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Sample records for alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

  1. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar. PMID:11443349

  2. Amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase, the major frog liver enzyme. Relationships to other forms and assessment of an early gene duplication separating vertebrate class I and class III alcohol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, E.; Joernvall, H. ); Peralba, J.M.; Pares, X. )

    1991-03-19

    Submammalian alcohol dehydrogenase structures can be used to evaluate the origins and functions of different types of the mammalian enzyme. Two avian forms were recently reported, and the authors now define the major amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase. The enzyme from the liver of the Green frog Rana perezi was purified, carboxymethylated, and submitted to amino acid sequence determination by peptide analysis of six different digest. The protein has a 375-residue subunit and is a class I alcohol dehydrogenase, bridging the gap toward the original separation of the classes that are observable in the human alcohol dehydrogenase system. In relation to the human class I enzyme, the amphibian protein has residue identities exactly halfway (68%) between those for the corresponding avian enzyme (74%) and the human class III enzyme (62%), suggesting an origin of the alcohol dehnydrogenase classes very early in or close to the evolution of the vertebrate line. This conclusion suggests that these enzyme classes are more universal among animals than previously realized and constitutes the first real assessment of the origin of the duplications leading to the alcohol dehydrogenase classes. In conclusion, the amphibian enzyme allows a rough positioning of the divergence of the alcohol dehydrogenase classes, shows that the class I type is widesprread in vertebrates, and functionally conforms with greater variations at the substrate-binding than the coenzyme-binding site.

  3. Action of shear on enzymes: studies with alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C R; Nienow, A W; Dunnill, P

    1979-12-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) solutions (approximately 1 mg/ml, pH 7) were sheared in a coaxial cylindrical viscometer. This was fitted with a lid sealing the contents from the atmosphere and preventing evaporation. At 30 degrees C after a total of 5 hr intermittent shearing at 683 sec-1 no losses of activity were observed. No losses were found after 5 hr continuous shearing and in a no-shear control. At 40 degrees C and 683 sec-1 there were only small activity losses in 5 hr. Shearing at 3440 sec-1 no measurable losses of activity were found with a 1.03 mg/ml solution in 5 hr at 30 degrees C, a 1.03 mg/ml solution in 8 hr at 5 degrees C, and with a 3.89 mg/ml solution in 3 hr at 5 degrees C. In all these cases, however, a white precipitate formed that was not observed in zero shear control experiments. The sheared 3.89 mg/ml solution was clarified by centrifugation. It was shown that there were no ADH aggregates in the supernatant and that the precipitate was less than 2% of the original protein. At 30 degrees C under adverse pH conditions (pH 8.8) there was no significant difference in activity losses of an approximately 1 mg/ml solution sheared at 65 and 744 sec-1. An approximately 0.5 mg/ml ADH solution, pH 7, was agitated in a small reactor with no free air-liquid interface. Peak shear rates near the impeller were estimated to be about 9000 sec-1. Only a small decrease in specific activity was observed until over 15 hr total running at 5 degrees C. PMID:42450

  4. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme. PMID:24846734

  5. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  6. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  7. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  8. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  9. Suitability of the hydrocarbon-hydroxylating molybdenum-enzyme ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for industrial chiral alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Tataruch, M; Heider, J; Bryjak, J; Nowak, P; Knack, D; Czerniak, A; Liesiene, J; Szaleniec, M

    2014-12-20

    The molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) was successfully applied to catalyze enantiospecific hydroxylation of alkylaromatic and alkylheterocyclic compounds. The optimization of the synthetic procedure involves use of the enzyme in a crude purification state that saves significant preparation effort and is more stable than purified EbDH without exhibiting unwanted side reactions. Moreover, immobilization of the enzyme on a crystalline cellulose support and changes in reaction conditions were introduced in order to increase the amounts of product formed (anaerobic atmosphere, electrochemical electron acceptor recycling or utilization of ferricyanide as alternative electron acceptor in high concentrations). We report here on an extension of effective enzyme activity from 4h to more than 10 days and final product yields of up to 0.4-0.5g/l, which represent a decent starting point for further optimization. Therefore, we expect that the hydrocarbon-hydroxylation capabilities of EbDH may be developed into a new process of industrial production of chiral alcohols. PMID:24998764

  10. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  11. Hydroperoxidic inhibitor of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity, tightly bound to the enzyme-NAD+ complex, characteristically degrades the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Skurský, L; Rezác, M; Khan, A N; Zídek, L; Rocek, J

    1992-01-01

    The strong inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLAD) by p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide (XyHP) is only transient, XyHP behaves also as a pseudo-substrate of the enzyme and in the presence of NAD+, is degraded by HLAD to (as yet unidentified) non-inhibiting products while the NAD+ is converted to a derivative similar to the "NADX", originally observed in an analogous reaction of HLAD with hydrogen peroxide. The apparent KM for XyHP is approximately 10(4) times smaller than that for H2O2. The catalytic constant kcat for HLAD degradation of XyHP is two orders of magnitude less than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. XyHP inhibits both directions of the alcohol-aldehyde interconversion with equal potency. The first step of the inhibition mechanism is a tight binding of XyHP to the binary HLAD-NAD+ complex. PMID:1284958

  12. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  13. Synthesis of cinnamyl alcohol from cinnamaldehyde with Bacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase as the isolated enzyme and in recombinant E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of the aroma chemical cinnamyl alcohol (CMO) by means of enzymatic reduction of cinnamaldehyde (CMA) was investigated using NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus both as an isolated enzyme, and in recombinant Escherichia coli whole cells. The influence of parameters such as reaction time and cofactor, substrate, co-substrate 2-propanol and biocatalyst concentrations on the bioreduction reaction was investigated and an efficient and sustainable one-phase system developed. The reduction of CMA (0.5 g/L, 3.8 mmol/L) by the isolated enzyme occurred in 3 h at 50 °C with 97% conversion, and yielded high purity CMO (≥98%) with a yield of 88% and a productivity of 50 g/genzyme. The reduction of 12.5 g/L (94 mmol/L) CMA by whole cells in 6 h, at 37 °C and no requirement of external cofactor occurred with 97% conversion, 82% yield of 98% pure alcohol and a productivity of 34 mg/gwet cell weight. The results demonstrate the microbial system as a practical and efficient method for larger-scale synthesis of CMO. PMID:23686507

  14. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E.; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  15. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  16. An enzyme-amplified microtiter plate assay for ethanol: Its application to the detection of peanut ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Vercellotti, J.R.; Sanders, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    A calorimetric microliter plate assay for ethanol amplified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was developed. In the assay ethanol from a sample took part in a chain-reaction catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and amplified by ALDH in the presence of NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, and p-ibdonitrotetrazolium-violet (INT-violet)(a precursor of red product). The resultant reaction gave a red color, the intensity of which was proportional to the amount of ethanol present. Using the technique, the content of activity from peanuts of differing maturity and curing stages were determined respectively. Data showed that immature peanuts had a higher level of ethanol and a lower ADH activity than mature peanuts, and that the level of ethanol and ADH activity decreased with the curing time. This indicates that peanut maturity and curing have an effect on ethanol. Also, this implies that other peanut volatiles could be affected in the same way as ethanol, a major volatile in peanuts.

  17. Elevated glutathione level does not protect against chronic alcohol mediated apoptosis in recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A over-expressing alcohol metabolizing enzymes--alcohol dehydrogenase and Cytochrome P450 2E1.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2011-06-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol leads to liver injury. Ethanol-inducible Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) plays a critical role in alcohol mediated oxidative stress due to its ability to metabolize ethanol. In the present study, using the recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A that over-expresses the alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and CYP2E1; and control HepG2 cells, the mechanism and mode of cell death due to chronic ethanol exposure were studied. Untreated VL-17A cells exhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress when compared with untreated HepG2 cells. Chronic alcohol exposure, i.e., 100 mM ethanol treatment for 72 h caused a significant decrease in viability (47%) in VL-17A cells but not in HepG2 cells. Chronic ethanol mediated cell death in VL-17A cells was predominantly apoptotic, with increased oxidative stress as the underlying mechanism. Chronic ethanol exposure of VL-17A cells resulted in 1.1- to 2.5-fold increased levels of ADH and CYP2E1. Interestingly, the level of the antioxidant GSH was found to be 3-fold upregulated in VL-17A cells treated with ethanol, which may be a metabolic adaptation to the persistent and overwhelming oxidative stress. In conclusion, the increased GSH level may not be sufficient enough to protect VL-17A cells from chronic alcohol mediated oxidative stress and resultant apoptosis. PMID:21414402

  18. Structural Studies of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase and Cinnamyl-Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Key Enzymes of Monolignol Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiyun; Zhou, Rui; Louie, Gordon V.; Mühlemann, Joëlle K.; Bomati, Erin K.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dudareva, Natalia; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the two key reduction reactions in the conversion of cinnamic acid derivatives into monolignol building blocks for lignin polymers in plant cell walls. Here, we describe detailed functional and structural analyses of CCRs from Medicago truncatula and Petunia hybrida and of an atypical CAD (CAD2) from M. truncatula. These enzymes are closely related members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Our structural studies support a reaction mechanism involving a canonical SDR catalytic triad in both CCR and CAD2 and an important role for an auxiliary cysteine unique to CCR. Site-directed mutants of CAD2 (Phe226Ala and Tyr136Phe) that enlarge the phenolic binding site result in a 4- to 10-fold increase in activity with sinapaldehyde, which in comparison to the smaller coumaraldehyde and coniferaldehyde substrates is disfavored by wild-type CAD2. This finding demonstrates the potential exploitation of rationally engineered forms of CCR and CAD2 for the targeted modification of monolignol composition in transgenic plants. Thermal denaturation measurements and structural comparisons of various liganded and unliganded forms of CCR and CAD2 highlight substantial conformational flexibility of these SDR enzymes, which plays an important role in the establishment of catalytically productive complexes of the enzymes with their NADPH and phenolic substrates. PMID:25217505

  19. Alcohol dehydrogenases from olive (Olea europaea) fruit.

    PubMed

    Salas, J J; Sánchez, J

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was detected in extracts from the pericarp tissues of developing olive fruits using hexanal as the substrate. Total activity in the crude extract was 20-fold higher with NADPH than with NADH. Three discrete enzymes were resolved by means of a purification protocol involving ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. One of the enzymes was NAD-dependent and displayed a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 2.1 mM). Two NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases were resolved, one showing a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 1.9 mM) and the second with a lower K(m) for the same substrate (K(m) = 0.04 mM). The three enzymes have been partially purified and their kinetic parameters and specificities for various aldehydes determined. The involvement of these enzymes in the biogenesis of six carbon alcohols constituent of the aroma of olive oil is discussed. PMID:9621451

  20. N-acylethanolamines as novel alcohol dehydrogenase 3 substrates.

    PubMed

    Ivkovic, Milena; Dempsey, Daniel R; Handa, Sumit; Hilton, Joshua H; Lowe, Edward W; Merkler, David J

    2011-02-15

    N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are members of the fatty acid amide family. The NAEs have been proposed to serve as metabolic precursors to N-acylglycines (NAGs). The sequential oxidation of the NAEs by an alcohol dehydrogenase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase would yield the N-acylglycinals and/or the NAGs. Alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) is one enzyme that might catalyze this reaction. To define a potential role for ADH3 in NAE catabolism, we synthesized a set of NAEs and evaluated these as ADH3 substrates. NAEs were oxidized by ADH3, yielding the N-acylglycinals as the product. The (V/K)(app) values for the NAEs included here were low relative to cinnamyl alcohol. Our data show that the NAEs can serve as alcohol dehydrogenase substrates. PMID:21144815

  1. Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from ethanol-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, B; Frank, J; Duine, J A

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, grown on ethanol, showed dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The enzyme responsible for this activity was purified to homogeneity. It appeared to contain two molecules of pyrroloquinoline quinone per enzyme molecule. In many respects, it resembled other quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.99.8), having a substrate specificity intermediate between that of methanol dehydrogenases and ethanol dehydrogenases in this group. On the other hand, it also showed dissimilarities: the enzyme was found to be a monomer (Mr 101 000), to need only one molecule of the suicide substrate cyclopropanol to become fully inactivated, and to have a different aromatic amino acid composition. PMID:6439190

  2. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  3. Structural of the class II enzyme of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase: combined cDNA and protein sequence determination of the. pi. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeoeg, J.O.; von Bahr-Lindstroem, H.; Heden, L.O.; Holmquist, B.; Larsson, K.; Hempel, J.; Vallee, B.L.; Joernvall, H.

    1987-04-07

    The class II enzyme of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated, carboxymethylated, and cleaved with CNBr and proteolytic enzymes. Sequence analysis of peptides established structures corresponding to the ..pi.. subunit. Two segments from the C-terminal region unique to ..pi.. were selected for synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes to screen a human liver cDNA library constructed in plasmid pT4. Sequence analysis of two identical hybridization-positive clones with cDNA inserts of about 2000 nucleotides gave the entire coding region of the ..pi.. subunit, a 61-nucleotide 5' noncoding region and a 741-nucleotide 3' noncoding region containing four possible polyadenylation sites. Translation of the coding region yields a 391-residue polypeptide, which in all regions except the C-terminal segment corresponds to the protein structure as determined directly by peptide analysis. With the class I numbering system, the exception concerns a residue exchange at position 368, the actual C-terminus which is Phe-374 by peptide data but a 12 residue extension by cDNA data, and possibly two further residue exchanges at positions 303 and 312. The size difference might indicate the existence of posttranslational modifications of the mature protein or, in combination with the residue exchanges, the existence of polymorphism at the locus for class II subunits. The ..pi.. subunit analyzed directly results in a 379-residue polypeptide and is the only class II size thus far known to occur in the mature protein. Comparison of the ..pi.. structure with those of the class I subunits (..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma..) reveals a homology with extensive differences. Large variations in segments affecting relationships at the active site and the area of subunit interactions account for the significant alterations of enzymatic specificities and other properties that differentiate class II from class I enzymes.

  4. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  5. Human gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity: effect of age, sex, and alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, H K; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A; Waldherr, R; Eckey, R; Agarwal, D P; Goedde, H W; von Wartburg, J P

    1993-01-01

    As various isoenzymes of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase exist and as the effect of sex and age on these enzymes is unknown, this study measured the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase at high and low ethanol concentrations in endoscopic biopsy specimens from a total of 290 patients of various ages and from 10 patients with chronic alcoholism. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase was also detected by immunohistological tests in biopsy specimens from 40 patients by the use of a polyclonal rabbit antibody against class I alcohol dehydrogenase. A significant correlation was found between the immunohistological reaction assessed by the intensity of the colour reaction in the biopsy specimen and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase measured at 580 mM ethanol. While alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 16 mM ethanol was not significantly affected by age and sex, both factors influenced alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 580 mM ethanol. Young women below 50 years of age had significantly lower alcohol dehydrogenase activities in the gastric corpus and antrum when compared with age matched controls (SEM) (6.4 (0.7) v 8.8 (0.6) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001 and 6.0 (1.3) v 9.5 (1.3) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001). Over 50 years of age this sex difference was no longer detectable, as high Km gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity decreases with age only in men and not in women. In addition, extremely low alcohol dehydrogenase activities have been found in gastric biopsy specimens from young male alcoholics (2.2 (0.5) nmol/min/mg protein), which returned to normal after two to three weeks of abstinence. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the human stomach measured at 580 mM ethanol is decreased in young women, in elderly men, and in the subject with alcoholism. This decrease in alcohol dehydrogenase activity may contribute to the reduced first pass metabolism of ethanol associated with raised ethanol blood concentrations seen in these people. Images Figure

  6. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  7. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  8. Biochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from Drosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; Hovik, R; McKinley-McKee, J S; Juan, E; Gonzalez-Duarte, R

    1986-01-01

    Purified Drosophila lebanonensis alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) revealed one enzymically active zone in starch gel electrophoresis at pH 8.5. This zone was located on the cathode side of the origin. Incubation of D. lebanonensis Adh with NAD+ and acetone altered the electrophoretic pattern to more anodal migrating zones. D. lebanonensis Adh has an Mr of 56,000, a subunit of Mr of 28 000 and is a dimer with two active sites per enzyme molecule. This agrees with a polypeptide chain of 247 residues. Metal analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy indicated that this insect alcohol dehydrogenase is not a metalloenzyme. In studies of the substrate specificity and stereospecificity, D. lebanonensis Adh was more active with secondary than with primary alcohols. Both alkyl groups in the secondary alcohols interacted hydrophobically with the alcohol binding region of the active site. The catalytic centre activity for propan-2-ol was 7.4 s-1 and the maximum velocity of most secondary alcohols was approximately the same and indicative of rate-limiting enzyme-coenzyme dissociation. For primary alcohols the maximum velocity varied and was much lower than for secondary alcohols. The catalytic centre activity for ethanol was 2.4 s-1. With [2H6]ethanol a primary kinetic 2H isotope effect of 2.8 indicated that the interconversion of the ternary complexes was rate-limiting. Pyrazole was an ethanol-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The difference spectra of the enzyme-NAD+-pyrazole complex gave an absorption peak at 305 nm with epsilon 305 14.5 X 10(3) M-1 X cm-1. Concentrations and amounts of active enzyme can thus be determined. A kinetic rate assay to determine the concentration of enzyme active sites is also presented. This has been developed from active site concentrations established by titration at 305 nm of the enzyme and pyrazole with NAD+. In contrast with the amino acid composition, which indicated that D. lebanonensis Adh and the D. melanogaster alleloenzymes were not

  9. Crystal structure of cod liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase: substrate pocket and structurally variable segments.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, S.; el Ahmad, M.; Danielsson, O.; Jörnvall, H.; Eklund, H.

    1996-01-01

    The structural framework of cod liver alcohol dehydrogenase is similar to that of horse and human alcohol dehydrogenases. In contrast, the substrate pocket differs significantly, and main differences are located in three loops. Nevertheless, the substrate pocket is hydrophobic like that of the mammalian class I enzymes and has a similar topography in spite of many main-chain and side-chain differences. The structural framework of alcohol dehydrogenase is also present in a number of related enzymes like glucose dehydrogenase and quinone oxidoreductase. These enzymes have completely different substrate specificity, but also for these enzymes, the corresponding loops of the substrate pocket have significantly different structures. The domains of the two subunits in the crystals of the cod enzyme further differ by a rotation of the catalytic domains by about 6 degrees. In one subunit, they close around the coenzyme similarly as in coenzyme complexes of the horse enzyme, but form a more open cleft in the other subunit, similar to the situation in coenzyme-free structures of the horse enzyme. The proton relay system differs from the mammalian class I alcohol dehydrogenases. His 51, which has been implicated in mammalian enzymes to be important for proton transfer from the buried active site to the surface is not present in the cod enzyme. A tyrosine in the corresponding position is turned into the substrate pocket and a water molecule occupies the same position in space as the His side chain, forming a shorter proton relay system. PMID:8845755

  10. Structural aspects of the dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bamforth, C W; Quayle, J R

    1979-01-01

    1. A dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase was purified 60-fold from extracts of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050 grown aerobically on ethanol. 2. The properties of this enzyme were identical with those of the alcohol dehydrogenase synthesized by this organism during growth on methanol anaerobically in the light, and they are judged to be the same enzyme. 3. The enzyme gave a single protein band, coincident with alcohol dehydrogenase activity, during electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. 4. The amino acid composition, ioselectric point, u.v. and visible absorption spectra of the enzyme were determined and compared with those of other similar enzymes. 5. The presence of 0.7--1.0 g-atom of non-haem, acidlabile iron/mol of enzyme was shown by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and colorimetric assay. The iron could not be dissociated from the enzyme by dialysis against chelating agents. 6. E.p.r. spectroscopy of the enzyme did not indicate any redox function for the iron during alcohol dehydrogenation, but showed a signal at g = 2.00 consistent with the presence of a protein-bound organic free radical. 8. Antisera were raised against alcohol (methanol) dehydrogenases purified from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, Paracoccus denitrificans and Methylophilus methylotrophus. 9. The antiserum to the Rhodopseudomonas acidophila enzyme cross-reacted with neither of the two other antisera, nor with crude extracts of methanol-grown Hyphomicrobium X and Pseudomonas AM1, thus emphasizing its singular biochemical properties. PMID:229820

  11. Use of the anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Leifsonia and Pseudomonas for producing chiral alcohols.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuya

    2014-05-01

    The asymmetric reduction of ketones is one of the most promising processes for producing chiral alcohols. However, dehydrogenases or reductases that can catalyze the reduction of ketones to give anti-Prelog chiral alcohols have been limited to some NADP(+)/NADPH-dependent enzymes. Recently, we reported a novel NAD(+)/NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Leifsonia sp. and Pseudomonas ADH homologs from soil metagenomes. Moreover, we have established an efficient hydrogen-transfer bioreduction process with 2-propanol as a hydrogen donor using Leifsonia ADH. This review focuses on the recent development of novel ADHs for producing industrially useful anti-Prelog chiral alcohols from various ketones. PMID:24615386

  12. Physicochemical Characterization of a Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Annalisa; Thorne, Natasha; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Xin; Shen, Min; D'Auria, Sabato; Auld, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we characterize an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PyAeADHII). We have previously found that PyAeADHII has no activity when standard ADH substrates are used but is active when α-tetralone is used as substrate. Here, to gain insights into enzyme function, we screened several chemical libraries for enzymatic modulators using an assay employing α-tetralone. The results indicate that PyAeADHII activity in the presence of α-tetralone was inhibited by compounds such as flunarizine. We also examined metal coordination of the enzyme in solution by performing metal substitution of the enzyme-bound zinc (Zn2+) with cobalt. The solution-based absorption spectra for cobalt substituted PyAeADHII supports substitution at the structural Zn2+ site. To gain structural insight, we obtained the crystal structure of both wild-type and cobalt-substituted PyAeADHII at 1.75 Å and 2.20 Å resolution, respectively. The X-ray data confirmed one metal ion per monomer present only at the structural site with otherwise close conservation to other ADH enzymes. We next determined the co-crystal structure of the NADPH-bound form of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution to help define the active site region of the enzyme and this data shows close structural conservation with horse ADH, despite the lack of a catalytic Zn2+ ion in PyAeADHII. Modeling of α-tetralone into the NADPH bound structure suggests an arginine as a possible catalytic residue. The data presented here can yield a better understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases lacking the catalytic zinc as well as the structural features inherent to thermostable enzymes. PMID:23755111

  13. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  14. Encapsulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Mannitol by Spray Drying

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Hirokazu; Joreau, Hiromi; Neoh, Tze Loon; Furuta, Takeshi; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably due to the quick crystallization of mannitol during spray drying that resulted in the impairment of enzyme protection ability in comparison to its amorphous form. Maltodextin (dextrose equivalent = 11) was used to reduce the crystallization of mannitol. The addition of maltodextrin increased ADH activity and drastically changed the powder X-ray diffractogram of the spray-dried powders. PMID:24662364

  15. Redesigning alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases for more efficient biosynthesis of enantiopure isomers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases predominantly catalyze the asymmetric biosynthesis of optically pure stereoisomers because of their unique chiral constitutions. The enantioselectivities of alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases are substrate- and cofactor-dependent, and therefore they usually catalyze specific reactions with high enantioselectivity under physiological conditions; this may not be suitable for asymmetric biosynthesis with non-natural substrates or non-natural cofactors, and under nonphysiological conditions. It is therefore necessary to modify alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases using various redesigning tools such as directed evolution and rational design, and their combinations, as well as engineering enzyme modules for more efficient production of "non-natural" products. In this article, progress in these aspects of alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase design is reviewed, and future challenges are discussed. PMID:26320091

  16. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  17. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  18. The alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme alcohol dehydrogenase IV as a candidate marker of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Strumnik, Anna; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with decreased alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the gastric mucosa. The decrease in gastric ADH activity depends on the severity of inflammation and mucosal injury. This damage can be a reason of the release of enzyme from gastric mucosa and leads to the increase of the ADH activity in the sera of patients with H. pylori infection. Material and methods Serum samples were taken from 140 patients with H. pylori infection. Total ADH activity was measured by photometric method with p-nitrosodimethylaniline as a substrate and ALDH activity by the fluorometric method with 6-methoxy-2-naphtaldehyde. For the measurement of the activity of class I and II isoenzymes we employed the fluorometric methods, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of class III ADH was measured by the photometric method with n-octanol and class IV with m-nitrobenzaldehyde as a substrate. Results The activity of ADH IV in the serum of patients with H. pylori infection increased about 42% (7.86 mU/l) in the comparison to the control level (4.52 mU/l). Total activity of ADH was 1105 mU/l in patients group and 682 mU/l in control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 88%, specificity 90%, positive and negative predictive values were 91% and 84% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.84. Conclusions Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric mucosa is reflected in the serum by significant increase of class IV and total ADH activity. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as a marker of H. pylori infection. PMID:25395946

  19. Recommended nomenclature for the vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase gene family.

    PubMed

    Duester, G; Farrés, J; Felder, M R; Holmes, R S; Höög, J O; Parés, X; Plapp, B V; Yin, S J; Jörnvall, H

    1999-08-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family encodes enzymes that metabolize a wide variety of substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids, and lipid peroxidation products. Studies on 19 vertebrate animals have identified ADH orthologs across several species, and this has now led to questions of how best to name ADH proteins and genes. Seven distinct classes of vertebrate ADH encoded by non-orthologous genes have been defined based upon sequence homology as well as unique catalytic properties or gene expression patterns. Each class of vertebrate ADH shares <70% sequence identity with other classes of ADH in the same species. Classes may be further divided into multiple closely related isoenzymes sharing >80% sequence identity such as the case for class I ADH where humans have three class I ADH genes, horses have two, and mice have only one. Presented here is a nomenclature that uses the widely accepted vertebrate ADH class system as its basis. It follows the guidelines of human and mouse gene nomenclature committees, which recommend coordinating names across species boundaries and eliminating Roman numerals and Greek symbols. We recommend that enzyme subunits be referred to by the symbol "ADH" (alcohol dehydrogenase) followed by an Arabic number denoting the class; i.e. ADH1 for class I ADH. For genes we recommend the italicized root symbol "ADH" for human and "Adh" for mouse, followed by the appropriate Arabic number for the class; i.e. ADH1 or Adh1 for class I ADH genes. For organisms where multiple species-specific isoenzymes exist within a class, we recommend adding a capital letter after the Arabic number; i.e. ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C for human alpha, beta, and gamma class I ADHs, respectively. This nomenclature will accommodate newly discovered members of the vertebrate ADH family, and will facilitate functional and evolutionary studies. PMID:10424757

  20. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. PMID:25280628

  1. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  2. Direct Electrochemical Addressing of Immobilized Alcohol Dehydrogenase for the Heterogeneous Bioelectrocatalytic Reduction of Butyraldehyde to Butanol

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, S; Neugebauer, H; Haberbauer, M; Hinterberger, G; Sariciftci, N S

    2015-01-01

    Modified electrodes using immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes for the efficient electroreduction of butyraldehyde to butanol are presented as an important step for the utilization of CO2-reduction products. Alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized, embedded in an alginate–silicate hybrid gel, on a carbon felt (CF) electrode. The application of this enzyme to the reduction of an aldehyde to an alcohol with the aid of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), in analogy to the final step in the natural reduction cascade of CO2 to alcohol, has been already reported. However, the use of such enzymatic reductions is limited because of the necessity of providing expensive NADH as a sacrificial electron and proton donor. Immobilization of such dehydrogenase enzymes on electrodes and direct pumping of electrons into the biocatalysts offers an easy and efficient way for the biochemical recycling of CO2 to valuable chemicals or alternative synthetic fuels. We report the direct electrochemical addressing of immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase for the reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol without consumption of NADH. The selective reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol occurs at room temperature, ambient pressure and neutral pH. Production of butanol was detected by using liquid-injection gas chromatography and was estimated to occur with Faradaic efficiencies of around 40 %. PMID:26113881

  3. Structure of a bacterial enzyme regulated by phosphorylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J H; Thorsness, P E; Ramalingam, V; Helmers, N H; Koshland, D E; Stroud, R M

    1989-11-01

    The structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase [threo-DS-isocitrate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42] from Escherichia coli has been solved and refined at 2.5 A resolution and is topologically different from that of any other dehydrogenase. This enzyme, a dimer of identical 416-residue subunits, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-113, which lies at the edge of an interdomain pocket that also contains many residues conserved between isocitrate dehydrogenase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Isocitrate dehydrogenase contains an unusual clasp-like domain in which both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock. Based on the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase and conservation with isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, we suggest that the active site lies in an interdomain pocket close to the phosphorylation site. PMID:2682654

  4. Contribution of liver alcohol dehydrogenase to metabolism of alcohols in rats.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Leidal, Kevin G; Murch, Bruce P; Green, David W

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5-20 mmol/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmol/kgh. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5-10 mmol/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmol/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6±1 mmol/kg h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD(+) for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD(+) for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. PMID:25641189

  5. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F.; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism. PMID:23772048

  6. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  7. A model system for QTL analysis: Effects of alcohol dehydrogenase genotype on alcohol pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.G.; Nightingale, B.; Whitfield, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    There is much interest in the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) - major genes which affect quantitative phenotypes. The relationship of polymorphism at known alcohol metabolizing enzyme loci to alcohol pharmacokinetics is a good model system. The three class I alcohol dehydrogenase genes are clustered on chromosome 4 and protein electrophoresis has revealed polymorphisms at the ADH2 and ADH3 loci. While different activities of the isozymes have been demonstrated in vitro, little work has been done in trying to relate ADH polymorphism to variation in ethanol metabolism in vivo. We previously measured ethanol metabolism and psychomotor reactivity in 206 twin pairs and demonstrated that most of the repeatable variation was genetic. We have now recontacted the twins to obtain DNA samples and used PCR with allele specific primers to type the ADH2 and ADH3 polymorphisms in 337 individual twins. FISHER has been used to estimate fixed effects of typed polymorphisms simultaneously with remaining linked and unlinked genetic variance. The ADH2*1-2 genotypes metabolize ethanol faster and attain a lower peak blood alcohol concentration than the more common ADH2*1-1 genotypes, although less than 3% of the variance is accounted for. There is no effect of ADH3 genotype. However, sib-pair linkage analysis suggests that there is a linked polymorphism which has a much greater effect on alcohol metabolism that those typed here.

  8. Characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and 3 from Neurospora crassa FGSC2489.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Cheol; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2007-08-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a key enzyme in the production and utilization of alcohols. Some also catalyze the formation of carboxylate esters from alcohols and aldehydes. The ADH1 and ADH3 genes of Neurospora crassa FGSC2489 were cloned and expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli to investigate their alcohol dehydrogenation and carboxylate ester formation abilities. Homology analysis and sequence alignment of amino acid sequence indicated that ADH1 and ADH3 of N. crassa contained a zinc-binding consensus sequence and a NAD(+)-binding motif and showed 54-75% identity with fungi ADHs. N. crassa ADH1 was expressed in E. coli to give a specific activity of 289 +/- 9 mU/mg using ethanol and NAD(+) as substrate and cofactor, respectively. Corresponding experiments on the expression and activity of ADH3 gave 4 mU/mg of specific activity. N. crassa ADH1 preferred primary alcohols containing C3-C8 carbons to secondary alcohols such as 2-propanol and 2-butanol. N. crassa ADH1 possessed 5.3 mU/mg of specific carboxylate ester-forming activity accumulating 0.4 mM of ethyl acetate in 18 h. Substrate specificity of various linear alcohols and aldehydes indicated that short chain-length alcohols and aldehydes were good substrates for carboxylate ester production. N. crassa ADH1 was a primary alcohol dehydrogenase using cofactor NAD(+) preferably and possessed carboxylate ester-forming activity with short chain alcohols and aldehydes. PMID:17516063

  9. Physiological Studies of Methane- and Methanol-Oxidizing Bacteria: Comparison of a Primary Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Texas Strain) and Pseudomonas Species M27

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R. N.; Bose, H. R.; Mandy, W. J.; Hoare, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    A primary alcohol dehydrogenase has been purified from Methylococcus capsulatus (Texas strain). The purified enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate; other primary alcohols are oxidized to their corresponding aldehydes. Ammonium ions are required for enzyme activity. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 120,000 daltons and consists of two 62,000 molecular-weight subunits which dissociate at acidic pH. The enzyme is similar to an alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme isolated from Pseudomonas sp. M27. Images PMID:5022170

  10. Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase: developmental studies on cryptic variant lines.

    PubMed

    Miglani, G S; Ampy, F R

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-five cryptic variant lines were used to examine the mechanisms involved in genetic modulation of alcohol metabolism in Drosophila. Late third-instar larval, preemergence pupal, and adult stages cultured at 18 and 28 C were examined. Spectrophotometric analyses for native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and residual ADH activity after treatment with guanidine hydrochloride and heat were performed. Differential response of cryptic variants to treatment with the denaturants during development suggested that this variation may have an adaptive significance. PMID:6800354

  11. Complete amino acid sequence and characterization of the reaction mechanism of a glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Ryoko; Kubota, Humie; Hosoki, Tomoko; Ikehara, Kenji; Tanaka, Mieko

    2002-02-15

    A glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens) and its fundamental properties have been characterized. The enzyme catalyzes NAD-dependent dehydrogenation of aliphatic alcohols and amino alcohols. In this work, the complete amino acid sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase was determined by PCR method using genomic DNA of A. radiobacter as template. The enzyme comprises 336 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 36 kDa. The primary structure of the enzyme demonstrates a high homology to structures of alcohol dehydrogenases from Shinorhizobium meliloti (83% identity, 90% positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (65% identity, 76% positive). The two Zn(2+) ion binding sites, both the active site and another site that contributed to stabilization of the enzyme, are conserved in those enzymes. Sequences analysis of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase family using a hypothetical phylogenetic tree indicates that these three enzymes form a new group distinct from other members of the Zn-containing long-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. The physicochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from A. radiobacter were characterized as follows. (1) Stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from ethanol to NADH was categorized as pro-R type by NMR spectra of NADH formed in the enzymatic reaction using ethanol-D(6) was used as substrate. (2) Optimal pH for all alcohols with no amino group examined was pH 8.5 (of the C(2)-C(6) alcohols, n-amyl alcohol demonstrated the highest activity). Conversely, glucosaminitol was optimally dehydrogenated at pH 10.0. (3) The rate-determining step of the dehydrogenase for ethanol is deprotonation of the enzyme-NAD-Zn-OHCH(2)CH(3) complex to enzyme-NAD-Zn-O(-)CH(2)CH(3) complex and that for glucosaminitol is H(2)O addition to enzyme-Zn-NADH complex. PMID:11831851

  12. Contribution of Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase to Metabolism of Alcohols in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Leidal, Kevin G.; Murch, Bruce P.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5–20 mmole/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmole/kg•h. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5–10 mmole/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmole/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6 ± 1 mmole/kg•h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD+ for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD+ for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD+ is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. PMID:25641189

  13. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms in Chinese and Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Lim, Leslie; Leong, Jern-Yi; Lim, Jing-Yan; Lee, Arthur; Yang, Jun; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Winslow, Munidasa

    2010-01-01

    The association between two functional polymorphisms in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2/ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) genes and alcohol dependence was examined in 182 Chinese and Indian patients undergoing treatment for alcohol dependence and 184 screened control subjects from Singapore. All subjects were screened by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Patients were also administered the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ). Polymorphisms were genotyped by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and selected genotypes confirmed by DNA sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Our results showed that frequencies of ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 were higher in controls compared to alcohol-dependent subjects for both Chinese and Indians. Frequencies of these two alleles were also higher in the 104 Chinese controls compared to the 80 Indian controls. None of the eight Chinese who were homozygous for both protective alleles was alcohol dependent. The higher frequencies of the protective alleles could explain the lower rate of alcohol dependence in Chinese. PMID:20025435

  14. Geometric specificity of alcohol dehydrogenases and its potential for separation of trans and cis isomers of unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, A M; Giannousis, P P

    1982-01-01

    The geometric specificity of three different alcohol dehydrogenases (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) (from yeast, from horse liver, and from Leuconostoc mesenteroides) in the reduction of trans- and cis-cinnamaldehydes has been investigated. All three enzymes display a remarkable trans specificity: they react with the trans isomer 7 to 647 times faster than with its cis counterpart. Experiments with the enzymatic reduction of 3-phenylpropionaldehyde, a saturated analog of cinnamaldehyde, have revealed that whereas trans-cinnamaldehyde possesses the "right" configuration for the active centers of the alcohol dehydrogenases, the cis isomer apparently does not fit the active centers well. All three alcohol dehydrogenases studied also exhibit a marked trans specificity in the reaction with alpha-methylcinnamaldehyde. The geometric specificity of alcohol dehydrogenases can be used for the production of otherwise hard to synthesize cis isomers of unsaturated aldehydes from their readily available trans counterparts: trans-cinnamaldehyde was irradiated with ultraviolet light (which converted it to a mixture of trans and cis isomers) then treated with NADH and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (which selectively reduces only trans aldehyde into the alcohol), and finally the mixture of cis-cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamyl alcohol was separated easily by preparative column chromatography. PMID:7048306

  15. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  16. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  17. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  18. NAD(P)-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Induced during Growth of Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo on Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Schräder, Thomas; Zarnt, Grit; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Different aldehyde dehydrogenases (AlDHs) were formed during growth of Ralstonia eutropha Bo on tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). One of these enzymes, AlDH 4, was purified and characterized as a homodimer containing no prosthetic groups, showing a strong substrate inhibition, and having an N-terminal sequence similar to those of various NAD(P)-dependent AlDHs. The conversion rate of THFA by the quinohemoprotein THFA dehydrogenase was increased by AlDH 4. PMID:11717302

  19. Characterization of a Zinc-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase with Stereoselectivity from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiangxian; Ma, Kesen

    2011-01-01

    An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis was purified to homogeneity and was found to be a homotetramer with a subunit size of 40 ± 1 kDa. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and sequenced; this gene had 1,095 bp, corresponding to 365 amino acids, and showed high sequence homology to zinc-containing ADHs and l-threonine dehydrogenases with binding motifs of catalytic zinc and NADP+. Metal analyses revealed that this NADP+-dependent enzyme contained 0.9 ± 0.03 g-atoms of zinc per subunit. It was a primary-secondary ADH and exhibited a substrate preference for secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones. Particularly, the enzyme with unusual stereoselectivity catalyzed an anti-Prelog reduction of racemic (R/S)-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. The optimal pH values for the oxidation and formation of alcohols were 10.5 and 7.5, respectively. Besides being hyperthermostable, the enzyme activity increased as the temperature was elevated up to 95°C. The enzyme was active in the presence of methanol up to 40% (vol/vol) in the assay mixture. The reduction of ketones underwent high efficiency by coupling with excess isopropanol to regenerate NADPH. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed that the apparent Km values and catalytic efficiency for NADPH were 40 times lower and 5 times higher than those for NADP+, respectively. The physiological roles of the enzyme were proposed to be in the formation of alcohols such as ethanol or acetoin concomitant to the NADPH oxidation. PMID:21515780

  20. [Possible ways of regulating detoxifying processes in the alcohol dehydrogenase reaction with pantothenic acid derivatives].

    PubMed

    Chernikevich, I P; Dorofeev, B F; Moĭseenok, A G

    1993-01-01

    Oxidation of derivatives and precursors of pantothenic acid was studied in alcohol dehydrogenase reactions. Despite the presence of free hydroxymethyl groups in a number of pantothenic acid derivatives only panthenol with Km = 8 x 10(-3) M was shown to serve as a substrate for alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver tissue (EC 1.1.1.1) Pantethine, sodium phosphopantothenate, CoA and acetyl-CoA decreased the rate of ethanol oxidation, where pantethine and sodium phosphopantothenate were competitive inhibitors, while CoA and acetyl-CoA inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively Ki = 1.2 x 10(-2) M, 2.1 x 10(-2) M, 4.4 x 10(-4) M and 5.1 x 10(-4) M, respectively. Metabolic precursors, which were different from pantothenic acid in their structure, were not involved in the alcohol dehydrogenase reaction. Possible regulation of alcohol intoxication using derivatives and precursors of vitamin B3 is discussed. PMID:8511887

  1. Bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) in chlorophyte algal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William; Riveros-Rosas, Hector; González-Halphen, Diego

    2003-09-01

    Protein profiles of mitochondria isolated from the heterotrophic chlorophyte Polytomella sp. grown on ethanol at pH 6.0 and pH 3.7 were analyzed by Blue Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Steady-state levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were influenced by external pH. Levels of an abundant, soluble, mitochondrial protein of 85 kDa and its corresponding mRNA increased at pH 6.0 relative to pH 3.7. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the 85 kDa mitochondrial protein together with the corresponding cDNA identified it as a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) with strong similarity to homologues from eubacteria and amitochondriate protists. A mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acids precedes the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial protein. A gene encoding an ADHE homologue was also identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a photosynthetic relative of Polytomella. ADHE reveals a complex picture of sequence similarity among homologues. The lack of ADHE from archaebacteria indicates a eubacterial origin for the eukaryotic enzyme. Among eukaryotes, ADHE has hitherto been characteristic of anaerobes since it is essential to cytosolic energy metabolism of amitochondriate protists such as Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica. Its abundance and expression pattern suggest an important role for ADHE in mitochondrial metabolism of Polytomella under the conditions studied. The current data are compatible with the view that Polytomella ADHE could be involved either in ethanol production or assimilation, or both, depending upon environmental conditions. Presence of ADHE in an oxygen-respiring algal mitochondrion and co-expression at ambient oxygen levels with respiratory chain components is unexpected with respect to the view that eukaryotes acquired ADHE genes specifically as an adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle. PMID:14756315

  2. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. The primary structure of the gamma 1 protein chain.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    The primary structure of the gamma 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme gamma 1 gamma 1 was deduced by characterization of 36 tryptic and 2 CNBr peptides. The polypeptide chain is composed of 373 amino acid residues. gamma 1 differs from the beta 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 21 positions, and from the E subunit of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 43 positions including a gap at position 128 as in the beta 1 subunit. All zinc-liganding residues from the E subunit of the horse protein and the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme are conserved, but like beta 1, gamma 1 also has an additional cysteine residue at position 286 (in the positional numbering system of the horse enzyme) due to a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most amino acid exchanges preserve the properties of the residues affected and are largely located on the surface of the molecules, away from the active site and the coenzyme binding region. However, eight positions with charge differences in relation to the E subunit of the horse enzyme are noticed. These result in a net positive charge increase of one in gamma 1 versus E, explaining the electrophoretic mobilities on starch gels. Of functional significance is the conservation of Ser-48 in gamma 1 relative to E. The residue is close to the active site but different (Thr-48) in the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme. Thus, the closer structural relationship between human gamma 1 and horse E enzyme subunit than between beta 1 and E is also reflected in functionally important residues, explaining a greater similarity between gamma 1 gamma 1 and EE than between beta 1 beta 1 and EE. PMID:6391921

  3. The aromatic alcohol dehydrogenases in Pseudomonas putida N.C.I.B. 9869 grown on 3,5-xylenol and p-cresol.

    PubMed Central

    Keat, M J; Hopper, D J

    1978-01-01

    Whole cells of Pseudomonas putida N.C.I.B 9869, when grown on either 3,5-xylenol or p-cresol, oxidized both m- and p-hydroxybenzyl alcohols. Two distinct NAD+-dependent m-hydroxybenzyl alcohol dehydrogenases were purified from cells grown on 3,5-xylenol. Each is active with a range of aromatic alcohols, including both m- and p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, but differ in their relative rates with the various substrates. An NAD+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was also partially purified from p-cresol grown cells. This too was active with m- and p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol and other aromatic alcohols, but was not identical with either of the other two dehydrogenases. All three enzymes were unstable, but were stabilized by dithiothreitol and all were inhibited with p-chloromercuribenzoate. All were specific for NAD+ and each was shown to catalyse conversion of alcohol into aldehyde. PMID:743216

  4. Baboon alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes: phenotypic changes in liver following chronic consumption of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Holmes, R S; VandeBerg, J L

    1987-01-01

    According to the nomenclature of Vallee and Bazzone [1983] for mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes, baboon ADHs comprise three major classes of activity, which were distinguished according to the following properties: Class I ADHs. These isozymes exhibited low-Km characteristics with ethanol as substrate, high isoelectric points (8.5-9.3), and sensitivity to 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, and were the major liver (ADH-2) and kidney (ADH-1) isozymes in the baboon. Class II ADHs. These isozymes showed high-Km values for ethanol, neutral isoelectric points (7.7 for the liver ADH-4 [pi-ADH] and 7.2 for the major stomach ADH [ADH-3], respectively), and were insensitive to inhibition with 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole. Class III ADH. This enzyme was characterized by its inactivity with ethanol as substrate (up to 0.5 M), insensitivity to 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, preference for medium-chain-length alcohols as substrate (trans-2-hexen-1-ol was routinely used in this study), and an isoelectric point (6.5) similar to that of the human liver chi-ADH (pI 6.4). Major activity variation of the liver pi-ADH (ADH-4) isozyme was observed among the 114 liver samples examined, with 34 percent exhibiting a null (or low-activity) phenotype. An electrophoretic variant phenotype for the major class II stomach isozyme (ADH-3) was also found in the population studied. The baboon was used as a model for studying alcohol-induced changes in liver ADH phenotype following chronic alcohol consumption. Prepuberal male baboons were pair-fed nutritionally adequate liquid diets containing ethanol (50 percent of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrates, and liver ADH isozyme patterns from biopsy samples were monitored for 20 weeks. Dramatic decreases in class II liver ADH activity (ADH-4, or pi-ADH) were observed within 4 weeks after the start of alcohol feeding, and a shift in liver class I isozymes was found during the later stages of alcohol consumption. These changes during chronic

  5. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci. PMID:23637459

  6. Syringyl Lignin Is Unaltered by Severe Sinapyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Suppression in Tobacco[W

    PubMed Central

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N.; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D.; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreel, Kris; Boerjan, Wout; Halpin, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was challenged by the discovery of a novel sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that preferentially uses sinapaldehyde as a substrate and that was claimed to regulate S lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms. Consequently, most pathway schemes now show SAD (or SAD and CAD) at the sinapaldehyde reduction step, although functional evidence is lacking. We cloned SAD from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and suppressed it in transgenic plants using RNA interference–inducing vectors. Characterization of lignin in the woody stems shows no change to content, composition, or structure, and S lignin is normal. By contrast, plants additionally suppressed in CAD have changes to lignin structure and S:G ratio and have increased sinapaldehyde in lignin, similar to plants suppressed in CAD alone. These data demonstrate that CAD, not SAD, is the enzyme responsible for S lignin biosynthesis in woody angiosperm xylem. PMID:22158465

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanse and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. ADH-A and ADH-B were distinguished on the basis of electrophoretic mobility, pyridine nucleotide cofactor requirement, and substrate specificity. ADH-A is a soluble, NAD-linked, inducible ethanol dehydrogenase (EDH). An ethanol-negative mutant (Eth1) was isolated which contained 6.5% of wild-type EDH activity and was deficient in ADH-A. Eth1 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane and hexadecanol. A second ethanol-negative mutant (Eth3) was acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) deficient, having 12.5% of wild-type ALDH activity. Eth3 had threefold-higher EDH activity than the wild-type strain. ALDH is a soluble, NAD-linked, ethanol-inducible enzyme. Eth3 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and fatty aldehyde. ADH-B is soluble, constitutive, NADP-linked ADH which was active with medium-chain-length alcohols. Hexadecanol dehydrogenase (HDH), a soluble and membrane-bound, NAD-linked ADH, was induced 5- to 11-fold by growth on hexadecane or hexadecanol. HDH was distinct from ADH-A and ADH-B. NAD-linked HDH appears to possess a functional role in hexadecane and hexadecanol dissimilation.

  8. Catalytic and Molecular Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo

    PubMed Central

    Zarnt, Grit; Schräder, Thomas; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    The quinohemoprotein tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol dehydrogenase (THFA-DH) from Ralstonia eutropha strain Bo was investigated for its catalytic properties. The apparent kcat/Km and Ki values for several substrates were determined using ferricyanide as an artificial electron acceptor. The highest catalytic efficiency was obtained with n-pentanol exhibiting a kcat/Km value of 788 × 104 M−1 s−1. The enzyme showed substrate inhibition kinetics for most of the alcohols and aldehydes investigated. A stereoselective oxidation of chiral alcohols with a varying enantiomeric preference was observed. Initial rate studies using ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates revealed that a ping-pong mechanism can be assumed for in vitro catalysis of THFA-DH. The gene encoding THFA-DH from R. eutropha strain Bo (tfaA) has been cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence showed an identity of up to 67% to the sequence of various quinoprotein and quinohemoprotein dehydrogenases. A comparison of the deduced sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence previously determined by Edman degradation analysis suggested the presence of a signal sequence of 27 residues. The primary structure of TfaA indicated that the protein has a tertiary structure quite similar to those of other quinoprotein dehydrogenases. PMID:11222593

  9. S-Nitrosoglutathione is a substrate for rat alcohol dehydrogenase class III isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D E; Belka, G K; Du Bois, G C

    1998-04-15

    An enzyme isolated from rat liver cytosol (native molecular mass 78. 3 kDa; polypeptide molecular mass 42.5 kDa) is capable of catalysing the NADH/NADPH-dependent degradation of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). The activity utilizes 1 mol of coenzyme per mol of GSNO processed. The isolated enzyme has, as well, several characteristics that are unique to alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) class III isoenzyme: it is capable of catalysing the NAD+-dependent oxidations of octanol (insensitive to inhibition by 4-methylpyrazole), methylcrotyl alcohol (stimulated by added pentanoate) and 12-hydroxydodecanoic acid, and also the NADH/NADPH-dependent reduction of octanal. Methanol and ethanol oxidation activity is minimal. The enzyme has formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity in that it is capable of catalysing the NAD+/NADP+-dependent oxidation of S-hydroxymethylglutathione. Treatment with the arginine-specific reagent phenylglyoxal prevents the pentanoate stimulation of methylcrotyl alcohol oxidation and markedly diminishes the enzymic activity towards octanol, 12-hydroxydodecanoic acid and S-hydroxymethylglutathione; the capacity to catalyse GSNO degradation is also checked. Additionally, limited peptide sequencing indicates 100% correspondence with known ADH class III isoenzyme sequences. Kinetic studies demonstrate that GSNO is an exceptionally active substrate for this enzyme. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and S-nitrosated human serum albumin are not substrates; the activity towards S-nitrosated glutathione mono- and di-ethyl esters is minimal. Product analysis suggests that glutathione sulphinamide is the major stable product of enzymic GSNO processing, with minor yields of GSSG and NH3; GSH, hydroxylamine, nitrite, nitrate and nitric oxide accumulations are minimal. Inclusion of GSH in the reaction mix decreases the yield of the supposed glutathione sulphinamide in favor of GSSG and hydroxylamine. PMID:9531510

  10. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Falus, Peter; Preost, Sylvain

    2008-09-26

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  11. High blood alcohol levels in women. The role of decreased gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity and first-pass metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frezza, M; di Padova, C; Pozzato, G; Terpin, M; Baraona, E; Lieber, C S

    1990-01-11

    After consuming comparable amounts of ethanol, women have higher blood ethanol concentrations than men, even with allowance for differences in size, and are more susceptible to alcoholic liver disease. Recently, we documented significant "first-pass metabolism" of ethanol due to its oxidation by gastric tissue. We report a study of the possible contribution of this metabolism to the sex-related difference in blood alcohol concentrations in 20 men and 23 women. Six in each group were alcoholics. The first-pass metabolism was determined on the basis of the difference in areas under the curves of blood alcohol concentrations after intravenous and oral administration of ethanol (0.3 g per kilogram of body weight). Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also measured in endoscopic gastric biopsies. In nonalcoholic subjects, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the women were 23 and 59 percent, respectively, of those in the men, and there was a significant correlation (rs = 0.659) between first-pass metabolism and gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity. In the alcoholic men, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity were about half those in the nonalcoholic men; in the alcoholic women, the gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity was even lower than in the alcoholic men, and first-pass metabolism was virtually abolished. We conclude that the increased bioavailability of ethanol resulting from decreased gastric oxidation of ethanol may contribute to the enhanced vulnerability of women to acute and chronic complications of alcoholism. PMID:2248624

  12. Isolation and characterization of full-length putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Nur Athirah Abd; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-11-01

    Polygonum minus, locally named as Kesum is an aromatic herb which is high in secondary metabolite content. Alcohol dehydrogenase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohol and aldehyde with the presence of NAD(P)(H) as co-factor. The main focus of this research is to identify the gene of ADH. The total RNA was extracted from leaves of P. minus which was treated with 150 μM Jasmonic acid. Full-length cDNA sequence of ADH was isolated via rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE). Subsequently, in silico analysis was conducted on the full-length cDNA sequence and PCR was done on genomic DNA to determine the exon and intron organization. Two sequences of ADH, designated as PmADH1 and PmADH2 were successfully isolated. Both sequences have ORF of 801 bp which encode 266 aa residues. Nucleotide sequence comparison of PmADH1 and PmADH2 indicated that both sequences are highly similar at the ORF region but divergent in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR). The amino acid is differ at the 107 residue; PmADH1 contains Gly (G) residue while PmADH2 contains Cys (C) residue. The intron-exon organization pattern of both sequences are also same, with 3 introns and 4 exons. Based on in silico analysis, both sequences contain "classical" short chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases ((c) SDRs) conserved domain. The results suggest that both sequences are the members of short chain alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  13. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension. PMID:23578856

  14. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  15. Alcohol oxidase is a novel pathogenicity factor for Cladosporium fulvum, but aldehyde dehydrogenase is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Segers, G; Bradshaw, N; Archer, D; Blissett, K; Oliver, R P

    2001-03-01

    Cladosporiumfulvum is a mitosporic ascomycete pathogen of tomato. A study of fungal genes expressed during carbon starvation in vitro identified several genes that were up regulated during growth in planta. These included genes predicted to encode acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh1) and alcohol oxidase (Aox1). An Aldh1 deletion mutant was constructed. This mutant lacked all detectable ALDH activity, had lost the ability to grow with ethanol as a carbon source, but was unaffected in pathogenicity. Aox1 expression was induced by carbon starvation and during the later stages of infection. The alcohol oxidase enzyme activity has broadly similar properties (Km values, substrate specificity, pH, and heat stability) to yeast enzymes. Antibodies raised to Hansenula polymorpha alcohol oxidase (AOX) detected antigens in Western blots of starved C. fulvum mycelium and infected plant material. Antigen reacting with the antibodies was localized to organelles resembling peroxisomes in starved mycelium and infected plants. Disruption mutants of Aox1 lacked detectable AOX activity and had markedly reduced pathogenicity as assayed by two different measures of fungal growth. These results identify alcohol oxidase as a novel pathogenicity factor and are discussed in relation to peroxisomal metabolism of fungal pathogens during growth in planta. PMID:11277434

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  17. Lactate Dehydrogenase Is the Key Enzyme for Pneumococcal Pyruvate Metabolism and Pneumococcal Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A. Y.; Andrew, Peter W.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  18. From Alcohol Dehydrogenase to a “One-way” Carbonyl Reductase by Active-site Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Directional preference in catalysis is often used to distinguish alcohol dehydrogenases from carbonyl reductases. However, the mechanistic basis underpinning this discrimination is weak. In mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, stabilization of (partial) negative charge on the substrate oxyanion by the side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 is a key feature of catalysis in the direction of alcohol oxidation. We have disrupted this ability through individual and combined substitutions of the two asparagines by aspartic acid. Kinetic data and their thermodynamic analysis show that the internal equilibrium of enzyme-NADH-fructose and enzyme-NAD+-mannitol (Kint) was altered dramatically (104- to 105-fold) from being balanced in the wild-type enzyme (Kint ≈ 3) to favoring enzyme-NAD+-mannitol in the single site mutants, N191D and N300D. The change in Kint reflects a selective slowing down of the mannitol oxidation rate, resulting because Asn → Asp replacement (i) disfavors partial abstraction of alcohol proton by Lys-295 in a step preceding catalytic hydride transfer, and (ii) causes stabilization of a nonproductive enzyme-NAD+-mannitol complex. N191D and N300D appear to lose fructose binding affinity due to deprotonation of the respective Asp above apparent pK values of 5.3 ± 0.1 and 6.3 ± 0.2, respectively. The mutant incorporating both Asn→Asp substitutions behaved as a slow “fructose reductase” at pH 5.2, lacking measurable activity for mannitol oxidation in the pH range 6.8–10. A mechanism is suggested in which polarization of the substrate carbonyl by a doubly protonated diad of Asp and Lys-295 facilitates NADH-dependent reduction of fructose by N191D and N300D under optimum pH conditions. Creation of an effectively “one-way” reductase by active-site redesign of a parent dehydrogenase has not been previously reported and holds promise in the development of carbonyl reductases for application in organic synthesis. PMID:20639204

  19. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti. PMID:8765684

  20. Insight into the stereospecificity of short-chain thermus thermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase showing pro-S hydride transfer and prelog enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Giordano, Assunta; Esposito, Luciana; Langella, Emma; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2010-04-01

    The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in reactions catalyzed by NAD(H)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 was determined by means of (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The enzyme transfers the pro-S hydrogen of [4R-(2)H]NADH and exhibits Prelog specificity. Enzyme-substrate docking calculations provided structural details about the enantioselectivity of this thermophilic enzyme. These results give additional insights into the diverse active site architectures of the largely versatile short-chain dehydrogenase superfamily enzymes. A feasible protocol for the synthesis of [4R-(2)H]NADH with high yield was also set up by enzymatic oxidation of 2-propanol-d(8) catalyzed by Bacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:19807673

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenases from Scheffersomyces stipitis involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menggen; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xianxian

    2013-09-01

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are generated from biomass pretreatment. Scheffersomyces stipitis is able to reduce furfural and HMF to less toxic furanmethanol and furan-2,5-dimethanol; however, the enzymes involved in the reductive reaction still remain unknown. In this study, transcription responses of two known and five putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from S. stipitis were analyzed under furfural and HMF stress conditions. All the seven alcohol dehydrogenase genes were also cloned and overexpressed for their activity analyses. Our results indicate that transcriptions of SsADH4 and SsADH6 were highly induced under furfural and HMF stress conditions, and the proteins encoded by them exhibited NADH- and/or NADPH-dependent activities for furfural and HMF reduction, respectively. For furfural reduction, NADH-dependent activity was also observed in SsAdh1p and NAD(P)H-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. For HMF reduction, NADPH-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. SsAdh4p displayed the highest NADPH-dependent specific activity and catalytic efficiency for reduction of both furfural and HMF among the seven alcohol dehydrogenases. Enzyme activities of all SsADH proteins were more stable under acidic condition. For most SsADH proteins, the optimum temperature for enzyme activities was 30 °C and more than 50 % enzyme activities remained at 60 °C. Reduction activities of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, benzaldehyde, and phenylacetaldehyde were also observed in some SsADH proteins. Our results indicate that multiple alcohol dehydrogenases in S. stipitis are involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion. PMID:23912116

  2. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHES77). Interestingly, the ADHES77 was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration. PMID:26216639

  3. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from halophilic archaebacteria: purification and properties of the enzyme from halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, J.J.; McQuattie, A.; Stevenson, K.J.

    1986-07-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria possess dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity but apparently lack the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of which it is usually an integral component. In this paper, the purification of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Halobacterium halobium is reported. The enzyme is a dimer with a polypeptide chain M/sub r/ of 58,000 (+/-3000). The amino acid composition of the enzyme is compared with those of the eubacterial and eukaryotic dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, and evidence is presented to suggest that the N-terminal amino acid of the H. halobium enzyme is blocked. Chemical modification with the trivalent arsenical reagent (p-aminophenyl)dichloroarsine indicates the involvement of a reversibly reducible disulfide bond in the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. The possible metabolic role of this dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in the absence of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is discussed.

  4. Genic Heterogeneity at Two Alcohol Dehydrogenase Loci in DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA and DROSOPHILA PERSIMILIS

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Jerry A.; Felton, Alexander A.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential electrophoretic survey of the second chromosome loci, alcohol dehydrogenase-6 (Adh-6) and octanol dehydrogenase ( Odh), was performed on 147 isochromosomal lines of Drosophila pseudoobscura and 60 lines of its sibling species, D. persimilis. Gels run with a variety of acrylamide concentrations and buffer pH's revealed the presence of 18 alleles of Adh-6 in the two species, where only eight had been previously detected by conventional electrophoretic methods. Only two alleles were added with our techniques to the previous total of nine in both species at the largely monomorphic Odh locus. Both enzymes show a predominance of one allele, with the other variants being fairly rare. There was no evidence of increased genetic divergence between the two species, but we found a striking increase in differentiation of Adh-6 alleles between the main body of D. pseudoobscura populations and the conspecific isolate from Bogotá, Colombia. These results are compared with our previous surveys of xanthine dehydrogenase in these species and discussed in reference to theories of genic polymorphism. PMID:17248763

  5. Some properties of an alcohol dehydrogenase partially purified from baker's yeast grown without added zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, C J; Dickinson, F M

    1976-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was partially purified from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) grown in the presence of 20 muM-MnSO4 without added Zn2+ and from yeast grown in the presence of 1.8 muM-MnSO4. The enzyme from yeast grown with added Zn2+ has the same properties as the crystalline enzyme from commercial supplies of baker's yeast. The enzyme from yeast grown without added An2+ has quite different properties. It has a mol.wt. in the region of 72000 and an S 20 w of 5.8S. The values can be compared with a mol.wt. of 141000 and an S 20 w of 7.6S for the crystalline enzyme. ADP-ribose, a common impurity in commercial samples of NAD+, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the new enzyme (K1 = 0.5 muM), but is not so for the crystalline enzyme. The observed maximum rate of ethanol oxidation at pH 7.05 and 25 degrees C was decreased 12-fold by the presence of 0.06 mol of inhibitor/mol of NAD+ when using the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast, but with crystalline enzyme the maximum rate was essentially unchanged by this concentration of inhibitor. The kinetic characteristics for the two enzymes with ethanol, butan-1-ol, acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde as substrates are markedly different. These kinetic differences are discussed in relation to the mechanism of catalysis for the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast. PMID:179534

  6. Chronic alcoholism in rats induces a compensatory response, preserving brain thiamine diphosphate, but the brain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases are inactivated despite unchanged coenzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Yulia M; Kudryavtsev, Pavel A; Pylypchuk, Svetlana Yu; Chekhivska, Lilia I; Stepanenko, Svetlana P; Sergiichuk, Andrej A; Bunik, Victoria I

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine-dependent changes in alcoholic brain were studied using a rat model. Brain thiamine and its mono- and diphosphates were not reduced after 20 weeks of alcohol exposure. However, alcoholism increased both synaptosomal thiamine uptake and thiamine diphosphate synthesis in brain, pointing to mechanisms preserving thiamine diphosphate in the alcoholic brain. In spite of the unchanged level of the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate, activities of the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes decreased in alcoholic brain. The inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was caused by its increased phosphorylation. The inactivation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) correlated with a decrease in free thiols resulting from an elevation of reactive oxygen species. Abstinence from alcohol following exposure to alcohol reactivated OGDHC along with restoration of the free thiol content. However, restoration of enzyme activity occurred before normalization of reactive oxygen species levels. Hence, the redox status of cellular thiols mediates the action of oxidative stress on OGDHC in alcoholic brain. As a result, upon chronic alcohol consumption, physiological mechanisms to counteract the thiamine deficiency and silence pyruvate dehydrogenase are activated in rat brain, whereas OGDHC is inactivated due to impaired antioxidant ability. PMID:21517848

  7. New inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase: studies in vivo and in vitro in the rat.

    PubMed

    Delmas, C; de Saint Blanquat, G; Freudenreich, C; Biellmann, J F

    1983-01-01

    Two compounds bearing an amide group, p-butoxyphenol acetamide (BPA) and N-(p-butoxybenzyl)formamide (BBF) were studied as inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and their action compared with that of 4-methyl-pyrazole (4-MP), a known inhibitor of this enzyme. In vitro studies on pure horse liver ADH showed that BPA and BBF were noncompetitive inhibitors with respect to ethanol and that their Ki values were 22 and 0.14 micrometer, respectively. The apparent Ki values of BPA and BBF for rat liver ADH were found to be 90 and 2.3 micrometers, respectively (noncompetitive inhibition). Several in vivo experiments were carried out in the rat. Administration intraperitoneally of the substance (460 mumol/kg) 1 hr before intraperitoneal injection of alcohol (2 g/kg body weight) led to a significant decrease in ethanol catabolism. Injection of the substances at 460 mumol/kg brought about a decrease in rat liver ADH activity, but the activity of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase was only decreased in animals treated with BBF. PMID:6353976

  8. Ranitidine as an alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor in acute methanol toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Bakary, Amal A; El-Dakrory, Sahar A; Attalla, Sohayla M; Hasanein, Nawal A; Malek, Hala A

    2010-02-01

    Methanol poisoning is a hazardous intoxication characterized by visual impairment and formic acidemia. The therapy for methanol poisoning is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) inhibitors to prevent formate accumulation. Ranitidine has been considered to be an inhibitor of both gastric alcohol and hepatic aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. This study aimed at testing ranitidine as an antidote for methanol acute toxicity and comparing it with ethanol and 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP). This study was conducted on 48 Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into 6 groups, with 8 rats in each group (one negative control group [C1], two positive control groups [C2, C3] and three test groups [1, 2 and 3]). C2, C3 and all test groups were exposed to nitrous oxide by inhalation, then, C3 group was given methanol (3 g/kg orally). The three test groups 1, 2 and 3 were given ethanol (0.5 g/kg orally), 4-MP (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and ranitidine (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally), respectively, 4 hours after giving methanol. Rats were sacrificed and heparinized, cardiac blood samples were collected for blood pH and bicarbonate. Non-heparinized blood samples were collected for formate levels by high performance liquid chromatography. Eye balls were enucleated for histological examination of the retina. Ranitidine corrected metabolic acidosis (p = .025), decreased formate levels (p = .014) and improved the histological findings in the retina induced by acute methanol toxicity. PMID:20026516

  9. Physiological Studies of Methane- and Methanol-Oxidizing Bacteria: Immunological Comparison of a Primary Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus and Pseudomonas sp. M27

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R. N.; Mandy, W. J.; Hoare, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    A primary alcohol dehydrogenase was purified from cell extracts of two apparently unrelated microorganisms, namely, Pseudomonas sp. M27 and Methylococcus capsulatus. Rabbit antiserum prepared against the purified enzyme from M. capsulatus revealed distinctive antigenic determinants by quantitative and gel precipitin reactions. Rabbit antiserum to M27 enzyme detected both distinctive and shared antigenic determinants. Certain methane- and methanol-oxidizing bacteria were grouped on the basis of serological cross-reacting enzyme specificities. Images PMID:4120569

  10. Phylogeny and structure of the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Christian; Nord-Larsen, Pia Haugaard; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2012-10-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step of the monolignol biosynthesis, the conversion of cinnamyl aldehydes to alcohols, using NADPH as a cofactor. Seven members of the CAD gene family were identified in the genome of Brachypodium distachyon and five of these were isolated and cloned from genomic DNA. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR revealed differential expression of the cloned genes, with BdCAD5 being expressed in all tissues and highest in root and stem while BdCAD3 was only expressed in stem and spikes. A phylogenetic analysis of CAD-like proteins placed BdCAD5 on the same branch as bona fide CAD proteins from maize (ZmCAD2), rice (OsCAD2), sorghum (SbCAD2) and Arabidopsis (AtCAD4, 5). The predicted three-dimensional structures of both BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 resemble that of AtCAD5. However, the amino-acid residues in the substrate-binding domains of BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 are distributed symmetrically and BdCAD3 is similar to that of poplar sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (PotSAD). BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 expressed and purified from Escherichia coli both showed a temperature optimum of about 50 °C and molar weight of 49 kDa. The optimal pH for the reduction of coniferyl aldehyde were pH 5.2 and 6.2 and the pH for the oxidation of coniferyl alcohol were pH 8 and 9.5, for BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 respectively. Kinetic parameters for conversion of coniferyl aldehyde and coniferyl alcohol showed that BdCAD5 was clearly the most efficient enzyme of the two. These data suggest that BdCAD5 is the main CAD enzyme for lignin biosynthesis and that BdCAD3 has a different role in Brachypodium. All CAD enzymes are cytosolic except for BdCAD4, which has a putative chloroplast signal peptide adding to the diversity of CAD functions. PMID:23028019

  11. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Osman A. B. S. M.; Adekoya, Olayiwola A.; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2008-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that might be possible when inhibitors bind to the enzyme cofactor complex, were constructed. The binding of the two alcohol competitive inhibitors were studied using automatic docking by the Internal Coordinate Mechanics program, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with the AMBER program package, calculation of the free energy of ligand binding by the linear interaction energy method, and the hydropathic interactions force field. The calculations indicated that deprotonated Tyr acts as a strong base in the binary enzyme-NAD+ complex. Molecular dynamic simulations for 5 ns confirmed that deprotonated Tyr is essential for anchoring and orientating the inhibitors at the active site, which might be a general trend for the family of SDRs. The findings here have implications for the development of therapeutically important SDR inhibitors. PMID:17981907

  12. Purification and characterization of an anti-Prelog alcohol dehydrogenase from Oenococcus oeni that reduces 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fantao; Xu, Yan

    2010-04-01

    An anti-Prelog alcohol dehydrogenase from Oenococcus oeni that reduces 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol was purified by 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme had a homodimeric structure consisting of 49 kDa subunits, required NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor and was a Zn-independent short-chain dehydrogenase. Aliphatic methyl ketones (chain length > or =6 carbon atoms) and aromatic methyl ketones were the preferred substrates for the enzyme, the best being 2-octanone. Maximum enzyme activity with 2-octanone was at 45 degrees C and at pH 8.0. PMID:20035369

  13. Alcohol dehydrogenases and an alcohol oxidase involved in the assimilation of exogenous fatty alcohols in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-05-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica can assimilate hydrophobic substrates, including n-alkanes and fatty alcohols. Here, eight alcohol dehydrogenase genes, ADH1-ADH7 and FADH, and a fatty alcohol oxidase gene, FAO1, were analyzed to determine their roles in the metabolism of hydrophobic substrates. A mutant deleted for all of these genes (ALCY02 strain) showed severely defective growth on fatty alcohols, and enhanced sensitivity to fatty alcohols in glucose-containing media. The ALCY02 strain grew normally on n-tetradecane or n-hexadecane, but exhibited slightly defective growth on n-decane or n-dodecane. It accumulated more 1-dodecanol and less dodecanoic acid than the wild-type strain when n-dodecane was fed. Expression of ADH1, ADH3 or FAO1, but not that of other ADH genes or FADH, in the ALCY02 strain restored its growth on fatty alcohols. In addition, a triple deletion mutant of ADH1, ADH3 and FAO1 showed similarly defective growth on fatty alcohols and on n-dodecane to the ALCY02 strain. Microscopic observation suggests that Adh1p and Adh3p are localized in the cytosol and Fao1p is in the peroxisome. These results suggest that Adh1p, Adh3p and Fao1p are responsible for the oxidation of exogenous fatty alcohols but play less prominent roles in the oxidation of fatty alcohols derived from n-alkanes. PMID:25805841

  14. Low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) polymorphism, alcohol-drinking behavior, and chromosome alterations in peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T

    1996-01-01

    Excessive drinking of alcohol is now widely known to be one of the major lifestyle choices that ca effect health. Among the various effects of alcohol drinking, cytogenetic and other genotoxic effects are of major concern from the viewpoint of prevention of alcohol-related diseases. Alcohol is first metabolized to acetaldehyde, which directly causes various types of chromosomal DNA lesions and alcohol-related diseases, and is then further detoxified to the much less toxic metabolite acetate. About 50% of Oriental people are deficient in the aldehyde-dehydrogenase 2 isozyme (ALDH2) that can most efficiently detoxify acetaldehyde. We have performed a series of experiments to investigate how the genetic deficiency in ALDH2 affects the behavioral pattern for alcohol drinking and the sensitivity of peripheral lymphocytes to the induction of chromosome alterations by exposure to alcohol and alcohol-related chemicals. We found great effects of the ALDH2 genotypes on alcohol sensitivity and alcohol-drinking behavior. We also show that lymphocytes from habitual drinkers with the deficient ALDH2 enzyme had significantly higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges than those from ALDH2-proficient individuals. PMID:8781384

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  16. Conversion of alcohols to enantiopure amines through dual enzyme hydrogen-borrowing cascades

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Francesco G.; Knaus, Tanja; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Breuer, Michael; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    α-Chiral amines are key intermediates for the synthesis of a plethora of chemical compounds on industrial scale. Here we present a biocatalytic hydrogen-borrowing amination of primary and secondary alcohols that allows for the efficient and environmentally benign production of enantiopure amines. The method relies on the combination of an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs from Aromatoleum sp., Lactobacillus sp. and Bacillus sp.) enzyme operating in tandem with an amine dehydrogenase (AmDHs engineered from Bacillus sp.) to aminate a structurally diverse range of aromatic and aliphatic alcohols (up to 96% conversion and 99% enantiomeric excess). Furthermore, primary alcohols are aminated with high conversion (up to 99%). This redox self-sufficient network possesses high atom efficiency, sourcing nitrogen from ammonium and generating water as the sole by-product. PMID:26404833

  17. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  18. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67. PMID:26743849

  19. Study on immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase on nanocrystalline Ni-Co ferrites as magnetic support.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Mohammad; Nasir, Zeba; Khan, Mohd Shoeb; Lutfullah; Alam, Md Fazle; Younus, Hina; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The covalent binding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) enzyme complex in a series of magnetic crystalline Ni-Co nanoferrites, synthesized via sol-gel auto combustion technique was investigated. The structural analysis, morphology and magnetic properties of Ni-Co nanoferrites were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The comparative analysis of the HRTEM micrographs of bare magnetic nanoferrite particles and particles immobilized with enzyme revealed an uniform distribution of the particles in both the cases without undergoing change in the size which was found to be in the range 20-30 nm. The binding of YADH to Ni-Co nanoferrites and the possible binding mechanism have been suggested by comparing the FTIR results. The binding properties of the immobilized YADH enzyme were also studied by kinetic parameters, optimum operational pH, temperature, thermal stability and reusability. The immobilized YADH exhibits enhanced thermal stability as compared to the free enzyme over a wide range of temperature and pH, and showed good durability after recovery by magnetic separation for repeated use. PMID:25450541

  20. Probes of hydrogen tunneling with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at subzero temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Klinman, J P

    2001-02-20

    The temperature dependence of steady-state kinetics has been studied with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) using protonated and deuterated benzyl alcohol as substrates in methanol/water mixtures between +3 and -50 degrees C. Additionally, the competitive isotope effects, k(H)/k(T) and k(D)/k(T), were measured. The studies indicate increasing kinetic complexity for wild-type HLADH at subzero temperatures. Consistent with earlier findings at 25 degrees C [Bahnson et al. (1993) Biochemistry 31, 5503], the F93W mutant shows much less kinetic complexity than the wild-type enzyme between 3 and -35 degrees C. An analysis of noncompetitive deuterium isotope effects and competitive tritium isotope effects leads to the conclusion that the reaction of F93W involves substantial hydrogen tunneling down to -35 degrees C. The effect of methanol on kinetic properties for the F93W mutant was analyzed, showing a dependence of competitive KIEs on the NAD(+) concentration. This indicates a more random bi--bi kinetic mechanism, in comparison to an ordered bi-bi kinetic mechanism in water. Although MeOH also affects the magnitude of the reaction rates and, to some extent, the observed KIEs, the ratio of ln k(H)/k(T) to ln k(D)/k(T) for primary isotope effects has not changed in methanol, and we conclude little or no change in kinetic complexity. Importantly, the degree of tunneling, as shown from the relationship between the secondary k(H)/k(T) and k(D)/k(T) values, is the same in water and MeOH/water mixtures, implicating similar trajectories for H transfer in both solvents. In a recent study of a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase [Kohen et al. (1999) Nature 399, 496], it was shown that decreases in temperatures below a transition temperature lead to decreased tunneling. This arises because of a change in protein dynamics below a break point in enzyme activity [Kohen et al. (2000) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 10738-10739]. For the mesophilic HLADH described herein, an opposite

  1. Expression of Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 in Tissue and Cultured Cells from Human Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Jesper J.; Höög, Jan-Olov; Nilsson, Jan A.; Xi, Zheng; Elfwing, Åsa; Grafström, Roland C.

    2000-01-01

    Because formaldehyde exposure has been shown to induce pathological changes in human oral mucosa, eg, micronuclei, the potential enzymatic defense by alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3)/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase was characterized in oral tissue specimens and cell lines using RNA hybridization and immunological methods as well as enzyme activity measurements. ADH3 mRNA was expressed in basal and parabasal cell layers of oral epithelium, whereas the protein was detected throughout the cell layers. ADH3 mRNA and protein were further detected in homogenates of oral tissue and various oral cell cultures, including, normal, SV40T antigen-immortalized, and tumor keratinocyte lines. Inhibition of the growth of normal keratinocytes by maintenance at confluency significantly decreased the amount of ADH3 mRNA, a transcript with a determined half-life of 7 hours. In contrast, decay of ADH3 protein was not observed throughout a 4-day period in normal keratinocytes. In samples from both tissue and cells, the ADH3 protein content correlated to oxidizing activity for the ADH3-specific substrate S-hydroxymethylglutathione. The composite analyses associates ADH3 mRNA primarily to proliferative keratinocytes where it exhibits a comparatively short half-life. In contrast, the ADH3 protein is extremely stable, and consequently is retained during the keratinocyte life span in oral mucosa. Finally, substantial capacity for formaldehyde detoxification is shown from quantitative assessments of alcohol- and aldehyde-oxidizing activities including Km determinations, indicating that ADH3 is the major enzyme involved in formaldehyde oxidation in oral mucosa. PMID:11073833

  2. Microbial production of methylketones: properties of purified yeast secondary alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.N.; Hou, C.T.; Laskin, A.I.; Derelanko, P.

    1981-06-01

    Secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH) was purified from extracts of a methanol-grown yeast, Pichia sp. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by ultracentrifugation and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified SADH has a molecular weight of 98,000 as determined by gel filtration and 102,000 as determined by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. The sedimentation constant s/sub 20,w/ was 6.0. The subunit size of the SADH was 48,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that it consists of two subunits. The purified SADH contained two atoms of zinc per mole of enzyme protein. SADH catalyzed the oxidation of secondary alcohols. Primary alcohols (C/sub 1/ to C/sub 8/ tested) were not oxidized. The purified SADH and extracts of various yeasts and bacteria also catalyzed the reduction of methylketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols in the presence of reduced NAD/sup +/ as an electron donor. Both reactions (oxidation of secondary alcohols in the presence of NAD/sup +/ and reduction of methylketones in the presence of reduced NAD/sup +/) catalyzed by the purified SADH were inhibited by metal-chelating agents, thio reagent, and by antisera prepared against the purified enzyme. The apparent K/sub m/ values for NAD/sup +/, reduced NAD/sup +/, reduced NAD/sup +/, 2-butanol, and 2-butanone are 0.05, 0.1, 0.4, and 1 mM, respectively. The purified enzyme preferentially oxidized (-)-2-butanol and (-)-2-octanol, the rate of oxidation of (+)-2-butanol and (+)-2-octanol was 36% and 13% of that of 100% with (-)-2-butanol and (-)-2-octanol, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for (-)-2-butanol and (+)-2-butanol were 3.0 and 0.75 mM, respectively. Antisera prepared against purified Pichia SADH cross-reacted with the SADH derived from bacteria. This suggests difference in immunological properties between yeast and bacterial SADH.

  3. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food. PMID:26142864

  4. NADP+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase, a corpora allata enzyme involved in juvenile hormone synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Navare, Arti; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of juvenile hormone (JH) is an attractive target for control of insect pests and vectors of disease, but the minute size of the corpora allata (CA), the glands that synthesize JH, has made it difficult to identify important biosynthetic enzymes by classical biochemical approaches. Here, we report identification and characterization of an insect farnesol dehydrogenase (AaSDR-1) that oxidizes farnesol into farnesal, a precursor of JH, in the CA. AaSDR-1 was isolated as an EST in a library of the corpora allata-corpora cardiaca of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The 245-amino acid protein presents the typical short-chain dehydrogenase (SDR) Rossmann-fold motif for nucleotide binding. This feature, together with other conserved sequence motifs, place AaSDR-1 into the “classical” NADP+-dependent cP2 SDR subfamily. The gene is part of a group of highly conserved paralogs that cluster together in the mosquito genome; similar clusters of orthologs were found in other insect species. AaSDR-1 acts as a homodimer and efficiently oxidizes C10 to C15 isoprenoid and aliphatic alcohols, showing the highest affinity for the conversion of farnesol into farnesal. Farnesol dehydrogenase activity was not detected in the CA of newly emerged mosquitoes but significant activity was detected 24 h later. Real time PCR experiments revealed that AaSDR-1 mRNA levels were very low in the inactive CA of the newly emerged female, but increased >30-fold 24 h later during the peak of JH synthesis. These results suggest that oxidation of farnesol might be a rate-limiting step in JH III synthesis in adult mosquitoes. PMID:19940247

  5. Origin and evolution of medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Jörnvall, Hans; Hedlund, Joel; Bergman, Tomas; Kallberg, Yvonne; Cederlund, Ella; Persson, Bengt

    2013-02-25

    Different lines of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) have separate superfamily origins, already recognized but now extended and re-evaluated by re-screening of the latest databank update. The short-chain form (SDR) is still the superfamily with most abundant occurrence, most multiple divergence, most prokaryotic emphasis, and most non-complicated architecture. This pattern is compatible with an early appearance at the time of the emergence of prokaryotic cellular life. The medium-chain form (MDR) is also old but second in terms of all the parameters above, and therefore compatible with a second emergence. However, this step appears seemingly earlier than previously considered, and may indicate sub-stages of early emergences at the increased resolution available from the now greater number of data entries. The Zn-MDR origin constitutes a third stage, possibly compatible with the transition to oxidative conditions on earth. Within all these three lines, repeated enzymogeneses gave the present divergence. MDR-ADH origin(s), at a fourth stage, may also be further resolved in multiple or extended modes, but the classical liver MDR-ADH of the liver type can still be traced to a gene duplication ~550 MYA (million years ago), at the early vertebrate radiation, compatible with the post-eon-shift, "Cambrian explosion". Classes and isozymes correspond to subsequent and recent duplicatory events, respectively. They illustrate a peculiar pattern with functional and emerging evolutionary distinctions between parent and emerging lines, suggesting a parallelism between duplicatory and mutational events, now also visible at separate sub-stages. Combined, all forms show distinctive patterns at different levels and illustrate correlations with global events. They further show that simple molecular observations on patterns, multiplicities and occurrence give much information, suggesting common divergence rules not much disturbed by horizontal gene transfers after the initial origins. PMID

  6. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  7. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. Deficient activity of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase component of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, W B; Craft, D A

    1991-01-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an inherited disorder associated with impaired fatty alcohol oxidation due to deficient activity of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAO). FAO is a complex enzyme which consists of two separate proteins that sequentially catalyze the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty aldehyde and fatty acid. To determine which enzymatic component of FAO was deficient in SLS, we assayed fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) and fatty alcohol dehydrogenase in cultured fibroblasts from seven unrelated SLS patients. All SLS cells were selectively deficient in the FALDH component of FAO, and had normal activity of fatty alcohol dehydrogenase. The extent of FALDH deficiency in SLS cells depended on the aliphatic aldehyde used as substrate, ranging from 62% of mean normal activity using propionaldehyde as substrate to 8% of mean normal activity with octadecanal. FALDH activity in obligate SLS heterozygotes was partially decreased to 49 +/- 7% of mean normal activity using octadecanal as substrate. Differential centrifugation studies in fibroblasts indicated that this FALDH enzyme was largely particulate; soluble FALDH activity was normal in SLS cells. Intact SLS fibroblasts oxidized octadecanol to fatty acid at less than 10% of the normal rate, but oxidized free octadecanal normally, suggesting that the FALDH affected in SLS is chiefly involved in the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty acid. These results show that the primary enzymatic defect in SLS is the FALDH component of the FAO complex, which leads to deficient oxidation of fatty aldehyde derived from fatty alcohol. PMID:1939650

  8. Enhanced Stability and Reusability of Alcohol Dehydrogenase Covalently Immobilized on Magnetic Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangliang; Yu, Jingang; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has a unique planar structure and contains many functional groups. As a functional material, it can be functionalized with biomolecules and nanomaterials for various applications. In this study, Magnetic GO (MGO) nanocomposites were synthesized according to covalent binding of amino Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the GO surface and the as-made nanocomposites were successfully applied as supports for the immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Compared with free ADH and Fe3O4 nanoparticles immobilized ADH (MNP-ADH), the MGO immobilized ADH (MGO-ADH) exhibited a wider pH stability range and a better thermal stability. Furthermore, the MGO-ADH exhibited better storage stability and reusability than MNP-ADH after recovered by magnetic separations. The MGO-ADH maintained 35.1% activity after 20 days storage and lost about 20.4% activity after ten times usage. The Michaelis constant (Km) of MGO-ADH was close to that of free ADH. The results showed the MGO nanocomposites were appropriate for the immobilization of enzyme. As a novel support, MGO nanocomposites effectively increased the stability of enzyme, allowed the reuse or continuous use of enzymes and therefore improved the potential use in practical. PMID:26353636

  9. Identification and characterization of a mycobacterial NAD⁺-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase with superior reduction of diacetyl to (S)-acetoin.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Minoru; Anamizu, Shiori; Motomatsu, Shigekazu; Chen, Xue; Thapa Chhetri, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    An enzyme capable of reducing acetoin in the presence of NADH was purified from Mycobacterium sp. B-009, a non-clinical bacterial strain of soil origin. The enzyme is a homotetramer and can be classified as a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase based on the molecular weight of the monomer. Identification of the structural gene revealed a limited distribution of homologous genes only among actinomycetes. In addition to its activity as a reductase specific for (S)-acetoin (EC 1.1.1.76), the enzyme showed both diacetyl reductase (EC 1.1.1.304) and NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) activities. (S)-Acetoin and diacetyl reductases belong to a group of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductases but do not have superior abilities to dehydrogenate monoalcohols. Thus, the purified enzyme can be readily distinguished from other enzymes. We used the dual functionality of the enzyme to effectively reduce diacetyl to (S)-acetoin, coupled with the oxidation of 1-butanol. PMID:25082080

  10. Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase of Rauwolfia serpentina cells: the key enzyme in biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Esaki, N; Nakai, S; Hashimoto, K; Uesato, S; Soda, K; Fujita, T

    1991-02-01

    Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols in plants, is unstable and has been only poorly characterized. However we have established conditions which stabilize the enzyme from Rauwolfia serpentina cells, and then purified it to homogeneity. It is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 44,000 and contains zinc ions. Various branched-chain allylic primary alcohols such as nerol, geraniol, and 10-hydroxygeraniol were substrates, but ethanol was inert. The enzyme exclusively requires NADP+ or NADPH as the cofactor. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that the nerol dehydrogenation proceeds by an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. NADP+ binds the enzyme first and then NADPH is the second product released from it. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the reaction products showed that 10-hydroxygeraniol undergoes a reversible dehydrogenation to produce 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial, which are oxidized further to give 10-oxogeranial, the direct precursor of iridodial. The enzyme has been found to exclusively transfer the pro-R hydrogen of NADPH to neral. The N-terminal sequence of the first 21 amino acids revealed no significant homology with those of various other proteins including the NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases registered in a protein data bank. PMID:1864846

  11. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group.

  12. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group. PMID:27335670

  13. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, M; Chen, C S; Yoshida, A

    1991-01-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. We isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5' region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role. Images PMID:1881901

  14. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications. PMID:27474326

  15. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26178068

  16. Biophysical and mutagenic analysis of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D S; Secundo, F; Phillips, R S; Dong, J; Scott, R A; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E adhB gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (secondary ADH) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at more than 10% of total protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified in high yield (67%) by heat-treatment at 85 degrees C and (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. Site-directed mutants (C37S, H59N, D150N, D150Eand D150C were analysed to test the peptide sequence comparison-based predictions of amino acids responsible for putative catalytic Zn binding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a protein-bound Zn atom with ZnS1(imid)1(N,O)3 co-ordination sphere. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry measured 0.48 Zn atoms per wild-type secondary ADH subunit. The C37S, H59N and D150N mutant enzymes bound only 0.11, 0.13 and 0.33 Zn per subunit respectively,suggesting that these residues are involved in Zn liganding. The D150E and D150C mutants retained 0.47 and 1.2 Zn atoms per subunit, indicating that an anionic side-chain moiety at this position preserves the bound Zn. All five mutant enzymes had enzyme specific activity 2.7-fold, increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 225-fold, and decreased the Km(app) for NAD+ 3-fold, supporting the prediction that the enzyme binds nicotinamide cofactor in a Rossmann fold. Our data indicate therefore that, unlike the liver primary ADH

  17. Monoterpene alcohol metabolism: identification, purification, and characterization of two geraniol dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Polygonum minus leaves.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Maizom; Maarof, Nur Diyana; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Noor, Normah Mohd; Othman, Roohaida; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    NADP(+)-dependent geraniol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.183) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of geraniol to geranial. Stable, highly active cell-free extract was obtained from Polygonum minus leaves using polyvinylpolypyrrolidone, Amberlite XAD-4, glycerol, 2-mercaptoethanol, thiourea, and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride in tricine-NaOH buffer (pH 7.5). The enzyme preparation was separated into two activity peaks, geraniol-DH I and II, by DEAE-Toyopearl 650M column chromatography at pH 7.5. Both isoenzymes were purified to homogeneity in three chromatographic steps. The geraniol-DH isoenzymes were similar in molecular mass, optimal temperature, and pH, but the isoelectric point, substrate specificity, and kinetic parameters were different. The K(m) values for geraniol of geraniol-DH I and II appeared to be 0.4 mM and 0.185 mM respectively. P. minus geraniol-DHs are unusual among geraniol-DHs in view of their thermal stability and optimal temperatures, and also their high specificity for allylic alcohols and NADP(+). PMID:22878188

  18. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells. PMID:25988787

  19. Effect of amines as activators on the alcohol-oxidizing activity of pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (PQQ-ADH) require ammonia or primary amines as activators in in vitro assays with artificial electron acceptors. We found that PQQ-ADH from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (PpADH) was activated by various primary amines, di-methylamine, and tri-methylamine. The alcohol oxidation activity of PpADH was strongly enhanced and the affinity for substrates was also improved by pentylamine as an activator. PMID:25229857

  20. Dehydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol in isolated perfused rabbit skin, skin homogenate and purified dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bast, G E; Kampffmeyer, H G

    1998-01-01

    The formation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid from 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol was determined in (a) rabbit ears, single-pass perfused with a protein-free buffer, pH 7.4; (b) the microsomal fraction and its supernatant from homogenized rabbit skin; and (c) purified alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver and baker's yeast. The inhibition of product formation in (a) was about 60% by various 4-methylpyrazole concentrations, but metyrapone had no effect. Following ultracentrifugation, only the supernatant of homogenized skin showed product formation (apparent Vmay: 32 pmol/min per cm2 skin; apparent Km: 64 microM). 3-Phenoxybenzyl alcohol and ethanol dehydrogenation was similar by alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (apparent Km: 0.7 vs. 0.4 mM; apparent Vmax: 0.3 vs. 0.2 U/ microg protein). In baker's yeast, the apparent Km of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid formation was several times larger than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. The KI of 4-methylpyrazole for alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver was 0.6 (3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol) vs. 0.04 microM (ethanol). The KI for ethanol in baker's yeast was 470 microM. In conclusion dehydrogenation is an important metabolic pathway in the skin for xenobiotics with an aliphatic alcohol at a side chain. PMID:9885409

  1. Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase and Related Molybdenum Enzymes Involved in Oxygen-Independent Alkyl Chain Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Szaleniec, Maciej; Sünwoldt, Katharina; Boll, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase initiates the anaerobic bacterial degradation of ethylbenzene and propylbenzene. Although the enzyme is currently only known from a few closely related denitrifying bacterial strains affiliated to the Rhodocyclaceae, it clearly marks a universally occurring mechanism used for attacking recalcitrant substrates in the absence of oxygen. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase belongs to subfamily 2 of the DMSO reductase-type molybdenum enzymes together with paralogous enzymes involved in the oxygen-independent hydroxylation of p-cymene, the isoprenoid side chains of sterols and even possibly n-alkanes; the subfamily also extends to dimethylsulfide dehydrogenases, selenite, chlorate and perchlorate reductases and, most significantly, dissimilatory nitrate reductases. The biochemical, spectroscopic and structural properties of the oxygen-independent hydroxylases among these enzymes are summarized and compared. All of them consist of three subunits, contain a molybdenum-bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide cofactor, five Fe-S clusters and a heme b cofactor of unusual ligation, and are localized in the periplasmic space as soluble enzymes. In the case of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, it has been determined that the heme b cofactor has a rather high redox potential, which may also be inferred for the paralogous hydroxylases. The known structure of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase allowed the calculation of detailed models of the reaction mechanism based on the density function theory as well as QM-MM (quantum mechanics - molecular mechanics) methods, which yield predictions of mechanistic properties such as kinetic isotope effects that appeared consistent with experimental data. PMID:26960184

  2. Characterization of an Allylic/Benzyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp. Strain WZY002, an Organism Potentially Useful for the Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Alcohols from Allylic Aldehydes and Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiangxian; Wang, Yifang; Xiong, Bin; Wu, Tingting; Xie, Liping; Yu, Meilan

    2014-01-01

    A novel whole-cell biocatalyst with high allylic alcohol-oxidizing activities was screened and identified as Yokenella sp. WZY002, which chemoselectively reduced the C=O bond of allylic aldehydes/ketones to the corresponding α,β-unsaturated alcohols at 30°C and pH 8.0. The strain also had the capacity of stereoselectively reducing aromatic ketones to (S)-enantioselective alcohols. The enzyme responsible for the predominant allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity was purified to homogeneity and designated YsADH (alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp.), which had a calculated subunit molecular mass of 36,411 Da. The gene encoding YsADH was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant YsADH protein was characterized. The enzyme strictly required NADP(H) as a coenzyme and was putatively zinc dependent. The optimal pH and temperature for crotonaldehyde reduction were pH 6.5 and 65°C, whereas those for crotyl alcohol oxidation were pH 8.0 and 55°C. The enzyme showed moderate thermostability, with a half-life of 6.2 h at 55°C. It was robust in the presence of organic solvents and retained 87.5% of the initial activity after 24 h of incubation with 20% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. The enzyme preferentially catalyzed allylic/benzyl aldehydes as the substrate in the reduction of aldehydes/ketones and yielded the highest activity of 427 U mg−1 for benzaldehyde reduction, while the alcohol oxidation reaction demonstrated the maximum activity of 79.9 U mg−1 using crotyl alcohol as the substrate. Moreover, kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed lower Km values and higher catalytic efficiency for crotonaldehyde/benzaldehyde and NADPH than for crotyl alcohol/benzyl alcohol and NADP+, suggesting the nature of being an aldehyde reductase. PMID:24509923

  3. Characterization of an allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp. strain WZY002, an organism potentially useful for the synthesis of α,β-unsaturated alcohols from allylic aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiangxian; Wang, Yifang; Xiong, Bin; Wu, Tingting; Xie, Liping; Yu, Meilan; Wang, Zhao

    2014-04-01

    A novel whole-cell biocatalyst with high allylic alcohol-oxidizing activities was screened and identified as Yokenella sp. WZY002, which chemoselectively reduced the C=O bond of allylic aldehydes/ketones to the corresponding α,β-unsaturated alcohols at 30°C and pH 8.0. The strain also had the capacity of stereoselectively reducing aromatic ketones to (S)-enantioselective alcohols. The enzyme responsible for the predominant allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity was purified to homogeneity and designated YsADH (alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp.), which had a calculated subunit molecular mass of 36,411 Da. The gene encoding YsADH was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant YsADH protein was characterized. The enzyme strictly required NADP(H) as a coenzyme and was putatively zinc dependent. The optimal pH and temperature for crotonaldehyde reduction were pH 6.5 and 65°C, whereas those for crotyl alcohol oxidation were pH 8.0 and 55°C. The enzyme showed moderate thermostability, with a half-life of 6.2 h at 55°C. It was robust in the presence of organic solvents and retained 87.5% of the initial activity after 24 h of incubation with 20% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. The enzyme preferentially catalyzed allylic/benzyl aldehydes as the substrate in the reduction of aldehydes/ketones and yielded the highest activity of 427 U mg(-1) for benzaldehyde reduction, while the alcohol oxidation reaction demonstrated the maximum activity of 79.9 U mg(-1) using crotyl alcohol as the substrate. Moreover, kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed lower Km values and higher catalytic efficiency for crotonaldehyde/benzaldehyde and NADPH than for crotyl alcohol/benzyl alcohol and NADP(+), suggesting the nature of being an aldehyde reductase. PMID:24509923

  4. Expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans and some properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Benjamin; Lowe, David J; Smith, Andrew T; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Demais, Stephane; Bray, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    Recent crystal structures of xanthine dehydrogenase, xanthine oxidase and related enzymes have paved the way for a detailed structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. One problem encountered when working with these proteins, especially with recombinant protein, is that the preparations tend to be heterogeneous, with only a fraction of the enzyme molecules being active. This is due to the incompleteness of post-translational modification, which for this protein is a complex, and incompletely understood, process involving incorporation of the Mo and Fe/S centres. The enzyme has been expressed previously in both Drosophila and insect cells using baculovirus. The insect cell system has been exploited by Iwasaki et al. [Iwasaki, Okamoto, Nishino, Mizushima and Hori (2000) J. Biochem (Tokyo) 127, 771-778], but, for the rat enzyme, yields a complex mixture of enzyme forms, containing around 10% of functional enzyme. The expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans is described. The purified protein has been analysed both functionally and spectroscopically. Its specific activity is indistinguishable from that of the enzyme purified from fruit flies [Doyle, Burke, Chovnick, Dutton, Whittle and Bray (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 239, 782-795], and it appears to be more active than recombinant xanthine dehydrogenase produced with the baculovirus system. EPR spectra of the recombinant Drosophila enzyme are reported, including parameters for the Fe/S centres. Only a very weak "Fe/SIII" signal (g(1,2,3), 2.057, 1.930, 1.858) was observed, in contrast to the strong analogous signal reported for the enzyme from baculovirus. Since this signal appears to be associated with incomplete post-translational modification, this is consistent with relatively more complete cofactor incorporation in the Aspergillus-produced enzyme. Thus we have developed a recombinant expression system for D. melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase, which can be used

  5. Identification of a long-range protein network that modulates active site dynamics in extremophilic alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Cun, Shujian; Klinman, Judith P

    2013-05-17

    A tetrameric thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (ht-ADH) has been mutated at an aromatic side chain in the active site (Trp-87). The ht-W87A mutation results in a loss of the Arrhenius break seen at 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme and an increase in cold lability that is attributed to destabilization of the active tetrameric form. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are nearly temperature-independent over the experimental temperature range, and similar in magnitude to those measured above 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme. This suggests that the rigidification in the wild-type enzyme below 30 °C does not occur for ht-W87A. A mutation at the dimer-dimer interface in a thermolabile psychrophilic homologue of ht-ADH, ps-A25Y, leads to a more thermostable enzyme and a change in the rate-determining step at low temperature. The reciprocal mutation in ht-ADH, ht-Y25A, results in kinetic behavior similar to that of W87A. Collectively, the results indicate that flexibility at the active site is intimately connected to a subunit interaction 20 Å away. The convex Arrhenius curves previously reported for ht-ADH (Kohen, A., Cannio, R., Bartolucci, S., and Klinman, J. P. (1999) Nature 399, 496-499) are proposed to arise, at least in part, from a change in subunit interactions that rigidifies the substrate-binding domain below 30 °C, and impedes the ability of the enzyme to sample the catalytically relevant conformational landscape. These results implicate an evolutionarily conserved, long-range network of dynamical communication that controls C-H activation in the prokaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:23525111

  6. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  7. Rapid Microscale Isolation and Purification of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Cibacron Blue Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Chad; Moir, Neil

    1996-11-01

    A rapid microscale procedure has been developed for the isolation and purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Glass beads are used for cytolysis, PEG precipitation for partial purification and a cibacron blue affinity column for the final step. A 27.5 fold purification can be achieved in 2 - 3 hours.

  8. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  9. Genetic basis of the difference in alcohol dehydrogenase expression between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, C C; Heath, E M; Jacobson, J W; Thomson, M S

    1990-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, differ in expression of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Adult melanogaster flies that are homozygous for the Slow allozyme have approximately twice the level of ADH activity and crossreacting material as simulans adults. There is no corresponding difference in ADH mRNA, however, so this difference in ADH protein level is evidently due to a difference in the rate of translation of the two RNAs and/or to a difference in protein stability. Here we report an interspecific gene-transfer experiment, using P-element transformation, to determine whether this expression difference is due to genetic background differences between the species (trans-acting modifiers) or to cis-acting factors within the Adh gene. When the Adh genes from D. melanogaster and D. simulans are put into the same genetic background, there is no detectable difference in their level of expression. The level is relatively high in the melanogaster background and relatively low in the simulans background. Therefore, the interspecific difference in Adh expression is due entirely to trans-acting modifiers, in spite of the many sequence differences between the Adh genes of the two species, which include two amino acid substitutions. PMID:2124699

  10. Furfural reduction mechanism of a zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Kang, ChulHee; Hayes, Robert; Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Webb, Brian N.; Li, Qunrui; Hooper, Travis; Nissen, Mark S.; Xun, Luying

    2012-01-01

    Summary FurX is a tetrameric Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134. The enzyme rapidly reduces furfural with NADH as the reducing power. For the first time among characterized ADHs, the high-resolution structures of all reaction steps were obtained in a time-resolved manner, thereby illustrating the complete catalytic events of NADH-dependent reduction of furfural and the dynamic Zn2+ coordination among Glu66, water, substrate and product. In the fully closed conformation of the NADH complex, the catalytic turnover proved faster than observed for the partially closed conformation due to an effective proton transfer network. The domain motion triggered by NAD(H) association/dissociation appeared to facilitate dynamic interchanges in Zn2+ coordination with substrate and product molecules, ultimately increasing the enzymatic turnover rate. NAD+ dissociation appeared to be a slow process, involving multiple steps in concert with a domain opening and reconfiguration of Glu66. This agrees with the report that the cofactor is not dissociated from FurX during ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural, in which ethanol reduces NAD+ to NADH that is subsequently used for furfural reduction. PMID:22081946

  11. Molecular control of the induction of alcohol dehydrogenase by ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoun, A.M.; Geer, B.W.; Heinstra, P.W.H. ); Corbin, V. ); McKechnie, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the major pathway for ethanol degradation, is induced in Drosophila melanogaster larvae by low concentrations of dietary ethanol. Two lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic products of the ADH pathway for ethanol degradation are not directly involved in the induction of Adh. First, the accumulation of the proximal transcript in Adh{sup n2} larvae was increased when the intracellular level of ethanol was elevated. In addition, the ADH activity, the proximal Adh mRNA, and the intracellular concentration of ethanol were elevated coordinately in wild-type larvae fed hexadeuterated-ethanol, which is metabolized more slowly than normal ethanol.l An examination of P element transformant lines with specific deletions in the 5{prime} regulatory DNA of the Adh gene showed that the DNA sequence between +604 and +634 of the start site of transcription from the distal promoter was essential for this induction. The DNA sequence between {minus}660 and about {minus}5,000 of the distal transcript start site was important for the down-regulation of the induction response.

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  13. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from these enzymes were: AdhE1 > BdhB > BdhA ≈ YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2. For ethanol production, the contributions were: AdhE1 > BdhB > YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2 > BdhA. AdhE1 and BdhB are two essential enzymes for butanol and ethanol production. AdhE1 was relatively specific for butanol production over ethanol, while BdhB, YqhD, and SMB_P058 favor ethanol production over butanol. Butanol synthesis was increased in the adhE2 mutant, which had a higher butanol/ethanol ratio (8.15:1) compared with wild type strain (6.65:1). Both the SMB_P058 mutant and yqhD mutant produced less ethanol without loss of butanol formation, which led to higher butanol/ethanol ratio, 10.12:1 and 10.17:1, respectively. To engineer a more efficient butanol-producing strain, adhE1 could be overexpressed, furthermore, adhE2, SMB_P058, yqhD are promising gene inactivation targets. This work provides useful information guiding future strain improvement for butanol production. PMID:27321949

  14. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from these enzymes were: AdhE1 > BdhB > BdhA ≈ YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2. For ethanol production, the contributions were: AdhE1 > BdhB > YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2 > BdhA. AdhE1 and BdhB are two essential enzymes for butanol and ethanol production. AdhE1 was relatively specific for butanol production over ethanol, while BdhB, YqhD, and SMB_P058 favor ethanol production over butanol. Butanol synthesis was increased in the adhE2 mutant, which had a higher butanol/ethanol ratio (8.15:1) compared with wild type strain (6.65:1). Both the SMB_P058 mutant and yqhD mutant produced less ethanol without loss of butanol formation, which led to higher butanol/ethanol ratio, 10.12:1 and 10.17:1, respectively. To engineer a more efficient butanol-producing strain, adhE1 could be overexpressed, furthermore, adhE2, SMB_P058, yqhD are promising gene inactivation targets. This work provides useful information guiding future strain improvement for butanol production. PMID:27321949

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  16. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  17. Mutation of Tyr-218 to Phe in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase: effects on bioelectronic interface performance.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Brian L; Dennis, Megan; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Worden, Robert M

    2007-10-01

    Bioelectronic interfaces that facilitate electron transfer between the electrode and a dehydrogenase enzyme have potential applications in biosensors, biocatalytic reactors, and biological fuel cells. The secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees ADH) from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus is especially well suited for the development of such bioelectronic interfaces because of its thermostability and facile production and purification. However, the natural cofactor for the enzyme, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+), is more expensive and less stable than beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). PCR-based, site-directed mutagenesis was performed on 2 degrees ADH in an attempt to adjust the cofactor specificity toward NAD+ by mutating Tyr218 to Phe (Y218F 2 degrees ADH). This mutation increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 200-fold while decreasing the Km(app) for NAD+ 2.5-fold. The mutant enzyme was incorporated into a bioelectronic interface that established electrical communication between the enzyme, the NAD+, the electron mediator toluidine blue O (TBO), and a gold electrode. Cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, constant potential amperometry, and chronoamperometry were used to characterize the mutant and wild-type enzyme incorporated in the bioelectronic interface. The Y218F 2 degrees ADH exhibited a fourfold increase in the turnover ratio compared to the wild type in the presence of NAD+. The electrochemical and kinetic measurements support the prediction that the Rossmann fold of the enzyme binds to the phosphate moiety of the cofactor. During the 45 min of continuous operation, NAD+ was electrically recycled 6.7 x 10(4) times, suggesting that the Y218F 2 degrees ADH-modified bioelectronic interface is stable. PMID:18025592

  18. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  19. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  20. Studies of a Halophilic NADH Dehydrogenase. 1: Purification and Properties of the Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1973-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase obtained from an extremely halophilic bacterium was purified 570-fold by a combination of gel filtration, chromatography on hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex. The purified enzyme appeared to be FAD-linked and bad an apparent molecular weight of 64000. Even though enzyme activity was stimulated by NaCl, considerable activity (430 % of the maximum activity observed in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl) was observed in the absence of added NaCl. The enzyme was unstable when incubated in solutions of low ionic strength. The presence of NADH enhanced the stability of the enzyme.

  1. Subcellular Localization and Biochemical Comparison of Cytosolic and Secreted Cytokinin Dehydrogenase Enzymes from Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX, EC 1.5.99.12) degrades cytokinin hormones in plants. There are several differently targeted isoforms of CKX in cells of each plant. While most CKX enzymes appear to be localized in the apoplast or vacuoles, there is generally only one CKX per plant genome that lacks a t...

  2. Effects of Cavities at the Nicotinamide Binding Site of Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase on Structure, Dynamics and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A role for protein dynamics in enzymatic catalysis of hydrogen transfer has received substantial scientific support, but the connections between protein structure and catalysis remain to be established. Valine residues 203 and 207 are at the binding site for the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme in liver alcohol dehydrogenase and have been suggested to facilitate catalysis with “protein-promoting vibrations” (PPV). We find that the V207A substitution has small effects on steady-state kinetic constants and the rate of hydrogen transfer; the introduced cavity is empty and is tolerated with minimal effects on structure (determined at 1.2 Å for the complex with NAD+ and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol). Thus, no evidence is found to support a role for Val-207 in the dynamics of catalysis. The protein structures and ligand geometries (including donor–acceptor distances) in the V203A enzyme complexed with NAD+ and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol or 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (determined at 1.1 Å) are very similar to those for the wild-type enzyme, except that the introduced cavity accommodates a new water molecule that contacts the nicotinamide ring. The structures of the V203A enzyme complexes suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that the diminished tunneling and decreased rate of hydride transfer (16-fold, relative to that of the wild-type enzyme) are not due to differences in ground-state ligand geometries. The V203A substitution may alter the PPV and the reorganization energy for hydrogen transfer, but the protein scaffold and equilibrium thermal motions within the Michaelis complex may be more significant for enzyme catalysis. PMID:24437493

  3. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  4. Three alcohol dehydrogenase genes and one acetyl-CoA synthetase gene are responsible for ethanol utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Michael; Ottlik, Stephanie; Kövesi, Zsolt; Bauer, Benjamin; Matthäus, Falk; Barth, Gerold

    2016-10-01

    The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is able to utilize a wide range of different substrates like glucose, glycerol, ethanol, acetate, proteins and various hydrophobic molecules. Although most metabolic pathways for the utilization of these substrates have been clarified by now, it was not clear whether ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases or by an alternative oxidation system inside the cell. In order to detect the genes that are required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica, eight alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and one alcohol oxidase gene (FAO1) have been identified and respective deletion strains were tested for their ability to metabolize ethanol. As a result of this, we found that the availability of ADH1, ADH2 or ADH3 is required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica. A strain with deletions in all three genes is lacking the ability to utilize ethanol as sole carbon source. Although Adh2p showed by far the highest enzyme activity in an in vitro assay, the availability of any of the three genes was sufficient to enable a decent growth. In addition to ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, an acetyl-CoA synthetase encoding gene (ACS1) was found to be essential for ethanol utilization. As Y. lipolytica is a non-fermenting yeast, it is neither able to grow under anaerobic conditions nor to produce ethanol. To investigate whether Y. lipolytica may produce ethanol, the key genes of alcoholic fermentation in S. cerevisiae, ScADH1 and ScPDC1, were overexpressed in an ADH and an ACS1 deletion strain. However, instead of producing ethanol, the respective strains regained the ability to use ethanol as single carbon source and were still not able to grow under anaerobic conditions. PMID:27486067

  5. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, Danielle J.; Patrick, Wayne M.; Gerth, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2′-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary–secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2′-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme–cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  6. Characterization of a transient intermediate formed in the liver alcohol dehydrogenase catalyzed reduction of 3-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    MacGibbon, A.K.H.; Koerber, S.C.; Pease, K.; Dunn, M.F.

    1987-06-02

    The compounds 3-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzaldehyde and 3-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzyl alcohol are introduced as new chromophoric substrates for probing the catalytic mechanism of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). Ionization of the phenolic hydroxyl group shifts the spectrum of the aldehyde from 360 to 433 nm (pK/sub a/ = 6.0), whereas the spectrum of the alcohol shifts from 350 to 417 nm (pK/sub a/ = 6.9). Rapid-scanning, stopped-flow (RSSF) studies at alkaline pH show that the LADH-catalyzed interconversion of these compounds occurs via the formation of an enzyme-bound intermediate with a blue-shifted spectrum. When reaction is limited to a single turnover of enzyme sites, the formation and decay of the intermediate when aldehyde reacts with enzyme-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide E(NADH) are characterized by two relaxations. Detailed stopped-flow kinetic studies were carried out to investigate the disappearance of aldehyde and NADH, the formation and decay of the intermediate, the displacement of Auramine O by substrate, and /sup 2/H kinetic isotope effects. It was found that (1) NADH oxidation takes place at the rate of the slower relaxation (2) when NADD is substituted for NADH, lambda/sub s/ is subject to a small primary isotope effect; and (3) the events that occur in lambda/sub s/ precede lambda/sub f/. These findings identify the intermediate as a ternary complex containing bound oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD/sup +/) and some form of 3-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The authors conclude that the LADH substrate site can be divided into two subsites: a highly polar, electropositive subsite in the vicinity of the active-site zinc and, just a few angstroms away, a rather nonpolar region.

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms exacerbate bladder cancer risk associated with alcohol drinking: gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hidemi; Soga, Norihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokomizo, Akira; Hayashi, Norio; Eto, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-06-01

    Although a range of chemical exposures (cigarette smoking and occupational exposure) are recognized risk factors for the development of bladder cancer (BCa), many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is not associated with BCa risk. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2; rs671, Glu504Lys) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B; rs1229984, His47Arg) polymorphisms impact the accumulation of acetaldehyde, resulting in an increased risk of various cancers. To date, however, no studies evaluating the association between BCa risk and alcohol drinking have considered these polymorphisms. Here, we conducted a matched case-control study to investigate whether ALDH2 and ADH1B polymorphisms influence BCa risk associated with alcohol drinking. Cases were 74 BCa patients and controls were 740 first-visit outpatients without cancer at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005. Odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and gene-environment interaction were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Results showed that ALDH2 Glu/Lys was associated with a significantly increased risk of BCa compared with Glu/Glu (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62, P = 0.017). In contrast, ALDH2 Glu/Lys showed no increase in risk among the stratum of never drinkers compared with Glu/Glu, indicating a gene-environment interaction. ADH1B His/Arg had an OR of 1.98 (1.20-3.24, P = 0.007) compared with His/His. ADH1B Arg+ showed a similar OR and 95% CI. Individuals with ALDH2 Glu/Lys and ADH1B Arg+ had the highest risk of BCa compared with ALDH2 Glu/Glu and ADH1B His/His [OR 4.00 (1.81-8.87), P = 0.001]. PMID:26992901

  8. Purification and Characterization of the Bifunctional Enzyme Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase-Saccharopine Dehydrogenase from Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves-Butruille, M.; Szajner, P.; Torigoi, E.; Leite, A.; Arruda, P.

    1996-01-01

    The first enzyme of the lysine degradation pathway in maize (Zea mays L.), lysine-ketoglutarate reductase, condenses lysine and [alpha]-ketoglutarate into saccharopine using NADPH as a cofactor, whereas the second, saccharopine dehydrogenase, converts saccharopine to [alpha]-aminoadipic-[delta]-semialdehyde and glutamic acid using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. The reductase and dehydrogenase activities are optimal at pH 7.0 and 9.0, respectively. Both enzyme activities, co-purified on diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and gel filtration columns, were detected on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels as single bands with identical electrophoretic mobilities and share tissue specificity for the endosperm. The highly purified preparation containing the reductase and dehydrogenase activities showed a single polypeptide band of 125 kD on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The native form of the enzyme is a dimer of 260 kD. Limited proteolysis with elastase indicated that lysine-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase from maize endosperm are located in two functionally independent domains of a bifunctional polypeptide. PMID:12226216

  9. Escherichia coli d-Malate Dehydrogenase, a Generalist Enzyme Active in the Leucine Biosynthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A.; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of d-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on d-malate as a carbon source, the d-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB− strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (l(+)-tartrate, d-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution. PMID:25160617

  10. Similarity of Escherichia coli propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO product) and an unusual alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-07-01

    The gene that encodes 1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO) from Escherichia coli was sequenced. The reading frame specified a protein of 383 amino acids (including the N-terminal methionine), with an aggregate molecular weight of 40,642. The induction of fucO transcription, which occurred in the presence of fucose, was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. In E. coli, the primary fucO transcript was approximately 2.1 kilobases in length. The 5{prime} end of the transcript began more than 0.7 kilobase upstream of the fucO start codon within or beyond the fucA gene. Propanediol oxidoreductase exhibited 41.7% identity with the iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase II from Zymomonas mobilis and 39.5% identity with ADH4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These three proteins did not share homology with either short-chain or long-chain zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes. We propose that these three unusual alcohol dehydrogenases define a new family of enzymes.

  11. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  12. Reconstruction of an acetogenic 2,3-butanediol pathway involving a novel NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L; Maddock, Danielle J; Mueller, Alexander P; Liew, FungMin; Simpson, Séan D; Patrick, Wayne M

    2014-06-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h(-1) optical density unit(-1)), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  13. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the Clostridium magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, N; Oppermann, F B; Lorenzl, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1994-01-01

    E2 (dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase) and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) of the Clostridium magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system were copurified in a three-step procedure from acetoin-grown cells. The denatured E2-E3 preparation comprised two polypeptides with M(r)s of 49,000 and 67,000, respectively. Microsequencing of both proteins revealed identical amino acid sequences. By use of oligonucleotide probes based on the N-terminal sequences of the alpha and beta subunits of E1 (acetoin dehydrogenase, thymine PPi dependent), which were purified recently (H. Lorenzl, F.B. Oppermann, B. Schmidt, and A. Steinbüchel, Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 63:219-225, 1993), and of E2-E3, structural genes acoA (encoding E1 alpha), acoB (encoding E1 beta), acoC (encoding E2), and acoL (encoding E3) were identified on a single ClaI restriction fragment and expressed in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequences of acoA (978 bp), acoB (999 bp), acoC (1,332 bp), and acoL (1,734 bp), as well as those of acoX (996 bp) and acoR (1,956 bp), were determined. The amino acid sequences deduced from acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL for E1 alpha (M(r), 35,532), E1 beta (M(r), 35,541), E2 (M(r), 48,149), and E3 (M(r), 61,255) exhibited striking similarities to the amino acid sequences of the corresponding components of the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system and the Alcaligenes eutrophus acetoin-cleaving system, respectively. Significant homologies to the enzyme components of various 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes were also found, indicating a close relationship between the two enzyme systems. As a result of the partial repetition of the 5' coding region of acoC into the corresponding part of acoL, the E3 component of the C. magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system contains an N-terminal lipoyl domain, which is unique among dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases. We found strong similarities between the AcoR and AcoX sequences and the A. eutrophus acoR gene product

  14. An enantioselective NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase responsible for cooxidative production of (3S)-5-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Minoru; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Kurosaki, Kaishi; Chhetri, Rajan Thapa; Motomatsu, Shigekazu; Suzuki, Ichiro; Sahabi, Danladi Mahuta

    2016-06-01

    A soil bacterium, Mycobacterium sp. B-009, is able to grow on racemic 1,2-propanediol (PD). The strain was revealed to oxidize 3-methyl-1,5-pentanediol (MPD) to 5-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid (HMPA) during growth on PD. MPD was converted into an almost equimolar amount of the S-form of HMPA (S-HMPA) at 72%ee, suggesting the presence of an enantioselective MPD dehydrogenase (MPD-DH). As expected, an NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the initial step of MPD oxidation, was detected and purified from the cell-free extract. This enzyme was suggested to be a homodimeric medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR). The catalytic and kinetic parameters indicated that MPD is the most suitable substrate for the enzyme. The enzyme was encoded by a 1047-bp gene (mpd1) and several mycobacterial strains were found to have putative MDR genes similar to mpd1. In a phylogenetic tree, MPD-DH formed an independent clade together with the putative MDR of Mycobacterium neoaurum, which produces opportunistic infections. PMID:26923741

  15. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Ethanol is a renewable biofuel, and it can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates that consist of sugar and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Yeast ferments sugar to ethanol, but furfural higher than 3 mM is inhibitory. It can take several days for yeast cells to reduce furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol before producing ethanol. Bioreduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol before fermentation may relieve yeast from furfural toxicity. We observed that Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a strict aerobe, rapidly reduced 17 mM furfural to less than 3 mM within 14 min with cell turbidity of 1.0 at 600 nm at 50°C. The rapid reduction consumed ethanol. The "furfural reductase" (FurX) was purified, and it oxidized ethanol to acetaldehyde and reduced furfural to furfuryl alcohol with NAD(+) as the cofactor. The protein was identified with mass spectrometry fingerprinting to be a hypothetical protein belonging to Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase family. The furX-inactivation mutant of C. necator JMP134 lost the ability to rapidly reduce furfural, and Escherichia coli producing recombinant FurX gained the ability. Thus, an alcohol dehydrogenase enabled bacteria to rapidly reduce furfural with ethanol as the reducing power. PMID:21526390

  16. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  17. Characterization of transposable element-associated mutations that alter yeast alcohol dehydrogenase II expression.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, V M; Cox, D; Young, E T; Russell, D W; Smith, M

    1983-01-01

    Seven cis-dominant, constitutively expressed mutations of the normally glucose-repressible isozyme of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHII) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are caused by insertion of transposable elements from the Ty1 family in front of the ADHII structural gene (ADR2) (V. M. Williamson, E. T. Young, and M. Ciriacy, Cell 23:605-614, 1981). We cloned ADR2 with its associated Ty1 element from five S. cerevisiae strains carrying these mutations. Comparison of the Ty1 elements by heteroduplex studies and restriction enzyme analyses indicated that four were very similar; the fifth, although the same size as the others (about 5.6 kilobases), differed by the presence of two large substitutions of approximately 1 and 2 kilobases. The DNA sequences of the terminal direct repeats (deltas) were very homologous but not identical and were similar to previously reported Ty1 element direct repeats. We determined the 5'-flanking sequences of the ADR2 gene isolated from a wild-type strain and from five Ty1-associated mutations. The 5-base pair target sequence at the site of Ty1 insertion was present at both ends of each Ty1 element. The sites of insertion of the elements were all different and occurred from 125 to 210 base pairs in front of the coding region of ADR2. The 5' end of the major transcript as determined by S1 mapping was the same in wild-type cells and in Ty1-associated constitutive mutants and was approximately 54 base pairs upstream from the coding region. ADR2 transcripts were not detected when a solo delta sequence was present in the 5'-flanking region of this gene. Images PMID:6298605

  18. Engineering a domain-locking disulfide into a bacterial malate dehydrogenase produces a redox-sensitive enzyme.

    SciTech Connect

    Muslin, E. H.; Li, D.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M.; Schiffer, M.; Anderson, L. E.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-06-01

    Light-dependent reduction of cystine disulfide bonds results in activation of several of the enzymes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism within the chloroplast. We have modeled the tertiary structure of four of these light-activated enzymes, namely NADP-linked malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase, fructosebisphosphatase, and sedoheptulosebisphosphatase, and identified cysteines in each enzyme that be expected to form inactivating disulfide bonds (Li, D., F. J. Stevens, M. Schiffer, and L. E. Anderson, 1994. Biophys. J. 67:29-35). We have now converted two residues in the Escherichia coli NAD-linked malate dehydrogenase to cysteines and produced a redox-sensitive enzyme. Oxidation of domain-locking cysteine residues in the mutant enzyme clearly mimics dark inactivation of the redox-sensitive chloroplast dehydrogenase. This result is completely consistent with our proposed mechanism.

  19. Stability engineering of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase and application for the synthesis of a polyamide 12 precursor.

    PubMed

    Kirmair, Ludwig; Seiler, Daniel Leonard; Skerra, Arne

    2015-12-01

    The thermostable NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsADH) was exploited with regard to the biocatalytic synthesis of ω-oxo lauric acid methyl ester (OLAMe), a key intermediate for biobased polyamide 12 production, from the corresponding long-chain alcohol. Recombinant BsADH was produced in Escherichia coli as a homogeneous tetrameric enzyme and showed high activity towards the industrially relevant substrate ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) with K M = 86 μM and 44 U mg(-1). The equilibrium constant for HLAMe oxidation to the aldehyde (OLAMe) with NAD(+) was determined as 2.16 × 10(-3) from the kinetic parameters of the BsADH-catalyzed forward and reverse reactions. Since BsADH displayed limited stability under oxidizing conditions, the predominant oxidation-prone residue Cys257 was mutated to Leu based on sequence homology with related enzymes and computational simulation. This substitution resulted in an improved BsADH variant exhibiting prolonged stability and an elevated inactivation temperature. Semi-preparative biocatalysis at 60 °C using the stabilized enzyme, employing butyraldehyde for in situ cofactor regeneration with only catalytic amounts of NAD(+), yielded up to 23 % conversion of HLAMe to OLAMe after 30 min. In contrast to other oxidoreductases, no overoxidation to the dodecanoic diacid monomethyl ester was detected. Thus, the mutated BsADH offers a promising biocatalyst for the selective oxidation of fatty alcohols to yield intermediates for industrial polymer production. PMID:26329849

  20. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  1. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beekhuis, H; Duursma, A M; Bouma, J M; Gruber, M

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1 (EC 1.1.1.27), intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected 125I-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of 131I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats. PMID:3197286

  2. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibition as a new potential therapeutic target for alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, P P; Kawamura, T; Chen, J; Koob, G F; Roberts, A J; Vendruscolo, L F; Repunte-Canonigo, V

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new and more effective treatments for alcohol abuse remains a priority. Alcohol intake activates glucocorticoids, which have a key role in alcohol's reinforcing properties. Glucocorticoid effects are modulated in part by the activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11β-HSD) acting as pre-receptors. Here, we tested the effects on alcohol intake of the 11β-HSD inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid 3β-O-hemisuccinate), which has been extensively used in the clinic for the treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcer and is active on both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 isoforms. We observed that CBX reduces both baseline and excessive drinking in rats and mice. The CBX diastereomer 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid 3β-O-hemisuccinate (αCBX), which we found to be selective for 11β-HSD2, was also effective in reducing alcohol drinking in mice. Thus, 11β-HSD inhibitors may be a promising new class of candidate alcohol abuse medications, and existing 11β-HSD inhibitor drugs may be potentially re-purposed for alcohol abuse treatment. PMID:26978742

  3. Activity of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenases on Benzyl Alcohols and Benzaldehydes. Characterization of ADH1 from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Transition State Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Suresh; Park, Doo-Hong; Plapp, Bryce V.

    2009-01-01

    The substrate specificities of yeast alcohol dehydrogenases I and II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SceADH1 and SceADH2) and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis (ScbADH1) were studied. For this work, the gene for the S. carlsbergensis ADH1 was cloned, sequenced and expressed. The amino acid sequence of ScbADH1 differs at four positions as compared to SceADH1, including substitutions of two glutamine residues with glutamic acid residues, and has the same sequence as the commercial yeast enzyme, which apparently is prepared from S. carlsbergensis. The electrophoretic mobilities of ScbADH1, SceADH2 and commercial ADH are similar. The kinetics and specificities of ScbADH1 and SceADH1 acting on branched, long-chain and benzyl alcohols are very similar, but the catalytic efficiency of SceADH2 is about 10 to 100-fold higher on these substrates. A three dimensional structure of SceADH1 shows that the substrate binding pocket has Met-270, whereas SceADH2 has Leu-270, which allows larger substrates to bind. The reduction of a series of p-substituted benzaldehydes catalyzed by SceADH2 is significantly enhanced by electron-withdrawing groups, whereas the oxidation of p-substituted aromatic alcohols may be only slightly affected by the substituents. The substituent effects on catalysis generally reflect the effects on the equilibrium constant for the reaction, where electron-withdrawing substituents favor alcohol. The results are consistent with a transition state that is electronically similar to the alcohol, supporting previous results obtained with commercial yeast ADH. PMID:19022233

  4. Regulated Expression of Three Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes in Barley Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Jacobsen, John V.; Zwar, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Three genes specify alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.; ADH) enzymes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (Adh 1, Adh 2, and Adh 3). Their polypeptide products (ADH 1, ADH 2, ADH 3) dimerize to give a total of six ADH isozymes which can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis and stained for enzyme activity. Under fully aerobic conditions, aleurone layers of cv Himalaya had a high titer of a single isozyme, the homodimer containing ADH 1 monomers. This isozyme was accumulated by the aleurone tissue during the later part of seed development, and survived seed drying and rehydration. The five other possible ADH isozymes were induced by O2 deficit. The staining of these five isozymes on electrophoretic gels increased progressively in intensity as O2 levels were reduced below 5%, and were most intense at 0% O2. In vivo35S labeling and specific immunoprecipitation of ADH peptides, followed by isoelectric focusing of the ADH peptides in the presence of 8 molar urea (urea-IEF) demonstrated the following. (a) Aleurone layers incubated in air synthesized ADH 1 and a trace of ADH 2; immature layers from developing seeds behaved similarly. (b) At 5% O2, synthesis of ADH 2 increased and ADH 3 appeared. (c) At 2% and 0% O2, the synthesis of all three ADH peptides increased markedly. Cell-free translation of RNA isolated from aleurone layers, followed by immunoprecipitation and urea-IEF of in vitro synthesized ADH peptides, showed that levels of mRNA for all three ADH peptides rose sharply during 1 day of O2 deprivation. Northern hybridizations with a maize Adh 2 cDNA clone established that the clone hybridized with barley mRNA comparable in size to maize Adh 2 mRNA, and that the level of this barley mRNA increased 15- to 20-fold after 1 day at 5% or 2% O2, and about 100-fold after 1 day at 0% O2. We conclude that in aleurone layers, expression of the three barley Adh genes is maximal in the absence of O2, that regulation of mRNA level is likely to be a major controlling factor, and

  5. The Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) is a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis. However, little was known about CADs in melon. Five CAD-like genes were identified in the genome of melons, namely CmCAD1 to CmCAD5. The signal peptides analysis and CAD proteins prediction showed no typical signal peptides were found in all CmCADs and CmCAD proteins may locate in the cytoplasm. Multiple alignments implied that some motifs may be responsible for the high specificity of these CAD proteins, and may be one of the key residues in the catalytic mechanism. The phylogenetic tree revealed seven groups of CAD and melon CAD genes fell into four main groups. CmCAD1 and CmCAD2 belonged to the bona fide CAD group, in which these CAD genes, as representative from angiosperms, were involved in lignin synthesis. Other CmCADs were distributed in group II, V and VII, respectively. Semi-quantitative PCR and real time qPCR revealed differential expression of CmCADs, and CmCAD5 was expressed in different vegetative tissues except mature leaves, with the highest expression in flower, while CmCAD2 and CmCAD5 were strongly expressed in flesh during development. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CAD genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones. Treatment of abscisic acid (ABA) elevated the expression of CmCADs in flesh, whereas the transcript levels of CmCAD1 and CmCAD5 were induced by auxin (IAA); Ethylene induced the expression of CmCADs, while 1-MCP repressed the effect, apart from CmCAD4. Taken together, these data suggested that CmCAD4 may be a pseudogene and that all other CmCADs may be involved in the lignin biosynthesis induced by both abiotic and biotic stresses and in tissue-specific developmental lignification through a CAD genes family network, and CmCAD2 may be the main CAD enzymes for lignification of melon flesh and CmCAD5 may also function in flower development. PMID:25019207

  6. [Classification of alcohol metabolizing enzymes and polymorphisms--specificity in Japanese].

    PubMed

    Harada, S

    2001-04-01

    Multiple forms and gene loci of human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH EC: 1.2.1.3) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH, EC: 1.2.1.3) in the major pathway of alcohol metabolism have been found and characterized in the last two decades. With the coenzyme NAD, these enzymes catalyze the reversible conversion of organic alcohols to ketones or aldehydes, and aldehyde to acetic acid. The ADH genes are mapped to chromosome 4p21-25, but the ALDH genes are localized at different chromosomes. The cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) gene, which is mapped to chromosome 10q24.3-qter contributes also the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Genetic polymorphisms have been reported in these alcohol metabolizing enzymes. The metabolisms of alcohol and acetaldehyde in liver and blood after drinking alcohol are thought to be influenced by the interactive action of these enzymes. Amongst the five major classes of the ADH subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, pi, chi, sigma), beta and gamma subunits show genetic polymorphisms. Recently a new nomenclature for ALDH genes has been recommend based on divergent evolution and chromosomal mapping. Two major isoforms designated as cytosolic ALDH1 and mitochondrial ALDH2 can be distinguished by their electrophoretic and kinetic properties as well as by their subcellular localization. Mitochondrial ALDH2 is a major enzyme in the oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethanol metabolism. The catalytic deficiency of ALDH2 isozyme is responsible for flushing and other vasomotor symptoms caused by higher acetaldehyde levels after alcohol intake. So far, frequencies of the two alleles of ALDH2 in Mongoloid have been reported in the different population groups. The catalytic deficiency of ALDH2 is caused by a structural point mutation at amino acid position 487, where a substitution of Glu to Lys resulting from a transition of G (C) to A (T) at 1510 nucleotide from the initiation codon has occurred. Individuals deficient in ALDH2 activity refrain from excessive drinking

  7. Fructophilic characteristics of Fructobacillus spp. may be due to the absence of an alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (adhE).

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Tanaka, Naoto; Oikawa, Yo; Okada, Sanae; Dicks, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Fructophilic strains of Leuconostoc spp. have recently been reclassified to a new genus, i.e., Fructobacillus. Members of the genus are differentiated from Leuconostoc spp. by their preference for fructose on growth, requirement of an electron acceptor for glucose metabolism, and the inability to produce ethanol from the fermentation of glucose. In the present study, enzyme activities and genes involved in ethanol production were studied, since this is the key pathway for NAD(+)/NADH cycling in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Fructobacillus spp. has a weak alcohol dehydrogenase activity and has no acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, whereas both enzymes are active in Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, was described in Leuconostoc spp., but not in Fructobacillus spp. These results suggested that, due to the deficiency of the adhE gene, the normal pathway for ethanol production is absent in Fructobacillus spp. This leads to a shortage of NAD(+), and the requirement for an electron acceptor in glucose metabolism. Fructophilic characteristics, as observed for Fructobacillus spp., are thus due to the absence of the adhE gene, and a phenotype that most likely evolved as a result of regressive evolution. PMID:24352296

  8. Inhibitory effects of ofloxacin and cefepime on enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Erat, Mustafa; Sakiroğlu, Halis

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of some antibiotics, namely, ofloxacin, cefepime, cefazolin, and ampicillin on the in vitro enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase have been investigated. For this purpose, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was purified from chicken liver 535-fold with a yield of 18% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. In order to check the purity of the enzyme, SDS polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed. This analysis revealed a highly pure enzyme band on the gel. Among the antibiotics, ofloxacin and cefepime exhibited inhibitory effects, but cefazolin and ampicillin showed neither important inhibitory nor activatory effects on the enzyme activity. The measured I(50) values by plotting activity percent vs. inhibitor concentration, [I(50)] were 0.1713 mM for ofloxacin and 6.0028 mM for cefepime. Inhibition constants, K(i), for ofloxacin and cefepime were also calculated as 0.2740 +/- 0.1080 mM and 12.869 +/- 16.6540 mM by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs, and inhibition types of the antibiotics were found out to be non-competitive and competitive, respectively. It has been understood from the calculated inhibitory parameters that the purified chicken enzyme has been quite inhibited by these two antimicrobials. PMID:17305608

  9. CARDIAC OVEREXPRESSION OF ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE EXACERBATES CARDIAC CONTRACTILE DYSFUNCTION, LIPID PEROXIDATION, AND PROTEIN DAMAGE AFTER CHRONIC ETHANOL INGESTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is manifested as ventricular dysfunction although its specific toxic mechanism(s) remains obscure. This study was designed to examine the impact of enhanced acetaldehyde (ACA) exposure on cardiac function via cardiac-specific over-expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) fo...

  10. ETHANOL INDUCES AND INSULIN INHIBITS ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE CLASS 1 IN FGC-4 CELLS: BOTH APPEAR TO WORK THROUGH SREBP-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported that chronic feeding of alcohol-containing diets (via intragastric infusion) to Sprague-Dawley rats induces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) Class 1 by interfering with signaling via the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1). We have studied the effects ...

  11. Alcohol Dehydrogenase-1B (rs1229984) and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (rs671) Genotypes Are Strong Determinants of the Serum Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels of Japanese Alcoholic Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are common in drinkers. The fast-metabolizing alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by the ADH1B*2 allele (vs. ADH1B*1/*1 genotype) and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 encoded by the ALDH2*2 allele (vs. ALDH2*1/*1 genotype) modify ethanol metabolism and are prevalent (≈90% and ≈40%, respectively) in East Asians. We attempted to evaluate the associations between the ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes and lipid levels in alcoholics. Methods The population consisted of 1806 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who had undergone ADH1B and ALDH2 genotyping and whose serum TG, total cholesterol, and HDL-C levels in the fasting state had been measured within 3 days after admission. Results High serum levels of TG (≥150 mg/dl), HDL-C (>80 mg/dl), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C calculated by the Friedewald formula ≥140 mg/dl) were observed in 24.3%, 16.8%, and 15.6%, respectively, of the subjects. Diabetes, cirrhosis, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) affected the serum lipid levels. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of the ADH1B*2 allele and the active ALDH2*1/*1 genotype increased the odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval) for a high TG level (2.22 [1.67–2.94] and 1.39 [0.99–1.96], respectively), and decreased the OR for a high HDL-C level (0.37 [0.28–0.49] and 0.51 [0.37–0.69], respectively). The presence of the ADH1B*2 allele decreased the OR for a high LDL-C level (0.60 [0.45–0.80]). The ADH1B*2 plus ALDH2*1/*1 combination yielded the highest ORs for high TG levels and lowest OR for a high HDL-C level. The genotype effects were more prominent in relation to the higher levels of TG (≥220 mg/dl) and HDL-C (≥100 mg/dl). Conclusions The fast-metabolizing ADH1B and active ALDH2, and especially a combination of the two were strongly associated with higher serum TG levels and lower serum HDL-C levels of alcoholics. The fast

  12. Ethanol-Induced Alcohol Dehydrogenase E (AdhE) Potentiates Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence. PMID:25312953

  13. Tea triterpenoidal saponins from the roots of Camellia sinensis have inhibitory effects against alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Titto; Manir, Md Maniruzzaman; Rahaman, Mozahidur; Kim, Jeong Kee; Lee, Byeong-Gon; Moon, Surk-Sik

    2011-12-01

    Ten new polyhydroxyolean-12-ene pentacyclic triterpenoidal saponins, named rogchaponins 1-10, were isolated from the methanolic extract of the roots of Camellia sinensis by a series of chromatographic methods (silica gel flash column and C18 MPLC followed by C18 HPLC). Their structures were established by 1D and 2D-NMR techniques along with IR and HR-TOF-MS. Rogchaponins R4 ( 4) and R5 (5) showed inhibitory activities against yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with IC (50) values of 16.1 ± 3.2 and 15.4 ± 3.3 µM, respectively. A 4-methylpyrazole positive control exhibited an IC (50) of 2750 ± 50 µM. However, the saponins showed no inhibitory activity against yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). PMID:21786220

  14. A potent specific inhibitor of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase of Cryptococcus neoformans and of certain other fungal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, W G; Flynn, T

    1993-09-01

    A particular lot of the zwitterionic buffer, 2(N-morpholino) ethane sulfonic acid (MES), contained a contaminant that inhibited a number of fungal NADP-dependent dehydrogenases. Enzymes that were particularly sensitive include 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases from Cryptococcus neoformans and Schizophyllum commune and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Schizophyllum commune. A number of NADP-dependent dehydrogenases of animal origin were tested and all were completely insensitive to inhibition except for rat liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, which was 10-fold less sensitive than the Cryptococcal enzyme. The pattern of inhibition in all cases was linear competitive versus NADP. The inhibitor has been purified and identified as an ethylenesulfonic acid oligomer. This inhibitor holds promise as a model compound for the development of a specific antifungal agent. PMID:8302365

  15. Purification and Characterization of Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoforms from the Periderm of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S. W.; Boudet, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, EC 1.1.1.195) isoforms were purified from the periderm (containing both suberized and lignified cell layers) of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook stems. Two isoforms (CAD 1P and CAD 2P) were initially characterized, and the major form, CAD 2P, was resolved into three further isoforms by ion-exchange chromatography. Crude extracts contained two aliphatic alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) and one aromatic ADH, which was later resolved into two further isoforms. Aliphatic ADHs did not use hydroxycinnamyl alcohols as substrates, whereas both aromatic ADH isoforms used coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol as substrates but with a much lower specific activity when compared with benzyl alcohol. The minor form, CAD 1P, was a monomer with a molecular weight of 34,000 that did not co-elute with either aromatic or aliphatic ADH activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot analysis demonstrated that this protein was very similar to another CAD isoform purified from Eucalyptus xylem tissue. CAD 2P had a native molecular weight of approximately 84,000 and was a dimer consisting of two heterogenous subunits (with molecular weights of 42,000 and 44,000). These subunits were differentially combined to give the heterodimer and two homodimers. SDS-PAGE, western blots, and nondenaturing PAGE indicated that the CAD 2P heterodimer was very similar to the main CAD isoform previously purified in our laboratory from differentiating xylem tissue of E. gunnii (D. Goffner, I. Joffroy, J. Grima-Pettenati, C. Halpin, M.E. Knight, W. Schuch, A.M. Boudet [1992] Planta 188: 48-53). Kinetic data indicated that the different CAD 2P isoforms may be implicated in the preferential production of different monolignols used in the synthesis of lignin and/or suberin. PMID:12232063

  16. Functional reclassification of the putative cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase multigene family in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Mi-Ran; Bedgar, Diana L.; Moinuddin, Syed G. A.; Cardenas, Claudia L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kang, ChulHee; Lewis, Norman G.

    2004-01-01

    Of 17 genes annotated in the Arabidopsis genome database as cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) homologues, an in silico analysis revealed that 8 genes were misannotated. Of the remaining nine, six were catalytically competent for NADPH-dependent reduction of p-coumaryl, caffeyl, coniferyl, 5-hydroxyconiferyl, and sinapyl aldehydes, whereas three displayed very low activity and only at very high substrate concentrations. Of the nine putative CADs, two (AtCAD5 and AtCAD4) had the highest activity and homology (≈83% similarity) relative to bona fide CADs from other species. AtCAD5 used all five substrates effectively, whereas AtCAD4 (of lower overall catalytic capacity) poorly used sinapyl aldehyde; the corresponding 270-fold decrease in kenz resulted from higher Km and lower kcat values, respectively. No CAD homologue displayed a specific requirement for sinapyl aldehyde, which was in direct contrast with unfounded claims for a so-called sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase in angiosperms. AtCAD2, 3, as well as AtCAD7 and 8 (highest homology to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase) were catalytically less active overall by at least an order of magnitude, due to increased Km and lower kcat values. Accordingly, alternative and/or bifunctional metabolic roles of these proteins in plant defense cannot be ruled out. Comprehensive analyses of lignified tissues of various Arabidopsis knockout mutants (for AtCAD5, 6, and 9) at different stages of growth/development indicated the presence of functionally redundant CAD metabolic networks. Moreover, disruption of AtCAD5 expression had only a small effect on either overall lignin amounts deposited, or on syringyl-guaiacyl compositions, despite being the most catalytically active form in vitro. PMID:14745009

  17. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene

  18. Temperature-Jump Fluorescence Provides Evidence for Fully Reversible Microsecond Dynamics in a Thermophilic Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics on the microsecond (μs) time scale were investigated by temperature-jump fluorescence spectroscopy as a function of temperature in two variants of a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase: W87F and W87F:H43A. Both mutants exhibit a fast, temperature-independent μs decrease in fluorescence followed by a slower full recovery of the initial fluorescence. The results, which rule out an ionizing histidine as the origin of the fluorescence quenching, are discussed in the context of a Trp49-containing dimer interface that acts as a conduit for thermally activated structural change within the protein interior. PMID:26223665

  19. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  20. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate, is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production. In alpha (sub 2) beta (sub 2)-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha) -C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites has not yet been understood. To understand the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95-Angstrom resolution. We propose a model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through a concerted approximately 2-Angstrom shuttle-like motion of its heterodimers. Similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase with functionally related enzymes suggests that this newly defined shuttle-like motion of domains is common to the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  1. In vitro characterization of an enzymatic redox cascade composed of an alcohol dehydrogenase, an enoate reductases and a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Oberleitner, Nikolin; Peters, Christin; Rudroff, Florian; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Mihovilovic, Marko D.

    2014-01-01

    An artificial enzyme cascade composed of an alcohol dehydrogenase, an enoate reductase and a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was investigated in vitro to gain deeper mechanistic insights and understand the assets and drawbacks of this multi-step biocatalysis. Several substrates composed of different structural motifs were examined and provided access to functionalized chiral compounds in high yields (up to >99%) and optical purities (up to >99%). Hence, the applicability of the presented enzymatic cascade was exploited for the synthesis of biorenewable polyesters. PMID:24746588

  2. Manipulating cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) expression in flax affects fibre composition and properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent decades cultivation of flax and its application have dramatically decreased. One of the reasons for this is unpredictable quality and properties of flax fibre, because they depend on environmental factors, retting duration and growing conditions. These factors have contribution to the fibre composition, which consists of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and pectin. By far, it is largely established that in flax, lignin reduces an accessibility of enzymes either to pectin, hemicelluloses or cellulose (during retting or in biofuel synthesis and paper production). Therefore, in this study we evaluated composition and properties of flax fibre from plants with silenced CAD (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase) gene, which is key in the lignin biosynthesis. There is evidence that CAD is a useful tool to improve lignin digestibility and/or to lower the lignin levels in plants. Results Two studied lines responded differentially to the introduced modification due to the efficiency of the CAD silencing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that flax CAD belongs to the “bona-fide” CAD family. CAD down-regulation had an effect in the reduced lignin amount in the flax fibre cell wall and as FT-IR results suggests, disturbed lignin composition and structure. Moreover introduced modification activated a compensatory mechanism which was manifested in the accumulation of cellulose and/or pectin. These changes had putative correlation with observed improved fiber’s tensile strength. Moreover, CAD down-regulation did not disturb at all or has only slight effect on flax plants’ development in vivo, however, the resistance against flax major pathogen Fusarium oxysporum decreased slightly. The modification positively affected fibre possessing; it resulted in more uniform retting. Conclusion The major finding of our paper is that the modification targeted directly to block lignin synthesis caused not only reduced lignin level in fibre, but also affected amount and

  3. Harnessing functional plasticity of enzymes: a fluorogenic probe for imaging 17beta-HSD10 dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Froemming, Mary K; Sames, Dalibor

    2007-11-21

    In this paper, we describe the development of a fluorogenic substrate for 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 10 (17beta-HSD10), which is a multifunctional metabolic enzyme fulfilling several metabolic roles (beta-oxidation of fatty acids, catabolism of isoleucine, and metabolism of steroids). In recent years, it has emerged as an important stress and pathological marker in neurons and glial cells (expression down-regulation in Parkinson's disease, up-regulation and association with beta-amyloid peptide in Alzheimer's disease). Through the iterative molecular design and chemical synthesis described herein, compound 1 was developed, which possesses all required properties for a selective optical reporter substrate: alcohol-ketone optical switching, the ability to function as a good enzyme substrate (expressed in kinetic parameters), cell permeability, and cell retention. Probe 1 provides a blue-to-green/yellow bright switch and enables non-invasive, real-time imaging of 17beta-HSD10 in live human cells. The selectivity of reporter 1 was established by the quantitative correlation of metabolic activity to protein expression in human kidney cell line HEK-293T. PMID:17958419

  4. Identification and analysis of the genes coding for the putative pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex in Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed Central

    Wallbrandt, P; Tegman, V; Jonsson, B H; Wieslander, A

    1992-01-01

    A monospecific antibody recognizing two membrane proteins in Acholeplasma laidlawii identified a plasmid clone from a genomic library. The nucleotide sequence of the 4.6-kbp insert contained four sequential genes coding for proteins of 39 kDa (E1 alpha, N terminus not cloned), 36 kDa (E1 beta), 57 kDa (E2), and 36 kDa (E3; C terminus not cloned). The N termini of the cloned E2, E1 beta, and native A. laidlawii E2 proteins were verified by amino acid sequencing. Computer-aided searches showed that the translated DNA sequences were homologous to the four subenzymes of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from gram-positive bacteria and humans. The plasmid-encoded 57-kDa (E2) protein was recognized by antibodies against the E2 subenzymes of the pyruvate and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes from Bacillus subtilis. A substantial fraction of the E2 protein as well as part of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzymatic activity was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane in A. laidlawii. In vivo complementation with three different Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase-defective mutants showed that the four plasmid-encoded proteins were able to restore pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in E. coli. Since A. laidlawii lacks oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and most likely branched-chain dehydrogenase enzyme complex activities, these results strongly suggest that the sequenced genes code for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Images PMID:1735725

  5. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  6. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  7. Phospholipid protection against proteolysis of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, a lecithin-requiring enzyme.

