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Sample records for alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

  1. Interaction of carbohydrates with alcohol dehydrogenase: Effect on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Swati B; Bankar, Sandip B; Granström, Tom; Ojamo, Heikki; Singhal, Rekha S; Survase, Shrikant A

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was covalently conjugated with three different oxidized carbohydrates i.e., glucose, starch and pectin. All the carbohydrates inhibited the enzyme. The inhibition was studied with respect to the inhibition rate constant, involvement of thiol groups in the binding, and structural changes in the enzyme. The enzyme activity decreased to half of its original activity at the concentration of 2 mg/mL of pectin, 4 mg/mL of glucose and 10 mg/mL of starch within 10 min at pH 7. This study showed oxidized pectin to be a potent inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase followed by glucose and starch. Along with the aldehyde-amino group interaction, thiol groups were also involved in the binding between alcohol dehydrogenase and carbohydrates. The structural changes occurring on binding of alcohol dehydrogenase with oxidized carbohydrates was also confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Oxidized carbohydrates could thus be used as potential inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase.

  2. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  3. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  4. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  5. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  6. Evaluation of the impact of functional diversification on Poaceae, Brassicaceae, Fabaceae, and Pinaceae alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Fernandes, Cláudia L; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; de Freitas, Loreta B; Salzano, Francisco M

    2010-05-01

    The plant alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) have been intensively studied in the last years in terms of phylogeny and they have been widely used as a molecular marker. However, almost no information about their three-dimensional structure is available. Several studies point to functional diversification of the ADH, with evidence of its importance, in different organisms, in the ethanol, norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, and bile acid metabolism. Computational results demonstrated that in plants these enzymes are submitted to a functional diversification process, which is reinforced by experimental studies indicating distinct enzymatic functions as well as recruitment of specific genes in different tissues. The main objective of this article is to establish a correlation between the functional diversification occurring in the plant alcohol dehydrogenase family and the three-dimensional structures predicted for 17 ADH belonging to Poaceae, Brassicaceae, Fabaceae, and Pinaceae botanical families. Volume, molecular weight and surface areas are not markedly different among them. Important electrostatic and pI differences were observed with the residues responsible for some of them identified, corroborating the function diversification hypothesis. These data furnish important background information for future specific structure-function and evolutionary investigations.

  7. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  8. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro.

  9. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases: structures of the human liver enzymes, functional properties and evolutionary aspects.

    PubMed

    Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J; von Bahr-Lindström, H; Höög, J O; Vallee, B L

    1987-01-01

    All three types of subunit of class I human alcohol dehydrogenase have been analyzed both at the protein and cDNA levels, and the structures of alpha, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 1, and gamma 2 subunits are known. The same applies to class II pi subunits. Extensive protein data are also available for class III chi subunits. In the class I human isozymes, amino acid exchanges occur at 35 positions in total, with 21-28 replacements between any pair of the alpha/beta/gamma chains. These values, compared with those from species differences between the corresponding human and horse enzymes, suggest that isozyme developments in the class I enzyme resulted from separate gene duplications after the divergence of the human and equine evolutionary lines. All subunits exhibit some unique properties, with slightly closer similarity between the human gamma and horse enzyme subunits and somewhat greater deviations towards the human alpha subunit. Differences are large also in segments close to the active site zinc ligands and other functionally important positions. Species differences are distributed roughly equally between the two types of domain in the subunit, whereas isozyme differences are considerably more common in the catalytic than in the coenzyme-binding domain. These facts illustrate a functional divergence among the isozymes but otherwise similar changes during evolution. Polymorphic forms of beta and gamma subunits are characterized by single replacements at one and two positions, respectively, explaining known deviating properties. Class II and class III subunits are considerably more divergent. Their homology with class I isozymes exhibits only 60-65% positional identity. Hence, they reflect further steps towards the development of new enzymes, with variations well above the horse/human species levels, in contrast to the class I forms. Again, functionally important residues are affected, and patterns resembling those previously established for the divergently related

  10. Suitability of the hydrocarbon-hydroxylating molybdenum-enzyme ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for industrial chiral alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Tataruch, M; Heider, J; Bryjak, J; Nowak, P; Knack, D; Czerniak, A; Liesiene, J; Szaleniec, M

    2014-12-20

    The molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) was successfully applied to catalyze enantiospecific hydroxylation of alkylaromatic and alkylheterocyclic compounds. The optimization of the synthetic procedure involves use of the enzyme in a crude purification state that saves significant preparation effort and is more stable than purified EbDH without exhibiting unwanted side reactions. Moreover, immobilization of the enzyme on a crystalline cellulose support and changes in reaction conditions were introduced in order to increase the amounts of product formed (anaerobic atmosphere, electrochemical electron acceptor recycling or utilization of ferricyanide as alternative electron acceptor in high concentrations). We report here on an extension of effective enzyme activity from 4h to more than 10 days and final product yields of up to 0.4-0.5g/l, which represent a decent starting point for further optimization. Therefore, we expect that the hydrocarbon-hydroxylation capabilities of EbDH may be developed into a new process of industrial production of chiral alcohols.

  11. Suitability of the hydrocarbon-hydroxylating molybdenum-enzyme ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for industrial chiral alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Tataruch, M; Heider, J; Bryjak, J; Nowak, P; Knack, D; Czerniak, A; Liesiene, J; Szaleniec, M

    2014-12-20

    The molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) was successfully applied to catalyze enantiospecific hydroxylation of alkylaromatic and alkylheterocyclic compounds. The optimization of the synthetic procedure involves use of the enzyme in a crude purification state that saves significant preparation effort and is more stable than purified EbDH without exhibiting unwanted side reactions. Moreover, immobilization of the enzyme on a crystalline cellulose support and changes in reaction conditions were introduced in order to increase the amounts of product formed (anaerobic atmosphere, electrochemical electron acceptor recycling or utilization of ferricyanide as alternative electron acceptor in high concentrations). We report here on an extension of effective enzyme activity from 4h to more than 10 days and final product yields of up to 0.4-0.5g/l, which represent a decent starting point for further optimization. Therefore, we expect that the hydrocarbon-hydroxylation capabilities of EbDH may be developed into a new process of industrial production of chiral alcohols. PMID:24998764

  12. Alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases are both divided into two protein types, and structural properties cross-relate the different enzyme activities within each type.

    PubMed Central

    Jörnvall, H; Persson, M; Jeffery, J

    1981-01-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase from sheep liver shows similarities to mammalian and yeast alcohol dehydrogenases. Comparisons based on peptides from segments of sorbitol dehydrogenase reveal that homologous regions with 38% identity include two ligands to the active site zinc atom in liver alcohol dehydrogenase, as well as further important residues. Similarities in in other regions are less extensive, exactly as they are between different alcohol dehydrogenases. In all aspects, sorbitol dehydrogenase appears as a typical member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. On the other hand, alcohol dehydrogenase from Drosophila, which has a shorter subunit, is not closely related to either of these enzymes, except for a region that probably corresponds to the first part of the coenzyme binding domain in many dehydrogenases. Instead, Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase in its supposed catalytic region shows similarities toward Klebsiella ribitol dehydrogenase, which also has a small subunit. It may be concluded that both alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases show two types of protein subunit, reflecting an early subdivision of polypeptide types into "long" and "short" subunits rather than into different enzymatic specificities or quaternary structures. The relationships explain known properties of all these enzymes and provide insight into functional mechanisms and evolutionary interpretations. PMID:7027257

  13. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  14. Liposomal encapsulation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase with cofactor for stabilization of the enzyme structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Sato, Mami; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Nakao, Katsumi

    2008-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) with its cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) could be stably encapsulated in liposomes composed of POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine). The YADH- and NAD+-containing liposomes (YADH-NADL) were 100 nm in mean diameter. The liposomal YADH and NAD+ concentrations were 2.3 mg/mL and 3.9 mM, respectively. A synergistic effect of the liposomal encapsulation and the presence of NAD+ was examined on the thermal stability of YADH at 45 and 50 degrees C. The enzyme stability of the YADH-NADL was compared to the stabilities of the liposomal YADH (YADHL) containing 3.3 mg/mL YADH without NAD+ as well as the free YADH with and without NAD+. Free YADH was increasingly deactivated during its incubation at 45 degrees C for 2 h with decrease of the enzyme concentration from 3.3 to 0.01 mg/mL because of the dissociation of tetrameric YADH into its subunits. At that temperature, the coexistence of free NAD+ at 3.9 mM improved the stability of free YADH at 2.3 mg/mL through forming their thermostable complex, although the stabilization effect of NAD+ was lowered at 50 degrees C. The turbidity measurements for the above free YADH solution with and without NAD+ revealed that the change in the enzyme tertiary structure was much more pronounced at 50 degrees C than at 45 degrees C even in the presence of NAD+. This suggests that YADH was readily deactivated in free solution due to a decrease in the inherent affinity of YADH with NAD+. On the other hand, both liposomal enzyme systems, YADH-NADL and YADHL, showed stabilities at both 45 and 50 degrees C much higher than those of the above free enzyme systems, YADH/NAD+ and YADH. These results imply that the liposome membranes stabilized the enzyme tertiary and thus quaternary structures. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of the YADH-NADL showed a stability higher than that of the YADHL with a more remarkable effect of NAD+ at 50 degrees C than at 45 degrees C. This was

  15. A comparison of two novel alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes (ADH1 and ADH2) from the extreme halophile Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Timpson, Leanne M; Liliensiek, Ann-Kathrin; Alsafadi, Diya; Cassidy, Jennifer; