Science.gov

Sample records for alcohol chemical vapor

  1. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis of alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process for single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomie, Takashi; Inoue, Shuhei; Iba, Yushi; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2012-05-01

    In situ mass spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the growth mechanism of single-walled carbon nanotube grown by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. When catalysts were used, pyrolysis could be accomplished at a temperature of 600 °C; without the use of catalysts, successful pyrolysis required a temperature of more than 800 °C. Ethylene and acetylene are important products for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, and fusion of the metal catalyst is the cause of failure of synthesis at high temperatures. This fact indicates that the degradation and polymerization of ethanol are not the cause of the failure of synthesis.

  2. Vapor inhalation of alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Richardson, Heather N; Cole, Maury; Koob, George F

    2008-07-01

    Alcohol dependence constitutes a neuroadaptive state critical for understanding alcoholism, and various methods have been utilized to induce alcohol dependence in animals, one of which is alcohol vapor exposure. Alcohol vapor inhalation provides certain advantages over other chronic alcohol exposure procedures that share the ultimate goal of producing alcohol dependence in rats. Chronic alcohol vapor inhalation allows the experimenter to control the dose, duration, and pattern of alcohol exposure. Also, this procedure facilitates testing of somatic and motivational aspects of alcohol dependence. Chronic exposure to alcohol vapor produces increases in alcohol-drinking behavior, increases in anxiety-like behavior, and reward deficits in rats. Alcohol vapor inhalation as a laboratory protocol is flexible, and the parameters of this procedure can be adjusted to accommodate the specific aims of different experiments. This unit describes the options available to investigators using this procedure for dependence induction, when different options are more or less appropriate, and the implications of each.

  3. On the inclusion of alkanes into the monolayer of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface: a quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Fomina, Elena S; Belyaeva, Elena A; Fainerman, Valentin B; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2013-02-14

    In the framework of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method thermodynamic and structural parameters of the formation and clusterization of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K at the water/alkane vapor C(n)H(2n+2), (n(CH(3)) = 6-16) interface were calculated. The dependencies of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization per one monomer molecule of 2D films on the alkyl chain length of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the molar fraction of alkanes in the monolayers and the immersion degree of alcohol molecules into the water phase were shown to be linear or stepwise. The threshold of spontaneous clusterization of aliphatic alcohols at the water/alkane vapor interface was 10-11 carbon atoms at 298 K which is in line with experimental data at the air/water interface. It is shown that the presence of alkane vapor does not influence the process of alcohol monolayer formation. The structure of these monolayers is analogous to those obtained at the air/water interface in agreement with experimental data. The inclusion of alkane molecules into the amphiphilic monolayer at the water/alkane vapor interface is possible for amphiphiles with the spontaneous clusterization threshold at the air/water interface (n(s)(0)) of at least 16 methylene units in the alkyl chain, and it does not depend on the molar fraction of alkanes in the corresponding monolayer. The inclusion of alkanes from the vapor phase into the amphiphilic monolayer also requires that the difference between the alkyl chain lengths of alcohols and alkanes is not larger than n(s)(0) - 15 and n(s)(0) - 14 for the 2D film 1 and 2D film 2, respectively.

  4. Quantum chemical analysis of thermodynamics of 2D cluster formation of alkanes at the water/vapor interface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Fainerman, V B; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2015-11-21

    Using the quantum chemical semi-empirical PM3 method it is shown that aliphatic alcohols favor the spontaneous clusterization of vaporous alkanes at the water surface due to the change of adsorption from the barrier to non-barrier mechanism. A theoretical model of the non-barrier mechanism for monolayer formation is developed. In the framework of this model alcohols (or any other surfactants) act as 'floats', which interact with alkane molecules of the vapor phase using their hydrophobic part, whereas the hydrophilic part is immersed into the water phase. This results in a significant increase of contact effectiveness of alkanes with the interface during the adsorption and film formation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. To test the model the thermodynamic and structural parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated for vaporous alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n(CH3) = 6-16) at the water surface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K. It is shown that the values of clusterization enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy per one monomer of the cluster depend on the chain lengths of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the alcohol molar fraction in the monolayers formed, and the shift of the alkane molecules with respect to the alcohol molecules Δn. Two possible competitive structures of mixed 2D film alkane-alcohol are considered: 2D films 1 with single alcohol molecules enclosed by alkane molecules (the alcohols do not form domains) and 2D films 2 that contain alcohol domains enclosed by alkane molecules. The formation of the alkane films of the first type is nearly independent of the surfactant type present at the interface, but depends on their molar fraction in the monolayer formed and the chain length of the compounds participating in the clusterization, whereas for the formation of the films of the second type the interaction between the hydrophilic parts of the surfactant is

  5. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  8. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method

    PubMed Central

    Van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-01-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices. PMID:27616038

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    surface roughness. 0.9 0.8 p0.7 0.6 0.5 C0.4 0.3 0.2- 0.1- 0-. 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 frequency (cm-1) Figure 10. Transmission spectrum of CVD...significantly less than one micrometer. The resultant films show root-mean- squared surface roughnesses -0.02 pm as long as the film thickness is not much... Derjaguin , B.V., Vapor Growth of Diamond on Diamond and Other Surfaces , J. Cryst. Growth 52:219-226 (1981); Spitsyn, B.V., The State of the Art in

  10. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  13. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Elliott, N.

    1991-12-31

    A microwave assisted process for production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. A simple apparatus combining a chemical vapor infiltration reactor with a conventional 700 W multimode oven is described. Microwave induced inverted thermal gradients are exploited with the ultimate goal of reducing processing times on complex shapes. Thermal gradients in stacks of SiC (Nicalon) cloths have been measured using optical thermometry. Initial results on the ``inside out`` deposition of SiC via decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen are presented. Several key processing issues are identified and discussed. 5 refs.

  14. Vapor compression evaporator concentrates, recovers alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.N.; Robe, K.; Bacchetti, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on presenting a solution to the high energy cost of operating a steam heated, single effect evaporator used by Monsanto Industrial Chemical Company at a plant in Seattle, Wash., to produce vanillin from pulp and paper mill sulfite. Use of the single effect flash evaporator resulted in high energy usage due not only to the ''single effect'' use of steam, but also because energy consumption was reduced only slightly at low operating rates. The solution to this problem was the replacement of the single effect evaporator with a vapor recompression evaporator. Operating for over 1 1/2 years, the vapor recompression evaporator system has had no significant maintenance problems. The system operates with only 1/60th the steam consumption and 15% of the total energy consumption of the previous evaporator and has had no tube fouling. Also, since the distillate is condensed within the evaporator, less cooling water is required, allowing two heat exchangers to be taken out of service. When operating at less than design capacity, the energy consumption drops almost linearly with the feed rate. At low feed rates, a by-pass valve unloads the compressor to reduce energy consumption. Total energy consumption, now 15% of the previous level, results in an estimated pay-back of less than three years.

  15. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  16. Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David J.; Currier, Robert P.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Barbero, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    A method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  19. Automated semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility (totally automatic) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to the track, and sent on to the next operation. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  20. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  1. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  2. Membrane-assisted vapor stripping: energy efficient hybrid distillation-vapor permeation process for alcohol-water separation

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Energy efficient alternatives to distillation for alcohol recovery from dilute solution are needed to improve biofuel sustainability. A process integrating steam stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step is proposed. The...

  3. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  4. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  5. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  6. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  9. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  10. Quantitative infrared spectra of vapor phase chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, Pamela M.; Kleimeyer, James; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White cell of 5.6 m optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer's law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG).

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  13. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  14. The influence of vapor pressure of chemicals on dermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important route of entry for chemicals in occupational and consumer settings. Key to this exposure is the penetration of the skin's barrier, and key to this penetration is a chemical's vapor pressure. Until now, vapor pressure and its effects on the skin have yet to be widely studied. This review aims to provide some historical background on early work on dermal penetration for volatile materials, which has helped form later research into the effects of vapor pressure on chemical risk assessment for dermal exposures. This review should be the start of an investigation into more in-depth coverage of vapor pressure and current prediction models.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  16. Operant alcohol self-administration in dependent rats: focus on the vapor model

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Roberts, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism (alcohol dependence) is characterized by a compulsion to seek and ingest alcohol (ethanol), loss of control over intake, and the emergence of a negative emotional state during withdrawal. Animal models are critical in promoting our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. Here, we review the studies involving operant alcohol self-administration in rat models of alcohol dependence and withdrawal with the focus on the alcohol vapor model. In 1996, the first articles were published reporting that rats made dependent on alcohol by exposure to alcohol vapors displayed increased operant alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal compared with nondependent rats (i.e., not exposed to alcohol vapors). Since then, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that this model reliably produces physical and motivational symptoms of alcohol dependence. The functional roles of various systems implicated in stress and reward, including opioids, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), glucocorticoids, neuropeptide Y (NPY), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), norepinephrine, and cannabinoids, have been investigated in the context of alcohol dependence. The combination of models of alcohol withdrawal and dependence with operant self-administration constitutes an excellent tool to investigate the neurobiology of alcoholism. In fact, this work has helped lay the groundwork for several ongoing clinical trials for alcohol dependence. Advantages and limitations of this model are discussed, with an emphasis on what future directions of great importance could be. PMID:24290310

  17. Operant alcohol self-administration in dependent rats: focus on the vapor model.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Roberts, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Alcoholism (alcohol dependence) is characterized by a compulsion to seek and ingest alcohol (ethanol), loss of control over intake, and the emergence of a negative emotional state during withdrawal. Animal models are critical in promoting our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. Here, we review the studies involving operant alcohol self-administration in rat models of alcohol dependence and withdrawal with the focus on the alcohol vapor model. In 1996, the first articles were published reporting that rats made dependent on alcohol by exposure to alcohol vapors displayed increased operant alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal compared with nondependent rats (i.e., not exposed to alcohol vapors). Since then, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that this model reliably produces physical and motivational symptoms of alcohol dependence. The functional roles of various systems implicated in stress and reward, including opioids, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), glucocorticoids, neuropeptide Y (NPY), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), norepinephrine, and cannabinoids, have been investigated in the context of alcohol dependence. The combination of models of alcohol withdrawal and dependence with operant self-administration constitutes an excellent tool to investigate the neurobiology of alcoholism. In fact, this work has helped lay the groundwork for several ongoing clinical trials for alcohol dependence. Advantages and limitations of this model are discussed, with an emphasis on what future directions of great importance could be.

  18. Modeling of Tungsten Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunghoon; Akiyama, Yasunobu; Imaishi, Nobuyuki; Park, Heung-Chul

    1999-05-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten (W)film on silicon (Si) substrate was performed by reducting hexafluoride(WF6) with hydrogen. This CVD system is known for its nonlineardependence of growth rate on WF6 concentration. This study adopted asimple surface-reaction model which assumes that the precursor, i.e.,WF6, in the gas phase adsorbs on solid surfaces and then the adsorbedWF6 molecule is converted into tungsten solid film. The two kineticparameters involved in the model are derived from the experimentalresults. The solidification rate constant (ks) is equal to the growthrate at very high WF6 concentrations. The adsorption rate constant(ka) is derived from profile analyses of films grown in microtrenchesunder very low WF6 concentrations by applying the conventional MonteCarlo simulation code, which is valid for linear surface-reactionsystems. In the temperature range of 623 to 823 K, ka and ks haveactivation energies of 82 kJmol-1, 66.1 kJmol-1, respectively. A newlyproposed Monte Carlo simulation for nonlinear reaction systems, incombination with the two kinetic parameters, can quantitativelypredict the shape of film in microtrenches for a wide range oftemperatures and WF6 concentrations.

  19. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  20. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  1. Hazardous Chemical Vapor Handbook for Marine Tank Vessels,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    D-A128 768 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL VAPOR HANDBOOK FOR MARINE TANK 13 VESSELS(U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX A J STLEFORD ET AL. OCT 83 USCG-D...34• ° _ °." . 0h S " e ’S o e . 0 .o- -. " o .’ ReportNo. CG-D-12-83 QHAZARDOUS CHEMICAL VAPOR HANDBOOK (30 FOR MARINE TANK VESSELS W. J. ASTLEFORD T. B...Catalog No. CG-D-12-83 D \\W h<____ 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Dote Hazardous Chemical Vapor Handbook for Marine April 1983 Tank Vessels 6

  2. Precursors for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of copper metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alicia Marie

    The colorless square-planar cluster [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4, which contains four Cu(I) ions with four bridging amide groups, was studied as a precursor for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu metal. The cluster phosphoresces in CH2Cl2 solution and in the solid state at room temperature. Its electronic spectrum in CH 2Cl2 consists of two intense bands which are assigned to symmetry-allowed 3d → 4p transitions; the phosphorescence is also likely to be metal-centered. Solid [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 luminesces with approximately the same spectrum as that of the CH2Cl2 solutions. At 77 K, the solid-state luminescence red-shifts slightly. The emission lifetime in glassy Et2O solution is 690 mus. [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 deposits Cu metal via chemical vapor deposition under H2 carrier gas at substrate temperatures of 145--200°C. Deposition also occurs photochemically beginning at 136--138°C under near-UV irradiation. The preparation of monomeric derivatives of [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 was attempted by using neutral donor ligands L (e.g. LnCuN(SiMe3)2; L = CO, PR3, CN-t-Bu; n = 1--3). The target compounds were expected to be more volatile than the copper cluster and still maintain photosensitivity. CuCl and [Cu(CH 3CN)4]PF6 were used as starting materials. Even in the presence of L, [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4 is a major product in reactions using CuCl and NaN(SiCH3) 2- [Cu(CH3CN)4]PF6 was a promising route for the monomeric Cu(I) complexes because of ready dissociation of its acetonitrile ligands. However, the characterization of these complexes was unsuccessful. Other Cu(I) amide clusters have been prepared; they may also be suitable for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu. [CuNEt2] 4, [CuN(i-Pr)2]4, and [CuN(t-Bu)(SiMe 3)]4 are phosphorescent though they are very air sensitive. They should be more volatile and produce Cu metal films more readily than [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 Cu(hfac)2 is a versatile Lewis acid, forming adducts with a variety of bases. The bases that were used were ethylene

  3. Differentiation of vapor mixture with chemical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulki; Jung, Youngmo; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Bum Ju; Lim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jaebin; Seo, Minah; Kim, Jae Hun; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Sang Kyung; Kang, Chong Yun; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok

    2015-07-01

    Arrays of partially selective chemical sensors have been the focus of extensive research over the past decades because of their potential for widespread application in ambient air monitoring, health and safety, and biomedical diagnostics. Especially, vapor sensor arrays based on functionalized nanomaterials have shown great promise with their high sensitivity by dimensionality and outstanding electronic properties. Here, we introduce experiments where individual vapors and mixtures of them are examined by different chemical sensor arrays. The collected data from those sensor arrays are further analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and targeted vapors are recognized based on prepared database.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  5. Sensing properties of monolayer borophane nanosheet towards alcohol vapors: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, V; Chandiramouli, R

    2017-05-01

    The electronic properties of borophane nanosheet and adsorption behavior of three distinct alcohol vapors namely methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol on borophane nanosheet is studied using density functional theory method for the first time. The state-of-the-art provides insights on to the development of new two dimensional materials with the surface passivation on boron nanostructures. The density of states spectrum provides a clear perception on charge transfer upon adsorption of alcohol vapors on borophane nanosheets. The monolayer of borophane band gap widens upon adsorption of alcohol vapors, which can be used for the detection for volatile organic vapors. The adsorption properties of alcohol vapors on borophane base material are analyzed in terms of natural bond orbital, average energy gap variation, adsorption energy and energy gap. The most suitable adsorption sites of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol molecules on borophane nanosheet are investigated in atomistic level. The adsorption of alcohol molecules on borophane nanosheet is found to be more favorable. The findings suggest that the monolayer borophane nanosheet can be utilized to detect the presence of alcohol vapors in the atmosphere.

  6. Advanced chemical heat pumps using liquid-vapor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirol, L.

    Chemical heat pumps utilizing liquid-vapor reactions can be configured in forms analogous to electric drive vapor-compression heat pumps and heat activated absorption heat pumps. Basic thermodynamic considerations eliminate some heat pumps and place restrictive working fluid requirements on others, but two thermodynamically feasible systems have significant potential advantage over conventional technology. An electric drive reactive heat pump can use smaller heat exchangers and compressor than a vapor-compression machine, and have more flexible operating characteristics. A waste heat driven heat pump (temperature amplifier) using liquid-vapor chemical reactions can operate with higher coefficient of performance and smaller heat exchangers than an absorption temperature amplifying heat pump. Higher temperatures and larger temperature lifts should also be possible.

  7. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  8. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  9. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  11. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  13. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iridium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    accepted types are made of porous tungsten impregnated with barium calcium aluminates (Levi, 1955; Brodie and Jenkins, 1956). The emission capability of the...not only does the chemical composition of the pore ends and the bulk material undergo alteration, but the crystal structure of the tungsten (Maloney... hexafluoride to iridium metal or IrF 6 species. In our work, IrF 6 was prepared and stored in fluorine-passivated apparatus, and between runs maintained at

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  15. Vapor-deposited alcohol glasses reveal a wide range of kinetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylinski, M.; Chua, Y. Z.; Beasley, M. S.; Schick, C.; Ediger, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    In situ AC nanocalorimetry was used to characterize vapor-deposited glasses of six mono- and di-alcohol molecules. Benzyl alcohol glasses with high kinetic stability and decreased heat capacity were prepared. When annealed above the glass transition temperature Tg, transformation of these glasses into the supercooled liquid took 103.4 times longer than the supercooled liquid relaxation time (τα). This kinetic stability is similar to other highly stable organic glasses prepared by vapor deposition and is the first clear demonstration of an alcohol forming a stable glass. Vapor deposited glasses of five other alcohols exhibited moderate or low kinetic stability with isothermal transformation times ranging from 100.7 to 102 τα. This wide range of kinetic stabilities is useful for investigating the factors that control stable glass formation. Using our current results and literature data, we compare the kinetic stability of vapor deposited glasses prepared from 14 molecules and find a correlation with the value of τα at 1.25 Tg. We also observe that some vapor-deposited glasses exhibit decreased heat capacity without increased kinetic stability.

  16. Vapor-alcohol control tests with compressed ethanol-gas mixtures: scientific basis and actual performance.

    PubMed

    Dubowski, K M; Essary, N A

    1996-10-01

    Commercial compressed vapor-alcohol mixtures ("dry gas") were evaluated to ascertain their suitability for control tests in breath-alcohol analysis. Dry gas control tests were conducted at nominal vapor-alcohol concentrations (VACs) of 0.045, 0.085, and 0.105 g/210 L (n = 50 at each VAC) with Alcotest 7110 MK III and Intoxilyzer 1400 evidential breath-alcohol testers. The measurement results were analyzed by standard statistical methods, and their correlation with certified dry gas VAC target values was examined. Also measured and examined statistically were the VACs of National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable Research Gas mixtures (dry gas) ethanol standards at 97.8 and 198 ppm (n = 30-50 at each VAC). With the Alcotest 7110 MK III programmed to report VACs normalized to standard atmospheric pressure at 760 torr and the intoxilyzer 1400 programmed to report VACs at ambient atmospheric pressure, the predicted effects of ambient atmospheric pressure were confirmed experimentally. We developed and validated the following conversion factor for VAC units at 34 degrees C and 760 torr: ppm/2605 = g/210 L and g/210 L x 2605 = ppm. We found that the dry gas vapor-alcohol control samples conformed to established formal specifications and concluded that they compared favorably with simulator effluents for control tests of breath-alcohol analyzers, which are capable of adjusting VAC results for ambient atmospheric pressure.

  17. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.J.; Lowden, R.A.; Stinton, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A process was developed for the fabrication of ceramic-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. The ceramic composites were prepared by making fibrous preforms from multiple layers of SiC cloth and forming the silicon-carbide matrix for each component specimen by infiltrating the fibrous preform by a chemical vapor deposition process. A major goal of the work was achieved when infiltration was accomplished in hours instead of weeks by combining the thermal-gradient and forced-gas-flow techniques. Composites that possessed moderate flexural strength and high strain to failure were produced. In addition, the strength of the composites decreased gradually after the maximum strength was obtained, demonstrating that the composites had the desired high toughness and avoided the typical brittle behavior of monolithic ceramics.

  18. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-06-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}{endash}SiCl{sub 4}{endash}CO{sub 2}{endash}H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  19. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  20. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  2. Chemical Vapor Sensing with Monolayer MoS2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-04

    much higher selectivity than carbon nanotube-based sensors. KEYWORDS: Chemical sensor, MoS2, molybdenum disulfide, two-dimensional materials, vapor...such single or few monolayer materials enables highly efficient gating of charge transport via surface gates, obviating the need for the more complex ...photoresponse.7−9 Very recent work has demonstrated fabrication of complex integrated logic circuits based on bilayer MoS2 transistors, 10 and significant

  3. Extraordinary magnetoresistance in shunted chemical vapor deposition grown graphene devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    than 95% single-layer gra- phene using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foils.12 These large-area films are transferable to any arbi- trary...graphene will reconcile with the need for higher mobility, as mobility coupled the cleanliness and defectiveness of the graphene. Nonetheless, such devices...Wiesendagner, Science 320, 82 (2008). 21A. L. Friedman, H. Chun, Y. J. Jung, D. Heiman, E. R. Glaser , and L. Menon, Phys. Rev. B 81, 115461 (2010). FIG. 3

  4. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  5. Scale-up and modeling of forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Starr, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    The forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process has been scaled-up from a maximum of 7.6 cm dia. disk to fabrication of 24 cm dia. disks, 1.6 cm in thickness. The components are turbine rotor subelements produced from polar weave Tyranno fibers preforms. The disks were subjected to non-destructive testing and spin-tested to high rpm. The processing conditions were modeled with the GTCVI code to aid in optimization.

  6. Processing Research on Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    the feasi- bility of synthesizing free-standing plate and figured geometries of phase-pure silicon nitride by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method...ates toward moisture and the probability that they all contain absorbed ammonium chloride and ammonia. A strong ammoniacal odor indicates that...solid (V- L -S) processes favored by high ammonia/silicon ratios, high concentrations and long times. Whisker formation would be favored by the opposite

  7. Controlled vaporized cannabis, with and without alcohol: subjective effects and oral fluid-blood cannabinoid relationships.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Rebecca L; Brown, Timothy L; Milavetz, Gary; Spurgin, Andrew; Gorelick, David A; Gaffney, Gary; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-07-01

    Vaporized cannabis and concurrent cannabis and alcohol intake are commonplace. We evaluated the subjective effects of cannabis, with and without alcohol, relative to blood and oral fluid (OF, advantageous for cannabis exposure screening) cannabinoid concentrations and OF/blood and OF/plasma vaporized-cannabinoid relationships. Healthy adult occasional-to-moderate cannabis smokers received a vaporized placebo or active cannabis (2.9% and 6.7% Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) with or without oral low-dose alcohol (~0.065g/210L peak breath alcohol concentration [BrAC]) in a within-subjects design. Blood and OF were collected up to 8.3 h post-dose and subjective effects measured at matched time points with visual-analogue scales and 5-point Likert scales. Linear mixed models evaluated subjective effects by THC concentration, BrAC, and interactions. Effects by time point were evaluated by dose-wise analysis of variance (ANOVA). OF versus blood or plasma cannabinoid ratios and correlations were evaluated in paired-positive specimens. Nineteen participants (13 men) completed the study. Blood THC concentration or BrAC significantly associated with subjective effects including 'high', while OF contamination prevented significant OF concentration associations <1.4 h post-dose. Subjective effects persisted through 3.3-4.3 h, with alcohol potentiating the duration of the cannabis effects. Effect-versus-THC concentration and effect-versus-alcohol concentration hystereses were counterclockwise and clockwise, respectively. OF/blood and OF/plasma THC significantly correlated (all Spearman r≥0.71), but variability was high. Vaporized cannabis subjective effects were similar to those previously reported after smoking, with duration extended by concurrent alcohol. Cannabis intake was identified by OF testing, but OF concentration variability limited interpretation. Blood THC concentrations were more consistent across subjects and more accurate at predicting cannabis' subjective

  8. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  10. Flexible electrochemical capacitors based on polypyrrole/carbon fibers via chemical polymerization of pyrrole vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Han, Gaoyi; Xiao, Yaoming; Chang, Yunzhen; Liu, Cuixian; Li, Miaoyu; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has been deposited on the carbon fibers (CFs) via chemical oxidation of monomer vapor strategy, during which FeCl3·6H2O in acetonitrile adsorbed on CFs acts as oxidant to polymerize the pyrrole vapor. The morphologies and capacitive properties of the PPy deposited on CFs (PPy/CFs) are strongly influenced by the concentration of oxidant used in the process. The assembled flexible capacitors by using PPy/CFs as electrodes and LiCl/polyvinyl alcohol as gel electrolyte have been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the composites of PPy/CFs prepared by using 350 mg mL-1 FeCl3·6H2O as oxidant (PPy/CFs-350) exhibit relatively higher specific capacitance and good rate capability. Compared with PPy/CFs prepared by electrochemical deposition (retaining 5% of the initial capacitance), the PPy/CFs prepared by chemically polymerizing monomer vapor shows excellent stability (retaining 85% of initial capacitance after 5000 cycles). Furthermore, cells fabricated by PPy/CFs show a fairly good performance under various bending states, three cells of PPy/CFs-350 connected in series can light up a light emitting diode with a voltage threshold of about 2.5 V for approximate 10 min after being charged for about 3 min, revealing the potential of the cells' practical applications.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed.

  12. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goekoglu, Sueleyman

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  14. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria in the system methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Susial, P.; Ortega, J. . Lab. de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica)

    1993-10-01

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were determined at 74.66, 101.32, and 127.99 kPa for binary mixtures containing methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol by using a dynamic still with vapor and liquid circulation. No azeotrope was detected. The data were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to the point to point test. Application of the group-contribution models ASOG, UNIFAC, and modified UNIFAC to the activity coefficients at the three pressures studied gives average errors of less than 10%, 11%, and 3%, respectively.

  15. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung; Yurgens, August

    2014-01-01

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  16. Highly sensitive wide bandwidth photodetectors using chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo Kang, Chang; Kyung Lee, Sang; Jin Yoo, Tae; Park, Woojin; Jung, Ukjin; Ahn, Jinho; Hun Lee, Byoung

    2014-04-01

    A photodetector generating a nearly constant photocurrent in a very wide spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared has been demonstrated using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Instability due to a photochemical reaction in the UV region has been minimized using an Al2O3 passivation layer, and a responsivity comparable to that of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite graphene photodetectors of ˜8 mA/W has been achieved at a 0.1 V bias, despite high defect density in the CVD graphene. A highly sensitive multi-band photodetector using graphene has many potential applications including optical interconnects, multi-band imaging sensors, highly sensitive motion detectors, etc.

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  18. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices as Chemical Vapor Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposited Surfaces,” Advanced Materials, 2006. 45. S . C. Huang, K. D. Caldwell , J. N. Lin, H . K. Wang, and J. N. Herron...exposure, 45 s develop, titanium. 59 Figure 4.4: SEM image of one of the devices from Series 3. 4.2 Testing AFRL- Designed SAW Devices Through...Approach for the Detection of Explosives,” Jour- nal of Hazardous Materials,, vol. 144, pp. 15–28, June 2007. 4. M. H . Ervin, S . J. Kilpatrick, C

  19. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  20. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  3. High activity redox catalysts synthesized by chemical vapor impregnation.

    PubMed

    Forde, Michael M; Kesavan, Lokesh; Bin Saiman, Mohd Izham; He, Qian; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Jenkins, Robert L; Taylor, Stuart H; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-01-28

    The use of precious metals in heterogeneous catalysis relies on the preparation of small nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions. To date, most conventional routes used to prepare noble metal nanoparticles have drawbacks related to surface contamination, particle agglomeration, and reproducibility restraints. We have prepared titania-supported palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) catalysts using a simplified vapor deposition technique termed chemical vapor impregnation (CVI) that can be performed in any standard chemical laboratory. These materials, composed of nanoparticles typically below 3 nm in size, show remarkable activity under mild conditions for oxidation and hydrogenation reactions of industrial importance. We demonstrate the preparation of bimetallic Pd-Pt homogeneous alloy nanoparticles by this new CVI method, which show synergistic effects in toluene oxidation. The versatility of our CVI methodology to be able to tailor the composition and morphology of supported nanoparticles in an easily accessible and scalable manner is further demonstrated by the synthesis of Pdshell-Aucore nanoparticles using CVI deposition of Pd onto preformed Au nanoparticles supported on titania (prepared by sol immobilization) in addition to the presence of monometallic Au and Pd nanoparticles.

  4. Intensive use of biomass feedstock in ethanol conversion: The alcohol-water, vapor-phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, G.H.; Doyle, L.R.; Pavlath, A.E.

    1983-12-01

    Fermentation of ethanol in a system whereby the biomass is used intensively (both to separate alcohol from water by vapor phase adsorption and to serve as the feedstock) is shown to be possible on theoretical grounds when the biomass is grain. The rationale for a vapor-phase adsorption process as an alternative to distillation is shown to be energetically valid above 84 wt % ethanol. The capacity of grain in new vapor-phase ambient adsorption processes was estimated experimentally with the finding that sufficient capacity exists for the intensive use but that the adsorption is dynamically controlled so that the grain form and particle size are important. Pretreatments such as explosive dehydration improve the transfer of water to the grain in adsorption with potential improvement in the efficiency of liquefaction and saccharification. At room temperature, these sorbents are not perfectly selective for water but adsorb ethanol which will be carried to the liquefaction, saccharification, and fermentation with the feedstock.

  5. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  6. Chemiluminescent chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Chemiluminescent, chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors are being investigated via the immobilization of 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol) within hydrogels and polymeric, sorbent coatings. The films are supported behind a teflon membrane and positioned in front of a photomultiplier tube, permitting the sensitive detection of numerous toxic vapors. Some selectivity has been tailored into these devices by careful selection of the polymer type, pH and metal catalyst incorporated within the film. The incorporation of luminol and Fe(3) within a polyvinylalcohol hydrogel gave a film with superior sensitivity toward NO{sub 2} (detection limit of 0.46 ppb and a response time on the order of seconds). The use of the hydrogel matrix helped eliminate humidity problems associated with other polymeric films. Other chemiluminescent thin films prepared have demonstrated the detection of ppb levels of SO{sub 2}(g) and hydrazine, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}(g). Recently, the authors have begun investigating the incorporation of a heated Pt filament into the inlet line as a pre-oxidative step prior to passage of the gas stream across the teflon membrane. This has permitted the sensitive detection of ppm levels of CCl{sub 4}(g), CHCl{sub 3}(g) and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(g).

  7. Temperature-dependent morphology of chemical vapor grown molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yantao; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Monolayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a 2D direct band gap semiconductor with promising potential applications. In this work, we observed the temperature dependency of the morphologies of MoS2 monolayers from chemical vapor deposition. At a low growing temperature below 850 °C, MoS2 flakes tend to be trianglular in shape. At 850–950 °C, hexagonal MoS2 flakes can be observed. While at a temperature over 950 °C, MoS2 flakes can form rectangular shapes. Complementary characterizations have been made to these samples. We also proposed a mechanism for such temperature-dependent shape evolution based on thermodynamic simulation.

  8. Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Graphene and Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Ryo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Xiang, Rong; Hone, James; Kong, Jing; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    Research on atomic layers including graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and their heterostructures has attracted a great deal of attention. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) can provide large-area structure-defined high-quality atomic layer samples, which have considerably contributed to the recent advancement of atomic-layer research. In this article, we focus on the CVD growth of various atomic layers and review recent progresses including (1) the CVD growth of graphene using methane and ethanol as carbon sources, (2) the CVD growth of hBN using borazine and ammonia borane, (3) the CVD growth of various TMDCs using single and multi-furnace methods, and (4) CVD growth of vertical and lateral heterostructures such as graphene/hBN, MoS2/graphite, WS2/hBN and MoS2/WS2.

  9. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  10. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  11. Gas transport model for chemical vapor infiltration. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    1995-05-01

    A node-bond percolation model is presented for the gas permeability and pore surface area of the coarse porosity in woven fiber structures during densification by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Model parameters include the number of nodes per unit volume and their spatial distribution, and the node and bond radii and their variability. These parameters relate directly to structural features of the weave. Some uncertainty exists in the proper partition of the porosity between {open_quotes}node{close_quotes} and{open_quote}bond{close_quotes} and between intra-tow and inter-tow, although the total is constrained by the known fiber loading in the structure. Applied to cloth layup preforms the model gives good agreement with the limited number of available measurements.

  12. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  13. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal ⿿cauliflower⿿ morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  15. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  17. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  18. Chemical vapor synthesis and characterization of aluminum nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Won; Sohn, Hong Yong; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    Aluminum is a component in many promising hydrogen storage materials such as aluminum hydride and complex aluminum hydrides. In this research, Al and TiAl 3-containing Al nanopowders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process using Mg as the reducing agent. XRD and EDS results indicated that the produced powder was composed of Al or Al with TiAl 3. The shape of the powder was spherical with the average size in the range of 10-50 nm measured by SEM, TEM, BET and ZetaPALS compared with the typically larger than 100 nm for commercially available fine Al powders. In addition, the effects of the operating conditions such as Ar flow rate, precursor feed rate and reaction temperature on the properties of the product powder were investigated.

  19. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Troppenz, Gerald V. Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H.