    PubMed

    Maurer, A; McIntyre, J O; Churchill, S; Fleischer, S

    1985-02-10

    D-beta-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase is a lipid-requiring enzyme which is localized on the inner face of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The apodehydrogenase, i.e. the purified enzyme devoid of lipid, has been purified from beef heart mitochondria and as such is inactive. It can be reactivated by insertion into phospholipid vesicles containing lecithin. Proteolytic digestion with different proteases has been carried out to obtain insight into the orientation of the enzyme in the membrane and to assess the extent of immersion of the protein into the phospholipid bilayer. Digestion of the apodehydrogenase with either trypsin, chymotrypsin, Staphylococcus aureus protease, thermolysin, carboxypeptidases A and Y, or Pronase (from Streptomyces griseus) leads to loss of activity, as assayed with phospholipid. Limited digestion with carboxypeptidase results in complete inactivation. Of the proteases tested, only Pronase and chymotrypsin cleave and inactivate the enzyme inserted into phospholipid vesicles (enzyme-phospholipid complex). For the enzyme-phospholipid complex, the loss of activity with Pronase digestion follows a single exponential decay to less than 10% of the initial activity. With chymotrypsin digestion, the staining intensity of the original approximately 31,500-dalton polypeptide decreases more rapidly than the loss of enzymic activity. The enzyme-phospholipid complex, after limited cleavage with chymotrypsin, retains enzymic activity and resonance energy transfer from protein to bound NADH and an approximately 26,000-dalton polypeptide is observed. Phospholipid alters the cleavage pattern with both chymotrypsin and Pronase, and the rate of inactivation of the enzyme-phospholipid complex is slowed in the presence of NAD(H). Moreover, the rate of inactivation of the apodehydrogenase with chymotrypsin is diminished approximately 3-fold in the presence of NAD+. Digestion of submitochondrial vesicles with either trypsin, chymotrypsin, or Pronase rapidly

  8. Thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard: Analysis of in vitro biotransformation by mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases using nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.; Hodgson, Ernest

    2006-06-15

    Thiodiglycol (2,2'-bis-hydroxyethylsulfide, TDG), the hydrolysis product of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, has been implicated in the toxicity of sulfur mustard through the inhibition of protein phosphatases in mouse liver cytosol. The absence of any inhibitory activity when TDG was present in assays of pure enzymes, however, led us to investigate the possibility for metabolic activation of TDG to inhibitory compound(s) by cytosolic enzymes. We have successfully shown that mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) rapidly oxidize TDG in vitro, but the classic spectrophotometric techniques for following this reaction provided no information on the identity of TDG intermediates and products. The use of proton NMR to monitor the oxidative reaction with structural confirmation by independent synthesis allowed us to establish the ultimate product, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetic acid, and to identify an intermediate equilibrium mixture consisting of 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde hydrate and the cyclic 1,4-oxathian-2-ol. The intermediate nature of this mixture was determined spectrophotometrically when it was shown to drive the production of NADH when added to ADH and NAD.

  9. Slowed Diffusion and Excluded Volume Both Contribute to the Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Steady-State Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Samuel H; Lockwood, Schuyler P; Hargreaves, Dominique I; Slade, David J; LoConte, Micaela A; Logan, Bridget E; McLaughlin, Erin E; Conroy, Michael J; Slade, Kristin M

    2015-09-29

    To understand the consequences of macromolecular crowding, studies have largely employed in vitro experiments with synthetic polymers assumed to be both pure and "inert". These polymers alter enzyme kinetics by excluding volume that would otherwise be available to the enzymes, substrates, and products. Presented here is evidence that other factors, in addition to excluded volume, must be considered in the interpretation of crowding studies with synthetic polymers. Dextran has a weaker effect on the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) than its small molecule counterpart, glucose. For glucose, the decreased Vmax values directly correlate with slower translational diffusion and the decreased Km values likely result from enhanced substrate binding due to YADH stabilization. Because dextran is unable to stabilize YADH to the same extent as glucose, this polymer's ability to decrease Km is potentially due to the nonideality of the solution, a crowding-induced conformational change, or both. Chronoamperometry reveals that glucose and dextran have surprisingly similar ferricyanide diffusion coefficients. Thus, the reduction in Vmax values for glucose is partially offset by an additional macromolecular crowding effect with dextran. Finally, this is the first report that supplier-dependent impurities in dextran affect the kinetic parameters of YADH. Taken together, our results reveal that caution should be used when interpreting results obtained with inert synthetic polymeric agents, as additional effects from the underlying monomer need to be considered. PMID:26333028

  10. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities and ethanol tolerance in Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit-fly species and their hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) system is one of the earliest known models of molecular evolution, and is still the most studied in Drosophila. Herein, we studied this model in the genus Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae). Due to the remarkable advantages it presents, it is possible to cross species with different Adh genotypes and with different phenotype traits related to ethanol tolerance. The two species studied here each have a different number of Adh gene copies, whereby crosses generate polymorphisms in gene number and in composition of the genetic background. We measured certain traits related to ethanol metabolism and tolerance. ADH specific enzyme activity presented gene by environment interactions, and the larval protein content showed an additive pattern of inheritance, whilst ADH enzyme activity per larva presented a complex behavior that may be explained by epistatic effects. Regression models suggest that there are heritable factors acting on ethanol tolerance, which may be related to enzymatic activity of the ADHs and to larval mass, although a pronounced environmental effect on ethanol tolerance was also observed. By using these data, we speculated on the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance and its inheritance as well as of associated traits. PMID:21637665

  11. Secondary alcohol dehydrogenase catalyzes the reduction of exogenous acetone to 2-propanol in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Sutak, Robert; Hrdy, Ivan; Dolezal, Pavel; Cabala, Radomir; Sedinová, Miroslava; Lewin, Joern; Harant, Karel; Müller, Miklos; Tachezy, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Secondary alcohols such as 2-propanol are readily produced by various anaerobic bacteria that possess secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH), although production of 2-propanol is rare in eukaryotes. Specific bacterial-type S-ADH has been identified in a few unicellular eukaryotes, but its function is not known and the production of secondary alcohols has not been studied. We purified and characterized S-ADH from the human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. The kinetic properties and thermostability of T. vaginalis S-ADH were comparable with bacterial orthologues. The substantial activity of S-ADH in the parasite's cytosol was surprising, because only low amounts of ethanol and trace amounts of secondary alcohols were detected as metabolic end products. However, S-ADH provided the parasite with a high capacity to scavenge and reduce external acetone to 2-propanol. To maintain redox balance, the demand for reducing power to metabolize external acetone was compensated for by decreased cytosolic reduction of pyruvate to lactate and by hydrogenosomal metabolism of pyruvate. We speculate that hydrogen might be utilized to maintain cytosolic reducing power. The high activity of Tv-S-ADH together with the ability of T. vaginalis to modulate the metabolic fluxes indicate efficacious metabolic responsiveness that could be advantageous for rapid adaptation of the parasite to changes in the host environment. PMID:22686835

  12. Elemental sulfur: toxicity in vivo and in vitro to bacterial luciferase, in vitro yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Cetkauskaite, Anolda; Pessala, Piia; Södergren, Anders

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the effects and the modes of action of elemental sulfur (S(0)) in bioluminescence and respiration of Vibrio fischeri cells and the enzymes crude luciferase, pure catalase, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Metallic copper removed sulfur and reduced the toxicity of acetone extracts of sediment samples analyzed in the bioluminescence test. The sulfur inhibition of cell bioluminescence was noncompetitive with decanal, the luciferase substrate; reversible, with maximum toxicity after 15 min (EC(50) = 11.8 microg/L); and almost totally recovered after 2 h. In vitro preincubation of crude luciferase extract with sulfur (0.28 ppm) weakly inhibited bioluminescence at 5 min, but at 30 min the inhibition reached 60%. Increasing the concentration of sulfur in the parts per million concentration range in vitro decreased bioluminescence, which was not constant, but depended on exposure time, and no dead-end/total inhibition was observed. The redox state of enzymes in the in vitro system significantly affected inhibition. Hydrogen peroxide restored fully and the reducing agent dithiothreitol, itself toxic, restored only partially luciferase activity in the presence of sulfur. Sulfur (5.5 ppm) slightly inhibited ADH and catalase, and dithiothreitol enhanced sulfur inhibition. High sulfur concentrations (2.2 ppm) inhibited the bioluminescence and enhanced the respiration rate of V. fischeri cells. Elemental sulfur data were interpreted to show that sulfur acted on at least a few V. fischeri cell sites: reversibly modifying luciferase at sites sensitive to/protected by oxidative and reducing agents and by affecting electron transport processes, resulting in enhanced oxygen consumption. Sulfur together with an enzyme reducing agent inhibited the oxidoreductive enzymes ADH and catalase, which have --SH groups, metal ion cofactors, or heme, respectively, in their active centers. PMID:15269910

  13. Enzyme-triggered and self-cleaving fragrant alcohol precursors.

    PubMed

    Flachsmann, Felix; Gautschi, Markus; Bachmann, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The high volatility and water solubility of many natural perfumery alcohols leads to their rapid loss in fabric-care and personal-care applications. A dramatically enhanced substantivity is achieved by the use of fragrance precursors as controlled-release systems. In the first part of this article, we present multi-odorant precursors, in which the enzymatic cleavage of esters or carbonates of fragrant alcohols triggers subsequent steps leading to the release of fragrant ketones, lactones, and additional fragrant alcohols. In the second part, a study on oligocarbonates of fragrant alcohols is presented. Therein, the outstanding enzyme-independent performance of gluconolactone oligocarbonate 27 for the long-lasting release of (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol is highlighted. We show that these polyfunctional compounds undergo complex rearrangements and intramolecular substitution reactions which lead to the observed release kinetics. PMID:18618399

  14. Effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on 5-fluorouracil-related metabolic enzymes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomomi; Kato, Keizo; Long, Nguyen Khanh; Makita, Hiroki; Yonemoto, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kazuki; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Lifestyle, particularly smoking and alcohol consumption, may induce and/or inhibit drug metabolism. In order to reveal the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-related metabolic enzymes, namely thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD; a sole catabolic enzyme of 5-FU), orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) and thymidine phosphorylase, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, the mRNA expression of these enzymes was investigated in 29 surgical specimens and compared by the Brinkman index and drinking years. The surgical specimens were divided into normal and tumor regions and were independently analyzed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was a significantly positive correlation between DPD mRNA expression in these tissues and Brinkman index/drinking years, with OPRT mRNA expression being significantly correlated to the Brinkman index in tumor tissues. These results revealed that lifestyle habits, including smoking and alcohol consumption, may vary the activity of the 5-FU-related metabolic enzymes. DPD is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolic pathway of 5-FU. Therefore, smoking and alcohol consumption may reduce the anticancer activity of 5-FU, possibly through the induction of DPD activity. PMID:24772313

  15. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline beta-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. The immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato beta-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcohol fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%.

  16. Aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and/or thiolase overexpression coupled with CoA transferase downregulation lead to higher alcohol titers and selectivity in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations.

    PubMed

    Sillers, Ryan; Al-Hinai, Mohab Ali; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic engineering (ME) of Clostridium acetobutylicum has led to increased solvent (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) production and solvent tolerance, thus demonstrating that further efforts have the potential to create strains of industrial importance. With recently developed ME tools, it is now possible to combine genetic modifications and thus implement more advanced ME strategies. We have previously shown that antisense RNA (asRNA)-based downregulation of CoA transferase (CoAT, the first enzyme in the acetone-formation pathway) results in increased butanol to acetone selectivity, but overall reduced butanol yields and titers. In this study the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (aad) gene (encoding the bifunctional protein AAD responsible for butanol and ethanol production from butyryl-CoA and acetyl-CoA, respectively) was expressed from the phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) promoter to enhance butanol formation and selectivity, while CoAT downregulation was used to minimize acetone production. This led to early production of high alcohol (butanol plus ethanol) titers, overall solvent titers of 30 g/L, and a higher alcohol/acetone ratio. Metabolic flux analysis revealed the likely depletion of butyryl-CoA. In order to increase then the flux towards butyryl-CoA, we examined the impact of thiolase (THL, thl) overexpression. THL converts acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, the first step of the pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA, and thus, combining thl overexpression with aad overexpression decreased, as expected, acetate and ethanol production while increasing acetone and butyrate formation. thl overexpression in strains with asRNA CoAT downregulation did not significantly alter product formation thus suggesting that a more complex metabolic engineering strategy is necessary to enhance the intracellular butyryl-CoA pool and reduce the acetyl-CoA pool in order to achieve improved butanol titers and selectivity. PMID:18726959

  17. Non-P450 aldehyde oxidizing enzymes: the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Marchitti, Satori A; Brocker, Chad; Stagos, Dimitrios; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2009-01-01

    Background Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules. While several non-P450 enzyme systems participate in their metabolism, one of the most important is the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily, composed of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze aldehyde oxidation. Objective This article presents a review of what is currently known about each member of the human ALDH superfamily including the pathophysiological significance of these enzymes. Methods Relevant literature involving all members of the human ALDH family was extensively reviewed, with the primary focus on recent and novel findings. Conclusion To date, 19 ALDH genes have been identified in the human genome and mutations in these genes and subsequent inborn errors in aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases, including Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, type II hyperprolinemia, γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria and pyridoxine-dependent seizures. ALDH enzymes also play important roles in embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress and cancer. Finally, ALDH enzymes display multiple catalytic and non-catalytic functions including ester hydrolysis, antioxidant properties, xenobiotic bioactivation and UV light absorption. PMID:18611112

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-01-01

    The presence of lactate dehydrogenase in skeletal muscle mitochondria was investigated to clarify whether lactate is a possible substrate for mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were prepared from 100 mg samples of human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle. All fractions from the preparation procedure were assayed for marker enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mitochondrial fraction contained no LDH activity (detection limit ∼0.05 % of the tissue activity) and the distribution of LDH activity among the fractions paralleled that of pyruvate kinase, i.e. LDH was fractionated as a cytoplasmic enzyme. Respiratory experiments with the mitochondrial fraction also indicated the absence of LDH. Lactate did not cause respiration, nor did it affect the respiration of pyruvate + malate. The major part of the native cytochrome c was retained in the isolated mitochondria, which, furthermore, showed high specific rates of state 3 respiration. This excluded artificial loss from the mitochondria of all activity of a possible LDH. It was concluded that skeletal muscle mitochondria are devoid of LDH and unable to metabolize lactate. PMID:12042361

  19. Assessment of freshness and freeze-thawing of sea bream fillets (Sparus aurata) by a cytosolic enzyme: Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Watier, Denis; Masson, Pierre-Yves; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid; Grard, Thierry; Lencel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of freshness and freeze-thawing of fish fillets was carried out by assessment of autolysis of cells using a cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Autolysis plays an important role in spoilage of fish and postmortem changes in fish tissue are due to the breakdown of the cellular structures and release of cytoplasmic contents. The outflow of a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, was studied in sea bream fillets and the Sparus aurata fibroblasts (SAF-1) cell-line during an 8day storage period at +4°C. A significant increase of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed, especially after 5days of storage. The ratio between the free and the total lactate dehydrogenase activity is a promising predictive marker to measure the quality of fresh fish fillets. The effect of freeze-thawing on cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and lysosomal α-d-glucosidase activities was also tested. Despite the protecting effect of the tissue compared to the cell-line, a loss of lactate dehydrogenase activity, but not of α-d-glucosidase, was observed. In conclusion, lactate dehydrogenase may be used as a marker to both assess freshness of fish and distinguish between fresh and frozen-thawed fish fillets. PMID:27211667

  20. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  1. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  2. Cloning and expression of a putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Entamoeba histolytica and its application to immunological examination.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Hara, Y; Kimoto, T; Okuno, Y; Minekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, T

    1996-01-01

    To clone and express the genes encoding major antigens of Entamoeba histolytica, we constructed a lambda gt11 cDNA library for E. histolytica HM1:IMSS and screened it with pooled sera from patients with amoebiasis. A 1,223-bp cDNA was cloned (clone 1223), and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence predicted to be encoded by the open reading frame of clone 1223 consisted of 396 residues and showed 32.5 and 32.3% homology to the NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenases I and II (bdhA and bdhB) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, respectively. In addition, 29 of the 34 consensus positions of bdhA and bdhB were also well conserved in clone 1223. The recombinant protein expressed from clone 1223 had an estimated molecular mass of 43.5 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The antigenicity and specificity of the recombinant protein were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using sera obtained from two clinical groups of patients with amoebiasis and a group of healthy controls. The recombinant protein had potent and specific antigenicity. In all, 53 serum samples (88.3%) from 60 patients with amoebiasis were positive for immunoglobulin G antibody against the recombinant protein, with a mean optical density value of 0.42. In contrast, 53 of 54 healthy control serum samples were negative, with only 1 positive serum sample showing the lower optical density value. These results suggested that clone 1223 is promising in terms of providing a useful antigen for the accurate serodiagnosis of amoebiasis and that the gene encodes a putative alcohol dehydrogenase of E. histolytica. PMID:8705667

  3. Use of an ionic liquid in a two-phase system to improve an alcohol dehydrogenase catalysed reduction.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Marrit; Villela Filho, Murillo; Liese, Andreas; Kragl, Udo

    2004-05-01

    Due to favourable partition coefficients the highly enantioselective reduction of 2-octanone, catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis, is faster in a biphasic system containing buffer and the ionic liquid [BMIM][(CF(3)SO(2))(2)N] compared to the reduction in a biphasic system containing buffer and methyl tert-butyl ether. PMID:15116196

  4. DOWNREGULATION OF CINNAMYL-ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE IN SWITCHGRASS BY RNA SILENCING RESULTS IN ENHANCED GLUCOSE RELEASE AFTER CELLULASE TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), catalyzes the last step in monolignol biosynthesis and genetic evidence indicates CAD deficiency in grasses both decreases overall lignin, alters lignin structure and increases enzymatic recovery of sugars. To ascertain the effect of CAD downregulation in switch...

  5. Azotobacter vinelandii Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Regulated by ς54: Role in Alcohol Catabolism and Encystment

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Núñez, Cinthia; Segura, Daniel; Moreno, Soledad; Guzmán, Josefina; Espín, Guadalupe

    2001-01-01

    Encystment in Azotobacter vinelandii is induced by n-butanol or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). We identified a gene, encoding an aldehyde dehydrogenase, that was named aldA. An aldA mutation impaired bacterial growth on n-butanol, ethanol, or hexanol as the sole carbon source. Expression of aldA increased in cells shifted from sucrose to n-butanol and was shown to be dependent on the alternative ς54 factor. A mutation in rpoN encoding the ς54 factor also impaired growth on alcohols. Encystment on n-butanol, but not on BHB, was impaired in aldA or rpoN mutants, indicating that n-butanol is not an inducer of encystment by itself but must be catabolized in order to induce encystment. PMID:11591659

  6. Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Identification of New Sites of Promoter Activity in Transgenic Poplar.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S.; Samaj, J.; Lauvergeat, V.; Boudet, A.; Grima-Pettenati, J.

    1997-01-01

    Stem sections from poplar that were stably transformed with a eucalypt cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase promoter-[beta]-glucuronidase construct were prepared by using either a technique routinely used in herbaceous species or a technique designed to take into account the particular anatomy of woody plants. Although both preparation techniques confirmed the pattern of expression previously observed (C. Feuillet, V. Lauvergeat, C. Deswarte, G. Pilate, A. Boudet and J. Grima-Pettenati [1995] Plant Mol Biol 27: 651-657), the latter technique also allowed the detection of other sites of promoter activity not revealed by the first technique. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression pattern obtained with the second sample preparation technique. PMID:12223610

  7. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  8. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-01-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 Å resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes. PMID:18296637

  9. Protease determination using an optimized alcohol enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Bardeletti, G; Carillon, C

    1993-12-01

    A new method for the determination of protease activities is described. In this large family, trypsin is used as a protease model that cleaves the ethyl or methyl ester of artificial substrates producing ethanol or methanol. Alcohol is detected using an alcohol oxidase enzyme electrode. The H2O2 production that occurs is measured amperometrically. At 30 degrees C, in a 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, the enzyme electrode response for ethanol was calibrated at 3.10(-6)-3.10(-3)M and for methanol from 3.10(-7) to 4.10(-4)M in the cell measurement. Trypsin levels as determined by the proposed method and by a conventional spectrophotometric method are in good agreement when using the same measurement conditions. A detection limit of 10 U.L-1 and a linear calibration curve of 10-100,000 U.L-1 in the sample were obtained. Measuring time for the required trypsin solution concentration was from 4 min (for the most dilute samples) to 1 min (for the most concentrate samples). In a typical experiment, protease measurements did not inactivate the alcohol oxidase on the probe, nor did a more classical use for alcohol detection. The procedure developed could permit any protease estimation on the condition that they hydrolyze ester bonds from synthetic substrate. PMID:8109959

  10. Radiochemical detection of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase: distribution of the indomethacin sensitive enzyme in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ivins, J.; Penning, T.

    1986-05-01

    Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase catalyzes the NADP/sup +/ dependent oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which are potent proximate carcinogens. The authors have developed a highly sensitive radiochemical assay for this enzyme in which the oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-cyclohexadiene, a model substrate for trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogens, is coupled to O-methylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyl transferase. Using S-adenosyl-(/sup 3/H-methyl)-methionine as methyl donor at a specific activity of 0.1 nCi/pmol and extracting the product, /sup 3/H-o-methoxyphenol, the assay provides a 5000 fold increase in sensitivity over the existing spectrophotometric method. The radiochemical assay was validated by comparing the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ values for rat liver cytosol with those derived spectrophotometrically. In both instances there was close agreement between values (K/sub m/ = 0.77 +/- 0.11 mM and V/sub max/ = 2.14 +/- 0.13 nmoles/min/mg protein determined radiochemically; K/sub m/ = 0.96 +/- 0.10 mM and V/sub max/ = 6.31 +/- 0.50 nmoles/min/mg protein determined spectrophotometrically). Using the radiochemical method, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in the following rat tissues: liver > lung > heart > small intestine > testis > seminal vesicle > bladder > prostate > spleen. Specific activities ranged between 0.944 and 0.016 nmoles/min/mg protein. In liver, lung, and testis, which are sites of PAH metabolism, the dehydrogenase is sensitive to inhibition by low ..mu..M concentrations of indomethacin, suggesting that this drug can prevent the detoxification of proximate carcinogens by this route.

  11. Changes in soluble sugar, starch, and alcohol dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to N2 diluted atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Crispi, M. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Proper exchange of atmospheric gases is important for normal root and shoot metabolism in plants. This study was conducted to determine how restricted air supply affects foliar carbohydrates, while using the marker enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to report on the oxygenation status of the rootzone. Fourteen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants grown singly in 7-ml tubes containing agarified nutrient medium were placed in coupled Magenta vessels and exposed for six days to either ambient air or one of six different air/nitrogen dilutions. Redox potential of the agar medium was measured immediately after harvesting and freezing leaf tissue, and then root systems were quickly extracted from the agar and frozen for subsequent analyses. Redox potential measurements indicated that this series of gas mixtures produced a transition from hypoxia to anoxia in the root zones. Root ADH activity increased at higher rates as the redox potential neared anoxic levels. In contrast, ADH mRNA expression quickly neared its maximum as the medium became hypoxic and showed little further increase as it became anoxic. Foliar carbohydrate levels increased 1.5- to 2-fold with decreased availability of metabolic gases, with starch increasing at higher concentrations of air than soluble carbohydrate. The results serve as a model for plant performance under microgravity conditions, where absence of convective air movement prevents replenishment of metabolic gases.

  12. Two zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases share common ancestry with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V alcohol dehydrogenase genes but have distinct functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Mark J; Hahn, Mark E; Tanguay, Robert L

    2004-09-10

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have been named Adh8a and Adh8b by the nomenclature committee. Both genes were genetically mapped to chromosome 13. The 1450-bp Adh8a is 82, 73, 72, and 72% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8 (previously named ADH1), the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. Also, the 1484-bp Adh8b is 77, 68, 67, and 66% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8, the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. ADH8A and ADH8B share 86% amino acid similarity. To characterize the functional properties of ADH8A and ADH8B, recombinant proteins were purified from SF-9 insect cells. Kinetic studies demonstrate that ADH8A metabolizes ethanol, with a V(max) of 13.4 nmol/min/mg protein, whereas ADH8B does not metabolize ethanol. The ADH8A K(m) for ethanol as a substrate is 0.7 mm. 4-Methyl pyrazole, a classical competitive inhibitor of class I ADH, failed to inhibit ADH8A. ADH8B has the capacity to efficiently biotransform longer chain primary alcohols (>/=5 carbons) and S-hydroxymethlyglutathione, whereas ADH8A does not efficiently metabolize these substrates. Finally, mRNA expression studies indicate that both ADH8A and ADH8B mRNA are expressed during early development and in the adult brain, fin, gill, heart, kidney, muscle, and liver. Together these results indicate that class I-like ADH is conserved in zebrafish, albeit with mixed functional properties. PMID:15231826

  13. Loop-Grafted Old Yellow Enzymes in the Bienzymatic Cascade Reduction of Allylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sabrina; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The enzymatic reduction of C=C bonds in allylic alcohols with Old Yellow Enzymes represents a challenging task, due to insufficient activation through the hydroxy group. In our work, we coupled an alcohol dehydrogenase with three wild-type ene reductases-namely nicotinamide-dependent cyclohex-2-en-1-one reductase (NCR) from Zymomonas mobilis, OYE1 from Saccharomyces pastorianus and morphinone reductase (MR) from Pseudomonas putida M10-and four rationally designed β/α loop variants of NCR in the bienzymatic cascade hydrogenation of allylic alcohols. Remarkably, the wild type of NCR was not able to catalyse the cascade reaction whereas MR and OYE1 demonstrated high to excellent activities. Through the rational loop grafting of two intrinsic β/α surface loop regions near the entrance of the active site of NCR with the corresponding loops from OYE1 or MR we successfully transferred the cascade reduction activity from one family member to another. Further we observed that loop grafting revealed certain influences on the interaction with the nicotinamide cofactor. PMID:27037735

  14. Methanoarchaeal sulfolactate dehydrogenase: prototype of a new family of NADH-dependent enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Adriana; Madern, Dominique; Zaccaï, Giuseppe; Vellieux, Frédéric MD

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the sulfolactate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic and methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was solved at 2.5 Å resolution (PDB id. 1RFM). The asymmetric unit contains a tetramer of tight dimers. This structure, complexed with NADH, does not contain a cofactor-binding domain with ‘Rossmann-fold' topology. Instead, the tertiary and quaternary structures indicate a novel fold. The NADH is bound in an extended conformation in each active site, in a manner that explains the pro-S specificity. Cofactor binding involves residues belonging to both subunits within the tight dimers, which are therefore the smallest enzymatically active units. The protein was found to be a homodimer in solution by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle neutron scattering. Various compounds were tested as putative substrates. The results indicate the existence of a substrate discrimination mechanism, which involves electrostatic interactions. Based on sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses, several other enzymes were classified as belonging to this novel family of homologous (S)-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:15014443

  15. Polyol specificity of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana sorbitol dehydrogenase studied by enzyme kinetics and in silico modeling

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, M. Francisca; Cáceres, Juan Carlos; Fuentealba, Matías; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Stange, Claudia; Cabrera, Ricardo; Handford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyols are enzymatically-produced plant compounds which can act as compatible solutes during periods of abiotic stress. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+-dependent SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, E. C. 1.1.1.14) from Arabidopsis thaliana L. sorbitol dehydrogenase (AtSDH) is capable of oxidizing several polyols including sorbitol, ribitol, and xylitol. In the present study, enzymatic assays using recombinant AtSDH demonstrated a higher specificity constant for xylitol compared to sorbitol and ribitol, all of which are C2 (S) and C4 (R) polyols. Enzyme activity was reduced by preincubation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating a requirement for zinc ions. In humans, it has been proposed that sorbitol becomes part of a pentahedric coordination sphere of the catalytic zinc during the reaction mechanism. In order to determine the validity of this pentahedric coordination model in a plant SDH, homology modeling, and Molecular Dynamics simulations of AtSDH ternary complexes with the three polyols were performed using crystal structures of human and Bemisia argentifolii (Genn.) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) SDHs as scaffolds. The results indicate that the differences in interaction with structural water molecules correlate very well with the observed enzymatic parameters, validate the proposed pentahedric coordination of the catalytic zinc ion in a plant SDH, and provide an explanation for why AtSDH shows a preference for polyols with a chirality of C2 (S) and C4 (R). PMID:25755662

  16. Multiple Independent Fusions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase with Enzymes in the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Nicholas A.; Dixon, Thomas A.; Cavalcanti, Andre R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fusions of the first two enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), have been previously described in two distant clades, chordates and species of the malarial parasite Plasmodium. We have analyzed genome and expressed sequence data from a variety of organisms to identify the origins of these gene fusion events. Based on the orientation of the domains and range of species in which homologs can be found, the fusions appear to have occurred independently, near the base of the metazoan and apicomplexan lineages. Only one of the two metazoan paralogs of G6PD is fused, showing that the fusion occurred after a duplication event, which we have traced back to an ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. The Plasmodium genes are known to contain a functionally important insertion that is not seen in the other apicomplexan fusions, highlighting this as a unique characteristic of this group. Surprisingly, our search revealed two additional fusion events, one that combined 6PGL and G6PD in an ancestor of the protozoan parasites Trichomonas and Giardia, and another fusing G6PD with phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in a species of diatoms. This study extends the range of species known to contain fusions in the pentose phosphate pathway to many new medically and economically important organisms. PMID:21829610

  17. Biochemical characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus reveals a unique NAD+-dependent homotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Runar; Madern, Dominique; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Karlsen, Solveig; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Steen, Ida Helene

    2007-05-01

    The gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) of Methylococcus capsulatus (McIDH) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was NAD+-dependent with a thermal optimum for activity at 55-60 degrees C and an apparent midpoint melting temperature (Tm) of 70 degrees C. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) revealed a homotetrameric state, and McIDH thus represents the first homotetrameric NAD+-dependent IDH that has been characterized. Based on a structural alignment of McIDH and homotetrameric homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HDH) from Thermus thermophilus (TtHDH), we identified the clasp-like domain of McIDH as a likely site for tetramerization. McIDH showed moreover, higher sequence identity (48%) to TtHDH than to previously characterized IDHs. Putative NAD+-IDHs with high sequence identity (48-57%) to McIDH were however identified in a variety of bacteria showing that NAD+-dependent IDHs are indeed widespread within the domain, Bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis including these new sequences revealed a close relationship with eukaryal allosterically regulated NAD+-IDH and the subfamily III of IDH was redefined to include bacterial NAD+- and NADP+-dependent IDHs. This apparent relationship suggests that the mitochondrial genes encoding NAD+-IDH are derived from the McIDH-like IDHs. PMID:17160675

  18. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  19. Effect of selective thiol-group derivatization on enzyme kinetics of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, L A; McIntyre, J O; Fleischer, S

    1993-01-01

    (R)-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) is a phosphatidylcholine-requiring tetrameric enzyme with two thiol groups (SH-1 and SH-2) per protomer. By first protecting the more rapidly reacting thiol group (SH-1) with diamide [1,1'-azobis-(NN'-dimethylformamide), DM] to form DM(SH-1)BDH, SH-2 can be selectively derivatized by reaction with maleimide reagents such as 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (MSL), which gives DM(SH-1)MSL(SH-2)BDH. Reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) regenerates SH-1, yielding MAL(SH-2)BDH (where MAL is the diamagnetic reduction product of MSL-BDH and DTT). The enzymic activity of DM(SH-1)BDH is decreased to approx. 4% relative to the native purified enzyme, and the apparent Km for substrate, KmBOH, is increased approx. 100-fold. Reduction of DM(SH-1)BDH with DTT regenerates SH-1 and restores normal enzymic function. Modification of SH-2 with piperidinylmaleimide [MAL(SH-2)BDH] diminishes enzymic activity to approx. 35% of its original value, but has no significant effect on apparent KmBOH. The doubly derivatized enzyme, DM(SH-1)MSL(SH-2)BDH, has lower enzymic activity [about half that for DM(SH-2)BDH] and a yet higher apparent KmBOH than DM(SH-1)BDH. Derivatization of SH-2 with different maleimide reagents results in diminished activity approximately proportional to the size of the maleimide substituent, suggesting that this inhibition is steric. Whereas modification of SH-1 results in marked changes in kinetic parameters (increased apparent Km and reduced apparent Vmax), derivatization of SH-2 has a lesser effect on enzymic function. Thus SH-1 is postulated to be closer to the active centre than is SH-2, although neither is involved in catalysis, since: (1) the activity of the derivatized enzyme is not abolished; and (2) activity can be enhanced by increasing substrate (and cofactor) concentrations. PMID:8280053

  20. A new cofactor in prokaryotic enzyme: Tryptophan tryptophylquinone as the redox prosthetic group in methylamine dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, W.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Wemmer, D.E. ); Chistoserdov, A.; Lidstrom, M.E. )

    1991-05-10

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH), an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} enzyme from numerous methylotrophic soil bacteria, contains a novel quinonoid redox prosthetic group that is covalently bound to its small {beta} subunit through two amino acyl residues. A comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the gene sequence of the small subunit for the enzyme from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with the published amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation method, allowed the identification of the amino acyl constituents of the cofactor as two tryptophyl residues. This information was crucial for interpreting {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectral data collected for the semicarbazide- and carboxymethyl-derivatized bis(tripeptidyl)-cofactor of MADH from bacterium W3A1. The cofactor is composed of two cross-linked tryptophyl residues. Although there are many possible isomers, only one is consistent with all the data: The first tryptophyl residue in the peptide sequence exists as an indole-6,7-dione, and is attached at its 4 position to the 2 position of the second, otherwise unmodified, indole side group. Contrary to earlier reports, the cofactor of MADH is not 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a derivative thereof, of pro-PQQ. This appears to be the only example of two cross-linked, modified amino acyl residues having a functional role in the active site of an enzyme, in the absence of other cofactors or metal ions.

  1. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin. PMID:25772736

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis risk: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Deng, Tao; Luo, He-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The association between alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) has been analyzed in several studies, but results have been conflicting. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ADH1C polymorphism and risk of ALC. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang databases up to January 10, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association using the fixed or random effect model. A total of 16 case-control studies, including 1375 cases and 1802 controls, were included. Overall, no significant association between the ADH1C polymorphism and ALC risk was found (dominant model: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.62-1.23; recessive model: OR=1.30, 95% CI: 0.84-1.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.63-1.21; *2/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.71-1.70). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we observed a significant association in Asian descent (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.07-2.49), while a decreased risk was found among Caucasians (dominant model: OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66-0.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.95). This meta-analysis demonstrated that the ADH1C polymorphism might increase the risk of ALC in Asians, while it may be a protective factor for ALC among Caucasians. PMID:26379912

  3. Development of an Alcohol Dehydrogenase Biosensor for Ethanol Determination with Toluidine Blue O Covalently Attached to a Cellulose Acetate Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Alpat, Şenol; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel voltammetric ethanol biosensor was constructed using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Firstly, alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified by cellulose acetate (CA) bonded to toluidine blue O (TBO). Secondly, the surface was covered by a glutaraldehyde/bovine serum albumin (BSA) cross-linking procedure to provide a new voltammetric sensor for the ethanol determination. In order to fabricate the biosensor, a new electrode matrix containing insoluble Toluidine Blue O (TBO) was obtained from the process, and enzyme/coenzyme was combined on the biosensor surface. The influence of various experimental conditions was examined for the characterization of the optimum analytical performance. The developed biosensor exhibited sensitive and selective determination of ethanol and showed a linear response between 1 × 10−5 M and 4 × 10−4 M ethanol. A detection limit calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio was 5.0 × 10−6 M. At the end of the 20th day, the biosensor still retained 50% of its initial activity. PMID:22315566

  4. Glutamate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria: do lipid modifications and transient metabolon formation influence enzyme activity?

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in brain, is complex and of paramount importance to overall brain function. Thus, understanding the regulation of enzymes involved in formation and disposal of glutamate and related metabolites is crucial to understanding glutamate metabolism. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a pivotal enzyme that links amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle activity in brain and other tissues. The allosteric regulation of GDH has been extensively studied and characterized. Less is known about the influence of lipid modifications on GDH activity, and the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes (metabolons) that can greatly influence metabolism by altering kinetic parameters and lead to channeling of metabolites. This review summarizes evidence for palmitoylation and acylation of GDH, information on protein binding, and information regarding the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes. Recent studies suggest that a number of other proteins can bind to GDH altering activity and overall metabolism. It is likely that these modifications and interactions contribute additional levels of regulation of GDH activity and glutamate metabolism. PMID:21771624

  5. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Borgnia, Mario J.; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A.; Falconieri, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an “open” or “closed” state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  6. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, Mario J; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A; Falconieri, Veronica; Subramaniam, Sriram; Milne, Jacqueline L S

    2016-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an "open" or "closed" state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  7. Metabolic basis of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (2-butoxyethanol) toxicity: role of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Burka, L.T.; Matthews, H.B.

    1987-07-01

    2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is a massively produced glycol ether of which more than 230 million pounds was produced in the United States in 1983. It is extensively used in aerosols and cleaning agents intended for household use. This creates a high potential for human exposure during its manufacturing and use. A single exposure of rats to BE causes severe hemolytic anemia accompanied by secondary hemoglobinuria as well as liver and kidney damage. Butoxyacetic acid (BAA) was earlier identified as a urinary metabolite of BE. In addition, we have recently identified two additional urinary metabolites of BE, namely, BE-glucuronide and BE-sulfate conjugates. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the metabolic basis of BE-induced hematotoxicity in male F344 rats. Treatment of rats with pyrazole (alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor) protected rats against BE-induced hematotoxicity and inhibited BE metabolism to BAA. Pyrazole inhibition of BE metabolism to BAA was accompanied by increased BE metabolism to BE-glucuronide and BE-sulfate as determined by quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of BE metabolites in urine. There was approximately a 10-fold decrease in the ratio of BAA to BE-glucuronide + BE-sulfate in the urine of rats treated with pyrazole + BE compared to rats treated with BE alone. Pretreatment of rats with cyanamide (aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) also significantly protected rats against BE-induced hematotoxicity and modified BE metabolism in a manner similar to that caused by pyrazole. Administration of equimolar doses of BE, the metabolic intermediate butoxyacetaldehyde, or the ultimate metabolite BAA caused similar hematotoxic effects. Cyanamide also protected rats against butoxyacetaldehyde-induced hematotoxicity.

  8. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  9. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR318C (ADH6) gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase: relevance in aldehyde reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Larroy, Carol; Fernández, M Rosario; González, Eva; Parés, Xavier; Biosca, Josep A

    2002-01-01

    YMR318C represents an open reading frame from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown function. It possesses a conserved sequence motif, the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) signature, specific to the medium-chain zinc-containing ADHs. In the present study, the YMR318C gene product has been purified to homogeneity from overexpressing yeast cells, and found to be a homodimeric ADH, composed of 40 kDa subunits and with a pI of 5.0-5.4. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (linear and branched-chain) and aromatic primary alcohols and aldehydes. Aldehydes were processed with a 50-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that for the corresponding alcohols. The highest k(cat)/K(m) values were found with pentanal>veratraldehyde > hexanal > 3-methylbutanal >cinnamaldehyde. Taking into consideration the substrate specificity and sequence characteristics of the YMR318C gene product, we have proposed this gene to be called ADH6. The disruption of ADH6 was not lethal for the yeast under laboratory conditions. Although S. cerevisiae is considered a non lignin-degrading organism, the catalytic activity of ADHVI can direct veratraldehyde and anisaldehyde, arising from the oxidation of lignocellulose by fungal lignin peroxidases, to the lignin biodegradation pathway. ADHVI is the only S. cerevisiae enzyme able to significantly reduce veratraldehyde in vivo, and its overexpression allowed yeast to grow under toxic concentrations of this aldehyde. The enzyme may also be involved in the synthesis of fusel alcohols. To our knowledge this is the first NADPH-dependent medium-chain ADH to be characterized in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11742541

  10. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 Å resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg2+ and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. How­ever, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate inter­mediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH. PMID:20516620

  11. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E.

    2010-10-28

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 {angstrom} resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg{sup 2+} and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. However, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate intermediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH.

  12. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family. PMID:25591389

  13. NAD-dependent aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase in wheats (Triticum L.) and goatgrasses (Aegilops L.): evolutionary genetics.

    PubMed

    Jaaska, V

    1984-04-01

    Evolutionary electrophoretic variation of a NAD-specific aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase, AADH-E, in wheat and goatgrass species is described and discussed in comparison with a NAD-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A) and a NADP-dependent AADH-B studied previously. Cultivated tetraploid emmer wheats (T. turgidum s. l.) and hexaploid bread wheats (T. aestivum s. l.) are all fixed for a heterozygous triplet, E(0.58)/E(0.64). The slowest isoenzyme, E(0.58), is controlled by a homoeoallelic gene on the chromosome arm 6AL of T. aestivum cv. 'Chinese Spring' and is inherent in all diploid wheats, T. monococcum s. Str., T. boeoticum s. l. and T. urartu. The fastest isoenzyme, E(0.64), is presumably controlled by the B- and D-genome homoeoalleles of the bread wheat and is the commonest alloenzyme of diploid goat-grasses, including Ae. speltaides and Ae. tauschii. The tetraploid T. timopheevii s. str. has a particular heterozygous triplet E(0.56)/E(0.71), whereas the hexaploid T. zhukovskyi exhibited polymorphism with electromorphs characteristic of T. timopheevii and T. monococcum. Wild tetraploid wheats, T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum, showed partially homologous intraspecific variation of AADH-E with heterozygous triplets E(0.58)/E(0.64) (the commonest), E(0.58)/E(0.71), E(0.45)/E(0.58), E(0.48)/E(0.58) and E(0.56)/E(0.58) recorded. Polyploid goatgrasses of the D-genome group, excepting Ae. cylindrica, are fixed for the common triplet E(0.58)/E(0.64). Ae. cylindrica and polyploid goatgrasses of the C(u)-genome group, excepting Ae. kotschyi, are homozygous for E(0.64). Ae. kotschyi is exceptional, showing fixed heterozygosity for both AADH-E and ADH-A with unique triplets E(0.56)/E(0.64) and A(0.49)/A(0.56). PMID:24258843

  14. Selection variability for Arg48His in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B among Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Evsyukov, Alexey; Ivanov, Denis

    2013-08-01

    The variant His at codon 48 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1B) results in more efficient ethanol metabolism than with the "typical" codon 48Arg. In this study we introduced selection properties of Arg48His genotypes of ADH1B and estimated fitness in four ethnic-geographical clusters in Asia. Population genetics models were employed that derive observed gene frequencies from fitness relationships among genotypes, to infer the selection pattern of polymorphisms in an indirect manner. The data were analyzed using the model of "complete stationary distribution" by Wright that takes into account random genetic drift, pressure of migrations, mutations, and selection as influential factors of gene frequency. We found that the different population groups showed some variation in the types of selection for Arg48His. Han Chinese from eastern and southeastern China and the Japanese and Korean populations showed stabilizing selection, while the groups from Central Asian and Indochina showed divergent selection. However, all the groups demonstrated a strong positive selection for Arg48His. PMID:25019189

  15. Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Contribute to Sex-Related Differences in Clearance of Zolpidem in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Cody J.; Strope, Jonathan D.; Beedie, Shaunna; Ley, Ariel M.; Holly, Alesia; Calis, Karim; Farkas, Ronald; Parepally, Jagan; Men, Angela; Fadiran, Emmanuel O.; Scott, Pamela; Jenkins, Marjorie; Theodore, William H.; Sissung, Tristan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The recommended zolpidem starting dose was lowered in females (5 mg vs. 10 mg) since side effects were more frequent and severe than those of males; the mechanism underlying sex differences in pharmacokinetics (PK) is unknown. We hypothesized that such differences were caused by known sex-related variability in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) expression. Methods: Male, female, and castrated male rats were administered 2.6 mg/kg zolpidem, ± disulfiram (ADH/ALDH pathway inhibitor) to compare PK changes induced by sex and gonadal hormones. PK analyses were conducted in rat plasma and rat brain. Key findings: Sex differences in PK were evident: females had a higher CMAX (112.4 vs. 68.1 ug/L) and AUC (537.8 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L) than uncastrated males. Castration induced an earlier TMAX (0.25 vs. 1 h), greater CMAX (109.1 vs. 68.1 ug/L), and a corresponding AUC increase (339.7 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L). Administration of disulfiram caused more drastic CMAX and TMAX changes in male vs. female rats that mirrored the effects of castration on first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the observed PK differences may be caused by ADH/ALDH expression. Brain concentrations paralleled plasma concentrations. Conclusion: These findings indicate that sex differences in zolpidem PK are influenced by variation in the expression of ADH/ALDH due to gonadal androgens. PMID:27574509

  16. Determination of Kinetic Isotope Effects in Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Transition Path Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Matthew; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The experimental determination of kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems can be a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive process. In this study, we use the Chandler-Bolhius method for the determination of reaction rates within transition path sampling (rTPS) to determine the primary kinetic isotope effect in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). In this study, normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) was applied to the transferring hydride/deuteride in order to correctly incorporate quantum effects into the molecular simulations. Though previous studies have used rTPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. Due to the fact that particle transfer is not wholly indicative of the chemical step, this method cannot be used to determine reaction rate constants in YADH. However, it is possible to determine the transition rate constant of the particle transfer, and the kinetic isotope effect of that step. This method provides a set of tools to determine kinetic isotope effects with the atomistic detail of molecular simulations.

  17. Red Xylem and Higher Lignin Extractability by Down-Regulating a Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Poplar.

    PubMed Central

    Baucher, M.; Chabbert, B.; Pilate, G.; Van Doorsselaere, J.; Tollier, M. T.; Petit-Conil, M.; Cornu, D.; Monties, B.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Jouanin, L.; Boerjan, W.

    1996-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of the lignin precursors, the monolignols. We have down-regulated CAD in transgenic poplar (Populus tremula X Populus alba) by both antisense and co-suppression strategies. Several antisense and sense CAD transgenic poplars had an approximately 70% reduced CAD activity that was associated with a red coloration of the xylem tissue. Neither the lignin amount nor the lignin monomeric composition (syringyl/guaiacyl) were significantly modified. However, phloroglucinol-HCl staining was different in the down-regulated CAD plants, suggesting changes in the number of aldehyde units in the lignin. Furthermore, the reactivity of the cell wall toward alkali treatment was altered: a lower amount of lignin was found in the insoluble, saponified residue and more lignin could be precipitated from the soluble alkali fraction. Moreover, large amounts of phenolic compounds, vanillin and especially syringaldehyde, were detected in the soluble alkali fraction of the CAD down-regulated poplars. Alkaline pulping experiments on 3-month-old trees showed a reduction of the kappa number without affecting the degree of cellulose degradation. These results indicate that reducing the CAD activity in trees might be a valuable strategy to optimize certain processes of the wood industry, especially those of the pulp and paper industry. PMID:12226459

  18. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: Analysis through the use of alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sofer, W.H.

    1986-12-01

    Our original objective was to understand the mechanism of mutagenesis of several important mutagens in higher organisms. Our approach was to try to deduce this mechanism by working backwards from its final effects. The strategy that we used in an effort to carry out our studies was to make mutations in the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Drosophila melanogaster and sequence the modified genes. Most of our work was focused on an array of mutants that we had induced with formaldehyde, a potent mutagen in Drosophila, and with ethyl methane sulfonate. Over the course of the project period we cloned and sequenced the ADH gene from four formalde-induced mutants and from one EMS mutant. We showed that the four formaldehyde-induced mutants contained small deletions within the protein-coding region of their ADH genes ranging in size from between 6 and 34 bp. The one EMS-induced mutant was shown by DNA sequencing to bear an AT to GC sequence change at a tryptophan codon near the c-terminal coding portion of the gene. These results have significantly increased our understanding of the mechanism(s) of mutagenesis in higher organisms. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  20. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene is nested in the outspread locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, S.; Greig, S.; Davis, T.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the structure and expression of the outspread (osp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work showed that chromosomal breakpoints associated with mutations of the osp locus map to both sides of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh), suggesting that Adh and the adjacent gene Adh{sup r} are nested in osp. We extended a chromosomal walk and mapped additional osp mutations to define the maximum molecular limit of osp as 119 kb. We identified a 6-kb transcript that hybridizes to osp region DNA and is altered or absent in osp mutants. Accumulation of this RNA peaks during embryonic and pupal periods. The osp cDNAs comprise two distinct classes based on alternative splicing patterns. The 5{prime} end of the longest cDNA was extended by PCR amplification. When hybridized to the osp walk, the 5{prime} extension verifies that Adh and Adh{sup r} are nested in osp and shows that osp has a transcription unit of {ge}74 kb. In situ hybridization shows that osp is expressed both maternally and zygotically. In the ovary, osp is transcribed in nurse cells and localized in the oocyte. In embryos, expression is most abundant in the developing visceral and somatic musculature. 55 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Measuring Selection Coefficients Affecting the Alcohol Dehydrogenase Polymorphism in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. R.; Oakeshott, J. G.; Gibson, J. B.; Anderson, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a perturbation experiment on the frequency of the F and S Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) alleles of D. melanogaster. Fifty-four isofemale lines set up from three wild populations and with initial F frequencies of either 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 were maintained on standard laboratory food medium at 22°. At generations 4, 12 and 20 the lines were again scored for Adh gene frequencies. Maximum likelihood procedures were used to estimate selection coefficients for the Adh genotypes. An analysis of deviance was used to compare the coefficients against expectations under the hypotheses of neutrality and of constant values for the three base populations, and for the three initial gene frequency classes. Highly-significant departures from neutrality were observed; over all 54 lines, the set of relative fitnesses for S/S:F/S:F/F was estimated as 1.00:1.08:1.08. In addition, there were significant differences between lines in the outcome of selection which were not attributable to differences between base populations or initial F frequencies. These residual between-line differences, as well as some between-generation, within-line differences are discussed in terms of linkage disequilibria with background genes and electrophoretically cryptic variation at the Adh locus. PMID:6807750

  2. Isolation of an alcohol dehydrogenase cDNA from and characterization of its expression in chrysanthemum under waterlogging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongmei; Ni, Dian; Song, Lili; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2013-11-01

    A PCR strategy was used to isolate a full-length CgADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) cDNA from chrysanthemum. The gene putatively encodes a 378 residue polypeptides, which shares 95% homology with tomato alcohol dehydrogenase class III. Endogenous ethylene generated in waterlogged Chrysanthemum zawadskii was enhanced by exogenous ethylene but decreased by 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an inhibitor of ethylene action. In waterlogged roots, the transcription of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) increased rapidly but transiently, peaking at 7.5 fold the non-waterlogged level after 2h of stress. Waterlogging elevated ADH activity after a prolonged episode of stress. The exogenous supply of 40μLL(-1) ethylene suppressed the production of ethanol, while that of 4μLL(-1) 1-MCP enhanced it. Ethylene appeared to suppress an acceleration of both CgADH expression and fermentation, and alleviates ethanolic fermentation probably through by as a signal to acceleration of waterlogging-induced aerenchyma formation. This supports the previously observed phenomenon that the expression level of ADH gene is regulated by the local level of physiologically active ethylene. The relevance of the CgADH gene in relation to chrysanthemum waterlogging was discussed as well. PMID:24094053

  3. Oxidoreductive cellulose depolymerization by the enzymes cellobiose dehydrogenase and glycoside hydrolase 61.

    PubMed

    Langston, James A; Shaghasi, Tarana; Abbate, Eric; Xu, Feng; Vlasenko, Elena; Sweeney, Matt D

    2011-10-01

    Several members of the glycoside hydrolase 61 (GH61) family of proteins have recently been shown to dramatically increase the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass by microbial hydrolytic cellulases. However, purified GH61 proteins have neither demonstrable direct hydrolase activity on various polysaccharide or lignacious components of biomass nor an apparent hydrolase active site. Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) is a secreted flavocytochrome produced by many cellulose-degrading fungi with no well-understood biological function. Here we demonstrate that the binary combination of Thermoascus aurantiacus GH61A (TaGH61A) and Humicola insolens CDH (HiCDH) cleaves cellulose into soluble, oxidized oligosaccharides. TaGH61A-HiCDH activity on cellulose is shown to be nonredundant with the activities of canonical endocellulase and exocellulase enzymes in microcrystalline cellulose cleavage, and while the combination of TaGH61A and HiCDH cleaves highly crystalline bacterial cellulose, it does not cleave soluble cellodextrins. GH61 and CDH proteins are coexpressed and secreted by the thermophilic ascomycete Thielavia terrestris in response to environmental cellulose, and the combined activities of T. terrestris GH61 and T. terrestris CDH are shown to synergize with T. terrestris cellulose hydrolases in the breakdown of cellulose. The action of GH61 and CDH on cellulose may constitute an important, but overlooked, biological oxidoreductive system that functions in microbial lignocellulose degradation and has applications in industrial biomass utilization. PMID:21821740

  4. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions. PMID:19198723

  5. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70–4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  6. Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase is a secreted enzyme that confers resistance to H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Prasummanna; Braun, Sterling E.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile produces an NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which converts l-glutamate into α-ketoglutarate through an irreversible reaction. The enzyme GDH is detected in the stool samples of patients with C. difficile-associated disease and serves as one of the diagnostic tools to detect C. difficile infection (CDI). We demonstrate here that supernatant fluids of C. difficile cultures contain GDH. To understand the role of GDH in the physiology of C. difficile, an isogenic insertional mutant of gluD was created in strain JIR8094. The mutant failed to produce and secrete GDH as shown by Western blot analysis. Various phenotypic assays were performed to understand the importance of GDH in C. difficile physiology. In TY (tryptose yeast extract) medium, the gluD mutant grew slower than the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the growth defect in TY medium. The presence of extracellular GDH may have a functional role in the pathogenesis of CDI. In support of this assumption we found higher sensitivity to H2O2 in the gluD mutant as compared to the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the H2O2 sensitivity. PMID:24145018

  7. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  8. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R.; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M.; Martin, William F.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Ronimus, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn2+ cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn2+ cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. PMID:26175150

  9. Characterization of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in seminal plasma of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Sastry, K V H; Pandey, N K; Shit, N; Agrawal, R; Singh, K B; Mohan, Jag; Saxena, V K; Moudgal, R P

    2011-02-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme present in quail seminal plasma has been characterized. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequently with LDH specific staining of seminal plasma revealed a single isozyme in quail semen. Studies on substrate inhibition, pH for optimum activity and inhibitor (urea) indicated the isozyme present in the quail semen has catalytic properties like LDH-1 viz. H-type. Furthermore, unlike other mammalian species, electrophoretic and kinetic investigations did not support the existence of semen specific LDH-X isozyme in quail semen. The effect of exogenous lactate and pyruvate on sperm metabolic activity was also studied. The addition of 1 mM lactate or pyruvate to quail semen increased sperm metabolic activity. Our results suggested that both pyruvate and lactate could be used by quail spermatozoa to maintain their basic functions. Since the H-type isozyme is important for conversion of lactate to pyruvate under anaerobic conditions it was postulated that exogenous lactate being converted into pyruvate via LDH present in semen may be used by sperm mitochondria to generate ATP. During conversion of lactate to pyruvate NADH is being generated that may be useful for maintaining sperm mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:21074838

  10. Wired pyrroloquinoline quinone soluble glucose dehydrogenase enzyme electrodes operating at unprecedented low redox potential.

    PubMed

    Flexer, Victoria; Mano, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    We report unprecedented high current densities for the enzymatic oxidation of glucose already at 0 V versus Ag/AgCl. The modified electrodes were made by assembling pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-soluble glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-sGDH) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus with osmium-based redox polymers and a cross-linker. Both redox mediators are made of a poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) polymer with Os complexes tethered to the polymer backbone via long C chains, giving the Os complexes flexibility and mobility inside the redox hydrogels. Current densities larger than 1 mA cm(-2) were measured already below 0 V with a plateau value of 4.4 mA cm(-2). Similar hydrogel electrodes comprising the same redox polymers and glucose oxidase (GOx) showed less than half the current densities of the PQQ-sGDH electrodes. The current versus potential curve dependence showed a sigmoidal shape characteristic of mediated enzyme catalysis but with a current increase versus potential less sharp than expected. Surprisingly, the midwave redox potential was positively shifted with respect to the potential of the redox mediator. PMID:24475934

  11. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. PMID:27317665

  12. Catecholamines enhance dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase inactivation by the copper Fenton system. Enzyme protection by copper chelators.

    PubMed

    Correa, J G; Stoppani, A O

    1996-04-01

    Catecholamines (CAs: epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, L-DOPA, 6-hydroxydopamine) and o-diphenols (DOPAC and catechol) enhanced dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LADH) inactivation by Cu(II)/H2O2 (Cu-Fenton system). The inhibition of LADH activity correlated with Cu(II), H2O2 and CA concentrations. Similar inhibitions were obtained with the assayed CAs and o-diphenols. CAs enhanced HO. radical production by Cu(II)/H2O2, as demonstrated by benzoate hydroxylation and deoxyribose oxidation; LADH counteracted the pro-oxidant effect of CAs by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. Captopril, dihydrolipoamide, dihydrolipoic acid, DL-dithiothreitol, GSSG, trypanothione and histidine effectively preserved LADH from oxidative damage, whereas N-acetylcysteine, N-(2-mercaptopropionylglycine) and lipoamide were less effective protectors. Catalase (though neither bovine serum albumin nor superoxide dismutase) protected LADH against the Cu(II)/H2O2/CAs systems. Denatured catalase protected less than the native enzyme, its action possibly depending on Cu-binding. LADH increased and Captopril inhibited epinephrine oxidation by Cu(II)/H2O2 and Cu(II). The summarized evidence supports the following steps for LADH inactivation: (1) reduction of LADH linked-Cu(II) to Cu(I) by CAs; (2) production of HO. from H2O2 by LADH-linked Cu(I) (Haber-Weiss reaction) and (3) oxidation of aminoacid residues at the enzyme active site by site-specifically generated HO. radicals. Hydrogen peroxide formation from CAs autoxidation may contribute to LADH inactivation. PMID:8731015

  13. Isolation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Acetobacterium woodii and comparison of its properties with those of the Clostridium thermoaceticum enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, S W; Ljungdahl, L G; DerVartanian, D V

    1983-09-01

    An oxygen-labile carbon monoxide dehydrogenase was purified to at least 98% homogeneity from fructose-grown cells of Acetobacterium woodii. Gel filtration and electrophoresis experiments gave molecular weights of 480,000 and 153,000, respectively, of the active enzyme. The molecular weights for the subunits are 80,000 and 68,000; the subunits occur in equal proportion. The small subunit of the A. woodii enzyme differs in size from that of the Clostridium thermoaceticum enzyme; however, the large subunits are similar. The specific activity of the A. woodii enzyme, measured at 30 degrees C and pH 7.6, is 500 mumol of CO oxidized min-1 mg-1 with 20 mM methyl viologen as the electron acceptor. Analysis revealed (number per dimer) iron (9), acid-labile sulfide (12), nickel (1.4), and magnesium or zinc (1). This metal content is quite similar to that of the C. thermoaceticum enzyme (Ragsdale et al., J. Biol. Chem. 258:2364-2369, 1983). The nickel as well as the iron-sulfur clusters are redox-active, as was found for the C. thermoaceticum enzyme (Ragsdale et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 108:658-663, 1982). CO can reduce and CO2 can oxidize the iron-sulfur clusters. The enzyme is inhibited by cyanide, but CO2 in the presence of reduced methyl viologen or CO alone can reverse or prevent this inhibition. Several ferredoxins, flavodoxin, and rubredoxin and some artificial electron carriers were tested for their relative rates of reaction with the CO dehydrogenases from A. woodii, C. thermoaceticum, and Clostridium formicoaceticum. Rubredoxin was by far the most reactive acceptor and is proposed to be the primary natural electron carrier for the acetogenic CO dehydrogenases. PMID:6309745

  14. Role of ammonia in the activiation of methanol dehydrogenase/cytochrome C(L) enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjumon, Ancy

    Recent advancement in enzyme catalysis has opened ways to design efficient biocatalysts, bio-sensors and bio-fuel cells. An in-depth knowledge about the mechanism of the reaction taking place within the enzymes is of great importance to achieve these goals. In this dissertation, various computation methods are applied to investigate the mechanism behind enzyme catalysis in the presence of compounds called activators. Methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) is a well-known bio-catalyst that can oxidize excess of methanol from the environment to formaldehyde. The enzyme works well within the bacterial environment, but under in vitro, it loses activity. Ammonia is used as an activator to restore the activity of MDH. The Monte Carlo search using simulated annealing metaheuristic method is conducted to explore the binding of MDH with its natural electron acceptor Cytochrome cL in varying concentration of ammonia. The main aim behind this is to explore the interaction energy between the enzymes under the influence of its activator. The concentration of ammonia is varied from 0 to 5 ammonia molecules. Moving deeper into the active site of MDH, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were performed to investigate the position and effect of ammonia in the active site amino acids of MDH. The concentration of ammonia was varied from 0 to 55.39 mM. It was proposed that ammonia may form a complex conjugate with the cofactor of MDH (Pyrroloquinoline quinone) to assist in the oxidation of methanol. Two of the most debated methanol oxidation mechanisms, Addition-Elimination reaction and Hydride-Transfer mechanism, were used to investigate the role of ammonia in the oxidation of methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) was applied to explore the methanol oxidation mechanism in the presence of ammonia. Models of varying size that best represent the active site of MDH were tested for this purpose. The interaction energy obtained after the docking of MDH and Cytochrome cL (CL) indicate

  15. Structural and Kinetic Evidence That Catalytic Reaction of Human UDP-glucose 6-Dehydrogenase Involves Covalent Thiohemiacetal and Thioester Enzyme Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Sigrid; Chaikuad, Apirat; Klimacek, Mario; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Oppermann, Udo; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid by UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (UGDH) occurs through the four-electron oxidation of the UDP-glucose C6 primary alcohol in two NAD+-dependent steps. The catalytic reaction of UGDH is thought to involve a Cys nucleophile that promotes formation of a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate in the course of the first oxidation step. The thiohemiacetal undergoes further oxidation into a thioester, and hydrolysis of the thioester completes the catalytic cycle. Herein we present crystallographic and kinetic evidence for the human form of UGDH that clarifies participation of covalent catalysis in the enzymatic mechanism. Substitution of the putative catalytic base for water attack on the thioester (Glu161) by an incompetent analog (Gln161) gave a UGDH variant (E161Q) in which the hydrolysis step had become completely rate-limiting so that a thioester enzyme intermediate accumulated at steady state. By crystallizing E161Q in the presence of 5 mm UDP-glucose and 2 mm NAD+, we succeeded in trapping a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate and determined its structure at 2.3 Å resolution. Cys276 was covalently modified in the structure, establishing its role as catalytic nucleophile of the reaction. The thiohemiacetal reactive C6 was in a position suitable to become further oxidized by hydride transfer to NAD+. The proposed catalytic mechanism of human UGDH involves Lys220 as general base for UDP-glucose alcohol oxidation and for oxyanion stabilization during formation and breakdown of the thiohemiacetal and thioester enzyme intermediates. Water coordinated to Asp280 deprotonates Cys276 to function as an aldehyde trap and also provides oxyanion stabilization. Glu161 is the Brønsted base catalytically promoting the thioester hydrolysis. PMID:22123821

  16. Immobilization of enzyme onto poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-02-01

    Invertase was ionically bound to the poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane surface modified with two aminoacetals with different molecular length, 2-dimethyl-aminoacetoaldehyde dimethylacetal (AAA) and 3-(N,N-dimethylamino-n-propanediamine) propionaldehyde dimethylacetal (APA). Immobilization conditions were determined with respect to enzyme concentration in solution, pH value, ionic strength in immobilization solution, and immobilization time. Various properties of immobilized invertase were evaluated, and thermal stability was found especially to be improved by immobilization. The apparent Michaelis constant, Km, was smaller for invertase bound by APA with longer molecular lengths than for invertase bound by AAA. We attempted to bind glucoamylase of Rhizopus delemarorigin in the same way. The amount and activity of immobilized glucoamylase were much less than those of invertase. 16 references.

  17. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway. PMID:26755859

  18. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway. PMID:26755859

  19. Regulation of human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH7: importance of an AP-1 site.

    PubMed

    Kotagiri, S; Edenberg, H J

    1998-07-01

    The structure and function of the human alcohol dehydrogenase 7 (ADH7) promoter were analyzed. A promoter fragment extending to bp -232 functioned well in H4IIE-C3, CV-1, and HeLa cells, whereas the region extending further upstream to bp -799 had no significant effect on activity. We identified cis-acting elements in the proximal 232 bp and examined their effect on promoter activity. Mutation of site A, where c-Jun bound, caused a drastic decrease in the promoter activity in H4IIE-C3 and CV-1 cells, suggesting that AP-1 plays an important role in the regulation of ADH7. Mutation of site B also caused a large drop in promoter activity in both cell lines; C/EBPalpha can bind to this site, but because the site affects activity approximately equally in CV-1 cells that lack C/EBPalpha and in H4IIE-C3 cells that contain low levels, other proteins are likely to play the major roles in vivo. Mutation of site C, where C/EBP bound and c-Jun bound weakly, had different effects in the two cell lines: in H4IIE-C3 cells, the site C mutation did not significantly increase promoter activity, whereas in CV-1 cells, which lack C/EBPalpha, it led to a doubling of activity. Surprisingly, cotransfection of the wild-type promoter with C/EBPa or C/EBPbeta led to a decrease in promoter activity, which might in part explain the lack of activity of ADH7 in adult liver. PMID:9703017

  20. Classical Raman spectroscopic studies of NADH and NAD+ bound to liver alcohol dehydrogenase by difference techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Yue, K.T.; Martin, C.; Rhee, K.W.; Sloan, D.; Callender, R.

    1987-07-28

    We report the Raman spectra of reduced and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (ADPR) when bound to the coenzyme site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). The bound NADH spectrum is calculated by taking the classical Raman difference spectrum of the binary complex, LADH/NADH, with that of LADH. We have investigated how the bound NADH spectrum is affected when the ternary complexes with inhibitors are formed with dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) or isobutyramide (IBA), i.e., LADH/NADH/Me2SO or LADH/NADH/IBA. Similarly, the difference spectra of LADH/NAD+/pyrazole or LADH/ADPR with LADH are calculated. The magnitude of these difference spectra is on the order of a few percent of the protein Raman spectrum. We report and discuss the experimental configuration and control procedures we use in reliably calculating such small difference signals. These sensitive difference techniques could be applied to a large number of problems where the classical Raman spectrum of a ''small'' molecule, like adenine, bound to the active site of a protein is of interest. The spectrum of bound ADPR allows an assignment of the bands of the bound NADH and NAD+ spectra to normal coordinates located primarily on either the nicotinamide or the adenine moiety. By comparing the spectra of the bound coenzymes with model compound data and through the use of deuterated compounds, we confirm and characterize how the adenine moiety is involved in coenzyme binding and discuss the validity of the suggestion that the adenine ring is protonated upon binding. The nicotinamide moiety of NADH shows significant molecular changes upon binding.

  1. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH), designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into three groups respectively, namely long-, medium-, and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into six medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and –insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed. PMID:27242871

  2. Acrylamide quenching of Trp phosphorescence in liver alcohol dehydrogenase: evidence of gated quencher penetration.

    PubMed

    Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita

    2009-08-11

    Notwithstanding the relevance of their biological function, slow motions in proteins, beyond the microsecond range, are still poorly understood and often elusive. We propose that acrylamide quenching of Trp phosphorescence of deeply buried residues, when extended over the entire accessible range of lifetime measurements (tau > 10 micros), may help to unveil low-frequency protein motions that allow penetration of solute into the protein interior. The work examines in some detail acrylamide quenching of Trp phosphorescence in a model protein (liver alcohol dehydrogenase) over an extended submillimolar to molar acrylamide concentration range. The results, which encompass a >10(4)-fold variation in the quenching rate, provide the first evidence of a downward-curving lifetime Stern-Volmer plot, indicative of a nonlinear dependence of the quenching rate on the quencher concentration. From an analysis of saturation effects in terms of a protein-gated acrylamide diffusion mechanism, we infer two main routes for acrylamide to penetrate the globular fold and come into the proximity of internal W314: a low-frequency gate [36 s(-1) (at 25 degrees C)] tentatively assigned to partial opening of the dimer interface and a higher-frequency one (11800 s(-1)) tentatively assigned to a channel blocked by the side chains of V276 and L307. These motions are sharply inhibited in the rigid protein complexes formed with the coenzyme NAD(+) and the coenzyme analogue adenine diphosphate ribose, as well as by the frictional drag of the solvent in viscous glycerol solutions, evidence that rules out an alternative quenching mechanism involving acrylamide binding to the protein. PMID:19594170

  3. Cooperativity in highly aggregated enzyme systems. A slow transition model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bisswanger, H

    1984-02-25

    Three models are compared describing cooperative phenomena in enzymatic reactions in order to explain sigmoidal saturation curves found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli: the concerted model, the sequential model, and the slow transition model. Both the concerted and the sequential model were considered especially with regard to the increasing number of identical interaction subunits (protomers) in order to get close to the situation found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which consists of 24 protomers. Applying the sequential model to a great number of protomers results in a weak increase of the Hill coefficient, while, in addition to this effect, the concerted model drastically shifts the sigmoidal range of the saturation function to very low ligand concentrations. Such shift is seen with saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine disphosphate with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and a good fit with theoretical curves derived from the concerted model is obtained. However, subcomplexes with a reduced number of protomers exhibited no change in saturation behavior, thus providing evidence against concerted conformational changes of all subunits of the enzyme complex. A scheme for the initial reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex based on slow transitions is presented and a rate equation has been derived. Ordered binding of thiamine diphosphate and pyruvate and a ligand-induced slow transition between a less active and a fully active enzyme form has been assumed. The curves simulated with this model are in agreement with all essential kinetic data, which are observed with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the atypical shape of the saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate, the respective Hill coefficients and Michaelis constants, the hyperbolic binding behavior of thiamine diphosphate, and the inhibition pattern found for acetyl coenzyme A. PMID:6365912

  4. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition. PMID:26017233

  5. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26659432

  6. Characterization of two novel alcohol short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases from Ralstonia eutropha H16 capable of stereoselective conversion of bulky substrates.

    PubMed

    Magomedova, Zalina; Grecu, Andreea; Sensen, Christoph W; Schwab, Helmut; Heidinger, Petra

    2016-03-10

    Biocatalysis has significant advantages over organic synthesis in the field of chiral molecule production and several types of stereoselective enzymes are already in use in industrial biotechnology. However, there is still a high demand for new enzymes capable of transforming bulky molecules with sufficient operability. In order to reveal novel high-potential biocatalysts, the complete genome of the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 was screened for potential short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs). We were able to identify two (S)-enantioselective SDRs named A5 and B3. These showed clear preference towards long-chain and aromatic secondary alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, with diaryl diketone benzil as one of the best substrates. In addition the phylogenetic analysis of all enzyme types, which are known to facilitate benzil reduction, revealed at least two separate evolutionary clusters. Our results indicate the biotechnological potential of SDRs A5 and B3 for the production of chiral compounds with potential commercial value. PMID:26812656

  7. An aryl-alcohol oxidase of Pleurotus sapidus: heterologous expression, characterization, and application in a 2-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Ilya; Javeed, Aysha; Luig, Hanno; Lochnit, Günter; Rühl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidases (AAOs) are enzymes supporting the degradation of lignin by fungal derived class II peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi. AAOs are able to generate H2O2 as a by-product via oxidation of an aryl-alcohol into its correspondent aldehyde. In this study, an AAO was heterologously expressed in a basidiomycete host for the first time. The gene for an AAO of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus sapidus, a close relative to the oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, was cloned into an expression vector and put under control of the promotor of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene 2 (gpdII) of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The expression vector was transformed into the model basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea, and several positive transformants were obtained. The best producing transformants were grown in shake-flasks and in a stirred tank reactor reaching enzymatic activities of up to 125 U L(-1) using veratryl alcohol as a substrate. The purified AAO was biochemically characterized and compared to the previously described native and recombinant AAOs from other Pleurotus species. In addition, a two-enzyme system comprising a dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) from Mycetinis scorodonius and the P. sapidus AAO was successfully employed to bleach the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 5. PMID:27138199

  8. Subcellular localization and biochemical comparison of cytosolic and secreted cytokinin dehydrogenase enzymes from maize.

    PubMed

    Smehilová, Mária; Galuszka, Petr; Bilyeu, Kristin D; Jaworek, Pavel; Kowalska, Marta; Sebela, Marek; Sedlárová, Michaela; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX; EC 1.5.99.12) degrades cytokinin hormones in plants. There are several differently targeted isoforms of CKX in plant cells. While most CKX enzymes appear to be localized in the apoplast or vacuoles, there is generally only one CKX per plant genome that lacks a translocation signal and presumably functions in the cytosol. The only extensively characterized maize CKX is the apoplastic ZmCKX1; a maize gene encoding a non-secreted CKX has not previously been cloned or characterized. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the maize non-secreted CKX gene (ZmCKX10), elucidate the subcellular localization of ZmCKX10, and compare its biochemical properties with those of ZmCKX1. Expression profiling of ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX10 was performed in maize tissues to determine their transcript abundance and organ-specific expression. For determination of the subcellular localization, the CKX genes were fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and overexpressed in tomato hairy roots. Using confocal microscopy, the ZmCKX1-GFP signal was confirmed to be present in the apoplast, whereas ZmCKX10-GFP was detected in the cytosol. No interactions of ZmCKX1 with the plasma membrane were observed. While roots overexpressing ZmCKX1-GFP formed significantly more mass in comparison with the control, non-secreted CKX overexpression resulted in a small reduction in root mass accumulation. Biochemical characterization of ZmCKX10 was performed using recombinant protein produced in Pichia pastoris. In contrast to the preference for 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) as an electron acceptor and trans-zeatin, N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenine (iP) and N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenosine (iPR) as substrates for ZmCKX1, the non-secreted ZmCKX10 had a range of suitable electron acceptors, and the enzyme had a higher preference for cis-zeatin and cytokinin N-glucosides as substrates. PMID:19436049

  9. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Huynh, My-Hang; Garavito, Manuel F; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Carruthers, Vern B; Löffler, Monika; Zimmermann, Barbara H

    2012-08-01

    The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway in the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is essential for parasite growth during infection. To investigate the properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TgDHOD), the fourth enzyme in the T. gondii pyrimidine pathway, we expressed and purified recombinant TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibited a specific activity of 84U/mg, a k(cat) of 89s(-1), a K(m)=60μM for l-dihydroorotate, and a K(m)=29μM for decylubiquinone (Q(D)). Quinones lacking or having short isoprenoid side chains yielded lower k(cat)s than Q(D). As expected, fumarate was a poor electron acceptor for this family 2 DHOD. The IC(50)s determined for A77-1726, the active derivative of the human DHOD inhibitor leflunomide, and related compounds MD249 and MD209 were, 91μM, 96μM, and 60μM, respectively. The enzyme was not significantly affected by brequinar or TTFA, known inhibitors of human DHOD, or by atovaquone. DSM190, a known inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum DHOD, was a poor inhibitor of TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibits a lengthy 157-residue N-terminal extension, consistent with a potential organellar targeting signal. We constructed C-terminally c-myc tagged TgDHODs to examine subcellular localization of TgDHOD in transgenic parasites expressing the tagged protein. Using both exogenous and endogenous expression strategies, anti-myc fluorescence signal colocalized with antibodies against the mitochondrial marker ATPase. These findings demonstrate that TgDHOD is associated with the parasite's mitochondrion, revealing this organelle as the site of orotate production in T. gondii. The TgDHOD gene appears to be essential because while gene tagging was successful at the TgDHOD gene locus, attempts to delete the TgDHOD gene were not successful in the KU80 background. Collectively, our study suggests that TgDHOD is an excellent target for the development of anti-Toxoplasma drugs. PMID:22580100

  10. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Triana, Miryam Andrea Hortua; Huynh, My-Hang; Garavito, Manuel F.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Carruthers, Vern B.; Löffler, Monika; Zimmermann, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway in the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is essential for parasite growth during infection. To investigate the properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TgDHOD), the fourth enzyme in the T. gondii pyrimidine pathway, we expressed and purified recombinant TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibited a specific activity of 84 U/mg, a kcat of 89 sec−1, a Km = 60 μM for L-dihydroorotate, and a Km = 29 μM for decylubiquinone (QD). Quinones lacking or having short isoprenoid side chains yielded lower kcats than QD. As expected, fumarate was a poor electron acceptor for this family 2 DHOD. The The IC50s determined for A77-1726, the active derivative of the human DHOD inhibitor leflunomide, and related compounds MD249 and MD209 were, 91 μM, 96 μM, and 60 μM, respectively. The enzyme was not significantly affected by brequinar or TTFA, known inhibitors of human DHOD, or by atovaquone. DSM190, a known inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum DHOD, was a poor inhibitor of TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibits a lengthy 157-residue N-terminal extension, consistent with a potential organellar targeting signal. We constructed C-terminally c-myc tagged TgDHODs to examine subcellular localization of TgDHOD in transgenic parasites expressing the tagged protein. Using both exogenous and endogenous expression strategies, anti-myc fluorescence signal colocalized with antibodies against the mitochondrial marker ATPase. These findings demonstrate that TgDHOD is associated with the parasite’s mitochondrion, revealing this organelle as the site of orotate production in T gondii. The TgDHOD gene appears to be essential because while gene tagging was successful at the TgDHOD gene locus, attempts to delete the TgDHOD gene were not successful in the KU80 background. Collectively, our study suggests that TgDHOD is an excellent target for the development of anti-Toxoplasma drugs. PMID:22580100

  11. Alcohol Selectivity in a Synthetic Thermophilic n-Butanol Pathway Is Driven by Biocatalytic and Thermostability Characteristics of Constituent Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Andrew J.; Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Garrison, G. Dale; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    n-Butanol is generated as a natural product of metabolism by several microorganisms, but almost all grow at mesophilic temperatures. A synthetic pathway for n-butanol production from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) that functioned at 70°C was assembled in vitro from enzymes recruited from thermophilic bacteria to inform efforts for engineering butanol production into thermophilic hosts. Recombinant versions of eight thermophilic enzymes (β-ketothiolase [Thl], 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase [Hbd], and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase [Crt] from Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis; trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase [Ter] from Spirochaeta thermophila; bifunctional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/alcohol dehydrogenase [AdhE] from Clostridium thermocellum; and AdhE, aldehyde dehydrogenase [Bad], and butanol dehydrogenase [Bdh] from Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514) were utilized to examine three possible pathways for n-butanol. These pathways differed in the two steps required to convert butyryl-CoA to n-butanol: Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (C. thermocellum), Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (Thermoanaerobacter X514), and Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-Bad-Bdh. n-Butanol was produced at 70°C, but with different amounts of ethanol as a coproduct, because of the broad substrate specificities of AdhE, Bad, and Bdh. A reaction kinetics model, validated via comparison to in vitro experiments, was used to determine relative enzyme ratios needed to maximize n-butanol production. By using large relative amounts of Thl and Hbd and small amounts of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol was observed in vitro, but with a 60% decrease in the predicted pathway flux. With more-selective hypothetical versions of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol is predicted, with a 19% increase in pathway flux. Thus, more-selective thermophilic versions of Bad, Bdh, and AdhE are needed to fully exploit biocatalytic n-butanol production at elevated temperatures. PMID:26253677

  12. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  13. CHRONIC FEEDING ALCOHOL-CONTAINING DIETS VIA TOTAL ENTERAL NUTRITION INDUCES ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (ADH) AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction of Class 1 ADH occurs in rats fed alcohol chronically, and we have reported that C/EBPs and SREBP-1 are important signaling factors in this process. Chronic alcohol intake in humans can result in alcohol-induced diabetes. We have studied insulin signaling pathways in adult male Sprague-D...

  14. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes1,2. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication. PMID:23416793

  15. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication.

  16. Determining Structure and Function of Steroid Dehydrogenase Enzymes by Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling, and Rational Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    DUAX, WILLIAM L.; THOMAS, JAMES; PLETNEV, VLADIMIR; ADDLAGATTA, ANTHONY; HUETHER, ROBERT; HABEGGER, LUKAS; WEEKS, CHARLES M.

    2006-01-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, ~300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of ~40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30–40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3β-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3α,20β-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3α,20β-HSD, UDPGE, and 3β-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3β-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model. PMID:16467263

  17. Strong Protective Effect of The Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene (ALDH2) 504lys (*2) Allele Against Alcoholism And Alcohol-Induced Medical Diseases in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is oxidized to acetaldehyde, which in turn is oxidized to acetate. The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) is the most important gene responsible for acetaldehyde metabolism. Individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the lys (A or *2) allele at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) glu504lys (rs671) of ALDH2 have greatly reduced ability to metabolize acetaldehyde, which greatly decreases their risk for alcohol dependence (AD). Case-control studies have shown association between this SNP and alcohol dependence as well as alcohol-induced liver disease. However, some studies have produced insignificant results. Using cumulative data from the past 20 years predominately from Asian populations (from both English and Chinese publications), this meta-analysis sought to examine and update whether the aggregate data provide new evidence of statistical significance for the proposed association. Our results (9,678 cases and 7,331 controls from 53 studies) support a strong association of alcohol abuse and dependence, with allelic P value of 3×10−56 and OR of 0.23 (0.2, 0.28) under the random effects model. The dominant model (lys-lys + lys-glu vs. glu-glu) also showed strong association with P value of 1×10−44 and OR of 0.22 (0.18, 0.27). When stricter criteria and various sub-group analyses were applied, the association remained strong (for example, OR = 0.23 (0.18, 0.3) and P = 2×10−28 for the alcoholic patients with alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis, or pancreatitis). These findings provide confirmation of the involvement of the human ALDH2 gene in the pathogenesis of AD as well as alcohol-induced medical illnesses in East-Asians. PMID:22102315

  18. Degradation of Swainsonine by the NADP-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenase A1R6C3 in Arthrobacter sp. HW08

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhai, A’guan; Zhang, Yanqi; Qiu, Kai; Wang, Jianhua; Li, Qinfan

    2016-01-01

    Swainsonine is an indolizidine alkaloid that has been found in locoweeds and some fungi. Our previous study demonstrated that Arthrobacter sp. HW08 or its crude enzyme extract could degrade swainsonie efficiently. However, the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we used label-free quantitative proteomics method based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to dissect the mechanism of swainsonine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. HW08. The results showed that 129 differentially expressed proteins were relevant to swainsonine degradation. These differentially expressed proteins were mostly related to the biological process of metabolism and the molecular function of catalytic activity. Among the 129 differentially expressed proteins, putative sugar phosphate isomerase/epimerase A1R5X7, Acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A0JZ95, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase A1R6C3 were found to contribute to the swainsonine degradation. Notably, NADP-dependent alcohol dehyrodgenase A1R6C3 appeared to play a major role in degrading swainsonine, but not as much as Arthrobacter sp. HW08 did. Collectively, our findings here provide insights to understand the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria. PMID:27196926

  19. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  20. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of vitamin BI, is a cofactor of enzymes catalyzing reactions involving the cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond adjacent to an oxo group. TPP-dependent enzymes show a common mechanism of TPP activation by: (1) forming the ionic N-H...O(sup -) hydrogen bonding between the N1' atom of the aminopirymidine ring of the coenzyme and intrinsic gamma-carboxylate group of glutamate and (2) imposing an "active" V-conformation that brings the N4' atom of the aminopirymidine to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H.. .N hydrogen bonding with the thiazolium C2 atom. Within these two hydrogen bonds that rapidly exchange protons, protonation of the N1' atom is strictly coordinated with the deprotonation of the 4' -amino group and eventually abstraction of the proton from C2. The human pyruvate dehydrogenase Elp, component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of the pyruvate followed by the reductive acetylation of the lipoyl group of dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase. Elp is alpha(sub 2)beta(sub2)-heterotetrameric with a molecular mass of I54 kDa, which has two catalytic sites, each providing TPP and magnesium ion as cofactors and each formed on the interface between the PP and PYR domains. The dynamic nonequivalence of two otherwise chemically equivalent catalytic sites has been observed and the flip-flop mechanism was suggested, according to which two active sites affect each other and in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the sites at any given moment. Based on specific futures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase including rigid and flexible connections between domains that bind the cofactor we propose a mechanistic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme. We postulate that the dynamic protein environment drives the exchange of tautomers in the 4' -aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor through a concerted shuttl-like motion of

  1. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticum produce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains of C. thermocellum produce ethanol at lower yields (∼50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in their adhE genes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, the adhE genes from six strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains of T. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain of C. thermocellum has acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels. When single amino acid mutations in AdhE that caused increased NADPH-linked ADH activity were introduced into C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum, ethanol production increased in both organisms. Structural analysis of the wild-type and mutant AdhE proteins was performed to provide explanations for the cofactor specificity change on a molecular level. IMPORTANCE This work describes the characterization of the AdhE enzyme from different strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum are thermophilic anaerobes that have been engineered to make high yields of ethanol and can solubilize components of

  2. Effects of the cofactor binding sites on the activities of secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiangjun; Han, Jun; Ma, Sichun; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    SADHs from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are enzymes that, together with various cofactors, catalyze the reversible reduction of carbonyl compounds to their corresponding alcohols. To explore how cofactors bind to SADH, TeSADH was cloned in this study, and Ser(199) and Arg(200) were replaced by Tyr and Asp, respectively. Both sites were expected to be inside or adjacent to the cofactor-binding domain according to computational a prediction. Analysis of TeSADH activities revealed that the enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the S199Y mutant was noticeably enhanced using by NADH, NADPH as cofactors, and similar with that of wild-type using by NADP(+), NAD(+). Conversely, the activity of the R200D mutant significantly decreased with all cofactors. Furthermore, in yeast, the S199Y mutant substantially elevated the ethanol concentration compared with the wild type. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicated the H-bonding network between TeSADH and the cofactors was stronger for the S199Y mutant and the binding energy was simultaneously increased. Moreover, the fluorescence results indicated the S199Y mutant exhibited an increased preference for NAD(P)H, binding with NAD(P)H more compactly compared with wild type. PMID:27016086

  3. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities. PMID:26616098

  4. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. PMID:26820767

  5. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  6. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The analysis of a wheat lysine ketoglutarate reductase – saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH) gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes...

  7. Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether–Induced Toxicity Is Mediated through the Inhibition of Flavoprotein Dehydrogenase Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Makoto; Ando, Yosuke; Saitoh, Wataru; Tanimoto, Tomoe; Kiyosawa, Naoki; Manabe, Sunao; Sanbuissho, Atsushi; Okazaki, Osamu; Iwabuchi, Haruo; Yamoto, Takashi; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Weiel, James E.; Ryals, John A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Guo, Lining

    2010-01-01

    Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) is a widely used industrial solvent known to cause adverse effects to human and other mammals. Organs with high metabolism and rapid cell division, such as testes, are especially sensitive to its actions. In order to gain mechanistic understanding of EGME-induced toxicity, an untargeted metabolomic analysis was performed in rats. Male rats were administrated with EGME at 30 and 100 mg/kg/day. At days 1, 4, and 14, serum, urine, liver, and testes were collected for analysis. Testicular injury was observed at day 14 of the 100 mg/kg/day group only. Nearly 1900 metabolites across the four matrices were profiled using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis indicated that the most significant metabolic perturbations initiated from the early time points by EGME were the inhibition of choline oxidation, branched-chain amino acid catabolism, and fatty acid β-oxidation pathways, leading to the accumulation of sarcosine, dimethylglycine, and various carnitine- and glycine-conjugated metabolites. Pathway mapping of these altered metabolites revealed that all the disrupted steps were catalyzed by enzymes in the primary flavoprotein dehydrogenase family, suggesting that inhibition of flavoprotein dehydrogenase–catalyzed reactions may represent the mode of action for EGME-induced toxicity. Similar urinary and serum metabolite signatures are known to be the hallmarks of multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency in humans, a genetic disorder because of defects in primary flavoprotein dehydrogenase reactions. We postulate that disruption of key biochemical pathways utilizing flavoprotein dehydrogenases in conjugation with downstream metabolic perturbations collectively result in the EGME-induced tissue damage. PMID:20616209

  8. Structural Studies of the Final Enzyme in the alpha-Aminoadipate Pathway-Saccharopine Dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Burk,D.; Hwang, J.; Kwok, E.; Marrone, L.; Goodfellow, V.; Dmitrienko, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2007-01-01

    The 1.64 Angstroms structure of the apoenzyme form of saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows the enzyme to be composed of two domains with similar dinucleotide binding folds with a deep cleft at the interface. The structure reveals homology to alanine dehydrogense, despite low primary sequence similarity. A model of the ternary complex of SDH, NAD, and saccharopine identifies residues Lys77 and Glu122 as potentially important for substrate binding and/or catalysis, consistent with a proton shuttle mechanism. Furthermore, the model suggests that a conformational change is required for catalysis and that residues Lys99 and Asp281 may be instrumental in mediating this change. Analysis of the crystal structure in the context of other homologous enzymes from pathogenic fungi and human sources sheds light into the suitability of SDH as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  9. Structural and Functional Insights into (S)-Ureidoglycolate Dehydrogenase, a Metabolic Branch Point Enzyme in Nitrogen Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Il; Shin, Inchul; Cho, Suhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Rhee, Sangkee

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism is one of essential processes in living organisms. The catabolic pathways of nitrogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the storage and recovery of nitrogen. In Escherichia coli, two different, interconnecting metabolic routes drive nitrogen utilization through purine degradation metabolites. The enzyme (S)-ureidoglycolate dehydrogenase (AllD), which is a member of l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family, converts (S)-ureidoglycolate, a key intermediate in the purine degradation pathway, to oxalurate in an NAD(P)-dependent manner. Therefore, AllD is a metabolic branch-point enzyme for nitrogen metabolism in E. coli. Here, we report crystal structures of AllD in its apo form, in a binary complex with NADH cofactor, and in a ternary complex with NADH and glyoxylate, a possible spontaneous degradation product of oxalurate. Structural analyses revealed that NADH in an extended conformation is bound to an NADH-binding fold with three distinct domains that differ from those of the canonical NADH-binding fold. We also characterized ligand-induced structural changes, as well as the binding mode of glyoxylate, in the active site near the NADH nicotinamide ring. Based on structural and kinetic analyses, we concluded that AllD selectively utilizes NAD+ as a cofactor, and further propose that His116 acts as a general catalytic base and that a hydride transfer is possible on the B-face of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. Other residues conserved in the active sites of this novel l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family also play essential roles in catalysis. PMID:23284870

  10. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  11. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    PubMed

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hassan, Maizom

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity towards

  12. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH. PMID:25757537

  13. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2 displayed a

  14. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76–1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80–1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54–0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28–6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89–4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06–5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  15. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  16. Folate, alcohol, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 polymorphism and the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Keitaro; Rossi, Marta; Negri, Eva; Oze, Isao; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Tajima, Kazuo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2012-03-01

    Folate consumption is inversely associated with the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC) and potentially interacts with alcohol drinking in the risk of OPC. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene polymorphism is known to interact with alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate potential interaction between folate, alcohol drinking, and ALDH2 polymorphism in the risk of OPC in a Japanese population. The study group comprised 409 head and neck cancer cases and 1227 age-matched and sex-matched noncancer controls; of these, 251 cases and 759 controls were evaluated for ALDH rs671 polymorphism. Associations were assessed by odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in multiple logistic regression models. We observed an inverse association between folate consumption and OPC risk. The odds ratio for high folate intake was 0.53 (95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.77) relative to low intake (P trend=0.003). This association was consistent across strata of sex, age, smoking, and ALDH2 genotypes. Interaction between folate consumption, drinking, and ALDH2 genotype was remarkable (three-way interaction, P<0.001). We observed significant interaction among folate, drinking, and ALDH2 genotype in the Japanese population. PMID:21946912

  17. Activity and electrophoretic profiles of liver aldehyde dehydrogenases from mice of inbred strains with different alcohol preference.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Nishiguchi, K; Miyamoto, R; Ogita, Z I; Nakanishi, S

    1983-01-01

    1. The activity of low Km-aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the liver mitochondrial fraction (MT-fraction) from male C57BL/6J strain mice (alcohol preferring) was significantly higher than that from DBA/2 mice (alcohol avoiding). The F1 hybrids (C57BL/6J X DBA/2) did not exhibit the intermediate activity to these two strains. 2. Strain differences in liver mitochondrial ALDH isozymes were observed by isoelectric focusing. C57BL/6J strain had two isozymes at pH 7.1 while DBA/2 had no band at this pH. F1 hybrid mice had similar two bands with lower density to those of C57BL/6J at pH 7.1. There was no difference in zymograms of the soluble fraction between C57BL/6J and DBA/2 strains. 3. The present results suggest that the difference in alcohol preference of mice may depend on some restricted ALDH isozymes with different pl or electric mobility rather than the enzymatic activity in the liver MT-fraction. PMID:6822317

  18. MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS OF THE GENUS NEOTOMA BASED ON DNA SEQUENCES FROM INTRON 2 OF THE ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE GENE

    PubMed Central

    Longhofer, Lisa K.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were evaluated among 13 species of Neotoma based on DNA sequences from intron 2 of the nuclear alcohol dehydrogenase gene 1 (Adh1-I2). Sequences were analyzed using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Three major clades (I–III) consistently were recovered and relationships among taxa within 2 of the clades remained unchanged between analyses; however, relationships within clade III were largely unresolved. Average genetic divergence values were 2.12% among species, 4% between subgenera (Teonoma and Neotoma), and 5.1% between genera (Hodomys and Neotoma). Adh1-I2 sequences were concatenated with mitochondrial cytochrome-b sequences generated from the same individuals. Examination of the combined data resulted in a phylogeny whose topology was similar to that based only on cytochrome-b sequences. PMID:19907669

  19. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  20. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nickolas A; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-08-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content. PMID:26265762

  1. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content. PMID:26265762

  2. A novel electrochemiluminescence ethanol biosensor based on tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium (II) and alcohol dehydrogenase immobilized in graphene/bovine serum albumin composite film.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenhua; Chen, Yunsheng; Xi, Jing; Lin, Shaoyu; Chen, Yaowen; Lin, Yuejuan; Chen, Zhanguang

    2013-03-15

    We developed a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) ethanol biosensor based on Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) immobilized by graphene/bovine serum albumin composite film. The graphene film was directly formed on a glassy carbon electrode surface via an in situ reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) was immobilized during its formation. The graphene film acted as both a decorating agent for immobilization of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and a matrix to immobilize bovine serum albumin (BSA), meanwhile BSA not only acted as a reductant to reduce GO, but also provided a friendly environment for ADH immobilization. Furthermore, ADH was separated from Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) by the electron-conductive graphene/BSA composite film to retain its enzymatic activity. The experimental results indicated that the biosensor had excellent electrochemical activity, ECL response to ethanol and stability. Such a design of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-graphene/BSA film to modify electrode holds a great promise as a new biocompatible platform for the development of enzyme-based ECL biosensors. PMID:23122751

  3. Joining Astrobiology to Medicine, Resurrecting Ancient Alcohol Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, M. A.; Uryasev, O.; Davis, R. W.; Chamberlin, S. G.; Benner, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    We apply an astrobiological approach to understand how primates responded to the emergence of ethanol in their environment by resurrecting two enzymes involved in the degradation of ethanol, alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrgenase.

  4. Effect of organic solvents on the activity and stability of halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) from Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Alsafadi, Diya; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various organic solvents on the catalytic activity, stability and substrate specificity of alchohol dehydrogenase from Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2) was evaluated. The HvADH2 showed remarkable stability and catalysed the reaction in aqueous-organic medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH). Tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were also investigated and adversely affected the stability of the enzyme. High concentration of salt, essential to maintain the enzymatic activity and structural integrity of the halophilic enzyme under standard conditions may be partially replaced by DMSO and MeOH. The presence of organic solvents did not induce gross changes in substrate specificity. DMSO offered a protective effect for the stability of the enzyme at nonoptimal pHs such as 6 and 10. Salt and solvent effects on the HvADH2 conformation and folding were examined through fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence findings were consistent with the activity and stability results and corroborated the denaturing properties of some solvents. The intrinsic tolerance of this enzyme to organic solvent makes it highly attractive to industry. PMID:23179592

  5. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) Ameliorates Chronic Alcohol Ingestion-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Xu, Xihui; Babcock, Sara A.; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) plays a critical role in the detoxification of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the impact of global ALDH2 overexpression on alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild-type friendly virus B (FVB) and ALDH2 transgenic mice were placed on a 4% alcohol or control diet for 12 weeks. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), bilirubin and cholesterol, hepatic triglyceride, steatosis, fat metabolism-related proteins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), autophagy and autophagy signaling were examined. The role of autophagy was evaluated in ADH1-transfected human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (VA-13) treated with or without autophagy inducer rapamycin and lysosomal inhibitors. Results Chronic alcohol intake led to elevated AST, ALT, bilirubin, AST/ALT ratio, cholesterol, hepatic triglycerides, hepatic fat deposition as evidenced by H&E and oil Red O staining, associated with disturbed fat metabolism-related proteins (fatty acid synthase, SCD1), upregulated interleukin-6, TNF-α, cyclooxygenase, oxidative stress, and loss of autophagy, the effects of which were attenuated or ablated by ALDH2 transgene. Moreover, ethanol (100 mM) and acetaldehyde (100, 500 μM) increased levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and suppressed autophagy in VA-13 cells, the effects of which were markedly alleviated by rapamycin. In addition, lysosomal inhibitors mimicked ethanol-induced p62 accumulation with little additive effect with ethanol. Ethanol significantly suppressed LC3 conversion in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors. Conclusions In summary, our results revealed that ALDH2 plays a beneficial role in ameliorating chronic alcohol intake-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation through regulation of autophagy. PMID:25457208

  6. Molecular cloning of a plant betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme implicated in adaptation to salinity and drought.

    PubMed

    Weretilnyk, E A; Hanson, A D

    1990-04-01

    Many plants, as well as other organisms, accumulate betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a nontoxic or protective osmolyte under saline or dry conditions. In plants, the last step in betaine synthesis is catalyzed by betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8), a nuclear-encoded chloroplastic enzyme. A cDNA clone for BADH (1812 base pairs) was selected from a lambda gt10 cDNA library derived from leaves of salt-stressed spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The library was screened with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to amino acid sequences of two peptides prepared from purified BADH. The authenticity of the clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis; this analysis demonstrated the presence of a 1491-base-pair open reading frame that contained sequences encoding 12 peptide fragments of BADH. The clone hybridized to a 1.9-kilobase mRNA from spinach leaves; this mRNA was more abundant in salt-stressed plants, consistent with the known salt induction of BADH activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the BADH cDNA sequence showed substantial similarities to those for nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenases (EC 1.2.1.3 and EC 1.2.1.5) from several sources, including absolute conservation of a decapeptide in the probable active site. Comparison of deduced and determined amino acid sequences indicated that the transit peptide may comprise only 7 or 8 residues, which is atypically short for precursors to stromal proteins. PMID:2320587

  7. The preparation of nylon-tube-supported hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the use of the co-immobilized enzymes in the automated determination of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D L; Campbell, J; Hornby, W E

    1975-01-01

    Triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate was used to O-alkylate nylon-tube thus producing the imidate salt of the nylon which was further made to react with 1,6-diaminohexane. 2. Hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) were immobilized on the amino-substituted nylon tube through glutaraldeyde and bisimidates. 3. The effect of varying the conditions of O-alkylation and the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon tube-hexokinase derivatives was determined. 4. The effect of varying the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was determined. 5. The thermal stability of nylon-tube-hexokinase and nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was studied. 6. Different ratios of hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were co-immobilized on nylon tube, and the rate of conversion of glucose into 6-phosphogluconolactone was compared with the individual activities of the immobilized enzymes. 7. Hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase co-immobilized on nylon tube were used in the automated analysis of glucose. PMID:1167161

  8. 20-alpha-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from pseudopregnant rat ovary: obtention and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    De La Llosa-Hermier, M P; Nocart, M; Paly, J; Hermier, C

    1992-12-01

    The enzyme 20-alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-alpha-HSD) was purified from pseudopregnant rat ovaries and used as antigen for the development of a monoclonal antibody by the hybridoma technique. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with purified 20-alpha-HSD were fused with SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells. Among the colonies of hybrid cells, one (designated mAb-HSD 11) was found to be secreting antibodies (IgM) able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity. The antibody-secreting hybridome was amplified by ascitic fluid production and the monoclonal antibody purified by Bakerbond ABx procedure. Purified mAb-HSD 11 was able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity in a dose-dependent manner. Studies of Michaelis constants of 20-alpha-HSD indicate that this monoclonal antibody increases the Km for 20-alpha-dihydroprogesterone and decreases the Vmax. PMID:1292619

  9. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vulliamy, T.J.; D'Urso, M.; Battistuzzi, G.; Estrada, M.; Foulkes, N.S.; Martini, G.; Calabro, V.; Poggi, V.; Giordano, R.; Town, M.; Luzzatto, L.; Persico, M.G. )

    1988-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. The authors have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A they have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C {yields} T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency.

  10. Chloroplast NDH: A different enzyme with a structure similar to that of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Eleven genes encoding chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex have been discovered in plastid genomes on the basis of their homology with genes encoding respiratory complex I. Despite this structural similarity, chloroplast NDH and its evolutionary origin NDH-1 in cyanobacteria accept electrons from ferredoxin (Fd), indicating that chloroplast NDH is an Fd-dependent plastoquinone (PQ) reductase rather than an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. In Arabidopsis thaliana, chloroplast NDH interacts with photosystem I (PSI); this interaction is needed to stabilize NDH, especially under high light. On the basis of these distinct characters of chloroplast and cyanobacterial NDH, it can be distinguished as a photosynthetic NDH from respiratory complex I. In fact, chloroplast NDH forms part of the machinery of photosynthesis by mediating the minor pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport. Along with the antimycin A-sensitive main pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport, chloroplast NDH compensates the ATP/NADPH production ratio in the light reactions of photosynthesis. In this review, I revisit the original concept of chloroplast NDH on the basis of its similarity to respiratory complex I and thus introduce current progress in the field to researchers focusing on respiratory complex I. I summarize recent progress on the basis of structure and function. Finally, I introduce the results of our examination of the process of assembly of chloroplast NDH. Although the process requires many plant-specific non-subunit factors, the core processes of assembly are conserved between chloroplast NDH and respiratory complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26519774

  11. Isozyme multiplicity with anomalous dimer patterns in a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Effects on the activity and quaternary structure of residue exchanges at "nonfunctional" sites in a native protein.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, O; Shafqat, J; Estonius, M; el-Ahmad, M; Jörnvall, H

    1996-11-19

    The isozymes of class III alcohol dehydrogenase/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase from cod were characterized. They exhibited three unexpected properties of general interest. First, these dimeric isozymes, derived from two types of subunit (h and l, for high- and low-activity forms), were recovered from liver preparations in only the homodimeric ll and heterodimeric hl combinations. Dissociation and reassociation of the isolated hl form in vitro also resulted in lower yields of the hh than the ll homodimer, although class III subunits are usually freely associable over wide borders of divergence (human and Drosophila). The h and l primary structures show that both chain types are characteristic of class III enzymes, without large amino acid replacements at positions of known subunit interactions. Hence, the hh dimer partial restriction indicates nontraditional alterations at h-subunit interfaces. The structure provides a possible explanation, in the form of h-chain modifications that may influence the anchoring of a loop at positions of two potentially deamidative beta-aspartyl shifts at distant Asn-Gly structures. Second the ll and hl forms differ in enzymatic properties, having 5-fold different K(m) values for NAD+ at pH 8, different K(m) values for S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione (10 versus 150 microM), and different specific activities (4.5 versus 41 units/mg), with ll resembling and hl deviating from human and other class III alcohol dehydrogenases. However, functional residues lining substrate and coenzyme pockets in the known conformations of homologous forms are largely identical in the two isozymes [only minor conservative exchanges of Val/Leu116, Val/Leu203, Ile/Val224, and Ile/Val269 (numbering system of the human class I enzyme)], again indicating effects from distantly positioned h-chain replacements. Third, the two isozymes differ a surprising amount in amino acid sequence (18%, the same as the piscine/ human difference), reflecting a

  12. A Nonsense Mutation in a Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Is Responsible for the Sorghum brown midrib6 Phenotype1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Scott E.; Saathoff, Aaron J.; Haas, Eric J.; Palmer, Nathan A.; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.; Sarath, Gautam; Pedersen, Jeffrey F.

    2009-01-01

    brown midrib6 (bmr6) affects phenylpropanoid metabolism, resulting in reduced lignin concentrations and altered lignin composition in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Recently, bmr6 plants were shown to have limited cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamoyl aldehydes (monolignals) to monolignols. A candidate gene approach was taken to identify Bmr6. Two CAD genes (Sb02g024190 and Sb04g005950) were identified in the sorghum genome based on similarity to known CAD genes and through DNA sequencing a nonsense mutation was discovered in Sb04g005950 that results in a truncated protein lacking the NADPH-binding and C-terminal catalytic domains. Immunoblotting confirmed that the Bmr6 protein was absent in protein extracts from bmr6 plants. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Bmr6 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved group of CAD proteins, which function in lignin biosynthesis. In addition, Bmr6 is distinct from the other CAD-like proteins in sorghum, including SbCAD4 (Sb02g024190). Although both Bmr6 and SbCAD4 are expressed in sorghum internodes, an examination of enzymatic activity of recombinant Bmr6 and SbCAD4 showed that Bmr6 had 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater activity for monolignol substrates. Modeling of Bmr6 and SbCAD4 protein structures showed differences in the amino acid composition of the active site that could explain the difference in enzyme activity. These differences include His-57, which is unique to Bmr6 and other grass CADs. In summary, Bmr6 encodes the major CAD protein involved in lignin synthesis in sorghum, and the bmr6 mutant is a null allele. PMID:19363091

  13. Engineering of xylose reductase and overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase improves xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Dmytruk, Olena V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Abbas, Charles A; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2008-01-01

    Background The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is capable of alcoholic fermentation of xylose at elevated temperatures (45 – 48°C). Such property of this yeast defines it as a good candidate for the development of an efficient process for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, to be economically viable, the main characteristics of xylose fermentation of H. polymorpha have to be improved. Results Site-specific mutagenesis of H. polymorpha XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase was carried out to decrease affinity of this enzyme toward NADPH. The modified version of XYL1 gene under control of the strong constitutive HpGAP promoter was overexpressed on a Δxyl1 background. This resulted in significant increase in the KM for NADPH in the mutated xylose reductase (K341 → R N343 → D), while KM for NADH remained nearly unchanged. The recombinant H. polymorpha strain overexpressing the mutated enzyme together with native xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase on Δxyl1 background was constructed. Xylose consumption, ethanol and xylitol production by the constructed strain were determined for high-temperature xylose fermentation at 48°C. A significant increase in ethanol productivity (up to 7.3 times) was shown in this recombinant strain as compared with the wild type strain. Moreover, the xylitol production by the recombinant strain was reduced considerably to 0.9 mg × (L × h)-1 as compared to 4.2 mg × (L × h)-1 for the wild type strain. Conclusion Recombinant strains of H. polymorpha engineered for improved xylose utilization are described in the present work. These strains show a significant increase in ethanol productivity with simultaneous reduction in the production of xylitol during high-temperature xylose fermentation. PMID:18651968

  14. A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 from Arachis diogoi, expressed in resistance responses against late leaf spot pathogen, induces cell death when transexpressed in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Rampuria, Sakshi; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kirti, Pulugurtha B

    2016-03-01

    A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (AdZADH2) was significantly upregulated in a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi treated with conidia of late leaf spot (LLS) pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. This upregulation was not observed in a comparative analysis of cultivated peanut, which is highly susceptible to LLS. This zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase possessed a Rossmann fold containing NADB domain in addition to the MDR domain present in all previously characterized plant ADH genes/proteins. Transient over-expression of AdZADH2 under an estradiol inducible promoter (XVE) resulted in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in tobacco leaf. However, the same level of cell death was not observed when the domains were transiently expressed individually. Cell death observed in tobacco was associated with overexpression of cell death related proteins, antioxidative enzymes such as SOD, CAT and APX and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. In A. diogoi, AdZADH2 expression was significantly upregulated in response to the plant signaling hormones salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and sodium nitroprusside. PMID:27047748

  15. Oxidation of methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol with human alcohol dehydrogenases and the inhibition by ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Shih, Hsuan-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chou; Li, Yeung-Pin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2011-05-30

    Human alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) include multiple isozymes with broad substrate specificity and ethnic distinct allozymes. ADH catalyzes the rate-limiting step in metabolism of various primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. The oxidation of common toxic alcohols, that is, methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol by the human ADHs remains poorly understood. Kinetic studies were performed in 0.1M sodium phosphate buffer, at pH 7.5 and 25°C, containing 0.5 mM NAD(+) and varied concentrations of substrate. K(M) values for ethanol with recombinant human class I ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, and ADH1C2, and class II ADH2 and class IV ADH4 were determined to be in the range of 0.12-57 mM, for methanol to be 2.0-3500 mM, for ethylene glycol to be 4.3-2600mM, and for isopropanol to be 0.73-3400 mM. ADH1B3 appeared to be inactive toward ethylene glycol, and ADH2 and ADH4, inactive with methanol. The variations for V(max) for the toxic alcohols were much less than that of the K(M) across the ADH family. 4-Methylpyrazole (4MP) was a competitive inhibitor with respect to ethanol for ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1C1 and ADH1C2, and a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH1B3, ADH2 and ADH4, with the slope inhibition constants (K(is)) for the whole family being 0.062-960 μM and the intercept inhibition constants (K(ii)), 33-3000 μM. Computer simulation studies using inhibition equations in the presence of alternate substrate ethanol and of dead-end inhibitor 4MP with the determined corresponding kinetic parameters for ADH family, indicate that the oxidation of the toxic alcohols up to 50mM are largely inhibited by 20 mM ethanol or by 50 μM 4MP with some exceptions. The above findings provide an enzymological basis for clinical treatment of methanol and ethylene glycol poisoning by 4MP or ethanol with pharmacogenetic perspectives. PMID:21167143

  16. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  17. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K M and V max values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K i value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  18. Multiple forms of octopine dehydrogenase in Strombus luhuanus (mollusca, gastropoda, strombidae): genetic basis of polymorphism, properties of the enzymes, and relationship between the octopine dehydrogenase phenotype and the accumulation of anaerobic end products during exercise.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J; England, W R

    1982-10-01

    Octopine dehydrogenase (ODH) is electrophoretically polymorphic in the gastropod mollusk Strombus luhuanus. The frequencies of the six electrophoretic phenotypes in the Heron Island population, together with the molecular weight values of 38,000 obtained for each of the three forms of the enzyme, demonstrate that the monomeric enzyme is encoded by three codominant alleles at a single locus. The purified allozymes are indistinguishable in terms of Km values for substrates, product inhibition by octopine and NAD, pH optima, and substrate inhibition by pyruvate. No statistically significant correlations were found between the ODH phenotype and the maximum activities of ODH or alanopine dehydrogenase, the capacity for anaerobic muscle work, or the accumulation of octopine or strombine/alanopine during exercise. It would appear that the ODH allozymes may be functionally equivalent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:7181845

  19. Lysophosphatidylethanolamine Is a Substrate for the Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenase SocA from Myxococcus xanthus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Avadhani, Madhavi; Geyer, Roland; White, David C.; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2006-01-01

    Short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases (SCADHs) synthesize a variety of intercellular signals and other chemically diverse products. It is difficult to predict the substrate of a SCADH on the basis of amino acid sequence homology, as the substrates are not known for most SCADHs. In Myxococcus xanthus, the SCADH CsgA is responsible for C signaling during fruiting body development, although the mechanism is unclear. Overexpression of the SCADH SocA compensates for the lack of CsgA and restores development and C signaling in csgA mutants. The potential of SocA in generating the C signal enzymatically was explored by developing a dehydrogenase assay-based screen to purify the SocA substrate(s). A SocA substrate was extracted from M. xanthus cells with acidified ethyl acetate and sequentially purified by solid-phase extraction on silica gel and by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The fraction with the highest SocA dehydrogenase activity contained the lysophospholipid 1-acyl 2-hydroxy-sn-glycerophosphoethanolamine (lyso-PE) as indicated by the fragment ions and a phosphatidylethanolamine-specific neutral loss scan following liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The abundant lysophospholipid with the mass m/z 450 (molecular ion [M-H]−) had a monounsaturated acyl chain with 16 carbons. SocA oxidizes lyso-PE containing either saturated or unsaturated fatty acids but exhibits poor activity on l-α-glycerophosphorylethanolamine, suggesting that an acyl chain is important for activity. Of the five different head groups, only ethanolamine showed appreciable activity. The apparent Km and Vmax for lyso-PE 18:1 were 116 μM and 875 μmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) was 1 × 108 M−1 s−1. The proposed product, 1-acyloxy-3-(2-aminoethylphosphatyl) acetone was unstable, and the fragmented products were unable to rescue csgA mutant development. The active fraction from thin-layer chromatography also contained an

  20. Plant fatty acyl reductases: enzymes generating fatty alcohols for protective layers with potential for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Primary fatty alcohols are found throughout the biological world, either in free form or in a combined state. They are common components of plant surface lipids (i.e. cutin, suberin, sporopollenin, and associated waxes) and their absence can significantly perturb these essential barriers. Fatty alcohols and/or derived compounds are also likely to have direct functions in plant biotic and abiotic interactions. An evolutionarily related set of alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases (FARs) is present in all kingdoms of life. Plant microsomal and plastid-associated FAR enzymes have been characterized, acting on acyl-coenzymeA (acyl-CoA) or acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates, respectively. FARs have distinct substrate specificities both with regard to chain length and chain saturation. Fatty alcohols and wax esters, which are a combination of fatty alcohol and fatty acid, have a variety of commercial applications. The expression of FARs with desired specificities in transgenic microbes or oilseed crops would provide a novel means of obtaining these valuable compounds. In the present review, we report on recent progress in characterizing plant FAR enzymes and in understanding the biological roles of primary fatty alcohols, as well as describe the biotechnological production and industrial uses of fatty alcohols. PMID:22794916

  1. Enzymic assay of creatinine in serum and urine with creatinine iminohydrolase and glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tanganelli, E; Prencipe, L; Bassi, D; Cambiaghi, S; Murador, E

    1982-07-01

    We describe an assay for creatinine in which it is converted by creatinine iminohydrolase (EC 3.5.4.21) into ammonia and N-methylhydantoin. The ammonia is subsequently assayed by use of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.3). Use of NADPH as coenzyme eliminates all interferences from endogenous reactions. Endogenous ammonia in the sample is eliminated during a preincubation. The reaction reaches the endpoint in 15 min at working temperatures of 20-37 degrees C. No sample blank or reagent blank is needed. The standard curve is linear at least to 884 mumol (100 mg) of creatinine per liter. Average analytical recovery of creatinine in serum and urine is 99%. Within-run and between-run CVs are less than or equal to 2% and less than or equal to 6% for creatinine values of 335 mumol/L (38 mg/L) and 80 mumol/L (0 mg/L), respectively. Results by the described method (y) compare well with those by Jaffé's kinetic test (y = 1.01x -- 12.8), Berthelot/AutoAnalyzer method after treatment with immobilized creatinine iminohydrolase (y = 0.987x -- 13.2), Jaffé's test run on the SMA 12/60 (y = 1.011x -- 5.8), the Wahlefeld method (y = 1.014x -- 0.88), and Jaffé's test after deproteinization and absorption on fuller's earth (y = 0.985x -- 3.08). The method may be suitable for discrete, including centrifugal, automation. PMID:7083556

  2. DFT study of the active site of the XoxF-type natural, cerium-dependent methanol dehydrogenase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lewis, Andrew J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-01-19

    Rare-earth metal cations have recently been demonstrated to be essential co-factors for the growth of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. A crystal structure of the rare-earth-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) includes a cerium cation in the active site. Herein, the Ce-MDH active site has been analyzed through DFT calculations. The results show the stability of the Ce(III)-pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) semiquinone configuration. Calculations on the active oxidized form of this complex indicate a 0.81 eV stabilization of the PQQ(0) LUMO at cerium versus calcium, supporting the observation that the cerium cation in the active site confers a competitive advantage to Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. Using reported aqueous electrochemical data, a semi-empirical correlation was established based on cerium(IV/III) redox potentials. The correlation allowed estimation of the cerium oxidation potential of +1.35 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in the active site. The results are expected to guide the design of functional model complexes and alcohol-oxidation catalysts based on lanthanide complexes of biologically relevant quinones. PMID:25421364

  3. Novel mutations in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) are distributed throughout the protein and result in altered enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; de Koning, T J; Geboers, A J J M; van den Berg, I E T; Berger, R; Klomp, L W J

    2009-05-01

    Three-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is a rare recessive inborn error in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine characterized clinically by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. The biochemical abnormalities associated with this disorder are low concentrations of L-serine, D-serine, and glycine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Only two missense mutations (p.V425M and p.V490M) have been identified in PHGDH, the gene encoding 3-PGDH, but it is currently unclear how these mutations in the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain of the protein affect enzyme function. We now describe five novel mutations in five patients with 3-PGDH deficiency; one frameshift mutation (p.G238fsX), and four missense mutations (p.R135W, p.V261M, p.A373T, and p.G377S). The missense mutations were located in the nucleotide binding and regulatory domains of 3-PGDH and did not affect steady-state expression, protein stability, and protein degradation rates. Patients' fibroblasts displayed a significant, but incomplete, reduction in maximal enzyme activities associated with all missense mutations. In transient overexpression studies in HEK293T cells, the p.A373T, p.V425M, and p.V490M mutations resulted in almost undetectable enzyme activities. Molecular modeling of the p.R135W and p.V261M mutations onto the partial crystal structure of 3-PGDH predicted that these mutations affect substrate and cofactor binding. This prediction was confirmed by the results of kinetic measurements in fibroblasts and transiently transfected HEK293T cells, which revealed a markedly decreased V(max) and an increase in K(m) values, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that missense mutations associated with 3-PGDH deficiency either primarily affect substrate binding or result in very low residual enzymatic activity. PMID:19235232

  4. The short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase ABA2 catalyzes the conversion of xanthoxin to abscisic aldehyde.

    PubMed

    González-Guzmán, Miguel; Apostolova, Nadezda; Bellés, José M; Barrero, José M; Piqueras, Pedro; Ponce, María R; Micol, José L; Serrano, Ramón; Rodríguez, Pedro L

    2002-08-01

    Mutants able to germinate and perform early growth in medium containing a high NaCl concentration were identified during the course of two independent screenings and named salt resistant (sre) and salobreño (sañ). The sre and sañ mutants also were able to germinate in high-osmoticum medium, indicating that they are osmotolerant in a germination assay. Complementation analyses revealed that sre1-1, sre1-2, sañ3-1, and sañ3-2 were alleles of the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis ABA2 gene. A map-based cloning strategy allowed the identification of the ABA2 gene and molecular characterization of four new aba2 alleles. The ABA2 gene product belongs to the family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases, which are known to be NAD- or NADP-dependent oxidoreductases. Recombinant ABA2 protein produced in Escherichia coli exhibits a K(m) value for xanthoxin of 19 micro M and catalyzes in a NAD-dependent manner the conversion of xanthoxin to abscisic aldehyde, as determined by HPLC-mass spectrometry. The ABA2 mRNA is expressed constitutively in all plant organs examined and is not upregulated in response to osmotic stress. The results of this work are discussed in the context of previous genetic and biochemical evidence regarding ABA biosynthesis, confirming the xanthoxin-->abscisic aldehyde-->ABA transition as the last steps of the major ABA biosynthetic pathway. PMID:12172025

  5. Application of nicotin amide-adenine dinucleotide analogs for clinical enzymology: alcohol dehydrogenase activity in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Kimura, A; Minato, S; Tamaoki, H; Mizushima, H

    1976-06-01

    The activities of alcohol dehydrogease(ADH) in serum and in the subcellular fractions of rat liver were determined with n-amyl alcohol or ethanol as substrate and thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme. It was found that the enzyme's activity ratio on the amyl alcohol and ethanol(A/E value) of serum and on the particulate fractions of the liver were different, but the A/E value of the soluble fraction was similar to that of serum. The A/E value of the particulate fractions were higher than that of the soluble fraction. From the results of experimental liver damage in the rat, it seems that estimation of the A/E value of ADH activity in serum is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of active liver injury. Since the A/E values of patients' sera differed from those of the normal subjects, the estimation of the A/E value of serum may give diagnostic information on liver injury, especially in chronic liver injury. PMID:179739

  6. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed.

    PubMed

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  7. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  8. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Matthews, S. W.; Daugherty, C. J.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior.

  9. Estimates of Gene Flow in Drosophila Pseudoobscura Determined from Nucleotide Sequence Analysis of the Alcohol Dehydrogenase Region

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, S. W.; Miller, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic structure of Drosophila pseudoobscura populations was inferred from a nucleotide sequence analysis of a 3.4-kb segment of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) region. A total of 99 isochromosomal strains collected from 13 populations in North and South America were used to determine if any population departed from a neutral model and to estimate levels of gene flow between populations. This study also included the nucleotide sequences from two sibling species, D. persimilis and D. miranda. We estimated the neutral mutation parameter, 4Nμ, in synonymous and noncoding sites for 17 subregions of Adh in each of nine populations with sample sizes greater than three. The nucleotide diversity data in the nine populations was tested for departures from an equilibrium neutral model with two statistical tests. The Tajima and the Hudson, Kreitman, Aguade tests showed that each population fails to reject a neutral model. Tests for genetic differentiation between populations fail to show any population substructure among the North American populations of D. pseudoobscura. The nucleotide diversity data is consistent with direct and indirect measures of gene flow that show extensive dispersal between populations of D. pseudoobscura. PMID:1427038

  10. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) Polymorphism and the Risk of Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis among East Asians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been implicated in the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) in East Asians. However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ALDH2 polymorphism and the risk of ALC. Materials and Methods Relevant studies were retrieved by searching PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, Wanfang and Veipu databases up to January 10, 2015. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using either the fixed- or random effects model. Results A total of twelve case-control studies included 1003 cases and 2011 controls were included. Overall, the ALDH2 polymorphism was associated with a decreased risk of ALC (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99). However, in stratification analysis by country, we failed to detect any association among Chinese, Korean or Japanese populations. Conclusion The pooled evidence suggests that ALDH2 polymorphism may be an important protective factor for ALC in East Asians. PMID:27189280

  11. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, D M; Matthews, S W; Daugherty, C J; Musgrave, M E

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior. PMID:9085569

  12. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  13. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  14. Star block-copolymers: enzyme-inspired catalysts for oxidation of alcohols in water.

    PubMed

    Mugemana, Clément; Chen, Ba-Tian; Bukhryakov, Konstantin V; Rodionov, Valentin

    2014-07-25

    A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. PMID:24912078

  15. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Talla, Sai K.; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C3 plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck–Halliwell–Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants. PMID:22140244

  16. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles.

  17. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles. PMID:25992482

  18. cDNA cloning and analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, a salt inducible enzyme in sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Betaine accumulates and serves as a compatible osmolyte in some plants subjected to drought or salinity stress. The last enzyme in the betaine biosynthetic pathway is betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The activity of BADH increases in response to increasing salinity levels. This increase in activity corresponds to an increase in protein detectable by immunoblotting, and to an increase in the translatable BADH mRNA. BADH was cloned from a cDNA library constructed in {lambda}gt10 using poly(A){sup +} RNA from sugar beets salinized to 500 mM NaCl. cDNAs were size selected (>1kb) before ligation into the vector, and the library was screened with a spinach BADH cDNA probe. Three nearly full length clones obtained were confirmed as BADH by their nucleotide and deduced amino acid homology to spinach BADH. Clones averaged 1.8 kb and contained open reading frames of 500 amino acids at 80% identity with spinach BADH. RNA gel blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA indicated that salinization to 500 mM NaCl resulted in a 5-fold increase of BADH mRNA level.

  19. Putative role of the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase in H2O2 signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heyno, Eiri; Innocenti, Gilles; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2014-04-19

    In photosynthetic organisms, sudden changes in light intensity perturb the photosynthetic electron flow and lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species. At the same time, thioredoxins can sense the redox state of the chloroplast. According to our hypothesis, thioredoxins and related thiol reactive molecules downregulate the activity of H2O2-detoxifying enzymes, and thereby allow a transient oxidative burst that triggers the expression of H2O2 responsive genes. It has been shown recently that upon light stress, catalase activity was reversibly inhibited in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in correlation with a transient increase in the level of H2O2. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking the NADP-malate dehydrogenase have lost the reversible inactivation of catalase activity and the increase in H2O2 levels when exposed to high light. The mutants were slightly affected in growth and accumulated higher levels of NADPH in the chloroplast than the wild-type. We propose that the malate valve plays an essential role in the regulation of catalase activity and the accumulation of a H2O2 signal by transmitting the redox state of the chloroplast to other cell compartments. PMID:24591715

  20. Purification and characterization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from the wing-polymorphic cricket, Gryllus firmus, and assessment of causes of morph-differences in enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zera, Anthony J; Wehrkamp, Cody; Schilder, Rudolf; Black, Christine; Gribben, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Considerable information exists on the physiological correlates of life history adaptation, while molecular data on this topic are rapidly accumulating. However, much less is known about the enzymological basis of life history adaptation in outbred populations. In the present study, we compared developmental profiles of fat body specific activity, kinetic constants of homogeneously purified and unpurified enzyme, and fat body enzyme concentration of the pentose-shunt enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH, E.C.1.1.1.44) between the dispersing [long-winged, LW(f)] and flightless [short-winged, SW] genotypes of the cricket Gryllus firmus. Neither kcat nor the Michaelis constant for 6-phosphogluconate differed between 6PGDH from LW(f) versus SW morphs for either homogeneously purified or unpurified enzyme. Purified enzyme from the LW(f) morph exhibited reduced KM for NADP(+), but this was not observed for multiple KM(NADP+) estimates for unpurified enzyme. A polyclonal antibody was generated against 6PGDH which was used to develop a chemiluminescence assay to quantify 6PGDH concentration in fat body homogenates. Elevated enzyme concentration accounted for all of the elevated 6PGDH specific activity in the LW(f) morph during the juvenile and adult stages. Finally, activity of another pentose-shunt enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, strongly covaried with 6PGDH activity suggesting that variation in 6PGDH activity gives rise to variation in pentose shunt flux. This is one of the first life-history studies and one of the few studies of intraspecific enzyme adaptation to identify the relative importance of evolutionary change in enzyme concentration vs. kinetic constants to adaptive variation in enzyme activity in an outbred population. PMID:24726622

  1. Dissociation and rate constants of some human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Pietruszko, R; de Zalenski, C; Theorell, H

    1976-01-01

    ADH from human liver forms binary complexes with NADH, associated with a blue shift of the peak of the fluorescence emission of NADH. The wavelength shift is the same for all isoenzymes but the accompanying intensification of the fluorescence is different. The fluorescence is further increased by the formation of the very tight ternary enzyme-NADH-isobutyramide complexes. These properties are similar to those for the horse liver ADH, as well as the molecular weight of E=40 000 per active site of the dimer molecule (EE). "Stopped-flow" determined velocity constants (ER in equilibrium E+R) were found to be in good agreement with ethanol activity constants previously determined by activity measurement, confirming the validity of the ordered ternary complex mechanism also for the human ADH. No single isoenzyme activity as high as that reported by Mourad and Woronick or Drum has been found. PMID:184631

  2. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei: characterization of the enzyme, cloning and sequencing of the gene, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zwickl, P; Fabry, S; Bogedain, C; Haas, A; Hensel, R

    1990-01-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei (optimal growth temperature, 100 to 103 degrees C) was purified to homogeneity. This enzyme was strictly phosphate dependent, utilized either NAD+ or NADP+, and was insensitive to pentalenolactone like the enzyme from the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus. The enzyme exhibited a considerable thermostability, with a 44-min half-life at 100 degrees C. The amino acid sequence of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from P. woesei was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the coding gene. Compared with the enzyme homologs from mesophilic archaebacteria (Methanobacterium bryantii, Methanobacterium formicicum) and an extremely thermophilic archaebacterium (Methanothermus fervidus), the primary structure of the P. woesei enzyme exhibited a strikingly high proportion of aromatic amino acid residues and a low proportion of sulfur-containing residues. The coding gene of P. woesei was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli, thus providing an ideal basis for detailed structural and functional studies of that enzyme. Images PMID:2165475

  3. Mitochondrial 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Requires Reversible pH-dependent Conformational Change at the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Manoj; Thomas, James L.; Whittal, Randy M.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2012-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane protein 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2) synthesizes progesterone and androstenedione through its dehydrogenase and isomerase activities. This bifunctionality requires 3βHSD2 to undergo a conformational change. Given its proximity to the proton pump, we hypothesized that pH influences 3βHSD2 conformation and thus activity. Circular dichroism (CD) showed that between pH 7.4 and 4.5, 3βHSD2 retained its primarily α-helical character with a decrease in α-helical content at lower pH values, whereas the β-sheet content remained unchanged throughout. Titrating the pH back to 7.4 restored the original conformation within 25 min. Metabolic conversion assays indicated peak 3βHSD2 activity at pH 4.5 with ∼2-fold more progesterone synthesized at pH 4.5 than at pH 3.5 and 7.4. Increasing the 3βHSD2 concentration from 1 to 40 μg resulted in a 7-fold increase in progesterone at pH 4.5, but no change at pH 7.4. Incubation with guanidinum hydrochloride (GdmHCl) showed a three-step cooperative unfolding of 3βHSD2 from pH 7.4 to 4.5, possibly due to the native state unfolding to the intermediate ion core state. With further decreases in pH, increasing concentrations of GdmHCl led to rapid two-step unfolding that may represent complete loss of structure. Between pH 4 and 5, the two intermediate states appeared stable. Stopped-flow kinetics showed slower unfolding at around pH 4, where the protein is in a pseudostable state. Based on our data, we conclude that at pH 4–5, 3βHSD2 takes on a molten globule conformation that promotes the dual functionality of the enzyme. PMID:22262841

  4. CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE-C and -D are the primary genes involved in lignin biosynthesis in the floral stem of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sibout, Richard; Eudes, Aymerick; Mouille, Gregory; Pollet, Brigitte; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise; Séguin, Armand

    2005-07-01

    During lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms, coniferyl and sinapyl aldehydes are believed to be converted into their corresponding alcohols by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and by sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD), respectively. This work clearly shows that CAD-C and CAD-D act as the primary genes involved in lignin biosynthesis in the floral stem of Arabidopsis thaliana by supplying both coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. An Arabidopsis CAD double mutant (cad-c cad-d) resulted in a phenotype with a limp floral stem at maturity as well as modifications in the pattern of lignin staining. Lignin content of the mutant stem was reduced by 40%, with a 94% reduction, relative to the wild type, in conventional beta-O-4-linked guaiacyl and syringyl units and incorportion of coniferyl and sinapyl aldehydes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that both xylem vessels and fibers were affected. GeneChip data and real-time PCR analysis revealed that transcription of CAD homologs and other genes mainly involved in cell wall integrity were also altered in the double mutant. In addition, molecular complementation of the double mutant by tissue-specific expression of CAD derived from various species suggests different abilities of these genes/proteins to produce syringyl-lignin moieties but does not indicate a requirement for any specific SAD gene. PMID:15937231

  5. Dehydrin, alcohol dehydrogenase, and central metabolite levels are associated with cold tolerance in diploid strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    PubMed

    Davik, Jahn; Koehler, Gage; From, Britta; Torp, Torfinn; Rohloff, Jens; Eidem, Petter; Wilson, Robert C; Sønsteby, Anita; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2013-01-01

    The use of artificial freezing tests, identification of biomarkers linked to or directly involved in the low-temperature tolerance processes, could prove useful in applied strawberry breeding. This study was conducted to identify genotypes of diploid strawberry that differ in their tolerance to low-temperature stress and to investigate whether a set of candidate proteins and metabolites correlate with the level of tolerance. 17 Fragaria vesca, 2 F. nilgerrensis, 2 F. nubicola, and 1 F. pentaphylla genotypes were evaluated for low-temperature tolerance. Estimates of temperatures where 50 % of the plants survived (LT₅₀) ranged from -4.7 to -12.0 °C between the genotypes. Among the F. vesca genotypes, the LT₅₀ varied from -7.7 °C to -12.0 °C. Among the most tolerant were three F. vesca ssp. bracteata genotypes (FDP821, NCGR424, and NCGR502), while a F. vesca ssp. californica genotype (FDP817) was the least tolerant (LT₅₀) -7.7 °C). Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), total dehydrin expression, and content of central metabolism constituents were assayed in select plants acclimated at 2 °C. The LT₅₀ estimates and the expression of ADH and total dehydrins were highly correlated (r(adh) = -0.87, r (dehyd) = -0.82). Compounds related to the citric acid cycle were quantified in the leaves during acclimation. While several sugars and acids were significantly correlated to the LT₅₀ estimates early in the acclimation period, only galactinol proved to be a good LT₅₀ predictor after 28 days of acclimation (r(galact) = 0.79). It is concluded that ADH, dehydrins, and galactinol show great potential to serve as biomarkers for cold tolerance in diploid strawberry. PMID:23014928

  6. A stable intermediate in the thermal unfolding process of a chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase between a thermophilic and a mesophilic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Iwasaki, Y; Numata, K; Yamagishi, A; Yutani, K; Sakurai, M; Tanaka, N; Oshima, T

    1996-03-01

    The thermal unfolding process of a chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase made of parts from an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, and a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, enzymes was studied by CD spectrophotometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The enzyme is a homodimer with a subunit containing two structural domains. The DSC melting profile of the chimeric enzyme in 20 mM NaHCO3, pH 10.4, showed two endothermic peaks, whereas that of the T. thermophilus wild-type enzyme had one peak. The CD melting profiles of the chimeric enzyme under the same conditions as the DSC measurement, also indicated biphasic unfolding transition. Concentration dependence of the unfolding profile revealed that the first phase was protein concentration-independent, whereas the second transition was protein concentration-dependent. When cooled after the first transition, the intermediate was isolated, which showed only the second transition upon heating. These results indicated the existence of a stable dimeric intermediate followed by the further unfolding and dissociation in the thermal unfolding of the chimeric enzyme at pH 10-11. Because the portion derived from the mesophilic isopropylmalate dehydrogenase in the chimeric enzyme is located in the hinge region between two domains of the enzyme, it is probably responsible for weakening of the interdomain interaction and causing the decooperativity of two domains. The dimeric form of the intermediate suggested that the first unfolding transition corresponds to the unfolding of domain 1 containing the N- and C-termini of the enzyme, and the second to that of domain 2 containing the subunit interface. PMID:8868488

  7. Separation of dehydrogenases on polyaminomethylstyrene.

    PubMed

    Schöpp, W; Meinert, S; Thyfronitou, J; Aurich, H

    1975-01-29

    The binding of dehydrogenases, especially alcohol dehydrogenase, and other proteins to several ion exchangers and hydrophobic polymers was investigated. Quantitative parameters for the stability of the polymer-protein complexes (obtained form double reciprocal plots) indicate a high but different affinity of many proteins for polyaminomethylstyrene. The chromatography of a mixture of five dehydrogenases and human serum albumin on polyaminomethylstyrene is described. PMID:237012

  8. In vivo ethanol elimination in man, monkey and rat: A lack of relationship between the ethanol metabolism and the hepatic activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Zorzano, A. ); Herrera, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo ethanol elimination in human subjects, monkeys and rats was investigated after an oral ethanol dosage. After 0.4 g. ethanol/kg of body weight, ethanol elimination was much slower in human subjects than in monkeys. In order to detect a rise in monkey plasma ethanol concentrations as early as observed in human subjects, ethanol had to be administered at a dose of 3 g/kg body weight. Ethanol metabolism in rats was also much faster than in human subjects. However, human liver showed higher alcohol dehydrogenase activity and higher low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than rat liver. Thus, our data suggest a lack of relationship between hepatic ethanol-metabolizing activities and the in vivo ethanol elimination rate.

  9. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  10. Toward cell-free biofuel production: Stable immobilization of oligomeric enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, J; Collins, C H; Belfort, G

    2014-01-01

    To overcome the main challenges facing alcohol-based biofuel production, we propose an alternate simplified biofuel production scheme based on a cell-free immobilized enzyme system. In this paper, we measured the activity of two tetrameric enzymes, a control enzyme with a colorimetric assay, β-galactosidase, and an alcohol-producing enzyme, alcohol dehydrogenase, immobilized on multiple surface curvatures and chemistries. Several solid supports including silica nanoparticles (convex), mesopourous silica (concave), diatomaceous earth (concave), and methacrylate (concave) were examined. High conversion rates and low protein leaching was achieved by covalent immobilization of both enzymes on methacrylate resin. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) exhibited long-term stability and over 80% conversion of aldehyde to alcohol over 16 days of batch cycles. The complete reaction scheme for the conversion of acid to aldehyde to alcohol was demonstrated in vitro by immobilizing ADH with keto-acid decarboxylase free in solution. PMID:24449684

  11. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  12. Biochemical Studies and Ligand-bound Structures of Biphenyl Dehydrogenase from Pandoraea pnomenusa Strain B-356 Reveal a Basis for Broad Specificity of the Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Patil, Dipak N.; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Sylvestre, Michel; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2011-01-01

    Biphenyl dehydrogenase, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzymes, catalyzes the second step of the biphenyl/polychlorinated biphenyls catabolic pathway in bacteria. To understand the molecular basis for the broad substrate specificity of Pandoraea pnomenusa strain B-356 biphenyl dehydrogenase (BphBB-356), the crystal structures of the apo-enzyme, the binary complex with NAD+, and the ternary complexes with NAD+-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl and NAD+-4,4′-dihydroxybiphenyl were determined at 2.2-, 2.5-, 2.4-, and 2.1-Å resolutions, respectively. A crystal structure representing an intermediate state of the enzyme was also obtained in which the substrate binding loop was ordered as compared with the apo and binary forms but it was displaced significantly with respect to the ternary structures. These five structures reveal that the substrate binding loop is highly mobile and that its conformation changes during ligand binding, starting from a disorganized loop in the apo state to a well organized loop structure in the ligand-bound form. Conformational changes are induced during ligand binding; forming a well defined cavity to accommodate a wide variety of substrates. This explains the biochemical data that shows BphBB-356 converts the dihydrodiol metabolites of 3,3′-dichlorobiphenyl, 2,4,4′-trichlorobiphenyl, and 2,6-dichlorobiphenyl to their respective dihydroxy metabolites. For the first time, a combination of structural, biochemical, and molecular docking studies of BphBB-356 elucidate the unique ability of the enzyme to transform the cis-dihydrodiols of double meta-, para-, and ortho-substituted chlorobiphenyls. PMID:21880718

  13. Characterization of the functional role of allosteric site residue Asp102 in the regulatory mechanism of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (malic enzyme)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (malic enzyme) can be specifically and allosterically activated by fumarate. X-ray crystal structures have revealed conformational changes in the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of fumarate. Previous studies have indicated that fumarate is bound to the allosteric pocket via Arg67 and Arg91. Mutation of these residues almost abolishes the activating effect of fumarate. However, these amino acid residues are conserved in some enzymes that are not activated by fumarate, suggesting that there may be additional factors controlling the activation mechanism. In the present study, we tried to delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the enzyme by fumarate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Asp102, which is one of the charged amino acids in the fumarate binding pocket and is not conserved in other decarboxylating malate dehydrogenases. In order to explore the charge effect of this residue, Asp102 was replaced by alanine, glutamate or lysine. Our experimental data clearly indicate the importance of Asp102 for activation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 to Ala or Lys significantly attenuated the activating effect of fumarate on the enzyme. Kinetic parameters indicate that the effect of fumarate was mainly to decrease the Km values for malate, Mg2+ and NAD+, but it did not notably elevate kcat. The apparent substrate Km values were reduced by increasing concentrations of fumarate. Furthermore, the greatest effect of fumarate activation was apparent at low malate, Mg2+ or NAD+ concentrations. The Kact values were reduced with increasing concentrations of malate, Mg2+ and NAD+. The Asp102 mutants, however, are much less sensitive to regulation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 leads to the desensitization of the co-operative effect between fumarate and substrates of the enzyme. PMID:15989682

  14. Tryptophan in Alcoholism Treatment II:  Inhibition of the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Low Km Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity, Elevation of Blood Acetaldehyde Concentration and Induction of Aversion to Alcohol by Combined Administration of Tryptophan and Benserazide

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina; Steptoe, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims were to provide proofs of mechanism and principle by establishing the ability of the amino acid L-tryptophan (Trp) combined with the kynureninase inhibitor benserazide (BSZ) to inhibit the liver mitochondrial low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity after administration and in vivo and to induce aversion to alcohol. Methods: Trp, BSZ or both were administered to male Wistar rats and ALDH activity was determined both in vitro in liver homogenates and in vivo (by measuring acetaldehyde accumulation in blood after ethanol administration). Alcohol consumption was studied in an aversion model in rats and in alcohol-preferring C57 mice. Results: Combined administration of Trp + BSZ, but neither compound alone, produced a strong inhibition of ALDH activity and an increase in blood acetaldehyde concentration after ethanol, and induced aversion to alcohol in rats and decreased preference in mice. Another kynureninase inhibitor, carbidopa, induced aversion to alcohol by itself, which was reversed by Trp co-administration. Conclusions: The present results establish a prior art for the use of a combination of Trp plus BSZ in the treatment of alcoholism by aversion, which merits rapid clinical development. PMID:21896551

  15. CvADH1, a member of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, is inducible by gibberellin and sucrose in developing watermelon seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyul; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jinwon; Yim, Jieun; An, Gynheung

    2003-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that control seed formation, we selected a seed-preferential gene (CvADH1) from the ESTs of developing watermelon seeds. RNA blot analysis and in situ localization showed that CvADH1 was preferentially expressed in the nucellar tissue. The CvADH1 protein shared about 50% homology with short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase including ABA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana, stem secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase in Forsythia intermedia, and 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase in Digitalis lanata. We investigated gene-expression levels in seeds from both normally pollinated fruits and those made parthenocarpic via N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea treatment, the latter of which lack zygotic tissues. Whereas the transcripts of CvADH1 rapidly started to accumulate from about the pre-heart stage in normal seeds, they were not detectable in the parthenocarpic seeds. Treating the parthenogenic fruit with GA(3) strongly induced gene expression, up to the level accumulated in pollinated seeds. These results suggest that the CvADH1 gene is induced in maternal tissues by signals made in the zygotic tissues, and that gibberellin might be one of those signals. We also observed that CvADH1 expression was induced by sucrose in the parthenocarpic seeds. Therefore, we propose that the CvADH1 gene is inducible by gibberellin, and that sucrose plays an important role in the maternal tissues of watermelon during early seed development. PMID:12552151

  16. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the short-chain dehydrogenase enzymes WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Harmer, Nicholas J.; King, Jerry D.; Palmer, Colin M.; Preston, Andrew; Maskell, Duncan J.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2007-08-01

    The expression, purification, and crystallisation of the short-chain dehydrogenases WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from B. bronchiseptica are described. Native diffraction data to 1.5, 2.0, and 2.2 Å were obtained for the three proteins, together with complexes with nucleotides. The short-chain dehydrogenase enzymes WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from Bordetella bronchiseptica were cloned into Escherichia coli expression vectors, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of all three wild-type enzymes were obtained using vapour-diffusion crystallization with high-molecular-weight PEGs as a primary precipitant at alkaline pH. Some of the crystallization conditions permitted the soaking of crystals with cofactors and nucleotides or nucleotide sugars, which are possible substrate compounds, and further conditions provided co-complexes of two of the proteins with these compounds. The crystals diffracted to resolutions of between 1.50 and 2.40 Å at synchrotron X-ray sources. The synchrotron data obtained were sufficient to determine eight structures of the three enzymes in complex with a variety of cofactors and substrate molecules.

  17. Crystal structure of L-sorbose dehydrogenase, a pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent enzyme with homodimeric assembly, from Ketogulonicigenium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaodong; Xiong, Xianghua; Jiang, Dunquan; Chen, Sihan; Huang, Enyu; Zhang, Weicai; Liu, Xinqi

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structure of the L-sorbose dehydrogenase (SDH) from Ketogulonicigenium vulgare Y25 has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution using the molecular replacement method. The overall structure of SDH is similar to that of other quinoprotein dehydrogenases; consisting of an eight bladed β-propeller PQQ domain and protrusion loops. We identified a stable homodimer in crystal and demonstrated its existence in solution by sedimentation velocity measurement. By biochemical characterization of the SDH in vitro, using L-sorbose as substrate and cytochrome c551 as electron acceptor, we revealed cytochrome c551 acting as physiological primary electron acceptor for SDH. PMID:24557074

  18. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: Chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.; Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1991-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high levels of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose to ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA).

  19. Sulfur-rich zinc chemistry: new tris(thioimidazolyl)hydroborate ligands and their zinc complex chemistry related to the structure and function of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, M; Shu, M; Vahrenkamp, H

    2001-07-30

    The 1-substituted tris(2-thioimidazolyl)hydroborate ligands Tt(R) were prepared as the potassium salts from KBH(4) and the corresponding 1-R-2-thioimidazole for R = t-Bu and C(6)H(4)-p-CH(CH(3))(2) (Cum). Their reactions with zinc salts yielded the tetrahedral complexes Tt(R)Zn-X with X = F, Cl, ONO(2) and (Tt(t)()(-)(Bu))(2)Zn. With zinc perchlorate the labile perchlorate complexes Tt(R)Zn-OClO(3) were obtained. They served as starting materials for the incorporation of substrates which are relevant for the chemistry of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase: Ethanol led to [Tt(t)()(-Bu)Zn.EtOH] ClO(4).EtOH, p-nitrophenol (NitOH) yielded Tt(Cum)Zn-ONit. Pyridine-2-carbaldehyde and salicylic aldehyde were incorporated as N(pyridine) and O(phenolate) coligands with possible additional O(aldehyde) coordination. Substituted pyridyl methanols (R-PyCH(2)OH) yielded the trinuclear complexes [(Tt(t)()(-Bu))(2)Zn(3)(R-PyCH(2)O)(2)] (ClO(4))(2) with bridging Tt and pyridylmethoxide ligands. Preliminary experiments on the functional modeling of alcohol dehydrogenase have shown that TtZn complexes promote both the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and the hydrogenation of pentafluorobenzaldehyde. PMID:11466063

  20. An experimental investigation of enzyme release from poly(vinyl alcohol) crosslinked microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bachtsi, A R; Kiparissides, C

    1995-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) particles were prepared by the addition of glutaraldehyde into a PVA methanol/water solution in the presence of 0.2 N sulphuric acid. The polymer solution was dispersed in mineral oil in a jacketed vessel, with the aid of a six-blade impeller. Spherical crosslinked particles in the size range 30-80 microns were obtained by varying the degree of agitation or/and the amount of suspending agent. The crosslinked particles, after washing and drying, were placed into a protease enzyme solution for loading. The enzyme-containing water-swollen particles were subsequently removed from the solution and the enzyme release kinetics determined by a UV spectrophotometer. The influence of the degree of crosslinking, ionic strength, pH, particle size, and degree of hydrophilicity of the polymer on the enzyme activity was retained during the adsorption-desorption studies. The release behaviour of enzymes from crosslinked PVA particles exhibited a biphasic kinetic model, with an initial fast release followed by a much slower release rate. PMID:7730954

  1. A simple method for the rapid determination of the stereospecificity of NAD-dependent dehydrogenases applied to mammalian IMP dehydrogenase and bacterial NADH peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D; Hamel, E; Cohen, M; Kang, G J; Dalal, M; Marquez, V

    1987-11-01

    The stereospecificity of IMP dehydrogenase (IMP:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.205) from two different sources was determined. The enzyme preparations were obtained from murine lymphoblasts and from Escherichia coli. Both enzymes transferred the 2-3H of IMP to the pro-S position of carbon atom C-4 of the nicotinamide ring in NAD. Thus, B-sided stereospecificity is common to the enzyme from two very different species. In addition, the studies described here demonstrate that alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH peroxidase, used as auxiliary enzymes, in combination with a microdistillation procedure, should permit rapid determination of the stereospecificity of any NAD-dependent dehydrogenase for which the appropriate tritiated substrate is available. PMID:2889473

  2. Model analysis for enhancement of enzyme-catalyzed alcohol oxidation by solvent extraction of product

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Toshitatsu; Morooka, Shigeharu

    1995-07-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of ethanol and butanol was conducted with alcohol oxidase in a one-phase system of water and a two-phase system of water and toluene. The conversion of the reaction in the two-phase system was higher than that in the one-phase system. The inhibition of the enzyme was relieved in the two-phase system by extracting the aldehyde product into the organic phase. The dissolved oxygen concentration in the water phase also affected the reaction rate. A kinetic model of the reaction was developed by considering both the inhibition of enzyme activity and the dissolved oxygen concentration. Parameters used in the model were evaluated experimentally. The reaction rate calculated using the model was in good agreement with the data.

  3. Producing enzymes from molds to convert cellulose into glucose and alcohol. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, S.; Curran, P.

    1982-11-29

    The following significant results were obtained: (1) extracts of various tree barks were made and used to determine if any of the chemicals had growth stimulating effects on the molds. The extracts from the oak and elm tree bark were very active in inducing and stimulating the mycelial growth of the molds Trichoderma reesei, Pleurotus ostreatus and Aspergillus awamori. Efforts to determine what specific chemical caused the increase in growth were unsuccessful but are being continued. This information will be very useful because it was discovered that by speeding and increasing the growth of the mold cells, it was also possible to speed and increase the production of the enzymes; (2) efforts to cultivate the mold Pleurotus ostreatus in the same culture with Trichoderma reesei were successful. When the two molds were cultured on an enriched cellulose media, it was discovered that the reesei produced large amounts of the beta glucosidase. Reesei produces very small amounts of this enzyme under normal conditions but this high production under coculture conditions may be due to the fact that Pleurotus ostreatus removes the glucose formed from the cellulose breakdown. Trichoderma reesei produces cellulases which convert cellulose into cellobiose and cellobiose is converted to glucose by the enzyme beta-glucosidase. In the presence of glucose the gene producing beta-glucosidase is repressed by the feedback mechanism. These surplus enzymes can then be used for saccharifying cellulose from wastepaper, wood pulp, cornstalks, wheat straw and other cellulosic materials and eventually produce alcohol; (3) efforts to produce mutants of the Trichoderma reesei by using the uv irradiation were unsuccessful; and (4) Zymomonas mobilis is capable of faster fermentation. The only drawback is that only low concentrations of glucose can be used. Mutants of Zymomonas resistant to higher alcohol levels would help in this process and are being looked into.

  4. Development of post-column enzymic reactors with immobilized alcohol oxidase for use in the high-performance liquid chromatographic assay of alcohols with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Tagliaro, F; Schiavon, G; Dorizzi, R; Marigo, M

    1991-01-18

    The development of a very sensitive, direct injection high-performance liquid chromatographic method, using a post-column reactor with immobilized alcohol oxidase, was undertaken with the aim of determining methanol and ethanol levels in microlitre volumes of biological samples. After reversed-phase chromatography to separate methanol and ethanol, the analytes were enzymically converted into the respective aldehydes with formation of stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which could be measured via electrochemical oxidation at a platinum electrode. Some problems were encountered in the development of solid-phase enzymic reactors, using a delicate enzyme, that is prone to lose activity, such as alcohol oxidase. Owing to the slightly alkaline pH required for the optimum activity of alcohol oxidase, polymeric columns seemed to be preferable for the chromatography. HEMA copolymer was chosen as the stationary phase, but the methanol and ethanol peaks eluted close together and posed severe problems of limiting post-column band spreading. Reactors based on coarse supports for enzyme immobilization gave unacceptable band spreading, causing the methanol and ethanol peaks to overlap. On the other hand high-performance liquid chromatographic packings maintained the efficiency of the chromatographic separation, quite independently of the reactor volume. Polymeric supports proved superior to silicas in maintaining the enzyme activity. However, relevant changes in the enzyme substrate specificity were observed after immobilization. PMID:2061376

  5. Activities of the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway and formation of branched-chain alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida utilis grown in continuous culture on valine or ammonium as sole nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Derrick, S; Large, P J

    1993-11-01

    Valine aminotransferase, a key enzyme in both biosynthesis and breakdown of branched-chain amino acids, showed consistently higher activity in Candida utilis grown in continuous culture than in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, the other two enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway of branched-chain alcohol formation, were lower in activity. By spheroplast lysis, it was shown that valine aminotransferase followed the distribution of pyruvate decarboxylase in being located in the cytosol. Replacement of ammonium as nitrogen source by valine during conditions of carbon or nitrogen limitation caused increased specific activities of these three enzymes in S. cerevisiae, but (with one exception) decreased those of C. utilis. Of the metabolites accumulating in the culture medium, little or no ethanol or branched-chain alcohols were present during carbon-limited growth of either organism, but the change to nitrogen limitation resulted in increases in concentration of 20- to 100-fold in pyruvate, acetate and non-pyruvate keto acids as well as the accumulation of branched-chain alcohols in both organisms, and of ethanol, ethyl acetate and glycerol in S. cerevisiae. When valine was the limiting nitrogen source, there was an increase in non-pyruvate keto acids and a 10- to 16-fold increase in 2-methylpropanol. Total branched-chain alcohols formed under nitrogen limitation were 2-fold higher in S. cerevisiae than in C. utilis, irrespective of nitrogen source. Accumulation of branched-chain alcohols, ethanol, acetate and glycerol was also observed during carbon-limited growth of S. cerevisiae with valine as nitrogen source at dilution rates above the critical rate for transition to respirofermentative growth. Less than 70% of the valine carbon metabolized during growth of S. cerevisiae and only 15% of that used during growth of C. utilis was recovered in identified metabolic products. Even allowing for losses by volatilization during

  6. Characterization of a NADH-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase Mutant of Arabidopsis Demonstrates the Key Role of this Enzyme in Root Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  7. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  8. Enzyme biosensor for androsterone based on 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase immobilized onto a carbon nanotubes/ionic liquid/NAD+ composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Mundaca, R A; Moreno-Guzmán, M; Eguílaz, M; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2012-09-15

    A 3α-hydrosteroid biosensor for androsterone determination has been prepared by immobilizing the enzyme 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) in a composite electrode platform constituted of a mixture of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), octylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate (OPPF(6)) ionic liquid and NAD(+) cofactor. This configuration allowed the fast, sensitive and stable electrochemical detection of the NADH generated in the enzyme reaction. All the experimental variables involved in the preparation and performance of the enzyme biosensor were optimized. Amperometry in stirred solutions at +400 mV provided a linear calibration plot for androsterone in the 0.5-10 μM concentration range with a slope value more than 200-times higher than that previously reported. The detection limit achieved was 0.15 μM and a low value of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(app)(M)), 36.0 μM, similar to that reported for the enzyme in solution, was calculated. The 3α-HSD/MWCNTs/OPPF(6)/NAD(+) biosensor provided good results in the determination of androsterone in spiked human serum samples. PMID:22967613

  9. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  10. Nonsense mutations in the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Drosophila melanogaster correlate with an abnormal 3' end processing of the corresponding pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brogna, S

    1999-01-01

    From bacteria to mammals, mutations that generate premature termination codons have been shown to result in the reduction in the abundance of the corresponding mRNA. In mammalian cells, more often than not, the reduction happens while the RNA is still associated with the nucleus. Here, it is reported that mutations in the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster that generate premature termination codons lead to reduced levels of cytoplasmic and nuclear mRNA. Unexpectedly, it has been found that the poly(A) tails of Adh mRNAs and pre-mRNAs that carry a premature termination codon are longer than in the wild-type transcript. The more 5' terminal the mutation is, the longer is the poly(A) tail of the transcript. These findings suggest that the integrity of the coding region may be required for accurate mRNA 3' end processing. PMID:10199572

  11. Inhibition of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity by histamine H2-receptor antagonists has no influence on the pharmacokinetics of ethanol after a moderate dose.

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, A; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Bergmann, J F; Trout, H; Simonneau, G; Dutreuil, C; Blanc, L E; Dhumeaux, D; Delchier, J C

    1994-01-01

    Ethanol undergoes gastric first pass metabolism by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We have shown that cimetidine and famotidine both cause competitive inhibition of human gastric ADH in vitro. However, in a randomized 4-way cross-over study in 12 healthy subjects a 7-day course of treatment with cimetidine (800 mg day-1), ranitidine (300 mg day-1) or famotidine (40 mg day-1), did not modify the pharmacokinetics of ethanol given as a post-prandial 0.3 g kg-1 dose. We conclude that gastric mucosal concentrations of histamine H2-receptor blockers achieved after oral dosing are probably too low to cause significant inhibition of gastric ADH in vivo. PMID:7910473

  12. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  13. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Alcohol KidsHealth > For Teens > Alcohol Print A A A ... you can make an educated choice. What Is Alcohol? Alcohol is created when grains, fruits, or vegetables ...

  14. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  15. Fibre-optic biosensor based on luminescence and immobilized enzymes: microdetermination of sorbitol, ethanol and oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Gautier, S M; Blum, L J; Coulet, P R

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated highly selective and ultrasensitive biosensors based on luminescent enzyme systems linked to optical transducers. A fibre-optic sensor with immobilized enzymes was designed; the solid-phase bioreagent was maintained in close contact contact with the tip of a glass fibre bundle connected to the photomultiplier tube of a luminometer. A bacterial luminescence fibre-optic sensor was used for the microdetermination of NADH. Various NAD(P)-dependent enzymes, sorbitol dehydrogenase, alcohol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, were co-immobilized on preactivated polyamide membranes with the bacterial system and used for the microdetermination of sorbitol, ethanol and oxaloacetate at the nanomolar level with a good precision. PMID:2316395

  16. Structural determinants of enzyme binding affinity: the E1 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli in complex with the inhibitor thiamin thiazolone diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Nemeria, Natalia; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2004-03-01

    Thiamin thiazolone diphosphate (ThTDP), a potent inhibitor of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), binds to the enzyme with greater affinity than does the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). To identify what determines this difference, the crystal structure of the apo PDHc E1 component complex with ThTDP and Mg(2+) has been determined at 2.1 A and compared to the known structure of the native holoenzyme, PDHc E1-ThDP-Mg(2+) complex. When ThTDP replaces ThDP, reorganization occurs in the protein structure in the vicinity of the active site involving positional and conformational changes in some amino acid residues, a change in the V coenzyme conformation, addition of new hydration sites, and elimination of others. These changes culminate in an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds to the protein, explaining the greater affinity of the apoenzyme for ThTDP. The observed hydrogen bonding pattern is not an invariant feature of ThDP-dependent enzymes but rather specific to this enzyme since the extra hydrogen bonds are made with nonconserved residues. Accordingly, these sequence-related hydrogen bonding differences likewise explain the wide variation in the affinities of different thiamin-dependent enzymes for ThTDP and ThDP. The sequence of each enzyme determines its ability to form hydrogen bonds to the inhibitor or cofactor. Mechanistic roles are suggested for the aforementioned reorganization and its reversal in PDHc E1 catalysis: to promote substrate binding and product release. This study also provides additional insight into the role of water in enzyme inhibition and catalysis. PMID:14992577

  17. Stabilization of enzymes through encapsulation in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid vesicle (liposome) offers an aqueous compartment surrounded by lipid bilayer membranes. Various enzyme molecules were reported to be encapsulated in liposomes. The liposomal enzyme shows peculiar catalytic activity and selectivity to the substrate in the bulk liquid, which are predominantly derived from the substrate permeation resistance through the membrane. We reported that the quaternary structure of bovine liver catalase and alcohol dehydrogenase was stabilized in liposomes through their interaction with lipid membranes. The method and condition for preparing the enzyme-containing liposomes with well-defined size, lipid composition, and enzyme content are of particular importance, because these properties dominate the catalytic performance and stability of the liposomal enzymes. PMID:20865384

  18. Nonlinear (amplified) relationship between nuclear occupancy by triiodothyronine and the appearance rate of hepatic alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, J H; Coulombe, P; Schwartz, H L; Gutfeld, N W

    1978-01-01

    Three separate approaches were applied to examine the general relationship between R, the rate of induction of specific enzymes (mitochondrial alpha-glycero-phosphate dehydrogenase and cytosolic malic enzyme) and q, the fractional nuclear occupancy by triiodothyronine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Daily 200-microgram injections of triiodothyronine per 10u g body wt for 7 days resulted in saturation of the hepatic nuclear sites and the achievement of an apparent new steady state of enzyme levels. The increase achieved over base-line hypothyroid levels was then compared with the increment over hypothyroid base line characteristic of intact euthyroid animals with 47% of nuclear sites occupied. The maximal theoretical reate of steady-state enzyme induction could be protected on the basis of the observed maximal increase in enzyme activity observed 1 day after the injection of graded doses of hormone and lambda, the known fractional rate of enzyme dissipation. The 24-h dose-response studies were used to generate R as a continuous function of q, both in hypothyroid as well as in euthyroid animals. This approach involved the numerical solution of an ordinary differential equation describing the rate of change of enzyme as a function of R, which was assumed to be uniquely related to q. Results of these analyses indicated that the ratio of the maximal rate of induction of enzyme at full occupancy to the rate of induction under euthyroid conditions assumes a value between 9.0 and 19.5, depending on the precise analytic and experimental approach applied. This value is far in excess of the theoretical ratio 2.13 which on would anticipate if R were linearly related to q and 47% of the nuclear sites occupied under physiological conditions. Thus, the signal for enzyme induction appears to undergo progressjive amplification with increasing nuclear occupancy. Moreover, the curve describing the relationship between R and q appears highly nonlinear throughout (concave upwards

  19. Anaerobic degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) in a denitrifying bacterium: purification and characterization of the NTA dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase enzyme complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal-Wanner, U; Egli, T

    1993-01-01

    The initial step in the anoxic metabolism of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was investigated in a denitrifying member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In membrane-free cell extracts, the first step of NTA oxidation was catalyzed by a protein complex consisting of two enzymes, NTA dehydrogenase (NTADH) and nitrate reductase (NtR). The products formed were iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. Electrons derived from the oxidation of NTA were transferred to nitrate only via the artificial dye phenazine methosulfate, and nitrate was stoichiometrically reduced to nitrite. NTADH activity could be measured only in the presence of NtrR and vice versa. The NTADH-NtrR enzyme complex was purified and characterized. NTADH and NtrR were both alpha 2 dimers and had molecular weights of 170,000 and 105,000, respectively. NTADH contained covalently bound flavin cofactor, and NtrR contained a type b cytochrome. Optimum NTA-oxidizing activity was achieved at a molar ratio of NTADH to NtrR of approximately 1:1. So far, NTA is the only known substrate for NTADH. This is the first report of a redox enzyme complex catalyzing the oxidation of a substrate and concomitantly reducing nitrate. Images PMID:8250558

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of the gene encoding the trifunctional enzyme MTHFD (methylenetetrahydrofolate-dehydrogenase, methenyltetrahydrofolate-cyclohydrolase, formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase) in patients with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Hol, F A; van der Put, N M; Geurds, M P; Heil, S G; Trijbels, F J; Hamel, B C; Mariman, E C; Blom, H J

    1998-02-01

    It is now well recognized that periconceptional folic acid or folic acid containing multivitamin supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Recently we were able to show that homozygosity for a thermolabile variant of the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase is associated with an increased risk for spina bifida in patients recruited from the Dutch population. However, this genetic risk factor could not account for all folic acid preventable NTDs. In an attempt to identify additional folate related enzymes that contribute to NTD etiology we now studied the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase gene on chromosome 14q24 which encodes a single protein with three catalytic properties important in the folate metabolism. The cDNA sequence of 38 familial and 79 sporadic patients was screened for the presence of mutations by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by sequencing. Two amino acid substitutions were identified. The first one (R293H) was detected in a patient with familial spina bifida and not in 300 control individuals. The mutation was inherited from the unaffected maternal grandmother and was also present in two younger brothers of the index patient, one of them displaying spina bifida occulta and the other being unaffected. The second change turned out to be an amino acid polymorphism (R653Q) that was present in both patients and controls with similar frequencies. Our results so far provide no evidence for a major role of the methylenetetrahydrofolate-dehydrogenase (MTHFD) gene in NTD etiology. However, the identification of a mutation in one family suggests that this gene can act as a risk factor for human NTD. PMID:9611072

  1. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper), which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ)-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall. PMID:25679509

  2. Characterization of a Novel PQQ-Dependent Quinohemoprotein Pyranose Dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea Classified into Auxiliary Activities Family 12 in Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper), which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ)-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall. PMID:25679509

  3. I86A/C295A mutant secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus has broadened substrate specificity for aryl ketones.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Christopher M; Welsh, Travis P; Kim, Chang Sup; Phillips, Robert S

    2016-09-15

    Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH) reduces aliphatic ketones according to Prelog's Rule, with binding pockets for small and large substituents. It was shown previously that the I86A mutant SADH reduces acetophenone, which is not a substrate of wild-type SADH, to give the anti-Prelog R-product (Musa, M. M.; Lott, N.; Laivenieks, M.; Watanabe, L.; Vieille, C.; Phillips, R. S. ChemCatChem2009, 1, 89-93.). However, I86A SADH did not reduce aryl ketones with substituents larger than fluorine. We have now expanded the small pocket of the active site of I86A SADH by mutation of Cys-295 to alanine to allow reaction of substituted acetophenones. As predicted, the double mutant I86A/C295A SADH has broadened substrate specificity for meta-substituted, but not para-substituted, acetophenones. However, the increase of the substrate specificity of I86A/C295A SADH is accompanied by a decrease in the kcat/Km values of acetophenones, possibly due to the substrates fitting loosely inside the more open active site. Nevertheless, I86A/C295A SADH gives high conversions and very high enantiomeric excess of the anti-Prelog R-alcohols from the tested substrates. PMID:27495738

  4. Reliability of a flushing questionnaire and the ethanol patch test in screening for inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 and alcohol-related cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, A; Muramatsu, T; Ohmori, T; Kumagai, Y; Higuchi, S; Ishii, H

    1997-12-01

    Molecular epidemiology of esophageal and upper aerodigestive tract cancers revealed that alcohol is more carcinogenic in persons with inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) than in those with active ALDH2. A simple questionnaire has been developed to screen for the facial flushing that occurs in persons with inactive ALDH2 when they drink even a single glass of beer. In this study, 266 of 284 consecutive male Japanese clinic patients (age > or = 50 years) completed the flushing questionnaire, and 239 underwent the ethanol patch test (a cutaneous model for the flushing response). Blinded genotyping showed inactive ALDH2 for 94.4% (102 of 108) of subjects who reported always flushing (early in their drinking history or currently) and for 47.7% (21 of 44) of those who reported sometimes flushing, whereas 95.6% (109 of 114) of subjects reporting that they never exhibited facial flushing had active ALDH2. When all three categories of flushing (current always, former always, and sometimes) were collapsed into one, the questionnaire's sensitivity and specificity for identifying inactive ALDH2 were 96.1 and 79.0%, respectively, compared with 72.4 and 71.4% for the ethanol patch test. The results suggest the utility of this simple flushing questionnaire in daily practice, as well as large-scale studies to assess cancer risks associated with drinking and ALDH2 and for activities aimed at preventing alcohol-related cancer. PMID:9419411

  5. Loss of function of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1 leads to unconventional lignin and a temperature-sensitive growth defect in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Zhou, Rui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Fu, Chunxiang; Jackson, Lisa A; Hahn, Michael G; Kim, Hoon; Chen, Fang; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-08-13

    There is considerable debate over the capacity of the cell wall polymer lignin to incorporate unnatural monomer units. We have identified Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion mutants of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) that show reduced lignin autofluorescence under UV microscopy and red coloration in interfascicular fibers. The phenotype is caused by insertion of retrotransposons into a gene annotated as encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, here designated M. truncatula CAD1. NMR analysis indicated that the lignin is derived almost exclusively from coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde and is therefore strikingly different from classical lignins, which are derived mainly from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Despite such a major alteration in lignin structure, the plants appear normal under standard conditions in the greenhouse or growth chamber. However, the plants are dwarfed when grown at 30 °C. Glycome profiling revealed an increased extractability of some xylan and pectin epitopes from the cell walls of the cad1-1 mutant but decreased extractability of others, suggesting that aldehyde-dominant lignin significantly alters cell wall structure. PMID:23901113

  6. Loss of function of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1 leads to unconventional lignin and a temperature-sensitive growth defect in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiao; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Zhou, Rui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Fu, Chunxiang; Jackson, Lisa A.; Hahn, Michael G.; Kim, Hoon; Chen, Fang; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable debate over the capacity of the cell wall polymer lignin to incorporate unnatural monomer units. We have identified Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion mutants of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) that show reduced lignin autofluorescence under UV microscopy and red coloration in interfascicular fibers. The phenotype is caused by insertion of retrotransposons into a gene annotated as encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, here designated M. truncatula CAD1. NMR analysis indicated that the lignin is derived almost exclusively from coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde and is therefore strikingly different from classical lignins, which are derived mainly from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Despite such a major alteration in lignin structure, the plants appear normal under standard conditions in the greenhouse or growth chamber. However, the plants are dwarfed when grown at 30 °C. Glycome profiling revealed an increased extractability of some xylan and pectin epitopes from the cell walls of the cad1-1 mutant but decreased extractability of others, suggesting that aldehyde-dominant lignin significantly alters cell wall structure. PMID:23901113

  7. Circadian rhythm in plasma concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Hoes, M J; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J

    1981-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) was orally administered to six alcoholics at 09.00 and 23.00 h. The plasma concentrations of GHB show a clear circadian pattern, the area under the curve in the daytime experiments being 61% of that in the night experiments. The significance of alcohol dehydrogenase, the catabolic enzyme of GHB, for the difference is discussed. It is concluded that, although the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in alcoholics is quantitatively disturbed, it remains subject to physiologic circadian activation. PMID:7341501

  8. Stabilization of Enzymes against Thermal Stress and Freeze-Drying by Mannosylglycerate

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A.; Raven, N.; Sharp, R. J.; Bartolucci, S.; Rossi, M.; Cannio, R.; Lebbink, J.; Van Der Oost, J.; De Vos, W. M.; Santos, H.

    1997-01-01

    2-O-(beta)-Mannosylglycerate, a solute that accumulates in some (hyper)thermophilic organisms, was purified from Pyrococcus furiosus cells, and its effect on enzyme stabilization in vitro was assessed. Enzymes from hyperthermophilic, thermophilic, and mesophilic sources were examined. The thermostabilities of alcohol dehydrogenases from P. furiosus and Bacillus stearothermophilus and of glutamate dehydrogenases from Thermotoga maritima and Clostridium difficile were improved to a significant extent when enzyme solutions were incubated at supraoptimal temperatures in the presence of 2-O-(beta)-mannosylglycerate, but no effect on the thermostability of glutamate dehydrogenase from P. furiosus was detected. On the other hand, there was a remarkable effect on the thermal stabilities of rabbit muscle lactate dehydrogenase, baker's yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase, which were used as model systems to evaluate stabilization of enzymes of mesophilic origin. For all of the enzymes examined and at the highest temperatures tested, 2-O-(beta)-mannosylglycerate was a better thermoprotectant than trehalose. The stabilizing effect exerted by 2-O-(beta)-mannosylglycerate on enzymes suggests a role for this compound as a protein thermostabilizer under physiological conditions. 2-O-(beta)-Mannosylglycerate was also effective in the protection of enzymes against stress imposed by freeze-drying, with its protecting effect being similar to or better than that exerted by trehalose. The data show 2-O-(beta)-mannosylglycerate to be a potential enzyme stabilizer in biotechnological applications. PMID:16535713

  9. Surface modifications for enhanced enzyme immobilization and improved electron transfer of PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase anodes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ryan J; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-10-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone dependent soluble glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-sGDH) enzymatic MWCNT electrodes were p roduced using 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid (PCA) activated through carbodiimide functionalization and 1-Pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (PBSE) as tethering agents. At 600 mV potential, the current density generated by the activated-PCA tethered PQQ-sGDH anode was significantly greater than the current density generated by the untethered PQQ-sGDH and PBSE tethered anodes, and performance was nearly identical to the performance of a covalently bound PQQ-sGDH anode. A technique for covalently bonding heme-b (hemin), a natural quinohemoprotein porphyrin redox cofactor, to carbon nanotubes modified with arylamine groups is reported. The resulting performance of the covalently bound hemin PQQ-sGDH anode is considerably higher than that of any other PQQ-sGDH anodes tested. PMID:26011132

  10. A novel glucose dehydrogenase from the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus: production in Aspergillus niger and physicochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Piumi, François; Levasseur, Anthony; Navarro, David; Zhou, Simeng; Mathieu, Yann; Ropartz, David; Ludwig, Roland; Faulds, Craig B; Record, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Data on glucose dehydrogenases (GDHs) are scarce and availability of these enzymes for application purposes is limited. This paper describes a new GDH from the fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CIRM BRFM 137 that is the first reported GDH from a white-rot fungus belonging to the Basidiomycota. The enzyme was recombinantly produced in Aspergillus niger, a well-known fungal host producing an array of homologous or heterologous enzymes for industrial applications. The full-length gene that encodes GDH from P. cinnabarinus (PcGDH) consists of 2,425 bp and codes for a deduced protein of 620 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 62.5 kDa. The corresponding complementary DNA was cloned and placed under the control of the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The signal peptide of the glucoamylase prepro sequence of A. niger was used to target PcGDH secretion into the culture medium, achieving a yield of 640 mg L(-1), which is tenfold higher than any other reported value. The recombinant PcGDH was purified twofold to homogeneity in a one-step procedure with a 41 % recovery using a Ni Sepharose column. The identity of the recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunodetection using western blot analysis and N-terminal sequencing. The molecular mass of the native PcGDH was 130 kDa, suggesting a homodimeric form. Optimal pH and temperature were found to be similar (5.5 and 60 °C, respectively) to those determined for the previously characterized GDH, i.e., from Glomerella cingulata. However PcGDH exhibits a lower catalytic efficiency of 67 M(-1) s(-1) toward glucose. This substrate is by far the preferred substrate, which constitutes an advantage over other sugar oxidases in the case of blood glucose monitoring. The substrate-binding domain of PcGDH turns out to be conserved as compared to other glucose-methanol-choline (GMCs) oxidoreductases. In addition, the ability of PcGDH to reduce oxidized quinones or radical

  11. Exploring the evolutionary route of the acquisition of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by plant ALDH10 enzymes: implications for the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant ALDH10 enzymes are aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs) that oxidize different ω-amino or trimethylammonium aldehydes, but only some of them have betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity and produce the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB). The latter enzymes possess alanine or cysteine at position 441 (numbering of the spinach enzyme, SoBADH), while those ALDH10s that cannot oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) have isoleucine at this position. Only the plants that contain A441- or C441-type ALDH10 isoenzymes accumulate GB in response to osmotic stress. In this work we explored the evolutionary history of the acquisition of BAL specificity by plant ALDH10s. Results We performed extensive phylogenetic analyses and constructed and characterized, kinetically and structurally, four SoBADH variants that simulate the parsimonious intermediates in the evolutionary pathway from I441-type to A441- or C441-type enzymes. All mutants had a correct folding, average thermal stabilities and similar activity with aminopropionaldehyde, but whereas A441S and A441T exhibited significant activity with BAL, A441V and A441F did not. The kinetics of the mutants were consistent with their predicted structural features obtained by modeling, and confirmed the importance of position 441 for BAL specificity. The acquisition of BADH activity could have happened through any of these intermediates without detriment of the original function or protein stability. Phylogenetic studies showed that this event occurred independently several times during angiosperms evolution when an ALDH10 gene duplicate changed the critical Ile residue for Ala or Cys in two consecutive single mutations. ALDH10 isoenzymes frequently group in two clades within a plant family: one includes peroxisomal I441-type, the other peroxisomal and non-peroxisomal I441-, A441- or C441-type. Interestingly, high GB-accumulators plants have non-peroxisomal A441- or C441-type isoenzymes, while low-GB accumulators

  12. Effect of Hofmeister anions and protein concentration on the activity and stability of some immobilized made-independent dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Bovara, R.; Pasta, P.; Cremonesi, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of several factors on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, both free and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, was investigated. Enzymes were immobilized under different conditions including various degrees of matrix activation, variable amounts of protein, in the presence, or in the absence of, additives (coenzymes, dithiothreitol, salts). Activity recovery was in general satisfactorily high with 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, low with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and markedly linked to the concentration of immobilized protein with alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case the advantageous stabilizing effect of high enzyme concentrations was notably diminished by the paralled decrease of the effectiveness factor. The effect of high concentrations of anions of the Hofmeister series was examined. It was found that 1M phosphate and 0.5M sulfate dramatically stabilize both free and immobilized enzymes against inactivation by temperature and urea. Km values of apolar substrates were considerably lowered by the two anions while Km values of polar substrates were not affected. In some cases Vmax values also were influenced by high concentrations of these anions. The present results appear of interest particularly in view of enzyme utilization for analytical as well as for preparative purposes. (Refs. 13).

  13. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Alcohol Wondering if alcohol is off limits with diabetes? Most people with diabetes can have a moderate amount of alcohol. Research has shown that there can be some ...

  14. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  15. Novel functions of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex may mediate diverse oxidant-induced changes in mitochondrial enzymes associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingli; Xu, Hui; Kleinman, Wayne A.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Measures in autopsied brains from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients reveal a decrease in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) and an increase in malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity. The present experiments tested whether both changes could be caused by the common oxidant H2O2 and to probe the mechanism underlying these changes. Since the response to H2O2 is modified by the level of the E2k subunit of KGDHC, the interaction of MDH and KGDHC was studied in cells with varying levels of E2k. In cells with only 23% of normal E2k protein levels, one hour treatment with H2O2 decreased KGDHC and increased MDH activity as well as the mRNA level for both cytosolic and mitochondrial MDH. The increase in MDH did not occur in cells with 100% or 46% of normal E2k. Longer treatments with H2O2 inhibited the activity of both enzymes. Glutathione is a major regulator of cellular redox state and can modify enzyme activities. H2O2 converts reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), which reacts with protein thiols. Treatment of purified KGDHC with GSSG leads to glutathionylation of all three KGDHC subunits. Thus, cellular glutathione level was manipulated by two means to determine the effect on KGDHC and MDH activities. Both buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which inhibits glutathione synthesis without altering redox state, and H2O2 diminished glutathione to a similar level after 24 hrs. However, H2O2, but not BSO, reduced KGDHC and MDH activities, and the reduction was greater in the E2k-23 line. These findings suggest that the E2k may mediate diverse responses of KGDHC and MDH to oxidants. In addition, the differential response of activities to BSO and H2O2 together with the in vitro interaction of KGDHC with GSSG suggests that glutathionylation is one possible mechanism underlying oxidative stress-induced inhibition of the TCA cycle enzymes. PMID:18206986

  16. A chemically modified carbon paste electrode with d-lactate dehydrogenase and alanine aminotranferase enzyme sequences for d-lactic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Shu, H C; Wu, N P

    2001-04-12

    An amperometric biosensor was constructed for the analysis of d-lactic acid based on immobilizing d-lactate dehydrogenase(d-LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), NAD(+), a redox polymer and polyethylenimine in carbon paste. The effect of addition of ALT in the paste, using enzyme sequences of ALT/d-LDH, was insignificant for d-lactic acid analysis. The responses of d-lactic acid in ALT/d-LDH paste electrode are the same as those in d-LDH paste electrode. However, the interference effect of pyruvate in the sample can be substantially reduced if sodium glutamate was applied in the carrier solution. When ALT immobilized in control porous glass as an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) was mounted in flow injection analysis system with the d-LDH paste electrode as detector for d-lactate analysis, the interference of the pyruvate can be significantly eliminated. The adverse effect of pyruvate in the samples for d-lactic acid analysis was reduced more effectively in ALT IMER with d-LDH electrode than in ALT/d-LDH electrode. PMID:18968259

  17. Crystal structure of the γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. strainWBC-3, a key enzyme involved in para-Nitrophenol degradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background para-Nitrophenol (PNP) is a highly toxic compound with threats to mammalian health. The pnpE-encoded γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase catalyzes the reduction of γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde to maleylacetate in Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3, playing a key role in the catabolism of PNP to Krebs cycle intermediates. However, the catalyzing mechanism by PnpE has not been well understood. Results Here we report the crystal structures of the apo and NAD bound PnpE. In the PnpE-NAD complex structure, NAD is situated in a cleft of PnpE. The cofactor binding site is composed of two pockets. The adenosine and the first ribose group of NAD bind in one pocket and the nicotinamide ring in the other. Conclusions Six amino acids have interactions with the cofactor. They are C281, E247, Q210, W148, I146 and K172. Highly conserved residues C281 and E247 were identified to be critical for its catalytic activity. In addition, flexible docking studies of the enzyme-substrate system were performed to predict the interactions between PnpE and its substrate γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. Amino acids that interact extensively with the substrate and stabilize the substrate in an orientation suitable for enzyme catalysis were identified. The importance of these residues for catalytic activity was confirmed by the relevant site-directed mutagenesis and their biochemical characterization. PMID:24252642

  18. Determination of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we assessed the effects of various glutamate concentrations in combination with either the coenzyme NAD+ or NADP+ on GDH activity in mouse liver cryostat sections using metabolic mapping. NAD+-dependent GDH Vmax was 2.5-fold higher than NADP+-dependent Vmax, whereas the Km was similar, 1.92 mM versus 1.66 mM, when NAD+ or NADP+ was used, respectively. With either coenzyme, Vmax was determined at 10 mM glutamate and substrate inhibition was observed at higher glutamate concentrations with a Ki of 12.2 and 3.95 for NAD+ and NADP+ used as coenzyme, respectively. NAD+- and NADP+-dependent GDH activities were examined in various mouse tissues. GDH activity was highest in liver and much lower in other tissues. In all tissues, the highest activity was found when NAD+ was used as a coenzyme. In conclusion, GDH activity in mice is highest in the liver with NAD+ as a coenzyme and highest GDH activity was determined at a glutamate concentration of 10 mM. PMID:25124006

  19. Structural shifts of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes were instrumental for the early evolution of retinoid-dependent axial patterning in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Tiago J P; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Schechtman, Deborah; Pereira, Alexandre C; Brunet, Frédéric; Sweeney, Sarah; Pani, Ariel; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Lowe, Christopher J; Davidson, Bradley; Laudet, Vincent; Bronner, Marianne; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Schubert, Michael; Xavier-Neto, José

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catabolize toxic aldehydes and process the vitamin A-derived retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), a small diffusible molecule and a pivotal chordate morphogen. In this study, we combine phylogenetic, structural, genomic, and developmental gene expression analyses to examine the evolutionary origins of ALDH substrate preference. Structural modeling reveals that processing of small aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, by ALDH2, versus large aldehydes, including retinaldehyde, by ALDH1A is associated with small versus large substrate entry channels (SECs), respectively. Moreover, we show that metazoan ALDH1s and ALDH2s are members of a single ALDH1/2 clade and that during evolution, eukaryote ALDH1/2s often switched between large and small SECs after gene duplication, transforming constricted channels into wide opened ones and vice versa. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that during the evolutionary emergence of RA signaling, the ancestral, narrow-channeled metazoan ALDH1/2 gave rise to large ALDH1 channels capable of accommodating bulky aldehydes, such as retinaldehyde, supporting the view that retinoid-dependent signaling arose from ancestral cellular detoxification mechanisms. Our analyses also indicate that, on a more restricted evolutionary scale, ALDH1 duplicates from invertebrate chordates (amphioxus and ascidian tunicates) underwent switches to smaller and narrower SECs. When combined with alterations in gene expression, these switches led to neofunctionalization from ALDH1-like roles in embryonic patterning to systemic, ALDH2-like roles, suggesting functional shifts from signaling to detoxification. PMID:21169504

  20. Structural shifts of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes were instrumental for the early evolution of retinoid-dependent axial patterning in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Schechtman, Deborah; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Brunet, Frédéric; Sweeney, Sarah; Pani, Ariel; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Lowe, Christopher J.; Davidson, Bradley; Laudet, Vincent; Bronner, Marianne; de Oliveira, Paulo S. L.; Schubert, Michael; Xavier-Neto, José

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catabolize toxic aldehydes and process the vitamin A-derived retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), a small diffusible molecule and a pivotal chordate morphogen. In this study, we combine phylogenetic, structural, genomic, and developmental gene expression analyses to examine the evolutionary origins of ALDH substrate preference. Structural modeling reveals that processing of small aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, by ALDH2, versus large aldehydes, including retinaldehyde, by ALDH1A is associated with small versus large substrate entry channels (SECs), respectively. Moreover, we show that metazoan ALDH1s and ALDH2s are members of a single ALDH1/2 clade and that during evolution, eukaryote ALDH1/2s often switched between large and small SECs after gene duplication, transforming constricted channels into wide opened ones and vice versa. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that during the evolutionary emergence of RA signaling, the ancestral, narrow-channeled metazoan ALDH1/2 gave rise to large ALDH1 channels capable of accommodating bulky aldehydes, such as retinaldehyde, supporting the view that retinoid-dependent signaling arose from ancestral cellular detoxification mechanisms. Our analyses also indicate that, on a more restricted evolutionary scale, ALDH1 duplicates from invertebrate chordates (amphioxus and ascidian tunicates) underwent switches to smaller and narrower SECs. When combined with alterations in gene expression, these switches led to neofunctionalization from ALDH1-like roles in embryonic patterning to systemic, ALDH2-like roles, suggesting functional shifts from signaling to detoxification. PMID:21169504

  1. An overview on alcohol oxidases and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Pranab; Chinnadayyala, Soma Sekhar R; Chakraborty, Mitun; Kumar, Adepu Kiran; Kakoti, Ankana

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol oxidases (Alcohol: O₂ Oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.3.x) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with a concomitant release of hydrogen peroxide. Based on substrate specificity, alcohol oxidases may be categorized broadly into four different groups namely, (a) short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), (b) long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), (c) aromatic alcohol oxidase (AAO), and (d) secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO). The sources reported for these enzymes are mostly limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, plant, insect, and mollusks. However, the quantum of reports for each category of enzymes considerably varies across these sources. The enzymes belonging to SCAO and LCAO are intracellular in nature, whereas AAO and SAO are mostly secreted to the medium. SCAO and LCAO are invariably reported as multimeric proteins with very high holoenzyme molecular masses, but the molecular characteristics of these enzymes are yet to be clearly elucidated. One of the striking features of the alcohol oxidases that make them distinct from the widely known alcohol dehydrogenase is the avidly bound cofactor to the redox center of these enzymes that obviate the need to supplement cofactor during the catalytic reaction. These flavin-based redox enzymes have gained enormous importance in the development of various industrial processes and products primarily for developing biosensors and production of various industrially useful carbonyl compounds. The present review provides an overview on alcohol oxidases from different categories focusing research on these oxidases during the last decade along with their potential industrial applications. PMID:23525937

  2. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in coke oven workers relative to exposure, alcohol consumption, and metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Ichiba, M; Hara, K; Zhang, S; Hanaoka, T; Pan, G; Yamano, Y; Takahashi, K; Tomokuni, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the influence of personal lifestyle—such as smoking and alcohol consumption—on urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) concentrations in coke oven workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to evaluate the association of 1-OHP concentrations with the genetic polymorphism of several metabolic enzymes including cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A1 and glutathione S-tranferases (GSTs).
METHODS—The study population contained 162 coke oven workers and 58 controls employed at the largest iron and steel factory in China. Personal data were collected at the interview. 1-OHP in urine was measured with high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Genetic polymorphisms were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.
RESULTS—A positive association between excretion of urinary 1-OHP and the levels of exposure to PAHs was confirmed. Those people who consumed ⩾50 g/day ethanol had significantly higher 1-OHP excretion than did other coke oven workers (p<0.01). No significant difference in urinary 1-OHP was found between smokers and non-smokers, in both controls and exposed subjects. The variant homozygotes at exon 7 of the CYP1A1 gene had significantly higher urinary 1-OHP concentrations than other CYP1A1 genotypes among the exposed workers (p=0.03). There was less association between the concentrations of 1-OHP and the GSTM1, GSTP1, or GSTT1 polymorphism.
CONCLUSIONS—The present study confirmed that urinary 1-OHP is a good biomarker for exposure to PAHs. Alcohol consumption affected urinary 1-OHP excretion. The variant genotypes of the CYP1A1 gene may result in the enhancement of PAH metabolites. It is helpful to understand the role of individual susceptibility on metabolism of carcinogens. These findings suggest that the modulating effect of individual lifestyle factors or genetic nature should be considered in future studies on occupational exposure to PAHs and in evaluating the health risk

  3. Liver Enzymes: Interaction Analysis of Smoking with Alcohol Consumption or BMI, Comparing AST and ALT to γ-GT

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Lutz P.; Arndt, Volker; Drath, Christoph; Brenner, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Background A detrimental interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption with respect serum γ-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT) has recently been described. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The present work aimed to provide further insights by examining similar interactions pertaining to aspartate and alanine transaminase (AST, ALT), routine liver markers less prone to enzyme induction. Methodology/Principal Findings The present cross-sectional analysis was based on records from routine occupational health examinations of 15,281 male employees predominantly of the construction industry, conducted from 1986 to 1992 in Southern Germany. Associations of smoking intensity with log-transformed activities of γ-GT, AST, and ALT were examined in regression models adjusted for potential confounders and including an interaction of smoking with alcohol consumption or body mass index (BMI). Statistically significant interactions of smoking were observed with both alcohol consumption (AST and ALT, each with P<0.0001) and BMI (AST only, P<0.0001). The interactions all were in the same directions as for γ-GT, i.e. synergistic with alcohol and opposite with BMI. Conclusion The patterns of interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption or BMI with respect to AST and ALT resembled those observed for γ-GT. This renders enzyme induction a less probable mechanism for these associations, whereas it might implicate exacerbated hepatocellular vulnerability and injury. PMID:22132177

  4. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A Text Size What's in ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  5. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  6. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  7. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in the substrate-free conformation

  8. The titanium binding protein of Rhodococcus ruber GIN1 (NCIMB 40340) is a cell-surface homolog of the cytosolic enzyme dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Siegmann, Ari; Komarska, Avital; Betzalel, Yifaat; Brudo, Irene; Jindou, Sadanari; Mor, Gil; Fleminger, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus ruber GIN1 (formally Rh. strain GIN1) was previously isolated on the basis of its strong adherence to coal fly ash (CFA) and titanium dioxide particles from CFA sedimentation ponds of an electrical power plant in Israel. The interaction of the bacterium with oxides has been shown to be mediated by a cell surface protein designated TiBP (titanium binding protein) involving primarily strong, non-electrostatic forces. In this work, we set forward to identify this unique exocellular protein. Sequence analysis of the purified protein by mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) following trypsinization revealed 11 peptides. All of them showed >90% amino acid residues identity with sequences of one of the orthologs (dldh1) of the cytosolic enzyme dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH), based on the genome sequence of Rhodococcus strain RHA1. This genome was selected as a reference since currently it is the only sequenced Rhodococcal genome. Altogether, these peptides covered over 25% of the 52 kDa protein molecule. N- and C-termini primers were prepared and used to sequence the paralog gene from Rh. ruber GIN1 after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. All 11 peptides showed 100% identity with the sequence of this gene. The homology of TiBP with the supposedly cytosolic DLDH raised the question of whether the exocellular TiBP possesses DLDH activity. Indeed, intact late logarithmic phase Rh. ruber GIN1 cells, previously shown to express TiBP, were found to possess such activity, while very low activity was associated with stationary phase cells which possess diminished TiBP expression on their surface. Further evidence for the exocellular location of TiBP/DLDH was achieved using specific anti-TiBP polyclonal antibodies by whole cell and protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showing high reactivity of the logarithmic phase cell surface and substantially lower reactivity with the stationary phase cells. As expected, logarithmic phase spheroplasts were

  9. 2-Butanol and butanone production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through combination of a B12 dependent dehydratase and a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase using a TEV-based expression system.

    PubMed

    Ghiaci, Payam; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Christer

    2014-01-01

    2-Butanol and its chemical precursor butanone (methyl ethyl ketone--MEK) are chemicals with potential uses as biofuels and biocommodity chemicals. In order to produce 2-butanol, we have demonstrated the utility of using a TEV-protease based expression system to achieve equimolar expression of the individual subunits of the two protein complexes involved in the B12-dependent dehydratase step (from the pdu-operon of Lactobacillus reuteri), which catalyze the conversion of meso-2,3-butanediol to butanone. We have furthermore identified a NADH dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Sadh from Gordonia sp.) able to catalyze the subsequent conversion of butanone to 2-butanol. A final concentration of 4±0.2 mg/L 2-butanol and 2±0.1 mg/L of butanone was found. A key factor for the production of 2-butanol was the availability of NADH, which was achieved by growing cells lacking the GPD1 and GPD2 isogenes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25054226

  10. 2-Butanol and Butanone Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through Combination of a B12 Dependent Dehydratase and a Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using a TEV-Based Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ghiaci, Payam; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Christer

    2014-01-01

    2-Butanol and its chemical precursor butanone (methyl ethyl ketone – MEK) are chemicals with potential uses as biofuels and biocommodity chemicals. In order to produce 2-butanol, we have demonstrated the utility of using a TEV-protease based expression system to achieve equimolar expression of the individual subunits of the two protein complexes involved in the B12-dependent dehydratase step (from the pdu-operon of Lactobacillus reuterii), which catalyze the conversion of meso-2,3-butanediol to butanone. We have furthermore identified a NADH dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Sadh from Gordonia sp.) able to catalyze the subsequent conversion of butanone to 2-butanol. A final concentration of 4±0.2 mg/L 2-butanol and 2±0.1 mg/L of butanone was found. A key factor for the production of 2-butanol was the availability of NADH, which was achieved by growing cells lacking the GPD1 and GPD2 isogenes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25054226

  11. The intrinsic topological information of the wild-type and of up-promoter mutations of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase II regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Della Seta, F; Camilloni, G; Venditti, S; Di Mauro, E

    1988-11-01

    A 569-base pair fragment encompassing the upstream regulatory region, the RNA initiation sites, and the initial part of the coding region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase II gene has been analyzed for the presence of sites which undergo conformational modification under torsional stress. Fine mapping of P1 and S1 endonuclease-sensitive sites was obtained on single topoisomers produced by in vitro ligation. It was shown that the upstream activator sequence, the TATA sequence, a region directly upstream to the RNA initiation sites, and several positions in the first segment of the transcribed region change conformation as a function of the applied torsional stress in a precisely coordinate fashion. The superhelical density optima for this coordinate modifications have been determined. Analysis of the conformational changes of the promoter sequence in several naturally occurring (Young, E. T., Williamson, V. M., Taguchi, A., Smith, M., Sledziewski, L., Russel, D., Osterman, J., Denis, C., Cox, D., and Beier, D., (1982) in Genetic Engineering of Microorganisms for Chemicals (Hollander, A., De Moss, R. D., Kaplan, S., Konisky, J., Savage, D., and Wolle, R. S., eds) pp. 335-361, Plenum Publishing Corp., New York) up-promoter constitutive mutants was performed. This analysis has shown that the conformation of functionally relevant sites changes as a function of sequence mutations that have taken place elsewhere; this shows that the conformational behavior of the whole promoter region is linked and suggests transmission in cis of topological effects in RNA polymerase II promoters. PMID:3053683

  12. Alcohol production from various enzyme-converted starches with or without cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.K.; Rivera, B.C.

    1982-02-01

    The effectiveness of alcoholic fermentation was compared by measuring alcoholic yields from various starch mashes, both cooked and uncooked. Alcohol yields from cooked and liquefied starch by bacterial ..cap alpha..-amylase were 93.9% for corn, 92.0% for cassava, 90.6% for potato, and 73.0% for babassu, whereas alcohol yields from raw starch were 90.0% for corn, 89.0% for cassava, 48.9% for babassu, and 11.4% for potato. (JMT)

  13. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important component in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.

  14. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important componentmore » in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.« less

  15. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Standish; O'Carra, Pádraig

    1973-01-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD+ through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD+ (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm–agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD+ derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD+. Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD+-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  16. Waste recycling by vermicomposting: Maturity and quality assessment via dehydrogenase enzyme activity, lignin, water soluble carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and other indicators.

    PubMed

    Alidadi, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh, Ahmad; Najafpoor, Ali Asghar; Esmaili, Habibollah; Zanganeh, Jafar; Dolatabadi Takabi, Maryam; Piranloo, Fardin Ghasemy

    2016-11-01

    Present study aims to examine the dynamics of maturation and qualification indicators in various vermicompost treatments and selection of the best treatment along with best maturation time in this regard. In this empirical study, dynamics of chemical (pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorous, lignin, water soluble carbon (WSC), C/N, NH4/NO3) and biological (dehydrogenase enzyme (DEH) and DEH/WSC) properties were investigated in four various treatments, including various ratios of compost produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) and carbonaceous materials (50:50, 70:30, 85:15 and 100:0) over 100 days. Results showed a significant fluctuation in EC, DEH and DEH/WSC proportions over the process. In addition, a noticeable increase was observed for the dynamics of TN, phosphorous and lignin. In contrast, the C/N, NH4/NO3 and WSC values gradually decreased during the process. Moreover, it was observed that the length of 75 days for the process is an appropriate time for maturation of all treatments. However, the first and second treatments resulted in better outcomes compared with the other types of treatments. From the point of view of quality obtained vermicompost was nitrogen enriched product in all treatments. Whereas, for the phosphorous elements this method is appropriate for the first treatment only. PMID:27472049

  17. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; De Mattia, D.; Pagnini, D.; Alfinito, F.; Schettini, F.; Luzzatto, L.; Martini, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G-->A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C-->T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8808605

  18. SIRT3 and SIRT5 Regulate the Enzyme Activity and Cardiolipin Binding of Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  19. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  20. SIRT3 and SIRT5 regulate the enzyme activity and cardiolipin binding of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  1. Biofuel cells based on direct enzyme-electrode contacts using PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase/bilirubin oxidase and modified carbon nanotube materials.

    PubMed

    Scherbahn, V; Putze, M T; Dietzel, B; Heinlein, T; Schneider, J J; Lisdat, F

    2014-11-15

    Two types of carbon nanotube electrodes (1) buckypaper (BP) and (2) vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (vaCNT) have been used for elaboration of glucose/O2 enzymatic fuel cells exploiting direct electron transfer. For the anode pyrroloquinoline quinone dependent glucose dehydrogenase ((PQQ)GDH) has been immobilized on [poly(3-aminobenzoic acid-co-2-methoxyaniline-5-sulfonic acid), PABMSA]-modified electrodes. For the cathode bilirubin oxidase (BOD) has been immobilized on PQQ-modified electrodes. PABMSA and PQQ act as promoter for enzyme bioelectrocatalysis. The voltammetric characterization of each electrode shows current densities in the range of 0.7-1.3 mA/cm(2). The BP-based fuel cell exhibits maximal power density of about 107 µW/cm(2) (at 490 mV). The vaCNT-based fuel cell achieves a maximal power density of 122 µW/cm(2) (at 540 mV). Even after three days and several runs of load a power density over 110 µW/cm(2) is retained with the second system (10mM glucose). Due to a better power exhibition and an enhanced stability of the vaCNT-based fuel cells they have been studied in human serum samples and a maximal power density of 41 µW/cm(2) (390 mV) can be achieved. PMID:24967753

  2. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G.

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Expression profiles of cortisol-inactivating enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2, in human epidermal tumors and its role in keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) catalyzes the interconversion between hormonally active cortisol and inactive cortisone within cells. There are two isozymes: 11β-HSD1 activates cortisol from cortisone and 11β-HSD2 inactivates cortisol to cortisone. 11β-HSD1 was recently discovered in skin, and we subsequently found that the enzyme negatively regulates keratinocyte proliferation. We verified 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression in benign and malignant skin tumors and investigated the role of 11β-HSD in skin tumor pathogenesis. Randomly selected formalin-fixed sections of skin lesions of seborrheic keratosis (SK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were stained with 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 antibodies, and 11β-HSD expression was also evaluated in murine epidermis in which hyperproliferation was induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA). We observed that 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in all SK, SCC, and BCC lesions compared with unaffected skin. Conversely, 11β-HSD2 expression was increased in SK and BCC but not in SCC. Overexpression of 11β-HSD2 in keratinocytes increased cell proliferation. In the murine model, 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in TPA-treated hyperproliferative skin. Our findings suggest that 11β-HSD1 expression is decreased in keratinocyte proliferative conditions, and 11β-HSD2 expression is increased in basal cell proliferating conditions, such as BCC and SK. Assessing 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression could be a useful tool for diagnosing and characterizing skin tumors. PMID:23362866

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of a steroidogenic enzyme, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14, from the stony coral Euphyllia ancora (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    PubMed

    Shikina, Shinya; Chung, Yi-Jou; Chiu, Yi-Ling; Huang, Yi-Jie; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2016-03-01

    Sex steroids play a fundamental role not only in reproduction but also in various other biological processes in vertebrates. Although the presence of sex steroids has been confirmed in cnidarians (e.g., coral, sea anemone, jellyfish, and hydra), which are basal metazoans, only a few studies to date have characterized steroidogenesis-related genes in cnidarians. Based on a transcriptomic analysis of the stony coral Euphyllia ancora, we identified the steroidogenic enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 (17beta-hsd 14), an oxidative enzyme that catalyzes the NAD(+)-dependent inactivation of estrogen/androgen (estradiol to estrone and testosterone to androstenedione) in mammals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. ancora 17beta-Hsd 14 (Ea17beta-Hsd 14) clusters with other animal 17beta-HSD 14s but not with other members of the 17beta-HSD family. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a lack of correlation of Ea17beta-hsd 14 transcript levels with the coral's reproductive cycle. In addition, Ea17beta-hsd 14 transcript and protein were detected in all tissues examined, such as the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and gonads, at similar levels in both sexes, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blotting with an anti-Ea17beta-Hsd 14 antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Ea17beta-Hsd 14 is mainly distributed in the endodermal regions of the polyps, but the protein was also observed in all tissues examined. These results suggest that Ea17beta-Hsd 14 is involved in important functions that commonly occur in endodermal cells or has multiple functions in different tissues. Our data provide information for comparison with advanced animals as well as insight into the evolution of steroidogenesis-related genes in metazoans. PMID:26868454

  5. Substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstad, R I; Köll, P; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase has been studied by steady-state kinetics over the range pH 7-10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase stereo-selectively catalyses the reversible NAD-linked oxidation of various polyols and other secondary alcohols into their corresponding ketones. The kinetic constants are given for various novel polyol substrates, including L-glucitol, L-mannitol, L-altritol, D-altritol, D-iditol and eight heptitols, as well as for many aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. The maximum velocities (kcat) and the substrate specificity-constants (kcat/Km) are positively correlated with increasing pH. The enzyme-catalysed reactions occur by a compulsory ordered kinetic mechanism with the coenzyme as the first, or leading, substrate. With many substrates, the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction is the enzyme-NADH product dissociation. However, with several substrates there is a transition to a mechanism with partial rate-limitation at the ternary complex level, especially at low pH. The kinetic data enable the elucidation of new empirical rules for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The specificity-constants for polyol oxidation vary as a function of substrate configuration with D-xylo> D-ribo > L-xylo > D-lyxo approximately L-arabino > D-arabino > L-lyxo. Catalytic activity with a polyol or an aromatic substrate and various 1-deoxy derivatives thereof varies with -CH2OH > -CH2NH2 > -CH2OCH3 approximately -CH3. The presence of a hydroxyl group at each of the remaining chiral centres of a polyol, apart from the reactive C2, is also nonessential for productive ternary complex formation and catalysis. A predominantly nonpolar enzymic epitope appears to constitute an important structural determinant for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The existence of two distinct substrate binding regions in the enzyme active site, along with that of the catalytic zinc, is suggested to account for the lack of

  6. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well as injuries, liver disease, heart disease, cancer, and other health problems. It can also cause problems at home, at work, and with friends. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  7. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  8. Human oestrogenic 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase specificity: enzyme regulation through an NADPH-dependent substrate inhibition towards the highly specific oestrone reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, A; Garneau, A; Huang, Y W; Yang, F; Lin, S X

    2001-01-01

    Human oestrogenic 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD1) catalyses the final step in the biosynthesis of all active oestrogens. Here we report the steady-state kinetics for 17beta-HSD1 at 37 degrees C and pH 7.5, using a homogeneous enzyme preparation with oestrone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as substrate and NADP(H) as the cofactor. Kinetic studies made over a wide range of oestrone concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) revealed a typical substrate-inhibition phenomenon. Data analysis using the substrate-inhibition equation v=V.[s]/[K(m)+[s](1+[s]/K(i))] gave a K(m) of 0.07+/-0.01 microM, a k(cat) (for the dimer) of 1.5+/-0.1 s(-1), a specificity of 21 microM(-1) x s(-1) and a K(i) of 1.3 microM. When NADH was used instead of NADPH, substrate inhibition was no longer observed and the kinetic constants were significantly modified to 0.42+/-0.07 microM for the K(m), 0.8+/-0.04 s(-1) for the k(cat) and 1.9 microM(-1) x s(-1) for the specificity. The modification of an amino acid in the cofactor-binding site (Leu36Asp) eliminated the substrate inhibition observed in the presence of NADPH, confirming the NADPH-dependence of the phenomenon. The possible formation of an enzyme-NADP(+)-oestrone dead-end complex during the substrate-inhibition process is supported by the competitive inhibition of oestradiol oxidation by oestrone. Kinetic studies performed with either DHEA (K(m)=24+/-4 microM; k(cat)=0.47+/-0.06 s(-1); specificity=0.002 microM(-1) x s(-1)) or DHT (K(m)=26+/-6 microM; k(cat)=0.2+/-0.02 s(-1); specificity=0.0008 microM(-1) x s(-1)) in the presence of NADP(H) resulted in low specificities and no substrate inhibition. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the high specificity of 17beta-HSD1 towards oestrone is coupled with an NADPH-dependent substrate inhibition, suggesting that both the specificity and the enzyme control are provided for the cognate substrate. PMID:11336660

  9. The dilemma of the gender assignment in a Portuguese adolescent with disorder of sex development due to 17β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 3 enzyme deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Correia, Cíntia; Mira-Coelho, Alda; Monteiro, Bessa; Monteiro, Joaquim; Hughes, Ieuan; Fontoura, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of male internal and external genitalia in an XY fetus requires a complex interplay of many critical genes, enzymes, and cofactors. The enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 3 (17βHSD3) is present almost exclusively in the testicles and converts Delta 4-androstenodione (Δ4) to testosterone. A deficiency in this enzyme is rare and is a frequently misdiagnosed autosomal recessive cause of 46,XY, disorder of sex development. The case report is of a 15-year-old adolescent, who was raised according to female gender. At puberty, the adolescent had a severe virilization and primary amenorrhea. The physical examination showed a male phenotype with micropenis and blind vagina. The Tanner stage was A3B1P4, nonpalpable gonads. The karyotype revealed 46,XY. The endocrinology study revealed: testosterone=2.38 ng/ml, Δ4>10.00 ng/ml, and low testosterone/Δ4 ratio=0.23. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdominal–pelvic showed the presence of testicles in inguinal canal, seminal vesicle, prostate, micropenis, and absence of uterus and vagina. The genetic study confirmed the mutation p.Glu215Asp on HSD17B3 gene in homozygosity. The dilemma of sex reassignment was seriously considered when the diagnosis was made. During all procedures the patient was accompanied by a child psychiatrist/psychologist. The teenager desired to continue being a female, so gonadectomy was performed. Estrogen therapy and surgical procedure to change external genitalia was carried out. In this case, there was a severe virilization at puberty. It is speculated to be due to a partial activity of 17βHSD3 in the testicles and/or extratesticular ability to convert Δ4 to testosterone by 17βHSD5. Prenatal exposure of the brain to androgens has increasingly been put forward as a critical factor in gender identity development, but in this case the social factor was more important for the gender assignment. Learning points In this case, we highlight the late diagnosis

  10. An enzyme flow immunoassay that uses beta-galactosidase as the label and a cellobiose dehydrogenase biosensor as the label detector.

    PubMed

    Burestedt, E; Nistor, C; Schagerlöf, U; Emnéus, J

    2000-09-01

    The aim was to develop a fast generic enzyme flow immunoassay (EFIA) using a beta-galactosidase (beta-GAL) label in combination with colorimetric detection as well as with a new amperometric biosensor as the label detector. The amperometric biosensor was previously developed within the group for the determination of diphenols in surface water samples. Antigen (Ag, analyte), tracer (Ag*, antigen labeled with beta-GAL), and antibody (Ab) were incubated off-line. After the equilibrium was reached, the sample was introduced into the flow system. The antibody complexes, AgAb and Ag*Ab, were trapped in a protein G column while the free unbound tracer was eluted and detected by an amperometric biosensor downstream after substrate reaction. The enzyme label beta-GAL converted the substrate 4-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (4-APG) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP), which subsequently was detected by a cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) modified solid graphite electrode. 4-AP was first oxidized at the electrode surface at +300 mV vs Ag/AgCl, and the formed 4-imino quinone (4-IQ) was reduced back to 4-AP by the CDH in the presence of cellobiose. By combining the EFIA with the CDH biosensor, the overall signal of one tracer molecule is amplified at two occasions, i.e., one enzyme label converts the substrate into many 4-AP molecules, and second these are further amplified by the CDH biosensor. The optimum conditions for the EFIA in terms of the molar ratio between tracer and beta-GAL, temperature, flow rate, etc., was investigated with colorimetric detection, using 2-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2-NPG) as the beta-GAL substrate. The performance of both the colorimetric and CDH biosensor detection was investigated and both methods were applied for determination of the model compound atrazine in spiked surface water samples. Detection limits of 0.056 +/- 0.008 and 0.038 +/- 0.007 microg L(-1) and IC50 values of 2.04 +/- 0.294 and 0.42 +/- 0.08 microg L(-1) were obtained for

  11. Rapid electrochemical enzyme assay with enzyme-free calibration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maogen; Karra, Sushma; Gorski, Waldemar

    2013-06-18

    The internally calibrated electrochemical continuous enzyme assay (ICECEA, patent pending) was developed for the fast determination of enzyme activity unit (U). The assay depends on the integration of enzyme-free preassay calibration with the actual enzyme assay in one continuous experiment. Such integration resulted in a uniquely shaped amperometric trace that allowed for the selective picomolar determination of redox enzymes. The ICECEA worked because the preassay calibration did not interfere with the enzyme assay allowing both measurements to be performed in succession in the same solution and at the same electrode. The method displayed a good accuracy (relative error, <3%) and precision (relative standard deviation (RSD), <3%) when tested with different working electrodes (carbon nanotubes/chitosan, glassy carbon, platinum) and enzymes (alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH; lactate dehydrogenase, LDH; xanthine oxidase, XOx; glucose oxidase, GOx). The limit of detection for the ADH, LDH, XOx, and GOx was equal to 0.18, 0.14, 0.0031, and 0.11 U L(-1) (or 4.2, 0.72, 89, and 6.0 pM), respectively. The simplicity, reliability, and short analysis time make the ICECEA competitive with the optical enzyme assays currently in use. PMID:23697336

  12. The asymmetric distribution of enzymic activity between the six subunits of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. Use of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, C G; Nicolaidis, S; Akhtar, M

    1976-01-01

    A method for the preparation of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid) is described. These chloromethyl ketones irreversibly inactivated bovine glutamate dehydrogenase, whereas several other related compounds had no adverse effect on the activity of the enzyme. The inactivation process was shown to be due to the modification of lysine-126. The time-courses for the inactivation and the incorporation of radioactivity from tritiated L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketone into the glutamate dehydrogenase were biphasic. The results were interpreted to suggest the involvement of 'negative co-operative' interactions in the reactivity of lysine-126. From the cumulative evidence it is argued that the first subunit of the enzyme, which takes part in catalysis, makes the largest, and the last the smallest, contribution to the overall catalysis. It is emphasized that three of the six subunits of the enzyme may possess as much as 80% of the total activity of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:10889

  13. Production of polyvinyl alcohol-degrading enzyme with Janthinobacterium sp. and its application in cotton fabric desizing.

    PubMed

    Du, Guocheng; Liu, Liming; Song, Zhaoxia; Hua, Zhaozhe; Zhu, Yang; Chen, Jian

    2007-06-01

    A strain capable of using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as sole carbon source was isolated from soil samples of a textile factory. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis cell morphology, physiology and biochemistry showed that it belonged to Janthinobacterium sp. This is the first report to show that the screened Janthinobacterium sp. could degrade PVA. The optimum nutritional and environmental conditions for PVA-degrading enzyme production by Janthinobacterium sp. were investigated by single-factor tests. Under optimized nutritional and environmental condition in shake flasks, PVA-degrading enzyme reached 5.12 U/mL at 21 h. With PVA-degrading enzyme produced by Janthinobacterium sp. WSH04-01, 80% of PVA could be degraded from cotton fabrics in 3 h. PMID:17345576

  14. Alcohol Dehydrogenase Protects against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction via Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Autophagy: Role of PTEN-Akt-mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiaojiao; Fuller, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Barton, Linzi A.; Henion, Jeremy M.; Guo, Rui; Chen, Yuguo; Ren, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an essential role in ensuring proper folding of the newly synthesized proteins. Aberrant ER homeostasis triggers ER stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. ADH is involved in catalyzing ethanol to acetaldehyde although its role in cardiovascular diseases other than ethanol metabolism still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the impact of ADH on ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies and underlying mechanisms involved using cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Methods ADH and wild-type FVB mice were subjected to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (1 mg/kg, i.p., for 48 hrs). Myocardial mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties, ER stress, autophagy and associated cell signaling molecules were evaluated. Results ER stress compromised cardiac contractile function (evidenced as reduced fractional shortening, peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged relengthening duration and impaired intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis), oxidative stress and upregulated autophagy (increased LC3B, Atg5, Atg7 and p62), along with dephosphorylation of PTEN, Akt and mTOR, all of which were attenuated by ADH. In vitro study revealed that ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte anomaly was abrogated by ADH overexpression or autophagy inhibition using 3-MA. Interestingly, the beneficial effect of ADH was obliterated by autophagy induction, inhibition of Akt and mTOR. ER stress also promoted phosphorylation of the stress signaling ERK and JNK, the effect of which was unaffected by ADH transgene. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggested that ADH protects against ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies possibly via attenuation of oxidative stress and PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathway-regulated autophagy. PMID:26807981

  15. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the mesocarp of ripening fruit of Prunus persica genotypes with different flesh characteristics: changes in activity and protein and transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Gabotti, Damiano; Negrini, Noemi; Morgutti, Silvia; Nocito, Fabio F; Cocucci, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Development of fruit flesh texture quality traits may involve the metabolism of phenolic compounds. This study presents molecular and biochemical results on the possible role played by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) during ripening [S3, S4 I (pre-climacteric) and S4 III (climacteric) stages] of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] fruit with different flesh firmness [non-melting flesh (NMF) 'Oro A'/melting flesh (MF) 'Springcrest' and 'Sanguinella'] and color (blood-flesh Sanguinella). A total of 24 putative full-length PRUPE_CAD genes were identified (in silico analysis) in the peach genome. The most abundant CAD isoforms, encoded by genes located on scaffolds 8 and 6, were probed by specifically developed anti-PRUPE_CAD sc8 and by anti-FaCAD (PRUPE_CAD sc6) polyclonal antibodies, respectively. PRUPE_CAD sc8 proteins (SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE/western blot) appeared responsible for the CAD activity (in vitro/in-gel assays) that increased with ripening (parallel to PRUPE_ACO1 transcripts accumulation and ethylene evolution) only in the mesocarp of Oro A and blood-flesh Sanguinella. Accumulation of PRUPE_CAD sc8 transcripts (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) occurred in all three cultivars, but in Oro A and Springcrest it was not always accompanied by that of the related proteins, suggesting possible post-transcriptional regulation. Flesh firmness, as well as levels of lignin, total phenolics and, where present (Sanguinella), anthocyanins, declined with ripening, suggesting that, at least in the studied peach cultivars, CAD activity is related to neither lignification nor differences in flesh firmness (NMF/MF). Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the high levels of CAD activity/expression in Sanguinella play a role in determining the characteristics of this blood-flesh fruit. PMID:25534876

  16. Rice alcohol dehydrogenase 1 promotes survival and has a major impact on carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm when seeds are germinated in partially oxygenated water

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Greenway, Hank; Matsumura, Hideo; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rice (Oryza sativa) has the rare ability to germinate and elongate a coleoptile under oxygen-deficient conditions, which include both hypoxia and anoxia. It has previously been shown that ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1 (ADH1) is required for cell division and cell elongation in the coleoptile of submerged rice seedlings by means of studies using a rice ADH1-deficient mutant, reduced adh activity (rad). The aim of this study was to understand how low ADH1 in rice affects carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm, and lactate and alanine synthesis in the embryo during germination and subsequent coleoptile growth in submerged seedlings. Methods Wild-type and rad mutant rice seeds were germinated and grown under complete submergence. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 d after imbibition, the embryo and endosperm were separated and several of their metabolites were measured and compared. Key results In the rad embryo, the rate of ethanol fermentation was halved, while lactate and alanine concentrations were 2·4- and 5·7- fold higher in the mutant than in the wild type. Glucose and fructose concentrations in the embryos increased with time in the wild type, but not in the rad mutant. The rad mutant endosperm had lower amounts of the α-amylases RAMY1A and RAMY3D, resulting in less starch degradation and lower glucose concentrations. Conclusions These results suggest that ADH1 is essential for sugar metabolism via glycolysis to ethanol fermentation in both the embryo and endosperm. In the endosperm, energy is presumably needed for synthesis of the amylases and for sucrose synthesis in the endosperm, as well as for sugar transport to the embryo. PMID:24431339

  17. A functionally critical single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase found in ethanol oxidation-deficient Gluconobacter thailandicus.

    PubMed

    Charoenyingcharoen, Piyanat; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Theeragool, Gunjana; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2015-08-10

    The Gluconobacter thailandicus strains NBRC3254, NBRC3255, NBRC3256, NBRC3257, and NBRC3258 are naturally deficient in the ethanol-oxidizing respiratory chain because they do not produce the cytochrome subunit of the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Draft genomes of G. thailandicus strains NBRC3255 and NBRC3257 indicated that the adhB gene encoding the cytochrome subunit contains four base differences when compared to a closely related gene in the public database One of the nucleotide differences results in an Opal codon at the -19th tryptophan (Trp) in the signal sequence for translocation to the periplasmic space (here, the position of +1st residue is assigned to the N-terminal amino acid residue after signal peptide cleavage), while the other differences result in one missense and two silent amino acid alterations. All five of the G. thailandicus strains were shown to have the Trp(-19)Opal alteration. Ethanol oxidation and ADH activities in NBRC3255 were restored by transformation with a derivative of the endogenous adhB gene, of which the -19th Opal codon was altered to encode Trp. These results indicate that this sequence is a functionally critical single nucleotide polymorphism in the cytochrome subunit. Comparative genomic analyses between the draft genomes of NBRC3255 and NBRC3257 revealed that although the two genomes are closely related, they both have a significant number of unique open reading frames. We suggest that the closely related NBRC3255 and NBRC3257 diverged from a common ancestor having the mutation in the adhB gene, whereas no additional functionally critical mutation occurred in the adhB pseudogene over the course of evolution. PMID:25943635

  18. Inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase after 2-propanol exposure in different geographic races of Drosophila mojavensis: lack of evidence for selection at the Adh-2 locus.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Edward; Reed, Laura K; Markow, Therese A

    2005-03-15

    High frequencies of the fast allele of alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (Adh-2F) are found in populations of Drosophila mojavensis that inhabit the Baja California peninsula (race BII) whereas the slow allele (Adh-2S) predominates at most other localities within the species' geographic range. Race BII flies utilize necrotic tissue of pitaya agria cactus (Stenocereus gummosus) which contains high levels of 2-propanol, whereas flies from most other localities utilize different cactus hosts in which 2-propanol levels are low. To test if 2-propanol acts as a selective force on Adh-2 genotype, or whether some other yet undetermined genetic factor is responsible, mature males of D. mojavensis lines derived from the Grand Canyon (race A) and Santa Catalina Island (race C), each with individuals homozygous for Adh-2F and Adh-2S, were exposed to 2-propanol for 24 h and ADH-2 specific activity was then determined on each genotype. Flies from five other localities homozygous for either the fast or slow allele also were examined. Results for all reported races of D. mojavensis were obtained. 2-propanol exposure inhibited ADH-2 specific activity in both genotypes from all localities, but inhibition was significantly less in two populations of race BII flies homozygous for Adh-2F. When F/F and S/S genotypes in flies from the same locality were compared, both genotypes showed high 2-propanol inhibition that was not statistically different, indicating that the F/F genotype alone does not provide a benefit against the inhibitory effects of 2-propanol. ADH-1 activity in female ovaries was inhibited less by 2-propanol than ADH-2. These results do not support the hypothesis that 2-propanol acts as a selective factor favoring the Adh-2F allele. PMID:15726639

  19. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence studies of substrate and cofactor-binding domain mutants in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase uncover an extended network of communication.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Corey W; Tsang, Jonathan E; Klinman, Judith P

    2014-10-22

    Time-resolved fluorescence dynamics are investigated in two mutants of a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ht-ADH): Y25A (at the dimer interface) and V260A (at the cofactor-binding domain). These residues, ca. 32 Å apart, are shown to exhibit opposing low-temperature effects on the hydride tunneling step. Using single-tryptophan constructs at the active site (Trp87) and a remote, surface-exposed site (Trp167), time-dependent Stokes shifts and collisional quenching data allow an analysis of intra-protein dynamical communication. A double mutant, Y25A:V260A, was also inserted into each single-Trp construct and analyzed accordingly. None of the mutations affect fluorescence lifetimes, Stokes shift relaxation rates, and quenching data for the surface-exposed Trp167 to an appreciable extent. By contrast, fluorescent probes of the active-site tryptophan 87 reveal distinctive forms of dynamical communication. Stokes shifts show that the distal Y25A increases active-site flexibility, V260A introduces a temperature-dependent equilibration process not previously reported by such measurements, and the double mutant (Y25A:V260A) eliminates the temperature-dependent transition sensed by the active-site tryptophan in the presence of V260A. Collisional quenching data at Trp87 further show a structural change in the active-site environment/solvation for V260A. In the aggregate, the temperature dependencies of the fluorescence data are distinct from the breaks in behavior previously reported for catalysis and hydrogen/deuterium exchange, attributed to time scales for the interconversion of protein conformational substates that are slower and more global than the local motions monitored within. An extended network of dynamical communication between the protein dimer surface and substrate- and cofactor-binding domains emerges from the flourescent data. PMID:25314615

  20. Picosecond-resolved fluorescent probes at functionally distinct tryptophans within a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase: relationship of temperature-dependent changes in fluorescence to catalysis.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Corey W; Ou, Ryan; Klinman, Judith P

    2014-06-12

    Two single-tryptophan variants were generated in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase with the goal of correlating temperature-dependent changes in local fluorescence with the previously demonstrated catalytic break at ca. 30 °C (Kohen et al., Nature 1999, 399, 496). One tryptophan variant, W87in, resides at the active site within van der Waals contact of bound alcohol substrate; the other variant, W167in, is a remote-site surface reporter located >25 Å from the active site. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence measurements were used to analyze fluorescence lifetimes, time-dependent Stokes shifts, and the extent of collisional quenching at Trp87 and Trp167 as a function of temperature. A subnanosecond fluorescence decay rate constant has been detected for W87in that is ascribed to the proximity of the active site Zn(2+) and shows a break in behavior at 30 °C. For the remainder of the reported lifetime measurements, there is no detectable break between 10 and 50 °C, in contrast with previously reported hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments that revealed a temperature-dependent break analogous to catalysis (Liang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2004, 101, 9556). We conclude that the motions that lead to the rigidification of ht-ADH below 30 °C are likely to be dominated by global processes slower than the picosecond to nanosecond motions measured herein. In the case of collisional quenching of fluorescence by acrylamide, W87in and W167in behave in a similar manner that resembles free tryptophan in water. Stokes shift measurements, by contrast, show distinctive behaviors in which the active-site tryptophan relaxation is highly temperature-dependent, whereas the solvent-exposed tryptophan's dynamics are temperature-independent. These data are concluded to reflect a significantly constrained environment surrounding the active site Trp87 that both increases the magnitude of the Stokes shift and its temperature-dependence. The results are discussed in the context

  1. Picosecond-Resolved Fluorescent Probes at Functionally Distinct Tryptophans within a Thermophilic Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Relationship of Temperature-Dependent Changes in Fluorescence to Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two single-tryptophan variants were generated in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase with the goal of correlating temperature-dependent changes in local fluorescence with the previously demonstrated catalytic break at ca. 30 °C (Kohen et al., Nature1999, 399, 496). One tryptophan variant, W87in, resides at the active site within van der Waals contact of bound alcohol substrate; the other variant, W167in, is a remote-site surface reporter located >25 Å from the active site. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence measurements were used to analyze fluorescence lifetimes, time-dependent Stokes shifts, and the extent of collisional quenching at Trp87 and Trp167 as a function of temperature. A subnanosecond fluorescence decay rate constant has been detected for W87in that is ascribed to the proximity of the active site Zn2+ and shows a break in behavior at 30 °C. For the remainder of the reported lifetime measurements, there is no detectable break between 10 and 50 °C, in contrast with previously reported hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments that revealed a temperature-dependent break analogous to catalysis (Liang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2004, 101, 9556). We conclude that the motions that lead to the rigidification of ht-ADH below 30 °C are likely to be dominated by global processes slower than the picosecond to nanosecond motions measured herein. In the case of collisional quenching of fluorescence by acrylamide, W87in and W167in behave in a similar manner that resembles free tryptophan in water. Stokes shift measurements, by contrast, show distinctive behaviors in which the active-site tryptophan relaxation is highly temperature-dependent, whereas the solvent-exposed tryptophan’s dynamics are temperature-independent. These data are concluded to reflect a significantly constrained environment surrounding the active site Trp87 that both increases the magnitude of the Stokes shift and its temperature-dependence. The results are discussed in the context

  2. Cloning and overexpression of an NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Candida maris involved in (R)-selective reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shigeru; Yano, Miho; Hasegawa, Junzo; Yasohara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    5-((R)-1-Hydroxyethyl)-furo[2,3-c]pyridine ((R)-FPH) is a useful chiral building block in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. An NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (AFPDH) isolated from Candida maris catalyzed the reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine (AFP) to (R)-FPH with 100% enantiomeric excess. The gene encoding AFPDH was cloned and sequenced. The AFPDH gene comprises 762 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 27,230 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The AFPDH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lac promoter. One L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant coexpressing AFPDH and the glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) gene reduced 250 g of AFP to (R)-FPH in an organic solvent two-phase system. Under coupling with NADH regeneration using 2-propanol, 1 L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant expressing the AFPDH gene reduced 150 g of AFP to (R)-FPH. The optical purity of the (R)-FPH formed was 100% enantiomeric excess under both reaction conditions. PMID:22056439

  3. Diagnosing Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea using enzyme immunoassay: the clinical significance of toxin negativity in glutamate dehydrogenase-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Yagihara, Yuka; Misawa, Yoshiki; Sato, Tomoaki; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The enzyme immunoassay (EIA) has lower sensitivity for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B than the polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Furthermore, toxin positivity with EIA performed on C. difficile isolates from stool cultures may be observed even in patients with EIA glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-positive and toxin-negative stool specimens. It is unclear whether such patients should be treated as having CDAD. Methods The present study retrospectively compared patient characteristics, treatment, and diarrhea duration among three groups of patients who underwent stool EIA testing for CDAD diagnosis: a toxin-positive stool group (positive stool group; n=39); a toxin-negative stool/toxin-positive isolate group (discrepant negative/positive group, n=14); and a dual toxin-negative stool and isolate group (dual negative group, n=15). All cases included were confirmed to be GDH positive on EIA test. Results Patients’ backgrounds and comorbidities were not significantly different among three groups. No difference was observed among the three groups with regard to antimicrobial drug use before diarrhea onset. Treatment was received by 82.1% of the positive stool group compared to 7.1% of the discrepant positive/negative group and 0% of the dual negative group, while mean diarrhea duration was 10.6 days compared to 7.9 days (P=0.6006) and 3.4 days (P=0.0312), respectively. Conclusion Even without treatment, patients with toxin-negative stool specimens had shorter diarrhea duration than those with toxin-positive stool specimens even with toxin-positive isolates. These findings may suggest a limited need for CDAD treatment for GDH-positive patients and toxin-negative stool specimens. PMID:27313472

  4. Population screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, using a modified enzyme assay on filter paper dried bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency poses a significant impediment to primaquine use for the elimination of liver stage infection with Plasmodium vivax and for gametocyte clearance, because of the risk of life-threatening haemolytic anaemia that can occur in G6PD deficient patients. Although a range of methods for screening G6PD deficiency have been described, almost all require skilled personnel, expensive laboratory equipment, freshly collected blood, and are time consuming; factors that render them unsuitable for mass-screening purposes. Methods A published WST8/1-methoxy PMS method was adapted to assay G6PD activity in a 96-well format using dried blood spots, and used it to undertake population screening within a malaria survey undertaken in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. The assay results were compared to a biochemical test and a recently marketed rapid diagnostic test. Results Comparative testing with biochemical and rapid diagnostic test indicated that results obtained by filter paper assay were accurate providing that blood spots were assayed within 5 days when stored at ambient temperature and 10 days when stored at 4 degrees. Screening of 8541 people from 41 villages in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands revealed the prevalence of G6PD deficiency as defined by enzyme activity < 30% of normal control was 20.3% and a prevalence of severe deficiency that would predispose to primaquine-induced hemolysis (WHO Class I-II) of 6.9%. Conclusions The assay enabled simple and quick semi-quantitative population screening in a malaria-endemic region. The study indicated a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Isabel Province and highlights the critical need to consider G6PD deficiency in the context of P. vivax malaria elimination strategies in Solomon Islands, particularly in light of the potential role of primaquine mass drug administration. PMID:20684792

  5. Protective effect of heat-treated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) juice on alcohol detoxification in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kim, Na-Hyung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kangmin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-05-01

    In this study, heat-treated cucumber juice was assessed for its protective effect on blood alcohol levels and hepatic alcohol metabolic enzyme system in experimental rats. Initially, during detoxification of alcohol, all groups were orally dosed to 22% alcohol (6ml/kg body weight) along with different concentrations of heat-treated cucumber juice (10, 100 and 500mg/kg) and commercial goods for hangover-removal on sale (2ml/kg). Cucumber juice was dosed before 30 min, and simultaneously after 30min of alcohol administration, and its hepatoprotective effect on blood alcohol levels and hepatic alcohol metabolic enzyme system in experimental rats was evaluated. As a result, after 7h, remarkable reduction was found in the blood alcohol levels for all concentrations of cucumber juice treatment. Treatment with cucumber juice resulted in increasing dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activities in rat liver at 9h after alcohol administration thereby stimulated blood alcohol metabolism as compared with control group. The effect of heat-treated cucumber juice on alcohol detoxification was observed only in the rats treated before 30min from alcohol administration. These findings indicate that heat-treated cucumber juice has significant protective effect on alcohol detoxification in experimental rats, suggesting its usefulness in the treatment of liver injury caused by alcohol consumption. PMID:27383492

  6. Enzyme orientation for direct electron transfer in an enzymatic fuel cell with alcohol oxidase and laccase electrodes.

    PubMed

    Arrocha, Andrés A; Cano-Castillo, Ulises; Aguila, Sergio A; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    A new full enzymatic fuel cell was built and characterized. Both enzymatic electrodes were molecularly oriented to enhance the direct electron transfer between the enzyme active site and the electrode surface. The anode consisted in immobilized alcohol oxidase on functionalized carbon nanotubes with 4-azidoaniline, which acts as active-site ligand to orientate the enzyme molecule. The cathode consisted of immobilized laccase on functionalized graphite electrode with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzoic acid. The enzymatic fuel cell reaches 0.5 V at open circuit voltage with both, ethanol and methanol, while in short circuit the highest current intensity of 250 μA cm(-2) was obtained with methanol. Concerning the power density, the methanol was the best substrate reaching 60 μW cm(-2), while with ethanol 40 μW cm(-2) was obtained. PMID:24953844

  7. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase binary and ternary complexes. Specificity and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-11-01

    Long-chain mannitol dehydrogenases are secondary alcohol dehydrogenases that are of wide interest because of their involvement in metabolism and potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. They differ from other alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases because they do not contain a conserved tyrosine and are not dependent on Zn(2+) or other metal cofactors. The structures of the long-chain mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (54 kDa) from Pseudomonas fluorescens in a binary complex with NAD(+) and ternary complex with NAD(+) and d-mannitol have been determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 1.8 A and R-factors of 0.171 and 0.176, respectively. These results show an N-terminal domain that includes a typical Rossmann fold. The C-terminal domain is primarily alpha-helical and mediates mannitol binding. The electron lone pair of Lys-295 is steered by hydrogen-bonding interactions with the amide oxygen of Asn-300 and the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of Val-229 to act as the general base. Asn-191 and Asn-300 are involved in a web of hydrogen bonding, which precisely orients the mannitol O2 proton for abstraction. These residues also aid in stabilizing a negative charge in the intermediate state and in preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes with the substrate. The catalytic lysine may be returned to its unprotonated state using a rectifying proton tunnel driven by Glu-292 oscillating among different environments. Despite low sequence homology, the closest structural neighbors are glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, N-(1-d-carboxylethyl)-l-norvaline dehydrogenase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, indicating a possible evolutionary relationship among these enzymes. PMID:12196534

  8. NADP-dependent aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase in polyploid wheats and their diploid relatives. On the origin and phylogeny of polyploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Jaaska, V

    1978-09-01

    The three major isoenzymes of the NADP-dependent aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-B), distinguished in polyploid wheats by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, are shown to be coded by homoeoalleles of the locus Adh-2 on short arms of chromosomes of the fifth homoeologous group. Essentially codominant expression of the Adh-2 homoeolleles of composite genomes was observed in young seedlings of hexaploid wheats (T. aestivum s.l.) and tetraploid wheats of the emmer group (T. turgidum s.l.), whereas only the isoenzyme characteristic of the A genome is present in the seedlings of the timopheevii-group tetraploids (T. timopheevii s.str. and T. araraticum).The slowest-moving B(3) isoenzyme of polyploid wheats, coded by the homoeoallele of the B genome, is characteristic of the diploid species Aegilops speltoides S.l., including both its awned and awnless forms, but was not encountered in Ae. bicornis, Ae. sharonensis and Ae. longissima. The last two diploids, as well as Ae. tauschii, Ae. caudata, Triticum monococcum s.str., T. boeoticum s.l. (incl. T. thaoudar) and T. urartu all shared a common isoenzyme coinciding electrophoretically with the band B(2) controlled by the A and D genome homoeoalleles in polyploid wheats. Ae. bicomis is characterized by the slowest isoenzyme, B(4), not found in wheats and in the other diploid Aegilops species studied.Two electrophoretic variants of ADH-B, B(1) and B(2), considered to be alloenzymes of the A genome homoeoallele, were observed in T. dicoccoides, T. dicoccon, T. turgidum. s.str. and T. spelta, whereas B(2) was characteristic of T. timopheevii s.l. and only B(1) was found in the remaining taxa of polyploid wheats. The isoenzyme B(1), not encountered among diploid species, is considered to be a mutational derivative which arose on the tetraploid level from its more ancestral form B(2) characteristic of diploid wheats.The implication of the ADH-B isoenzyme data to the problems of wheat phylogeny and gene evolution is

  9. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  10. Effects of low dosage of stable strontium on serum enzymes in chronic alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Pivon, R.J.; Koch, P.; Nolan, J.T.; Skoryna, S.C.; Perras, J.; Stara, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Systemic effects of low dosage of stable Sr/sup 2 +/ have not been investigated previously with respect to chronic ethanol abuse. They have previously demonstrated that Sr/sup 2 +/ may exert a protective effect against mitochondrial injury in rats. The baseline data for the present investigation was established by a study of 83 chronic alcoholics admitted to a half-way treatment center. In the current study, 6 chronic alcoholic patients were administered Sr carbonate for periods of 4-6 weeks, alternating with treatment-free intervals. Serum GDH was determined using Koch's modification; GGTP was determined using standard methodology. Serum ethanol levels were determined using Alcohol Dipstick Methodology of Kapur and Israel. Serum Sr/sup 2 +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/ levels were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. In patients receiving Sr/sup 2 +/, serum GDH levels were decreased 61-68% when compared to the control periods during the acute alcoholic episodes. The effects of Sr/sup 2 +/ on serum GGTP levels varied in extent of decrease. The preliminary studies indicate that low dosage of Sr/sup 2 +/ exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial function during acute alcoholic episodes. 15 references, 12 figures.

  11. The crystallographic structure of the mannitol 2-dehydrogenase NADP+ binary complex from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Hörer, S; Stoop, J; Mooibroek, H; Baumann, U; Sassoon, J

    2001-07-20

    Mannitol, an acyclic six-carbon polyol, is one of the most abundant sugar alcohols occurring in nature. In the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, it is synthesized from fructose by the enzyme mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (MtDH; EC ) using NADPH as a cofactor. Mannitol serves as the main storage carbon (up to 50% of the fruit body dry weight) and plays a critical role in growth, fruit body development, osmoregulation, and salt tolerance. Furthermore, mannitol dehydrogenases are being evaluated for commercial mannitol production as alternatives to the less efficient chemical reduction of fructose. Given the importance of mannitol metabolism and mannitol dehydrogenases, MtDH was cloned into the pET28 expression system and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Kinetic and physicochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme are indistinguishable from the natural enzyme. The crystal structure of its binary complex with NADP was solved at 1.5-A resolution and refined to an R value of 19.3%. It shows MtDH to be a tetramer and a member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes. The catalytic residues forming the so-called catalytic triad can be assigned to Ser(149), Tyr(169), and Lys(173). PMID:11335726

  12. The substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-08-01

    Alcohols are a rich source of compounds from renewable sources, but they have to be activated in order to allow the modification of their carbon backbone. The latter can be achieved via oxidation to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. As an alternative to (thermodynamically disfavoured) nicotinamide-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, alcohol oxidases make use of molecular oxygen but their application is under-represented in synthetic biotransformations. In this review, the mechanism of copper-containing and flavoprotein alcohol oxidases is discussed in view of their ability to accept electronically activated or non-activated alcohols and their propensity towards over-oxidation of aldehydes yielding carboxylic acids. In order to facilitate the selection of the optimal enzyme for a given biocatalytic application, the substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases is compiled and discussed: Substrates are classified into groups (non-activated prim- and sec-alcohols; activated allylic, cinnamic and benzylic alcohols; hydroxy acids; sugar alcohols; nucleotide alcohols; sterols) together with suitable alcohol oxidases, their microbial source, relative activities and (stereo)selectivities. PMID:26153139

  13. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Results: Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27–33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusion: Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug. PMID:26997722

  14. Physical Activity- and Alcohol-dependent Association Between Air Pollution Exposure and Elevated Liver Enzyme Levels: An Elderly Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lee, Hyemi; Kim, Jin Hee; Jung, Kweon; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The deleterious effects of air pollution on various health outcomes have been demonstrated. However, few studies have examined the effects of air pollution on liver enzyme levels. Methods: Blood samples were drawn up to three times between 2008 and 2010 from 545 elderly individuals who regularly visited a community welfare center in Seoul, Korea. Data regarding ambient air pollutants (particulate matter ≤2.5 μm [PM2.5], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], ozone [O3], carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide) from monitoring stations were used to estimate air pollution exposure. The effects of the air pollutants on the concentrations of three liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase [AST], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase [γ-GTP)]) were evaluated using generalized additive and linear mixed models. Results: Interquartile range increases in the concentrations of the pollutants showed significant associations of PM2.5 with AST (3.0% increase, p=0.0052), ALT (3.2% increase, p=0.0313), and γ-GTP (5.0% increase, p=0.0051) levels; NO2 with AST (3.5% increase, p=0.0060) and ALT (3.8% increase, p=0.0179) levels; and O3 with γ-GTP (5.3% increase, p=0.0324) levels. Significant modification of these effects by exercise and alcohol consumption was found (p for interaction <0.05). The effects of air pollutants were greater in non-exercisers and heavy drinkers. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to air pollutants such as PM2.5, NO2, and O3 is associated with increased liver enzyme levels in the elderly. These adverse effects can be reduced by exercising regularly and abstinence from alcohol. PMID:26081652

  15. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  16. d-Xylose Metabolism in Hypocrea jecorina: Loss of the Xylitol Dehydrogenase Step Can Be Partially Compensated for by lad1-Encoded l-Arabinitol-4-Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Hartl, Lukas; Pail, Manuela; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2003-01-01

    With the goal of the genetic characterization of the d-xylose pathway in Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph: Trichoderma reesei), we cloned the xdh1 gene, encoding NAD-xylitol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the second step of fungal d-xylose catabolism. This gene encodes a 363-amino-acid protein which has a mass of 38 kDa, belongs to the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase family, exhibits high sequence identity to the published sequences of xylitol dehydrogenases from yeast origins, but contains a second, additional binding site for Zn2+. The enzyme catalyzed the NAD-dependent oxidation of xylitol and d-sorbitol and the NADH-dependent reduction of d-xylulose and d-fructose. No activity was observed with NADP, l-arabinose, or l-arabinitol. A single 1.4-kb transcript was formed during growth on xylan, d-xylose, l-arabinose, l-arabinitol and, at a lower abundance, xylitol, d-galactose, galactitol, and lactose but not on d-glucose and glycerol. xdh1 deletion mutants exhibited 50% reduced growth rates on d-xylose, whereas growth rates on xylitol remained unaltered. These mutants contained 30% of the xylitol dehydrogenase activity of the parent strain, indicating the presence of a second xylitol dehydrogenase. This activity was shown to be due to lad1-encoded l-arabinitol-4-dehydrogenase, because H. jecorina xdh1 lad1 double-deletion strains failed to grow on d-xylose or xylitol. In contrast, lad1 deletion strains of H. jecorina grew normally on these carbon sources. These results show that H. jecorina contains a single xylitol dehydrogenase which is encoded by xdh1 and is involved in the metabolism of d-xylose and that lad1-encoded l-arabinitol-4-dehydrogenase can compensate for it partially in mutants with a loss of xdh1 function. PMID:14555469

  17. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration