of acid strength. The explicit dependence of the E1 activation barrier on the acid deprotonation energy is much weaker than that on reactant proton affinity. This results from the more effective compensation between the acid deprotonation energy and the interaction energy between the cationic hydrocarbon fragment and the anionic POM cluster at the transition state. The direct interactions between the POM protons and the support, other POM clusters, n-donors, base probe molecules, and charge-compensating cations increased the negative charge of the oxide shell of the W12O40 conjugate base, which increased the

  2. Chemical Analysis and Risk Assessment of Diethyl Phthalate in Alcoholic Beverages with Special Regard to Unrecorded Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Jenny; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Phthalates are synthetic compounds with a widespread field of applications. For example, they are used as plasticizers in PVC plastics and food packaging, or are added to personal care products. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) may be used to denature alcohol, e.g., for cosmetic purposes. Public health concerns of phthalates include carcinogenic, teratogenic, hepatotoxic and endocrine effects. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for determining phthalates in alcohol samples and to provide a risk assessment for consumers of such products. Methodology/Principal Findings A liquid-liquid extraction procedure was optimized by varying the following parameters: type of extraction solvent (cyclohexane, n-hexane, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane), the ratio extraction solvent/sample volume (1∶1 to 50∶1) and the number of extraction repetitions (1–10). The best extraction yield (99.9%) was achieved with the solvent 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, an extraction solvent volume/sample volume ratio of 10∶1 and a double extraction. For quantification, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with deuterated internal standards was used. The investigated samples were alcoholic beverages and unrecorded alcohol products from different countries (n = 257). Two unrecorded alcohol samples from Lithuania contained diethyl phthalate in concentrations of 608 mg/L and 210 mg/L. Conclusions/Significance The consumption of the phthalate-positive unrecorded alcohols would exceed tolerable daily intakes as derived from animal experiments. Both positive samples were labelled as cosmetic alcohol, but had clearly been offered for human consumption. DEP seems to be unsuitable as a denaturing agent as it has no effect on the organoleptic properties of ethanol. In light of our results that DEP might be consumed by humans in unrecorded alcohols, the prohibition of its use as a denaturing agent should be considered. PMID:19956573

  3. Resveratrol induces catalytic bioscavenger paraoxonase 1 expression and protects against chemical warfare nerve agent toxicity in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Bryan F; Seetharam, Karthik I; Dhoieam, Pilin; Gordon, Richard K; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2008-04-01

    Current advances in enzyme bioscavenger prophylactic therapy against chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure are moving towards the identification of catalytic bioscavengers that can degrade large doses of organophosphate (OP) nerve agents without self destruction. This is a preferred method compared to therapy with the purified stoichiometric bioscavenger, butyrylcholinesterase, which binds OPs 1:1 and would thus require larger doses for treatment. Paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) is one such catalytic bioscavenger that has been shown to hydrolyze OP insecticides and contribute to detoxification in animals and humans. Here we investigated the effects of a common red wine ingredient, Resveratrol (RSV), to induce the expression of PON-1 in the human hepatic cell line HC04 and evaluated the protection against CWNA simulants. Dose-response curves showed that a concentration of 20 microM RSV was optimal in inducing PON-1 expression in HC04 cells. RSV at 20 microM increased the extracellular PON-1 activity approximately 150% without significantly affecting the cells. Higher doses of RSV were cytotoxic to the cells. Resveratrol also induced PON-1 in the human lung cell line A549. RSV pre-treatment significantly (P = 0.05) protected the hepatic cells against exposure to 2x LD(50) of soman and sarin simulants. However, lung cells were protected against soman simulant exposure but not against sarin simulant exposure following RSV treatment. In conclusion, these studies indicate that dietary inducers, such as RSV, can up-regulate PON-1, a catalytic bioscavenger, which can then hydrolyze and protect against CWNA-induced toxicity, providing a prospective new method to protect against CWNA exposure.

  4. Chemical transformations of glucose to value added products using Cu-based catalytic systems.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Alfonso; Pineda, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Romero, Antonio A; Luque, Rafael

    2013-08-07

    Cu nanoparticles have been supported by two types of aluminosilicate materials with and without Zn in their composition in view of their application in the microwave-assisted conversion of glucose to valuable products via tandem formic acid-promoted dehydration (to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural--HMF) and further selective hydrogenation to 5-methylfurfuryl alcohol (MFA). Results show that interesting selectivities (up to 60% to MFA or HMF) could be achieved after short times of reaction (typically 2-30 min) using Cu-containing nanomaterials. Zn was found to play an interesting role in the selectivity to reduced products, even if present in very small quantities (0.2 wt%).

  5. Synthesis of high yield single helical carbon microsprings by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and an experimental investigation of their growth mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Jining; Varadan, V. K.

    2007-06-01

    A type of single helical carbon microsprings (SHCMSs) was synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. The as-prepared SHCMSs were characterized by a number of techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental results indicate that during the synthesis both morphology change and crystalline phase transformation occur for cobalt catalytic particles and certain chemical bonding form between cobalt and sulfur atoms. Based on the data from this study, a possible growth mechanism of SHCMSs was discussed.

  6. Chemical Compositional Analysis of Catalytic Hydroconversion Products of Heishan Coal Liquefaction Residue

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yajun; Zhang, Shuangquan; Yang, Xiaoqin; Wei, Xianyong

    2017-01-01

    Liquefaction residue of Heishan bituminous coal (HLR) was subject to two hydroconversion reactions under 5 MPa initial pressure of hydrogen at 300°C for 3 h, without catalyst and with acid supported catalyst (ASC), respectively. The reaction products were analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The results show that 222 organic compounds were detected totally in the products and they can be divided into alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons (AHCs), phenols, ketones, ethers, and other species (OSs). The yield of hydroconversion over the ASC is much higher than that without catalyst. The most abundant products are aromatic hydrocarbons in the reaction products from both catalytic and noncatalytic reactions of HLR. The yield of aromatic hydrocarbons in the reaction product from hydroconversion with the ACS is considerably higher than that from hydroconversion without a catalyst. PMID:28250770

  7. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Richard; Brown, Heather; Li, Joanne; Holladay, John; Cooper, Alan; Rao, Tony

    2012-04-13

    This project provides critical innovations and fundamental understandings that enable development of an economically-viable process for catalytic conversion of biomass (sugar) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). A low-cost ionic liquid (Cyphos 106) is discovered for fast conversion of fructose into HMF under moderate reaction conditions without any catalyst. HMF yield from fructose is almost 100% on the carbon molar basis. Adsorbent materials and adsorption process are invented and demonstrated for separation of 99% pure HMF product and recovery of the ionic liquid from the reaction mixtures. The adsorbent material appears very stable in repeated adsorption/regeneration cycles. Novel membrane-coated adsorbent particles are made and demonstrated to achieve excellent adsorption separation performances at low pressure drops. This is very important for a practical adsorption process because ionic liquids are known of high viscosity. Nearly 100% conversion (or dissolution) of cellulose in the catalytic ionic liquid into small molecules was observed. It is promising to produce HMF, sugars and other fermentable species directly from cellulose feedstock. However, several gaps were identified and could not be resolved in this project. Reaction and separation tests at larger scales are needed to minimize impacts of incidental errors on the mass balance and to show 99.9% ionic liquid recovery. The cellulose reaction tests were troubled with poor reproducibility. Further studies on cellulose conversion in ionic liquids under better controlled conditions are necessary to delineate reaction products, dissolution kinetics, effects of mass and heat transfer in the reactor on conversion, and separation of final reaction mixtures.

  8. [Chemical structure of bioethanol lignin by low-temperature alkaline catalytic hydrothermal treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Wang, Ji-Fu; Xu, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Chun-Peng; Chu, Fu-Xiang

    2013-11-01

    In order to improve the reaction activity of bioethanol lignin, we investigated the activation of bioethanol lignin by a hydrothermal treatment method. Catalytic hydrothermal treatment of bioethanol lignin was performed at 180 degrees C for 3 h in the presence of alkaline solutions (NaOH, Na2 CO3, KOH and K2 CO3), the change in bioethanol lignin structures was studied comparatively by FTIR, 1H NMR,GPC and elemental analysis. FTIR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the band at 1 375 cm(-1) attributed to the phenolic hydroxyl groups increased, and the band intensity at 1 116 cm(-1) attributed to the ether bond decreased. On the other hand, the band at 1 597 and 1 511 cm(-1) attributed to aromatic skeletal vibration remained almost unchanged. 1H NMR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the number of aromatic methoxyl is increased, and based on the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl, the catalytic activity can be ranked as follows: KOH > NaOH > K2 CO3 > Na2 CO3. Especially for KOH, the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl was 170%, because the ion radius of potassium cation is bigger than sodium cation, so the potassium cations more easily formed cation adducts with lignin. GPC results showed that the molecular weight of alkali hydrothermal treatment lignin decreased and the molecular distribution got wider. Elemental analysis showed that hydrothermal treatment could break the interlinkage between lignin and protein, which can reduce the protein content and increase the purity of lignin, meanwhile, the content of O and H both decreased,while C fell, indicating that the bioethanol lignin had suffered a decarbonylation reaction. This is the most benefit of the lignin as a substitute for phenol.

  9. Size-controlled synthesis of NiFe2O4 nanospheres via a PEG assisted hydrothermal route and their catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols by periodic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bappi; Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Dhar, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-05-01

    A novel and facile approach for synthesis of spinel nickel ferrites (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) employing homogeneous chemical precipitation followed by hydrothermal heating is reported. The synthesis involves use of tributylamine (TBA) as a hydroxylating agent in synthesis of nickel ferrites. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 was used as surfactant. As-synthesized NiFe2O4 NPs were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm (BET) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The XRD pattern revealed formation of cubic face-centered NiFe2O4 and TEM image showed spherical particles of sizes 2-10 nm. These NiFe2O4 NPs were used as magnetically recoverable catalyst in oxidation of cyclic alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes by periodic acid. This eco-friendly procedure affords products in very high yield and selectivity. The reusability of the catalyst is proved to be noteworthy as the material exhibits no significant changes in its catalytic activity even after five cycles of reuse.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanofibers by catalytic chemical vapor deposition using non-ferromagnetic metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Su, Chi-Jung; Yuan, Wei-Li; Lai, Tzu-Wei; Lei, Chien-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have wide applications in energy storage devices, electrically conducting composites, selective adsorbents, and catalyst supports. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition was carried out in this work to synthesize CNFs at mild temperatures of 700 and 800 degrees C. Non-ferromagnetic metal complexes of La, Nb, and Ti, spread on porous NaX-type zeolite support, were tested as new catalyst. CNFs ranging from 30 to 200 nm in diameter were obtained. Images of transmission electron microscopy showed encapsulated transition-metal nanoparticles by CNFs. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the crystalline structures of La (FCC), Nb (BCC), and Ti (HCP) formed over zeolite. Magnetic hysteresis loops showed superconductivity from the CNF-encapsulated Nb at 2 K. Raman spectra showed that all the samples possessed graphitic and amorphous carbon structures. Based on the SEM images and Raman spectra, the three metals all catalyzed the synthesis of CNFs.

  11. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  12. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANOPARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seetala V. Naidu; Upali Siriwardane

    2005-05-24

    We have developed and streamlined the experimental systems: (a) Laser-induced solution deposition (LISD) photosynthesis, ball-milling, and chemical synthesis of Fe, Co, and Cu nanoparticle catalysts; (b) Sol-gel method for mesoporous {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, hybrid alumina/silica granular supports; (c) Three sol-gel/oil-drop catalyst preparation methods to incorporate metal nanoparticles into mesoporous 1 mm granular supports; (d) Low-cost GC-TCD system with hydrogen as carrier gas for the determination of wide spectrum of alkanes produced during the F-T reactions; and (e) Gas-flow reactor and microchannel reactor for fast screening of catalysts. The LISD method could produce Co, Cu, and Fe (5 nm) nanoparticles, but in milligram quantities. We could produce nanoparticles in gram quantities using high-energy ball milling and chemical synthesis methods. Ball milling gave wide particle size distribution compared to the chemical synthesis method that gave almost uniform size ({approx}5 nm) particles. Metal nanoparticles Cu, Co, Fe, Cu/Co, Cu/Fe and Co/Fe were loaded (2-12 wt%) uniformly into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, or alumina/silica hybrid supports by combined sol-gel/oil-drop methods followed by calcination and hydrogenation steps, prior to syngas FT reaction studies. The properties of metal loaded {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} granules were compared for the two precursors: aluminum tri-sec-butoxide (ALTSB) and aluminum tri-iso-propoxide (ALTIP). The effect of solgel supports alumina, silica, and alumina/silica hybrid were examined on catalytic properties. Metal loading efficiencies for pure metal catalysts increased in the order Co, Cu and Fe in agreement with solubility of metal hydroxides. In case of mixed metals, Co and Cu seams to interfere and reduce Fe metal loading when metal nitrate solutions are used. The solubility differences of metal hydroxides would not allow precise control of metal loading. We have overcome this problem by

  13. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fifteenth quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The previous best catalysts consisted of potassium-promoted Pd on a Zn/Cr spinel oxide prepared via controlled pH precipitation. The authors have now examined the effect of cesium addition to the Zn/Cr spinel oxide support. Surprisingly, cesium levels required for optimum performance are similar to those for potassium on a wt% basis. The addition of 3 wt% cesium gives isobutanol rates > 170 g/kg-hr at 440 C and 1,500 psi with selectivity to total alcohols of 77% and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of 1.4: this performance is as good as their best Pd/K catalyst. The addition of both cesium and palladium to a Zn/Cr spinel oxide support gives further performance improvements. The 5 wt% cesium, 5.9 wt% Pd formulation gives isobutanol rates > 150 g/kg-hr at 440 C and only 1,000 psi with a selectivity to total alcohols of 88% and with a methanol/isobutanol mole ratio of 0.58: this is their best overall performance to date. The addition of both cesium and palladium to a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide support that contains excess Zn has also been examined. This spinel was the support used in the synthesis of 10-DAN-54, the benchmark catalyst. Formulations made on this support show a lower overall total alcohol rate than those using the spinel without Mn present, and require less cesium for optimal performance.

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have prepared an improved version of 10-DAN-54, a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide promoted with Pd and K. This material (16-DMM-68) has acceptable elemental analysis for the expected composition and possesses the desired high surface area of >80 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst has extra added potassium vs. the standard catalyst, 10-DAN-54, as previous work had indicated that more potassium is required for optimal performance. In tests under standard conditions (400 C, 1,000 psi, GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1), this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 84% and produces > 100 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 4.7. The authors have tested 16-DMM-68 at temperatures above 400 C and pressures up to 1,500 psi (GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1). At 440 C and 1500 psi, this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 64% and produces 179 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 2.2. This is their best overall performance to data. The catalyst operates at syngas conversions up to 28% with good selectivity to total alcohols due to the extra added alkali. This performance can be compared with 10-DAN-54, which could only operate up to 20% conversion before hydrocarbon formation became a serious inefficiency.

  15. Synthesis and Comparative Catalytic Study of Zirconia–MnCO3 or –Mn2O3 for the Oxidation of Benzylic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Mohamed E.; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Khan, Mujeeb; Al‐Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H.; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report on the synthesis of the zirconia–manganese carbonate ZrO x (x  %)–MnCO3 catalyst (where x=1–7) that, upon calcination at 500 °C, is converted to zirconia–manganese oxide ZrO x (x  %)–Mn2O3. We also present a comparative study of the catalytic performance of the both catalysts for the oxidation of benzylic alcohol to corresponding aldehydes by using molecular oxygen as the oxidizing agent. ZrO x (x  %)–MnCO3 was prepared through co‐precipitation by varying the amounts of Zr(NO3)4 (w/w %) in Mn(NO3)2. The morphology, composition, and crystallinity of the as‐synthesized product and the catalysts prepared upon calcination were studied by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy‐dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy, and powder X‐ray diffraction. The surface areas of the catalysts [133.58 m2 g−1 for ZrO x (1 %)–MnCO3 and 17.48 m2 g−1 for ZrO x (1 %)–Mn2O3] were determined by using the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method, and the thermal stability was assessed by using thermal gravimetric analysis. The catalyst with composition ZrO x (1 %)–MnCO3 pre‐calcined at 300 °C exhibited excellent specific activity (48.00 mmolg−1 h−1) with complete conversion within approximately 5 min and catalyst cyclability up to six times without any significant loss in activity. The specific activity, turnover number and turnover frequency achieved is the highest so far (to the best of our knowledge) compared to the previously reported catalysts used for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The catalyst showed selectivity for aromatic alcohols over aliphatic alcohols. PMID:28168156

  16. Catalytic polymerization and facile grafting of poly(furfuryl alcohol) to single-wall carbon nanotube: preparation of nanocomposite carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C; Kim, Un Jeong; Liu, Xiaoming; Eklund, Peter C

    2006-08-30

    A nanocomposite carbon was prepared by grafting a carbonizable polymer, poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA), to a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT). The SWNT was first functionalized with arylsulfonic acid groups on the sidewall via a method using a diazonium reagent. Both Raman and FTIR spectroscopies were used to identify the functional groups on the nanotube surface. HRTEM imaging shows that the SWNT bundles are exfoliated after functionalization. Once this state of the SWNTs was accomplished, the PFA-functionalized SWNT (PFA-SWNT) was prepared by in situ polymerization of furfuryl alcohol (FA). The sulfonic acid groups on the surface of the SWNT acted as a catalyst for FA polymerization, and the resulting PFA then grafted to the SWNTs. The surfaces of the SWNTs converted from hydrophilic to hydrophobic when they were wrapped with PFA. The formation of the polymer and the attraction between it and the sulfonic acid groups were confirmed by IR spectra. A nanocomposite carbon was generated by heating the PFA-SWNT in argon at 600 degrees C, a process during which the PFA was transformed to nanoporous carbon (NPC) and the sulfonic acid groups were cleaved from the SWNT. Based upon the Raman spectra and HRTEM images of the composite, it is concluded that SWNTs survive this process and a continuous phase is formed between the NPC and the SWNT.

  17. Aspartate 46, a second sphere ligand to the catalytic zinc, is essential for activity of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzhorn, A.J.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    The crystal structure of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) shows a hydrogen bond between the imidazole of His-67, a ligand to the active site zinc, and the carboxylate of Asp-49. Both residues are conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. Directed mutagenesis was used to replace the homologous Asp-46 in ADH I from S. cerevisiae with asparagine. The substitution did not alter the overall structure of the enzyme, as judged by CD measurements, but the removal of a negative charge was evident in electrophoresis, and in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The mutant and wild-type enzymes had similar zinc contents as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Active site titration and steady state kinetics indicated that binding of coenzymes, substrates and substrate analogs is 4-24 fold weaker in the asparagine enzyme. The turnover numbers were reduced by a factor of 70 for ethanol oxidation and 30 for acetaldehyde reduction at pH 7.3, 30/sup 0/C. Dead end inhibition studies and the kinetic isotope effect showed that NAD and ethanol binding follow a rapid equilibrium random mechanism as opposed to the ordered mechanism found for ADH I. They conclude that the carboxyl group of Asp-46 is essential for the electrostatic environment near the active site zinc. Amidation may affect the geometry and/or coordination of the metal complex.

  18. CHEMICAL SENSING BASED ON CATALYTIC NANOMOTORS: MOTION-BASED DETECTION OF TRACE SILVER

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Daniel; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Manesh, Kalayil Manian; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe; Wang, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    A motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking changes in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of the target analyte. Selective and sensitive measurements of trace silver ions are illustrated based on the dramatic and specific acceleration of bimetal nanowire motors in the presence of silver. Such nanomotor-based measurements would lead to a wide range of novel and powerful chemical and biological sensing protocols. PMID:19670862

  19. Effect of additions of C/sub 2/-C/sub 4/ alcohols on the catalytic activity of silver in the oxidation of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kurina, L.N.; Zeile, L.E.; Filicheva, O.D.; Roznina, M.I.

    1988-02-20

    The authors give the results of a study of the partial oxidation of methanol on a pumice-silver catalyst in the presence of ethyl, isopropyl, and isobutyl alcohol impurities that are contained in the methanol feedstock. The choice of alcohols as the materials of the investigation is related to the fact that in the rectification of the methanol feedstock the recovered methanol-fusel oil-water fraction, containing up to 33% water, 5% ethanol, and up to 13% higher alcohols, is burned, i.e., is irretrievably lost for industry, while this valuable chemical raw material can be used for formaldehyde synthesis. The gaseous reaction products were analyzed for CO, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/ contents; the amount of the obtained formaldehyde was determined by the sulfite method, the acidity of the formaldehyde solution was determined titrimetrically, and the content of the unreacted methanol was determined chromatographically. The results of the analysis were used to calculate the yields of formaldehyde and gases and the selectivity as the ratio of the amount of methanol consumed for formaldehyde formation to all the reacted methanol.

  20. Environmentally friendly synthesis of CeO2 nanoparticles for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and selective detection of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Tamizhdurai, P; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Chen, Shen-Ming; Shanthi, K; Sivasanker, S; Sangeetha, P

    2017-04-13

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are favorable in nanotechnology based on some remarkable properties. In this study, the crystalline CeO2 NPs are successfully prepared by an efficient microwave combustion (MCM) and conventional route sol-gel (CRSGM) methods. The structural morphology of the as-prepared CeO2 NPs was investigated by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Moreover, the XRD pattern confirmed the formation of CeO2 NPs as a face centered cubic structure. The magnetometer studies indicated the low saturation magnetization (23.96 emu/g) of CeO2 NPs for weak paramagnetic and high saturation magnetization (32.13 emu/g) of CeO2 NPs for super paramagnetic. After that, the oxidation effect of benzyl alcohol was investigated which reveals good conversion and selectivity. Besides, the CeO2 NPs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) used for the detection of nitrite with linear concentration range (0.02-1200 μM), low limit of detection (0.21 μM) and higher sensitivity (1.7238 μAμM(-1) cm(-2)). However, the CeO2 NPs modified electrode has the fast response, high sensitivity and good selectivity. In addition, the fabricated electrode is applied for the determination of nitrite in various water samples. Eventually, the CeO2 NPs can be regarded as an effective way to enhance the catalytic activity towards the benzyl alcohol and nitrite.

  1. Quantum chemical modelling of ethene epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide: role of catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Angelica; Panas, Itai; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2007-12-07

    Ethene epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide was studied on hydroxylated binuclear metal sites, using DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. A decrease of the activation enthalpy of approximately 100 kJ mol(-1) was observed compared to the gas phase reaction between hydrogen peroxide and ethene. It was previously shown that micro-solvation with water reduces the activation enthalpy by approximately 77 kJ mol(-1) and only the additional 24 kJ mol(-1) can be attributed to the binuclear site. Three different metal centres were tested, Ti(iv), Si(iv) and Ge(iv), in order to investigate any specific role of the metal centre on the activation enthalpy. The results clearly show that the activation enthalpy is independent on the nature of the metal centre. This emphasises the role of the hydrogen bonded network provided by the hydroxylated metal sites, on the stabilisation of the transitions state. In ref. 1 (A. Lundin, I. Panas and E. Ahlberg, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2007, 111, 9080) it was demonstrated that, at the transition state and upon micro-solvation, the hydrogen peroxide entity becomes polarized within the hydrogen bonding network, forming a negatively-charged fragment distant from the ethene molecule and a positively-charged fragment directly involved in the oxygen insertion step. The same mechanism was found to hold also for the reaction at the binuclear catalytic site, since the required hydrogen bonding is effectively provided by the hydroxylated metal centres. This mechanism is compared to the two-step pathway which employs a metal peroxide intermediate. Both reaction channels were found to be plausible in confined environments.

  2. Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonate—this process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

  3. Photoelectrochemical power, chemical energy and catalytic activity for organic evolution on natural pyrite interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tributsch, H; Fiechter, S; Jokisch, D; Rojas-Chapana, J; Ellmer, K

    2003-04-01

    Natural pyrite (FeS2) has frequently been discussed as a material involved in CO2 fixation in presence of H2S and as a possible catalyst for the origin of life. A straightforward chemical fixation of carbon dioxide as proposed by Wächtershauser could not be verified from thermo-chemical equilibrium calculations by minimizing Gibb's Free Energy in the system C, O, H, S, Fe and appears unlikely due to the experimentally encountered large overpotentials involved in CO2 fixation. However, the hypothesis, by W. R. Edwards, that pyrite in shallow coastal waters may have been involved, can be sustained. In this case, daily available photoelectrochemical power from FeS2/Fe2+/3+ interfaces could have made the difference in combination with electrochemical processes, such as hydrogen insertion, and the solubilization of pyrite by the amino acid cysteine to yield dissolved chemical energy. Periodical changes in energy supply could also have entrained primitive self-organization processes for organic-biological evolution. Natural samples from thirteen ore deposits have been investigated photoelectrochemically. Efficient light-induced current generation has been found with several of these samples so that photoelectrochemical processes generated by pyrite have to be considered as naturally occurring phenomena, which could have been even more pronounced in oxygen deficient environments. Pyrite from the Murgul mine in Turkey of suboceanic volcanic origin was closer examined as a model system to understand the morphology and chemistry of pyrite photoactivity.

  4. Studies on Anion Promoted Titania.1: Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity toward Alcohol and Cumene Conversion Reactions of Phosphated Titania.

    PubMed

    Parida; Acharya; Samantaray; Mishra

    1999-09-15

    Phosphate impregnated titania samples with varying amount of phosphate have been prepared by solid-solid kneading as well as aqueous impregnation method. All the samples are characterized by XRD, TG-DTA, and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherm. Surface area is found to increase with the increase in phosphate content up to 7.5 wt% loading and thereafter decreases. The average pore diameter and crystallite size of titania decreases with the addition of phosphate. However, total acidity (determined by base adsorption method) and the catalytic activity increases with the increase in phosphate content up to 10 wt%. Phosphated samples prepared using phosphoric acid as the source of phosphate exhibit higher acidity compared to the samples prepared using (NH(4))(3)PO(4). However, the sample prepared from (NH(4))(3)PO(4) shows the presence of both acid and basic sites. Though from the cumene conversion study it is understood that phosphated samples contain both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites, the latter predominates over the former. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Biotransformation of chemical constituents of durian wine with simultaneous alcoholic fermentation by Torulaspora delbrueckii and malolactic fermentation by Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuyun; Chua, Jian-Yong; Huang, Dejian; Lee, Pin-Rou; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2016-10-01

    This work represents the first study on the biotransformation of chemical constituents of durian wine via simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) with non-Saccharomyces yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely, Torulaspora delbrueckii Biodiva and Oenococcus oeni PN4. The presence of PN4 improved the utilization of sugars but did not affect ethanol production. MLF resulted in the significant degradation of malic acid with corresponding increases in pH and lactic acid. The final concentrations of acetic acid (1.29 g/L) and succinic acid (3.70 g/L) in simultaneous AF and MLF were significantly higher than that in AF (1.05 and 1.31 g/L) only. Compared with AF, simultaneous AF and MLF significantly elevated the levels of aroma compounds with higher levels of higher alcohols (isoamyl alcohol, active amyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, and 2-phenylethyl alcohol), acetate esters (ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate), and ethyl esters (ethyl octanoate, ethyl dodecanoate). All the endogenous volatile sulfur compounds decreased to trace or undetectable levels at the end of fermentation. MLF accentuated the reduction of acetaldehyde and sulfides. The initially absent dipropyl disulfide was formed, then catabolized, especially in simultaneous AF and MLF. This study suggested that the simultaneous AF and MLF of non-Saccharomyces and LAB could modify the volatile compositions and potentially modulate the organoleptic properties of durian wine.

  6. Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2014-09-15

    A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder.

  7. Chemical Components of Noncommercial Alcohol Beverage Samples: A Study With the Viewpoint of Toxic Components in Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dadpour, Bita; Hedjazi, Arya; Ghorbani, Hamideh; Khosrojerdi, Hamid; Vaziri, Seyed Mohsen; Malek Zadeh, Haleh; Habibi Tamijani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background Iran has one of the lowest alcoholic beverage use rates in comparison with other countries, because it is legally forbidden and because of religious beliefs. Even so, unrecorded and noncommercial alcohol remains a considerable concern, which needs special attention. Objectives In the current research, we have studied the general composition of noncommercial alcohol samples to identify potentially toxic components in the context of the city of Mashhad in IR Iran. Patients and Methods Using a descriptive study, chemical composition records of alcohol samples obtained from Mashhad and its suburbs (from March 2013 to March 2014) were evaluated in terms of ethanol percentage and methanol percentage using gas chromatography. Likewise, the pH of the alcohol and the location of the sample were also considered. Some substances, such as inorganic elements, were not included because there was no information about these substances in the records. Results Of 877 reports of alcohol samples, more than 50% were obtained from Mashhad and the rest were from the suburbs. Of the reports, 57.5% were in the spring and summer, followed by 42.5% in the fall and winter. The mean (min-max) of ethanol percentage was 30.04% (0 - 98.4). In four cases, methanol was detected. The mean (min-max) of methanol percentage was 23% (4 - 95).The majority of the samples had an acidic pH. Conclusions The composition of unrecorded samples did not raise major toxicological concern beyond ethanol in alcohol products. However, concentration levels of methanol in some unrecorded alcohol samples made these samples detrimental for human consumption. PMID:27622171

  8. Hydrodeoxygenation processes: advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    De, Sudipta; Saha, Basudeb; Luque, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C-C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed.

  9. A review of catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass for value-added fuel and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hervan Marion; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jianghui; Liu, Yujing; Mao, Hanping; Shi, Aiping; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant renewable resource and can be efficiently converted into bio-energy by a bio-refinery. From the various techniques available for biomass thermo-chemical conversion; microwave assisted pyrolysis (MAP) seems to be the very promising. The principles of microwave technology were reviewed and the parameters for the efficient production of bio-oil using microwave technology were summarized. Microwave technology by itself cannot efficiently produce high quality bio-oil products, catalysts are used to improve the reaction conditions and selectivity for valued products during MAP. The catalysts used to optimize MAP are revised in the development of this article. The origins for bio-oils that are phenol rich or hydrocarbon rich are reviewed and their experimental results were summarized. The kinetics of MAP is discussed briefly in the development of the article. Future prospects and scientific development of MAP are also considered in the development of this article.

  10. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed.

  11. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  12. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-02-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1} , 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  13. Catalytic oxidation of biorefinery lignin to value-added chemicals to support sustainable biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruoshui; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Transforming plant biomass to biofuel is one of the few solutions that can truly sustain mankind's long-term needs for liquid transportation fuel with minimized environmental impact. However, despite decades of effort, commercial development of biomass-to-biofuel conversion processes is still not an economically viable proposition. Identifying value-added co-products along with the production of biofuel provides a key solution to overcoming this economic barrier. Lignin is the second most abundant component next to cellulose in almost all plant biomass; the emerging biomass refinery industry will inevitably generate an enormous amount of lignin. Development of selective biorefinery lignin-to-bioproducts conversion processes will play a pivotal role in significantly improving the economic feasibility and sustainability of biofuel production from renewable biomass. The urgency and importance of this endeavor has been increasingly recognized in the last few years. This paper reviews state-of-the-art oxidative lignin depolymerization chemistries employed in the papermaking process and oxidative catalysts that can be applied to biorefinery lignin to produce platform chemicals including phenolic compounds, dicarboxylic acids, and quinones in high selectivity and yield. The potential synergies of integrating new catalysts with commercial delignification chemistries are discussed. We hope the information will build on the existing body of knowledge to provide new insights towards developing practical and commercially viable lignin conversion technologies, enabling sustainable biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass to be competitive with fossil fuel.

  14. Selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 on Cu-faujasite catalysts: an experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Delahay, Gérard; Villagomez, Enrique Ayala; Ducere, Jean-Marie; Berthomieu, Dorothée; Goursot, Annick; Coq, Bernard

    2002-08-16

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2 on Cu-faujasite (Cu-FAU) has been studied. Substitution of some Cu2+ with H+ and Na+ cations, compensating for the negative charge of the zeolite framework, forms the various CuHNa-FAU studied. The amount of Cu was held constant and the proportion of H+ and Na+ varied in the sample. The substitution of Na+ for H+ increases sharply the SCR rate by lowering the temperature of reaction by about 150 K. It is proposed that the rate increase mainly comes from an unhindered migration of Cu from hidden to active sites and a modification of the redox properties of Cu species. The former was demonstrated by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. The change in redox properties was demonstrated by a faster oxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ (rate-determining step). Quantum chemical calculations on model clusters of CuHNa-FAU indicate that the faster rate of oxidation can be explained by a higher lability of protons in the absence of Na, which can be then removed from the catalyst more easily to yield H2O during the oxidation process.

  15. The rational of catalytic activity of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. a combined biochemical and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Sulpizi, M; Schelling, P; Folkers, G; Carloni, P; Scapozza, L

    2001-06-15

    Most antiherpes therapies exploit the large substrate acceptance of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK(HSV1)) relative to the human isoenzyme. The enzyme selectively phosphorylates nucleoside analogs that can either inhibit viral DNA polymerase or cause toxic effects when incorporated into viral DNA. To relate structural properties of TK(HSV1) ligands to their chemical reactivity we have carried out ab initio quantum chemistry calculations within the density functional theory framework in combination with biochemical studies. Calculations have focused on a set of ligands carrying a representative set of the large spectrum of sugar-mimicking moieties and for which structural information of the TK(HSV1)-ligand complex is available. The k(cat) values of these ligands have been measured under the same experimental conditions using an UV spectrophotometric assay. The calculations point to the crucial role of electric dipole moment of ligands and its interaction with the negatively charged residue Glu(225). A striking correlation is found between the energetics associated with this interaction and the k(cat) values measured under homogeneous conditions. This finding uncovers a fundamental aspect of the mechanism governing substrate diversity and catalytic turnover and thus represents a significant step toward the rational design of novel and powerful prodrugs for antiviral and TK(HSV1)-linked suicide gene therapies.

  16. Sono-assisted extraction of alcohol-insoluble extract from Althaea rosea: purification and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Meghdad; Samavati, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was used to evaluate the effects of ultrasonic power, extraction time, extraction temperature, and water to raw material ratio on extraction yield of alcohol-insoluble polysaccharide of Althaea rosea leaf (ARLP). Purification was carried out by dialysis method. Chemical analysis of ARLP revealed contained 12.69 ± 0.48% moisture, 79.33 ± 0.51% total sugar, 3.82 ± 0.21% protein, 11.25 ± 0.37% uronic acid and 3.77 ± 0.15% ash. The response surface methodology (RSM) showed that the significant quadratic regression equation with high R(2) (=0.9997) was successfully fitted for extraction yield of ARLP as function of independent variables. The overall optimum region was found to be at the combined level of ultrasonic power 91.85 W, extraction time 29.94 min, extraction temperature 89.78 °C, and the ratio of water to raw material 28.77 (mL/g). At this optimum point, extraction yield of ARLP was 19.47 ± 0.41%. No significant (p>0.05) difference was found between the actual and predicted (19.30 ± 0.075%) values. The results demonstrated that ARLP had strong scavenging activities on DPPH and hydroxyl radicals.

  17. Microbial production of fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fillet, Sandy; Adrio, José L

    2016-09-01

    Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50 g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8 g/L of C16-C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols.

  18. Syntheses and molecular structures of novel Ru(II) complexes with bidentate benzimidazole based ligands and their catalytic efficiency for oxidation of benzyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Osman; Tercan, Melek; Özdemir, Namık

    2016-11-01

    Five bidentate ligands derived from quinoline-2-carboxylic acid, i.e. 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)quinoline (L1), 2-(1-benzyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)quinoline (L2), 2-[1-(2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L3), 2-[1-(4-chlorobenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L4), and 2-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L5) were synthesized. Treatment of L1-5 with [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 and KPF6 afforded six-coordinate piano-stool Ru(II) complexes, namely, [RuCl(L1)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C1), [RuCl(L2)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C2), [RuCl(L3)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C3), [RuCl(L4)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C4), and [RuCl(L5)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C5). Synthesized compounds were characterized with different techniques such as 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The solid state structure of L1 and C3 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The single crystal structure of C3 verified coordination of L3 to the Ru(II) center. The Ru(II) center has a pseudo-octahedral three legged piano stool geometry. The complexes C1-5 were tested as catalysts for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde in the presence of periodic acid (H5IO6) (Substrate/Catalyst/Oxidant = 1/0.01/0.5). The best result was obtained with C2 (3 h→90%).

  19. An in vitro and in vivo Evaluation of the Efficacy of Recombinant Human Liver Prolidase as a Catalytic Bioscavenger of Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the efficacy of recombinant human liver prolidase 5a...butyrylcholinesterase, catalytic bioscavenger, chemical warfare nerve agents, human liver prolidase, in vivo delivery 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Healthcare USA, Inc. DOI: 10.3109/01480545.2014.900071 RESEARCH ARTICLE An in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the efficacy of recombinant human liver

  20. The application of Cu/SiO2 catalytic system in chemical mechanical planarization based on the stability of SiO2 sol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Aochen, Wang; Zhixin, Yang; Mingbin, Sun; Chuan, Cheng; Yufeng, Zhang; Nannan, Zhang

    2014-06-01

    There is a lot of hydroxyl on the surface of nano SiO2 sol used as an abrasive in the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, and the chemical reaction activity of the hydroxyl is very strong due to the nano effect. In addition to providing a mechanical polishing effect, SiO2 sol is also directly involved in the chemical reaction. The stability of SiO2 sol was characterized through particle size distribution, zeta potential, viscosity, surface charge and other parameters in order to ensure that the chemical reaction rate in the CMP process, and the surface state of the copper film after CMP was not affected by the SiO2 sol. Polarization curves and corrosion potential of different concentrations of SiO2 sol showed that trace SiO2 sol can effectively weaken the passivation film thickness. In other words, SiO2 sol accelerated the decomposition rate of passive film. It was confirmed that the SiO2 sol as reactant had been involved in the CMP process of copper film as reactant by the effect of trace SiO2 sol on the removal rate of copper film in the CMP process under different conditions. In the CMP process, a small amount of SiO2 sol can drastically alter the chemical reaction rate of the copper film, therefore, the possibility that Cu/SiO2 as a catalytic system catalytically accelerated the chemical reaction in the CMP process was proposed. According to the van't Hoff isotherm formula and the characteristics of a catalyst which only changes the chemical reaction rate with out changing the total reaction standard Gibbs free energy, factors affecting the Cu/SiO2 catalytic reaction were derived from the decomposition rate of Cu (OH)2 and the pH value of the system, and then it was concluded that the CuSiO3 as intermediates of Cu/SiO2 catalytic reaction accelerated the chemical reaction rate in the CMP process. It was confirmed that the Cu/SiO2 catalytic system generated the intermediate of the catalytic reaction (CuSiO3) in the CMP process through the removal

  1. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of an emerging pollutant (enrofloxacin) by catalytic wet air oxidation and ozonation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Yediler, Ayfer

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the degradation efficiency of enrofloxacin (ENR) by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) and ozonation. Results obtained by CWAO experiments show that 99.5% degradation, 37.0% chemical oxidation demand (COD) removal and 51.0% total organic carbon (TOC) conversion were obtained when 100 mol% FeCl(3) and 25 mol% NaNO(2) at 150 °C under 0.5 MPa oxygen pressure after 120 min are used. The degradation products are identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). The oxidation end products, F(-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were determined by IC. The BOD(5)/COD ratio as a measure of the biodegradability of the parent compound increased from 0.01 to 0.12 after 120 min of reaction time, indicating an improved biodegradability of the parent compound. The inhibition of bioluminescence of the marine bacteria V. fischeri decreased from 43% to 12% demonstrating a loss in toxicity of ENR during CWAO. Ozonation of 0.2 mM ENR was carried out with an ozone concentration of 7.3 g m(-3) at pH 7. ENR decomposition with a degradation rate of 87% was obtained corresponding to the reaction time. Moderate changes in COD (18%) and TOC (17%) removal has been observed. The bioluminescence inhibition increased from 8% to 50%, due to the generation of toxic degradation products during ozonation. In comparison to the widely use of well developed method of ozonation CWAO exhibits better performance in terms of COD, TOC removals and generates less toxic products.

  2. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  3. Catalytic ethanolysis and gasification of kraft lignin into aromatic alcohols and H2-rich gas over Rh supported on La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Chunze; Wang, Yuanyuan; Dai, Liyi

    2016-10-01

    Efficient catalytic ethanolysis and gasification of kraft lignin were conducted over a versatile supported catalyst Rh/La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2 to give high-value aromatic alcohols and H2-rich gas. The removal of phenolic hydroxyl group was the most prevalent reaction, and importantly, almost no phenols, undesired char and saturating the aromatic ring were detected. Meanwhile, the feedstock and solvent both played key roles in H2 generation that contributed to the hydrodeoxygenation of liquid components and made the whole catalytic process out of H2 supply. Reusability tests of catalyst indicated that the crystalline phase transition and agglomeration of support, the loss of noble metal Rh and carbon deposition were the possible reasons for its deactivation in supercritical ethanol. Comparing with water, methanol and isopropanol system, ethanol was the only effective solvent for the depolymerization process.

  4. Quantum-chemical modeling of energy parameters and vibrational spectra of chain and cyclic clusters of monohydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, P.; Doroshenko, I.; Pogorelov, V.

    2014-05-01

    The specific peculiarities of alcohols such as heightened viscosity, boiling temperature and surface tension can be explained by the capability of their molecules to form relatively stable associates named clusters due to hydrogen bonding. In present work the stability of different chain-like and cyclic clusters of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol was investigated by means of quantum-chemical simulation and particular by recently developed DFT exchange-correlation functional M06-2X. The relative stability of the cluster structure was evaluated by the total energy per molecule at low temperatures (where all alcohols exist in solid state) and by the changing of the free Gibbs energy upon cluster formation at the room temperature. For the verification of revealed results the conformity of calculated IR spectra of the most stable cluster structures with the experimental IR spectra at different temperatures was analyzed.

  5. Anti-Alcohol and Anxiolytic Properties of a New Chemical Entity, GET73

    PubMed Central

    Loche, Antonella; Simonetti, Francesco; Lobina, Carla; Carai, Mauro A. M.; Colombo, Giancarlo; Castelli, M. Paola; Barone, Domenico; Cacciaglia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    N-[(4-trifluoromethyl)benzyl]4-methoxybutyramide (GET73) is a newly synthesized compound structurally related to the clinically used, alcohol-substituting agent, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). The present study was designed to assess whether GET73 may share with GHB the capacity to reduce alcohol intake in rats. Additionally, the effect of treatment with GET73 on anxiety-related behaviors and cognitive tasks in rats was investigated. A series of in vitro binding assays investigated the capacity of GET73 to bind to the GHB binding site and multiple other receptors. GET73 (10−9–10−3 M) failed to inhibit [3H]GHB binding at both high- and low-affinity GHB recognition sites in rat cortical membranes. GET73 displayed minimal, if any, binding at dopamine, serotonin, GABA, and glutamate receptors in membranes from different rat brain areas. Acute treatment with low-to-moderate, non-sedative doses of GET73 (5–50 mg/kg, i.g. or i.p.) (a) reduced alcohol intake and suppressed “alcohol deprivation effect” (a model of alcohol relapse) in selectively bred, Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats, (b) exerted anxiolytic effects in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and sP rats exposed to the Elevated Plus Maze test, and (c) tended to induce promnestic effects in SD rats exposed to a modified water version of the Hebb–Williams maze test. Although the mechanism of GET73 action is currently unknown, the results of the present study suggest that GET73 has a multifaceted pharmacological profile, including the capacity to reduce alcohol drinking and anxiety-related behaviors in rats. PMID:22347868

  6. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  7. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  8. Novel Dextranase Catalyzing Cycloisomaltooligosaccharide Formation and Identification of Catalytic Amino Acids and Their Functions Using Chemical Rescue Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Min; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Muraki, Tomoe; Kang, Min-Sun; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Saburi, Wataru; Lang, Weeranuch; Kang, Hee-Kwon; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Funane, Kazumi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Momma, Mitsuru; Fujimoto, Zui; Oguma, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Mikihiko; Kim, Doman; Kimura, Atsuo

    2012-01-01

    A novel endodextranase from Paenibacillus sp. (Paenibacillus sp. dextranase; PsDex) was found to mainly produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides (CIs) with a degree of polymerization of 7–14 from dextran. The 1,696-amino acid sequence belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 66 (GH-66) has a long insertion (632 residues; Thr451–Val1082), a portion of which shares identity (35% at Ala39–Ser1304 of PsDex) with Pro32–Ala755 of CI glucanotransferase (CITase), a GH-66 enzyme that catalyzes the formation of CIs from dextran. This homologous sequence (Val837–Met932 for PsDex and Tyr404–Tyr492 for CITase), similar to carbohydrate-binding module 35, was not found in other endodextranases (Dexs) devoid of CITase activity. These results support the classification of GH-66 enzymes into three types: (i) Dex showing only dextranolytic activity, (ii) Dex catalyzing hydrolysis with low cyclization activity, and (iii) CITase showing CI-forming activity with low dextranolytic activity. The fact that a C-terminal truncated enzyme (having Ala39–Ser1304) has 50% wild-type PsDex activity indicates that the C-terminal 392 residues are not involved in hydrolysis. GH-66 enzymes possess four conserved acidic residues (Asp189, Asp340, Glu412, and Asp1254 of PsDex) of catalytic candidates. Their amide mutants decreased activity (11,500 to 140,000 times), and D1254N had 36% activity. A chemical rescue approach was applied to D189A, D340G, and E412Q using α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride with NaN3. D340G or E412Q formed a β- or α-isomaltotetraosyl azide, respectively, strongly indicating Asp340 and Glu412 as a nucleophile and acid/base catalyst, respectively. Interestingly, D189A synthesized small sized dextran from α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride in the presence of NaN3. PMID:22461618

  9. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiN{sub x} films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Trinh Cham Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-07-28

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH{sub 3} molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN{sub x} passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN{sub x} films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  10. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECT OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and Cu, Mo, V, Cr and Mn metal oxides, and mixed metal oxides support on y-alumina as catalysts ov...

  11. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECTS OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and activities of Cu, Mo, Cr and Mn oxides, and mixed metal oxides supported on -alumina, were tes...

  12. Alcohol Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other preservatives Chemicals, grains or other ingredients Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing In some ... in some people, possibly as a result of histamines contained in some alcoholic beverages. Your immune system ...

  13. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Setala V. Naidu

    2003-01-01

    We have produced Co, Cu, and Fe nano-particles by Laser-induced solution deposition (LISD) as evidenced by TEM investigations. Sizes of the nano-particles created are in the order of 5 nm. The LISD system could generate nano-particles in quantities only in the order of a milligram. This may be mainly due to the limited photo induced reactions taking place on the surface of the solutions. We have designed experiments to use drop flow technique with LISD for nano-particle deposition on microreactors. Preliminary work has been done on Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors. We are also investigating the catalytic properties of nano-particles of FeO and CoO prepared by ball milling and dispersed into sol-gel prepared alumina granules. We have continued our investigation of catalytic reactions of Cu, Co, Fe, Cu/Co, Cu/Fe and Co/Fe on alumina support. The metal oxides were first reduced with hydrogen and used for the conversion of CO/H{sub 2}. The surface area of the catalysts has been determined by nitrogen disorption. They are in the range of 200-300 m{sup 2}/g. Cu, Co, Fe, Co/Fe, Cu/Co and Cu/Fe showed increasing order of catalytic activity for CO/H{sub 2} conversion. We are also studying catalytic conversion rates for CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures using these catalysts. Our investigations of Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors showed higher CO/H{sub 2} conversion for Fe compared to Co. We have used vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to study the magnetic characteristics of as prepared, reduced, post-reaction catalysts. Comparative study of the ferromagnetic component of these samples gives the reduction efficiency and the changes in metal centers during catalytic reactions. Magnetic studies of post-reaction Co and Fe micro-reactors show that more carbide formation occurs for iron compared to cobalt.

  14. Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogel Irradiated and Acetalized for Osteochondral Defect Repair: Mechanical, Chemical, and Histological Evaluation after Implantation in Rat Knees

    PubMed Central

    Batista, N. A.; Rodrigues, A. A.; Bavaresco, V. P.; Mariolani, J. R. L.; Belangero, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) hydrogel plugs were implanted in artificial osteochondral defects on the trochlear groove of rat knees. After 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of followup, samples containing the implants were mechanically evaluated by creep indentation test, chemically, and histologically by optical microscopy. The mechanical test pointed towards an increase of the implant creep modulus and the chemical analysis exhibited an increasing concentration of calcium and phosphorus within the implants over time. Optical microscopy showed no foreign body reaction and revealed formation, differentiation, and maintenance of new tissue at the defect/implant interface. The absence of implant wear indicated that the natural articular lubrication process was not disturbed by the implant. The performance of the irradiated and acetalized PVA was considered satisfactory for the proposed application. PMID:23197982

  15. The Kemp elimination in membrane mimetic reaction media. Probing catalytic properties of cationic vesicles formed from a double-tailed amphiphile and linear long-tailed alcohols or alkyl pyranosides.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Jaap E; Engberts, Jan B F N

    2004-06-21

    Vesicles formed from synthetic, double-tailed amphiphiles are often used as mimics for biological membranes. However, biological membranes are a complex mixture of various compounds. In the present paper we describe a first attempt to study the importance of additives on vesicular catalysis. The rate-determining deprotonation of 5-nitrobenzisoxazole (Kemp elimination) by hydroxide ion is efficiently catalysed by vesicles formed from dimethyldi-n-octadecylammonium chloride (C(18)C(18)(+)) as a result of (partial) dehydration of the reactants (especially the hydroxide ion) at the vesicular binding sites. Gradual addition of linear alcohols, such as n-decanol (C(10)OH), n-octadecanol (C(18)OH) and batyl alcohol (C(18)GlyOH) leads to a decrease in the observed catalysis. By contrast, gradual addition of oleyl alcohol, n-dodecyl-beta-glucoside (C(12)Glu) and n-dodecyl-beta-maltoside (C(12)Mal) leads to an increase in the observed catalysis. A detailed kinetic analysis, taking into account substrate binding site polarities, counterion binding percentages and binding affinity of the kinetic probe, suggests that the catalytic changes depend strongly on subtle changes in the structure of the additive. Whereas the C(12)Glu-induced effect can be explained by an increase in the vesicular rate constant, the effect of C(12)Mal can only be explained by an increase in the binding constant of the kinetic probe. However, for these pyranoside-containing vesicles others factors, such as a more extensive dehydration of the hydroxide ion, and micelle formation have to be considered. For the linear alcohols, besides a decrease in the counterion binding, changes in the vesicular rate constant and the binding constant should be taken into account. These two parameters change to a different extent for the different alcohols. The kinetic analysis is supported by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), E(T)(30) absorbance data and Nile Red, Laurdan, ANS and pyrene fluorescence measurements

  16. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  17. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  18. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  19. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seetala V. Naidu; Upali Siriwardane

    2005-01-14

    We have developed effective nanoparticle incorporated heterogeneous F-T catalysts starting with the synthesis of Fe, Co, Cu nanoparticles using Fe(acac){sub 3}, Co(acac){sub 2}, and Cu(acac){sub 2} precursors and incorporating the nanoparticles into alumina sol-gel to yield higher alkanes production. SEM/EDX, XRD, BET, VSM and SQUID experimental techniques were used to characterize the catalysts, and GC/MS were used for catalytic product analysis. The nanoparticle oxide method gave the highest metal loading. In case of mixed metals it seems that Co or Cu interferes and reduces Fe metal loading. The XRD pattern for nanoparticle mixed metal oxides show alloy formation between cobalt and iron, and between copper and iron in sol-gel prepared alumina granules. The alloy formation is also supported by DTA and VMS data. The magnetization studies were used to estimate the catalyst activity in pre- and post-catalysts. A lower limit of {approx}40% for the reduction efficiency was obtained due to hydrogenation at 450 C for 4 hrs. About 85% of the catalyst has become inactive after 25 hrs of catalytic reaction, probably by forming carbides of Fe and Co. The low temperature (300 K to 4.2 K) SQUID magnetometer results indicate a superparamagnetic character of metal nanoparticles with a wide size distribution of < 20 nm nanoparticles. We have developed an efficient and economical procedure for analyzing the F-T products using low cost GC-TCD system with hydrogen as a carrier gas. Two GC columns DC 200/500 and Supelco Carboxen-1000 column were tested for the separation of higher alkanes and the non-condensable gases. The Co/Fe on alumina sol-gel catalyst showed the highest yield for methane among Fe, Co, Cu, Co/Fe, Cu/Co, Fe/Cu. The optimization of CO/H{sub 2} ratio indicated that 1:1 ratio gave more alkanes distribution in F-T process with Co/Fe (6% each) impregnated on alumina mesoporous catalyst.

  20. Controllable stereoselective synthesis of trisubstituted alkenes by a catalytic three-component reaction of terminal alkynes, benzylic alcohols, and simple arenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Hua; Jin, Yin-Huan; Wang, Jie-Qi; Tian, Shi-Kai

    2009-08-21

    The acid-catalyzed three-component reaction of terminal alkynes, benzylic alcohols, and simple arenes provides convenient and atom-economic access to an array of both Z- and E-isomers of trisubstituted alkenes with excellent stereoselectivity by switching reaction temperature and acidic catalysts.

  1. Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

  2. Defect termination on crystalline silicon surfaces by hydrogen for improvement in the passivation quality of catalytic chemical vapor-deposited SiNx and SiNx/P catalytic-doped layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cham Thi, Trinh; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the role of hydrogen (H) in the improvement in the passivation quality of silicon nitride (SiNx) prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) and Cat-CVD SiNx/phosphorus (P) Cat-doped layers on crystalline silicon (c-Si) by annealing. Both structures show promising passivation capabilities for c-Si with extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) on n-type c-Si. Defect termination by H is evaluated on the basis of defect density (Nd) determined by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and interface state density (Dit) calculated by the Terman method. The two parameters are found to be drastically decreased by annealing after SiNx deposition. The calculated average Dit at midgap (Dit-average) is 2.2 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 for the SiNx/P Cat-doped c-Si sample with a SRV of 2 cm/s, which is equivalent to 3.1 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 for the SiNx/c-Si sample with a SRV of 5 cm/s after annealing. The results indicate that H atoms play a critical role in the reduction in Dit for SiNx/c-Si and SiNx/P Cat-doped c-Si, resulting in a drastic reduction in SRV by annealing.

  3. Biofuel production from palm oil with supercritical alcohols: effects of the alcohol to oil molar ratios on the biofuel chemical composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Sawangkeaw, Ruengwit; Teeravitud, Sunsanee; Bunyakiat, Kunchana; Ngamprasertsith, Somkiat

    2011-11-01

    Biofuel production from palm oil with supercritical methanol (SCM) and supercritical ethanol (SCE) at 400 °C and 15 MPa were evaluated. At the optimal alcohol to oil molar ratios of 12:1 and 18:1 for the SCM and SCE processes, respectively, the biofuel samples were synthesized in a 1.2-L reactor and the resulting biofuel was analyzed for the key properties including those for the diesel and biodiesel standard specifications. Biofuel samples derived from both the SCM and SCE processes could be used as an alternative fuel after slight improvement in their acid value and free glycerol content. The remarkable advantages of this novel process were: the additional fuel yield of approximately of 5% and 10% for SCM and SCE, respectively; the lower energy consumption for alcohol preheating, pumping and recovering than the biodiesel production with supercritical alcohols that use a high alcohol to oil molar ratio of 42:1.

  4. Effect of heat treatment on the physico-chemical properties and catalytic activity of manganese nodules leached residue towards decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Parida, K M; Dash, S S; Mallik, S; Das, J

    2005-10-15

    The effect of calcination temperature on the physico-chemical characterization of manganese nodule leached residue (MNLR) and water-washed manganese nodule leached residue (WMNLR) has been investigated on the basis of chemical analysis, XRD, TG-DTA, FTIR, surface hydroxyl groups, surface oxygen, reducing and oxidizing sites, surface area. XRD and IR confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxyhydroxides, delta-MnO2, which are converted to alpha-Fe2O3 and gamma-Mn2O3 phases above 400 degrees C of calcination, respectively. A solid solution of Fe2O3 and Mn2O3 is formed above 700 degrees C. The surface area, surface hydroxyl group, surface oxygen, reducing and oxidizing sites increase with the increase in calcination temperature up to 400 degrees C and then decrease with further rise in calcination temperature up to 700 degrees C. The catalytic activity of the sample towards H2O2 decomposition shows the similar trend as surface properties. A suitable Mn(3+)Mn4+ couple favours H2O2 decomposition reaction. The activity has been correlated with various physico-chemical properties.

  5. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  6. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  7. Nanoporous carbon materials with enhanced supercapacitance performance and non-aromatic chemical sensing with C1/C2 alcohol discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Adhikari, Laxmi; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Adhikari, Mandira Pradhananga; Adhikari, Rina; Hill, Jonathan P.; Pradhananga, Raja Ram; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have investigated the textural properties, electrochemical supercapacitances and vapor sensing performances of bamboo-derived nanoporous carbon materials (NCM). Bamboo, an abundant natural biomaterial, was chemically activated with phosphoric acid at 400 °C and the effect of impregnation ratio of phosphoric acid on the textural properties and electrochemical performances was systematically investigated. Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of various oxygen-containing surface functional groups (i.e. carboxyl, carboxylate, carbonyl and phenolic groups) in NCM. The prepared NCM are amorphous in nature and contain hierarchical micropores and mesopores. Surface areas and pore volumes were found in the range 218–1431 m2 g−1 and 0.26–1.26 cm3 g−1, respectively, and could be controlled by adjusting the impregnation ratio of phosphoric acid and bamboo cane powder. NCM exhibited electrical double-layer supercapacitor behavior giving a high specific capacitance of c.256 F g−1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s−1 together with high cyclic stability with capacitance retention of about 92.6% after 1000 cycles. Furthermore, NCM exhibited excellent vapor sensing performance with high sensitivity for non-aromatic chemicals such as acetic acid. The system would be useful to discriminate C1 and C2 alcohol (methanol and ethanol). PMID:27877898

  8. On-matrix derivatization extraction of chemical weapons convention relevant alcohols from soil.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2013-10-11

    Present study deals with the on-matrix derivatization-extraction of aminoalcohols and thiodiglycols, which are important precursors and/or degradation products of VX analogues and vesicants class of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The method involved hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) mediated in situ silylation of analytes on the soil. Subsequent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of derivatized analytes offered better recoveries in comparison to the procedure recommended by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). Various experimental conditions such as extraction solvent, reagent and catalyst amount, reaction time and temperature were optimized. Best recoveries of analytes ranging from 45% to 103% were obtained with DCM solvent containing 5%, v/v HMDS and 0.01%, w/v iodine as catalyst. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) with selected analytes ranged from 8 to 277 and 21 to 665ngmL(-1), respectively, in selected ion monitoring mode.

  9. Catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced from different thermo-chemical conversion routes of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Wang, Bing; Xu, Yuping

    2015-06-01

    This study presents experimental results that compare the use of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), alcoholysis (Al), pyrolysis (Py) and hydropyrolysis (HPy) for the production of bio-oil from a microalga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and the catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced by these four conversion routes. The yields and compositions of bio-oil, solid residue, and gases were evaluated and compared. HTL resulted in a bio-oil that has a higher energy density and superior fuel properties, such as thermal and storage stabilities, compared with the other three conversion routes. The N in crude bio-oils produced from Py and HPy is more easily removed than that in the bio-oils produced from HTL and Al. The upgraded bio-oils contain reduced amounts of certain O-containing and N-containing compounds and significantly increased saturated hydrocarbon contents. All of the upgraded bio-oils have a larger fraction boiling below 350°C than their corresponding crude bio-oils.

  10. Physico-Chemical Condition Optimization during Biosynthesis lead to development of Improved and Catalytically Efficient Gold Nano Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Madhuree; Mishra, Aradhana; Pandey, Shipra; Singh, Satyendra Pratap; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Shukla, Shatrunajay; Kakkar, Poonam; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has gained great attention in making the process cost-effective and eco-friendly, but there are limited reports which describe the interdependency of physical parameters for tailoring the dimension and geometry of nanoparticles during biological synthesis. In the present study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of various shapes and sizes were obtained by modulating different physical parameters using Trichoderma viride filtrate. The particles were characterized on the basis of visual observation, dynamic light scattering, UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X ray diffraction. While the size varied from 2–500 nm, the shapes obtained were nanospheres, nanotriangles, nanopentagons, nanohexagons, and nanosheets. Changing the parameters such as pH, temperature, time, substrate, and culture filtrate concentration influenced the size and geometry of nanoparticles. Catalytic activity of the biosynthesized GNP was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol which was strongly influenced by their structure and dimension. Common practices for biodegradation are traditional, expensive, require large amount of raw material, and time taking. Controlling shapes and sizes of nanoparticles could revolutionize the process of biodegradation that can remove all the hurdles in current scenario. PMID:27273371

  11. Hydrogenolysis goes bio: from carbohydrates and sugar alcohols to platform chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Agnieszka M; Weinberg, Kamil; Palkovits, Regina

    2012-03-12

    In view of the diminishing oil resources and the ongoing climate change, the use of efficient and environmentally benign technologies for the utilization of renewable resources has become indispensible. Therein, hydrogenolysis reactions offer a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. These reactions result in the cleavage of C-C and C-O bonds by hydrogen and allow direct access to valuable platform chemicals already integrated in today's value chains. Thus, hydrogenolysis bears the potential to bridge currently available technologies and future biomass-based refinery concepts. This Review highlights past and present developments in this field, with special emphasis on the direct utilization of cellulosic feedstocks.

  12. Systemic toxicity from subchronic dermal exposure, chemical characterization, and dermal penetration of catalytically cracked clarified slurry oil.

    PubMed

    Cruzan, G; Low, L K; Cox, G E; Meeks, J R; Mackerer, C R; Craig, P H; Singer, E J; Mehlman, M A

    1986-12-01

    Clarified slurry oil (CSO), the heavy residual fraction from the fluidized catalytic cracker, was applied to the shaven backs of groups of 10 male and 10 female Sprague-Dawley rats 5 days/week for 13 weeks at doses of 8, 30, 125, or 500 mg/kg/day, and to another group for 2 weeks at doses of 2000 mg/kg/day. The rats were fitted with cardboard Elizabethan collars to minimize the ingestion of the test material, which was applied undiluted and remained uncovered on the skin. A similar group of rats served as controls; they were treated in the same manner except that no CSO was applied to their skin. There was a dose-related mortality and depression of body weight gain in the rats treated with CSO at doses of 30 mg/kg/day or greater; none of the rats dosed at 2000 mg/kg/day survived more than 2 weeks. The primary target organs of CSO toxicity were the liver, thymus, and bone marrow. The effects on the liver included increased weight (250% at 500 mg/kg/day), cholangiolitis, diffuse liver cell degeneration and hypertrophy, necrosis, fibrosis, decreased serum glucose, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine amino transferase, bilirubin, and triglycerides. The thymus was found to be small and upon microscopic examination to be atrophic or hypoplastic. Erythroid hypoplasia was found in the bone marrow of some of the rats dosed at 30 mg/kg/day and increased in severity with increasing dose. The erythroid hypoplasia was accompanied by a dose-related anemia. Even in the rats dosed at 8 mg/kg/day, very slight abnormalities in the bile ducts were observed upon microscopic examination of the liver. Chromatographic separation and analyses demonstrated that CSO contains about 58% 3- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and approximately 8-10% carbazole derivatives. In vitro and in vivo skin penetration studies demonstrated that the carbazole materials penetrate through the skin to a considerable extent (about 44%); less penetration

  13. The usefulness of intermediate products of plum processing for alcoholic fermentation and chemical composition of the obtained distillates.

    PubMed

    Balcerek, Maria; Pielech-Przybylska, Katarzyna; Patelski, Piotr; Sapińska, Ewelina; Księżopolska, Mirosława

    2013-05-01

    In this study, an evaluation of intermediate products of plum processing as potential raw materials for distillates production was performed. Effects of composition of mashes on ethanol yield, chemical composition and taste, and flavor of the obtained spirits were determined. The obtained results showed that spontaneous fermentations of the tested products of plum processing with native microflora of raisins resulted in lower ethanol yields, compared to the ones fermented with wine yeast Saccharomyces bayanus. The supplementation of mashes with 120 g/L of sucrose caused an increase in ethanol contents from 6.2 ± 0.2 ÷ 6.5 ± 0.2% v/v in reference mashes (without sucrose addition, fermented with S. bayanus) to ca. 10.3 ± 0.3% v/v, where its highest yields amounted to 94.7 ± 2.9 ÷ 95.6 ± 2.9% of theoretical capacity, without negative changes in raw material originality of distillates. The concentrations of volatile compounds in the obtained distillates exceeding 2000 mg/L alcohol 100% v/v and low content of methanol and hydrocyanic acid, as well as their good taste and aroma make the examined products of plum processing be very attractive raw materials for the plum distillates production.

  14. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; Labouriau, Andrea

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate in the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.

  15. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; ...

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate inmore » the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.« less

  16. 40 CFR 721.10485 - Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic). 721.10485 Section 721.10485 Protection of... alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10485 - Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction products of alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic). 721.10485 Section 721.10485 Protection of... alcohols, alkyl alcohols, amino alcohols and methanol sodium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance...

  18. Quantum chemical analysis of thermodynamics of 2D cluster formation of alkanes at the water/vapor interface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Fainerman, V B; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2015-11-21

    Using the quantum chemical semi-empirical PM3 method it is shown that aliphatic alcohols favor the spontaneous clusterization of vaporous alkanes at the water surface due to the change of adsorption from the barrier to non-barrier mechanism. A theoretical model of the non-barrier mechanism for monolayer formation is developed. In the framework of this model alcohols (or any other surfactants) act as 'floats', which interact with alkane molecules of the vapor phase using their hydrophobic part, whereas the hydrophilic part is immersed into the water phase. This results in a significant increase of contact effectiveness of alkanes with the interface during the adsorption and film formation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. To test the model the thermodynamic and structural parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated for vaporous alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n(CH3) = 6-16) at the water surface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K. It is shown that the values of clusterization enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy per one monomer of the cluster depend on the chain lengths of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the alcohol molar fraction in the monolayers formed, and the shift of the alkane molecules with respect to the alcohol molecules Δn. Two possible competitive structures of mixed 2D film alkane-alcohol are considered: 2D films 1 with single alcohol molecules enclosed by alkane molecules (the alcohols do not form domains) and 2D films 2 that contain alcohol domains enclosed by alkane molecules. The formation of the alkane films of the first type is nearly independent of the surfactant type present at the interface, but depends on their molar fraction in the monolayer formed and the chain length of the compounds participating in the clusterization, whereas for the formation of the films of the second type the interaction between the hydrophilic parts of the surfactant is

  19. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  20. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  1. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  3. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost.

  4. Catalytic synthesis of high-value chemicals from coal-derived liquids. Conversion of phenanthrene derivatives into anthracene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Lai, W.C.

    1998-12-31

    It is known that phenanthrene and its derivatives are abundant in coal-derived liquids from coal carbonization, pyrolysis, and liquefaction; however, they have found little use in industry. On the other hand, anthracene and its derivatives are more useful materials for industrial applications. Thus, it is highly desirable to convert phenanthrene derivatives to anthracene derivatives. The authors have found that some chemically modified mordenites and Y-zeolites can selectively promote the transformation of sym-octahydrophenanthrene (sym-OHP) into sym-octahydroanthracene (sym-OHA) at lower temperatures. In this work, the effects of zeolite catalysts and reaction conditions on the ring-shift isomerization of sym-OHP into sym-OHA were studied through experiments at 200--300 C under an initial pressure of 0.79 MPa N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. They also explored the simultaneous hydrogenation-ring-shift isomerization of phenanthrene using zeolite-supported metal catalysts.

  5. Novel process and catalytic materials for converting CO2 and H2 containing mixtures to liquid fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Meiri, Nora; Dinburg, Yakov; Amoyal, Meital; Koukouliev, Viatcheslav; Nehemya, Roxana Vidruk; Landau, Miron V; Herskowitz, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and water are renewable and the most abundant feedstocks for the production of chemicals and fungible fuels. However, the current technologies for production of hydrogen from water are not competitive. Therefore, reacting carbon dioxide with hydrogen is not economically viable in the near future. Other alternatives include natural gas, biogas or biomass for the production of carbon dioxide, hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures that react to yield chemicals and fungible fuels. The latter process requires a high performance catalyst that enhances the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to higher hydrocarbons combined with an optimal reactor system. Important aspects of a novel catalyst, based on a Fe spinel and three-reactor system developed for this purpose published in our recent paper and patent, were investigated in this study. Potassium was found to be a key promoter that improves the reaction rates of the RWGS and FTS and increases the selectivity of higher hydrocarbons while producing mostly olefins. It changed the texture of the catalyst, stabilized the Fe-Al-O spinel, thus preventing decomposition into Fe3O4 and Al2O3. Potassium also increased the content of Fe5C2 while shifting Fe in the oxide and carbide phases to a more reduced state. In addition, it increased the relative exposure of carbide iron on the catalysts surface, the CO2 adsorption and the adsorption strength. A detailed kinetic model of the RWGS, FTS and methanation reactions was developed for the Fe spinel catalyst based on extensive experimental data measured over a range of operating conditions. Significant oligomerization activity of the catalyst was found. Testing the pelletized catalyst with CO2, CO and H2 mixtures over a range of operating conditions demonstrated its high productivity to higher hydrocarbons. The composition of the liquid (C5+) was found to be a function of the potassium content and the composition of the feedstock.

  6. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  7. Effects of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of ZnO films grown by catalytic reaction-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Kanji Morioka, Makoto; Kanauchi, Shingo; Ohashi, Yuki; Kato, Takahiro; Tamayama, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-15

    The influence of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) films grown on a-plane (11–20) sapphire (a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates was investigated, using a chemical vapor deposition method based on the reaction between dimethylzinc and high-temperature H{sub 2}O produced by a catalytic H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction on platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. The addition of N{sub 2}O was found to increase the size of the crystalline facets and to improve the crystal orientation along the c-axis. The electron mobility at 290 K was also increased to 234 cm{sup 2}/Vs following the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.2 × 10{sup −3 }Pa. In addition, the minimum full width at half maximum of the most intense photoluminescence peak derived from neutral donor bound excitons at 10 K decreased to 0.6 meV by the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.1 × 10{sup −2 }Pa.

  8. On the inclusion of alkanes into the monolayer of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface: a quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Fomina, Elena S; Belyaeva, Elena A; Fainerman, Valentin B; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2013-02-14

    In the framework of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method thermodynamic and structural parameters of the formation and clusterization of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K at the water/alkane vapor C(n)H(2n+2), (n(CH(3)) = 6-16) interface were calculated. The dependencies of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization per one monomer molecule of 2D films on the alkyl chain length of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the molar fraction of alkanes in the monolayers and the immersion degree of alcohol molecules into the water phase were shown to be linear or stepwise. The threshold of spontaneous clusterization of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface was 10-11 carbon atoms at 298 K which is in line with experimental data at the air/water interface. It is shown that the presence of alkane vapor does not influence the process of alcohol monolayer formation. The structure of these monolayers is analogous to those obtained at the air/water interface in agreement with experimental data. The inclusion of alkane molecules into the amphiphilic monolayer at the water/alkane vapor interface is possible for amphiphiles with the spontaneous clusterization threshold at the air/water interface (n(s)(0)) of at least 16 methylene units in the alkyl chain, and it does not depend on the molar fraction of alkanes in the corresponding monolayer. The inclusion of alkanes from the vapor phase into the amphiphilic monolayer also requires that the difference between the alkyl chain lengths of alcohols and alkanes is not larger than n(s)(0) - 15 and n(s)(0) - 14 for the 2D film 1 and 2D film 2, respectively.

  9. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  10. Higher-alcohols biorefinery: improvement of catalyst for ethanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Olson, Edwin S; Sharma, Ramesh K; Aulich, Ted R

    2004-01-01

    The concept of a biorefinery for higher-alcohol production is to integrate ethanol and methanol formation via fermentation and biomass gasification, respectively, with conversion of these simple alcohol intermediates into higher alcohols via the Guerbet reaction. 1-Butanol results from the self-condensation of ethanol in this multistep reaction occurring on a single catalytic bed. Combining methanol with ethanol gives a mixture of propanol, isobutanol, and 2-methyl-1-butanol. All of these higher alcohols are useful as solvents, chemical intermediates, and fuel additives and, consequently, have higher market values than the simple alcohol intermediates. Several new catalysts for the condensation of ethanol and alcohol mixtures to higher alcohols were designed and tested under a variety of conditions. Reactions of methanol-ethanol mixtures gave as high as 100% conversion of the ethanol to form high yields of isobutanol with smaller amounts of 1-propanol, the amounts in the mixture depending on the starting mixture. The most successful catalysts are multifunctional with basic and hydrogen transfer components.

  11. Antimicrobial, free radical scavenging activities and catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol by nano-silver synthesized from the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L.: a promenade towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, C.; Sivasubramanian, G.; Parthasarathi, Bera; Baskaran, K.; Balachander, R.; Parameswaran, V. R.

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized from aqueous silver nitrate through a simple route using the leaf extract of Aristolochia indica L. (LAIL) which acted as a reducing as well as capping agent. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the synthesized silver particles have a face centred cubic structure. EDS predicted the presence of elemental silver. The SEM images showed the synthesis of spherically mono-dispersed particles, with nano dimensions accounted by the TEM images. Infra-red spectrum adopted to the different organic functionalities present at the surface of the particles. TGA indicated an overall 11 % weight loss up to 1000 °C, suggesting desorption of biomolecules from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed the presence of metallic silver nanoparticles. The prepared material was utilized as catalyst in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol with molecular oxygen as the oxidant in methanol, under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Also Ag-NPs showed good to moderate anti-microbial activity employing the Agar disc diffusion method against various strains using Ciprofloxacin and Fluconazole as standard. Free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1-diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS in vitro assays. The work presented here demonstrates the adaptability of the synthesized Ag-NPs in participating as a disinfectant agent, free radical scavenger and an effective oxidation catalyst. The basic premise of attaining sustainability through the green synthesis of smart multifaceted materials has been consciously addressed.

  12. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N2 adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnOx and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnOx/CNT and MnOx/TiO2 catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnOx@CNTs presented better NH3-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn4+ and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnOx@CNTs. The H2-TPR and NH3-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnOx@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N2 with NH3. In addition, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H2O resistance.Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature

  13. Dinuclear manganese complexes containing chiral 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-derived ligands and their catalytic potential for the oxidation of olefins, alkanes, and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Romakh, Vladimir B; Therrien, Bruno; Süss-Fink, Georg; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2007-02-19

    Five new 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-derived compounds, sodium 3-(4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononan-1-yl)propionate (Na[LMe2R']) as well as the enantiopure derivatives (S)-1-(2-methylbutyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (S-LMe2R''), SS-trans-2,5,8-trimethyl-2,5,8-triazabicyclo[7.4.01,9]tridecane (SS-LBMe3), (S)-1-(2-hydroxypropyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (S-LMe2R), and (R)-1-(2-hydroxypropyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (R-LMe2R), have been synthesized. Reaction of manganese dichloride with the chiral macrocycles S-LMe2R and R-LMe2R in aqueous ethanol gives, upon oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, the brown dinuclear Mn(III)-Mn(IV) complexes which are enantiomers, [Mn2(S-LMe2R)2(mu-O)2]3+ (S,S-1) and [Mn2(R-LMe2R)2(mu-O)2]3+ (R,R-1). The single-crystal X-ray structure analyses of [S,S-1][PF6]3.0.5(CH3)2CO and [R,R-1][PF6]3.0.5(CH3)2CO show both enantiomers to contain Mn(III) and Mn(IV) centers, each of which being coordinated to three nitrogen atoms of a triazacyclononane ligand and each of which being bridged by two oxo and by two chiral hydroxypropyl pendent arms of the macrocycle. The enantiomeric complexes S,S-1 and R,R-1 were found to catalyze the oxidation of olefins, alkanes, and alcohols with hydrogen peroxide. In the epoxidation of indene the enantiomeric excess values attain 13%. The bond selectivities of the oxidation of linear and branched alkanes suggest the crucial step in this process to be the attack of a sterically hindered high-valent manganese-oxo species on the C-H bond.

  14. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH₃ over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-10-07

    Nanoflaky MnO(x) on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnO(x)@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH₃. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H₂ temperature-programmed reduction (H₂-TPR) and NH₃ temperature-programmed desorption (NH₃-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnO(x) and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnO(x)/CNT and MnO(x)/TiO₂ catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs presented better NH₃-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn(4+) and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnO(x)@CNTs. The H₂-TPR and NH₃-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N₂ with NH₃. In addition, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H₂O resistance.

  15. Role of the chemically non-innocent ligand in the catalytic formation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide from methanol and water with the metal as the spectator.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Hall, Michael B

    2015-09-30

    The catalytic mechanism for the production of H2 and CO2 from CH3OH and H2O by [K(dme)2][Ru(H) (trop2dad)] (K(dme)2.1_exp) was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since the reaction occurs under mild conditions and at reasonable rates, it could be considered an ideal way to use methanol to store hydrogen. The predicted mechanism begins with the dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde through a new ligand-ligand bifunctional mechanism, where two hydrogen atoms of CH3OH eliminate to the ligand's N and C atoms, a mechanism that is more favorable than the previously known mechanisms, β-H elimination, or the metal-ligand bifunctional. The key initiator of this first step is formed by migration of the hydride in 1 from the ruthenium to the meta-carbon atom, which generates 1″ with a frustrated Lewis pair in the ring between N and C. Hydroxide, formed when 1″ cleaves H2O, reacts rapidly with CH2O to give H2C(OH)O(-), which subsequently donates a hydride to 6 to generate HCOOH and 5. HCOOH then protonates 5 to give formate and a neutral complex, 4, with a fully hydrogenated ligand. The hydride of formate transfers to 6, releasing CO2. The fully hydrogenated complex, 4, is first deprotonated by OH(-) to form 5, which then releases hydrogen to regenerate the catalyst, 1″. In this mechanism, which explains the experimental observations, the whole reaction occurs on the chemically non-innocent ligand with the ruthenium atom appearing as a spectator.

  16. Formation of alcohol conversion catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2001-01-01

    The method of the present invention involves a composition containing an intimate mixture of (a) metal oxide support particles and (b) a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, its method of manufacture, and its method of use for converting alcohols to aldehydes. During the conversion process, catalytically active metal oxide from the discrete catalytic metal oxide particles migrates to the oxide support particles and forms a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on the oxide support particle to form a catalyst composition having a higher specific activity than the admixed particle composition.

  17. Synthesis of higher alcohols over highly dispersed Cu-Fe based catalysts derived from layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinyou; Fang, Kegong; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Lu; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-05-15

    Highly dispersed Cu-Fe based catalysts with Fe/Cu molar ratios ranging from 0.2 to 1 were prepared via thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) precursors and tested for higher alcohol synthesis (HAS) via CO hydrogenation. The catalysts were characterized using different techniques such as XRD, TEM, XPS, and H2-TPR. It was demonstrated that the Cu and Fe ions were highly dispersed in the brucite-like layers of the LDHs. With increased Fe/Cu atomic ratio, the tetrahedrally coordinated Cu ion content, Cu reduction temperatures, and the spacing of layers initially increase until the Fe/Cu ratio reaches 0.5 and then decrease. In addition to the catalytic evaluation for CO hydrogenation and catalyst characterization, the relationships between the physical-chemical properties of the catalysts and their catalytic performances were also investigated. It was also found that the alcohols/hydrocarbons ratios correlate linearly with the tetrahedrally coordinated Cu ion content. Moreover, higher reduction temperatures of Cu species as well as larger spacing between the layers in the catalyst are favorable for the synthesis of alcohols. The incorporation of a suitable amount of Fe is beneficial for the production of higher alcohols, with the best catalytic performance (alcohol selectivity of 20.77% and C2+ alcohol selectivity of 48.06%) obtained from a Fe/Cu atomic ratio of 0.5.

  18. (1)H NMR spectra of alcohols in hydrogen bonding solvents: DFT/GIAO calculations of chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, John S

    2016-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of aliphatic alcohols in hydrogen bonding solvents have been computed on the basis of density functional theory by applying the gauge-including atomic orbital method to geometry-optimized alcohol/solvent complexes. The OH proton shifts and hydrogen bond distances for methanol or ethanol complexed with pyridine depend very much on the functional employed and very little on the basis set, provided it is sufficiently large to give the correct quasi-linear hydrogen bond geometry. The CH proton shifts are insensitive to both the functional and the basis set. NMR shifts for all protons in several alcohol/pyridine complexes are calculated at the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof PBE0/cc-pVTZ//PBE0/6-311 + G(d,p) level in the gas phase. The results correlate with the shifts for the pyridine-complexed alcohols, determined by analysing data from the NMR titration of alcohols against pyridine. More pragmatically, computed shifts for a wider range of alcohols correlate with experimental shifts in neat pyridine. Shifts for alcohols in dimethylsulfoxide, based on the corresponding complexes in the gas phase, correlate well with the experimental values, but the overall root mean square difference is high (0.23 ppm), shifts for the OH, CHOH and other CH protons being systematically overestimated, by averages of 0.42, 0.21 and 0.06 ppm, respectively. If the computed shifts are corrected accordingly, a very good correlation is obtained with a gradient of 1.00 ± 0.01, an intercept of 0.00 ± 0.02 ppm and a root mean square difference of 0.09 ppm. This is a modest improvement on the result of applying the CHARGE programme to a slightly different set of alcohols. Some alcohol complexes with acetone and acetonitrile were investigated both in the gas phase and in a continuum of the relevant solvent.

  19. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  20. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  1. Cerium(III), europium(III), and ytterbium(III) complexes with alcohol donor groups as chemical exchange saturation transfer agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Morrow, Janet R

    2009-08-03

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of macrocycles 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (THED) and (1S,4S,7S,10S)-1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (S-THP) were studied as chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. The four hyperfine-shifted alcohol protons of these Ln(III) complexes gave rise to a single (1)H resonance in wet d(3)-acetonitrile that was separated from the bulk water resonance (Delta omega) by 8 ppm (Ce), 2 ppm (Nd), 7 ppm (Eu), or 17 ppm (Yb). A CEST peak corresponding to the alcohol protons was observed for all Ln(THED)(3+) or Ln(S-THP)(3+) complexes except Nd(III) at low water concentrations (<1%). In 100% aqueous buffered solutions, the CEST hydroxyl peak is observed for the Eu(III), Ce(III), and Yb(III) complexes over a range of pH values. The optimal pH range for the CEST effect of each complex is related to the pK(a) of the hydroxyl/water ligands of the complex. Optimum pH values for the CEST effect from alcohol proton exchange are pH = 6.0 for Ce(S-THP)(3+), pH = 4.5 for Eu(THED)(3+), and pH = 3.0 for Yb(S-THP)(3+).

  2. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  3. Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals and industrial wastes as a Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is attributed to rising consumption of fossil fuels around the world. The development of solutions to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is one of the most urgent needs of today's society. One of the most stable and long-term solutions for storing CO2 is via carbon mineralization, where minerals containing metal oxides of Ca or Mg are reacted with CO2 to produce thermodynamically stable Ca- and Mg-carbonates that are insoluble in water. Carbon mineralization can be carried out in-situ or ex-situ. In the case of in-situ mineralization, the degree of carbonation is thought to be limited by both mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction kinetics, and must be well understood to predict the ultimate fate of CO2 within geological reservoirs. While the kinetics of in-situ mineral trapping via carbonation is naturally slow, it can be enhanced at high temperature and high partial pressure of CO2. The addition of weak organic acids produced from food waste has also been shown to enhance mineral weathering kinetics. In the case of the ex-situ carbon mineralization, the role of these ligand-bearing organic acids can be further amplified for silicate mineral dissolution. Unfortunately, high mineral dissolution rates often lead to the formation of a silica-rich passivation layer on the surface of silicate minerals. Thus, the use of novel solvent mixture that allows chemically catalyzed removal of this passivation layer during enhanced Mg-leaching surface reaction has been proposed and demonstrated. Furthermore, an engineered biological catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, has been developed and evaluated to accelerate the hydration of CO2, which is another potentially rate-limiting step of the carbonation reaction. The development of these novel catalytic reaction schemes has significantly improved the overall efficiency and sustainability of in-situ and ex-situ mineral carbonation technologies and allowed direct

  4. Comparative stability and catalytic and chemical properties of the sulfate-activating enzymes from Penicillium chrysogenum (mesophile) and Penicillium duponti (thermophile).

    PubMed

    Renosto, F; Schultz, T; Re, E; Mazer, J; Chandler, C J; Barron, A; Segel, I H

    1985-11-01

    ATP sulfurylases from Penicillium chrysogenum (a mesophile) and from Penicillium duponti (a thermophile) had a native molecular weight of about 440,000 and a subunit molecular weight of about 69,000. (The P. duponti subunit appeared to be a little smaller than the P. chrysogenum subunit.) The P. duponti enzyme was about 100 times more heat stable than the P. chrysogenum enzyme; k inact (the first-order rate constant for inactivation) at 65 degrees C = 3.3 X 10(-4) s-1 for P. duponti and 3.0 X 10(-2) s-1 for P. chrysogenum. The P. duponti enzyme was also more stable to low pH and urea at 30 degrees C. Rabbit serum antibodies to each enzyme showed heterologous cross-reaction. Amino acid analyses disclosed no major compositional differences between the two enzymes. The analogous Km and Ki values of the forward and reverse reactions were also essentially identical at 30 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, the physiologically important adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 4 U mg of protein-1, which is about half that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. The molybdolysis and ATP synthesis activities of the P. duponti enzyme at 30 degrees C were similar to those of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. At 50 degrees C, the APS synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 12 to 19 U mg of protein-1, which was higher than that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme at 30 degrees C (8 +/- 1 U mg of protein-1). Treatment of the P. chrysogenum enzyme with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) at 30 degrees C under nondenaturing conditions modified one free sulfhydryl group per subunit. Vmax was not significantly altered, but the catalytic activity at low magnesium-ATP or SO4(2-) (or MoO4(2-)) was markedly reduced. Chemical modification with tetranitromethane had the same results on the kinetics. The native P. duponti enzyme was relatively unreactive toward DTNB or tetranitromethane at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 or pH 9.0, but at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0, DTNB rapidly

  5. A novel polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel functionalized with organic boundary lubricant for use as low-friction cartilage substitute: synthesis, physical/chemical, mechanical, and friction characterization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Michelle M; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    A novel material design was developed by functionalizing polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with an organic low-friction boundary lubricant (molar ratios of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 moles of lauroyl chloride). The hydrogels were fabricated using two different techniques. First, the boundary lubricant was initially functionalized to the polymer, then the hydrogels were created by physically crosslinking the reacted polymer. Second, hydrogels were initially created by crosslinking pure polyvinyl alcohol, with the functionalization reaction performed on the fully formed gel. After the reaction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance spectra revealed a clear ester peak, the diminishment of the alcohol peak, and the amplification of the alkyl peaks, which confirmed attachment of the hydrocarbon chains to the polymer. Additional chemical characterization occurred through elemental analysis where an average increase of 22% carbon and 40% hydrogen provided further confirmation of attachment. Physical characterization of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels was performed by water content and contact angle measurements. Water content dependency showed that method 1 had a direct relationship with boundary lubricant concentration, and method 2 displayed an inverse relationship. The contact angle increased as boundary lubricant concentration increased for the pure matrix material for both processing methods, suggesting that the hydrocarbons produced surface properties that mimic natural cartilage, and contact behavior of the biphasic system was dependent on processing method. Friction tests demonstrated a significant decrease in friction coefficient, with a maximum decrease of 70% and a minimum decrease of 24% for boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels compared with nonfunctionalized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels.

  6. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  7. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  8. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

  9. Prevalence of Bimolecular Routes in the Activation of Diatomic Molecules with Strong Chemical Bonds (O2, NO, CO, N2) on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, David; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-05-19

    Dissociation of the strong bonds in O2, NO, CO, and N2 often involves large activation barriers on low-index planes of metal particles used as catalysts. These kinetic hurdles reflect the noble nature of some metals (O2 activation on Au), the high coverages of co-reactants (O2 activation during CO oxidation on Pt), or the strength of the chemical bonds (NO on Pt, CO and N2 on Ru). High barriers for direct dissociations from density functional theory (DFT) have led to a consensus that "defects", consisting of low-coordination exposed atoms, are required to cleave such bonds, as calculated by theory and experiments for model surfaces at low coverages. Such sites, however, bind intermediates strongly, rendering them unreactive at the high coverages prevalent during catalysis. Such site requirements are also at odds with turnover rates that often depend weakly on cluster size or are actually higher on larger clusters, even though defects, such as corners and edges, are most abundant on small clusters. This Account illustrates how these apparent inconsistencies are resolved through activations of strong bonds assisted by co-adsorbates on crowded low-index surfaces. Catalytic oxidations occur on Au clusters at low temperatures in spite of large activation barriers for O2 dissociation on Au(111) surfaces, leading to proposals that O2 activation requires low-coordination Au atoms or Au-support interfaces. When H2O is present, however, O2 dissociation proceeds with low barriers on Au(111) because chemisorbed peroxides (*OOH* and *HOOH*) form and weaken O-O bonds before cleavage, thus allowing activation on low-index planes. DFT-derived O2 dissociation barriers are much lower on bare Pt surfaces, but such surfaces are nearly saturated with CO* during CO oxidation. A dearth of vacant sites causes O2* to react with CO* to form *OOCO* intermediates that undergo O-O cleavage. NO-H2 reactions occur on Pt clusters saturated with NO* and H*; direct NO* dissociation requires vacant

  10. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    CHEMICAL RESEARCH, r- DEVELOPMENT 5 N ENGINEERING CRDE-R-084 "" CENTER CENER(GC-TR-1728-008) ’ 04 N MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS Q...and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions &AUTHOR(S) Garlick, Stephanie M. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Tables........................87 vi MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION The hydrolysis of phosphate esters in microemulsion

  11. 1H NMR spectra of alcohols and diols in chloroform: DFT/GIAO calculation of chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, John S

    2014-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of aliphatic alcohols in chloroform have been computed on the basis of density functional theory, the solvent being included by the integral-equation-formalism polarisable continuum model of Gaussian 09. Relative energies of all conformers are calculated at the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE)0/6-311+G(d,p) level, and NMR shifts by the gauge-including atomic orbital method with the PBE0/6-311+G(d,p) geometry and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The 208 computed CH proton NMR shifts for 34 alcohols correlate very well with the experimental values, with a gradient of 1.00 ± 0.01 and intercept close to zero; the overall root mean square difference (RMSD) is 0.08 ppm. Shifts for CH protons of diols in chloroform are well correlated with the theoretical values for (isotropic) benzene, with similar gradient and intercept (1.02 ± 0.01, -0.13 ppm), but the overall RMSD is slightly higher, 0.12 ppm. This approach generally gives slightly better results than the CHARGE model of Abraham et al. The shifts of unsaturated alcohols in benzene have been re-examined with Gaussian 09, but the overall fit for CH protons is not improved, and OH proton shifts are worse. Shifts of vinyl protons in alkenols are systematically overestimated, and the correlation of computed shifts against the experimental data for unsaturated alcohols follows a quadratic equation. Splitting the 20 compounds studied into two sets, and applying empirical scaling based on the quadratic for the first set to the second set, gives an RMSD of 0.10 ppm. A multi-standard approach gives a similar result.

  12. The role of acetaldehyde outside ethanol metabolism in the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages: evidence from a large chemical survey.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Sohnius, Eva-Maria

    2008-08-01

    Acetaldehyde is a volatile compound naturally found in alcoholic beverages, and it is regarded as possibly being carcinogenic to humans (IARC Group 2B). Acetaldehyde formed during ethanol metabolism is generally considered as a source of carcinogenicity in alcoholic beverages. However, no systematic data is available about its occurrence in alcoholic beverages and the carcinogenic potential of human exposure to this directly ingested form of acetaldehyde outside ethanol metabolism. In this study, we have analysed and evaluated a large sample collective of different alcoholic beverages (n=1,555). Beer (9+/-7 mg/l, range 0-63 mg/l) had significantly lower acetaldehyde contents than wine (34+/-34 mg/l, range 0-211 mg/l), or spirits (66+/-101 mg/l, range 0-1,159 mg/l). The highest acetaldehyde concentrations were generally found in fortified wines (118+/-120 mg/l, range 12-800 mg/l). Assuming an equal distribution between the beverage and saliva, the residual acetaldehyde concentrations in the saliva after swallowing could be on average 195 microM for beer, 734 microM for wine, 1,387 microM for spirits, or 2,417 microM for fortified wine, which are above levels previously regarded as potentially carcinogenic. Further research is needed to confirm the carcinogenic potential of directly ingested acetaldehyde. Until then, some possible preliminary interventions include the reduction of acetaldehyde in the beverages by improvement in production technology or the use of acetaldehyde binding additives. A re-evaluation of the 'generally recognized as safe' status of acetaldehyde is also required, which does not appear to be in agreement with its toxicity and carcinogenicity.

  13. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  14. Catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, A.W. Jr.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

  15. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  16. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of Alcoholism Why can some people have a ... to an increased risk of alcoholism. Cutting-Edge Genetic Research in Alcoholism Although researchers already have made ...

  17. Development of a dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction procedure coupled to GC-qMSD for evaluation the chemical profile in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, F; Caldeira, M; Câmara, J S

    2008-02-18

    In the present study, a simple and sensitive methodology based on dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography with quadrupole mass detection (GC-qMSD), was developed and optimized for the determination of volatile (VOCs) and semi-volatile (SVOCs) compounds from different alcoholic beverages: wine, beer and whisky. Key experimental factors influencing the equilibrium of the VOCs and SVOCs between the sample and the SPME fibre, as the type of fibre coating, extraction time and temperature, sample stirring and ionic strength, were optimized. The performance of five commercially available SPME fibres was evaluated and compared, namely polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 100 microm); polyacrylate (PA, 85 microm); polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB, 65 microm); carboxentrade mark/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS, 75 microm) and the divinylbenzene/carboxen on polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS, 50/30 microm) (StableFlex). An objective comparison among different alcoholic beverages has been established in terms of qualitative and semi-quantitative differences on volatile and semi-volatile compounds. These compounds belong to several chemical families, including higher alcohols, ethyl esters, fatty acids, higher alcohol acetates, isoamyl esters, carbonyl compounds, furanic compounds, terpenoids, C13-norisoprenoids and volatile phenols. The optimized extraction conditions and GC-qMSD, lead to the successful identification of 44 compounds in white wines, 64 in beers and 104 in whiskys. Some of these compounds were found in all of the examined beverage samples. The main components of the HS-SPME found in white wines were ethyl octanoate (46.9%), ethyl decanoate (30.3%), ethyl 9-decenoate (10.7%), ethyl hexanoate (3.1%), and isoamyl octanoate (2.7%). As for beers, the major compounds were isoamyl alcohol (11.5%), ethyl octanoate (9.1%), isoamyl acetate (8.2%), 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (5.9%), and octanoic acid (5

  18. Highly Concentrated Catalytic Asymmetric Allylation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Alfred J.; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80–99%) with high enantioselectivities (79–95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84–87%). PMID:17249767

  19. Highly concentrated catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Alfred J; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J

    2007-02-01

    [reaction: see text] We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80-99%) with high enantioselectivities (79-95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84-87%).

  20. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  1. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W.; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  2. Reduction of the copper ion to its metal and clusters in alcoholic media: A radiation chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, G. R.

    2005-10-01

    Reduction of Cu 2+ ions with and without I - as a ligand was studied in N 2-purged alcoholic solutions by pulse radiolysis. In the absence of iodide ion, the initial rate constant for e -sol reaction with Cu 2+ was determined following the decay of solvated electrons in different alcohols; kbimol values are in the range of 0.8-1.1×10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. In the presence of 10 -3 mol dm -3 KI, the respective kbimol remained almost same. Generally, on reduction, Cu(II) ion changes to Cu(I) ion initially and later it produces metallic copper (Cu°), and the stability of these intermediates depends on the conditions of the matrix. In the presence of I -, Copper ions such as Cu(II) or Cu(I) ions get reduced to metallic copper (Cu°) having initial absorption around 740 and below 400 nm. Later, at 100 μs time after the electron pulse, it gets transformed into a nanoparticle with an absorption band at 580 nm. Such formation of copper nanoparticle was observed only in 2-propanolic medium in the presence of iodide ions. During γ-radiolysis of N 2-purged 1.5×10 -4 CuSO 4 solutions in 2-propanol, reddish pink colored copper nanoparticles were formed, which are quite similar to those reported earlier in aqueous solution. But, in the presence of I - (2-propanolic solutions), such phenomenon was not noticed on γ-radiolysis. Interestingly, the formation of copper nanoparticle was observed also in the reactions of copper (II) ions with alcohol radicals formed during γ-radiolysis in N 2O-purged system, where e -sol were scavenged by N 2O. The nanoparticles generated both in N 2 and N 2O-purged alcoholic systems, viz. methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol, were found to be oxygen sensitive. The contradictory results from pulse and γ-radiolysis studies in the presence and absence of iodide ions are explained to account for the nanoparticle generation.

  3. Carbon Cloth Supports Catalytic Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. T. P.; Ammon, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon cloth is starting material for promising new catalytic electrodes. Carbon-cloth electrodes are more efficient than sintered-carbon configuration previously used. Are also chemically stable and require less catalyst--an important economic advantage when catalyst is metal such as platinum.

  4. Catalytic microrotor driven by geometrical asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-02-07

    An asymmetric gear with homogeneous surface properties is, here, presented as a prototype to fabricate catalytic microrotors. The driving torque arises from the diffusiophoretic effect induced by the concentration gradients generated by catalytic chemical reactions at the gear surface. This torque produces a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of the asymmetric gear. By means of mesoscopic simulations, we prove and characterize this scenario. The gear rotational velocity is determined by the gear-solvent interactions, the gear geometry, the solvent viscosity, and the catalytic reaction ratio. Our work presents a simple way to design self-propelled microrotors, alternative to existing catalytic bi-component, or thermophoretic ones.

  5. Catalytic microrotor driven by geometrical asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-02-01

    An asymmetric gear with homogeneous surface properties is, here, presented as a prototype to fabricate catalytic microrotors. The driving torque arises from the diffusiophoretic effect induced by the concentration gradients generated by catalytic chemical reactions at the gear surface. This torque produces a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of the asymmetric gear. By means of mesoscopic simulations, we prove and characterize this scenario. The gear rotational velocity is determined by the gear-solvent interactions, the gear geometry, the solvent viscosity, and the catalytic reaction ratio. Our work presents a simple way to design self-propelled microrotors, alternative to existing catalytic bi-component, or thermophoretic ones.

  6. Chemical Analysis of Suspected Unrecorded Alcoholic Beverages from the States of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Giuseppina; Soares Neto, Julino Assunção Rodrigues; de Araujo Carlini, Elisaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Our study analyzed 152 samples of alcoholic beverages collected from the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, Brazil, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The methanol content varied from 20 to 180 ppm in 28 samples, and the limit of the accepted level of 200 ppm was exceeded in only one sample. High content of cyanide derivatives and ethyl carbamate, above the accepted level of 150 ppb, was observed in 109 samples. Carbonyl compounds were also observed in 111 samples, showing hydroxy 2-propanone, 4-methyl-4-hepten-3-one, furfural, and 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate as main constituents. Copper was found at concentrations above 5 ppm in 26 samples; the maximum value observed was 28 ppm. This work evaluated the human health risk associated with the poor quality of suspected unrecorded alcohols beverages. PMID:26495155

  7. Differential transition-state stabilization in enzyme catalysis: quantum chemical analysis of interactions in the chorismate mutase reaction and prediction of the optimal catalytic field.

    PubMed

    Szefczyk, Borys; Mulholland, Adrian J; Ranaghan, Kara E; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2004-12-15

    Chorismate mutase is a key model system in the development of theories of enzyme catalysis. To analyze the physical nature of catalytic interactions within the enzyme active site and to estimate the stabilization of the transition state (TS) relative to the substrate (differential transition state stabilization, DTSS), we have carried out nonempirical variation-perturbation analysis of the electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and correlation interactions of the enzyme-bound substrate and transition-state structures derived from ab initio QM/MM modeling of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase. Significant TS stabilization by approximately -23 kcal/mol [MP2/6-31G(d)] relative to the bound substrate is in agreement with that of previous QM/MM modeling and contrasts with suggestions that catalysis by this enzyme arises purely from conformational selection effects. The most important contributions to DTSS come from the residues, Arg90, Arg7, Glu78, a crystallographic water molecule, Arg116, and Arg63, and are dominated by electrostatic effects. Analysis of the differential electrostatic potential of the TS and substrate allows calculation of the catalytic field, predicting the optimal location of charged groups to achieve maximal DTSS. Comparison with the active site of the enzyme from those of several species shows that the positions of charged active site residues correspond closely to the optimal catalytic field, showing that the enzyme has evolved specifically to stabilize the TS relative to the substrate.

  8. Catalytic Science Center Opens at Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Described is a catalytic science center designed to incorporate academic and industrial concerns. The center combines educational and research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for the chemical professional. (MA)

  9. An overview of hazard and risk assessment of the OECD high production volume chemical category--long chain alcohols [C(6)-C(22)] (LCOH).

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Hans; Belanger, Scott E; Fisk, Peter R; Schäfers, Christoph; Veenstra, Gauke; Nielsen, Allen M; Kasai, Yutaka; Willing, Andreas; Dyer, Scott D; Stanton, Kathleen; Sedlak, Richard

    2009-05-01

    This review summarizes the findings of the assessment report for the category, long chain alcohols (LCOH) with a carbon chain length range of C(6)-C(22) covering 30 substances, and >1.5million tonnes/year consumed globally. The category was evaluated under the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) high production volume chemicals program in 2006. The main findings of the assessment include: (1) no unacceptable human or environmental risks were identified; (2) these materials are rapidly and readily biodegradable; (3) a parabolic relationship was demonstrated between carbon chain length and acute and chronic aquatic toxicity; (4) category-specific (quantitative) structure-activity relationships were developed enabling prediction of properties across the entire category; (5) LCOH occur naturally in the environment in an equilibrium between synthesis and degradation; (6) industry coming together and sharing resources results in minimizing the need for additional animal tests, produces cost savings, and increases scientific quality of the assessment.

  10. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method

    PubMed Central

    Van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-01-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices. PMID:27616038

  11. Suitability assessment of a continuous process combining thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single pilot-scale twin-screw extruder for six different biomass sources.

    PubMed

    Vandenbossche, Virginie; Brault, Julien; Hernandez-Melendez, Oscar; Evon, Philippe; Barzana, Eduardo; Vilarem, Gérard; Rigal, Luc

    2016-07-01

    A process has been validated for the deconstruction of lignocellulose on a pilot scale installation using six types of biomass selected for their sustainability, accessibility, worldwide availability, and differences of chemical composition and physical structure. The process combines thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single twin-screw extruder. Three treatment phases were sequentially performed: an alkaline pretreatment, a neutralization step coupled with an extraction-separation phase and a bioextrusion treatment. Alkaline pretreatment destructured the wall polymers after just a few minutes and allowed the initial extraction of 18-54% of the hemicelluloses and 9-41% of the lignin. The bioextrusion step induced the start of enzymatic hydrolysis and increased the proportion of soluble organic matter. Extension of saccharification for 24h at high consistency (20%) and without the addition of new enzyme resulted in the production of 39-84% of the potential glucose.

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  13. Pt3Ti nanoparticles: fine dispersion on SiO2 supports, enhanced catalytic CO oxidation, and chemical stability at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Govindachetty; Abe, Hideki; Xu, Ya; Sekido, Nobuaki; Hirata, Hirohito; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2010-07-06

    A platinum-based intermetallic phase with an early d-metal, Pt(3)Ti, has been synthesized in the form of nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on silica (SiO(2)) supports. The organometallic Pt and Ti precursors, Pt(1,5-cyclooctadiene)Cl(2) and TiCl(4)(tetrahydrofuran)(2), were mixed with SiO(2) and reduced by sodium naphthalide in tetrahydrofuran. Stoichiometric Pt(3)Ti NPs with an average particle size of 2.5 nm were formed on SiO(2) (particle size: 20-200 nm) with an atomically disordered FCC-type structure (Fm3m; a = 0.39 nm). A high dispersivity of Pt(3)Ti NPs was achieved by adding excessive amounts of SiO(2) relative to the Pt precursor. A 50-fold excess of SiO(2) resulted in finely dispersed, SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs that contained 0.5 wt % Pt. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs showed a lower onset temperature of catalysis by 75 degrees C toward the oxidation reaction of CO than did SiO(2)-supported pure Pt NPs with the same particle size and Pt fraction, 0.5 wt %. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs also showed higher CO conversion than SiO(2)-supported pure Pt NPs even containing a 2-fold higher weight fraction of Pt. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs retained their stoichiometric composition after catalytic oxidation of CO at elevated temperatures, 325 degrees C. Pt(3)Ti NPs show promise as a catalytic center of purification catalysts for automobile exhaust due to their high catalytic activity toward CO oxidation with a low content of precious metals.

  14. High chemical diversity in a wasp pheromone: a blend of methyl 6-methylsalicylate, fatty alcohol acetates and cuticular hydrocarbons releases courtship behavior in the Drosophila parasitoid Asobara tabida.

    PubMed

    Stökl, Johannes; Dandekar, Anna-Teresa; Ruther, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Wasps of genus Asobara, a larval parasitoid of Drosophila, have become model organisms for the study of host-parasite interactions. However, little is known about the role of pheromones in locating mates and courtship behavior in this genus. In the present study, we aimed to identify the female courtship pheromone in Asobara tabida. The chemical compositions of solvent extracts from male and female wasps were analyzed by GC/MS. These extracts, fractions thereof, and synthetic pheromone candidates were tested for their activity in behavioral bioassays. The results demonstrate that the courtship pheromone of A. tabida is characterized by a remarkable chemical diversity. A multi-component blend of female-specific compounds including methyl 6-methylsalicylate (M6M), fatty alcohol acetates (FAAs), and cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) released male courtship behavior. Using a combinatory approach that included both purified natural products and synthetic analogs, it was shown that none of the three chemical classes alone was sufficient to release a full behavioral response in males. However, a blend of M6M and FAAs or combinations of one or both of these with female-derived CHCs resulted in wing-fanning responses by males comparable to those elicited by the crude extract of females. Thus, components from all three chemical classes contribute to the bioactivity of the pheromone, but none of the elements plays a key role or is irreplaceable. The fact that one of the FAAs, vaccenyl acetate, is also used as a kairomone by Asobara females to locate Drosophila hosts suggests that a pre-existing sensory responsiveness to vaccenyl acetate might have been involved in the evolution of the female sex pheromone in Asobara.

  15. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  16. Decomposition of O,S-dimethyl methylphosphonothiolate by ammonia on magnesium oxide: a theoretical study of catalytic detoxification of a chemical warfare agent.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Chandan; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Sen, Kaushik; Das, Abhijit K

    2015-08-21

    The adsorption of a model nerve agent, O,S-dimethyl methylphosphonothiolate (DMPT), on the hydroxylated and unhydroxylated nano-crystalline magnesium oxide surface followed by the nucleophilic attack of ammonia (NH3) is investigated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory using the representative cluster models. The geometries of DMPT and NH3 are fully optimized, while the geometry of the oxide fragment is kept frozen. The main insight of this study is the incorporation of the Eley-Rideal mechanism for the first time in the detoxification process, where one of the reactant molecules (DMPT) is adsorbed and the other one (NH3) reacts with it directly impinging from the gas phase. There are two possible pathways of nucleophilic detoxification, either concerted or stepwise. The nature of the first transition state of nucleophilic attack in both pathways is the vital step for degradation. Our calculated results predict that the reaction of DMPT with NH3 gives rise to both P-S and P-O bond cleavage completely. Also, the P-S cleavage is found to be the favorable one over P-O bond breaking. The exploration of the overall reaction mechanism has established the catalytic activity of nano-crystalline MgO in nucleophilic DMPT degradation, as in all cases the activation barriers have reduced compared to the previously reported aminolysis of DMPT in the gas phase. Interestingly, the hydroxylated model has better catalytic performance than the unhydroxylated one.

  17. Formaldehyde in Alcoholic Beverages: Large Chemical Survey Using Purpald Screening Followed by Chromotropic Acid Spectrophotometry with Multivariate Curve Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jendral, Julien A.; Monakhova, Yulia B.; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2011-01-01

    A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L). 210 samples (41%) gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Calculation of UV-VIS and 13C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2–8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26%) contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0–14.4 mg/L). The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%), Asian spirits (59%), grape marc (54%), and brandy (50%). Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8%) had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L. PMID:21760790

  18. Formaldehyde in alcoholic beverages: large chemical survey using purpald screening followed by chromotropic Acid spectrophotometry with multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Jendral, Julien A; Monakhova, Yulia B; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-01-01

    A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L). 210 samples (41%) gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Calculation of UV-VIS and (13)C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2-8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26%) contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0-14.4 mg/L). The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%), Asian spirits (59%), grape marc (54%), and brandy (50%). Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8%) had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L.

  19. Investigation into the antioxidant activity and chemical composition of alcoholic extracts from defatted marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) residue.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ying; Liu, Xuan; He, Wen-Hao; Xu, Hong-Gao; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yan-Xiang

    2012-04-01

    The influence of various solvents on the yield of polyphenols from defatted marigold residue, the antioxidant activity of the extracts and the composition of antioxidant compounds in the extracts were investigated. The content of total phenolics and flavonoids in the extracts was significantly varied with different solvents (P<0.05) and the extract by ethyl alcohol (EtOH)/water (7:3, v/v) has the highest content of total phenolics and flavonoids, 62.33 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g and 97.00 mg rutin equivalent (RE)/g, respectively. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was evaluated by radical (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)) scavenging and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. The results of the correlation analysis showed that the antioxidant activity was well correlated with the content of total phenolics and flavonoids (R²>0.900). Antioxidant components in the extracts were identified by combined on-line HPLC-ABTS·+ post-column assay and HPLC-DAD-MS method. Gallic acid, gallicin, quercetagetin, 6-hydroxykaempferol-O-hexoside, patuletin-O-hexoside and quercetin were the dominant antioxidant compounds in the extracts, and quercetagetin was identified as the strongest antioxidant capacity.

  20. Nucleophilic substitution reactions of alcohols with use of montmorillonite catalysts as solid Brønsted acids.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Nakagiri, Nobuaki; Mizugaki, Tomoo; Ebitani, Kohki; Kaneda, Kiyotomi

    2007-08-03

    We have developed an environmentally benign synthetic approach to nucleophilic substitution reactions of alcohols that minimizes or eliminates the formation of byproducts, resulting in a highly atom-efficient chemical process. Proton- and metal-exchanged montmorillonites (H- and Mn+-mont) were prepared easily by treating Na+-mont with an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride or metal salt, respectively. The H-mont possessed outstanding catalytic activity for nucleophilic substitution reactions of a variety of alcohols with anilines, because the unique acidity of the H-mont catalyst effectively prevents the neutralization by the basic anilines. In addition, amides, indoles, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and allylsilane act as nucleophiles for the H-mont-catalyzed substitutions of alcohols, which allowed efficient formation of various C-N and C-C bonds. The solid H-mont was reusable without any appreciable loss in its catalytic activity and selectivity. Especially, an Al3+-mont showed high catalytic activity for the alpha-benzylation of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with primary alcohols due to cooperative catalysis between a protonic acid site and a Lewis acidic Al3+ species in its interlayer spaces.

  1. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  2. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication.

  3. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication.

  4. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nordvang, Emily C; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during catalytic testing with the single crystal in situ results. PMID:26463581

  5. Examination of surface phenomena of V₂O₅ loaded on new nanostructured TiO₂ prepared by chemical vapor condensation for enhanced NH₃-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cha, Woojoon; Yun, Seong-Taek; Jurng, Jongsoo

    2014-09-07

    In this article, we describe the investigation and surface characterization of a chemical vapor condensation (CVC)-TiO2 support material used in a V2O5/TiO2 catalyst for enhanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity and confirm the mechanism of surface reactions. On the basis of previous studies and comparison with a commercial TiO2 catalyst, we examine four fundamental questions: first, the reason for increased surface V(4+) ion concentrations; second, the origin of the increase in surface acid sites; third, a basis for synergistic influences on improvements in SCR activity; and fourth, a reason for improved catalytic activity at low reaction temperatures. In this study, we have cited the result of SCR with NH3 activity for removing NOx and analyzed data using the reported result and data from previous studies on V2O5/CVC-TiO2 for the SCR catalyst. In order to determine the properties of suitable CVC-TiO2 surfaces for efficient SCR catalysis at low temperatures, CVC-TiO2 specimens were prepared and characterized using techniques such as XRD, BET, HR-TEM, XPS, FT-IR, NH3-TPD, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, H2-TPR, and cyclic voltammetry. The results obtained for the CVC-TiO2 materials were also compared with those of commercial TiO2.

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  7. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  8. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOEpatents

    Ross, David S.; Blessing, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  9. Application of integrated ozone and granular activated carbon for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand reduction of vinasse from alcohol distilleries.

    PubMed

    Hadavifar, Mojtaba; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar; Mahdad, Faezeh; Li, Qin; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the treatment of the distilleries vinasse using a hybrid process integrating ozone oxidation and granular activated carbons (GAC) in both batch and continuous operation mode. The batch-process studies have been carried out to optimize initial influent pH, GAC doses, the effect of the ozone (O3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal of the distilleries vinasse. The continuous process was carried out on GAC and ozone treatment alone as well as the hybrid process comb both methods to investigate the synergism effectiveness of the two methods for distilleries vinasse COD reduction and color removal. In a continuous process, the Yan model described the experimental data better than the Thomas model. The efficiency of ozonation of the distilleries vinasse was more effective for color removal (74.4%) than COD removal (25%). O3/H2O2 process was not considerably more effective on COD and color removal. Moreover, O3/GAC process affected negatively on the removal efficiency by reducing COD and color from distilleries vinasse. The negative effect decreased by increasing pH value of the influent.

  10. Evolution of the Structure and Chemical State of Pd Nanoparticles During the in Situ Catalytic Reduction of NO with H2

    SciTech Connect

    K Paredis; L Ono; F Behafarid; Z Zhang; J Yang; A Frenkel; B Roldan Cuenya

    2011-12-31

    An in-depth understanding of the fundamental structure of catalysts during operation is indispensable for tailoring future efficient and selective catalysts. We report the evolution of the structure and oxidation state of ZrO{sub 2}-supported Pd nanocatalysts (5 nm) during the in situ reduction of NO with H{sub 2} using X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Prior to the onset of the reaction ({le}120 C), a NO-induced redispersion of our initial metallic Pd nanoparticles over the ZrO{sub 2} support was observed, and Pd{sup {delta}+} species were detected. This process parallels the high production of N{sub 2}O observed at the onset of the reaction (>120 C), while at higher temperatures ({ge}150 C) the selectivity shifts mainly toward N{sub 2} ({approx}80%). Concomitant with the onset of N{sub 2} production, the Pd atoms aggregate again into large (6.5 nm) metallic Pd nanoparticles, which were found to constitute the active phase for the H{sub 2}-reduction of NO. Throughout the entire reaction cycle, the formation and stabilization of PdO{sub x} was not detected. Our results highlight the importance of in situ reactivity studies to unravel the microscopic processes governing catalytic reactivity.

  11. Alcohol fuels program technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

  12. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  13. Main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarenko, V.N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper formulates the main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes yet to be solved and describes the stages of modeling. Fundamental problems of model construction for the physico-chemical phenomena and processes taking place in a catalytic reactor are considered. New methods for determining the mechanism of a catalytic reaction and selecting a kinetic model for it are analyzed. The use of the results of specially controlled experiments for the construction of models of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor is discussed. Algorithms are presented for determining the muliplicity of stationary states in the operation of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor.

  14. Highly basic CaO nanoparticles in mesoporous carbon materials and their excellent catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Raja, Pradeep Kumar; Chokkalingam, Anand; Priya, Subramaniam V; Balasubramanian, Veerappan V; Benziger, Mercy R; Aldeyab, Salem S; Jayavell, Ramasamy; Ariga, Katsukiho; Vinu, Ajayan

    2012-06-01

    Highly basic CaO nanoparticles immobilized mesoporous carbon materials (CaO-CMK-3) with different pore diameters have been successfully prepared by using wet-impregnation method. The prepared materials were subjected to extensive characterization studies using sophisticated techniques such as XRD, nitrogen adsorption, HRSEM-EDX, HRTEM and temperature programmed desorption of CO2 (TPD of CO2). The physico-chemical characterization results revealed that these materials possess highly dispersed CaO nanoparticles, excellent nanopores with well-ordered structure, high specific surface area, large specific pore volume, pore diameter and very high basicity. We have also demonstrated that the basicity of the CaO-CMK-3 samples can be controlled by simply varying the amount of CaO loading and pore diameter of the carbon support. The basic catalytic performance of the samples was investigated in the base-catalyzed transesterification of ethylacetoacetate by aryl, aliphatic and cyclic primary alcohols. CMK-3 catalyst with higher CaO loading and larger pore diameter was found to be highly active with higher conversion within a very short reaction time. The activity of 30% CaO-CMK3-150 catalyst for transesterification of ethylacetoacetate using different alcohols increases in the following order: octanol > butanol > cyclohexanol > benzyl alcohol > furfuryl alcohol.

  15. Engineering the leucine biosynthetic pathway for isoamyl alcohol overproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jifeng; Mishra, Pranjul; Ching, Chi Bun

    2017-01-01

    Isoamyl alcohol can be used not only as a biofuel, but also as a precursor for various chemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae inherently produces a small amount of isoamyl alcohol via the leucine degradation pathway, but the yield is very low. In the current study, several strategies were devised to overproduce isoamyl alcohol in budding yeast. The engineered yeast cells with the cytosolic isoamyl alcohol biosynthetic pathway produced significantly higher amounts of isobutanol over isoamyl alcohol, suggesting that the majority of the metabolic flux was diverted to the isobutanol biosynthesis due to the broad substrate specificity of Ehrlich pathway enzymes. To channel the key intermediate 2-ketosiovalerate (KIV) towards α-IPM biosynthesis, we introduced an artificial protein scaffold to pull dihydroxyacid dehydratase and α-IPM synthase into the close proximity, and the resulting strain yielded more than twofold improvement of isoamyl alcohol. The best isoamyl alcohol producer yielded 522.76 ± 38.88 mg/L isoamyl alcohol, together with 540.30 ± 48.26 mg/L isobutanol and 82.56 ± 8.22 mg/L 2-methyl-1-butanol. To our best knowledge, our work represents the first study to bypass the native compartmentalized α-IPM biosynthesis pathway for the isoamyl alcohol overproduction in budding yeast. More importantly, artificial protein scaffold based on the feature of quaternary structure of enzymes would be useful in improving the catalytic efficiency and the product specificity of other enzymatic reactions.

  16. Geometric tuning of self-propulsion for Janus catalytic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sébastien; Lauga, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Catalytic swimmers have attracted much attention as alternatives to biological systems for examining collective microscopic dynamics and the response to physico-chemical signals. Yet, understanding and predicting even the most fundamental characteristics of their individual propulsion still raises important challenges. While chemical asymmetry is widely recognized as the cornerstone of catalytic propulsion, different experimental studies have reported that particles with identical chemical properties may propel in opposite directions. Here, we show that, beyond its chemical properties, the detailed shape of a catalytic swimmer plays an essential role in determining its direction of motion, demonstrating the compatibility of the classical theoretical framework with experimental observations.

  17. Geometric tuning of self-propulsion for Janus catalytic particles

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Sébastien; Lauga, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic swimmers have attracted much attention as alternatives to biological systems for examining collective microscopic dynamics and the response to physico-chemical signals. Yet, understanding and predicting even the most fundamental characteristics of their individual propulsion still raises important challenges. While chemical asymmetry is widely recognized as the cornerstone of catalytic propulsion, different experimental studies have reported that particles with identical chemical properties may propel in opposite directions. Here, we show that, beyond its chemical properties, the detailed shape of a catalytic swimmer plays an essential role in determining its direction of motion, demonstrating the compatibility of the classical theoretical framework with experimental observations. PMID:28205563

  18. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  19. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. ECUT: Energy Conversion and utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Generation of chemical intermediates by catalytic oxidative decarboxylation of dilute organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A rhodium-based catalyst was prepared and preliminary experiments were completed where the catalyst appeared to decarboxylate dilute acids at concentrations of 1 to 10 vol%. Electron spin resonance spectroscoy was used to characterize the catalyst as a first step leading toward modeling and optimization of rhodium catalysts. Also, a hybrid chemical/biological process for the production of hydrocarbons has been assessed. These types of catalysts could greatly increase energy efficiency of this process.

  1. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  2. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes.

  3. A Postsynthetic Modified MOF Hybrid as Heterogeneous Photocatalyst for α-Phenethyl Alcohol and Reusable Fluorescence Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao; Yan, Bing

    2016-11-21

    The recent discovery of lanthanide-based metal-organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs) offers the potential to extend the chemical sensing and catalysis capabilities of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Herein, a new europium functionalized material based on MIL-125(Ti)-NH2 is synthesized by covalent postsynthetic modification and shows photocatalytic oxidation properties of α-phenethyl alcohol, and their fluorescence quenching behaviors are investigated. The catalytic efficiency is tested by monitoring the photocatalytic oxidation of α-phenethyl alcohol under ultraviolet light irradiation. Furthermore, MIL-125(Ti)-AM-Eu is developed as a fluorescence sensor integrated with its photocatalytic and luminescent properties. The MIL-125(Ti)-AM-Eu is used for detecting α-phenethyl alcohol, which could be successfully oxidized to acetophenone by the catalyst, and the fluorescence of MIL-125(Ti)-AM-Eu has changed accordingly.

  4. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  5. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Awareness Month April is Alcohol Awareness Month Biosensor Challenge Learn more College Drinking Learn More Alcohol Dependence Get the facts Alcohol Awareness Month Biosensor Challenge College Drinking Alcohol Dependence Latest News New & ...

  6. Influence of catalytic gold and silver metal nanoparticles on structural, optical, and vibrational properties of silicon nanowires synthesized by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, M. K.; Tripathy, S.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Ng, T. H.; Tan, H.; Lam, J.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the structural and vibrational characterization of silicon (Si) nanowire arrays synthesized by metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si deposited with metal nanoparticles. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) metal nanoparticles were synthesized by glancing angle deposition, and MACE was performed in a mixture of H2O2 and HF solution. We studied the structural differences between Au and Ag-etched Si nanowires. The morphology of the synthesized nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The optical and vibrational properties of the Si nanostructures were studied by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy using three different excitation sources (UV, visible, and near-infrared) and are correlated to their microstructures. The structural differences between Au-etched and Ag-etched nanowires are due to the higher degree of hole injection by the Au nanoparticle and diffusion into the Si nanowires, causing enhanced Si etching by HF on the nanowire surface. Au-etched nanowires were observed to be mesoporous throughout the nanowire while Ag-etched nanowires consisted of a thin porous layer around the crystalline core. In addition, the surface-enhanced resonant Raman scattering observed is attributed to the presence of the sunken metal nanoparticles. Such Si nanostructures may be useful for a wide range of applications such as photovoltaic and biological and chemical sensing.

  7. The development of catalytic nucleophilic additions of terminal alkynes in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-Jun

    2010-04-20

    One of the major research endeavors in synthetic chemistry over the past two decades is the exploration of synthetic methods that work under ambient atmosphere with benign solvents, that maximize atom utilization, and that directly transform natural resources, such as renewable biomass, from their native states into useful chemical products, thus avoiding the need for protecting groups. The nucleophilic addition of terminal alkynes to various unsaturated electrophiles is a classical (textbook) reaction in organic chemistry, allowing the formation of a C-C bond while simultaneously introducing the alkyne functionality. A prerequisite of this classical reaction is the stoichiometric generation of highly reactive metal acetylides. Over the past decade, our laboratory and others have been exploring an alternative, the catalytic and direct nucleophilic addition of terminal alkynes to unsaturated electrophiles in water. We found that various terminal alkynes can react efficiently with a wide range of such electrophiles in water (or organic solvent) in the presence of simple and readily available catalysts, such as copper, silver, gold, iron, palladium, and others. In this Account, we describe the development of these synthetic methods, focusing primarily on results from our laboratory. Our studies include the following: (i) catalytic reaction of terminal alkynes with acid chloride, (ii) catalytic addition of terminal alkynes to aldehydes and ketones, (iii) catalytic addition of alkynes to C=N bonds, and (iv) catalytic conjugate additions. Most importantly, these reactions can tolerate various functional groups and, in many cases, perform better in water than in organic solvents, clearly defying classical reactivities predicated on the relative acidities of water, alcohols, and terminal alkynes. We further discuss multicomponent and enantioselective reactions that were developed. These methods provide an alternative to the traditional requirement of separate steps in

  8. Alcohols toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  9. Non-catalytic synthesis of diamond from amorphous carbon at high static pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, K.; Onodera, A.

    1986-05-01

    Amorphous carbon prepared from furfuryl alcohol resin was studied under static high pressure above 10 GPa without planned addition of catalyst. Diamond can be formed at temperatures lower than required for the catalytic process.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  11. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  12. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH. (b) The ingredient meets...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  14. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  15. New ammonium surfactant-stabilized rhodium(0) colloidal suspensions: influence of novel counter-anions on physico-chemical and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Bilé, Elodie Guyonnet; Sassine, Rita; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Launay, Franck; Roucoux, Alain

    2011-06-28

    Novel anionic species, such as hydrogen carbonate (HCO(3)(−)), fluoride (F(−)), triflate (CF(3)SO(3)(−)), tetrafluoroborate (BF(4)(−)) and chloride (Cl(−)) were investigated as new partners of water soluble N,N-dimethyl-N-cetyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium salts, used as a protective agent of rhodium colloids. The effect of the surfactant polar head on the micellar behavior, size and morphology of the nanospecies was studied by adapted physico-chemical experiments (surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric and TEM analyses) and discussed in terms of strong or weak stabilization of the growing nanoparticles surface. Finally, the influence of the nanoenvironment generated by the surfactant with various counter-anions was evaluated via the hydrogenation of aromatics.

  16. Alcohol Use Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... less effect than before? Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such ...

  17. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase.

  18. Chemical modification of Penicillium 1,2-alpha-D-mannosidase by water-soluble carbodi-imide: identification of a catalytically important aspartic acid residue.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Maeda, K; Kobayashi, M; Ichishima, E

    1994-01-01

    1,2-alpha-D-Mannosidase from Penicillium citrinum was inactivated by chemical modification with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)carbodi-imide (EDC). Most of the activity was lost after modification in the absence of a nucleophile, glycine ethyl ester. 1-Deoxymannojirimycin (dMM), a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, showed partial protection against the inactivation. After the modification by EDC without the presence of a nucleophile, proteolytic digests of the enzyme were analysed by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. and a unique peptide was shown to decrease when dMM was present during the modification. The peptide was absent from the digests of unmodified enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the peptide (A; Ile-Gly-Pro) was identical in part with that of the adjacent peptide (B; Ile-Gly-Pro-Asp-Ser-Trp-Gly-Trp-Asp-Pro-Lys). When cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was modified by EDC alone, the modified peptide could be separated from unmodified peptide by reversed-phase h.p.i.c., and Edman degradation was stopped before the modified aspartic acid residue. This suggested that, in the enzyme, peptide A was derived from peptide B by the modification. Consequently, Asp-4 in peptide B was assumed to be masked by dMM during the modification, and to be involved in the interaction of the enzyme with its substrate. PMID:7945271

  19. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  20. Chemical-physical properties of spinel CoMn2O4 nano-powders and catalytic activity in the 2-propanol and toluene combustion: Effect of the preparation method.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Salari, Dariush; Niaei, Aligholi; Deganello, Francesca; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Hojati, Pejman

    2011-01-01

    Spinel-type CoMn(2)O(4)nano-powders are prepared using sol-gel auto combustion (SGC) and co-precipitation (CP) methods and their catalytic activities are evaluated in combustion of 2-propanol and toluene. The chemical-physical properties of the oxides are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N(2)-adsorption-desorption, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After calcination at 700°C, CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC shows higher amounts of the normal-type spinel phase and is more crystalline than CoMn(2)O(4)-CP. Higher calcination temperatures (850°C) do not affect very much the weight percentage of the normal-type spinel phase; although the crystal size slightly increased. The TPR analysis evidences a large number of Mn(3+) cations in CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC compared to CoMn(2)O(4)-CP. This difference, together with the higher surface area, could justify the higher activity of CoMn(2)O(4)-SGC in both the investigated reactions.

  1. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  2. Role of chemical composition in the enhanced catalytic activity of Pt-based alloyed ultrathin nanowires for the hydrogen oxidation reaction under alkaline conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Zhou, Yuchen; Yue, Shiyu; Wang, Lei; Su, Dong; Tong, Xiao; Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2016-05-11

    With the increased interest in the development of hydrogen fuel cells as a plausible alternative to internal combustion engines, recent work has focused on creating alkaline fuel cells (AFC), which employ an alkaline environment. Working in alkaline as opposed to acidic media yields a number of tangible benefits, including (i) the ability to use cheaper and plentiful precious-metal-free catalysts, due to their increased stability, (ii) a reduction in the amount of degradation and corrosion of Pt-based catalysts, and (iii) a longer operational lifetime for the overall fuel cell configuration. However, in the absence of Pt, no catalyst has achieved activities similar to those of Pt. Herein, we have synthesized a number of crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) (M = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, Au) in order to replace a portion of the costly Pt metal without compromising on activity while simultaneously adding in metals known to exhibit favorable synergistic ligand and strain effects with respect to the host lattice. In fact, our experiments confirm theoretical insights about a clear and correlative dependence between measured activity and chemical composition. We have conclusively demonstrated that our as-synthesized alloy NW catalysts yield improved hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activities as compared with a commercial Pt standard as well as with our as-synthesized Pt NWs. The Pt7Ru3 NW system, in particular, quantitatively achieved an exchange current density of 0.493 mA/cm2, which is higher than the corresponding data for Pt NWs alone. In addition, the HOR activities follow the same expected trend as their calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) values, thereby confirming the critical importance and correlation of HBE with the observed activities.

  3. Role of chemical composition in the enhanced catalytic activity of Pt-based alloyed ultrathin nanowires for the hydrogen oxidation reaction under alkaline conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Zhou, Yuchen; ...

    2016-05-11

    With the increased interest in the development of hydrogen fuel cells as a plausible alternative to internal combustion engines, recent work has focused on creating alkaline fuel cells (AFC), which employ an alkaline environment. Working in alkaline as opposed to acidic media yields a number of tangible benefits, including (i) the ability to use cheaper and plentiful precious-metal-free catalysts, due to their increased stability, (ii) a reduction in the amount of degradation and corrosion of Pt-based catalysts, and (iii) a longer operational lifetime for the overall fuel cell configuration. However, in the absence of Pt, no catalyst has achieved activitiesmore » similar to those of Pt. Herein, we have synthesized a number of crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) (M = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, Au) in order to replace a portion of the costly Pt metal without compromising on activity while simultaneously adding in metals known to exhibit favorable synergistic ligand and strain effects with respect to the host lattice. In fact, our experiments confirm theoretical insights about a clear and correlative dependence between measured activity and chemical composition. We have conclusively demonstrated that our as-synthesized alloy NW catalysts yield improved hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activities as compared with a commercial Pt standard as well as with our as-synthesized Pt NWs. The Pt7Ru3 NW system, in particular, quantitatively achieved an exchange current density of 0.493 mA/cm2, which is higher than the corresponding data for Pt NWs alone. In addition, the HOR activities follow the same expected trend as their calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) values, thereby confirming the critical importance and correlation of HBE with the observed activities.« less

  4. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  5. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  6. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-04-19

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  7. Direct Substitution of Alcohols in Pure Water by Brønsted Acid Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Rosa; Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing concern for sustainability, the use of environmentally friendly media to perform chemical processes has attracted the attention of many research groups. Among them, the use of water, as the unique solvent for reactions, is currently an active area of research. One process of particular interest is the direct nucleophilic substitution of an alcohol avoiding its preliminary transformation into a good leaving group, since one of the by-products in this approach would be water. The direct substitution of allylic, benzylic, and tertiary alcohols has been achieved through SN1-type reactions with catalytic amounts of Brønsted or Lewis acids; however, organic solvents are often required. In this review, the pioneering SN1 approaches performed in pure water and in the absence of a metal based Lewis acid are compiled and discussed.

  8. Helping Children Deal with Alcoholism in Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buwick, Amy; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the issue of alcoholism in the family, looking at the child in the alcoholic family, the influence of the alcoholic parent, and the effects of chemical dependency on the family. Provides strategies for interventions with children of alcoholics that elementary school counselors can use to help the children adjust in the school…

  9. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  10. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Keith L; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles feature high energy efficiency and minor environmental impact. Liquid fuels are ideal hydrogen carriers, which can catalytically be converted into syngas or hydrogen to power vehicles. Among the potential liquid fuels, alcohols have several advantages. The hydrogen/carbon ratio is higher than that of other liquid hydrocarbons or oxygenates, especially in the case of methanol. In addition, alcohols can be derived from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol or ethanol offers immense potential for onboard hydrogen generation due to its rapid reaction rate and exothermic nature. These benefits stimulate a burgeoning research community in catalyst design, reaction engineering, and mechanistic investigation. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide insight into syngas and hydrogen production from methanol and ethanol partial oxidation, particularly highlighting catalytic chemistry.

  11. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    It is reported that Savannah Foods and Industries, in a joint venture with United States Sugar Corporation have applied for a loan guarantee for the production of alcohol from agricultural commodities. The two phase program calls for research and development, before a prototype plant will be built for the conversion of cellulosic compounds found in bagasse into alcohol for use as a fuel.

  12. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug Use Hurts ... This Section Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Effects of Alcohol on Brains and Bodies Previous ... Treatment Work? Treatment and Rehab Resources About the ...

  13. Alcoholism & depression.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa

    2012-10-01

    One out of 2 Americans report drinking on a routine basis, making the excessive consumption of alcohol the third leading cause of preventable death in America (). Alcoholism and depression are common comorbidities that home healthcare professionals frequently encounter. To achieve the best patient outcomes, alcoholism should be addressed initially. Although all age groups are at risk, alcoholism and depression occur in more than 8 percent of older adults. Prevention through identifying alcohol use early in adolescence is vital to reduce the likelihood of alcohol dependence. This article provides an overview of the long-term effects of alcohol abuse, including alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnostic criteria for substance dependence and ideas for nonthreatening screening questions to use with patients who are adolescent or older are discussed. While providing patient care, home healthcare nurses share the patient's intimate home environment. This environment is perceived as a safe haven by the patient and home care nurses can take advantage of counseling and treatment opportunities in this nonthreatening environment.

  14. Palladium-catalyzed amination of allyl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Sarkar, Amitabha

    2011-10-21

    An efficient catalytic amination of aryl-substituted allylic alcohols has been developed. The complex [(η(3)-allyl)PdCl](2) modified by a bis phosphine ligand, L, has been used as catalyst in the reaction that afforded a wide range of allyl amines in good to excellent yield under mild conditions.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10217 - Branched and linear alcohols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Branched and linear alcohols (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10217 Branched and linear alcohols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... linear alcohols (PMN P-09-426) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  6. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs.

  7. A method for highly efficient catalytic immobilisation of glucose oxidase on the surface of silica.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yong-Kyun; Park, Jung-Woo; Kim, Bo-Hyeong; Jun, Chul-Ho

    2013-12-11

    A simple, mild and convenient method has been developed for catalytic immobilisation of glucose oxidase (GOx), chemically modified to contain pendant methallylsilyl groups, on an untreated silica surface.

  8. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 24059 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  9. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  10. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells.

  11. Catalytic properties of lamellar compounds of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Yu. N.; Vol'pin, M. E.

    1981-05-01

    In heterogenous catalysis, the supports derived from graphite and carbon-graphite materials constitute a unique and exceptionally attractive group. The lamellar compounds of graphite with various kinds of electron acceptors and donors show catalytic activities on the following reactions: the oxidation of organic compounds with molecular oxygen, many sorts of polymerization, alcohol and formic acid dehydrogenation, hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins and acetylenes, ammonia synthesis from nitrogen and hydrogen, and also CO hydrogenation. Furthermore, the transition metal lamellar compounds of graphite are highly active catalysts in the process of the graphite-to-diamond conversion.

  12. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  13. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  14. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  15. Alcoholics Anonymous

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help What's New Read Daily Reflections Make a Contribution Go to Online Bookstore Welcome to Alcoholics Anonymous ® ... and Twelve & Twelve | 75th Anniversary Edition | Make a contribution | Self-Support Press/Media | Archives & History | A.A. ...

  16. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161. Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  17. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  18. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  19. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  20. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-02

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  1. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  2. Vanadium-substituted heteropolyacids immobilized on amine- functionalized mesoporous MCM-41: A recyclable catalyst for selective oxidation of alcohols with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xinbo; Wang, Danjun; Li, Kebin; Zhen, Yanzhong; Hu, Huaiming; Xue, Ganglin

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acids are immobilized on amine- functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 and the hybrid catalyst is proved to be a highly efficient solid catalyst for the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, featured by the high conversion and selectivity, easy recovery, and quite steady reuse. - Highlights: • Vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acid immobilized on amine-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 are prepared. • HPAs were fixed on the inner surface of mesoporous MCM-41 by chemical bonding to aminosilane groups. • The hybrid catalyst showed much higher catalytic activity than the pure HPAs. • The hybrid catalyst is a highly efficient recyclable solid catalyst for the selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols. - Abstract: New hybrid materials of vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acids (VHPW) immobilized on amine-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 (VHPW/MCM-41/NH{sub 2}) are prepared and characterized by FT-IR, XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption, elemental analysis, SEM and TEM for their structural integrity and physicochemical properties. It is found that the structure of the heteropolyacids is retained upon immobilization over mesoporous materials. The catalytic activities of these hybrid materials are tested in the selective oxidation of alcohols to the carbonyl products with 30% aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidant in toluene. The catalytic activities of different number of vanadium-substituted phosphotungstic acid are investigated, and among the catalysts, H{sub 5}[PV{sub 2}W{sub 10}O{sub 40}] immobilized on amine-functionalized MCM-41 exhibits the highest activity with 97% conversion and 99% selectivity in the oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. The hybrid catalyst is proved to be a highly efficient recyclable solid catalyst for the selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  3. Temperature-induced conformational change at the catalytic site of Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase highlighted by Asn249Tyr substitution. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange, kinetic, and fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Francesco; Russo, Consiglia; Giordano, Antonietta; Carrea, Giacomo; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2005-08-23

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, fluorescence quenching, and kinetic studies was used to acquire experimental evidence for the crystallographically hypothesized increase in local flexibility which occurs in thermophilic NAD(+)-dependent Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase (SsADH) upon substitution Asn249Tyr. The substitution, located at the adenine-binding site, proved to decrease the affinity for both coenzyme and substrate, rendering the mutant enzyme 6-fold more active when compared to the wild-type enzyme [Esposito et al. (2003) FEBS Lett. 539, 14-18]. The amide H/D exchange data show that the wild-type and mutant enzymes have similar global flexibility at 22 and 60 degrees C. However, the temperature dependence of the Stern-Volmer constant determined by acrylamide quenching shows that the increase in temperature affects the local flexibility differently, since the K(SV) increment is significantly higher for the wild-type than for the mutant enzyme over the range 18-45 degrees C. Interestingly, the corresponding van't Hoff plot (log K(SV) vs 1/T) proves nonlinear for the apo and holo wild-type and apo mutant enzymes, with a break at approximately 45 degrees C in all three cases due to a conformational change affecting the tryptophan microenvironment experienced by the quencher molecules. The Arrhenius and van't Hoff plots derived from the k(cat) and K(M) thermodependence measured with cyclohexanol and NAD(+) at different temperatures display an abrupt change of slope at 45-50 degrees C. This proves more pronounced in the case of the mutant enzyme compared to the wild-type enzyme due to a conformational change in the structure rather than to an overlapping of two or more rate-limiting reaction steps with different temperature dependencies of their rate constants. Three-dimensional analysis indicates that the observed conformational change induced by temperature is associated with the flexible loops directly involved in the substrate and

  4. Development of ultrafine multichannel microfluidic mixer for synthesis of bimetallic nanoclusters: catalytic application of highly monodisperse AuPd nanoclusters stabilized by poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone).

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoto; Sakai, Yuka; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-09-02

    On account of their novel properties, bimetallic nanoparticles and nanoclusters (NCs) are strong potential candidates for optical, magnetic, and catalytic functional materials. These properties depend on the chemical composition and size (number of constituent atoms) of the NCs. Control of size, structure, and composition is particularly important for fabricating highly functional materials based on bimetallic NCs. Size- and structure-controlled synthesis of two-element alloys can reveal their intrinsic electronic synergistic effects. However, because synergistic enhancement of activity is strongly affected by composition as well as by size and structure, controlled synthesis is a challenging task, particularly in catalytic applications. To investigate catalytic synergistic effects, we have synthesized highly monodisperse, sub-2 nm, solid-solution AuPd NCs stabilized with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (AuPd:PVP) using a newly developed ultrafine microfluidic mixing device with 15 μm wide multiple lamination channels. The synergistic enhancement for catalytic aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol exhibited a volcano-shaped trend, with a maximum at 20-65 at. % Pd. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements, we confirmed that the enhanced activity originates from the enhanced electron density at the Au sites, donated by Pd sites.

  5. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  6. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse - quitting drinking; Quitting drinking; Quitting alcohol; Alcoholism - deciding to quit ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol- ...

  7. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  8. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  9. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  10. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  11. Fluorous biphasic catalysis: synthesis and characterization of copper(I) and copper(II) fluoroponytailed 1,4,7-Rf-TACN and 2,2'-Rf-bipyridine complexes--their catalytic activity in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, olefins, and alcohols, including mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Contel, María; Izuel, Cristina; Laguna, Mariano; Villuendas, Pedro R; Alonso, Pablo J; Fish, Richard H

    2003-09-05

    In this contribution on fluorous biphasic catalysis (FBC), we present the synthesis and characterization of new copper complexes, and define their role, as precatalysts, in the FBC oxidation of hydrocarbons, olefins, and alcohols. Thus the previously reported, but poorly characterized, fluoroponytailed ligand, 2,2'-R(f)-bipyridine (R(f)=-(CH(2))(3)C(8)F(17)) 2, as well as the new Cu(II) fluoroponytailed carboxylate synthon complex [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)] 3, will be addressed. Moreover, the reaction of previously described ligands, 1,4,7-R(f)-TACN 1, or 2,2'-R(f)-bipyridine 2 with 3 afforded new perfluoroheptane-soluble Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)(R(f)-tacn)] 4 and [Cu(C(8)F(17)(CH(2))(2)CO(2))(2)(R(f)-bpy)] 5, respectively. The reaction of 1 with [Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)]PF(6) or [CuCl] provided new Cu(I) complexes, which could be isolated and fully characterized as [Cu(R(f)-tacn)X']X, in which X=PF(6) (6) or X'=Cl (7) (soluble in perfluoroheptane). The Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes, 4-7, were characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and IR, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis, and EPR spectroscopies; complex 7 was also characterized by (1)H and (19)F[(1)H] NMR spectroscopy. Complexes 4 and 5, as well as 6 and 7 generated in situ, were evaluated as precatalysts for hydrocarbon and olefin functionalization. The oxidation reactions of these substrates in the presence of the necessary oxidants, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and oxygen gas, proceeded under FBC conditions for 5, 7, and Cu(I) salts with 2. However, the complexes with ligand 2 could not be recycled, owing to significant ligand dissociation. The Cu(II) complex 4, with the ligand 1, provide the oxidation of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol to 4-nitrobenzaldehyde under single-phase FBC conditions at 90 degrees C with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy) and O(2); the precatalyst 4, can be utilized for an additional four catalytic cycles without loss of activity. Plausible mechanisms

  12. Efficient conversion of furfuryl alcohol into alkyl levulinates catalyzed by an organic-inorganic hybrid solid acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehui; Dong, Kun; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2011-01-17

    A clean, facile, and environment-friendly catalytic method has been developed for the conversion of furfuryl alcohol into alkyl levulinates making use of the novel solid catalyst methylimidazolebutylsulfate phosphotungstate ([MIMBS]₃PW₁₂O₄₀). The solid catalyst is an organic-inorganic hybrid material, which consists of an organic cation and an inorganic anion. A study for optimizing the reaction conditions such as the reaction time, the temperature and the catalyst loading has been performed. Under optimal conditions, a high n-butyl levulinate yield of up to 93 % is obtained. Furthermore, the kinetics of the reaction pathways and the mechanism for the alcoholysis of furfuryl alcohol are discussed. This method is environmentally benign and economical for the conversion of biomass-based derivatives into fine chemicals.

  13. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67.

  14. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  15. Alcoholic sialosis.

    PubMed

    Kastin, B; Mandel, L

    2000-01-01

    Sialosis (sialadenosis) is a term used to describe a disorder that involves both secretory and parenchymal changes of the major salivary glands, most commonly the parotid. Seen often in a dental office, it is recognized as an indolent, bilateral, non-inflammatory, non-neoplastic, soft, symmetrical, painless and persistent enlargement of the parotid glands. Four major entities have commonly been associated with this disorder. They are alcoholism, endocrinopathy (particularly diabetes mellitus), maLnutrition and idiopathic. We are reporting a case of alcoholic sialosis with its clinical and diagnostic aspects. It is important for the dental practitioner to recognize sialosis, because it often indicates the existence of an unsuspected systemic disease.

  16. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... group of defects in the baby known as fetal alcohol syndrome. Symptoms can include: Behavior and attention problems Heart ...

  17. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one of the ...

  18. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  19. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  20. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  1. Determination of 2-, 3-, 4-methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids in wine: development of a selective method based on solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry and its application to different wines and alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Moreno, Elisa; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2015-02-13

    A method to analyse 2-methylpentanoic, 3-methylpentanoic and 4-methylpentanoic acids as well as cyclohexanecarboxylic acid has been developed and applied to wine and other alcoholic beverages. Selective isolation with solid phase extraction, derivatization with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl bromide at room temperature for 30 minutes, and further analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode provides detection limits between 0.4 and 2.4 ng/L. Good linearity up to 3.6 μg/L, satisfactory reproducibility (RSD<10%) and signal recovery of around 100% represent a robust method of analysis. Concentration data of these analytes in wine and other alcoholic beverages are reported for the first time. The levels found ranged from the method detection limits to 2630 ng/L, 2040 ng/L and 3810 ng/L for 2-, 3- and 4-methylpentanoic acids, respectively, and to 1780 ng/L for cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. There are significant differences depending on the type of wine or beverage. Distilled beverages, beer and aged wines have higher contents in methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids.

  2. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  3. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  4. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst.

  5. Development of an azanoradamantane-type nitroxyl radical catalyst for class-selective oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Doi, Ryusuke; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Murayama, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-02

    The development of 1,5-dimethyl-9-azanoradamantane N-oxyl (DMN-AZADO; 1,5-dimethyl-Nor-AZADO, 2) as an efficient catalyst for the selective oxidation of primary alcohols in the presence of secondary alcohols is described. The compact and rigid structure of the azanoradamantane nucleus confers potent catalytic ability to DMN-AZADO (2). A variety of hindered primary alcohols such as neopentyl primary alcohols were efficiently oxidized by DMN-AZADO (2) to the corresponding aldehydes, whereas secondary alcohols remained intact. DMN-AZADO (2) also has high catalytic efficiency for one-pot oxidation from primary alcohols to the corresponding carboxylic acids in the presence of secondary alcohols and for oxidative lactonization from diols.

  6. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  7. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  8. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  9. Hierarchical zeolites and their catalytic performance in selective oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Manuel; Grau-Atienza, Aida; Campos, Rafael; Romero, Antonio A; Serrano, Elena; Maria Marinas, Jose; García Martínez, Javier; Luque, Rafael

    2015-04-24

    Hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites prepared using a simple alkali treatment and subsequent HCl washing are found to exhibit unprecedented catalytic activities in selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation. The metal-free zeolites promote the microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol with hydrogen peroxide in yields ranging from 45-35 % after 5 min of reaction under mild reaction conditions as well as the epoxidation of cyclohexene to valuable products (40-60 % conversion). The hierarchically porous systems also exhibited an interesting catalytic activity in the dehydration of N,N-dimethylformamide (25-30 % conversion), representing the first example of transition-metal free catalysts in this reaction.

  10. Direct Catalytic Synthesis of Unprotected 2-Amino-1-Phenylethanols from Alkenes by Using Iron(II) Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Luca; Morandi, Bill

    2016-02-05

    Aryl-substituted amino alcohols are privileged scaffolds in medicinal chemistry and natural products. Herein, we report that an exceptionally simple and inexpensive Fe(II) complex efficiently catalyzes the direct transformation of simple alkenes into unprotected amino alcohols in good yield and perfect regioselectivity. This new catalytic method was applied in the expedient synthesis of bioactive molecules and could be extended to aminoetherification.

  11. Substrate and Inhibitor Spectra of Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase: Perspectives on Application Potential and Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Knack, Daniel; Hagel, Corina; Szaleniec, Maciej; Dudzik, Agnieszka; Salwinski, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) catalyzes the initial step in anaerobic degradation of ethylbenzene in denitrifying bacteria, namely, the oxygen-independent hydroxylation of ethylbenzene to (S)-1-phenylethanol. In our study we investigate the kinetic properties of 46 substrate analogs acting as substrates or inhibitors of the enzyme. The apparent kinetic parameters of these compounds give important insights into the function of the enzyme and are consistent with the predicted catalytic mechanism based on a quantum chemical calculation model. In particular, the existence of the proposed substrate-derived radical and carbocation intermediates is substantiated by the formation of alternative dehydrogenated and hydroxylated products from some substrates, which can be regarded as mechanistic models. In addition, these results also show the surprisingly high diversity of EbDH in hydroxylating different kinds of alkylaromatic and heterocyclic compounds to the respective alcohols. This may lead to attractive industrial applications of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for a new process of producing alcohols via hydroxylation of the corresponding aromatic hydrocarbons rather than the customary procedure of reducing the corresponding ketones. PMID:22773630

  12. Neurochemical and Neurostructural Plasticity in Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The behavioral manifestations of alcoholism are primarily attributable to the numerous and lasting adaptations that occur in the brain as a result of chronic heavy alcohol consumption. As will be reviewed here, these adaptations include alcohol-induced plasticity in chemical neurotransmission, density and morphology of dendritic spines, as well as neurodegeneration and cerebral atrophy. Within the context of these neuroadaptations that have been observed in both human and animal studies, we will discuss how these changes potentially contribute to the cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions that are hallmark features of alcoholism, as well as how they reveal novel potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of this disorder. PMID:22896799

  13. Catalyst-controlled dioxygenation of olefins: an approach to peroxides, alcohols, and ketones.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Su-Li; Gu, Zhen; Wang, Haijun; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Liang, Yong-Min

    2015-06-05

    An efficient catalytic approach for the synthesis of substituted peroxides, alcohols, and ketones through a catalyst-controlled highly selective dioxygenation of olefins has been demonstrated. The reported methods are mild and practical, can be switched by the selection of different catalytic systems, and employ peroxide as an oxidant and a reagent at room temperature.

  14. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... to alcohol use Get into trouble with the law, family members, friends, school, or dates because of alcohol THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL Alcoholic drinks have different amounts of alcohol in them. Beer is about 5% alcohol, although some beers can ...

  15. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  16. Integrated catalytic and electrocatalytic conversion of substituted phenols and diaryl ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yang; Chia, Shao H.; Sanyal, Udishnu; Gutierrez, Oliver Y.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-10-17

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation and catalytic thermal hydrogenation of substituted phenols and diaryl ethers were studied on carbon-supported Rh. For electrocatalytic and catalytic thermal hydrogen addition reactions, the dominant reaction pathway is hydrogenation to cyclic alcohols and cycloalkyl ethers. The presence of substituting methyl or methoxy groups led to lower rates compared to unsubstituted phenol or diphenyl ether. Methoxy or benzyloxy groups, however, undergo C-O bond cleavage via hydrogenolysis and hydrolysis (minor pathway).

  17. Status and prospects in higher alcohols synthesis from syngas.

    PubMed

    Luk, Ho Ting; Mondelli, Cecilia; Ferré, Daniel Curulla; Stewart, Joseph A; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2017-03-06

    Higher alcohols are important compounds with widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical and energy sectors. Currently, they are mainly produced by sugar fermentation (ethanol and isobutanol) or hydration of petroleum-derived alkenes (heavier alcohols), but their direct synthesis from syngas (CO + H2) would comprise a more environmentally-friendly, versatile and economical alternative. Research efforts in this reaction, initiated in the 1930s, have fluctuated along with the oil price and have considerably increased in the last decade due to the interest to exploit shale gas and renewable resources to obtain the gaseous feedstock. Nevertheless, no catalytic system reported to date has performed sufficiently well to justify an industrial implementation. Since the design of an efficient catalyst would strongly benefit from the establishment of synthesis-structure-function relationships and a deeper understanding of the reaction mechanism, this review comprehensively overviews syngas-based higher alcohols synthesis in three main sections, highlighting the advances recently made and the challenges that remain open and stimulate upcoming research activities. The first part critically summarises the formulations and methods applied in the preparation of the four main classes of materials, i.e., Rh-based, Mo-based, modified Fischer-Tropsch and modified methanol synthesis catalysts. The second overviews the molecular-level insights derived from microkinetic and theoretical studies, drawing links to the mechanisms of Fischer-Tropsch and methanol syntheses. Finally, concepts proposed to improve the efficiency of reactors and separation units as well as to utilise CO2 and recycle side-products in the process are described in the third section.

  18. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling.

  19. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  20. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  1. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  2. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  3. Laboratory evolution of Pyrococcus furiosus alcohol dehydrogenase to improve the production of (2S,5S)-hexanediol at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Machielsen, Ronnie; Leferink, Nicole G H; Hendriks, Annemarie; Brouns, Stan J J; Hennemann, Hans-Georg; Daussmann, Thomas; van der Oost, John

    2008-07-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenases for the production of enantio- and diastereomerically pure diols, which are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and fine chemicals. Due to the need for a stable alcohol dehydrogenase with activity at low-temperature process conditions (30 degrees C) for the production of (2S,5S)-hexanediol, we have improved an alcohol dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (AdhA). A stable S-selective alcohol dehydrogenase with increased activity at 30 degrees C on the substrate 2,5-hexanedione was generated by laboratory evolution on the thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA. One round of error-prone PCR and screening of approximately 1,500 mutants was performed. The maximum specific activity of the best performing mutant with 2,5-hexanedione at 30 degrees C was tenfold higher compared to the activity of the wild-type enzyme. A 3D-model of AdhA revealed that this mutant has one mutation in the well-conserved NADP(H)-binding site (R11L), and a second mutation (A180V) near the catalytic and highly conserved threonine at position 183.

  4. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  5. A revolution in micropower : the catalytic nanodiode.

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, Karen Charlene; Heller, Edwin J.; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Creighton, James Randall; Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2010-11-01

    Our ability to field useful, nano-enabled microsystems that capitalize on recent advances in sensor technology is severely limited by the energy density of available power sources. The catalytic nanodiode (reported by Somorjai's group at Berkeley in 2005) was potentially an alternative revolutionary source of micropower. Their first reports claimed that a sizable fraction of the chemical energy may be harvested via hot electrons (a 'chemicurrent') that are created by the catalytic chemical reaction. We fabricated and tested Pt/GaN nanodiodes, which eventually produced currents up to several microamps. Our best reaction yields (electrons/CO{sub 2}) were on the order of 10{sup -3}; well below the 75% values first reported by Somorjai (we note they have also been unable to reproduce their early results). Over the course of this Project we have determined that the whole concept of 'chemicurrent', in fact, may be an illusion. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the current measured from our nanodiodes is derived from a thermoelectric voltage; we have found no credible evidence for true chemicurrent. Unfortunately this means that the catalytic nanodiode has no future as a micropower source.

  6. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  7. Mechanism of copper(I)/TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-02-13

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) "catalyst oxidation" in which Cu(I) and TEMPO-H are oxidized by O(2) via a binuclear Cu(2)O(2) intermediate and (2) "substrate oxidation" mediated by Cu(II) and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a Cu(II)-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O(2) is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols.

  8. [Out of addictions: Alcohol, or alcohol to alcohol].

    PubMed

    Simmat-Durand, L; Vellut, N; Lejeune, C; Jauffret-Roustide, M; Mougel, S; Michel, L; Planche, M

    2016-06-29

    Pathways from alcoholism to recovery are documented; less often are those from drug addiction to alcoholism. Biographical approaches allow analyzing how people change their uses and talk about their trajectories of recovery.

  9. Microgravity Compatible Reagentless Instrumentation for Detection of Dissolved Organic Acids and Alcohols in Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jan, Darrell L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Organic Acid and Alcohol Monitor (OAAM) program has resulted in the successful development of a computer controlled prototype analyzer capable of accurately determining aqueous organic acids and primary alcohol concentrations over a large dynamic range with high sensitivity. Formic, acetic, and propionic acid were accurately determined at concentrations as low as 5 to 10 micrograms/L in under 20 minutes, or as high as 10 to 20 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Methanol, ethanol, and propanol were determined at concentrations as low as 20 to 100 micrograms/L, or as high as 10 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Importantly for space based application, the OAAM requires no reagents or hazardous chemicals to perform these analyses needing only power, water, and CO2 free purge gas. The OAAM utilized two membrane processes to segregate organic acids from interfering ions. The organic acid concentration was then determined based upon the conductiometric signal. Separation of individual organic acids was accomplished using a chromatographic column. Alcohols are determined in a similar manner after conversion to organic acids by sequential biocatalytic and catalytic oxidation steps. The OAAM was designed to allow the early diagnosis of under performing or failing sub-systems within the Water Recovery System (WRS) baselined for the International Space Station (ISS). To achieve this goal, several new technologies were developed over the course of the OAAM program.

  10. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  11. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    PubMed

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  12. Selective bromochlorination of a homoallylic alcohol for the total synthesis of (−)-anverene

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Frederick J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The scope of a recently reported method for the catalytic enantioselective bromochlorination of allylic alcohols is expanded to include a specific homoallylic alcohol. Critical factors for optimization of this reaction are highlighted. The utility of the product bromochloride is demonstrated by the first total synthesis of an antibacterial polyhalogenated monoterpene, (−)-anverene. PMID:27559385

  13. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  14. Catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell waste in a fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Bon Seok; Lee, Dong Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell was investigated in a fluidized bed with zsm-5 and equilibrium FCC (Ecat) catalysts. Catalytic pyrolysis oil yields were remarkably reduced and gas yields were increased due to the higher catalytic reaction of primary volatiles compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis. Char yields were affected by temperature and the pore structure of the catalysts. The pyrolysis oil was characterized by lower H/C and O/C molar ratios due to aromatization and deoxygenation of volatiles by the catalysts. The catalytic pyrolysis oils contained more oxygen and nitrogen and less sulfur than petroleum oils. The oils had a high concentration of nitriles, with a carbon number distribution similar to fatty acids. The catalytic pyrolysis oils featured high nitriles yield with Ecat and high aromatics yield in the light fraction with zsm-5, due to characteristics of the catalyst. The catalytic pyrolysis oils showed potentials as feedstocks for bio-diesel and chemicals.

  15. Scientists Toast the Discovery of Vinyl Alcohol in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    blocks for vinyl alcohol and other chemicals are able to form the necessary chemical bonds to make larger molecules - those containing as many as six or more atoms. "It has been an ongoing quest to understand exactly how these more complex molecules form and become distributed throughout the interstellar medium," said Turner. Since the 1970s, scientists have speculated that molecules could form on the microscopic dust grains in interstellar clouds. These dust grains are thought to trap the fast-moving molecules. The surface of these grains would then act as a catalyst, similar to a car's catalytic converter, and enable the chemical reactions that form vinyl alcohol and the other complex molecules. The problem with this theory, however, is that the newly formed molecules would remain trapped on the dust grains at the low temperature characteristic of most of interstellar space, and the energy necessary to "knock them off" would also be strong enough to break the chemical bonds that formed them. "This last process has not been well understood," explained Turner. "The current theory explains well how molecules like vinyl alcohol could form, but it doesn't address how these new molecules are liberated from the grains where they are born." To better understand how this might be accomplished, the scientists considered the volatile and highly energetic region of space where these molecules were detected. Turner and others speculate that since this cloud lies near an area of young, energetic star formation, the energy from these stars could evaporate the icy surface layers of the grains. This would liberate the molecules from their chilly nurseries, depositing them into interstellar space where they can be detected by sensitive radio antennas on Earth. Astronomers are able to detect the faint radio signals that these molecules emit as they jump between quantum energy states in the act of rotating or vibrating. Turner cautions, however, that even though this discovery has shed

  16. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... salt. 721.643 Section 721.643 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... salt. 721.643 Section 721.643 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... salt. 721.643 Section 721.643 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salt. 721.643 Section 721.643 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.643 - Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... salt. 721.643 Section 721.643 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.643 Ethoxylated alcohol, phosphated, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance... alcohol, phosphated, amine salt (PMN P-96-1478) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    SciTech Connect

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T.

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  2. Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

  3. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  4. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome. Deutsches Arztebaltt International. 2013;110:703. Ungerer M, et al. In utero alcohol exposure, epigenetic changes and their consequences. Alcohol Research: Current Reviews. 2013;35:37. Coriale G, et al. ...

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  6. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  7. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  8. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  9. 27 CFR 19.326 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.326 Section 19.326 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.326 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals produced, including chemical...

  10. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  11. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  12. 27 CFR 24.320 - Chemical record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical record. 24.320... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.320 Chemical record. A proprietor who uses chemicals, preservatives, or other such materials shall maintain a record of the purchase, receipt...

  13. 27 CFR 24.320 - Chemical record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical record. 24.320... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.320 Chemical record. A proprietor who uses chemicals, preservatives, or other such materials shall maintain a record of the purchase, receipt...

  14. Third international symposium on alcohol fuels technology

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    At the opening of the Symposium, Dr. Sharrah, Senior Vice President of Continental Oil Company, addressed the attendees, and his remarks are included in this volume. The Symposium was concluded by workshops which addressed specific topics. The topical titles are as follows: alcohol uses; production; environment and safety; and socio-economic. The workshops reflected a growing confidence among the attendees that the alcohols from coal, remote natural gas and biomass do offer alternatives to petroleum fuels. Further, they may, in the long run, prove to be equal or superior to the petroleum fuels when the aspects of performance, environment, health and safety are combined with the renewable aspect of the biomass derived alcohols. Although considerable activity in the production and use of alcohols is now appearing in many parts of the world, the absence of strong, broad scale assessment and support for these fuels by the United States Federal Government was a noted point of concern by the attendees. The environmental consequence of using alcohols continues to be more benign in general than the petroleum based fuels. The exception is the family of aldehydes. Although the aldehydes are easily suppressed by catalysts, it is important to understand their production in the combustion process. Progress is being made in this regard. Of course, the goal is to burn the alcohols so cleanly that catalytic equipment can be eliminated. Separate abstracts are prepared for the Energy Data Base for individual presentations.

  15. Catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  16. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.; Chum, Helena L.; Evans, Robert J.; Rejai, Bahman; Bain, Richard L.; Overend, Ralph P.

    1996-01-01

    A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

  17. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

    1996-04-02

    A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

  18. Amination of allylic alcohols in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2009-06-04

    The "trick" to carrying out regiocontrolled aminations of allylic alcohols in water as the only medium is use of a nanomicelle's interior as the organic reaction solvent. When HCO(2)Me is present, along with the proper base and source of catalytic Pd, allylic amines are cleanly formed at room temperature.

  19. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  20. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  1. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  2. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  3. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  4. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  5. Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nechitailov, A. A. Zvonareva, T. K.; Remenyuk, A. D.; Tolmachev, V. A.; Goryachev, D. N.; El'tsina, O. S.; Belyakov, L. V.; Sreseli, O. M.

    2008-10-15

    Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers produced by magnetron cosputtering have been studied. The layers were characterized by electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, gravimetry, and spectrophotometric chemical analysis. The catalytic activity of the layers was studied in an air-hydrogen fuel cell by measuring its load and power characteristics.

  6. Nanoscale mapping of catalytic activity using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Stephanidis, B.; Zenobi, R.; Wain, A. J.; Roy, D.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical mapping of a photocatalytic reaction with nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated for the first time using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). An ultrathin alumina film applied to the Ag-coated TERS tip blocks catalytic interference whilst maintaining near-field electromagnetic enhancement, thus enabling spectroscopic imaging of catalytic activity on nanostructured Ag surfaces.

  7. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pei Fang Ng; Li Li; Shaobin Wang; Zhonghua Zhu; Gaoqing Lu; Zifeng Yan

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud, a by-product of the aluminium industry) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H{sub 2} adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Recyclable nanostructured catalytic systems in modern environmentally friendly organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Irina; Tyurin, Vladimir

    2010-07-08

    Modern chemical synthesis makes heavy use of different types of catalytic systems: homogeneous, heterogeneous and nano-sized. The latter--nano-sized catalysts--have given rise in the 21st century to a rapidly developing area of research encompassing several prospects and opportunities for new technologies. Catalytic reactions ensure high regio- and stereoselectivity of chemical transformations, as well as better yields and milder reaction conditions. In recent years several novel catalytic systems were developed for selective formation of carbon-heteroatom and carbon-carbon bonds. This review presents the achievements of our team in our studies on various types of catalysts containing metal nanoparticles: palladium-containing diblock copolymer micelles; soluble palladium-containing polymers; metallides on a support; polymeric metal salts and oxides; and, in addition, metal-free organic catalysts based on soluble polymers acting as nanoreactors. Representative examples are given and discussed in light of possible applications to solve important problems in modern organic synthesis.

  9. Enhanced detectability of fluorinated derivatives of N,N-dialkylamino alcohols and precursors of nitrogen mustards by gas chromatography coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis for verification of chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Garg, Prabhat; Purohit, Ajay; Tak, Vijay K; Dubey, D K

    2009-11-06

    N,N-Dialkylamino alcohols, N-methyldiethanolamine, N-ethyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine are the precursors of VX type nerve agents and three different nitrogen mustards respectively. Their detection and identification is of paramount importance for verification analysis of chemical weapons convention. GC-FTIR is used as complimentary technique to GC-MS analysis for identification of these analytes. One constraint of GC-FTIR, its low sensitivity, was overcome by converting the analytes to their fluorinated derivatives. Owing to high absorptivity in IR region, these derivatives facilitated their detection by GC-FTIR analysis. Derivatizing reagents having trimethylsilyl, trifluoroacyl and heptafluorobutyryl groups on imidazole moiety were screened. Derivatives formed there were analyzed by GC-FTIR quantitatively. Of these reagents studied, heptafluorobutyrylimidazole (HFBI) produced the greatest increase in sensitivity by GC-FTIR detection. 60-125 folds of sensitivity enhancement were observed for the analytes by HFBI derivatization. Absorbance due to various functional groups responsible for enhanced sensitivity were compared by determining their corresponding relative molar extinction coefficients ( [Formula: see text] ) considering uniform optical path length. The RSDs for intraday repeatability and interday reproducibility for various derivatives were 0.2-1.1% and 0.3-1.8%. Limit of detection (LOD) was achieved up to 10-15ng and applicability of the method was tested with unknown samples obtained in international proficiency tests.

  10. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres.

    PubMed

    Quasdorf, Kyle W; Overman, Larry E

    2014-12-11

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres-carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached-are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  11. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters

    PubMed Central

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Quaternary carbon stereocenters–carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached–are common features of molecules found in nature. However, prior to recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods available for constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for synthesizing organic molecules containing such carbon atoms. This progress now makes it possible to selectively incorporate quaternary stereocenters in many high-value organic molecules for use in medicine, agriculture, and other areas. PMID:25503231

  12. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2014-12-01

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres--carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached--are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  13. Linking chemical electron-proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: broken-symmetry DFT exploration of intermediates along the catalytic reaction pathway of the iron-copper dinuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Noodleman, Louis; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Fee, James A; Götz, Andreas W; Walker, Ross C

    2014-07-07

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3-CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185-190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment.

  14. Catalytic properties of iron-based mixed oxides in the oxidation of methanol and olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifirò, F.; Carbucicchio, M.; Villa, P. L.

    1998-12-01

    The selective oxidation of alcohols and olefins is carried out commercially on complex systems based on Fe and Mo or Sb mixed oxides. The role of active phases and of the dopant in the catalysts has been elucidated using several characterization techniques and catalytic data.

  15. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy.

  16. Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the National Academies (IOM) diagnostic categories: 4 » Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) » Partial FAS (pFAS) » Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder ( ... 301.443.3860 Relevant Clinical Diagnoses IOM Diagnoses Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) was the first ...

  17. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  18. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krois, Deborah Helen

    Although alcoholism has long been considered a serious problem, the impact of parental alcoholism on children has only recently begun to receive attention from researchers and clinicians. A review of the empirical literature on children of alcoholics was conducted and it was concluded that children raised in an alcoholic family are at increased…

  19. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Our Funding Our Staff Jobs & Training Our Location Contact Us You are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Overview of Alcohol Consumption In this Section Alcohol Facts & Statistics What Is A Standard Drink? Drinking Levels Defined Overview of Alcohol Consumption ...

  20. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  3. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  4. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of higher alcohol synthesis products from syngas.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robert; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven

    2012-07-20

    An on-line gas chromatographic (GC) system has been developed for rapid and accurate product analysis in catalytic conversion of syngas (a mixture of H₂ and CO) to alcohols, so called "higher alcohol synthesis (HAS)". Conversion of syngas to higher alcohols is an interesting second step in the route of converting coal, natural gas and possibly biomass to liquid alcohol fuel and chemicals. The presented GC system and method are developed for analysis of the products formed from syngas using alkali promoted MoS₂ catalysts, however it is not limited to these types of catalysts. During higher alcohol synthesis not only the wanted short alcohols (∼C₂-C₅) are produced, but also a great number of other products in smaller or greater amounts, they are mainly short hydrocarbons (olefins, paraffins, branched, non-branched), aldehydes, esters and ketones as well as CO₂, H₂O. Trace amounts of sulfur-containing compounds can also be found in the product effluent when sulfur-containing catalysts are used and/or sulfur-containing syngas is feed. In the presented GC system, most of them can be separated and analyzed within 60 min without the use of cryogenic cooling. Previously, product analysis in "higher alcohol synthesis" has in most cases been carried out partly on-line and partly off-line, where the light gases (gases at room temp) are analyzed on-line and liquid products (liquid at room temp) are collected in a trap for later analysis off-line. This method suffers from many drawbacks compared to a complete on-line GC system. In this paper an on-line system using an Agilent 7890 gas chromatograph equipped with two flame ionization detectors (FID) and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD), together with an Agilent 6890 with sulfur chemiluminescence dual plasma detector (SCD) is presented. A two-dimensional GC system with Deans switch (heart-cut) and two capillary columns (HP-FFAP and HP-Al₂O₃) was used for analysis of the organic products on the FIDs. Light

  5. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse.

  6. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  7. Cinnamyl alcohols and methyl esters of fatty acids from Wedelia prostrata callus cultures.

    PubMed

    El-Mawla, Ahmed M A Abd; Farag, Salwa F; Beuerle, Till

    2011-01-01

    Two methyl esters of fatty acids, namely octadecanoic acid methyl ester (methyl stearate) and hexadecanoic acid methyl ester (methyl palmitate), in addition to four cinnamyl alcohol derivatives, sinapyl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol, p-coumaryl alcohol and coniferyl alcohol 4-O-glucoside (coniferin), were isolated from callus cultures of Wedelia prostrata. The structure of coniferin was established by spectroscopic and chemical methods, while the other compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin layer chromatography in comparison with standards.

  8. Metabolic engineering for higher alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Nozzi, Nicole E; Desai, Shuchi H; Case, Anna E; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-09-01

    Engineering microbial hosts for the production of higher alcohols looks to combine the benefits of renewable biological production with the useful chemical properties of larger alcohols. In this review we outline the array of metabolic engineering strategies employed for the efficient diversion of carbon flux from native biosynthetic pathways to the overproduction of a target alcohol. Strategies for pathway design from amino acid biosynthesis through 2-keto acids, from isoprenoid biosynthesis through pyrophosphate intermediates, from fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation by tailoring chain length specificity, and the use and expansion of natural solvent production pathways will be covered.

  9. Catalytic and reactive polypeptides and methods for their preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic and reactive polypeptides include a binding site specific for a reactant or reactive intermediate involved in a chemical reaction of interest. The polypeptides further include at least one active functionality proximate the bi.

  10. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  11. Pt/Ceria-based Catalysts for Small Alcohol Electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez-Mora, Christian L.

    High emissions of fossil-based energy sources have led to scientists around the world to develop new alternatives for the future. In this sense, fuel cells are a remarkable and promising energy option with less environmental impact. The most used fuels for this technology are hydrogen and small chain alcohols, which can be oxidized to transform their chemical energy into electrical power. To do this, fuel cells need catalysts that will act as an active surface where the oxidation can take place. The problem with platinum catalysts is its possible CO poisoning with intermediates that are produced before the complete oxidation of alcohol to CO2. Different approaches have been taken to try to resolve this issue. In this case, cerium oxide (ceria) was selected as a co-catalyst to mitigate the effect of CO poisoning of platinum. Ceria is a compound that has the ability to work as an "oxygen tank" and can donate oxygen to carbon monoxide that is strongly adsorbed at platinum surface to produce CO2 (carbon dioxide), regenerating the Pt surface for further alcohol oxidation. Therefore, enhancing the current density as well as the power output of a fuel cell. First, an occlusion deposition technique was used to prepare platinum/ceria composite electrodes and tested them towards small chain alcohol oxidation such as methanol oxidation reaction in acidic and alkaline media. The preliminary results demonstrated that the Pt/ceria electrodes were more efficient towards methanol electrooxidation when compared to Pt electrodes. This enhancement was attributed to the presence of ceria. A second preparation method was selected for the synthesis of ceria/Pt catalysts. In this case, a hydrothermal method was used and the catalysis were studied for the effect of MeOH, EtOH and n-BuOH oxidation. The observed effect was that electrodes made of Pt/Pt:CeO2-x showed better catalytic effect than Pt/ceria and platinum electrodes. Moreover, a comparison between ceria nanorods versus

  12. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  13. Structural; magnetic and catalytic properties of nanocrystalline Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 synthesized by microwave combustion and ball milling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. H.; Hassan, Azza M.; Said, Abd El-Aziz A.; Hamdeh, H. H.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of high energy ball-milling on nanosized Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 powders were studied at 30 and 330 min of milling. The powders were initially synthesized from its stoichiometric metal nitrates and urea mixtures, using a microwave assisted combustion method. Ball-milling induced electromechanical reaction was examined by XRD, TEM, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, and catalytic performance by exploring potential changes in size, phases and chemical structure. Before Milling, the as-prepared powders were comprised of small grains of poor spinel crystallinity and very small crystallite size, and a minor α-Fe2O3 phase. Progressive milling significantly reduced the grain size, increased chemical disorder, and reduced the hematite phase. These changes are also manifested in the magnetization measurements. The Catalytic activity performance was carried out using dehydrogenation of isopropyl alcohol. The observed activity was correlated to the presence of Cu2+ and Fe3+ catalysts at octahedral sites before and after milling.

  14. Preparation of mesoporous titania solid superacid and its catalytic property.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tingshun; Zhao, Qian; Li, Mei; Yin, Hengbo

    2008-11-30

    Mesoporous titania (TiO(2)) was synthesized by hydrothermal method using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template and using anhydrous ethanol and tetra-n-butyl titanate (TBOT) as raw materials. Mesoporous titania solid superacid and nanosized titania solid superacid catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method. The structure and property of as-prepared samples were characterized by means of XRD, FT-IR and N(2) physical adsorption. The esterification of salicylic acid with isoamyl alcohol and the condensation of cyclohexanone with ethylene were used as model reactions to test the catalytic activities of the catalysts. On the other hand, the comparison of catalytic activities of the prepared solid superacid catalysts and the conventional liquid acid H(2)SO(4) was also carried out under the same experimental conditions. The results show that the catalytic activities of the prepared solid superacid catalysts were higher than that of the conventional liquid acid H(2)SO(4), and that the catalytic activity of mesoporous TiO(2) solid superacid is the highest among the three catalysts. Mesoporous TiO(2) solid superacid is a good catalyst for the synthesis of isoamyl salicylate or cyclohexanone ethylene ketal.

  15. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  16. Selective liquid phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by tert-butyl hydroperoxide over γ-Al2O3 supported copper and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndolomingo, Matumuene Joe; Meijboom, Reinout

    2017-03-01

    Benzyl alcohol oxidation to benzaldehyde was performed by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in the absence of any solvent using γ-Al2O3 supported copper and gold nanoparticles. Li2O and ionic liquids were used as additive and stabilizers for the synthesis of the catalysts. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), N2 absorption/desorption (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR), whereas, the oxidation reaction was followed by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The as prepared catalysts exhibited good catalytic performance in terms of conversion and selectivity towards benzaldehyde. The performance of the Au-based catalysts is significantly higher than that of the Cu-based catalysts. For both Cu and Au catalysts, the conversion of benzyl alcohol increased as the reaction proceeds, while the selectivity for benzaldehyde decreased. Moreover, the catalysts can be easily recycled and reused with neither significant loss of activity nor selectivity. A kinetic study for the Cu and Au-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzyldehyde is reported. The rate at which the oxidation of benzyl alcohol is occurring as a function of catalyst and oxidant amounts was investigated, with the apparent rate constant, kapp being proportional to the amount of nano catalyst and oxygen present in the system.

  17. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  18. Linking Chemical Electron–Proton Transfer to Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Broken-Symmetry DFT Exploration of Intermediates along the Catalytic Reaction Pathway of the Iron–Copper Dinuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3–CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185–190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment. PMID:24960612

  19. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  20. Alkali promoted molybdenum (IV) sulfide based catalysts, development and characterization for alcohol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Belinda Delilah

    For more than a century transition metal sulfides (TMS) have been the anchor of hydro-processing fuels and upgrading bitumen and coal in refineries worldwide. As oil supplies dwindle and environmental laws become more stringent, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels and/or synthetic fuels. The depletion of oil reserves and a rapidly increasing energy demand worldwide, together with the interest to reduce dependence on foreign oil makes alcohol production for fuels and chemicals via the Fischer Tropsch synthesis (FTS) very attractive. The original Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction is the heart of all gas-to-liquid technologies; it creates higher alcohols and hydrocarbons from CO/H2 using a metal catalyst. This research focuses on the development of alkali promoted MoS2-based catalysts to investigate an optimal synthesis for their assistance in the production of long chain alcohols (via FTS) for their use as synthetic transportation liquid fuels. Properties of catalytic material are strongly affected by every step of the preparation together with the quality of the raw materials. The choice of a laboratory method for preparing a given catalyst depends on the physical and chemical characteristics desired in the final composition. Characterization methods of K0.3/Cs0.3-MoS2 and K0.3 /Cs0.3-Co0.5MoS2 catalysts have been carried out through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), BET porosity and surface analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Various characterization methods have been deployed to correlate FTS products versus crystal and morphological properties of these heterogeneous catalysts. A lab scale gas to liquid system has been developed to evaluate its efficiency in testing FT catalysts for their production of alcohols.