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  20. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  1. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd; Kalita, Golap; Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10 nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870 V/μm for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200 nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} in a cold plasma reactor using an aerosol vaporization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.S.; Hill, D.N.; Carter, W.B.; Lackey, W.J.

    1996-03-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique, utilizing an aerosol decomposition/vaporization process in a cold plasma reactor, was used to form YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) thin films on single-crystal MgO substrates. Aerosol droplets of the precursors were generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer operating at 1.63 MHz, while a 50 kW rf generator, operating at 2.87 MHz, was used to create the plasma and heat a stainless steel susceptor. Nitrate, acetylacetonate, and tetramethylheptanedionate compounds were used as precursors, and distilled water, ethyl alcohol, and an aqueous benzoic acid solution were investigated as solvents for the aerosol solution. The effects of the solubility and decomposition temperature of the chemical precursors, and the vapor pressure of the solvents, on the microstructure and phase assemblage of the deposits were determined. Specific combinations of substrate temperature, in the range of 800--940 C, and oxygen partial pressure, in the range of 0.3--2.7 kPa, were found to produce in situ, crystalline, stoichiometric YBCO films.

  4. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka; Kano, Emi; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  5. A Characterization Of Alcohol Fuel Vapor For Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Applied To Microgravity Flame Spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Perry, David S.; Miller, Fletcher; Piltch, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A diode laser diagnostic is being developed for use in an ongoing investigation of flame spread in microgravity at NASA Glenn Research Center. Flame spread rates through non-homogenous gas mixtures are significantly different in a microgravity environment because of buoyancy and possibly hydrostatic pressure effects. These effects contribute to the fuel vapor concentration ahead of the flame being altered so that flame spread is more rapid in microgravity. This paper describes spectral transmission measurements made through mixtures of alcohol, water vapor, and nitrogen in a gas cell that was designed and built to allow measurements at temperatures up to 500 C. The alcohols considered are methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol. The basic technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas species measurements in microgravity was developed by Silver et al. For this technique to be applicable, one must carefully choose the spectral features over which the diode laser is modulated to provide good sensitivity and minimize interference from other molecular lines such as those in water. Because the methanol spectrum was not known with sufficient resolution in the wavelength region of interest, our first task was to perform high-resolution transmission measurements with an FTIR spectrometer for methanol vapor in nitrogen, followed recently by ethanol and n-propanol. A computer program was written to generate synthesized data to mimic that expected from the experiment using the laser diode, and results from that simulation are also presented.

  6. Assessment of Exposure to Alcohol Vapor from Alcohol-Based Hand Rubs

    PubMed Central

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Thomas, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the inhaled dose of alcohol during hand disinfection. Experiments were conducted with two types of hand rub using two hand disinfection procedures. Air samples were collected every 10 s from the breathing zone, by bubbling through a mixture of K2Cr2O7 and H2SO4. The reduction of dichromate ions in the presence of alcohols was followed by UV-vis spectrophotometry. The difference in intensity of the dichromate absorption peak was used to quantify the alcohol concentration expressed in ethanol equivalent. During hygienic hand disinfection, the mean ethanol equivalent concentrations peaked at around 20–30 s for both hand rubs (14.3 ± 1.4 mg/L for hand rub 1 and 13.2 ± 0.7 mg/L for hand rub 2). During surgical hand disinfection, two peaks were found at the same time (40 and 80 s) for both hand rubs. The highest mean concentrations were 20.2 ± 0.9 mg/L for hand rub 1 and 18.1 ± 0.9 mg/L for hand rub 2. For hand rub 1, the total absorbed doses, calculated from ethanol with an inhalation flow of 24 L/min and an absorption rate of 62%, were 46.5 mg after one hygienic hand disinfection and 203.9 mg after one surgical hand disinfection. Although the use of ABHRs leads to the absorption of very low doses, sudden, repeated inhalation of high alcohol concentrations raises the question of possible adverse health effects. PMID:22690169

  7. Assessment of exposure to alcohol vapor from alcohol-based hand rubs.

    PubMed

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Thomas, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    This study assessed the inhaled dose of alcohol during hand disinfection. Experiments were conducted with two types of hand rub using two hand disinfection procedures. Air samples were collected every 10 s from the breathing zone, by bubbling through a mixture of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and H(2)SO(4). The reduction of dichromate ions in the presence of alcohols was followed by UV-vis spectrophotometry. The difference in intensity of the dichromate absorption peak was used to quantify the alcohol concentration expressed in ethanol equivalent. During hygienic hand disinfection, the mean ethanol equivalent concentrations peaked at around 20-30 s for both hand rubs (14.3 ± 1.4 mg/L for hand rub 1 and 13.2 ± 0.7 mg/L for hand rub 2). During surgical hand disinfection, two peaks were found at the same time (40 and 80 s) for both hand rubs. The highest mean concentrations were 20.2 ± 0.9 mg/L for hand rub 1 and 18.1 ± 0.9 mg/L for hand rub 2. For hand rub 1, the total absorbed doses, calculated from ethanol with an inhalation flow of 24 L/min and an absorption rate of 62%, were 46.5 mg after one hygienic hand disinfection and 203.9 mg after one surgical hand disinfection. Although the use of ABHRs leads to the absorption of very low doses, sudden, repeated inhalation of high alcohol concentrations raises the question of possible adverse health effects.

  8. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  9. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-02

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (μg m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) × M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed.

  10. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  11. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  12. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  13. Experimental Study of Diamond Nucleation by Plasmon Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-18

    chemical vapor deposition, characterization of diamond nanoparticles , and direct conversion of the polymer poly(hydridocarbyne) to diamond. We adapted the...the nucleation of diamond by plasmon assisted chemical vapor deposition, characterization of diamond nanoparticles , and direct conversion of the...and etching of amorphous carbon. We were able to form diamond-like carbon. For comparison, we examined commercially available diamond nanoparticles

  14. Passivation of aluminum nanoparticles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for energetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, Anaram; Desai, Tapan; Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-05-28

    We have produced passivating coatings on 80-nm aluminum particles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Three organic precursors--isopropyl alcohol, toluene, and perfluorodecalin--were used to fabricate thin films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 30 nm. The coated samples and one untreated sample were exposed to 85% humidity at 25 °C for two months, and the active Al content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in the presence of oxygen. The results were compared with an uncoated sample stored in a glovebox under argon for the same period. We find that all three coatings provide protection against humidity, compared to the control, and their efficacy ranks in the following order: isopropyl alcohol < toluene < perfluorodecalin. This order also correlates with increasing water contact angle of the three solid coatings. The amount of heat released in the oxidation, measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was found to increase in the same order. Perfluorodecalin resulted in providing the best protection, and it produced the maximum enthalpy of combustion, ΔH = 4.65 kJ/g. This value is higher than that of uncoated aluminum stored in the glovebox, indicating that the coatings promote more complete oxidation of the core. Overall, we conclude that the plasma polymer coatings of this study are suitable passivating thin film for aluminum nanoparticles by providing protection against oxidation while facilitating the complete oxidation of the metallic core at elevated temperature.

  15. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  16. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-13

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  17. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  18. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  19. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A.; Starr, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  20. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. ); Starr, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  1. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  2. Testing of Wrought Iridium/Chemical Vapor Deposition Rhenium Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-N class, iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) rocket chamber, composed of a thick (418 miocrometer) wrought iridium (Ir) liner and a rhenium substrate deposited via chemical vapor deposition, was tested over an extended period on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. The test conditions were designed to produce species concentrations similar to those expected in an Earth-storable propellant combustion environment. Temperatures attained in testing were significantly higher than those expected with Earth-storable propellants, both because of the inherently higher combustion temperature of GO2/GH2 propellants and because the exterior surface of the rocket was not treated with a high-emissivity coating that would be applied to flight class rockets. Thus the test conditions were thought to represent a more severe case than for typical operational applications. The chamber successfully completed testing (over 11 hr accumulated in 44 firings), and post-test inspections showed little degradation of the Ir liner. The results indicate that use of a thick, wrought Ir liner is a viable alternative to the Ir coatings currently used for Ir/Re rockets.

  3. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-07-03

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  5. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, V. I. Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  6. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  7. Application of chemical vapor composites (CVC) to terrestrial thermionics

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolczy, G.; Reagan, P.

    1995-01-20

    Terrestrial flame fired thermionics took a great leap forward in the earlier 1980`s with the development of reliable long-lived hot shells. These results were presented by Goodale (1981). The hot shell protects the fractory emitter from oxidizing in the combustion environment. In earlier efforts with supralloys emitters it was found that superalloys were poor thermionic emitters since they operated at too low a temperature for practical and economical use as discussed by Huffman (1978). With the development of Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) silicon carbide and CVD tungsten, it became possible to fabricate long-lived thermionic converters. These results were shown by Goodale (1980). Further improvements were achieved with the use of oxygen additives on the electrodes. These developments made thermionics attractive for topping a power plant or as the energy conversion part of a cogeneration plant as described by Miskolczy (1982) and Goodale (1983). The feasibility of a thermonic steam boiler and a thermionic topped gas turbine plant become a possibility, as shown by Miskolczy (1980). {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  8. A high temperature, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.; Britten, J.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Scrivener, M.S.; Unites, W.G.; Campbell, J.H. ); Johnson, W.L. )

    1990-02-01

    We have designed and built a high-temperature, plasma-assisted, chemical vapor deposition system to deposit multilayer optical coatings of SiO{sub 2} and doped-SiO{sub 2} flat substrates. The coater concept and design is an outgrowth of our recent work with Schott Glasswerke demonstrating the use of plasma assisted CVD to prepare very high damage threshold optical coatings. The coater is designed to deposit up to several thousand alternating quarterwave layers of SiO{sub 2} and doped SiO{sub 2} substrate at deposition rates up to several microns per minute. The substrate is resistively heated to about 1000{degree}C during the deposition phase of the process. The plasma is driven by a 13.56 MHz RF unit capable of producing power densities of up to 140 W cm{sup {minus}3} in the reaction zone. The coater is designed to be adaptable to microwave generated plasmas, as well as RF. Reactant gas flow rates of up to 10 slm can be achieved at a 10 tar operating pressure. Reactants consist of O{sub 2}, SiCl{sub 4} and a volatile halogenated dopant. These gases react in the plasma volume producing SiO{sub 2} with dopant concentrations of up to a few percent. A variable dopant concentration is used to produce index differences between adjacent optical layers.

  9. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  10. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  11. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  12. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  13. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  14. Parts per Million Detection of Alcohol Vapors via Metal Organic Framework Functionalized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors.

    PubMed

    Vandezande, Wouter; Janssen, Kris P F; Delport, Filip; Ameloot, Rob; De Vos, Dirk E; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Roeffaers, Maarten B J

    2017-03-30

    The development of novel molecular sieves opens opportunities in the development of more sensitive analytical devices. In this paper, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), specifically ZIF-8 and ZIF-93, are grown on fiber optic based surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR) sensors. FO-SPR has enabled sensitive sensing capabilities in biomedical settings and the addition of an MOF coating opens the way for the sensing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in gaseous media. FO-SPR probes were homogeneously functionalized with ZIF-8 and ZIF-93 in each case using two different precursor solutions to obtain a sequential nucleation and growth phase. The difference in MOF nucleation and growth kinetics of the two solutions was directly monitored by the FO-SPR system. The two established MOF-FO-SPR sensors were then subjected to sensing experiments with several alcohol vapors to establish their sensing capabilities. Vapors with mPa partial pressures, ppm concentrations, could successfully be detected, e.g., an LOD of 2.5 ppm for methanol detection was acquired. The difference in recognition behavior of the hydrophobic ZIF-8 and more hydrophilic ZIF-93 recognition layers can be exploited to yield qualitative information regarding the vapor composition.

  15. Assessment of the application of cascade lasers to stand-off detection of alcohol vapors in moving cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Jaroslaw; Kubicki, Jan; Kopczynski, Krzysztof; Mierczyk, Jadwiga

    2016-10-01

    The idea of using commercially available cascade lasers for stand-off detection of alcohol vapors in moving cars is presented. Special attention is paid to the optical characteristics of the car windowpanes for the monitoring as well as for the reference laser beams. A special experimental setup was built to investigate the idea. It is shown that using interband cascade lasers operating at 3.45- and 3.59-μm wavelengths, the alcohol vapors inside a car can be successfully detected, even in cars with different windowpanes.

  16. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  17. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  18. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of tungsten boron alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Fleming, J.G.; Lujan, R.D.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Reid, J.S.; Hochberg, A.K.; Roberts, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    A low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) process for depositing W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films from WF{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} is described. The depositions were performed in a cold wall reactor on 6 in. Si wafers at 400C. During deposition, pressure was maintained at a fixed level in the range of 200 to 260 mTorr. Ratio of WF{sub 6}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6} was varied from 0.05 to 1.07. Carrier gas was either 100 sccm of Ar with a gas flow of 308 to 591 sccm, or 2000 sccm of Ar and 2000 sccm of H{sub 2} with the overall gas flow from 4213 to 4452 sccm. Two stable deposition regions were found separated by an unstable region that produced non-uniform films. The B-rich films produced in one of the stable deposition regions had W concentrations of 30 at.% and resistivities between 200 and 300 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. The W-rich films produced in the other stable deposition region had W concentrations of 80 at.% and resistivities of 100 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. As-deposited films had densities similar to bulk material of similar stoichiometry. Barrier properties of the films against diffusion of Cu to 700C in vacuum were measured by 4-point probe. Also, annealing was carried out to 900C in order to determine phases formed as the films crystallize. These studies indicate that W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films may be useful barriers in ULSI metallization applications.

  20. Review of chemical vapor deposition of graphene and related applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Luyao; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-15

    Since its debut in 2004, graphene has attracted enormous interest because of its unique properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as an important method for the preparation and production of graphene for various applications since the method was first reported in 2008/2009. In this Account, we review graphene CVD on various metal substrates with an emphasis on Ni and Cu. In addition, we discuss important and representative applications of graphene formed by CVD, including as flexible transparent conductors for organic photovoltaic cells and in field effect transistors. Growth on polycrystalline Ni films leads to both monolayer and few-layer graphene with multiple layers because of the grain boundaries on Ni films. We can greatly increase the percentage of monolayer graphene by using single-crystalline Ni(111) substrates, which have smooth surface and no grain boundaries. Due to the extremely low solubility of carbon in Cu, Cu has emerged as an even better catalyst for the growth of monolayer graphene with a high percentage of single layers. The growth of graphene on Cu is a surface reaction. As a result, only one layer of graphene can form on a Cu surface, in contrast with Ni, where more than one layer can form through carbon segregation and precipitation. We also describe a method for transferring graphene sheets from the metal using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). CVD graphene has electronic properties that are potentially valuable in a number of applications. For example, few-layer graphene grown on Ni can function as flexible transparent conductive electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells. In addition, because we can synthesize large-grain graphene on Cu foil, such large-grain graphene has electronic properties suitable for use in field effect transistors.

  1. Investigation of diamond deposition by chemical vapor transport with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Wladyslaw; Messier, Russell F.; Roy, Rustum; Engdahl, Chris

    1990-12-01

    The carbon-hydrogen chemical vapor transport system was examined in accordance with a four-stage transport model. A result of this examination is that graphite co-deposition could be avoided when diamond is deposited from gas solutions under-saturated with respect to diamond. Actual deposition experiments showed that this unusual requirement can be fulfilled but only for the condition that the transport distance between the carbon source and the substrate surface is short. In such a case diamond can be deposited equally from super-saturated as well as from under-saturated gas solutions. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations a possible explanation of this unusual phenomenon is given. It is shown that there is a possibility of deposition of diamond from both super-saturated as well as under-saturated gas solutions but only on the condition that they are in a non-equilibrium state generally called the activated state. A model of the diamond deposition process consisting of two steps is proposed. In the first step diamond and graphite are deposited simultaneously. The most important carbon deposition reaction is C2H2(g) + 2 H(g) C(diamond graphite) + CH(g). The amount of co-deposited graphite is not a direct function of the saturation state of the gas phase. In the second step graphite is etched according to the most probable reaction C(graphite) + 4 H(g) CH4(g). Atomic hydrogen in a super-equilibrium concentration is necessary not only to etch graphite but also to precipitate and graphite. 1.

  2. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  3. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  4. Performance characteristics of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Toru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1988-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the operation of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap is described. The maximum CW laser power of 87 W was obtained without the water vapor trap at a Cl2 flow rate of 740 mmol/min. An alkaline H2O2 solution (90 wt pct H2O2, 50 wt pct KOH) was cooled down to about -30 C in order to control the saturated H2O2-H2O vapor pressure to less than 100 mTorr. Two porous pipes made of carbon were utilized as a singlet oxygen generator.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 625 Technical Report ARMET-TR-14041 CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM DISULFIDE (MoS2) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...materials, in their bulk form exist as lamellar structures, they can be exfoliated into individual, atomically -thin layers . While the exfoliated 2D materials

  6. Electrospinning of porphyrin/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and their acid vapor sensing capability.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kihun; Baek, Il Woong; Back, Sung Yul; Ahn, Heejoon

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescing 5,10,15,20-terakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP)-embedded and -coated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers were fabricated by using the electrospinning technique. To improve nonpolar solvent solubility of TMPyP/PVA nanofibers, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) was used as a cross-linking agent. UV-vis spectroscopy showed a strong Q band and two relatively weak Soret bands from the TMPyP/PVA nanofibers, and revealed that the TMPyP molecules were homogeneously loaded to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the electrospun nanofibers had ultrafine structures with an average diameter of ca. 250 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the compositional structure of TMPyP/PVA/TEOS nanofibers and revealed the relative coverage of TMPyP molecules on the surface of TMPyP-embedded and TMPyP-coated PVA/TEOS fibers. For the comparison of the acid vapor sensitivity, TMPyP-embedded PVA/TEOS films, and TMPyP-embedded PVA/TEOS fibers, TMPyP-coated PVA/TEOS fibers were exposed to 1N nitric-acid vapor for 20-60 seconds. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that TMPyP-coated PVA/TEOS nanofibers exhibited better acid-sensing capability than TMPyP-embedded PVA/TEOS nanofibers and films.

  7. Radiation-chemical preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, Anastasia V.; Kitaeva, Natalia K.; Duflot, Vladimir R.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports the usage of method of radiation-chemical synthesis to prepare cross-linked hydrogels from poly(vinyl alcohol) modified with glycidyl methacrylate. Synthesis kinetics of modified poly(vinyl alcohol) and properties of hydrogels were studied. The gel fraction, swelling, mechanical properties, and water content of the hydrogels were measured. It was found that gel fraction increases with increasing radiation dose, concentration of modified poly(vinyl alcohol), and reaches 60%. It was established by differential scanning calorimetry that a fraction of the "bound" water in hydrogels is 50-70% and independent of gel fraction content. In addition to "bound" and "free" states, water in hydrogels is also present in the intermediate state.

  8. Equilibrium chemical vapor deposition growth of Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pei; Kim, Sungjin; Chen, Xiao; Einarsson, Erik; Wang, Miao; Song, Yenan; Wang, Hongtao; Chiashi, Shohei; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2014-11-25

    Using ethanol as the carbon source, self-limiting growth of AB-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) has been achieved on Cu via an equilibrium chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. We found that during this alcohol catalytic CVD (ACCVD) a source-gas pressure range exists to break the self-limitation of monolayer graphene on Cu, and at a certain equilibrium state it prefers to form uniform BLG with a high surface coverage of ∼94% and AB-stacking ratio of nearly 100%. More importantly, once the BLG is completed, this growth shows a self-limiting manner, and an extended ethanol flow time does not result in additional layers. We investigate the mechanism of this equilibrium BLG growth using isotopically labeled (13)C-ethanol and selective surface aryl functionalization, and results reveal that during the equilibrium ACCVD process a continuous substitution of graphene flakes occurs to the as-formed graphene and the BLG growth follows a layer-by-layer epitaxy mechanism. These phenomena are significantly in contrast to those observed for previously reported BLG growth using methane as precursor.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  10. Chemically assisted release of transition metals in graphite vaporizers for atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2006-05-01

    decomposition of metal oxide, is the most probable source of chemical energy, which facilitates the vaporization. Intensity of the process depends on chemical properties of the sample and substrate and efficiency of mass and heat transfer by the protective gas. The discussed mechanism of chemically assisted vapor release signifies the energy exchange between all participants of the vaporization process in ET AAS including the matrix, modifier, purge gas and analyte. The finding contributes in the ET AAS theory regarding the mechanisms of vaporization and mass transfer in the presence of matrix and modifiers.

  11. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  12. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  13. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  14. Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Antimony Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Peng-Kuen

    This research is motivated by the desire to synthesize Sb III-V materials, including GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x), InSb, and InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x). Ga-As-Sb system is known to have a significant solid phase miscibility gap from x = 0.2 to x = 0.8 at 600(DEGREES)C using a liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth technique. In this work, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OM-CVD) has been shown to be a suitable growth technique for growing GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) alloys lying in the region of solid immiscibility. Conditions for growth of GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) layers with x as high as 0.7 on GaAs substrates are described for temperatures between 580 and 650(DEGREES)C. Effects of substrate orientation on growth characteristics are noted, and comparisons of growth on (511) and (100) GaAs faces are made. The experimental results indicate that growth is being controlled by surface reaction kinetics. A simple model based on kinetic control is presented. InSb is one of the most extensively examined semiconductors because of the small energy bandgap which is suitable for 3-5 (mu)m wavelength detection, and it also has highest mobility of any III-V compounds. OM-CVD has been used to epitaxially grow high quality InSb for the first time in this work. InSb with excellent morphology was achieved on both (100) and (111)B InSb substrates. The measured electron mobility at 300(DEGREES)K of undoped InSb grown on (100) GaAs semi-insulating substrates was 40,000 cm('2)/V -sec at a carrier concentration of N(,D)-N(,A) = 1.2 x 10('15)cm(' -3) has been measured at 77(DEGREES)K.Experimental data suggests that a dislocation scattering mechanism represents a significant mobility limiting process. InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x), with x (TURN) 0.6, has the lowest bandgap (=0.1 eV at 300(DEGREES)K) of any of the III-V ternary compounds. This bandgap is suitable for detectors in the 8-12 (mu)m wavelength region where an atmosphere window exists. So far, InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) with 0.55 < x < 0.75 has not been achieved by LPE and molecular

  15. Alcohol vapor exposure differentially impacts mesocorticolimbic cytokine expression in a sex-, region-, and duration-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Baxter-Potter, Lydia N; Henricks, Angela M; Berger, Anthony L; Bieniasz, Kennedy V; Lugo, Janelle M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2017-03-27

    Alcohol exposure elicits the production of cytokines that regulate the host response to infection, immunity, inflammation, and trauma. Although increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines has been linked to symptoms of alcoholism, few studies have evaluated whether cytokine expression changes across the development of alcohol dependence, or whether these changes are region and/or sex specific. In the present study, we subjected adult male and female rats to different regimens of alcohol vapor exposure (acute, subchronic, or chronic) and measured relative mRNA expression for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in reward-related brain regions. Results indicated that acute alcohol exposure increased TNFα mRNA expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and ventral tegmental area (VTA), whereas IL-6 expression was increased in the VTA, NAc, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) only in males. After subchronic exposure (1week daily intermittent exposure, 14h on:10h off), TNFα expression remained elevated in the BLA, NAc, and VTA, while IL-6 expression was reduced in the male vmPFC. Chronic alcohol exposure (6week daily intermittent exposure, 14 h on: 10 h off) increased TNFα mRNA expression in the NAc and increased IL-6 mRNA in the vmPFC and NAc. Interestingly, chronic alcohol exposure also robustly increased CCL2 mRNA expression in the BLA and VTA in males but not females. Thus, alcohol vapor exposure elicits sex-, region-, and duration-specific cytokine alterations that may contribute to differences in the manifestation and progression of symptoms of alcohol dependence in male and female populations.

  16. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; ...

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  17. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found in the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.

  18. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  19. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  20. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowiresvia Chemical Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-03-13

    We utilized a vapor-liquid-solid growth technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide nanowires using chemical vapor transport with gold nanoparticles as the catalyst. Using identical growth parameters we were able to synthesize single crystal nanowires typically 40-100 nm diameter and more than 10-100 microns long. The products were characterized by means of XRD, SEM and HRTEM. All the wires were grown under the same growth conditions with growth rates inversely proportional to the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show that different transparent oxide nanowires can be grown simultaneously on a single substrate with potential application for multi-component gas sensors.

  1. A model for chemical and isotopic fractionation in the lunar regolith by impact vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Up until now there has been no complete model of chemical and isotopic fractionation effects which could occur in the lunar regolith as a result of hypervelocity impact vaporization. Previous work on the outlines for such a model are extended and show that impact vaporization could be an efficient mechanism for producing heavy isotope enrichments. Rough qualitative predictions based on the model show a general similarity to the observations on lunar samples.

  2. From chemical agent alarm to fugitive vapor detection: development of a rugged commercial spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, William E.; Simonds, Jo Ann; Milchling, Suzanne

    1996-06-01

    Intellitec, a division of Technical Products Group, Inc., is developing and testing a ruggedized commercial spectrometer for stable platform applications. This spectrometer design incorporates the key components utilized in the M21 remote sensing chemical agent alarm (RSCAAL). The spectrometer, which has a resolution of 4 wavenumbers (cm-1), can be used to remotely sense fugitive vapors with spectral features in the 8 - 12 micrometer region. Intellitec has initiated a parallel effort to complete the development of personal computer (PC) based vapor identification software. The spectrometer's detection capability was tested by placing small amounts of anhydrous hydrazine vapor in a cell positioned in front of a black body reference. The data collected from the spectrometer clearly showed characteristic spectral features of hydrazine vapor. A developmental set of hydrazine coefficients was generated for use with the vapor identification software utilized in the M21. The coefficients were programmed into the M21. The effectiveness of the coefficients in the M21 was then tested by attempting to detect hydrazine vapor contained in a cell positioned in front of a black body. The developmental coefficient set successfully detected the hydrazine vapor. Further testing is required to improve detection sensitivity and confirm the spectrometer's ability to detect these vapors in an open path environment.

  3. Storage of pork meat under modified atmospheres containing vapors from commercial alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Kapetanakou, A E; Agathaggelou, E I; Skandamis, P N

    2014-05-16

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of AB vapors on microbial, physicochemical, and sensory profile of pork meat stored in different MAP conditions. Pork pieces (10g) and cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths (2×2cm) were placed into compartmentalized Petri-dishes in two sections. Aliquots (1mL) of water (control), 30% v/v and 40% v/v ethanol, whisky, brandy, tsipouro, raki, and ouzo were added separately to the cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths. Each pork sample was placed in one compartment and cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths supplemented with different ABs were placed in a separate compartment of each Petri-dish. Samples were packaged in 40% CO2: 30% O2: 30% N2 and 80% O2: 20% CO2 and stored at 4 and 10°C. Total viable counts, Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and molds, and Enterobacteriaceae, were enumerated during storage. Changes in pH, color (L*, a*, b*), odor, taste, and overall appearance of pork meat were also evaluated along with changes in organic acid levels via HPLC. At 4°C, lactic acid bacteria and B. thermosphacta were the dominant organisms under 40% CO2: 30% N2: 30% O2 and 80% O2: 20% CO2, respectively, while at 10°C, lactic acid bacteria dominated in both MAP conditions. All applied ABs were effective (p<0.05) against lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, and B. thermosphacta. The inhibitory effect of ABs was also reflected through lower levels of glucose consumption or accumulation of lactic, acetic, succinic, and formic acid compared to controls. Moreover, packaged samples in 40% CO2: 30% O2: 30% N2 exhibited a significant increase (p<0.05) of acetic acid during storage at 4°C, but the concentrations of acetic acid in samples exposed to AB vapors were lower than those in controls. Both antimicrobial active MAPs extended the shelf-life of pork meat by ca. 2-fold, while samples exposed to alcoholic beverages (especially ouzo) under 80% O2: 20% CO2 resulted in better (p<0.05) sensory properties

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on sacrificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, William Edward

    GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) face several challenges if the technology is to continue to make a significant impact in general illumination, and on technology that has become known as solid state lighting (SSL). Two of the most pressing challenges for the continued penetration of SSL into traditional lighting applications are efficacy and total lumens from the device, and their related cost. The development of alternative substrate technologies is a promising avenue toward addressing both of these challenges, as both GaN-based device technology and the associated metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology are already relatively mature technologies with a well-understood cost base. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and silicon (Si) are among the most promising alternative substrates for GaN epitaxy. These substrates offer the ability to access both higher efficacy and lumen devices (ZnO) at a much reduced cost. This work focuses on the development of MOCVD growth processes to yield high quality GaN-based materials and devices on both ZnO and Si. ZnO is a promising substrate for growth of low defect-density GaN because of its similar lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient. The major hurdles for GaN growth on ZnO are the instability of the substrate in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is typical of nitride growth conditions, and the inter-diffusion of zinc and oxygen from the substrate into the GaN-based epitaxial layer. A process was developed for the MOCVD growth of GaN and InxGa 1-xN on ZnO that attempted to address these issues. The structural and optical properties of these films were studied using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the growth of wurtzite GaN on ZnO, and room-temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) showed near band-edge luminescence from the GaN and InxGa1-xN layers. However, high zinc and oxygen concentrations due to interdiffusion near the ZnO substrate remained an issue; therefore, the diffusion of zinc and oxygen

  5. A chemical kinetic model for chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, K.; Thomas, Shijo; Sobhan, C. B.

    2011-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are classified among the most promising novel materials due to their exceptional physical properties. Still, optimal fabrication of carbon nanotubes involves a number of challenges. Whatever be the fabrication method, a process optimization can be evolved only on the basis of a good theoretical model to predict the parametric influences on the final product. The work reported here investigates the dependence of the deposition parameters on the controllable parameters for carbon nanotube growth during Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), through a chemical kinetic model. The theoretical model consisted of the design equations and the energy balance equations, based on the reaction kinetics, for the plug flow and the batch reactor, which simulate the CVD system. The numerical simulation code was developed in-house in a g++ environment. The results predicted the growth conditions for CNT: the deposition temperature, pressure and number of atoms, which were found to be influenced substantially by the initial controllable parameters namely the temperature, volumetric flow rate of the carbon precursor, and the reaction time. An experimental study was also conducted on a CVD system developed in the laboratory, to benchmark the computational results. The experimental results were found to agree well with the theoretical predictions obtained from the model.

  6. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  7. Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Barrier Coatings and Encapsulated Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report silicon oxide coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology (PECVD) on 125 μm polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces for the purpose of the shelf lifetime extension of sealed polymer solar cells. After optimization of the processing parameters, we achieved a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ca. 10-3 g/m2/day with the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) less than 0.05 cc/m2/day, and succeeded in extending the shelf lifetime to about 400 h in encapsulated solar cells. And then the chemical structure of coatings related to the properties of encapsulated cell was investigated in detail.

  8. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  9. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  10. Radiation stable, hybrid, chemical vapor infiltration/preceramic polymer joining of silicon carbide components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Hesham E.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Jacobsen, George M.; Deck, Christian P.; Back, Christina A.

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports on a nuclear-grade joining material for bonding of silicon carbide-based components. The joint material is fabricated via a hybrid preceramic polymer, chemical vapor infiltration process. The joint is comprised entirely of β-SiC and results in excellent mechanical and permeability performance. The joint strength, composition, and microstructure have been characterized before and after irradiation to 4.5 dpa at 730 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The hybrid preceramic polymer-chemical vapor infiltrated joint exhibited complete retention of shear strength and no evidence of microstructural evolution or damage was detected following irradiation.

  11. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  12. Construction of vapor chambers used to expose mice to alcohol during the equivalent of all three trimesters of human development.

    PubMed

    Morton, Russell A; Diaz, Marvin R; Topper, Lauren A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-07-13

    Exposure to alcohol during development can result in a constellation of morphological and behavioral abnormalities that are collectively known as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs). At the most severe end of the spectrum is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), characterized by growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Studies with animal models, including rodents, have elucidated many molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of FASDs. Ethanol administration to pregnant rodents has been used to model human exposure during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Third trimester ethanol consumption in humans has been modeled using neonatal rodents. However, few rodent studies have characterized the effect of ethanol exposure during the equivalent to all three trimesters of human pregnancy, a pattern of exposure that is common in pregnant women. Here, we show how to build vapor chambers from readily obtainable materials that can each accommodate up to six standard mouse cages. We describe a vapor chamber paradigm that can be used to model exposure to ethanol, with minimal handling, during all three trimesters. Our studies demonstrate that pregnant dams developed significant metabolic tolerance to ethanol. However, neonatal mice did not develop metabolic tolerance and the number of fetuses, fetus weight, placenta weight, number of pups/litter, number of dead pups/litter, and pup weight were not significantly affected by ethanol exposure. An important advantage of this paradigm is its applicability to studies with genetically-modified mice. Additionally, this paradigm minimizes handling of animals, a major confound in fetal alcohol research.

  13. Construction of Vapor Chambers Used to Expose Mice to Alcohol During the Equivalent of all Three Trimesters of Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Diaz, Marvin R.; Topper, Lauren A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol during development can result in a constellation of morphological and behavioral abnormalities that are collectively known as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs). At the most severe end of the spectrum is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), characterized by growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Studies with animal models, including rodents, have elucidated many molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of FASDs. Ethanol administration to pregnant rodents has been used to model human exposure during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Third trimester ethanol consumption in humans has been modeled using neonatal rodents. However, few rodent studies have characterized the effect of ethanol exposure during the equivalent to all three trimesters of human pregnancy, a pattern of exposure that is common in pregnant women. Here, we show how to build vapor chambers from readily obtainable materials that can each accommodate up to six standard mouse cages. We describe a vapor chamber paradigm that can be used to model exposure to ethanol, with minimal handling, during all three trimesters. Our studies demonstrate that pregnant dams developed significant metabolic tolerance to ethanol. However, neonatal mice did not develop metabolic tolerance and the number of fetuses, fetus weight, placenta weight, number of pups/litter, number of dead pups/litter, and pup weight were not significantly affected by ethanol exposure. An important advantage of this paradigm is its applicability to studies with genetically-modified mice. Additionally, this paradigm minimizes handling of animals, a major confound in fetal alcohol research. PMID:25046568

  14. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings.

  15. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria for the alcohol + glycerol systems using UNIFAC and modified UNIFAC (Dortmund)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartanto, Dhoni; Mustain, Asalil; Nugroho, Febry Dwi

    2017-03-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibria for eight systems of alcohols + glycerol at 101.325 kPa have been predicted in this study using UNIFAC and Modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) group contribution methods. The investigated alcohols were methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol. In order to study the accuracy of both contribution methods, the predicted data obtained from both approaches were compared to the experimental data from the literature. The prediction accuracy using modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) give better results compared to the UNIFAC method for (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol) + glycerol but UNIFAC method show better accuracy for methanol + glycerol system. In addition, the influences of carbon chain length on the phase behaviours of alcohol + glycerol systems were also discussed as well.

  16. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  17. Ultrafine Microstructure Composites Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    deposition experiments reported in this paper, we performed numerous thermo- dynamic calculations using the SOLGASMIX - PV program [21]. In summary...Besmann, " SOLGASMIX - PV , A Computer Program to Calculate Equilibrium Relationships in Complex Chemical Systems," ORNL/TM-5775, Oak Ridge National

  18. Differentiation of complex vapor mixtures using versatile DNA-carbon nanotube chemical sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Kybert, Nicholas J; Lerner, Mitchell B; Yodh, Jeremy S; Preti, George; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2013-03-26

    Vapor sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (NTs) have shown great promise, with high sensitivity conferred by the reduced dimensionality and exceptional electronic properties of the NT. Critical challenges in the development of NT-based sensor arrays for chemical detection include the demonstration of reproducible fabrication methods and functionalization schemes that provide high chemical diversity to the resulting sensors. Here, we outline a scalable approach to fabricating arrays of vapor sensors consisting of NT field effect transistors functionalized with single-stranded DNA (DNA-NT). DNA-NT sensors were highly reproducible, with responses that could be described through equilibrium thermodynamics. Target analytes were detected even in large backgrounds of volatile interferents. DNA-NT sensors were able to discriminate between highly similar molecules, including structural isomers and enantiomers. The sensors were also able to detect subtle variations in complex vapors, including mixtures of structural isomers and mixtures of many volatile organic compounds characteristic of humans.

  19. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  20. Physico-chemical mechanism for the vapors sensitivity of photoluminescent InP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosposito, P.; De Angelis, R.; De Matteis, F.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Zhang, H.; Casalboni, M.

    2016-03-01

    InP/InGaP surface quantum dots are interesting materials for optical chemical sensors since they present an intense emission at room temperature, whose intensity changes rapidly and reversibly depending on the composition of the environmental atmosphere. We present here their emission properties by time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy investigation and we discuss the physico-chemical mechanism behind their sensitivity to the surrounding atmosphere. Photoluminescence transients in inert atmosphere (N2) and in solvent vapours of methanol, clorophorm, acetone and water were measured. The presence of vapors of clorophorm, acetone and water showed a very weak effect on the transient times, while an increase of up to 15% of the decay time was observed for methanol vapour exposure. On the basis of the vapor molecule nature (polarity, proticity, steric hindrance, etc.) and of the interaction of the vapor molecules with the quantum dots surface a sensing mechanism involving quantum dots non-radiative surface states is proposed.

  1. Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  2. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  3. Chemical hazards present in liquids and vapors of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, Christoph; Paschke, Meike; Kruschinski, Svetlana; Henkler, Frank; Hahn, Jürgen; Luch, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Electronic (e-)cigarettes have emerged in recent years as putative alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. These products do not contain typical carcinogens that are present in tobacco smoke, due to the lack of combustion. However, besides nicotine, hazards can also arise from other constituents of liquids, such as solvents, flavors, additives and contaminants. In this study, we have analyzed 28 liquids of seven manufacturers purchased in Germany. We confirm the presence of a wide range of flavors to enhance palatability. Although glycerol and propylene glycol were detected in all samples, these solvents had been replaced by ethylene glycol as dominant compound in five products. Ethylene glycol is associated with markedly enhanced toxicological hazards when compared to conventionally used glycerol and propylene glycol. Additional additives, such as coumarin and acetamide, that raise concerns for human health were detected in certain samples. Ten out of 28 products had been declared "free-of-nicotine" by the manufacturer. Among these ten, seven liquids were identified containing nicotine in the range of 0.1-15 µg/ml. This suggests that "carry over" of ingredients may occur during the production of cartridges. We have further analyzed the formation of carbonylic compounds in one widely distributed nicotine-free brand. Significant amounts of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde were only found at 150 °C by headspace GC-MS analysis. In addition, an enhanced formation of aldehydes was found in defined puff fractions, using an adopted machine smoking protocol. However, this effect was delayed and only observed during the last third of the smoking procedure. In the emissions of these fractions, which represent up to 40 % of total vapor volume, similar levels of formaldehyde were detected when compared to conventional tobacco cigarettes. By contrast, carbonylic compounds were hardly detectable in earlier collected fractions. Our data demonstrate the

  4. Patterning and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown in a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Chamber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    determined optically through scanning electron microscope images. carbon nanotubes, field emission, microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition U U U...PECVD) 13 2.3 Carbon Nanotube Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4 Applications of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.4.1...Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 TEM Transmission Electron Microscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 SWCNT Single-walled Carbon

  5. Volatile Barium Beta-Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis, Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-31

    Volatile Barium 13- Diketonate Polyether Adducts.... Synthesis , Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition by Robin A. Gardiner...has been approved for public release and sale: its distribution is unlimited. Volatile, Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis ...NO. NO. INO. ACCESSION NO. Arlington, VA 22217 II 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) Volatile Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts

  6. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  7. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  8. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  9. Moire-Fringe Images of Twin Boundaries in Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-10

    Features in lattice image micrographs of chemical vapor deposited diamond can be interpreted as Moire fringes that occur when viewing twin boundaries that...are inclined to the electron beam. The periodicities in images of inclined twin boundaries with Sigma=3 and Sigma=9 misorientations have been modeled by computer graphic simulation.

  10. Circular Graphene Platelets with Grain Size and Orientation Gradients Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xing; Fei, Zeyuan; Ma, Teng; Chen, Long; Chen, Mao-Lin; Xu, Chuan; Qian, Xitang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2017-02-27

    Monolayer circular graphene platelets with a grain structure gradient in the radial direction are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on immiscible W-Cu substrates. Because of the different interactions and growth behaviors of graphene on Cu and tungsten carbide, such substrates cause the formation of grain size and orientation gradients through the competition between Cu and tungsten carbide in graphene growth.

  11. Chemical vapor detection and mapping with a multispectral forward-looking infrared (FLIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althouse, Mark L.; Chang, Chein-I.

    1995-02-01

    Detection of chemical vapors with a remote sensor is a requirement for both military defense and civilian pollution control. The FLIR is a natural instrument from which to build a chemical sensor since most chemical vapors of interest are spectrally active within its operating wavelength range, it is widely distributed in the battlefield, and it is becoming a standard surveillance tool in police departments. Additionally, the output image provides a 2D concentration map of the cloud which is easily interpreted by a lightly trained operator. A system has been designed to provide the spectral sensitivity in a dedicated instrument or to place a chemical detection capability as an adjunct function in a military thermal imager. In the latter case an additional detector array which is spectrally filtered at the focal plane is added to the imager. Real-time autonomous detection and alarm is a military requirement and is desired for commercial use. A detection system model based on a Gaussian vapor concentration distribution has been the basis for detection algorithms. Image processing and analysis methods have been based upon information theory. These techniques extract the cloud image from a clutter scene and perform a limited vapor classification. These methods are suited to hyperspectral imagery.

  12. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.L.; Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.; Nicolet, M.; Madar, R.; Bernard, C.

    1999-06-29

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF[sub 6], either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W-Si-N or W-B-N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications. 10 figs.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn; Smith, Paul M.; Custer, Jonathan S.; Jones, Ronald V.; Nicolet, Marc-A.; Madar, Roland; Bernard, Claude

    1999-01-01

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

  15. Ultrafine Microstructure Composites Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    have performed numerous thermodynamic calculations for the BN + AIN and HfB2 + SiC systems. The calculations were performed usi..g the SOLGASMIX - PV ...CH3 SiCl 3 (methyltrichlorosilane or MTS1 again using the SOLGASMIX - PV program. A quantity of hydrogen was added equal to ten times the sum of the...Electro- chemical Society, Inc., Pennington, NJ, 1979, p.1. 7. T. M. Besmann, " SOLGASMIX - PV , A Computer Program to Calcu- late Equilibrium

  16. Chemical vapor detection using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjoo J; Park, Kwan Kyu; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, O; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2011-12-15

    Distributed sensing of gas-phase chemicals using highly sensitive and inexpensive sensors is of great interest for many defense and consumer applications. In this paper we present ppb-level detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a common simulant for sarin gas, with a ppt-level resolution using an improved capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) as a resonant chemical sensor. The improved CMUT operates at a higher resonant frequency of 47.7 MHz and offers an improved mass sensitivity of 48.8 zg/Hz/μm(2) by a factor of 2.7 compared to the previous CMUT sensors developed. A low-noise oscillator using the CMUT resonant sensor as the frequency-selective device was developed for real-time sensing, which exhibits an Allan deviation of 1.65 Hz (3σ) in the presence of a gas flow; this translates into a mass resolution of 80.5 zg/μm(2). The CMUT resonant sensor is functionalized with a 50-nm thick DKAP polymer developed at Sandia National Laboratory for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. To demonstrate ppb-level detection of the improved chemical sensor system, the sensor performance was tested at a certified lab (MIT Lincoln Laboratory), which is equipped with an experimental chemical setup that reliably and accurately delivers a wide range of low concentrations down to 10 ppb. We report a high volume sensitivity of 34.5 ± 0.79 pptv/Hz to DMMP and a good selectivity of the polymer to DMMP with respect to dodecane and 1-octanol.

  17. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, David Christopher

    1998-12-01

    The continued drive to decrease the size and increase the speed of micro-electronic Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices is hampered by some of the properties of the SiOsb2 gate dielectric. This research has focused on the CVD of TiOsb2 thin films to replace SiOsb2 as the gate dielectric in MOS capacitors and transistors. The relationship of CVD parameters and post-deposition anneal treatments to the physical and electrical properties of thin films of TiOsb2 has been studied. Structural and electrical characterization of TiOsb2 films grown from the CVD precursors tetraisopropoxotitanium (IV) (TTIP) and TTIP plus Hsb2O is described in Chapter 3. Both types of deposition produced stoichiometric TiOsb2 films comprised of polycrystalline anatase, but the interface properties were dramatically degraded when water vapor was added. Films grown with TTIP in the presence of Hsb2O contained greater than 50% more hydrogen than films grown using only TTIP and the hydrogen content of films deposited in both wet and dry TTIP environments decreased sharply with a post deposition Osb2 anneal. A significant thickness variation of the dielectric constant was observed which could be explained by an interfacial oxide and the finite accumulation thickness. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 38, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 4 discusses the low temperature CVD of crystalline TiOsb2 thin films deposited using the precursor tetranitratotitanium (IV), TNT, which produces crystalline TiOsb2 films of the anatase phase in UHV-CVD at temperatures as low as 184sp°C. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 17, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 5 describes the results of a comparison of physical and electrical properties between TiOsb2 films grown via LPCVD using

  19. Ultrafine Microstructure Composites Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    phase ceramic composites by CVD is that mechanical as well as chemical, electrical , optical, and thermal properties of the composites 2 can be favorably...while it is also an electrical insulator. Also, in Table 2-1, other important properties of BN are compared with those of AIN and other materials... Electrical Resistivity >10" >1016 >10" >10" >101 - (ncm) Density theo: 2.27 3.26 3.97 2.21 obs: 1.9 1.4 3.1 3.15 92% (g/cm’) to to to to 2.0 2.2 3.2

  20. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  1. SiC nanofibers grown by high power microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Shin-ichi; Baek, Yang-Gyu; Ikuno, Takashi; Kohara, Hidekazu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro; Oura, Kenjiro; Hirao, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanofibers have been synthesized on Si substrates covered by Ni thin films using high power microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with electron energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that the resultant fibrous nanostructures were assigned to β-SiC with high crystallinity. The formation of SiC nanofibers can be explained by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism in which precipitation of SiC occurs from the supersaturated Ni nanoparticle containing Si and C.

  2. Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.

    1998-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 96 and 500 h at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic mechanisms are discussed. Passive oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants that are also found in combustion environments, oxygen and water vapor.

  3. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  4. Ultra-sensitive chemical vapor detection using micro-cavity photothermal spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juejun

    2010-10-11

    In this paper, I systematically investigated Micro-Cavity PhotoThermal Spectroscopy (MC-PTS), a novel technique for ultra-sensitive detection of chemical molecular species. I first derive the photothermal enhancement factor and noise characteristics of the technique using a generic theoretical model, followed by numerical analysis of a design example using chalcogenide glass micro-disk cavities. Guidelines for sensor material selection and device design are formulated based on the theoretical insight. The numerical analysis shows that this technique features a record photothermal enhancement factor of 10(4) with respect to conventional cavity-enhanced (multi-pass) infrared absorption spectroscopy, and is capable of detecting non-preconcentrated chemical vapor molecules down to the ppt level with a moderate cavity quality factor of 10(5) and a pump laser power of 0.1 W. Such performance qualifies this technique as one of the most sensitive methods for chemical vapor spectroscopic analysis.

  5. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  6. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; Labouriau, Andrea

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate in the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.

  7. Thermal and chemical stabilization of ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol (EVA-OH) terpolymers under nitroplasticizer environments

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Dali; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; ...

    2014-09-17

    Here, we compare the aging behaviors of cross-linked ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymers, also referred to as EVA-OH, when they are either immersed in nitroplasticizer (NP) liquid or exposed to NP vapor at different temperatures. And while thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry are used to probe the thermal stability of aged NP and polymers, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatography, ultra-violet/vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance are used to probe their structural changes over the aging process. Our study confirms that NP degrades through C[BOND]N cleavage, and releases HONO molecules at a slightly elevated temperature (<75°C). As these molecules accumulate inmore » the vapor phase, they react among themselves to create an acidic environment. Therefore, these chemical constituents in the NP vapor significantly accelerate the hydrolysis of EVA-OH polymer. When the hydrolysis occurs in both vinyl acetate and urethane groups and the scission at the cross-linker progresses, EVA-OH becomes vulnerable to further degradation in the NP vapor environment. Finally, through the comprehensive characterization, the possible degradation mechanisms of the terpolymers are proposed.« less

  8. Removal of Water Vapor in a Mist Singlet Oxygen Generator for Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Shigeki; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2004-02-01

    The mist singlet oxygen generator (Mist-SOG) for a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) has been developed in order to increase basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) utilization. It was clarified that the Mist-SOG generated much more water vapor than conventional SOGs because the heat capacity of BHP is small. The water vapor deactivates the excited iodine and depresses the laser power. Therefore, a jet-cold trap was developed in order to remove the water vapor while maintaining a minimum deactivation of singlet oxygen. In this method, a nozzle was used to spray chilled H2O2 at 238 K as a thin layer directly to the gas flow to achieve a large specific surface area for water vapor. As a result, the water vapor mole fraction was reduced to 7% from 18% with the BHP utilization of 21% at the Cl2 consumption rate of 3.5 mmol/s (Cl2 input flow rate of 8.0 mmol/s) for 65-μm-diameter BHP droplets.

  9. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  10. Combinatorial Characterization of TiO2 Chemical Vapor Deposition Utilizing Titanium Isopropoxide.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Michael; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-07-13

    The combinatorial characterization of the growth kinetics in chemical vapor deposition processes is challenging because precise information about the local precursor flow is usually difficult to access. In consequence, combinatorial chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized more to study functional properties of thin films as a function of chemical composition, growth rate or crystallinity than to study the growth process itself. We present an experimental procedure which allows the combinatorial study of precursor surface kinetics during the film growth using high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. As consequence of the high vacuum environment, the precursor transport takes place in the molecular flow regime, which allows predicting and modifying precursor impinging rates on the substrate with comparatively little experimental effort. In this contribution, we study the surface kinetics of titanium dioxide formation using titanium tetraisopropoxide as precursor molecule over a large parameter range. We discuss precursor flux and temperature dependent morphology, crystallinity, growth rates, and precursor deposition efficiency. We conclude that the surface reaction of the adsorbed precursor molecules comprises a higher order reaction component with respect to precursor surface coverage.

  11. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V.; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of β-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO2 laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO3 and SrTiO3 can be formed from corresponding mixtures of β-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  12. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors.

    PubMed

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of beta-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO(2) laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO(3) and SrTiO(3) can be formed from corresponding mixtures of beta-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  13. Electrical Performance of Monolayer MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    REPORT Electrical performance of monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...OF: Molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) field effect transistors (FET) were fabricated on atomically smooth large-area single layers grown by chemical vapor...Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Electrical performance of monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors prepared by chemical

  14. Detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions by nonlinear optimal estimation: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Gittins, Christopher M

    2009-08-10

    This paper addresses detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions in a nonscattering atmosphere by processing of remotely-sensed long-wavelength infrared spectra. The analysis approach integrates a parameterized signal model based on the radiative transfer equation with a statistical model for the infrared background. The maximum likelihood model parameter values are defined as those that maximize a Bayesian posterior probability and are estimated using a Gauss-Newton algorithm. For algorithm performance evaluation we simulate observation of fugitive emissions by augmenting plume-free measured spectra with synthetic plume signatures. As plumes become optically thick, the Gauss-Newton algorithm yields significantly more accurate estimates of chemical vapor column density and significantly more favorable plume detection statistics than clutter-matched-filter-based and adaptive-subspace-detector-based plume characterization and detection.

  15. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  16. Growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamasaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist-CVD) were experimentally investigated from the viewpoint of mist behaviors and chemical reactions. The proper growth model, either vaporization or the Leidenfrost model, was studied by supplying two kinds of mists with different kinds of sources, such as H2 16O and H2 18O for ZnO growth and ZnCl2 and thiourea for ZnS growth. Moreover, the origin of the oxygen atoms of ZnO was investigated using a quantitative analysis. The role of chloro complex of zinc in the growth of ZnS from aqueous solutions was also examined by systematic studies.

  17. Formation of catalyst nanoparticles and nucleation of carbon nanotubes in chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, C; Aguiar, M R; Moshkalev, S A

    2009-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have been grown using catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition method in a horizontal tubular quartz furnace at atmospheric pressure. The mechanisms of nanotubes/nanofibers nucleation and growth are analyzed. A new model explaining the nanotube nucleation as a specific instability occurring on the catalyst particle surface supersaturated with carbon is presented. It is also shown that an axially symmetric instability, giving rise to the nanotube nucleation, is developed when certain critical conditions such as temperature, supersaturation and catalyst volume are achieved. For smaller temperatures, another mechanism of carbon segregation from supersaturated catalyst particles has been observed. In this case, flat rather than tubular graphitic layers are formed. These findings are important for better understanding and control of the synthesis of different carbon nanoforms using chemical vapor deposition.

  18. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition of niobium coating on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaomu; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei; Liu, Jinling; Wang, Yiguang

    2009-07-01

    Nb coatings were prepared on a SiC substrate by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using NbCl 5. Thermodynamic calculations were performed to study the effect of temperature and partial pressure of NbCl 5 on the final products. The as-deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Nb coatings are oriented and grow in the preferred (2 0 0) plane and (2 1 1) plane, at 1173 K and 1223-1423 K, respectively. At 1123-1273 K, the deposition is controlled by the surface kinetic processes. The activation energy is found to be 133 kJ/mol. At 1273-1373 K, the deposition is controlled by the mass transport processes. The activation energy is found to be 46 kJ/mol. The growth mechanism of the chemical vapor deposited Nb is also discussed based on the morphologies and the deposition rates.

  19. Chemically enhanced mixed region vapor stripping of TCE-contaminated saturated peat and silty clay soils

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Cameron, P.A.; Lucero, A.J.; Koran, L.J. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct further testing of MRVS, chemically enhanced with calcium oxide conditioning, on field- contaminated soils collected from beneath the NASA Michoud Rinsewater Impoundment. In this study, residual soil VOC levels as a function of vapor stripping time were measured to quantify VOC removal rates. Physical and chemical soil parameters expected to affect MRVS efficiency were measures. The effects of varying the calcium oxide loadings as well as varying the vapor stripping flow rates on VOC removal were also evaluated. The results of this study will be used to determine whether acceptable removals can be achieved within reasonable treatment times, remediation costs being directly proportional to the latter. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental results of this study, as well as to address issues that were raised after completion of the previous Michoud treatability work.

  20. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  1. Investigations of chemical vapor deposition of GaN using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.; Stephenson, G. B.; Eastman, J. A.; Munkholm, A.; Auciello, O.; Murty, M. V. R.; Fini, P.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2000-05-25

    The authors apply synchrotron x-ray analysis techniques to probe the surface structure of GaN films during synthesis by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Their approach is to observe the evolution of surface structure and morphology in real time using grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS). This technique combines the ability of x-rays to penetrate the chemical vapor deposition environment for in situ measurements, with the sensitivity of GIXS to atomic scale structure. In this paper they present examples from some of their studies of growth modes and surface evolution as a function of process conditions that illustrate the capabilities of synchrotron x-ray analysis during MOCVD growth. They focus on studies of the homoepitaxial growth mode, island coarsening dynamics, and effects of impurities.

  2. Electro-optic polymer waveguide fabricated using electric-field-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuura, Satoshi; Sotoyama, Wataru; Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    1992-04-01

    The paper describes the fabrication of an electrooptic (EO) polymer channel waveguide using a new technique, electric-field-assisted chemical vapor deposition. A polymer film is deposited from epoxy and nonlinear optical (NLO) aliphatic amine, using chemical vapor deposition under an electric field applied by slit electrodes on a thermally oxidized Si wafer at room temperature. A clear propagating He-Ne laser beam is observed along the electrode gap. The propagated beam's near field pattern is bright for the TE mode, but very weak for the TM mode. This indicates the NLO side groups' in-plane alignment and the fabrication of a channel waveguide. The EO coefficient of this waveguide, measured in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, is r(11) of about 0.1 pm/V. The polymer channel waveguide, which is poled at room temperature after film deposition, shows no EO response. This means NLO molecules are actually aligned during polymerizing, not after.

  3. Calibrated In Situ Measurement of UT/LS Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A.; Gao, R.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable disagreement among in situ water vapor measurements by different instruments at the low part per million (ppm) mixing ratios found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). These discrepancies contribute to uncertainty in our understanding of the microphysics related to cirrus cloud particle nucleation and growth and affect our ability to determine the effect of climate changes on the radiatively important feedback from UT/LS water vapor. To address the discrepancies observed in measured UT/LS water vapor, a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor at low mixing ratios. The instrument utilizes a radioactive α particle source to ionize a flow of sample air drawn into the instrument. A cascade of ion-molecule reactions results in the production of protonated water ions proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio that are then detected by the mass spectrometer. The multi-step nature of the ionization mechanism results in a non-linear sensitivity to water vapor, necessitating calibration across the full range of values to be measured. To accomplish this calibration, we have developed a novel calibration scheme using catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to produce well-defined water vapor mixing ratios that can be introduced into the instrument inlet during flight. The CIMS instrument was deployed for the first time aboard the NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April 2011. The sensitivity of the instrument to water vapor was calibrated every ~45 minutes in flight from < 1 to 150 ppm. Analysis of in-flight data demonstrates a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz/ppm at 4.5 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ) > 50 for a 1 second measurement. The instrument and its calibration system performed successfully in

  4. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  5. Bandgap tuning of mixed organic cation utilizing chemical vapor deposition process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Teridi, Mohd Asri Mat; Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bandgap tuning of a mixed organic cation perovskite is demonstrated via chemical vapor deposition process. The optical and electrical properties of the mixed organic cation perovskite can be manipulated by varying the growth time. A slight shift of the absorption band to shorter wavelengths is demonstrated with increasing growth time, which results in the increment of the current density. Hence, based on the optimized growth time, our device exhibits an efficiency of 15.86% with negligible current hysteresis. PMID:27874026

  6. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  7. Monolayer Graphene Growth on Ni(111) by Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Batzill, M.; Sutter, P.; Addou, R.; Dahal, A.

    2012-01-09

    In contrast to the commonly employed high temperature chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the bulk, we demonstrate that below 600 C graphene can be grown in a self-limiting monolayer growth process. Optimum growth is achieved at {approx}550 C. Above this temperature, carbon diffusion into the bulk is limiting the surface growth rate, while at temperatures below {approx}500 C a competing surface carbide phase impedes graphene formation.

  8. Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Linked Carbon Monolayers with Acetylenic Scaffoldings on Silver Foil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Gao, Xin; Zhou, Jingyuan; Xu, Hua; Li, Zhenzhu; Zhang, Shuqing; Xie, Ziqian; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2017-03-02

    Graphdiyne analogs, linked carbon monolayers with acetylenic scaffoldings, are fabricated by adopting low-temperature chemical vapor deposition which provides a route for the synthesis of two-dimensional carbon materials via molecular building blocks. The electrical conductivity of the as-grown films can reach up to 6.72 S cm(-1) . Moreover, the films show potential as promising substrates for fluorescence suppressing and Raman advancement.

  9. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V.

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  10. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  11. Fabrication of lightweight ceramic mirrors by means of a chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process to fabricate lightweigth ceramic mirrors, and in particular, silicon/silicon carbide mirrors, involves three chemical vapor deposition steps: one to produce the mirror faceplate, the second to form the lightweight backstructure which is deposited integral to the faceplate, and the third and final step which results in the deposition of a layer of optical grade material, for example, silicon, onto the front surface of the faceplate. The mirror figure and finish are fabricated into this latter material.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Material on a Curvilinear Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvyrkin, G. N.; Zhuravskii, A. V.; Savel‧eva, I. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a mathematical model has been constructed that describes the process of chemical vapor deposition of material on a curvilinear plate. On the boundary where the deposition occurs, account is taken of convective heat transfer, heat transfer by radiation, and heat and mass transfer during the attachment of the substance to the surface. A numerical algorithm is proposed for finding the temperature profile at any instant of time; results and an analysis of numerical calculation are given for different materials.

  13. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  14. Characterization of single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors for neutron spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gagnon-Moisan, F; Zimbal, A; Nolte, R; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H

    2012-10-01

    Detectors made from artificial chemical vapor deposition single crystal diamond have shown great potential for fast neutron spectrometry. In this paper, we present the results of measurements made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt accelerator using neutron fields in the energy range from 7 MeV to 16 MeV. This study presents the first results of the characterization of the detector in this energy range.

  15. Negative Electron Affinity Effect on the Surface of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Polycrystalline Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Strong negative electron affinity effects have been observed on the surface of as-grown chemical vapor deposited diamond using Secondary Electron Emission. The test samples were randomly oriented and the surface was terminated with hydrogen. The effect appears as an intensive peak in the low energy part of the spectrum of the electron energy distribution and may be described in the model of effective negative electron affinity.

  16. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Investigation of the Hazards Posed by Chemical Vapors Released in Marine Operations - Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    at San Antonio, Texas . 307 U.S. COAST GUARDf SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS , USA UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, HOUSTON... TEXAS , USA SUBJECT CONSENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN AN INVESTIGATION OF "HAZARDS POSED BY CHEMICAL VAPORS RELEASED IN MARINE OPERATIONS: TASK V...write to the following persons: Dr. Stanley M. Pier Mr. William J. Astleford 5326 Dora Street Southwest Research Institute Houston, Texas , 77005, USA

  18. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Large-Sized Hexagonal WSe₂ Crystals on Dielectric Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yanpeng; Tang, Wei; Nai, Chang Tai; Li, Linjun; Zheng, Jian; Gao, Libo; Zheng, Yi; Shin, Hyun Suk; Jeong, Hu Young; Loh, Kian Ping

    2015-11-01

    High-quality large-sized hexagoal WSe2 crystals can be grown on dielectric substrates using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition in the presence of hydrogen gas. These hexagonal crystals (lateral width >160 um) have a carrier mobility of 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a photoresponsivity of ≈1100 mA W(-1), which is comparable to that of exfoliated flakes.

  19. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of high T(sub c) superconducting films in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Moises; Sarma, Bimal K.

    1994-01-01

    Since the discovery of the YBaCuO bulk materials in 1987, Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) has been proposed for preparing HTSC high T(sub c) films. This technique is now capable of producing high-T(sub c) superconducting thin films comparable in quality to those prepared by any other methods. The MOCVD technique has demonstrated its superior advantage in making large area high quality HTSC thin films and will play a major role in the advance of device applications of HTSC thin films. The organometallic precursors used in the MOCVD preparation of HTSC oxide thin films are most frequently metal beta-diketonates. High T(sub c) superconductors are multi-component oxides which require more than one component source, with each source, containing one kind of precursor. Because the volatility and stability of the precursors are strongly dependent on temperature, system pressure, and carrier gas flow rate, it has been difficult to control the gas phase composition, and hence film stoichiometry. In order circumvent these problems we have built and tested a single source MOCVD reactor in which a specially designed vaporizer was employed. This vaporizer can be used to volatilize a stoichiometric mixture of diketonates of yttrium, barium and copper to produce a mixed vapor in a 1:2:3 ratio respectively of the organometellics. This is accomplished even though the three compounds have significantly different volatilities. We have developed a model which provides insight into the process of vaporizing mixed precursors to produce high quality thin films of Y1Ba2Cu3O7. It shows that under steady state conditions the mixed organometallic vapor must have a stoichiometric ratio of the individual organometallics identical to that in the solid mixture.

  1. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  2. Removal characteristics of plasma chemical vaporization machining with a pipe electrode for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2010-08-10

    Plasma chemical vaporization machining (CVM) is a high-precision chemical shaping method using rf plasma generated in the proximity of an electrode in an atmospheric environment. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the removal characteristics of plasma CVM using a pipe electrode. Polished fused silica plates were processed by plasma CVM, polishing, and precision grinding under various conditions. The removal rate of plasma CVM was about 4 to 1100 times faster than that of polishing, and the maximum removal rate was almost equal to that of precision grinding. The roughness of the resultant surfaces was almost the same as that of the polished surfaces.

  3. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  4. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  5. Low power, lightweight vapor sensing using arrays of conducting polymer composite chemically-sensitive resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Lewis, N. S.

    2001-01-01

    Arrays of broadly responsive vapor detectors can be used to detect, identify, and quantify vapors and vapor mixtures. One implementation of this strategy involves the use of arrays of chemically-sensitive resistors made from conducting polymer composites. Sorption of an analyte into the polymer composite detector leads to swelling of the film material. The swelling is in turn transduced into a change in electrical resistance because the detector films consist of polymers filled with conducting particles such as carbon black. The differential sorption, and thus differential swelling, of an analyte into each polymer composite in the array produces a unique pattern for each different analyte of interest, Pattern recognition algorithms are then used to analyze the multivariate data arising from the responses of such a detector array. Chiral detector films can provide differential detection of the presence of certain chiral organic vapor analytes. Aspects of the spaceflight qualification and deployment of such a detector array, along with its performance for certain analytes of interest in manned life support applications, are reviewed and summarized in this article.

  6. Low power, lightweight vapor sensing using arrays of conducting polymer composite chemically-sensitive resistors.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M A; Lewis, N S

    2001-01-01

    Arrays of broadly responsive vapor detectors can be used to detect, identify, and quantify vapors and vapor mixtures. One implementation of this strategy involves the use of arrays of chemically-sensitive resistors made from conducting polymer composites. Sorption of an analyte into the polymer composite detector leads to swelling of the film material. The swelling is in turn transduced into a change in electrical resistance because the detector films consist of polymers filled with conducting particles such as carbon black. The differential sorption, and thus differential swelling, of an analyte into each polymer composite in the array produces a unique pattern for each different analyte of interest, Pattern recognition algorithms are then used to analyze the multivariate data arising from the responses of such a detector array. Chiral detector films can provide differential detection of the presence of certain chiral organic vapor analytes. Aspects of the spaceflight qualification and deployment of such a detector array, along with its performance for certain analytes of interest in manned life support applications, are reviewed and summarized in this article.

  7. The Effect of Intermittent Alcohol Vapor or Pulsatile Heroin on Somatic and Negative Affective Indices during Spontaneous Withdrawal in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Angela M.; Reis, Daniel J.; Powell, Alexa S.; Neira, Louis J.; Nealey, Kathryn A.; Ziegler, Cole E.; Kloss, Nina; Bilimoria, Jessica L.; Smith, Chelsea E.; Walker, Brendan M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Once dependent on alcohol or opioids, negative affect may accompany withdrawal. Dependent individuals are hypothesized to “self-medicate” in order to cope with withdrawal, which promotes escalated drug or alcohol use. Objectives The current study aimed to develop a reliable animal model to assess symptoms that occur during spontaneous alcohol and opioid withdrawal. Methods Dependence was induced using intermittent alcohol exposure or pulsatile heroin delivery and assessed for the presence of withdrawal symptoms during acute withdrawal by measuring somatic signs, behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and air-puff induced 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Additional animals subjected to eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure were evaluated for altered somatic signs, operant alcohol self-administration and 22-kHz USV production, as well as performance in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Results During spontaneous withdrawal from pulsatile heroin or intermittent alcohol vapor, animals displayed increased somatic withdrawal signs, FST immobility and 22-kHz USV production, but did not show any behavioral change in the EPM unless the duration of exposure was extended to four weeks. Following eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure, animals displayed somatic withdrawal signs, escalated alcohol self-administration and increased 22-kHz USVs. Conclusions These paradigms provide consistent methods to evaluate the behavioral ramifications, and neurobiological substrates, of alcohol and opioid dependence during spontaneous withdrawal. As immobility in the FST and percent open-arm time in the EPM were dissociable, with 22-kHz USVs paralleling immobility in the FST, assessment of air-puff induced 22-kHz USVs could provide an ethologically-valid alternative to the FST. PMID:22461104

  8. Detection of ethanol in alcoholic beverages or vapor phase using fluorescent molecules embedded in a nanofibrous polymer.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Masaaki; Mori, Taizo; Okamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Kumagai, Ken; Shiratori, Seimei; Yamamura, Masaki; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-03-25

    An alcohol sensor was developed using the solid-state fluorescence emission of terphenyl-ol (TPhOH) derivatives. Admixtures of TPhOH and sodium carbonate exhibited bright sky-blue fluorescence in the solid state upon addition of small quantities of ethanol. A series of terphenol derivatives was synthesized, and the effects of solvent polarities and the structures of these π-conjugated systems on their fluorescence were systematically investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, π-extended TPhOHs and TPhOHs containing electron-withdrawing groups exhibited significant solvatochromism, and fluorescence colors varied from blue to red. Detection of ethanol contents in alcohol beverages (detection limit ∼ 5 v/v %) was demonstrated using different TPhOHs revealing the effect of molecular structure on sensing properties. Ethanol contents in alcoholic beverages could be estimated from the intensity of the fluorescence elicited from the TPhOHs. Moreover, when terphenol and Na2CO3 were combined with a water-absorbent polymer, ethanol could be detected at lower concentrations. Detection of ethanol vapor (8 v/v % in air) was also accomplished using a nanofibrous polymer scaffold as the immobilized sensing film.

  9. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for Space Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Dickman, John E.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Kelly, Christopher V.; AquinoGonzalez, Angel R.; Rockett, Angus A.

    2006-01-01

    Copper indium disulfide thin films were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using single source precursors. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties in order to optimize device-quality material. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hot-wall reactor at 395 C yielded best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier, smoother, denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands (1.45, 1.43, 1.37, and 1.32 eV) and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was 1.03 percent.

  10. Influence of Geometry on a High Surface Area-Solid Phase Microextraction Sampler for Chemical Vapor Collection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-04

    Title of Thesis: Influence of Geometry on a High Surface Area-Solid Phase Microextraction Sampler for Chemical Vapor Collection Name of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Influence of Geometry on a High Surface Area-Solid Phase Microextraction Sampler for Chemical Vapor Collection 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The High Surface Area Solid Phase Microextraction (HSA-SPME) device is an internally heated sampling device designed for

  11. MICHIGAN SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION REMEDIATION (MISER) MODEL: A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO MODEL SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND BIOVENTING OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN UNSATURATED GEOLOGICAL MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing (BV) are proven strategies for remediation of unsaturated zone soils. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can be used to integrate and quantify the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in field sc...

  12. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  14. Direct measurement of chemical composition of SOx in impact vapor using a laser gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Sohsuke; Kadono, Toshihiko; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hamura, Taiga; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Sugita, Seiji; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Watari, Takeshi; Matsui, Takafumi

    2011-06-01

    The SO3/SO2 ratio of the impact vapor cloud is a key parameter for understanding the environmental perturbation caused by the impact-induced SOx and the killing mechanism of. the mass extinction at the K-Pg boundary. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments using a high-speed laser gun (GEKKO XII-HIPER, ILE, Osaka University) and measured the chemical compositions of the SOx released from CaSO4. The experimental result indicates that SOx are dominated by SO3. It implies that the SOx generated by the K-Pg impact would have been also dominated by SO3, because the SO3/SO2 ratio of natural planetary scale impact vapor clouds would have been larger than that of the experimental result of this study.

  15. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  16. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  17. Growth of high mobility InSb by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. L.; Green, L.; Heremans, J.

    1994-02-01

    Thin films of InSb have been grown on insulating GaAs substrates using the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technique with trimethyl indium and trimethyl antimony as reactants. We find that the mobilities obtained are usually low unless indium is predeposited onto the substrate. This indium predeposition technique greatly improves the yield of InSb films with mobilities of ~50000 crn2V-1S-1 at room temperature and a typical thickness of 2 microns. With this predeposition technique, the electron mobilities of these films become relatively independent of the vapor stroichiometry during growth and of the growth temperature. The electron mobilities are also very uniform across a wafer. These properties are obtained even when the film growth rate exceeds 2 μm/h.

  18. Remote catalyzation for growth of boron nitride nanotubes by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangjie; Li, Taotao; Ling, Lin; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Yancui; Lu, Huifen; Yao, Yagang

    2016-05-01

    Direct deposition of high purity and quality boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) on Si substrate were obtained using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We find Fe-Mg-O species may act as catalysts for growing BNNTs. This synthesis process conforms to vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. As-grown BNNTs also show a large optical energy band gap of 6.12 eV, approaching to hexagonal phase BN single crystals. Meanwhile, as-grown BNNTs exhibit an intense UV-emission band located at 345 nm and a weak deep band at 237 nm. Their optoelectronic properties make them have promising for future nanoscale deep-UV light emitting devices.

  19. Modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for ceramic composites reinforced with layered, woven fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Gui-Yung; Mccoy, Benjamin J.

    1991-01-01

    A homogeneous model is developed for the chemical vapor infiltration by one-dimensional diffusion into a system of layered plies consisting of woven tows containing bundles of filaments. The model predictions of the amount of deposition and the porosity of the sample as a function of time are compared with the predictions of a recent nonhomogeneous model with aligned holes formed by the weave. The nonhomogeneous model allows for diffusion through the aligned holes, into the spaces between plies, and into the gaps around filaments; i.e., three diffusion equations apply. Relative to the nonhomogeneous results, the homogeneous model underestimates the amount of deposition, since the absence of holes and spaces allows earlier occlusion of gaps around filaments and restricts the vapor infiltration.

  20. Copper-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition for high-quality and metal-free single-layer graphene on amorphous SiO2 substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungki; Song, Intek; Park, Chibeom; Son, Minhyeok; Hong, Misun; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2013-08-27

    We report that high-quality single-layer graphene (SLG) has been successfully synthesized directly on various dielectric substrates including amorphous SiO2/Si by a Cu-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The Cu vapors produced by the sublimation of Cu foil that is suspended above target substrates without physical contact catalyze the pyrolysis of methane gas and assist nucleation of graphene on the substrates. Raman spectra and mapping images reveal that the graphene formed on a SiO2/Si substrate is almost defect-free and homogeneous single layer. The overall quality of graphene grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is comparable to that of the graphene grown by regular metal-catalyzed CVD on a Cu foil. While Cu vapor induces the nucleation and growth of SLG on an amorphous substrate, the resulting SLG is confirmed to be Cu-free by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SLG grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is fabricated into field effect transistor devices without transfer steps that are generally required when SLG is grown by regular CVD process on metal catalyst substrates. This method has overcome two important hurdles previously present when the catalyst-free CVD process is used for the growth of SLG on fused quartz and hexagonal boron nitride substrates, that is, high degree of structural defects and limited size of resulting graphene, respectively.

  1. Inferring Alcoholism SNPs and Regulatory Chemical Compounds Based on Ensemble Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Sun, Jiatong; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Xianyue; Wu, Lingxiang; Wu, Wei; Wang, Qh

    2016-12-20

    The disturbance of consciousness is one of the most common symptoms of those have alcoholism and may cause disability and mortality. Previous studies indicated that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) increase the susceptibility of alcoholism. In this study, we utilized the Ensemble Bayesian Network (EBN) method to identify causal SNPs of alcoholism based on the verified GAW14 data. Thirteen out of eighteen SNPs directly connected with alcoholism were found concordance with potential risk regions of alcoholism in OMIM database. As a number of SNPs were found contributing to alteration on gene expression, known as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), we further sought to identify chemical compounds acting as regulators of alcoholism genes captured by causal SNPs. Chloroprene and valproic acid were identified as the expression regulators for genes C11orf66 and SALL3 which were captured by alcoholism SNPs, respectively.

  2. vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces via adsorption of short chain linear alcohols & a sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnette, Anna Lorraine

    The use of silicon oxide with its native oxide layer for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting sliding parts requires the need for innovative lubrication methods to extend device lifetimes. The most promising method to date involves the equilibrium vapor phase lubrication (VPL) of MEMS using short chain linear alcohols in ambient conditions. Still, some questions remain regarding the effectiveness of this lubrication method, these include (1) whether or not the adsorbed n-alcohol molecules are the primary lubricant and (2) is this lubrication method effective in humid environments. This study investigates the vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces using short chain linear alcohols, more specifically n-propanol and n-pentanol. Macro-scale ball-on-flat tribometer tests are used to evaluate the lubriciousness of n-pentanol vapor under a series of contact loads/ pressures. Wear reduction of the SiO2 surfaces is achieved when there is complete coverage of the SiO2 surfaces with the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules. This occurs when the partial pressure relative to the saturation pressure (P/Psat) of n-pentanol was kept above 20% P/Psat which corresponds to approximately monolayer coverage of the SiO2 surface. In contrast to the lubricious effect of n-pentanol vapor, water vapor proves to enhance wear of the SiO2 surfaces when compared to dry (low moisture) conditions. This study also demonstrates that the primary lubrication method of the SiO 2 surfaces is most likely the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules and not the tribochemical reaction species produced during the sliding contact. Although this reaction species is always present within the wear tested regions, the production of the tribochemical reaction species is enhanced when more severe wear is observed. So, the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules are the primary method of lubrication. The effectiveness of the lubrication method in environments containing water vapor is also investigated

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  4. Chemical Species in the Vapor Phase of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks: Potential Impacts on Waste Tank Corrosion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2010-09-22

    The presence of corrosive and inhibiting chemicals on the tank walls in the vapor space, arising from the waste supernatant, dictate the type and degree of corrosion that occurs there. An understanding of how waste chemicals are transported to the walls and the affect on vapor species from changing supernatant chemistry (e.g., pH, etc.), are basic to the evaluation of risks and impacts of waste changes on vapor space corrosion (VSC). In order to address these issues the expert panel workshop on double-shell tank (DST) vapor space corrosion testing (RPP-RPT-31129) participants made several recommendations on the future data and modeling needs in the area of DST corrosion. In particular, the drying of vapor phase condensates or supernatants can form salt or other deposits at the carbon steel interface resulting in a chemical composition at the near surface substantially different from that observed directly in the condensates or the supernatants. As a result, over the past three years chemical modeling and experimental studies have been performed on DST supernatants and condensates to predict the changes in chemical composition that might occur as condensates or supernatants equilibrate with the vapor space species and dry at the carbon steel surface. The experimental studies included research on both the chemical changes that occurred as the supernatants dried as well as research on how these chemical changes impact the corrosion of tank steels. The chemical modeling and associated experimental studies were performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the research on tank steel corrosion at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This report presents a summary of the research conducted at PNNL with special emphasis on the most recent studies conducted in FY10. An overall summary of the project results as well as their broader implications for vapor space corrosion of the DST’s is given at the end of this report.

  5. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of β-tungsten, a metastable phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. C.; Hess, D. W.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a metastable phase of tungsten ( β-W) is performed using tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen as source gases. At 350 °C, the as-deposited resistivity of these films is ˜50 μΩ cm. After heat treatments between 650 and 750 °C in forming gas, the resistivity drops below 11 μΩ cm. Concomitant with this resistivity change is a phase change to α-W, the equilibrium, body-centered-cubic form.

  6. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  7. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; ...

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of methane for single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing; Cassell, Alan M.; Dai, Hongjie

    1998-08-01

    We report the synthesis of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane at 1000°C on supported Fe 2O 3 catalysts. The type of catalyst support is found to control the formation of individual or bundled SWNTs. Catalysts supported on crystalline alumina nanoparticles produce abundant individual SWNTs and small bundles. Catalysts supported by amorphous silica particles produce only SWNT bundles. Studies of the ends of SWNTs lead to an understanding of their growth mechanism. Also, we present the results of methane CVD on supported NiO, CoO and NiO/CoO catalysts.

  9. Formation of Iron Carbide Nanorod by Pulsed Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yooyen, S.; Kawamura, T.; Kotake, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Iron carbide nanorods were produced on the surface of pure iron sheet by means of pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen plasma was used in the initial state, varied from 10 to 60 minute, for the purpose of cleaning and preparing nanoparticles. The formation was done under methane atmosphere, varied from 2 to 30 minute. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns analysis showed that iron carbide was found on all of these experiment conditions. By field emission scanning electron micro spectroscopy (FESEM) observation, iron carbide nanorods, however, were found neatly only on the methane plasma treating at 10 minute.

  10. Optical properties of silicon nitride films formed by plasma-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasukova, L. A.; Komarov, F. F.; Parkhomenko, I. N.; Milchanin, O. V.; Leont'ev, A. V.; Mudryi, A. V.; Togambaeva, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    The optical properties and structure of layers of silicon nitride deposited on silicon substrates by plasma-aided chemical vapor deposition at 300°C are studied by ellipsometry, Raman scattering, IR spectroscopy, and photoluminescence techniques. It is found that immediately after deposition the silicon nitride contains hydrogen in the form of Si-H bonds. Annealing (1100°C, 30 min) leads to dehydrogenation and densification of the nitride layer. An intense Si3N4 photoluminescence signal is detected in the green. Immediately after deposition the photoluminescence peak appears at 542 nm and annealing shifts it to shorter wavelengths.

  11. Development of a two-step, forced chemical vapor infiltration process

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{trademark} fiber pre-forms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90%. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  12. The preparation and economics of silicon carbide matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Y.G.; Stinton, D.P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a number of processing techniques that are currently in use for the development and production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composite materials. The limited number of available processing routes are compared with respect to the resulting material properties. As it appears the Chemical Vapor Infiltration technique is one of the most extensively developed methods. During the last decade, at least five different modifications of the isobaric isothermal CVI principle have been developed; each route having its own benefits. CVI techniques have now been developed to the extent that industrial commercialization is being realized. Projected cost aspects of the various CVI manufacturing techniques have been examined and compared.

  13. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Phosphorous- and Boron-Doped Graphene Using Phenyl-Containing Molecules.

    PubMed

    Mekan Ovezmyradov; Magedov, Igor V; Frolova, Liliya V; Chandler, Gary; Garcia, Jill; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A; Kalugin, Nikolai G

    2015-07-01

    Simultaneous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene and "in-situ" phosphorous or boron doping of graphene was accomplished using Triphenylphosphine (TPP) and 4-Methoxyphenylboronic acid (4-MPBA). The TPP and 4-MPBA molecules were sublimated and supplied along with CH4 molecules during graphene growth at atmospheric pressure. The grown graphene samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. Phosphorous and boron presence in phosphorous and boron doped graphene was confirmed with Auger electron spectroscopy. The possibility of obtaining phosphorous and boron doped graphene using solid-source molecule precursors via CVD can lead to an easy and rapid production of modified large area graphene.

  14. Growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneyoshi, T.; Okai, M.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.

    2001-10-01

    To investigate the most suitable deposition conditions and growth mechanism, we grew carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition under various conditions. The experimental parameters we varied were (a) the mixture ratio of methane in hydrogen, (b) the total gas pressure, and (c) the bias electric current. We found that the bias electric current was the most influential parameter in determining the shape of CNTs. We believe that the growth process of CNTs can be explained by using the solid solubility curves of metal-carbon phase diagrams. Selective growth and low-temperature growth of CNTs can also be understood from these phase diagrams.

  15. Structure of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, M.; Muneyoshi, T.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.

    2000-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown on a Ni substrate and an Fe-Ni-Cr alloy substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. TEM showed that the nanotubes on both substrates have a piled-cone structure with metal particles on top which determine the diameter of the nanotubes. Their diameter ranges from 60 to 80 nm. Moreover, EDX showed that the metal particles are composed of Ni when the nanotubes are grown on Ni substrate and of Fe and Ni in the case of the Fe-Ni-Cr alloy substrate.

  16. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Lang, Andrew C.; Taheri, Mitra; Cunnane, Dan; Karasik, Boris. S.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc) and high critical current density (Jc). The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  17. Microstructure and properties of multiphase and functionally graded materials prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.

    1996-05-01

    The synthesis of multiphase and functionally graded materials by chemical vapor deposition is discussed from a perspective of controlling their composition and microstructure at a nano-scale level, and ultimately, tailoring their material properties. Prior research is briefly reviewed to address the current state of this novel material concept. Recent experimental results relating to controlling the selected properties of two multiphase systems, TiN + MoS{sub 2} and NiAl + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are described to illustrate this concept`s potential merits and challenges for use in realistic applications.

  18. Monolayer graphene growth on Ni(111) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addou, Rafik; Dahal, Arjun; Sutter, Peter; Batzill, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the commonly employed high temperature chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the bulk, we demonstrate that below 600 °C graphene can be grown in a self-limiting monolayer growth process. Optimum growth is achieved at ˜550 °C. Above this temperature, carbon diffusion into the bulk is limiting the surface growth rate, while at temperatures below ˜500 °C a competing surface carbide phase impedes graphene formation.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  20. Ultrathin SnSe2 Flakes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition for High-Performance Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Gan, Lin; Tian, Wenming; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Shengye; Li, Huiqiao; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhai, Tianyou

    2015-12-22

    High-quality ultrathin single-crystalline SnSe2 flakes are synthesized under atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition for the first time. A high-performance photodetector based on the individual SnSe2 flake demonstrates a high photoresponsivity of 1.1 × 10(3) A W(-1), a high EQE of 2.61 × 10(5)%, and superb detectivity of 1.01 × 10(10) Jones, combined with fast rise and decay times of 14.5 and 8.1 ms, respectively.

  1. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  2. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  3. Development of chemical vapor composite (CVC) ceramic materials. Status report, April 1995--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-25

    The objective of the 94 DOE Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) ceramics materials grant is to develop a reliable and flexible process to produce, in a single step, ceramic composites to final shape. This report is a brief summary of activities in the development of the CVC ceramics materials. Equipment has been designed and built to fabricate CVC silicon carbides with fibers such as Nextel, Nicalon, and carbon. Materials and shapes have been fabricated and characterized as to physical and mechanical properties and microstructure. Details will be given in the final report.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition techniques and related methods for manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-25

    Methods of manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs made using the methods of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  5. Simulation of catalyst behavior during chemical vapor deposition processing of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kazuki; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2014-06-01

    Nucleation of carbon nanotubes is considered to start with the supersaturation of carbon atoms dissolved in a catalyst. In chemical vapor deposition synthesis, it is believed that condensation of the source gas terminates the growth. However, some experimental studies have suggested that termination is primarily affected by catalyst behavior. We modified the potential functions and observed the behavior of carbon-iron mixed nanoparticles by a molecular dynamics method and found that the iron fraction melted at the equivalent temperature of growth termination. Thus, we concluded that the catalyst fusion prevented nucleation that would normally occur as a consequence of solution supersaturation.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  7. Influence of Alumina Reaction Tube Impurities on the Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Pure coupons of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were oxidized for 100 h in dry flowing oxygen at 1300 C. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetry (TGA). The experiments were first performed using high-purity alumina reaction tubes. The experiments were then repeated using fused quartz reaction tubes. Differences in oxidation kinetics, scale composition, and scale morphology were observed. These differences were attributed to impurities in the alumina tubes. Investigators interested in high-temperature oxidation of silica formers should be aware that high-purity alumina can have significant effects on experiment results.

  8. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiOx films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 °C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiOx film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity.

  9. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  10. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plahutnik, F.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this program is to demonstrate that a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is capable of producing, at low cost, high quality polycrystalline silicon. Physical form and purity of this material will be consistent with LSA material requirements for use in the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells. Four polysilicon deposition runs were completed in an intermediate size reactor using dichlorosilane fed from 250 pound cylinders. Results from the intermediate size reactor are consistent with those obtained earlier with a small experimental reactor. Modifications of two intermediate size reactors were completed to interface with the dichlorosilane process demonstration unit (PDU).

  11. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  12. Localized heating induced chemical vapor deposition for one-dimensional nanostructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Lin, Liwei; Englander, Ongi

    2010-03-01

    Localized heating has emerged as a viable technique for the site specific synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. By localizing the heat source, the extent of chemical vapor deposition synthesis reactions can be confined to well-defined, microscale regions. Resistive heating has been extensively used to realize highly localized regions of elevated temperature while maintaining a microelectronics-compatible thermal environment elsewhere. Other localized heating methods are being pursued as well. Overall, the approach is simple, flexible, and robust, and offers unique opportunities in 1D nanostructure synthesis, characterization, and integration. Herein, the recent progress of these techniques is reviewed and discussed.

  13. Double-walled boron nitride nanotubes grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Jong; Chatterjee, Shahana; Kim, Seung Min; Stach, Eric A; Bradley, Mark G; Pender, Mark J; Sneddon, Larry G; Maruyama, Benji

    2008-10-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit quantum confinement which leads to unique electronic properties, making them attractive as the active elements for nanoscale electronic devices. Boron nitride nanotubes are of particular interest since, unlike carbon nanotubes, all chiralities are semiconducting. Here, we report a synthesis based on the use of low pressures of the molecular precursor borazine in conjunction with a floating nickelocene catalyst that resulted in the formation of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes. As has been shown for carbon nanotube production, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method has the potential for creating high quality boron nitride nanostructures with high production volumes.

  14. Formation of needlelike crystallites during growth of diamond films by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kopylov, P. G.; Obraztsov, A. N. Shvets, P. V.

    2010-07-15

    Diamond polycrystalline films have been grown by chemical vapor deposition from a hydrogenmethane mixture. The phase composition and structure of the films were studied using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. It is found that, upon heating in air, the oxidation of the carbon material forming the films occurs at significantly different temperatures, depending on the degree of its order and the crystallite size. This difference is used for selective oxidation of the least ordered fine-grained component of the films. The material obtained by this selective oxidation of the films consists of diamond crystallites shaped like regular micrometer-sized tetragonal pyramids with a radius of tip curvature of several nanometers.

  15. Fabrication of AIN Nano-Structures Using Polarity Control by High Temperature Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Eom, Daeyong; Kim, Jinwan; Lee, Kyungjae; Jeon, Minhwan; Heo, Cheon; Pyeon, Jaedo; Nam, Okhyun

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the crystallographic polarity transition of AIN layers grown by high temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (HT-MOCVD), with varying trimethylaluminum (TMAI) pre-flow rates. AIN layers grown without TMAI pre-flow had a mixed polarity, consisting of Al- and N-polarity, and exhibited a rough surface. With an increasing rate of TMAI pre-flow, the AIN layer was changed to an Al-polarity, with a smooth surface morphology. Finally, AIN nano-pillars and nano-rods of Al-polarity were fabricated by etching a mixed polarity AIN layer using an aqueous KOH solution.

  16. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  17. Self-assembled patterns of iron oxide nanoparticles by hydrothermal chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjun; Wei, B. Q.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2001-12-01

    Here, we report a hydrothermal chemical-vapor deposition process, which produces self-assembled patterns of iron oxide nanoparticles. By exposing a planar silica substrate to a prevaporized mixture of water, ferrocene [Fe(C5H5)2] and xylene (C8H10), at temperatures of ˜1000 °C, Fe2O3 nanoparticles are deposited on the substrate surface, in regular circular patterns. The particle sizes are less than 100 nm, and are organized into submicron-size patterns. The same process without water produces arrays of carbon nanotubes catalyzed by iron nanoparticles that are formed by the decomposition of ferrocene molecules.

  18. Alignment of nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires during chemical vapor deposition of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Park, Jin-Woo; Yang, Seung-Min; Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bibhu Prasad; Lee, Jae-Gab; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated silicon nanostructures (Si-NSs) on SiO x /Si substrate in chemical vapor deposition. During the synthesis of Si-NSs, Si sunflower-shaped structures of one to hundred microns were observed, therein the nanoparticles (NPs), nanowires, and nanorods were aligned in an ordered manner. We suggest that the NSs reported here are evolved by the electrostatic force exerted by charged NPs in gas phase. This NS would help in understanding the role of spontaneous charging of NPs in the gas phase and the role of charged NPs in the gas phase for NSs growth.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of Ti-Si-N films for diffusion barrier applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.

    1995-11-01

    Structurally disordered refractory ternary films such as titanium silicon nitride (Ti-Si-N) have potential as advanced diffusion barriers in future ULSI metallization schemes. The authors demonstrate chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ti-Si-N-containing films in a commercially available single-wafer CVD system using two different Ti precursors, TiCl{sub 4} and tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium (TDEAT). In particular, the TDEAT-based films can be grown conformally with low impurity content, and are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barrier applications.

  20. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of phase change Ge1Sb2Te4 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Longo, Massimo; Fallica, Roberto; Wiemer, Claudia; Salicio, Olivier; Fanciulli, Marco; Rotunno, Enzo; Lazzarini, Laura

    2012-03-14

    The self-assembly of Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, catalyzed by Au nanoislands in a narrow range of temperatures and deposition pressures. In the optimized conditions of 400 °C, 50 mbar, the NWs are Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) single hexagonal crystals. Phase change memory switching was reversibly induced by nanosecond current pulses through metal-contacted NWs with threshold voltage of about 1.35 V.

  1. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  2. Diamond-coated fiber Bragg grating through the hot filament chemical vapor process for chemical durability improvement.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Nélia; José Kalinowski, Hypolito; Neto, Victor; Nogueira, Rogério

    2017-02-20

    In recent years, the coating of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with a specific material has opened up the possibility to broaden the limits of applicability of this technology. Diamond has a set of properties that makes it an attractive candidate to protect the optical fiber against chemically harsh environments, whose sensing is also a great challenge. One of the most used techniques to obtain these coatings is through the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD); in this process, the temperature reaches, typically, around 850°C-900°C. In this work, the regeneration of a seed FBG during its coating with a nanocrystalline diamond thin film through the HFCVD process is presented. Simultaneously, the thermal monitoring of the process was also performed using the same grating. The resistance test in a corrosive medium reveals an improvement on the durability of the sensing properties of the diamond-coated FBG compared with an uncoated FBG, foreseeing a vast range of applications.

  3. Aromatic chemicals by iron-catalyzed hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapor.

    PubMed

    Olcese, Roberto Nicolas; Lardier, George; Bettahar, Mohammed; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Fontana, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Petitjean, Dominique; Dufour, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Lignin is a potential renewable material for the production of bio-sourced aromatic chemicals. We present the first hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapors, before any condensation, using inexpensive and sustainable iron-silica (Fe/SiO2 ) and iron-activated carbon (Fe/AC) catalysts. Lignin pyrolysis was conducted in a tubular reactor and vapors were injected in a fixed bed of catalysts (673 K, 1 bar) with stacks to investigate the profile of coke deposit. More than 170 GC-analyzable compounds were identified by GCxGC (heart cutting)/flame ionization detector mass spectrometry. Lignin oligomers were analyzed by very high resolution mass spectrometry, called the "petroleomic" method. They are trapped by the catalytic fixed bed and, in particular, by the AC. The catalysts showed a good selectivity for the hydrodeoxygenation of real lignin vapors to benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, cresols, and alkyl phenols. The spent catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 sorption. Micropores in the Fe/AC catalyst are completely plugged by coke deposits, whereas the mesoporous structure of Fe/SiO2 is unaffected. TEM images reveal two different types of coke deposit: 1) catalytic coke deposited in the vicinity of iron particles and 2) thermal coke (carbonaceous particles ≈1 μm in diameter) formed from the gas-phase growth of lignin oligomers.

  4. Opportunities and challenges in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition for electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koh; Yamaoka, Yuya; Ubukata, Akinori; Arimura, Tadanobu; Piao, Guanxi; Yano, Yoshiki; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Tabuchi, Toshiya

    2016-05-01

    The current situation and next challenge in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for electron devices of both GaN on Si and GaN on GaN are presented. We have examined the possibility of increasing the growth rate of GaN on 200-mm-diameter Si by using a multiwafer production MOCVD machine, in which the vapor phase parasitic reaction is well controlled. The impact of a high-growth-rate strained-layer-superlattice (SLS) buffer layer is presented in terms of material properties. An SLS growth rate of as high as 3.46 µm/h, which was 73% higher than the current optimum, was demonstrated. As a result, comparable material properties were obtained. Next, a typical result of GaN doped with Si of 1 × 1016 cm-3 grown at the growth rate of 3.7 µm/h is shown. For high-voltage application, we need a thick high-purity GaN drift layer with a low carbon concentration, of less than 1016 cm-3. It is shown that achieving a high growth rate by precise control of the vapor phase reaction is still challenge in GaN MOCVD.

  5. Highly scalable, atomically thin WSe2 grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Eichfeld, Sarah M; Hossain, Lorraine; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Piasecki, Aleksander F; Kupp, Benjamin; Birdwell, A Glen; Burke, Robert A; Lu, Ning; Peng, Xin; Li, Jie; Azcatl, Angelica; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M; Kim, Moon J; Mayer, Theresa S; Redwing, Joan M; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-02-24

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a two-dimensional material that is of interest for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its direct bandgap of 1.65 eV in the monolayer form and excellent transport properties. However, technologies based on this 2D material cannot be realized without a scalable synthesis process. Here, we demonstrate the first scalable synthesis of large-area, mono and few-layer WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) and dimethylselenium ((CH3)2Se). In addition to being intrinsically scalable, this technique allows for the precise control of the vapor-phase chemistry, which is unobtainable using more traditional oxide vaporization routes. We show that temperature, pressure, Se:W ratio, and substrate choice have a strong impact on the ensuing atomic layer structure, with optimized conditions yielding >8 μm size domains. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm crystalline monoto-multilayer WSe2 is achievable. Finally, TEM and vertical current/voltage transport provide evidence that a pristine van der Waals gap exists in WSe2/graphene heterostructures.

  6. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  7. Nanoporous carbon materials with enhanced supercapacitance performance and non-aromatic chemical sensing with C1/C2 alcohol discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Adhikari, Laxmi; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Adhikari, Mandira Pradhananga; Adhikari, Rina; Hill, Jonathan P.; Pradhananga, Raja Ram; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have investigated the textural properties, electrochemical supercapacitances and vapor sensing performances of bamboo-derived nanoporous carbon materials (NCM). Bamboo, an abundant natural biomaterial, was chemically activated with phosphoric acid at 400 °C and the effect of impregnation ratio of phosphoric acid on the textural properties and electrochemical performances was systematically investigated. Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of various oxygen-containing surface functional groups (i.e. carboxyl, carboxylate, carbonyl and phenolic groups) in NCM. The prepared NCM are amorphous in nature and contain hierarchical micropores and mesopores. Surface areas and pore volumes were found in the range 218–1431 m2 g−1 and 0.26–1.26 cm3 g−1, respectively, and could be controlled by adjusting the impregnation ratio of phosphoric acid and bamboo cane powder. NCM exhibited electrical double-layer supercapacitor behavior giving a high specific capacitance of c.256 F g−1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s−1 together with high cyclic stability with capacitance retention of about 92.6% after 1000 cycles. Furthermore, NCM exhibited excellent vapor sensing performance with high sensitivity for non-aromatic chemicals such as acetic acid. The system would be useful to discriminate C1 and C2 alcohol (methanol and ethanol). PMID:27877898

  8. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  9. Chemical sensing of copper phthalocyanine sol-gel glass through organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Ridhi, R.; Gawri, Isha; Abbas, Saeed J.; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-15

    The sensitivities of metallophthalocyanine to vapor phase electron donors has gained significance in many areas and disciplines due to their sensing properties and ease of operation. In the present study the interaction mechanism of organic vapors in Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc) sol-gel glass has been studied. The interaction mechanism is affected by many factors like morphology, electrical or optical properties of film. CuPc sol-gel glass has been synthesized using chemical route sol-gel method. Its structural characterization was conducted using XRD and the amorphous nature of the silicate glass was observed with characteristic α polymorph phase of CuPc at around 6.64° with 13.30Å interplanar spacing. The size of the particle as determined using Debbye Scherre’s formula comes out around 15.5 nm. The presence of α phase of CuPc was confirmed using FTIR with the appearance of crystal parameter marker band at 787 cm-1. Apart from this A2u and Eu symmetry bands of CuPc have also been observed. The UV absorption spectrum of CuPc exhibits absorption peaks owing to π→ π* and n→ π* transitions. A blue shift in the prepared CuPc glass has been observed as compared to the dopant CuPc salt indicating increase of band gap. A split in B (Soret) band and Q band appears as observed with the help of Lorentzian fitting. CuPc sol gel glass has been exposed with chemical vapors of Methanol, Benzene and Bromine individually and the electrical measurements have been carried out. These measurements show the variation in conductivity and the interaction mechanism has been analyzed.

  10. Simultaneous Chemical and Optical Patterning of Polyacrylonitrile Film by Vapor-Based Reaction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Won; Lee, Choonghyeon; Cha, Sang-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2015-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film is treated with ethyleneamines (EDA) in a simple chemical vapor phase reaction. Successful introduction of amine functional groups on the cyano group of PAN backbone is verified by FT-IR and NMR measurements. Further UV-vis and photoluminescence analyses show a red shift of the emission peak after repeated EDA treatment, which might be attributed to the formation of imine conjugation from newly formed carbon-nitrogen bonds on the PAN backbone. Further confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that selective patterning of EDA on PAN films is possible via local polydimethylsiloxane masking. The results indicate that both chemical and optical patterning on PAN film can be realized via a single reaction and show the potential of this novel methodology in selective patterning.

  11. Fabrication of ultrathin and highly uniform silicon on insulator by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mori, Yuzo

    2007-08-01

    Metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer operate faster and at a lower power than those fabricated on a bulk silicon wafer. Scaling down, which improves their performances, demands thinner SOI wafers. In this article, improvement on the thinning of SOI wafers by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining (PCVM) is described. PCVM is a gas-phase chemical etching method in which reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasma are used. Some factors affecting uniformity are investigated and methods for improvements are presented. As a result of thinning a commercial 8 in. SOI wafer, the initial SOI layer thickness of 97.5+/-4.7 nm was successfully thinned and made uniform at 7.5+/-1.5 nm.

  12. Reactivity of monolayer chemical vapor deposited graphene imperfections studied using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cen; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Parks, Joshua J; Ritzert, Nicole L; Ralph, Daniel C; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-04-24

    Imperfections that disrupt the sp(2) conjugation of graphene can alter its electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Here we report on the examination of monolayer chemical vapor deposited graphene imperfections using scanning electrochemical microscopy in the feedback mode. It was found that the sites with a large concentration of defects are approximately 1 order of magnitude more reactive, compared to more pristine graphene surfaces, toward electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, we successfully passivated the activity of graphene defects by carefully controlling the electropolymerization conditions of o-phenylenediamine. With further electropolymerization, a thin film of the polymer was formed, and it was found to be insulating in nature toward heterogeneous electron transfer processes. The use of spatially resolved scanning electrochemical microscopy for detecting the presence and the "healing" of defects on graphene provides a strategy for in situ characterization and control of this attractive surface, enabling optimization of its properties for application in electronics, sensing, and electrocatalysis.

  13. Nucleation Chemical Physics: From Vapor Phase Clusters to Crystals in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2007-08-03

    Both vapor-phase clusters and condensed-phase crystals are important in a wide variety of fundamental and applied problems in chemical physics. Favorable fluctuations in a supersaturated phase generate clusters of the new phase – exactly how one defines these new clusters as distinct from the mother phase represents a continuing challenge in molecular theories of nucleation. These incipient clusters can form homogeneously within the mother phase or heterogeneously on seeds, dust, impurities, ions, or others stability-inducing atomic/molecular structures (e.g., steps, edges, vacancies, etc.). Upon reaching a critical size the clusters may grow to macroscopic dimensions if enough nucleating material is present in surrounding environment or until relaxation processes dominate bringing the phase transformation to completion. This work was supported by the Chemical and Material Sciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the chemical vapor deposited W/Al interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, H.; Katayama, M.; Onoda, K.; Hattori, T.; Suzuki, H.; Tokuda, Y.

    1993-07-01

    The dependence of the amount of aluminum trifluoride (AlF3) piled up at the interface of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and the aluminum under layer on the deposition time and subsequent annealing in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) or in monosilane (SiH4) gas has been studied. AlF3 is formed by the reaction of the aluminum under layer with tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) during the initial state of tungsten chemical vapor deposition. Tungsten was deposited on an Al layer under selective deposition conditions by SiH4 reduction at 250 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement reveals that the amount of AlF3 decreases with an increase in the tungsten deposition time and that the reduction of AlF3 by volatilization of aluminum fluorides, which occurs at higher temperatures (≳400 °C) is not observed at low temperature (270 °C). Annealing in SiH4 gas after the tungsten deposition was effective to reduce the amount of AlF3 compared with annealing in UHV. This result and thermochemical data would suggest that the dependence of the amount of AlF3 on the tungsten deposition time is explained by the reduction of AlF3 with hydrogen atoms supplied from the dissociation of SiH4.

  15. Synthesis of silicon nanowires using tin catalyst by hot wire chemical vapor processing

    SciTech Connect

    Meshram, Nagsen; Kumbhar, Alka; Dusane, R.O.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Silicon nanowires are grown by hot wire chemical vapor processing at 400 °C using Sn as catalyst material via VLS. ► For nanowire synthesis Sn nanotemplates are formed with hot wire generated atomic hydrogen. ► The TEM image reveals the crystalline nature of nanowire. - Abstract: Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been synthesized at temperatures in the range 300–400 °C by the hot wire chemical vapor processing (HWCVP) using tin nanotemplate. The tin nano-template is formed by hot wire atomic hydrogen treatment of thermally evaporated Sn films (∼300 nm thick) on glass substrates. Silicon nanowires are then grown using hot wire induced dissociation of SiH{sub 4} gas over the nanotemplate. Growth conditions like growth time and temperature were varied to study their effect on the tin nanoparticle size and on the silicon nanowire dimensions thereafter. From the observations, it is clear that the nanowire diameters and lengths depend on the size of nanoparticles and the growth time respectively. Though SiNWs were observed to grow at temperatures as low as 300 °C, nanowires with a narrow diameter distribution were achieved at 400 °C. Raman spectra and transmission electron microscope (TEM) reveal the crystalline nature of the silicon nanowires.

  16. Electronic Properties of Large-scale Graphene Chemical Vapor Synthesized on Nickel and on Sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Helin; Zhang, Liyuan; Chen, Yong; Yu, Qingkai; Li, Hao

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the electronic transport properties of large area few-layer graphene/graphitic films grown by two different chemical vapor based methods. The first type of samples (metal-transfer graphene) is synthesized by carbon segregation from Ni, then transferred to SiO2/Si substrates. The second type of samples is synthesized by direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on sapphire. We measured these samples under variable temperatures (from 2K to 300 K) and transverse magnet fields (from 0 to 7 T). For both types of samples, we found a negative magnetoresistance at low field, and carrier mobilities on the order of several hundreds of cm^2/V-s. For metal-transfer graphene in particular, we were able to measure a moderate field effect response, using the highly doped Si substrate as back gate. The observed magnetoresistance shows characteristic features of weak localization, from which we extract various carrier scattering lengths in the metal-transfer graphene samples. Comparison with those measured in mechanically exfoliated graphene suggests possibly different carrier scattering mechanisms for graphene materials prepared with different methods.

  17. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  18. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  19. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  20. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Harris; Kass, Richard; Gan, K. K.

    2014-01-23

    With the LHC upgrades in 2013, and further LHC upgrades scheduled in 2018, most LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require more radiation hard technologies than presently available. At present all LHC experiments now have some form of diamond detector. As a result Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. Moreover CVD diamond is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the HL-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications. Our accomplishments include: • Developed a two U.S.companies to produce electronic grade diamond, • Worked with companies and acquired large area diamond pieces, • Performed radiation hardness tests using various proton energies: 70 MeV (Cyric, Japan), 800 MeV (Los Alamos), and 24 GeV (CERN).

  1. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  2. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's how many accidents occur. continue What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  3. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  4. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  5. Chemical etching and organometallic chemical vapor deposition on varied geometries of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of micron-spaced geometries produced by wet chemical etching and subsequent OMCVD growth on various GaAs surfaces are presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the process. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher-order planes produced by the hex groove etching.

  6. Differentiation of Chemical Components in a Binary Solvent Vapor Mixture Using Carbon/Polymer Composite-Based Chemiresistors

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Hughes, Robert C.; Yelton, W. Graham; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1999-07-19

    We demonstrate a ''universal solvent sensor'' constructed from a small array of carbon/polymer composite chemiresistors that respond to solvents spanning a wide range of Hildebrand volubility parameters. Conductive carbon particles provide electrical continuity in these composite films. When the polymer matrix absorbs solvent vapors, the composite film swells, the average separation between carbon particles increases, and an increase in film resistance results, as some of the conduction pathways are broken. The adverse effects of contact resistance at high solvent concentrations are reported. Solvent vapors including isooctane, ethanol, dlisopropyhnethylphosphonate (DIMP), and water are correctly identified (''classified'') using three chemiresistors, their composite coatings chosen to span the full range of volubility parameters. With the same three sensors, binary mixtures of solvent vapor and water vapor are correctly classified, following classification, two sensors suffice to determine the concentrations of both vapor components. Polyethylene vinylacetate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) are two such polymers that are used to classify binary mixtures of DIMP with water vapor; the PVA/carbon-particle-composite films are sensitive to less than 0.25{degree}A relative humidity. The Sandia-developed VERI (Visual-Empirical Region of Influence) technique is used as a method of pattern recognition to classify the solvents and mixtures and to distinguish them from water vapor. In many cases, the response of a given composite sensing film to a binary mixture deviates significantly from the sum of the responses to the isolated vapor components at the same concentrations. While these nonlinearities pose significant difficulty for (primarily) linear methods such as principal components analysis, VERI handles both linear and nonlinear data with equal ease. In the present study the maximum speciation accuracy is achieved by an array containing three or four sensor elements, with

  7. Adhesion and chemical vapor testing of second surface silver/glass solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Second surface silvered glass mirrors supplied by four different commercial manufacturers were evaluated for silver-to-glass adhesion and resistance to chemical vapor attack. The mirrors were chemically silvered on identical substrates of low iron float glass. Experiments were performed in order to assess the viability of using adhesion and chemical attack as screening tests for predicting the relative long-term durability of solar mirrors. The results of these tests will be compared at a future time with the survivability of field mirrors deployed in stationary exposure racks at ten locations throughout the United States. The adhesion tests were performed using a commercially-available thin film tensile pull tester in which a stud bonded to the film is pulled and the yield load recorded. Numerous subtleties regarding the selection of the adhesive used to bond the study and the validity of the testing procedure are discussed. Several different methods of normalizing the results were attempted in an effort to reduce the scatter in the data. The same set of samples were exposed to salt spray, water, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and HNO/sub 3/ vapors and then ranked according to their performance. Visual comparison of tested samples did not yield consistent results; however, definite trends were observed favoring one of the manufacturers. Some SEM/EDX analysis was performed on these mirrors subject to accelerated degradation in order to compare them to mirrors subject to natural degradation. However, insufficient data has been collected to show that any of the tests performed will accurately predict the relative life expectancy of the mirrors in an outdoor environment.

  8. Improved detection and false alarm rejection for chemical vapors using passive hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, William J.; Miyashiro, Rex; Gittins, Christopher M.; Konno, Daisei; Chang, Shing; Farr, Matt; Perkins, Brad

    2013-05-01

    Two AIRIS sensors were tested at Dugway Proving Grounds against chemical agent vapor simulants. The primary objectives of the test were to: 1) assess performance of algorithm improvements designed to reduce false alarm rates with a special emphasis on solar effects, and 3) evaluate performance in target detection at 5 km. The tests included 66 total releases comprising alternating 120 kg glacial acetic acid (GAA) and 60 kg triethyl phosphate (TEP) events. The AIRIS sensors had common algorithms, detection thresholds, and sensor parameters. The sensors used the target set defined for the Joint Service Lightweight Chemical Agent Detector (JSLSCAD) with TEP substituted for GA and GAA substituted for VX. They were exercised at two sites located at either 3 km or 5 km from the release point. Data from the tests will be presented showing that: 1) excellent detection capability was obtained at both ranges with significantly shorter alarm times at 5 km, 2) inter-sensor comparison revealed very comparable performance, 3) false alarm rates < 1 incident per 10 hours running time over 143 hours of sensor operations were achieved, 4) algorithm improvements eliminated both solar and cloud false alarms. The algorithms enabling the improved false alarm rejection will be discussed. The sensor technology has recently been extended to address the problem of detection of liquid and solid chemical agents and toxic industrial chemical on surfaces. The phenomenology and applicability of passive infrared hyperspectral imaging to this problem will be discussed and demonstrated.

  9. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  10. CHEMICALLY VAPOR DEPOSITED YTTRIA-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (YSZ) FOR THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATING

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, V.G.; Besmann, T.M.; Lothian, J.L.; Xu, W.; Starr, T.L.

    2003-04-22

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) to protect super-alloy blades such as Mar-M247 or Rene-N5 during engine operation. The current method for YSZ fabrication for TBC applications is by air-plasma spraying (APS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) (Haynes 1997). APS gives reasonable deposition rates, but has a limited life and aging effects due to its porous and lamellar structure. The EB-PVD coatings are more stable and can accommodate thermomechanical stresses due to their characteristic strain-tolerant, columnar microstructure. EB-PVD, however, is primarily line-of-sight, which often leaves ''hidden areas'' uncoated, has low throughput, and has high capital cost. The process of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is investigated here as an economical alternative to EB-PVD and APS, with the potential for better overall coverage as well as the ability to produce thick (100-250 {micro}m), strain-tolerant, columnar coatings. MOCVD of YSZ involves the use of zirconium and yttrium organometallic precursors reacting with an oxygen source. Previous researchers have used diketonate or chloride precursors and oxygen (Wahl et al. 2001a, Wahl et al. 2001b, Yamane and Harai 1989). These precursors have low transport rates due to their low carrier solvent solubility (Varanasi et al. 2003). Solvated zirconium and yttrium butoxide precursors were investigated here due to their higher vapor pressures and high solvent solubility. This work uses predictive equilibrium modeling and experiments involving butoxide precursors for tetragonal YSZ fabrication.

  11. Vapor Pressure Isotope Effects in Halogenated Organic Compounds and Alcohols Dissolved in Water.

    PubMed

    Horst, Axel; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2016-12-20

    Volatilization causes changes in the isotopic composition of organic compounds as a result of different vapor pressures of molecules containing heavy and light isotopes. Both normal and inverse vapor pressure isotope effects (VPIE) have been observed, depending on molecular interactions in the liquid phase and the investigated element. Previous studies have focused mostly on pure compound volatilization or on compounds dissolved in organic liquids. Environmentally relevant scenarios, such as isotope fractionation during volatilization of organics from open water surfaces, have largely been neglected. In the current study, open-system volatilization experiments (focusing thereby on kinetic/-nonequilibrium effects) were carried out at ambient temperatures for trichloromethane, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, trichlorotrifluoroethane, methanol, and ethanol dissolved in water and, if not previously reported in the literature for these compounds, for volatilization from pure liquids. Stable carbon isotopic signatures were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that volatilization of the four halogenated compounds from water does not cause a measurable change in the carbon isotopic composition, whereas for pure-phase evaporation, significant inverse isotope effects are consistently observed (+0.3 ‰< ε < + 1.7 ‰). In contrast, methanol and ethanol showed normal isotope effects for evaporation of pure organic liquids (-3.9 ‰ and -1.9 ‰) and for volatilization of compounds dissolved in water (-4.4 ‰ and -2.9 ‰), respectively. This absence of measurable carbon isotope fractionation considerably facilitates the application of isotopic techniques for extraction of field samples and preconcentration of organohalogens-known to be important pollutants in groundwater and in the atmosphere.

  12. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  13. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A What's in this article? ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  14. Regioselective Atomic Rearrangement of Ag-Pt Octahedral Catalysts by Chemical Vapor-Assisted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yung-Tin; Yan, Linqing; Shao, Yu-Tsun; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yang, Hong

    2016-12-14

    Thermal annealing is a common, and often much-needed, process to optimize the surface structure and composition of bimetallic nanoparticles for high catalytic performance. Such thermal treatment is often carried out either in air or under an inert atmosphere by a trial-and-error approach. Herewith, we present a new chemical vapor-assisted treatment, which can preserve the octahedral morphology of Ag-Pt nanoparticles while modifying the surface into preferred composition arrangements with site-selectivity for high catalytic activity. In situ environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) study reveals a relatively homogeneous distribution of Ag and Pt is generated on the surface of Ag-Pt nanoparticles upon exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), whereas Pt atoms preferably segregate to the edge regions when the gas atmosphere is switched to argon. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest stabilization of Pt atoms is energetically favored in the form of mixed surface alloys when CO vapor is present. Without CO, Ag and Pt phase separate under the similar mild treatment condition. There exists a close correlation between the tunable surface structures and the catalytic activities of Ag-Pt octahedral nanoparticles.

  15. Preparation Of Electrochromic Metal Oxide Films By Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Svensson, J. S. E. M.; Liebert, B. E.

    1987-11-01

    Laboratory procedures have been developed for depositing thin films of electrochromic metal oxides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). In this process, vapor phase reactants, such as tungsten hexafluotIde, are mixed with oxygen and excited by RF energy at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and power levels up to≍1W/cm2 substrate area. Large rates of oxide deposition have been achieved (> 8 nm/s) making this process a candidate for high-speed coating of large area substrates, such as window glass. Amorphous WO1 films prepared by PE-CVD have been shown to have electrochromic responses virtually identical to films prepared by vacuum evaporation. The lithium ion diffusion rate, for example, is approximately 1.3 x 10-11 cm2 /s at x = 0.03 in LixWO3 prepared by PE-CVD. On the other hand, molybdenum oxide films and mixed molybdenum/tungsten oxide films prepared by PE-CVD from the hexafluorides differ markedly from vacuum evaporated films. Their electrochromic responses are spectrally different and are much slower. Lithium ion diffusion rates in such Mo03 films are lower by about three orders of magnitude. These differences are tentatively attributed to a large fraction of fluorine (Mo:F ratios of the order of 2:1) which are incorporated into the molybdenum and mixed oxides, but are not incorporated into the tungsten oxides.

  16. Synthesis of Novel Sr Sources for Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Hideaki; Machida, Hideaki; Kokubun, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masao

    1994-09-01

    Novel Sr source materials for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of SrTiO3 have been developed. They were synthesized by adding amine, triethylenetetramine (trien) or tetraethylenepentamine (tetraen), to bis-dipivaloylmethanato strontium ( Sr(DPM)2, or strontium-bis-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate). The new sources, Sr(DPM)2-trien2 and Sr(DPM)2-tetraen2, have a low melting point (43 75° C), and are liquid in phase when they are vaporized at 120 130° C. SrTiO3 thin films were prepared on Pt/Ta/ SiO2/Si substrates by MOCVD using the new Sr sources. The dielectric constant of films prepared with Sr(DPM)2-trien2 was 215 for 125 nm thick SrTiO3 films, and leakage current densities were below 10-6 A/cm2 at 1.5 V for 80 nm thick SrTiO3 films. The new Sr sources did not change in quality after 20-time heat cycles between room temperature and 130° C in Ar atmosphere at 40 Torr.

  17. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of thermoresponsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) thin films for cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Jiao, Alex; Yu, Seungjung; You, Jae Bem; Kim, Deok-Ho; Im, Sung Gap

    2013-08-01

    Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) is a thermoresponsive polymer known to be nontoxic, water soluble and biocompatible. Here, PNVCL homopolymer was successfully synthesized for the first time by use of a one-step vapor-phase process, termed initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed that radical polymerization took place from N-vinylcaprolactam monomers without damaging the functional caprolactam ring. A sharp lower critical solution temperature transition was observed at 31°C from the iCVD poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) film. The thermoresponsive PNVCL surface exhibited a hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration with external temperature change, which enabled the thermally modulated attachment and detachment of cells. The conformal coverage of PNVCL film on various substrates with complex topography, including fabrics and nanopatterns, was successfully demonstrated, which can further be utilized to fabricate cell sheets with aligned cell morphology. The advantage of this system is that cells cultured on such thermoresponsive surfaces could be recovered as an intact cell sheet by simply lowering the temperature, eliminating the need for conventional enzymatic treatments.

  18. Thermal and chemical vapor deposition of Si nanowires: Shape control, dispersion, and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colli, A.; Fasoli, A.; Beecher, P.; Servati, P.; Pisana, S.; Fu, Y.; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.; De Franceschi, S.; Hofmann, S.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    We investigate and compare complementary approaches to SiNW production in terms of yield, morphology control, and electrical properties. Vapor-phase techniques are considered, including chemical vapor deposition (with or without the assistance of a plasma) and thermal evaporation. We report Au-catalyzed nucleation of SiNWs at temperatures as low as 300 deg. C using SiH{sub 4} as precursor. We get yields up to several milligrams by metal-free condensation of SiO powders. For all processes, we control the final nanostructure morphology. We then report concentrated and stable dispersions of SiNWs in solvents compatible with semiconducting organic polymers. Finally, we investigate the electrical response of intrinsic SiNWs grown by different methods. All our SiNWs exhibit p-type behavior and comparable performance, though in some cases ambipolar devices are observed. Thus, processing and morphology, rather than the growth technique, are key to achieve optimal samples for applications.

  19. Enhanced chemical vapor deposition of copper from (hfac)Cu(TMVS) using liquid coinjection of TMVS

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.A.; Parmeter, J.E.; Apblett, C.A.; Gonzales, M.F.; Smith, P.M.; Omstead, T.R.; Norman, J.A.T.

    1995-03-01

    A direct liquid connection system has been applied to the chemical vapor deposition of copper using the commercially available Cu(I) precursor (hfac)Cu(TMVS), where hfac = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate and TMVS = trimethylvinyl-silane. Precursor delivery was enhanced through the use of a coinjection system wherein additional TMVS was mixed with tire copper precursor before injection into the vaporization chamber. The results reported here demonstrate the capability of depositing blanket cooper for high purity (on the order of 99.99% copper) and low resistivity (1.85 {+-} 0.1 {mu}{Omega}-cm). These copper films have been deposited at rates up to and exceeding 1,500 {angstrom}/min. The effects of temperature and carrier gas on deposition rate and resistivity are examined. The as-deposited films demonstrate and dependence of grain size with thickness and little structural or morphological change with annealing. This study suggests that liquid coinjection is an effective method for enhancing deposition rates and for producing high quality copper films from copper(I) precursors.

  20. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  1. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  2. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen; Chen, Mingming; Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei; Chen, Anqi; Zhu, Hai; Tang, Zikang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future.

  3. Thermal and chemical vapor deposition of Si nanowires: Shape control, dispersion, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, A.; Fasoli, A.; Beecher, P.; Servati, P.; Pisana, S.; Fu, Y.; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.; De Franceschi, S.; Hofmann, S.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    We investigate and compare complementary approaches to SiNW production in terms of yield, morphology control, and electrical properties. Vapor-phase techniques are considered, including chemical vapor deposition (with or without the assistance of a plasma) and thermal evaporation. We report Au-catalyzed nucleation of SiNWs at temperatures as low as 300°C using SiH4 as precursor. We get yields up to several milligrams by metal-free condensation of SiO powders. For all processes, we control the final nanostructure morphology. We then report concentrated and stable dispersions of SiNWs in solvents compatible with semiconducting organic polymers. Finally, we investigate the electrical response of intrinsic SiNWs grown by different methods. All our SiNWs exhibit p-type behavior and comparable performance, though in some cases ambipolar devices are observed. Thus, processing and morphology, rather than the growth technique, are key to achieve optimal samples for applications.

  4. Temperature regulated-chemical vapor deposition for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Il Hee; Kim, Dae Han; Park, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a novel strategy for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous Al2O3 with a mean pore size of ∼12 nm and particle size of ∼1 mm. Ni-precursor vapor and ambient atmosphere were filled in a closed chamber with mesoporous Al2O3, and the chamber was initially heated at ∼100 °C, at which no chemical reaction between the inorganic precursor, oxygen, water vapor in the atmosphere, and the surface of Al2O3 took place. Next, the temperature of the system was increased to 260 °C for deposition of NiO. We found that NiO nanoparticles were not only deposited on the surface, but were also incorporated in a 50 μm-deep region of the mesoporous Al2O3 gel. We also demonstrated high CO oxidation activity and reusability of the deactivated NiO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the aforementioned method. These results suggest that our strategy could be widely applicable to the incorporation of various nanoparticles into mesoporous supports.

  5. The Vapor Pressure of Environmentally Significant Organic Chemicals: A Review of Methods and Data at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Site, A.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental techniques and the prediction procedures for the determination or evaluation of the vapor pressure of environmentally relevant organic compounds are described; with 259 references examined. For each of them the characteristics of precision and accuracy are given, when available from the literature. The experimental methods are classified as {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect.{close_quotes} The first class includes all those which can measure directly the vapor pressure, while the second concerns those which need {open_quotes}known{close_quotes} vapor pressures of reference compounds for the calibration. Prediction methods are based on the application of the Clapeyron{endash}Clausius equation or on the quantitative structure-property relationships. Also correlation methods require a suitable calibration. The vapor pressures at ambient temperature for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, selected pesticides, and some reference compounds are tabulated together with the vapor pressure equations and the enthalpy values in the temperature range of measurement. A critical comparison, based on a statistical analysis of the data obtained with different methods and derived from 152 references, is also carried out. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society.}{ital Key words:} chlorinated biphenyls; chlorinated dioxins; critically reviewed data; critically reviewed methods; pesticides; polynuclear aromatics; vapor pressure. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  6. Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition of Bi2Se3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brom, Joseph E.; Weiss, Lauren; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-10-01

    Bi2Se3 thin films were grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) using trimethyl bismuth (TMBi) and Se pellets. A Se-rich environment is created by evaporating Se pellets in the vicinity of the substrate, which is used to suppress the formation of Se vacancies. The effects of pre-cracking temperature and substrate/Se temperature on the growth rate, structural and electrical properties of the Bi2Se3 films were investigated. C-axis oriented films were obtained which show a reduction in the carrier concentration as pre-cracking temperature was increased from 290 °C (1.6×1019 cm-3) to 350 °C (8.4×1018 cm-3). An additional reduction in carrier concentration (7.28×1018 cm-3) was observed on increasing the substrate temperature from 200 to 260 °C.

  7. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, R; Munuera, C; Martínez, J I; Azpeitia, J; Gómez-Aleixandre, C; García-Hernández, M

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq(-1). The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  8. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Brown, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  9. Synthesis of zirconia (ZrO2) nanowires via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, M. K.; Park, S. J.; Choi, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Monoclinic zirconia nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using ZrCl4 powder as a starting material at 1200 °C and 760 Torr. Graphite was employed as a substrate, and an Au thin film was pre-deposited on the graphite as a catalyst. The zirconia nanostructure morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data, the resulting crystal structure was found to be single crystalline monoclinic zirconia. The homogeneous distributions of Zr, O and Au were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and there was no metal droplet at the nanowire tips despite the use of an Au metal catalyst. This result is apart from that of conventional metal catalyzed nanowires.

  10. High quality AlN epilayers grown on nitrided sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaming; Xu, Fujun; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xinqiang; Qin, Zhixin; Shen, Bo

    2017-02-21

    Influence of sapphire pretreatment conditions on crystalline quality of AlN epilayers has been investigated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Compared to alumination treatment, it is found that appropriate sapphire nitridation significantly straightens the surface atomic terraces and decreases the X-ray diffraction (0002) full width at half maximum (FWHM) to a minimum of 55 arcsec, indicating a great improvement of the tilting feature of the grain structures in the AlN epilayer. More importantly, there is no inversion domains (IDs) found in the AlN epilayers, which clarifies that optimal sapphire nitridation is promising in the growth of high quality AlN. It is deduced that the different interfacial atomic structures caused by various pretreatment conditions influence the orientation of the AlN nucleation layer grains, which eventually determines the tilting features of the AlN epilayers.

  11. Influence of Carbon in Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer WSe2 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.; Zhang, Fu; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Alem, Nasim; Jackson, Thomas N.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is a promising technique to form large-area, uniform films of monolayer or few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films; however, unintentional carbon incorporation is a concern. In this work, we report the presence of a defective graphene layer that forms simultaneously during MOCVD growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on sapphire at high growth temperature and high Se:W ratio when using tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) and dimethyl selenide ((CH3)2Se, DMSe) as precursors. The graphene layer alters the surface energy of the substrate reducing the lateral growth and coalescence of WSe2 domains. The use of hydrogen selenide (H2Se) instead of DMSe eliminates the defective graphene layer enabling coalesced monolayer and few-layer WSe2 films.

  12. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Th.; Carlsson, J.-O.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C. S.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020-1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  13. 3D simulation of tungsten low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, E.; Lorenz, J.

    1995-10-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3D) simulation of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in arbitrary geometries using a segment-based topography discretization with triangles combined with the calculation of particle fluxes to the wafer surface. The simulation program is applied to tungsten LPCVD using the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6) by silane (SiH 4). We found that an approach in which the redistribution of the SiH 4 molecules is simulated and a constant reaction probability after collision of a SiH 4 molecule with the surface is assumed allows the simulation of this process with a reaction probability which is consistent with thermodynamic calculations. A comparison between a simulated 3D profile and experimental data from tungsten LPCVD in a contact hole shows very good agreement between experiment and simulation.

  14. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J.

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  15. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, T.; Carlsson, J.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C.S.

    1988-09-15

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020--1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  16. Mechanism for chemical-vapor deposition of tungsten on silicon from tungsten hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; McFeely, F.R.

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism for the growth of tungsten films on silicon substrates with the use of low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition from WF/sub 6/ was studied with soft-x-ray photoemission by growing films in situ. The dissociative chemisorption of WF/sub 6/ on Si(111) was found to be complete, even at room temperature. The reaction is self-poisoning at room temperature, however, as the fluorine liberated from WF/sub 6/ ties up the active Si sites responsible for the dissociation. The mechanism for continued growth of tungsten films at elevated temperature was determined to proceed via Si diffusion through the layer towards the surface. Post-fluorination of these films via XeF/sub 2/ was employed as a means for illustrating their morphology.

  17. Mechanism for chemical-vapor deposition of tungsten on silicon from tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; McFeely, F. Read

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism for the growth of tungsten films on silicon substrates with the use of low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition from WF6 was studied with soft-x-ray photoemission by growing films in situ. The dissociative chemisorption of WF6 on Si(111) was found to be complete, even at room temperature. The reaction is self-poisoning at room temperature, however, as the fluorine liberated from WF6 ties up the active Si sites responsible for the dissociation. The mechanism for continued growth of tungsten films at elevated temperature was determined to proceed via Si diffusion through the layer towards the surface. Post-fluorination of these films via XeF2 was employed as a means for illustrating their morphology.

  18. Boron nitride nanowires synthesis via a simple chemical vapor deposition at 1200 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Pervaiz; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Khan, Ziaul Raza

    2015-04-24

    A very simple chemical vapor deposition technique is used to synthesize high quality boron nitride nanowires at 1200 °C within a short growth duration of 30 min. FESEM micrograph shows that the as-synthesized boron nitride nanowires have a clear wire like morphology with diameter in the range of ∼20 to 150 nm. HR-TEM confirmed the wire-like structure of boron nitride nanowires, whereas XPS and Raman spectroscopy are used to find out the elemental composition and phase of the synthesized material. The synthesized boron nitride nanowires have potential applications as a sensing element in solid state neutron detector, neutron capture therapy and microelectronic devices with uniform electronic properties.

  19. Reducing flicker noise in chemical vapor deposition graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Heather N.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Schmucker, Scott W.; Cress, Cory D.; Luck, Kyle A.; Friedman, Adam L.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene derived from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) holds promise for scalable radio frequency (RF) electronic applications. However, prevalent low-frequency flicker noise (1/f noise) in CVD graphene field-effect transistors is often up-converted to higher frequencies, thus limiting RF device performance. Here, we achieve an order of magnitude reduction in 1/f noise in field-effect transistors based on CVD graphene transferred onto silicon oxide substrates by utilizing a processing protocol that avoids aqueous chemistry after graphene transfer. Correspondingly, the normalized noise spectral density (10-7-10-8 μm2 Hz-1) and noise amplitude (4 × 10-8-10-7) in these devices are comparable to those of exfoliated and suspended graphene. We attribute the reduction in 1/f noise to a decrease in the contribution of fluctuations in the scattering cross-sections of carriers arising from dynamic redistribution of interfacial disorder.

  20. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  1. X-ray Tomographic Study of Chemical Vapor Infiltration Processing of Ceramic Composites.

    PubMed

    Kinney, J H; Breunig, T M; Starr, T L; Haupt, D; Nichols, M C; Stock, S R; Butts, M D; Saroyan, R A

    1993-05-07

    The fabrication of improved ceramic-matrix composites will require a better understanding of processing variables and how they control the development of the composite microstructure. Noninvasive, high-resolution methods of x-ray tomography have been used to measure the growth of silicon carbide in a woven Nicalon-fiber composite during chemical vapor infiltration. The high spatial resolution allows one to measure the densification within individual fiber tows and to follow the closure of macroscopic pores in situ. The experiments provide a direct test of a recently proposed model that describes how the surface area available for matrix deposition changes during infiltration. The measurements indicate that this surface area is independent of the fiber architecture and location within the preform and is dominated by large-scale macroporosity during the final stages of composite consolidation. The measured surface areas are in good agreement with the theoretical model.

  2. Finite volume model for forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W.

    1991-03-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successfully technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by many to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification.

  3. Growth of continuous graphene by open roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guofang; Wu, Xingyi; D'Arsie, Lorenzo; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Rupesinghe, Nalin L.; Jouvray, Alex; Robertson, John

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the growth of high-quality, continuous monolayer graphene on Cu foils using an open roll-to-roll (R2R) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor with both static and moving foil growth conditions. N2 instead of Ar was used as carrier gas to reduce process cost, and the concentrations of H2 and CH4 reactants were kept below the lower explosive limit to ensure process safety for reactor ends open to ambient. The carrier mobility of graphene deposited at a Cu foil winding speed of 5 mm/min was 5270-6040 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature (on 50 μm × 50 μm Hall devices). These results will enable the inline integration of graphene CVD for industrial R2R production.

  4. Growth of well-oriented VACNTs using thermal chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    The remarkable properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them attractive for biosensor applications, especially for medical detecting devices. In this paper, we describe a process to grow high oriented ratio CNT arrays to improve the electrical properties of the devices based on CNTs. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to grow highly oriented CNT using camphor as the carbon source, and argon and hydrogen as carrier gases to grow perpendicular CNTs on the surface of the silicon substrate in presence of ferrocene as a metallic catalyst. Images were revealed by FESEM indicates that the formation mechanism of oriented CNTs with high morphological purity nanotubes, which is depends significantly on deposition time and applied temperature to the furnaces. This method might be an effective method to produce oriented MWCNT in different length.

  5. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition (phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.; Plahutnik, F.

    1981-01-01

    A dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process demonstrated is capable of producing, at low cost, high quality polycrystalline silicon. Testing of decomposition reactor heat shields to insure that the shield provides adequate personnel protection assuming a worst case explosion was completed. Minor modifications to a production reactor heat shield provided adequate heat shield integrity. Construction of the redesigned PDU (Process Development Unit) to accommodate all safety related information proceeded on schedule. Structural steel work was completed as is the piping and instrumentation design work. Major pieces of process equipment were received and positioned in the support structure and all transfer piping and conduits to the PDU were installed. Construction was completed on a feed system for supplying DCS to an intermediate sized reactor. The feed system was successfully interfaced with a reactor equipped with a modified heat shield. Reactor checkout was completed.

  6. Study of surface morphology and alignment of MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shukrullah, S. E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my Mohamed, N. M. E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my Shaharun, M. S. E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my; Yasar, M.

    2014-10-24

    In this research work, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized successfully by using floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Different ferrocene amounts (0.1, 0.125 and 0.15 g) were used as catalyst and ethylene was used as a carbon precursor at reaction temperature of 800°C. Characterization of the grown MWCNTs was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed that the catalyst weight affects the nanotubes diameter, alignment, crystallinity and growth significantly, whereas negligible influence was noticed on CNTs forest length. The dense, uniform and meadow like patterns of grown CNTs were observed for 0.15 g ferrocene. The average diameter of the grown CNTs was found in the range of 32 to 75 nm. Close inspection of the TEM images also confirmed the defects in some of the grown CNTs, where few black spots were evident in CNTs structure.

  7. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi3Fe5O12, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches -5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods.

  8. Synchrotron radiation x-ray beam profile monitor using chemical vapor deposition diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Togo; Takahashi, Sunao; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Hirono, Toko; Tachibana, Takeshi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2006-12-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) of a Si-doped polycrystalline diamond film fabricated using the chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to measure the profile of a synchrotron radiation pink x-ray beam emitted from an in-vacuum hybrid undulator at the SPring-8 facility. The spectrum of the section of the diamond film penetrated by the emitted visible red light exhibited a peak at 739 nm and a wideband structure extending from 550 to 700 nm. The PL intensity increased with the absorbed dose of the incident beam in the diamond within a dynamic range of 10{sup 3}. A two-dimensional distribution of the PL intensity revealed the undulator beam profile.

  9. Controlling nucleation of monolayer WSe2 during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Oliveros Colon, Víctor; Nie, Yifan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a semiconducting, two-dimensional (2D) material that has gained interest in the device community recently due to its electronic properties. The synthesis of atomically thin WSe2, however, is still in its infancy. In this work we elucidate the requirements for large selenium/tungsten precursor ratios and explain the effect of nucleation temperature on the synthesis of WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The introduction of a nucleation-step prior to growth demonstrates that increasing nucleation temperature leads to a transition from a Volmer-Weber to Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. Additionally, the nucleation step prior to growth leads to an improvement of WSe2 layer coverage on the substrate. Finally, we note that the development of this two-step technique may allow for improved control and quality of 2D layers grown via CVD and MOCVD processes.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Chemical Vapor Deposition with Prediction of Gravity Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Spear, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study to characterize the effects of gravitationally-induced transport on atmospheric pressure silicon epitaxy by SiH4 pyrolysis is planned. Experimentally, flow regimes in which free convective transport contributes to the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process will be identified, and, for these conditions, the flow and deposition process will be characterized. Specifically, this will include measurements of three dimensional temperature variations using in situ Rayleigh scattering, gas phase composition profiles using laser absorption and fluorescence techniques, and deposition rates and defect densities. Subsequently, the free convective transport contribution to the CVD process will be minimized and/or altered while leaving deposition chemistry unaltered, and the characterization will be repeated. Based on these analyses, the effects of gravitationally-induced transport on atmospheric pressure CVD will be assessed.

  11. Modification of tubular ceramic membranes with carbon nanotubes using catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc Trung; Thieffry, Guillemette; Jacob, Matthieu; Batiot-Dupeyrat, Catherine; Teychene, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully grown on tubular ceramic membranes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. CNTs were synthesized at 650°C for 3-6 h under a 120 mL min(-1) flow of C2H6 on ceramic membranes impregnated with iron salt. The synthesis procedure was beforehand optimized in terms of catalyst amount, impregnation duration and reaction temperature, using small pieces of tubular ceramic membranes. The yield, size and structure of the CNTs produced were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis and microscopic imaging techniques. Afterwards, preliminary filtration tests with alginate and phenol were performed on two modified tubular membranes. The results indicate that the addition of CNTs on the membrane material increased the permeability of ceramic membrane and its ability to reject alginate and adsorb phenol, yet decreased its fouling resistance.

  12. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (∼8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited tungsten with dispersed carbides for Space Shuttle check valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposited tungsten with dispersed carbides was selected as the material for Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering and Reaction Control Systems check valve poppets and seats. The selection followed a NASA-sponsored prototype check valve development program utilizing the cutter-seal shell poppet concept. The poppet material is deposited as a coating approximately 0.9 mm thick and fabricated into a shell as a free standing body. The seat material is deposited as a coating 1.1 mm thick on a seat blank, and the cutter seal is machined in the coating. Module tests demonstrated that the material could be ground and lapped to very sharp edges and could cut through typical system contaminants without excessive damage to the sealing surfaces. The material was also determined to be unaffected by exposure to a strongly oxidizing storable propellant.

  14. Robust Ultralow-k Dielectric (Fluorocarbon) Deposition by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yoshiyuki; Miyatani, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Kawamura, Kohei; Nemoto, Takenao; Nakamura, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Ito, Azumi; Shirotori, Akihide; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Matsuoka, Takaaki

    2012-05-01

    A robust fluorocarbon film was successfully deposited on a substrate at a temperature above 400 °C by the new microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWPE-CVD) method using the linear C5F8 precursor instead of a conventional cyclic C5F8 one. The fluorocarbon performed keeping the dielectric constant low as a value of 2.25 by controlling the molecular structure forming cross-linked poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) chains with configurational carbon atoms. The novel fluorocarbon demonstrates less fluorine degassing at an elevated temperature, with high mechanical strength and without degradation of adhesion of the fluorocarbon film to SiCN and SiOx stacked films after thermal stress at 400 °C and 1 atm N2 for 1 h. Consequently, this robust fluorocarbon film is considered a promising candidate for general porous silicon materials with applications to practical integration processes as an interlayer dielectric.

  15. Thermal conductivity of ultra-thin chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. T.; Haque, M. A.; Bresnehan, M. S.; Robinson, J. A.

    2014-01-06

    Thermal conductivity of freestanding 10 nm and 20 nm thick chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films was measured using both steady state and transient techniques. The measured value for both thicknesses, about 100 ± 10 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}, is lower than the bulk basal plane value (390 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}) due to the imperfections in the specimen microstructure. Impressively, this value is still 100 times higher than conventional dielectrics. Considering scalability and ease of integration, hexagonal boron nitride grown over large area is an excellent candidate for thermal management in two dimensional materials-based nanoelectronics.

  16. Si delta-doped field-effect transistors by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, N.; Carter, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Hendriks, H.; Zheng, X. L.; Kim, M. H.

    1991-07-01

    Si delta-doped GaAs field-effect transistors (FETs) are demonstrated by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and characterized by Hall-effect, capacitance-voltage (C-V), and Shubnikov de-Haas measurements. The Si delta doping was accomplished by interrupting the growth and flowing silane with controlled timing under an arsenic overpressure. Devices with 0.5 μm gate length (Ns=2.2×1012 cm-2) were fabricated with a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 140 mS/mm and a current gain cutoff frequency of 17 GHz. The transconductance as a function of gate voltage showed a plateau region through a range of 1.5 V further supporting spatial confinement of the electrons.

  17. Preparation of dilute magnetic semiconductor films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouhi, Akbar (Inventor); Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method for preparation of a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) film is provided, wherein a Group II metal source, a Group VI metal source and a transition metal magnetic ion source are pyrolyzed in the reactor of a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system by contact with a heated substrate. As an example, the preparation of films of Cd.sub.1-x Mn.sub.x Te, wherein 0.ltoreq..times..ltoreq.0.7, on suitable substrates (e.g., GaAs) is described. As a source of manganese, tricarbonyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) maganese (TCPMn) is employed. To prevent TCPMn condensation during the introduction thereof int the reactor, the gas lines, valves and reactor tubes are heated. A thin-film solar cell of n-i-p structure, wherein the i-type layer comprises a DMS, is also described; the i-type layer is suitably prepared by MOCVD.

  18. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 {Omega}/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  19. X-ray tomographic study of chemical vapor infiltration processing of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Haupt, D.; Saroyan, R.A. ); Breunig, T.M.; Nichols, M.C. ); Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Butts, M.D. )

    1993-05-07

    The fabrication of improved ceramic-matrix composites will require a better understanding of processing variables and how they control the development of the composite microstructure. Noninvasive, high-resolution methods of x-ray tomography have been used to measure the growth of silicon carbide in a woven Nicalon-fiber composite during chemical vapor infiltration. The high spatial resolution allows one to measure the densification within individual fiber tows and to follow the closure of macroscopic pores in situ. The experiments provide a direct test of a recently proposed model that describes how the surface area available for matrix deposition changes during infiltration. The measurements indicate that this surface area is independent of the fiber architecture and location within the preform and is dominated by large-scale macroporosity during the final stages of composite consolidation. The measured surface areas are in good agreement with the theoretical model. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition of ZrF4-Based Fluoride Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiura, Kazuo; Ohishi, Yasutake; Takahashi, Shiro

    1989-01-01

    By organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD), fluoride glasses in a ZrF4-BaF2 binary system are successfully synthesized. β-Diketone chelates of Zr and Ba as starting materials can be volatilized and completely fluorinated with HF gas into ZrF4-BaF2 compounds. 65 mol%ZrF4-35 mol%BaF2 powder synthesized by OMCVD is identified as homogeneous glass by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By this method, ZrF4 is also obtained in an amorphous state. The OMCVD is available for preparation of fluoride glass, which is promising for optical fiber.

  1. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  2. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  3. Controlled modification of nanoporous gold: Chemical vapor deposition of TiO2 in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, A.; Ragazzon, D.; Walle, L. E.; Farstad, M. H.; Wichmann, A.; Bäumer, M.; Borg, A.; Sandell, A.

    2013-10-01

    TiO2 has been deposited in the first 400 nm of a nanoporous gold (NPG) structure using metal organic chemical vapor deposition with titanium-tetraisopropoxide as single source precursor in ultra high vacuum. The NPG has been pretreated by ozone to clean and stabilize the structure for deposition. The deposited oxide stabilizes the porous structure, otherwise prone to coarsening at elevated temperatures, up to 300 °C. The study combines the controlled sample preparation with a functional test of the prepared catalyst under real conditions in a continuous gas flow reactor. The catalytic activity of the loaded NPG at 60 °C for CO oxidation is found to be superior to unloaded as-prepared NPG.

  4. Growth of carbon nanotubes by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor processes on silicon-based substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelucci, Renato; Rizzoli, Rita; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Fortuna Bevilacqua, Maria; Guerri, Sergio; Corticelli, Franco; Passini, Mara

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a site-selective catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes on silicon-based substrates has been developed in order to get horizontally oriented nanotubes for field effect transistors and other electronic devices. Properly micro-fabricated silicon oxide and polysilicon structures have been used as substrates. Iron nanoparticles have been obtained both from a thin Fe film evaporated by e-gun and from iron nitrate solutions accurately dispersed on the substrates. Single-walled nanotubes with diameters as small as 1 nm, bridging polysilicon and silicon dioxide “pillars”, have been grown. The morphology and structure of CNTs have been characterized by SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jiangling; Su Shi; Kundrat, Vojtech; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao; Zhou Lei; Mushtaq, Fajer; Ouyang Defang; James, David; Roberts, Darren

    2013-01-14

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  6. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  7. Growth of FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yuji Kaneko, Tetsuya; Hori, Kenta; Takase, Sho; Sato, Hideki; Maeda, Kohji; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Jimbo, Mutsuko

    2014-03-15

    FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition using an Fe/Pt bilayer catalyst. The CNTs were grown according to the base growth model. Selected area electron diffraction results revealed that the encapsulated particles were A1-FePt, L1{sub 0}-FePt, and Fe{sub 3}PtC. The crystal structures of particles found at the root parts of CNTs were not able to be identified, however. The layered structure of catalytic films seemed to be responsible for the difference in Pt content between particles found at tip and root parts of CNTs. Approximately 60% of CNTs grown at 800 °C had particles at their tip parts, compared to only 30% when the growth temperature was 700 °C, indicating that higher process temperatures promote particle encapsulation in CNTs.

  8. Carbon agent chemical vapor transport growth of Ga2O3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Su; Tong, Liu; Jingming, Liu; Jun, Yang; Guiying, Shen; Yongbiao, Bai; Zhiyuan, Dong; Youwen, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Beta-type gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) is a new attractive material for optoelectronic devices. Different methods had been tried to grow high quality β-Ga2O3 crystals. In this work, crystal growth of Ga2O3 has been carried out by chemical vapor transport (CVT) method in a closed quartz tube using C as transport agent and sapphire wafer as seed. The CVT mass flux has been analyzed by theoretical calculations based on equilibrium thermodynamics and 1D diffusional mass transport. The crystal growth experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical predictions. Influence factors of Ga2O3 crystal growth, such as temperature distribution, amount of C as transport agent used, have also been discussed. Structural (XRD) and optical (Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectrum) properties of the CVT-Ga2O3 crystal are presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474104, 61504131).

  9. Identification of reaction products in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gaczi, P.J.; Reynolds, G.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The gaseous species produced by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum silicide in a cold wall reactor were identified by mass spectroscopy. Lowering the ionizing electron energy made possible the unambiguous assignment of the mass spectra to individual species and also permitted useful quantitative estimates to be made. Thermodynamic calculations using the computer program SOLGASMIX were carried out on the M-Si-H-F (M = Mo, W) quaternary system. Both experiment and calculation indicate that the fluorosilanes were the major gaseous reaction by-products, with SiHF{sub 3} being the most abundant for the experimental conditions investigated here. The changes in the process with substrate temperature were also investigated and are discussed with reference to both thermodynamic and kinetic effects.

  10. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.; Hemawan, Kadek W.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been successfully synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ and Hα were observed in emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealmore » that, depending on the on growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.« less

  11. Optical properties of InP doping superlattices grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Viner, J. M.; Taylor, P. C.; Yaun, J. S.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1987-04-01

    Photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and photoreflectance spectroscopy are applied to InP doping superlattices grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. It is observed that the emission peak and line shape depend on the optical excitation intensity; the peak of the CW PL spectrum increases in energy with the intensity of the pumping light; the highest energy peak is at 888 nm; and the time-resolved PL exhibits long decay times. The energy separation of the quantized subbands is studied by measuring the PR spectra of two samples. The measurements reveal that PR line shapes are explained by photomodulation of the subbands in the conduction band; these line shapes account for the dependence of the spectrum on the power of the exciting light and on the layer thickness.

  12. Growth inhibition to enhance conformal coverage in thin film chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navneet; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Daly, Scott R; Girolami, Gregory S; Abelson, John R

    2008-12-31

    We introduce the use of a growth inhibitor to enhance thin film conformality in low temperature chemical vapor deposition. Films of TiB(2) grown from the single source precursor Ti(BH(4))(3)(dme) are much more highly conformal when grown in the presence of one of the film growth byproducts, 1,2-dimethoxyethane (dme). This effect can be explained in terms of two alternative inhibitory mechanisms: one involving blocking of surface reactive sites, which is equivalent to reducing the rate of the forward reaction leading to film growth, the other analogous to Le Chatelier's principle, in which the addition of a reaction product increases the rate of the back reaction. The reduction in growth rate corresponds to a reduction in the sticking probability of the precursor, which enhances conformality by enabling the precursor to diffuse deeper into a recessed feature before it reacts.

  13. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R.

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  14. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  15. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J.; Sharp, K.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition process for the production of polycrystalline silicon is discussed. Experimental data indicate that the ease of ignition and explosion severity of dichlorosilane (DCS)/air mixtures is substantially attenuated if the DCS is diluted with hydrogen. Redesign of the process development unit to accommodate safety related information is described. Several different sources of trichlorosilane were used to generate a mixture of redistributed chlorosilanes via Dowex ion exchange resin. The unseparated mixtures were then fed to an experimental reactor in which silicon was deposited and the deposited silicon analyzed for electrically active impurities. At least one trichlorosilane source provided material of requisite purity. Silicon grown in the experimental reactor was converted to single crystal material and solar cells fabricated and tested.

  16. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies. PMID:28070341

  17. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} fibrous composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1997-04-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This process produces high purity matrix TiB{sub 2} without damaging the relatively fragile fibers. The program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and scale the process to provide demonstration components.

  18. Superconducting magnesium diboride coatings for radio frequency cavities fabricated by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolak, M. A.; Tan, T.; Krick, A.; Johnson, E.; Hambe, M.; Chen, Ke; Xi, X. X.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the coating of an inner surface of superconducting radio frequency cavities with a magnesium diboride thin film by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD). To simulate a 6 GHz rf cavity, a straight stainless steel tube of 1.5-inch inner diameter and a dummy stainless steel cavity were employed, on which small sapphire and metal substrates were mounted at different locations. The MgB2 films on these substrates showed uniformly good superconducting properties including Tc of 37-40 K, residual resistivity ratio of up to 14, and root-mean-square roughness Rq of 20-30 nm. This work demonstrates the feasibility of coating the interior of cylindrical and curved objects with MgB2 by the HPCVD technique, an important step towards superconducting rf cavities with MgB2 coating.

  19. The response of the ionosphere to the injection of chemically reactive vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    As a gas released in the ionosphere expands, it is rapidly cooled. When the vapor becomes sufficiently tenuous, it is reheated by collisions with the ambient atmosphere and its flow is then governed by diffusive expansion. As the injected gas becomes well mixed with the plasma, a hole is created by chemical processes. In the case of diatomic hydrogen release, depression of the electron concentrations is governed by the charge exchange reaction between oxygen ions and hydrogen, producing positive hydroxyl ions. Hydroxyl ions rapidly react with the electron gas to produce excited oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Enhanced airglow emissions result from the transition of the excited atoms to lower energy states. The electron temperature in the depleted region rises sharply causing a thermal expansion of the plasma and a further reduction in the local plasma concentration.

  20. Influence of gas phase equilibria on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda M; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-04-23

    We have investigated the influence of gas phase chemistry on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene in a hot wall reactor. A new extended parameter space for graphene growth was defined through literature review and experimentation at low pressures (≥0.001 mbar). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dark field optical microscopy, with the latter showing promise as a rapid and nondestructive characterization technique for graphene films. The equilibrium gas compositions have been calculated across this parameter space. Correlations between the graphene films grown and prevalent species in the equilibrium gas phase revealed that deposition conditions associated with a high acetylene equilibrium concentration lead to good quality graphene deposition, and conditions that stabilize large hydrocarbon molecules in the gas phase result in films with multiple defects. The transition between lobed and hexagonal graphene islands was found to be linked to the concentration of the monatomic hydrogen radical, with low concentrations associated with hexagonal islands.

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Graphene Using a Liquid Benzene Precursor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Lee, Jin Seok

    2015-11-01

    Graphene has attracted great attention owing to its unique structural and electrical properties. Among various synthetic approaches of the graphene, metal assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most reasonable and proper method to produce large-scale and low-defect graphene films. Until now, CVD from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth, but high growth temperature is required for such growth. A recent work by using liquid benzene precursor has shown that monolayer graphene could be obtained at 300 degrees C by low pressure, required for high vacuum equipment. Here, we report the first successful attempt of atmospheric pressure CVD graphene growth on Cu foil using liquid benzene as a precursor. We investigated the effect of hydrogen partial pressure, growth time, and precursor temperature on the domain size of as-grown graphene. Also, micro-Raman analysis confirmed that these reaction parameters influenced the number of layer and uniformity of the graphene.

  2. Vertical graphene nanosheets synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Qin, Shengchun; Bai, Shuai; Yue, Hongwei; Li, Yali; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; He, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we explored synthesis of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGNs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Through optimizing the experimental condition, growth of well aligned VGNs with uniform morphologies on nickel-coated stainless steel (SS) was realized for the first time by thermal CVD. In the meantime, influence of growth parameters on the VGN morphology was understood based on the balancing between the concentration and kinetic energy of carbon-containing radicals. Structural characterizations demonstrate that the achieved VGNs are normally composed of several graphene layers and less corrugated compared to the ones synthesized by other approaches, e.g. plasma enhanced (PE) CVD. The field emission measurement indicates that the VGNs exhibit relatively stable field emission and a field enhancement factor of about 1470, which is comparable to the values of VGNs prepared by PECVD can be achieved.

  3. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  4. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  5. Structure and magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles synthesized by chemical vapor condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Jang, T. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, B. K.

    2004-06-01

    Iron nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) without the aid of LN2 chiller. The powder synthesized at 400 °C was a mixture of amorphous and crystalline -Fe. Fully crystallized iron particles were then obtained at and above 600 °C. When the reactor temperature was 1000 °C, however, nonmagnetic -Fe was stabilized together with -Fe. The synthesized particles, mostly possessing the core-shell type structure, were all nearly spherical, but the average particle size rapidly increased as the temperature increased. The surface layer that enclosed the iron core and became thicker in smaller particles was Fe3O4 or Fe3O4-related amorphous. Except for the one synthesized at 1000 °C, the iron nanoparticles were not fully saturated. The iron nanoparticles (20 nm) synthesized at 600 °C exhibited iHc 1.0 kOe and Ms 170 emu/g.

  6. Spectroscopic measurements of the surface stoichiometry of chemical vapor deposited GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, H. S.; Rice, A. L.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Maria, J.-P.

    2011-02-01

    We report on the surface stoichiometry of Ga-polar GaN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition as studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. GaN film surfaces are found to be Ga-rich, with Ga:N ratios ranging from 1.3:1 to 3.2:1. In vacuo ion-beam sputter/annealing studies show that these treatments drive the apparent Ga:N surface composition farther from unity, either through a decrease in surface contamination, oxidation of the surface, or both. Simple annealing experiments decrease the Ga:N ratio. The measured GaN ratio is correlated with the GaN growth time, suggesting that residual Ga precursor after growth interacts with the GaN surface as it cools.

  7. Ultrahigh-mobility graphene devices from chemical vapor deposition on reusable copper

    PubMed Central

    Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Dauber, Jan; Oellers, Martin; Haupt, Federica; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Graphene research has prospered impressively in the past few years, and promising applications such as high-frequency transistors, magnetic field sensors, and flexible optoelectronics are just waiting for a scalable and cost-efficient fabrication technology to produce high-mobility graphene. Although significant progress has been made in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth of graphene, the carrier mobility obtained with these techniques is still significantly lower than what is achieved using exfoliated graphene. We show that the quality of CVD-grown graphene depends critically on the used transfer process, and we report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD growth and making devices with mobilities as high as 350,000 cm2 V–1 s–1, thus rivaling exfoliated graphene. PMID:26601221

  8. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  9. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  10. Antireflective silica nanoparticle array directly deposited on flexible polymer substrates by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jungheum; Bae, Tae-Sung; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Lee, Sunghun; Lee, Gun-Hwan

    2012-11-21

    We report the direct coating of a novel antireflective (AR) nanoarray structure of silica nanoparticles on highly flexible polymer substrates by a conventional vacuum coating method using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Globular-shaped silica nanoparticles are found to be self-arranged in a periodic pattern on subwavelength scales without the use of artificial assemblies that typically require complicated nanolithography or solution-based nanoparticle fabrication approaches. Highly efficient AR characteristics in the visible spectral range are obtained at optimized refractive indices by controlling the dimensions and average distances of the silica nanoparticle arrays in a level accuracy of tens of nanometers. The AR nanoarrays exhibit sufficient structural durability against the very high strain levels that arise from the flexibility of polymer substrates. This simple coating process provides a cost-effective, high-throughput, room-temperature fabrication solution for producing large-area polymer substrates with AR characteristics.

  11. Stress hysteresis and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.; Kamarajugadda, Mallika; Bozeman, Steven P.; Stearns, Laura C.

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive survey is described of the responses of three plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric film systems to thermal cycling and indentation contact. All three films—silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon oxy-nitride—exhibited significant nonequilibrium permanent changes in film stress on thermal cycling or annealing. The linear relationship between stress and temperature changed after the films were annealed at 300 °C, representing a structural alteration in the film reflecting a change in coefficient of thermal expansion or biaxial modulus. A double-substrate method was used to deduce both thermoelastic properties before and after the anneal of selected films and the results were compared with the modulus deconvoluted from small-scale depth-sensing indentation experiments (nanoindentation). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and hydrogen forward scattering were used to deduce the composition of the films and it was found that all the films contained significant amounts of hydrogen.

  12. Electronic properties of monolayer tungsten disulfide grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Abdullah; Shahrjerdi, Davood

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate chemical vapor deposition of large monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2) (>200 μm). Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy provide insight into the structural and strain heterogeneity of the flakes. We observe exciton quenching at grain boundaries that originate from the nucleation site at the center of the WS2 flakes. Temperature variable transport measurements of top-gated WS2 transistors show an apparent metal-to-insulator transition. Variable range and thermally activated hopping mechanisms can explain the carrier transport in the insulating phase at low and intermediate temperatures. The devices exhibit room-temperature field-effect electron mobility as high as 48 cm2/V.s. The mobility increases with decreasing temperature and begins to saturate at below 100 °K, possibly due to Coulomb scattering or defects.

  13. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  14. High quality AlN epilayers grown on nitrided sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaming; Xu, Fujun; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xinqiang; Qin, Zhixin; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Influence of sapphire pretreatment conditions on crystalline quality of AlN epilayers has been investigated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Compared to alumination treatment, it is found that appropriate sapphire nitridation significantly straightens the surface atomic terraces and decreases the X-ray diffraction (0002) full width at half maximum (FWHM) to a minimum of 55 arcsec, indicating a great improvement of the tilting feature of the grain structures in the AlN epilayer. More importantly, there is no inversion domains (IDs) found in the AlN epilayers, which clarifies that optimal sapphire nitridation is promising in the growth of high quality AlN. It is deduced that the different interfacial atomic structures caused by various pretreatment conditions influence the orientation of the AlN nucleation layer grains, which eventually determines the tilting features of the AlN epilayers. PMID:28220829

  15. Spiral Growth of Few-Layer MoS2 by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi; Tomer, Dushyant; Li, Lian

    Monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2 are grown by chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si substrates using MoO3 and S powder as precursors. Before growth, the substrates are pretreated with perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid tetrapotassium salt to promote nucleation. Monolayer MoS2 islands are triangularly shaped with sizes ranging from a few to tens of micrometers, which also exhibits the characteristic Raman bands at 403.36 and 385.05 cm-1 corresponding to the A1g and E2g modes, respectively. Atomic force microscopy imaging further confirms the monolayer thickness to be 0.8 nm. For few-layer MoS2 films, triangular spirals are observed with both left- and right-handed chirality. Raman spectra showed interesting features of these growth spirals, the details of which will be presented at the meeting. NSF DMR-1508560.

  16. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by Argon supported Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Pervaiz; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-03-01

    Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition technique is modified with the use of Argon gas flow inside the chamber as an alternative for vacuum and orientation of one end closed quartz test tube. The use of Argon gas not only simplified the experimental set up, but also made it ~ 18 % cost effective compared to the conventional set up. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs show straight and long BNNTs along with some cotton like morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy revealed bamboo like structure inside the tube and ~0.34 nm interlayer spacing for highly crystalline nature of boron nitride nanotubes. X-ray photon spectroscopy shows B 1s peak at 191.08 eV and N 1s peak at 398.78 eV that represents h-BN. Whereas, Raman spectrum indicates a major peak at ~1379.60 (cm-1) that correspond to E2g mode of h-BN.

  17. Specific heat capacity and density of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    We report on the basic physical quantities of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), namely specific heat capacity and density, which have not been measured to date. A series of differential scanning calorimetry experiments were performed, and specific heat capacity was calculated for multi-walled BNNTs synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using boron and metal oxide as precursor. Very close specific heat capacity values were revealed for BNNTs and a BN powder of hexagonal (h-BN) phase. Densities of BNNTs were measured through density analyses of their epoxy composites. Our work is important as far as bulk properties of large amounts of BNNTs are crucial, for example, thermal property and density prediction for composite materials with BNNTs embedded.

  18. Controllable Synthesis of Graphene by Plasma‐Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Its Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Menglin; Liu, Donghua; Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives hold a great promise for widespread applications such as field‐effect transistors, photovoltaic devices, supercapacitors, and sensors due to excellent properties as well as its atomically thin, transparent, and flexible structure. In order to realize the practical applications, graphene needs to be synthesized in a low‐cost, scalable, and controllable manner. Plasma‐enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is a low‐temperature, controllable, and catalyst‐free synthesis method suitable for graphene growth and has recently received more attentions. This review summarizes recent advances in the PECVD growth of graphene on different substrates, discusses the growth mechanism and its related applications. Furthermore, the challenges and future development in this field are also discussed. PMID:27980983

  19. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire; Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4 μm, with a peak responsivity of up to ∼100 μA/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140 K.

  20. Diameter Tuning of β -Ga2O3 Nanowires Using Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, R.

    2017-03-01

    Diameter tuning of β -Ga2O3 nanowires using chemical vapor deposition technique have been investigated under various experimental conditions. Diameter of root grown β -Ga2O3 nanowires having monoclinic crystal structure is tuned by varying separation distance between metal source and substrate. Effect of gas flow rate and mixer ratio on the morphology and diameter of nanowires has been studied. Nanowire diameter depends on growth temperature, and it is independent of catalyst nanoparticle size at higher growth temperature (850-900 °C) as compared to lower growth temperature (800 °C). These nanowires show changes in structural strain value with change in diameter. Band-gap of nanowires increases with decrease in the diameter.

  1. High quality AlN epilayers grown on nitrided sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaming; Xu, Fujun; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xinqiang; Qin, Zhixin; Shen, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Influence of sapphire pretreatment conditions on crystalline quality of AlN epilayers has been investigated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Compared to alumination treatment, it is found that appropriate sapphire nitridation significantly straightens the surface atomic terraces and decreases the X-ray diffraction (0002) full width at half maximum (FWHM) to a minimum of 55 arcsec, indicating a great improvement of the tilting feature of the grain structures in the AlN epilayer. More importantly, there is no inversion domains (IDs) found in the AlN epilayers, which clarifies that optimal sapphire nitridation is promising in the growth of high quality AlN. It is deduced that the different interfacial atomic structures caused by various pretreatment conditions influence the orientation of the AlN nucleation layer grains, which eventually determines the tilting features of the AlN epilayers.

  2. Thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of Ti-Si-N films for diffusion barrier applications

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, J.S.; Smith, P.M.; Jones, R.V.; Maverick, A.W.; Roberts, D.A.; Norman, J.A.T.; Hochberg, A.K.

    1996-04-01

    Structurally disordered refractory ternary films such as titanium silicon nitride (Ti-Si-N) have potential as advanced diffusion barriers in future ULSI metallization schemes. Here the authors present results on purely thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ti-Si-N. At temperatures between 300 and 450 C, tetrakis(diethylamido)titanium (TDEAT), silane, and ammonia react to grow Ti-Si-N films with Si contents of 0--20 at.%. Typical impurity contents are 5--10 at.%H and 0.5 to 1.5 at.% C, with no O or other impurities detected in the bulk of the film. Although the film resistivity increases with increasing Si content, it remains below 1,000 {micro}{Omega}-cm for films with less than 5 at.% Si. These films are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers.

  3. Improved carrier mobility of chemical vapor deposition-graphene by counter-doping with hydrazine hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Haoran; Sui, Yanping; Zhang, Yaqian; Ge, Xiaoming; Yu, Guanghui Xie, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaoliang; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xinyu

    2015-03-02

    We developed a counter-doping method to tune the electronic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene by varying the concentration and time of graphene exposure to hydrazine hydrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O). The shift of G and 2D peaks of Raman spectroscopy is analyzed as a function of N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O concentration. The result revealed that N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O realized n-type doping on CVD grown graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement proved the existence of nitrogen, which indicated the adsorption of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} on the surface of graphene. After counter-doping, carrier mobility, which was measured by Hall measurements, increased three fold.

  4. In situ nitrogen-doped graphene grown from polydimethylsiloxane by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Yungang; He, Lifang; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Hong, Guo; Wu, Qi-Hui; Gao, Fei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-01-21

    Due to its unique electronic properties and wide spectrum of promising applications, graphene has attracted much attention from scientists in various fields. Control and engineering of graphene’s semiconducting properties is considered to be the key of its applications in electronic devices. Here, we report a novel method to prepare in situ nitrogen-doped graphene by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) as a solid carbon source. Based on this approach, the concentration of nitrogen-doping can be easily controlled via the flow rate of nitrogen during the CVD process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen atoms doped into graphene lattice were mainly in the forms of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures. Moreover, first-principles calculations show that the incorporated nitrogen atoms can lead to p-type doping of graphene. This in situ approach provides a promising strategy to prepare graphene with controlled electronic properties.

  5. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovan, R. Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  6. Vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets: chemical vapor synthesis, ultraviolet light emission, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qin, Li; Hao, Yufeng; Kuang, Shengyong; Bai, Xuedong; Chong, Yat-Ming; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-26

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor with a wide band gap ( approximately 6 eV). Here, we report the synthesis of vertically aligned BN nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-N(2)-H(2). The size, shape, thickness, density, and alignment of the BNNSs were well-controlled by appropriately changing the growth conditions. With changing the gas flow rates of BF(3) and H(2) as well as their ratio, the BNNSs evolve from three-dimensional with branches to two-dimensional with smooth surface and their thickness changes from 20 to below 5 nm. The growth of the BNNSs rather than uniform granular films is attributed to the particular chemical properties of the gas system, mainly the strong etching effect of fluorine. The alignment of the BNNSs is possibly induced by the electrical field generated in plasma sheath. Strong UV light emission with a broad band ranging from 200 to 400 nm and superhydrophobicity with contact angles over 150 degrees were obtained for the vertically aligned BNNSs. The present BNNSs possess the properties complementary to carbon nanosheets such as intrinsically semiconducting, high temperature stability, and high chemical inertness and may find applications in ultraviolet nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, electron field emission, and self-cleaning coatings, etc., especially those working at high temperature and in harsh environments.

  7. Prediction of aqueous solubility, vapor pressure and critical micelle concentration for aquatic partitioning of perfluorinated chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-10-01

    The majority of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of increasing risk to biota and environment due to their physicochemical stability, wide transport in the environment and difficulty in biodegradation. It is necessary to identify and prioritize these harmful PFCs and to characterize their physicochemical properties that govern the solubility, distribution and fate of these chemicals in an aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, available experimental data (10-35 compounds) of three important properties: aqueous solubility (AqS), vapor pressure (VP) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) on per- and polyfluorinated compounds were collected for quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) modeling. Simple and robust models based on theoretical molecular descriptors were developed and externally validated for predictivity. Model predictions on selected PFCs were compared with available experimental data and other published in silico predictions. The structural applicability domains (AD) of the models were verified on a bigger data set of 221 compounds. The predicted properties of the chemicals that are within the AD, are reliable, and they help to reduce the wide data gap that exists. Moreover, the predictions of AqS, VP, and CMC of most common PFCs were evaluated to understand the aquatic partitioning and to derive a relation with the available experimental data of bioconcentration factor (BCF).

  8. Computational Study of Fluid Flow in a Rotational Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2015-11-01

    In a typical Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor, the flow of the reacting gases is one of the most important considerations that must be precisely controlled in order to obtain desired film quality. In general, the fluids enter the reactor chamber, travel over to the heated substrate area, where chemical reactions lead to deposition, and then exit the chamber. However, the flow inside the reactor chamber is not that simple. It would often develop recirculation at various locations inside the reactor due to reactor geometry, flow conditions, buoyancy effects from temperature differences and rotational effects cause by the rotating substrate. This recirculation causes hot spots and affects the overall performance of the reactor. A recirculation fluid packet experiences a longer residence time inside the reactor and, thus, it heats up to higher temperatures causing unwanted chemical reactions and decomposition. It decreases the grow rate and uniformity on the substrate. A mathematical and computational model has been developed to help identify these unwanted hot spots occurring inside the CVD reactor. The model can help identify the user parameters needed to reduce the recirculation effects and better control the flow. Flow rates, pressures, rotational speeds and temperatures can all affect the severity of the recirculation within the reactor. The model can also help assist future designs as the geometry plays a big role in controlling fluid flow. The model and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  9. Comprehensive investigation of HgCdTe metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this experimental and theoretical research program was to explore the possibility of depositing high quality epitaxial CdTe and HgCdTe at very low pressures through metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We explored two important aspects of this potential process: (1) the interaction of molecular flow transport and deposition in an MOCVD reactor with a commercial configuration, and (2) the kinetics of metal alkyl source gas adsorption, decomposition and desorption from the growing film surface using ultra high vacuum surface science reaction techniques. To explore the transport-reaction issue, we have developed a reaction engineering analysis of a multiple wafer-in-tube ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) reactor which allows an estimate of wafer or substrate throughput for a reactor of fixed geometry and a given deposition chemistry with specified film thickness uniformity constraints. The model employs a description of ballistic transport and reaction based on the pseudo-steady approximation to the Boltzmann equation in the limit of pure molecular flow. The model representation takes the form of an integral equation for the flux of each reactant or intermediate species to the wafer surfaces. Expressions for the reactive sticking coefficients (RSC) for each species must be incorporated in the term which represents reemission from a wafer surface. The interactions of MOCVD precursors with Si and CdTe were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in ultra high vacuum combined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). These studies revealed that diethyltellurium (DETe) and dimethylcadmium (DMCd) adsorb weakly on clean Si(100) and desorb upon heating without decomposing. These precursors adsorb both weakly and strongly on CdTe(111)A, with DMCd exhibiting the stronger interaction with the surface than DETe.

  10. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiOx, or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H2 gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000°C were achieved even in 200 Torr H2. We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  11. Development of aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition for thin film fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Marthatika, Dian; Panatarani, Camellia; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to grow a thin film applied in many industrial applications. This paper report the development of an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) which is one of the CVD methods. Newly developed AACVD system consists of a chamber of pyrex glass, two wire-heating elements placed to cover pyrex glass, a substrate holder, and an aerosol generator using an air brush sprayer. The temperature control system was developed to prevent condensation on the chamber walls. The control performances such as the overshoot and settling time were obtained from of the developed temperature controller. Wire-heating elements were controlled at certain setting value to heat the injected aerosol to form a thin film in the substrate. The performance of as-developed AACVD system tested to form a thin film where aerosol was sprayed into the chamber with a flow rate of 7 liters/minutes, and vary in temperatures and concentrations of precursor. The temperature control system have an overshoot around 25 °C from the desired set point temperature, very small temperature ripple 2 °C and a settling time of 20 minutes. As-developed AACVD successfully fabricated a ZnO thin film with thickness of below 1 µm. The performances of system on formation of thin films influenced by the generally controlled process such as values of setting temperature and concentration where the aerosol flow rate was fixed. Higher temperature was applied, the more uniform ZnO thin films were produced. In addition, temperature of the substrate also affected on surface roughness of the obtained films, while concentration of ZnO precursor determined the thickness of produce films. It is concluded that newly simple AACVD can be applied to produce a thin film.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  13. Synthesis of nanoscale materials via a novel chemical vapor deposition based apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Kevin L.

    Nanoscale materials are of interest due to the unusual properties afforded by their size. Two such morphologies, nanoparticles and the recently discovered "nanobelt" materials, are explored in this thesis. A novel nanoscale material synthesis apparatus was constructed. It consists of four primary components: an evaporation chamber, a chemical vapor deposition furnace, a collection chamber, and a powder reservoir. A two-stage subsonic jet separates the first two components, permitting nanoparticle production to occur independently of subsequent chemical and thermal treatment. An experimental design was conducted to examine the roles of several variables during the formation of graphite-encapsulated nickel nanoparticles. Coating morphology was strongly dependent on furnace temperature, which exhibited a more subtle influence on mean particle size. The percentage of nickel surviving acid treatment depended primarily on hydrocarbon identity, as well as furnace temperature and carbon atom flux. Acetylene at high temperature yielded crystalline carbon coatings and the greatest percentage of protected nickel achieved, but with an excess of carbon in the product. Additional encapsulated nickel experiments were conducted with reduced acetylene flowrates and a staggered furnace temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis of the as-collected powder revealed that the coating was a crystalline and amorphous carbon hybrid. While this coating effectively protected large clumps of embedded nickel, removal of the amorphous carbon by oxidation rendered individual particles susceptible to hydrochloric acid attack. Amorphous silica was introduced as an alternative coating material via tetraethoxysilane decomposition. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the production of well-dispersed, acid-resistant particles with a nickel core and silica shell. The synthesis of nanoscale alumina heterogeneous catalyst substrates was investigated. Exposure of aluminum nanoparticles to large

  14. Dynamics of chemical vapor sensing with MoS2 using 1T/2H phase contacts/channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; Perkins, F. Keith; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Culbertson, James C.; Campbell, Paul M.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) films show remarkable potential for use in chemical vapor sensing devices. Electronic devices fabricated from TMD films are inexpensive, inherently flexible, low-power, amenable to industrial-scale processing because of emergent growth techniques, and have shown high sensitivity and selectivity to electron donor analyte molecules important for explosives and nerve gas detection. However, for devices reported to date, the conductance response to chemical vapors is dominated by Schottky contacts, to the detriment of the sensitivity, selectivity, recovery, and obscuring their intrinsic behavior. Here, we use contact engineering to transition the contacts in a MoS2 FET-based chemical vapor sensor to the 1T conducting phase, while leaving the channel in the 2H semiconducting state, and thus providing Ohmic contacts to the film. We demonstrate that the resultant sensors have much improved electrical characteristics, are more selective, and recover fully after chemical vapor exposure--all major enhancements to previously MoS2 sensor devices. We identify labile nitrogen-containing electron donors as the primary species that generate a response in MoS2, and we study the dynamics of the sensing reactions, identifying two possible qualitative models for the chemical sensing reaction.

  15. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents and other adults use alcohol socially — having beer or wine with dinner, for example — alcohol seems ... besides just hanging out in someone's basement drinking beer all night. Plan a trip to the movies, ...

  16. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  17. Deposition of silicon carbide using the chemical vapor composites process: Process characterization and comparison with RASSPVDN model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N. ); Reagan, P.; Robbins, M. )

    1993-07-01

    In this work, we explore the use of the chemical vapor composites (CVC) process to increase the rates of silicon carbide (SiC) growth on graphite substrates. Large SiC seed particles are used that deposit by gravity-driven sedimentation. The results show that addition of large ([ital d][sub [ital p

  18. Development of a Ge/GaAs HMT (High Mobility Transistor) Technology Based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    R SEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE RTI/3628/89-3QTR November 1089 0 00 DEVELOPMENT OF A Ge/GaAs [MT TECHNOLCGY JBASED ON PLASMA-ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DE...N00014- 86-C-0838 during:the period -from I July 1080 to 30 September 1089 . Funding is being provided by the Strateg’c Defense Initiative under the

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon, silicon dioxide, titanium and ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    Various silicon-based thin films (such as epitaxial, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon thin films, silicon dioxide thin films and silicon nitride thin films), titanium thin film and various ferroelectric thin films (such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films) play critical roles in the manufacture of microelectronics circuits. For the past few years, there have been tremendous interests to search for cheap, safe and easy-to-use methods to develop those thin films with high quality and good step coverage. Silane is a critical chemical reagent widely used to deposit silicon-based thin films. Despite its wide use, silane is a dangerous material. It is pyrophoric, extremely flammable and may explode from heat, shock and/or friction. Because of the nature of silane, serious safety issues have been raised concerning the use, transportation, and storage of compressed gas cylinders of silane. Therefore it is desired to develop safer ways to deposit silicon-based films. In chapter III, I present the results of our research in the following fields: (1) Silane generator, (2) Substitutes of silane for deposition of silicon and silicon dioxide thin films, (3) Substitutes of silane for silicon dioxide thin film deposition. In chapter IV, hydropyridine is introduced as a new ligand for use in constructing precursors for chemical vapor deposition. Detachement of hydropyridine occurs by a low-temperature reaction leaving hydrogen in place of the hydropyridine ligands. Hydropyridine ligands can be attached to a variety of elements, including main group metals, such as aluminum and antimony, transition metals, such as titanium and tantalum, semiconductors such as silicon, and non-metals such as phosphorus and arsenic. In this study, hydropyridine-containing titanium compounds were synthesized and used as chemical vapor deposition precursors for deposition of titanium containing thin films. Some other titanium compounds were also studied for comparison. In chapter V, Chemical Vapor

  20. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  1. Growth of Er-doped silicon using metalorganics by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andry, P. S.; Varhue, W. J.; Ladipo, F.; Ahmed, K.; Adams, E.; Lavoie, M.; Klein, P. B.; Hengehold, R.; Hunter, J.

    1996-07-01

    Epitaxial growth of Er-doped silicon films has been performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature (430 °C) using an electron cyclotron resonance source. The goal was to incorporate an optically active center, erbium surrounded by nitrogen, through the use of the metalorganic compound tris (bis trimethyl silyl amido) erbium. Films were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction. The characteristic 1.54 μm emission was observed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. Previous attempts to incorporate the complex (ErO6) using tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl- 3,5-heptanedionato) erbium (III) indicated that excessive carbon contamination lowered epitaxial quality and reduced photoluminescent intensity. In this study, chemical analysis of the films also revealed a large carbon concentration, however, the effect on epitaxial quality was much less destructive. A factorial design experiment was performed whose analysis identified the key processing parameters leading to high quality luminescent films. Hydrogen was found to be a major cause of crystal quality degradation in our metalorganic plasma-enhanced process.

  2. Mechanism of incipient oxidation of bulk chemical vapor deposited Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, L. U. T.; Jayne, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed, in conjunction with ion bombardment, to analyze the chemical composition profile across thin (less than 50 nm) oxide films on chemically vapor deposited Si3N4. The thermal oxides were grown in dry oxygen at 1100 C on samples with or without native oxide film (formed in room air). The results show that the thermal oxidation product was silicon oxynitride of graded N:O ratio, and that the presence of a native oxide film promotes the formation of a SiO2 crust over the oxynitride. It is proposed that the fundamental mechanism of Si3N4 oxidation is progressive O-for-N substitution in the silicon oxynitride unit tetrahedron, which is best designated SiN(2-x)O(2+x), where x is also an index of depth. The corresponding equation for nonstoichiometric oxidation of Si3N4 describes a bulk (rather than an interface) reaction process, with significant implications for O2 and N2 fluxes and diffusivities.

  3. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  4. Unraveling the complex chemistry using dimethylsilane as a precursor gas in hot wire chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Toukabri, Rim; Shi, Yujun

    2014-05-07

    The gas-phase reaction chemistry when using dimethylsilane (DMS) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has been studied in this work. The complex chemistry is unraveled by using a soft 10.5 eV single photon ionization technique coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry in combination with the isotope labelling and chemical trapping methods. It has been demonstrated that both free-radical reactions and those involving silylene/silene intermediates are important. The reaction chemistry is characterized by the formation of 1,1,2,2-tetramethyldisilane (TMDS) from dimethylsilylene insertion into the Si-H bond of DMS, trimethylsilane (TriMS) from free-radical recombination, and 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (DMDSCB) from the self dimerization of either dimethylsilylene or 1-methylsilene. At low filament temperatures and short reaction time, silylene chemistry dominates. The free-radical reactions become more important with increasing temperature and time. The same three products have been detected when using tantalum and tungsten filaments, indicating that changing the filament material from Ta to W does not affect much the gas-phase reaction chemistry when using DMS as a source gas in a hot-wire CVD reactor.

  5. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  6. Functional metal oxide coatings by molecule-based thermal and plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Ruegamer, T; Donia, N; Shen, H

    2008-05-01

    Deposition of thin films through vaccum processes plays an important role in industrial processing of decorative and functional coatings. Many metal oxides have been prepared as thin films using different techniques, however obtaining compositionally uniform phases with a control over grain size and distribution remains an enduring challenge. The difficulties are largely related to complex compositions of functional oxide materials, which makes a control over kinetics of nucleation and growth processes rather difficult to control thus resulting in non-uniform material and inhomogeneous grain size distribution. Application of tailor-made molecular precursors in low pressure or plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques offers a viable solution for overcoming thermodynamic impediments involved in thin film growth. In this paper molecule-based CVD of functional coatings is demonstrated for iron oxide (Fe2O3, Fe3O4), vanadium oxide (V2O5, VO2) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) phases followed by the characterization of their microstructural, compositional and functional properties which support the advantages of chemical design in simplifying deposition processes and optimizing functional behavior.

  7. Chemical vapor transport and solid-state exchange synthesis of new copper selenite bromides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Kayukov, Roman A.; Zagidullin, Karim A.; Siidra, Oleg I.

    2017-02-01

    A new dimorphic copper selenite bromide, Cu5(SeO3)4Br2 was obtained via chemical transport reactions. α-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, monoclinic (1m) and β-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, triclinic (1a) polymorphs were produced simultaneously upon reaction of amorphous, partially dehydrated copper selenite and copper bromide. 1m is similar to Cu5(SeO3)4Cl2, whereas 1a is distantly related to Ni5(SeO3)4Br2 and Co5(SeO3)4Br2. Attempts to reproduce synthesis of 1a via exchange reaction between Na2SeO3 and CuBr2 resulted in a new Na2[Cu7O2](SeO3)4Br4 (2). Current study demonstrates for the first time, that both chemical vapor and exchange reactions can be employed in preparation of new selenite halides.

  8. Amorphouslike chemical vapor deposited tungsten diffusion barrier for copper metallization and effects of nitrogen addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kow-Ming; Yeh, Ta-Hsun; Deng, I.-Chung; Shih, Chieh-Wen

    1997-08-01

    In this article, we propose an amorphouslike chemical vapor deposited tungsten (CVD-W) thin film as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. Experimental results gave no evidence of interdiffusion and structural change for Cu/amorphouslike CVD-W/Si samples annealed up to 675 °C for 30 min in N2. At higher temperatures (700 °C), Cu penetration results in the formation of η''-Cu3Si precipitates at the CVD-W/Si interface. This is due to the crystallization of the amorphouslike CVD-W film above 650 °C, rendering the grain-boundary structure and, hence, fast pathways for Cu diffusion. The Cu/amorphouslike CVD-W/p+n diodes, thus, sustain large increases in reverse leakage current. In addition, the effects of nitrogen addition by using an in situ nitridation on the amorphouslike CVD-W film are also discussed. The effectiveness of the nitrided barrier is attributed to the blocking of the grain boundaries in the tungsten film by nitrogen atoms. This slows down Cu diffusion significantly. Physical and chemical analyses indicate that interfaces in the Cu/WNx/W/Si multilayer maintain their integrity while the annealing is carried out at 750 °C. Moreover, the reverse leakage current densities of Cu/WNx/W/p+n diodes remain at 10-7 A/cm2 after 725 °C annealing.

  9. Edge-controlled growth and kinetics of single-crystal graphene domains by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Ren, Wencai; Zhang, Xiuyun; Liu, Zhibo; Gao, Yang; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Ding, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-12-17

    The controlled growth of large-area, high-quality, single-crystal graphene is highly desired for applications in electronics and optoelectronics; however, the production of this material remains challenging because the atomistic mechanism that governs graphene growth is not well understood. The edges of graphene, which are the sites at which carbon accumulates in the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, influence many properties, including the electronic properties and chemical reactivity of graphene, and they are expected to significantly influence its growth. We demonstrate the growth of single-crystal graphene domains with controlled edges that range from zigzag to armchair orientations via growth-etching-regrowth in a chemical vapor deposition process. We have observed that both the growth and the etching rates of a single-crystal graphene domain increase linearly with the slanted angle of its edges from 0° to ∼19° and that the rates for an armchair edge are faster than those for a zigzag edge. Such edge-structure-dependent growth/etching kinetics of graphene can be well explained at the atomic level based on the concentrations of the kinks on various edges and allow the evolution and control of the edge and morphology in single-crystal graphene following the classical kinetic Wulff construction theory. Using these findings, we propose several strategies for the fabrication of wafer-sized, high-quality, single-crystal graphene.

  10. Growth and properties of W-B-N diffusion barriers deposited by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Custer, J.; Smith, P.M.; Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    The authors have used chemical vapor deposition to grow ternary tungsten-based diffusion barriers to determine if they exhibit properties similar to those of sputter-deposited ternaries. A range of different W-B-N compositions in a band of compositions roughly between 20 and 40% W were produced. The deposition temperature was low, 350 C, and the precursors used are well accepted by the industry. Deposition rates are high for a diffusion barrier application. Resistivities range from 200 to 20,000 {micro}{Omega}-cm, the films with the best barrier properties having {approximately}1,000 {micro}{Omega}-cm resistivities. Adhesion to oxides is sufficient to allow these films to be used as the adhesion layer in a tungsten chemical mechanical polishing plug application. The films are x-ray amorphous as-deposited and have crystallization temperatures of up to 900 C. Barrier performance against Cu has been tested using diode test structures. A composition of W{sub .23}B{sub .49}N{sub .28} was able to prevent diode failure up to a 700 C, 30 minute anneal. These materials, deposited by CVD, display properties similar to those deposited by physical deposition techniques.

  11. Semiconducting nanotube dominant chemical vapor deposition synthesis of isopropanol carbon feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Lin, Xue; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-02-01

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single wall carbon nanotubes provides great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotube into circuits and systems. However, the co-existence of the metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major problem for the development of carbon nanotube based nanoelectronics. To address this limitation, we developed a method to get semiconducting dominant nanotube by using isopropanol carbon feedstock. We achieved a purity of 87% of semiconducting nanotube growth, which was verified by measuring single nanotube transistors fabricated from aligned nanotube arrays. Besides, Raman spectrum was characterized to confirm the enhanced fraction of semiconducting nanotube as well. To further understand chemical mechanism of synthesis at atomic level, we performed the mass spectrum study and compared the measurement results from different carbon source. Furthermore, to discuss the future application of this synthesis method, we fabricated thin-film transistor from as-grown nanotube network. Transistor with on/off ratio over 104 and mobility up to 116 cm2/vs was achieved, which shows great potential for thin-film transistor applications.

  12. Superhydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membrane fabricated by chemical vapor deposition from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhenrong; Gu, Zhenya; Huo, Ruiting; Ye, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    Due to the chemical stability and flexibility, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes are widely used as the topcoat of architectural membrane structures, roof materials of vehicle, tent fabrics, and so on. Further modified PVDF membrane with superhydrophobic property may be even superior as the coating layer surface. The lotus flower is always considered to be a sacred plant, which can protect itself against water, dirt, and dust. The superhydrophobic surface of lotus leaf is rough, showing the micro- and nanometer scale morphology. In this work, the microreliefs of lotus leaf were mimicked using PVDF membrane and the nanometer scale peaks on the top of the microreliefs were obtained by the method of chemical vapor deposition from solution. The surface morphology of PVDF membrane was investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Elemental composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the material of the nanostructure of PVDF membrane was polymethylsiloxane. On the lotus-leaf-like PVDF membrane, the water contact angle and sliding angle were 155° and 4°, respectively, exhibiting superhydrophobic property.

  13. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesized Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide with Optoelectronic-Grade Crystalline Quality.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ismail; Liu, Fangze; Vargas, Anthony; Winchester, Andrew; Man, Michael K L; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Dani, Keshav M; Gupta, Gautam; Talapatra, Saikat; Mohite, Aditya D; Kar, Swastik

    2015-09-22

    The ability to synthesize high-quality samples over large areas and at low cost is one of the biggest challenges during the developmental stage of any novel material. While chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods provide a promising low-cost route for CMOS compatible, large-scale growth of materials, it often falls short of the high-quality demands in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We present large-scale CVD synthesis of single- and few-layered MoS2 using direct vapor-phase sulfurization of MoO2, which enables us to obtain extremely high-quality single-crystal monolayer MoS2 samples with field-effect mobility exceeding 30 cm(2)/(V s) in monolayers. These samples can be readily synthesized on a variety of substrates, and demonstrate a high-degree of optoelectronic uniformity in Raman and photoluminescence mapping over entire crystals with areas exceeding hundreds of square micrometers. Because of their high crystalline quality, Raman spectroscopy on these samples reveal a range of multiphonon processes through peaks with equal or better clarity compared to past reports on mechanically exfoliated samples. This enables us to investigate the layer thickness and substrate dependence of the extremely weak phonon processes at 285 and 487 cm(-1) in 2D-MoS2. The ultrahigh, optoelectronic-grade crystalline quality of these samples could be further established through photocurrent spectroscopy, which clearly reveal excitonic states at room temperature, a feat that has been previously demonstrated only on samples which were fabricated by micro-mechanical exfoliation and then artificially suspended across trenches. Our method reflects a big step in the development of atomically thin, 2D-MoS2 for scalable, high-quality optoelectronics.

  15. TANK VAPOR CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN & EXISTING DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTION & PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER, N.K.

    2004-11-01

    This document takes the newly released Industrial Hygiene Chemical Vapor Technical Basis (RPP-22491) and evaluates the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) identified for selected implementation actions by the industrial hygiene organization. This document is not intended as a hazard analysis with recommended controls for all tank farm activities. Not all of the chemicals listed are present in all tanks; therefore, hazard analyses can and should be tailored as appropriate. Detection of each chemical by current industrial hygiene non-specific instrumentation in use at the tank farms is evaluated. Information gaps are identified and recommendations are made to resolve these needs. Of the 52 COPC, 34 can be detected with existing instrumentation. Three additional chemicals could be detected with a photoionization detector (PID) equipped with a different lamp. Discussion with specific instrument manufacturers is warranted. Consideration should be given to having the SapphIRe XL customized for tank farm applications. Other instruments, sampling or modeling techniques should be evaluated to estimate concentrations of chemicals not detected by direct reading instruments. In addition, relative instrument response needs to be factored in to action levels used for direct reading instruments. These action levels should be correlated to exposures to the COPC and corresponding occupational exposure limits (OELs). The minimum respiratory protection for each of the COPC is evaluated against current options. Recommendations are made for respiratory protection based on each chemical. Until exposures are sufficiently quantified and analyzed, the current use of supplied air respiratory protection is appropriate and protective for the COPC. Use of supplied air respiratory protection should be evaluated once a detailed exposure assessment for the COPC is completed. The established tank farm OELs should be documented in the TFC-PLN-34. For chemicals without an established tank farm OEL

  16. Massively parallel computation of 3D flow and reactions in chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.G.; Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Moffat, H.K.

    1997-12-01

    Computer modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactors can greatly aid in the understanding, design, and optimization of these complex systems. Modeling is particularly attractive in these systems since the costs of experimentally evaluating many design alternatives can be prohibitively expensive, time consuming, and even dangerous, when working with toxic chemicals like Arsine (AsH{sub 3}): until now, predictive modeling has not been possible for most systems since the behavior is three-dimensional and governed by complex reaction mechanisms. In addition, CVD reactors often exhibit large thermal gradients, large changes in physical properties over regions of the domain, and significant thermal diffusion for gas mixtures with widely varying molecular weights. As a result, significant simplifications in the models have been made which erode the accuracy of the models` predictions. In this paper, the authors will demonstrate how the vast computational resources of massively parallel computers can be exploited to make possible the analysis of models that include coupled fluid flow and detailed chemistry in three-dimensional domains. For the most part, models have either simplified the reaction mechanisms and concentrated on the fluid flow, or have simplified the fluid flow and concentrated on rigorous reactions. An important CVD research thrust has been in detailed modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in the reactor vessel, treating transport and reaction of chemical species either very simply or as a totally decoupled problem. Using the analogy between heat transfer and mass transfer, and the fact that deposition is often diffusion limited, much can be learned from these calculations; however, the effects of thermal diffusion, the change in physical properties with composition, and the incorporation of surface reaction mechanisms are not included in this model, nor can transitions to three-dimensional flows be detected.

  17. Study of the low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten-silicon interface: Interfacial fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chopra, D.R.; Dillingham, T.R.; Gnade, B.; Smith, G.

    1989-03-15

    Single-crystal silicon <100> substrates uniformly doped at approx. >12 ..cap omega.. cm with boron were deposited with approx.800 A of low-pressure chemically vapor deposited W in a hot-quartz-walled (Anicon) system at a deposition temperature of 300 /sup 0/C. The samples studied include an as-deposited sample and two others which were post-deposition annealed at 600 /sup 0/C in Ar for 15 min each. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with an Ar/sup +/ ion sputter profiling technique was employed to investigate these structures as a function of depth. Particular emphasis was placed on the depth distribution, content, and chemical state of the fluorine present. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray diffraction were used to corroborate the XPS data. Results show that, for the as-deposited and 600 /sup 0/C annealed sample, the maximum concentration of fluorine (0.6--0.8 at. %) is observed, not at the W/Si interface, but rather at the W (H/sub 2/ reduction)/W (Si displacement) interface. For the sample annealed at 850 /sup 0/C, WSi/sub 2/ is formed in the overlayer, and the peak in the F profile corresponds to the position of the WSi/sub 2//Si interface. The maximum concentration of fluorine is reduced by approximately 75% to 0.23 at. % in this sample. From the XPS spectra of the F 1s region, the chemical species of fluorine present in these samples have been identified as WF/sub 6/, WF/sub 5/, and WF/sub 4/.

  18. Development of a fiber optic chemical sensor for detection of toxic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Lalitkumar

    Nerve agents are among the most potent of the chemical warfare agents being highly toxic in both liquid and gaseous form. In this thesis the development of a fiber optic chemical sensor for detection of organophosphorous nerve agent sarin precursor dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) is presented. The optical fiber sensor developed is based on the modified cladding approach using conducting polymer polypyrrole as a chemo-chromic material. Polypyrrole is synthesized by chemical oxidation and characterized by FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy. To characterize the electrical and optical property changes that come about in polypyrrole upon exposure to DMMP, four probe technique, ellipsometry, thin film transmission are used. The polypyrrole coating is applied to un-cladded fiber core using two different coating techniques, i.e. in-situ deposition and monomer vapor phase deposition. Preliminary results show an intensity decrease of 2.1% when the sensing element is exposed to 134ppm of DMMP. Three different dopant anions, i.e. 1--5, Napthalene disulphonic acid, Anthraquenone sulphonic acid and Hydrochloric acid, are added to improve the sensor sensitivity. The developed device is tested for DMMP sensitivity optimizations in terms of substrate nature, Cu2+ dopant, waveguide geometry, and light source intensity. The sensitivity optimization has resulted in a 25.75% sensor response and a detection of 26ppm of DMMP concentration. Selectivity and environmental stability of the developed device is investigated. The mechanical property and adhesion investigated using the nanoindentation and ASTM D-4541 pull-off test method. The influence of these adhesion enhancements on the sensor response is investigated.

  19. Electrical Transport and Low-Frequency Noise in Chemical Vapor Deposited Single-Layer MoS2 Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    vapor deposited (CVD) single-layer molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) based back-gated field-effect transistors (FETs). Electrical characterization and LFN...measurements were conducted on MoS2 FETs with Al2O3 top-surface passivation. We also studied the effect of top-surface passivation etching on the...is unlimited. Electrical transport and low-frequency noise in chemical vapor deposited single-layer MoS2 devices The views, opinions and/or findings

  20. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  1. Nanostructure and nanochemistry of gate dielectrics and processing of tunable dielectrics by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang-Gong

    2002-01-01

    PbTiO3-SrTiO3 (PST) thin films that are voltage tunable were developed for high-frequency application by a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique at rates of 10--15 nm/min. PST films (90--150nm) were deposited on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si and Sapphire (0001) substrates and characterized by various techniques to control the composition and structure. The tunability and dielectric loss (tandelta) of a 90nm PST film were 37% and 0.02, respectively, at 1MHz and 3V in a parallel plates capacitor (Pt/PST/Pt) configuration. PST films on (0001) Sapphire were epitaxial with an orientation relationship of PST [1 1 1]// Sapphire [0 0 0 1], and in-plane alignment of PST [1 i 0]// Sapphire [2 i i 0] and PST [i i 2]// Sapphire [0 1 i 0]. A coplanar waveguide structure was used to determine the tunability (31.3%) and figure of merit (13 degrees/dB) of an epitaxial 100nm PST film on Sapphire at 12 GHz. The tandelta, derived from transmission-type resonator, is explained in terms of composition inhomogeneities and in-plane biaxial stress due to lattice mismatch between PST and Sapphire. A 4nm-ZrOx/1.2nm-SiOx layer structure was formed on 200mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) technique for advanced metal oxide semiconductor gate dielectrics. The nanostructure and nanochemistry of this gate stack were investigated by various techniques, before and after oxygen annealing (700°C). The results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, defined as Zr-O/interlayer(IL)/Si stack. The critical parameters that control the nanostructural and nanochemical evolution are discussed using some simple mechanistic explanations and literature data. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric and electrical properties using a Pt/Zr-O/IL/Si capacitor configuration. The flat band shift (DeltaV FB), capacitance voltage hysteresis, and leakage current density were correlated with defects and roughness of the interface, thickness of IL

  2. Controllable poly-crystalline bilayered and multilayered graphene film growth by reciprocal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinke; Jung, Seong Jun; Jang, Sung Kyu; Lee, Joohyun; Jeon, Insu; Suh, Hwansoo; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2015-06-01

    We report the selective growth of large-area bilayered graphene film and multilayered graphene film on copper. This growth was achieved by introducing a reciprocal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process that took advantage of an intermediate h-BN layer as a sacrificial template for graphene growth. A thin h-BN film, initially grown on the copper substrate using CVD methods, was locally etched away during the subsequent graphene growth under residual H2 and CH4 gas flows. Etching of the h-BN layer formed a channel that permitted the growth of additional graphene adlayers below the existing graphene layer. Bilayered graphene typically covers an entire Cu foil with domain sizes of 10-50 μm, whereas multilayered graphene can be epitaxially grown to form islands a few hundreds of microns in size. This new mechanism, in which graphene growth proceeded simultaneously with h-BN etching, suggests a potential approach to control graphene layers for engineering the band structures of large-area graphene for electronic device applications.We report the selective growth of large-area bilayered graphene film and multilayered graphene film on copper. This growth was achieved by introducing a reciprocal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process that took advantage of an intermediate h-BN layer as a sacrificial template for graphene growth. A thin h-BN film, initially grown on the copper substrate using CVD methods, was locally etched away during the subsequent graphene growth under residual H2 and CH4 gas flows. Etching of the h-BN layer formed a channel that permitted the growth of additional graphene adlayers below the existing graphene layer. Bilayered graphene typically covers an entire Cu foil with domain sizes of 10-50 μm, whereas multilayered graphene can be epitaxially grown to form islands a few hundreds of microns in size. This new mechanism, in which graphene growth proceeded simultaneously with h-BN etching, suggests a potential approach to control graphene layers for

  3. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang

    2003-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor material. It is a promising candidate for short wavelength optoelectronic devices. Single crystalline and nanocrystalline ZnO thin films have been grown by organo-metallic chemical vapor depositions in a pulsed organo-metallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) system. The structural and morphological properties of ZnO films strongly depend on growth conditions. For epitaxially grown ZnO films on sapphire under optimal conditions, excellent crystallinity have been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Nanocrystalline films with columnar-shaped grains are grown with different grain sizes. With decreasing growth temperature, the morphology of POMBE grown ZnO goes through an transition from continuous thin film to nanorods. Well-aligned ZnO nanorods have been grown using two-step chemical vapor deposition methods. The growth mechanism is based on studies of ZnO nucleation. By controlling substrate temperature and oxygen concentration during the nucleation and growth steps, ZnO nanorods growth is achieved without any catalysts. High-resolution TEM studies show that ZnO nanorods are single crystals. Alignment of these nanorods depends on lattice match between ZnO and substrate. ZnO nanorods with different areal densities can be obtained by varying nucleation time. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of nonorods have shown band edge emission at 380 nm with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 106 meV which is comparable to films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Green emissions are found to originate from oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials; while orange-red emissions are attributed to oxygen interstitials. Optical properties of ZnO thin films and nanostructures are studied. Clear excitonic features observed in different optical measurements have proven good optical qualities of single crystal ZnO films. By alloying with magnesium, band gap of ZnO can be widened

  4. Expedient Respiratory and Physical Protection: Does a Wet Towel Work to Prevent Chemical Warfare Agent Vapor Infiltration?

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.H.

    2002-08-30

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of expedient protection strategies to reduce exposure to vapors from chemical warfare agents. This includes an examination of the physical and the psychological effectiveness of measures such as using a wet towel to seal a door jam against the infiltration of chemicals while sheltering in place or to provide expedient respiratory protection. Respiratory protection for civilians has never been considered a viable option for population protection in the CSEPP. Problems of storage, ability to effectively don respirators, and questionable fit have been primary factors in rejecting this option. Expedient respiratory protection seems to offer little benefits for population protection for chemical agent vapors. Furthermore, using wet towels as a vapor barrier at the bottom of a door should be discouraged. The wetted towel provides no vapor filtration and its effectiveness in infiltration reduction is unknown. Taping the bottom of the door will still likely provide greater infiltration reduction and is recommended as the current method for use in sheltering.

  5. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  6. Synthesis of New Ba Complex as Metalorganic Source for Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition and Optimization of Its Molecule Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zama, Hideaki; Morishita, Tadataka

    2000-10-01

    New Ba(DPM)2-amine (DPM=dipivaloylmethane) adduct compounds were attempted to be synthesized from Ba(DPM)2 and amines. Complexes obtained were evaluated based on decreases of their weight with increasing temperature by thermogravimetry. The simple vaporizing phenomenon, showing a one-step weight-reduction curve, was observed only in the case of using tetraethylenepentamine and pentaethylenehexamine (pentaen) as adduct molecules, which have a simple chain structure and five to six primary and secondary amine radicals. From the viewpoint of applicability to film growth, they have the best structure based on a survey in this study using sixteen amine molecules with distinctive structures. When we used Ba(DPM)2-pentaen as a metalorganic source for a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method at a vaporizing temperature of 140°C, the Ba supply rate remained stable within a standard deviation of 1.6% for over 300 h.

  7. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results.

  8. Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

  9. Nucleation and growth of single layer graphene on electrodeposited Cu by cold wall chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shantanu; Drucker, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    The nucleation density and average size of graphene crystallites grown using cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 4 μm thick Cu films electrodeposited on W substrates can be tuned by varying growth parameters. Growth at a fixed substrate temperature of 1000 °C and total pressure of 700 Torr using Ar, H2 and CH4 mixtures enabled the contribution of total flow rate, CH4:H2 ratio and dilution of the CH4/H2 mixture by Ar to be identified. The largest variation in nucleation density was obtained by varying the CH4:H2 ratio. The observed morphological changes are analogous to those that would be expected if the deposition rate were varied at fixed substrate temperature for physical deposition using thermal evaporation. The graphene crystallite boundary morphology progresses from irregular/jagged through convex hexagonal to regular hexagonal as the effective C deposition rate decreases. This observation suggests that edge diffusion of C atoms along the crystallite boundaries, in addition to H2 etching, may contribute to shape evolution of the graphene crystallites. These results demonstrate that graphene grown using cold wall CVD follows a nucleation and growth mechanism similar to hot wall CVD. As a consequence, the vast knowledge base relevant to hot wall CVD may be exploited for graphene synthesis by the industrially preferable cold wall method.

  10. Soot-overcladding process for enlarging modified chemical vapor deposition preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Heikki; Kurki, Jouko

    1995-09-01

    The equipment and the process for soot sleeving of optical fiber preforms made by the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) method has been developed. The equipment consists of a soot-sleeving lathe that is used for deposition of soot glass particles onto the surface of an MCVD core preform and a separate furnace that is used for drying and sintering the deposited porous glass layer. An outline of the equipment is presented. This equipment has then been used to study the basic parameters of flame hydrolysis deposition as well as sintering of the porous layer. The raw material and the fuel gas flow as well as the substrate diameter proved to be the most important parameters affecting the process. The basic knowledge achieved is used to optimize the process for three different preform sizes. In the soot-sleeving process for 80-km optical fiber preforms, an average deposition rate of 5.2 g/min is achieved with a double burner. The overall quality of the drawn fiber proved to be good. The typical attenuations were 0.330 and 0.215 dB/km at 1310- and 1550-nm wavelengths, respectively. The geometry of the drawn fibers was found to be very good.

  11. Exploring metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of Si-alloyed Al2O3 dielectrics using disilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Silvia H.; Keller, Stacia; Koksaldi, Onur S.; Gupta, Chirag; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2017-04-01

    The alloying of Al2O3 films with Si is a promising route to improve gate dielectric properties in Si- and wide-bandgap- based MOS devices. Here we present a comprehensive investigation of alloyed film growth by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using trimethylaluminum, disilane, and oxygen precursors over a variety of temperature and flow conditions. Binary growth rates of Al2O3 and SiO2 were evaluated to explain the aggregate growth kinetics of Si-alloyed Al2O3 films, and refractive indices were used to monitor Si incorporation efficiencies. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate of disilane with oxygen was found to be similar to that of trimethylaluminum and oxygen, leading to well-behaved deposition behavior in the kinetic and mass-transport controlled growth regimes. Compositional predictability and stability was achieved over a wider growth space with disilane-based growths as compared to previous work, which used silane as the Si precursor instead. In situ (Al,Si)O/n-GaN MOS gate stacks were grown and showed increasing reduction of net positive fixed charges with higher Si composition.

  12. Open-air type plasma chemical vaporization machining by applying pulse-width modulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshiki; Hata, Yuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-01

    Photolithography techniques have been used to enable the low-cost and high-speed transfer of a pattern onto a silicon wafer. However, owing to the high integration of semiconductors, extreme ultraviolet will be increasingly used as the exposure light source and all optics must be reflective to focus light because the wavelength of the light will be so short that it cannot pass through a lens. The form accuracy of reflective optics affects the accuracy of transfer, and a flatness of less than 32 nm on a 6 inch photomask substrate is required according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors roadmap. Plasma chemical vaporization machining is an ultraprecise figuring technique that enables a form accuracy of nanometre order to be obtained. In our previous study, the removal volume was controlled by changing the scanning speed of the worktable. However, a discrepancy between the theoretical scanning speed and the actual scanning speed occurred owing to the inertia of the worktable when the change in speed was rapid. As an attempt to resolve this issue, we controlled the removal volume by controlling the electric power applied during plasma generation while maintaining a constant scanning speed. The methods that we adapted to control the applied electric power were amplitude-modulation (AM) control and pulse-width modulation (PWM) control. In this work, we evaluate the controllability of the material removal rate in the AM and PWM control modes.

  13. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iron Pyrite Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nicholas; Cheng, Ming; Perkins, Craig L.; Limpinsel, Moritz; Hemminger, John C.; Law, Matt

    2012-10-23

    Iron pyrite (cubic FeS{sub 2}) is a promising candidate absorber material for earth-abundant thin-film solar cells. In this report, single-phase, large-grain, and uniform polycrystalline pyrite thin films are fabricated on glass and molybdenum-coated glass substrates by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) using the reaction of iron(III) acetylacetonate and tert-butyl disulfide in argon at 300 C, followed by sulfur annealing at 500--550 C to convert marcasite impurities to pyrite. The pyrite-marcasite phase composition depends strongly on the concentration of sodium in the growth substrate and the sulfur partial pressure during annealing. Phase and elemental composition of the films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The in-plane electrical properties are surprisingly insensitive to phase and elemental impurities, with all films showing p-type, thermally activated transport with a small activation energy ({approx}30 meV), a room- temperature resistivity of {approx}1 {Omega} cm, and low mobility. These ubiquitous electrical properties may result from robust surface effects. These CVD pyrite thin films are well suited to fundamental electrical studies and the fabrication of pyrite photovoltaic device stacks.

  14. Kinetics of the tungsten hexafluoride-silane reaction for the chemical vapor deposition of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Gokce, Huseyin.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the kinetics of the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten by silane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride on Si(100) surfaces was studied. A single-wafer, cold-wall reactor was sued for the experiments. The SiH[sub 4]/WF[sub 6] ratio was 1.0. The pressure and temperature range were 1-10 torr and 137-385[degree]C, respectively. Kinetic data were obtained in the absence of mass-transfer effects. The film thicknesses were measured by gravimetry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and resistivity measurements were used to analyze the W films. For the horizontal substrate position and 4-minute reaction times, the apparent activation energies were determined to be 0.35 eV/atom for 10 torr, 0.17 eV/atom for 3 torr, and 0.08 eV/atom for 1 torr. Lower temperatures and higher pressures produced porous films, while higher temperatures and lower pressures resulted in continuous films with smoother surfaces. As the Si-W interface, a W(110) preferential orientation was observed. As the W films grew thicker, W orientation switched from (110) to (100). Apparent activation energy seems to change with thickness.

  15. An approach for modeling surface reaction kinetics in chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.F.; Pollard, R.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the rate constants of elementary surface reactions that can take place in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The calculations consider well-defined surfaces that can have one or more dangling bonds at a given site and adsorbates that can take up one or more different bonding configurations. Rate constants for each reaction are obtained independently of any process data using statistical mechanics, transition state theory, and bond dissociation energies. Specifically, the reactions are divided in transition state structures and determine preexponential factors, and the requirement of thermodynamic consistency is used to estimate activation energies. The level of sophistication of the calculations is suitable for treating the large number of plausible steps that could take place in a practical CVD system. Incorporation of the calculated rate constants into a reactor model that includes the effects of fluid flow, transport phenomena, and reactions in the gas and at the growing surface enables dominant reaction pathways and rate-limiting steps to be identified. Moreover, the dependence of growth rate and species compositions on operating conditions can be predicted without fitting any parameters. The utility of the approach is illustrated by modeling low pressure deposition of tungsten from tungsten hexafluoride and silane. This model treats 35 reactions in the gas and 213 reactions at the growing surface. Results are compared with available experimental data and sensitivity studies are used to assess the limitations of the approach.

  16. Graphene-based quantum Hall resistance standards grown by chemical vapor deposition on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Lafont, Fabien; Kazazis, Dimitris; Michon, Adrien; Couturaud, Olivier; Consejo, Christophe; Jouault, Benoit; Poirier, Wilfrid; Schopfer, Felicien

    2015-03-01

    Replace GaAs-based quantum Hall resistance standards (GaAs-QHRS) by a more convenient one, based on graphene (Gr-QHRS), is an ongoing goal in metrology. The new Gr-QHRS are expected to work in less demanding experimental conditions than GaAs ones. It will open the way to a broad dissemination of quantum standards, potentially towards industrial end-users, and it will support the implementation of a new International System of Units based on fixed fundamental constants. Here, we present accurate quantum Hall resistance measurements in large graphene Hall bars, grown by the hybrid scalable technique of propane/hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon carbide (SiC). This new Gr-QHRS shows a relative accuracy of 1 ×10-9 of the Hall resistance under the lowest magnetic field ever achieved in graphene. These experimental conditions surpass those of the most wildely used GaAs-QHRS. These results confirm the promises of graphene for resistance metrology applications and emphasizes the quality of the graphene produced by the CVD on SiC for applications as demanding as the resistance metrology.

  17. Computer acquired performance data from a chemically vapor-deposited-rhenium, niobium planar diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manista, E. J.; Morris, J. F.; Smith, A. L.; Lancashire, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Performance data from a chemically vapor-deposited-rhenium, niobium thermionic converter are presented. The planar converter has a guard-ringed collector and a nominal fixed spacing of 0.25 mm (10 mils). The data were obtained by using a computerized acquisition system and are available on request to one of the authors on microfiche as individual and composite parametric current, voltage curves. The parameters are the temperatures of the emitter T sub E collector T sub C, and cesium reservoir T sub R. The composite plots have constant T sub E and varying T sub C or T sub R, or both. Current, voltage envelopes having constant T sub E with and without fixed T sub C appear in the present report. The diode was tested at increments between 1600 and 2000 K for the emitter Hohlraum, 800 to 1100 K for the collector, and 540 and 650 K for the reservoir. A total of 312 current, voltage curves were obtained in the present performance evaluation. Current, voltage envelopes from three rhenium emitter converters evaluated in the present program are also given. The data are compared at commom emitter Hohlraum temperatures.

  18. Chemical vapor-deposited carbon nanofibers on carbon fabric for supercapacitor electrode applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Entangled carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized on a flexible carbon fabric (CF) via water-assisted chemical vapor deposition at 800°C at atmospheric pressure utilizing iron (Fe) nanoparticles as catalysts, ethylene (C2H4) as the precursor gas, and argon (Ar) and hydrogen (H2) as the carrier gases. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron dispersive spectroscopy were employed to characterize the morphology and structure of the CNFs. It has been found that the catalyst (Fe) thickness affected the morphology of the CNFs on the CF, resulting in different capacitive behaviors of the CNF/CF electrodes. Two different Fe thicknesses (5 and 10 nm) were studied. The capacitance behaviors of the CNF/CF electrodes were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. The highest specific capacitance, approximately 140 F g−1, has been obtained in the electrode grown with the 5-nm thickness of Fe. Samples with both Fe thicknesses showed good cycling performance over 2,000 cycles. PMID:23181897

  19. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus and degradation of chemical vapor deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuecs, F.; Werner, M.; Sussmann, R. S.; Pickles, C. S. J.; Fecht, H. J.

    1999-12-01

    Temperature dependent measurements of Young's modulus were performed for the first time on black and transparent bulk material of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond by a dynamic three point bending method in a temperature range from -150 to 850 °C. The CVD specimens correspond to a room-temperature Young's modulus of single crystal diamond (1143 GPa). A lower Young's modulus of polycrystalline diamond is caused by crystal imperfections and impurities. At temperatures between -150 and 600 °C (black type) or -150 and 700 °C (transparent type) the Young's modulus is only slightly temperature dependent and decreases monotonically with an average temperature coefficient of -1.027×10-4 K-1, which is much higher than theoretically expected. At higher temperatures the bending stiffness and apparent Young's modulus of the diamond beams are drastically reduced to one third of the initial value before fracture occurs due to oxygen etching effects in air. The onset temperature of this degradation phenomenon and the rate of decline are dependent on grain size, texture and the crystal lattice imperfections of the CVD diamond material.

  20. Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1998-05-01

    Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

  1. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100–300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900–2,500 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact. PMID:26658923

  2. Ultra-precision grinding of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, Yoshiharu

    1996-12-31

    Chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is the most important material of mirrors for high-brightness synchrotron radiation beamlines, though the material is too difficult to be machined. It takes quite a long time to polish SiC substrate to make mirrors. This paper intends to reduce the machining time to make CVD-SiC mirrors by using ultra-precision grinding technology. The CVD-SiC sample has been ground into 0.4nm rms in surface roughness by a resinoid-bonded diamond wheel and an ultra-precision surface grinder having a glass-ceramic spindle of extremely-low thermal expansion. The surface roughness of ground samples were measured with TOPO-3D and AFM. 88.7% reflectivity has been obtained on the ground CVD-SiC flat surface, measured with X-ray of 0.834 nm in wavelength at the grazing incident angle of 0.7--0.95 degree. The reflectivity depends upon the angle between the direction of incident beam and grinding marks on the sample. The relationship between the surface roughness and grinding conditions was also discussed.

  3. Fabrication of Nanocarbon Composites Using In Situ Chemical Vapor Deposition and Their Applications.

    PubMed

    He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Jiajun

    2015-09-23

    Nanocarbon (carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene (GN)) composites attract considerable research interest due to their fascinating applications in many fields. Here, recent developments in the field of in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the design and controlled preparation of advanced nanocarbon composites are highlighted, specifically, CNT-reinforced bulk structural composites, as well as CNT, GN, and CNT/GN functional composites, together with their practical and potential applications. In situ CVD is a very attractive approach for the fabrication of composites because of its engaging features, such as its simplicity, low-cost, versatility, and tunability. The morphologies, structures, dispersion, and interface of the resulting nanocarbon composites can be easily modulated by varying the experimental parameters (such as temperature, catalysts, carbon sources, templates or template catalysts, etc.), which enables a great potential for the in situ synthesis of high-quality nanocarbons with tailored size and dimension for constructing high-performance composites, which has not yet been achieved by conventional methods. In addition, new trends of the in situ CVD toward nanocarbon composites are discussed.

  4. Impact of hydrogen and oxygen defects on the lattice parameter of chemical vapor deposited zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Wolf, Walter; Wimmer, Erich; Zelinski, Brian

    2013-01-09

    The lattice parameter of cubic chemical vapor deposited (CVD) ZnS with measured oxygen concentrations < 0.6 at.% and hydrogen impurities of < 0.015 at.% have been measured and found to vary between -0.10% and +0.09% relative to the reference lattice parameter (5.4093 Å) of oxygen-free cubic ZnS as reported in the literature. Defects other than substitutional O must be invoked to explain these observed volume changes. The structure and thermodynamic stability of a wide range of native and impurity induced defects in ZnS have been determined by Ab initio calculations. Lattice contraction is caused by S-vacancies, substitutional O on S sites, Zn vacancies, H in S vacancies, peroxy defects, and dissociated water in S-vacancies. The lattice is expanded by interstitial H, H in Zn vacancies, dihydroxy defects, interstitial oxygen, Zn and [ZnHn] complexes (n=1,…,4), interstitial Zn, and S2 dumbbells. Oxygen, though present, likely forms substitutional defects for sulfur resulting in lattice contraction rather than as interstitial oxygen resulting in lattice expansion. It is concluded based on measurement and calculations that excess zinc atoms either at anti-sites (i.e. Zn atoms on S-sites) or possibly as interstitial Zn are responsible for the relative increase of the lattice parameter of commercially produced CVD ZnS.

  5. Further development of chemical vapor deposition process for production of large diameter carbon-base monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, R. L.; Richmond, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The development of large diameter carbon-base monofilament in the 50 micron to 250 micron diameter range using the chemical vapor deposition process is described. The object of this program was to determine the critical process variables which control monofilament strength, monofilament modulus, and monofilament diameter. It was confirmed that wide scatter in the carbon substrate strength is primarily responsible for the scatter in the monofilament strength. It was also shown through etching experiments that defective substrate surface conditions which can induce low strength modular growth in the monofilament layers are best controlled by processing improvements during the synthesis of the substrate. Modulus was found to be linearily proportional to monofilament boron content. Filament modulus was increased to above 27.8MN/sq cm but only by a considerable increase in monofilament boron content to 60 wt. % or more. Monofilament diameter depended upon dwell time in the synthesis apparatus. A monofilament was prepared using these findings which had the combined properties of a mean U.T.S. of 398,000 N/sq cm, a modulus of 18.9 MN/sq cm (24,000,000 psi), and a diameter of 145 microns. Highest measured strength for this fiber was 451,000 N/sq cm (645,000 psi).

  6. Boron nitride nanowalls: low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Merenkov, Ivan S; Kosinova, Marina L; Maximovskii, Eugene A

    2017-05-05

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanowalls (BNNWs) were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from a borazine (B3N3H6) and ammonia (NH3) gas mixture at a low temperature range of 400 °C-600 °C on GaAs(100) substrates. The effect of the synthesis temperature on the structure and surface morphology of h-BN films was investigated. The length and thickness of the h-BN nanowalls were in the ranges of 50-200 nm and 15-30 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscope images showed the obtained BNNWs were composed of layered non-equiaxed h-BN nanocrystallites 5-10 nm in size. The parallel-aligned h-BN layers as an interfacial layer were observed between the film and GaAs(100) substrate. BNNWs demonstrate strong blue light emission, high transparency (>90%) both in visible and infrared spectral regions and are promising for optical applications. The present results enable a convenient growth of BNNWs at low temperatures.

  7. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  8. Experimental study of flow and heat transfer in a rotating chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun

    An experimental model was set up to study the rotating vertical impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid characteristic and heat transfer of the system will provide a good basis to understand the full model. Growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in CVD process and it is depended on the flow and thermal characteristic within the system. Optimizing the operating parameters will result in better growth rate and uniformity. Operating parameters such as inflow velocity, inflow diameter and rotational speed are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and various temperatures are recorded to see the effects of the different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using flow meter and hot wire anemometer. Temperatures are recorded by using various thermocouples and infrared thermometer. The result should provide a quantitative basis for the prediction, design and optimization of the system and process for design and fabrication of future CVD reactors. Further assessment of the system results will be discuss in detail such as effects of buoyancy and effects of rotation. The experimental study also coupled with a numerical study for further validation of both model. Comparisons between the two models are also presented.

  9. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  10. Application of Chlorine-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Chenyu; Altemir, David A.; Margrave, John L.; Hauge, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Low temperature deposition of diamond has been achieved by a chlorine-assisted diamond chemical vapor deposition (CA-CVD) process. This method begins with the thermal dissociation of molecular chlorine into atomic chlorine in a resistively heated graphite furnace at temperatures between 1300 and 1500 deg. C. The atomic chlorine, upon mixing, subsequently reacts with molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons. The rapid exchange reactions between the atomic chlorine, molecular hydrogen, and hydrocarbons give rise to the atomic hydrogen and carbon precursors required for diamond deposition. Homoepitaxial diamond growth on diamond substrates has been studied over the substrate temperature range of 100-950 C. It was found that the diamond growth rates are approximately 0.2 microns/hr in the temperature range between 102 and 300 C and that the growth rates do not decrease significantly with a decrease in substrate temperature. This is unique because the traditional diamond deposition using H2/CH4 systems usually disappears at substrate temperatures below approx. 500 deg. C. This opens up a possible route to the deposition of diamond on low-melting point materials such as aluminum and its alloys.

  11. Nitrogen doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on 4H-SiC (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, J. M.; Binder, J.; Wysmołek, A.; Dąbrowski, P.; Strupiński, W.; Kopciuszyński, M.; Jałochowski, M.; Klusek, Z.

    2014-06-21

    We present optical, electrical, and structural properties of nitrogen-doped graphene grown on the Si face of 4H-SiC (0001) by chemical vapor deposition method using propane as the carbon precursor and N{sub 2} as the nitrogen source. The incorporation of nitrogen in the carbon lattice was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows carrier behavior characteristic for massless Dirac fermions and confirms the presence of a graphene monolayer in the investigated nitrogen-doped samples. The structural and electronic properties of the material were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. A systematical analysis of the graphene Raman spectra, including D, G, and 2D bands, was performed. In the case of nitrogen-doped samples, an electron concentration on the order of 5–10 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} was estimated based upon Raman and Hall effect measurements and no clear dependence of the carrier concentration on nitrogen concentration used during growth was observed. This high electron concentration can be interpreted as both due to the presence of nitrogen in graphitic-like positions of the graphene lattice as well as to the interaction with the substrate. A greater intensity of the Raman D band and increased inhomogeneity, as well as decreased electron mobility, observed for nitrogen-doped samples, indicate the formation of defects and a modification of the growth process induced by nitrogen doping.

  12. Silicon oxynitride prepared by chemical vapor deposition as optical waveguide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. K.; Wong, Hei; Kok, C. W.; Chan, M.

    2006-02-01

    This work explores the technology for preparing low hydrogen-content silicon oxynitride film for integrated optical waveguide applications. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with N 2O, NH 3 and SiH 4 precursors was used for the oxynitride preparation. The flow rates of the precursor gases are varied to study processing effects on the refractive index and the content of hydrogen bonds. The refractive index of the oxynitride film can be readily tuned between 1.47 and 1.92 by varying the gas flow rates. The composition and the bonding structure of the oxynitride films were investigated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Results showed that the silicon oxynitride deposited with gas flow rates of NH 4/N 2O/SiH 4=10/400/10 (sccm) has favorable properties for integrated waveguide applications. The refractive index of this layer is about 1.5 and the layer has a comparative low density of N-H bonds. The high content of O-H bond can be readily eliminated with high-temperature annealing of the as-deposited film in nitrogen ambient. Annealing at temperature of 1000 °C or above which can significantly suppress both the N-H bonds and O-H bonds is preferred. Waveguide devices built with oxynitride prepared at those conditions would have properties of low propagation loss and small size.

  13. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  14. Ultralight boron nitride aerogels via template-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yangxi; Li, Bin; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Changrui; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Boron nitride (BN) aerogels are porous materials with a continuous three-dimensional network structure. They are attracting increasing attention for a wide range of applications. Here, we report the template-assisted synthesis of BN aerogels by catalyst-free, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogels using borazine as the B and N sources with a relatively low temperature of 900 °C. The three-dimensional structure of the BN aerogels was achieved through the structural design of carbon aerogel templates. The BN aerogels have an ultrahigh specific surface area, ultralow density, excellent oil absorbing ability, and high temperature oxidation resistance. The specific surface area of BN aerogels can reach up to 1051 m2 g-1, 2-3 times larger than the reported BN aerogels. The mass density can be as low as 0.6 mg cm-3, much lower than that of air. The BN aerogels exhibit high hydrophobic properties and can absorb up to 160 times their weight in oil. This is much higher than porous BN nanosheets reported previously. The BN aerogels can be restored for reuse after oil absorption simply by burning them in air. This is because of their high temperature oxidation resistance and suggests broad utility as water treatment tools.

  15. Facile synthesis 3D flexible core-shell graphene/glass fiber via chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene layers on the flexible glass fiber surface to form the three-dimensional (3D) core-shell structures is offered using a two-heating reactor chemical vapor deposition system. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a facile way for low-temperature deposition. Graphene layers, which are controlled by changing the growth time, can be grown on the surface of wire-type glass fiber with the diameter from 30 nm to 120 um. The core-shell graphene/glass fiber deposition mechanism is proposed, suggesting that the 3D graphene films can be deposited on any proper wire-type substrates. These results open a facile way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of the transfer-free graphene layers on the low-temperature dielectric wire-type substrates. PACS 81.05.U-; 81.07.-b; 81.15.Gh PMID:25170331

  16. Hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials grown by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Er-Xiong; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Zhi-Jia; Li, Guangfen; Wang, Wen-Yi; Li, Lin-Ge; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2016-02-26

    Novel hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials (CFL-CNMs) were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition based on acetylene decomposition. A scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope were employed to observe the morphology and structure of the unconventional nanostructures. It is found that the CFL-CNMs look like a blooming chrysanthemum with a stem rather than a spherical flower. The carbon flower has an average diameter of 5 μm, an average stem diameter of 150 nm, branch diameters ranging from 20 to 70 nm, and branch lengths ranging from 0.5 to 3 μm. The morphologies of the CFL-CNMs are unlike any of those previously reported. Fishbone-like carbon nanofibers with a spindle-shaped catalyst locating at the tip can also be found. Furthermore, the catalyst split was proposed to elucidate the formation mechanism of CFL-CNMs. A large and glomerate catalyst particle at the tip of the carbon nanofiber splits into smaller catalyst particles which are catalytic-active points for branch formation, resulting in the formation of CFL-CNMs.

  17. Hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Er-Xiong; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Zhi-Jia; Li, Guangfen; Wang, Wen-Yi; Li, Lin-Ge; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2016-02-01

    Novel hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials (CFL-CNMs) were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition based on acetylene decomposition. A scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope were employed to observe the morphology and structure of the unconventional nanostructures. It is found that the CFL-CNMs look like a blooming chrysanthemum with a stem rather than a spherical flower. The carbon flower has an average diameter of 5 μm, an average stem diameter of 150 nm, branch diameters ranging from 20 to 70 nm, and branch lengths ranging from 0.5 to 3 μm. The morphologies of the CFL-CNMs are unlike any of those previously reported. Fishbone-like carbon nanofibers with a spindle-shaped catalyst locating at the tip can also be found. Furthermore, the catalyst split was proposed to elucidate the formation mechanism of CFL-CNMs. A large and glomerate catalyst particle at the tip of the carbon nanofiber splits into smaller catalyst particles which are catalytic-active points for branch formation, resulting in the formation of CFL-CNMs.

  18. Preparation of dilute magnetic semiconductor films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouhi, Akbar (Inventor); Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method for preparation of a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) film is provided, in which a Group II metal source, a Group VI metal source and a transition metal magnetic ion source are pyrolyzed in the reactor of a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system by contact with a heated substrate. As an example, the preparation of films of Cd(sub 1-x)Mn(sub x)Te, in which 0 is less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.7, on suitable substrates (e.g., GaAs) is described. As a source of manganese, tricarbonyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) manganese (TCPMn) is employed. To prevent TCPMn condensation during its introduction into the reactor, the gas lines, valves and reactor tubes are heated. A thin-film solar cell of n-i-p structure, in which the i-type layer comprises a DMS, is also described; the i-type layer is suitably prepared by MOCVD.

  19. Structural, compositional, and photoluminescence characterization of thermal chemical vapor deposition-grown Zn₃N₂ microtips

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pai-Chun E-mail: tsengcm@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Hsu, Chia-Hao; Tong, Shih-Chang; Shen, Ji-Lin; Tseng, Chuan-Ming E-mail: tsengcm@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-10-14

    The catalytic growth of Zn₃N₂ using guided-stream thermal chemical vapor deposition has been investigated within the parameter range of acicular growth to obtain uniform microtips with a high crystalline quality. The cubic anti-bixbyite crystal structure of Zn₃N₂ microtips and its related phonon mode are revealed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The surface morphologies of pure and surface-oxidized Zn₃N₂ microtips are depicted by scanning electron microscopy and show the crack formation on the surface-oxidized Zn₃N₂ microtips. The spatial element distribution map confirms the VLS growth mechanism for Zn₃N₂ microtips and reveals the depth profile of zinc, nitrogen, oxygen, and nickel elements. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Zn₃N₂ microtips show a sharp infrared band-to-band emission peak at 1.34 eV with a full width at half maximum of ~100 meV and a very broad oxygen-related defect band emission peak centered at ~0.85 eV.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of Ni-C films from bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl) nickel.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, S E; Protopopova, V S

    2011-09-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is widely used for deposition of various nickel-containing coatings, such as catalytic nickel thin films and nanoparticles, nickel silicide alloys and magnetic carbon-nickel nanocomposite layers. Here we report preliminary results from an attempt to use bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl) nickel [(EtCp)2Ni] as a precursor for MOCVD of Ni-C thin films in the (EtCp)2Ni-Ar and (EtCp)2Ni-H2-Ar reaction systems. Mechanism of precursor fragmentation was proposed on the basis of the results from a study of gaseous reaction products in the exhaust line of the reactor by means of mass-spectrometry. It was found that an introduction of hydrogen in the gas phase led to an increase in conversion rate of the precursor. Deposited films were analyzed by means of atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFS). The effect of hydrogen on growth rate, composition, and morphology of the deposited Ni-C films were experimentally studied.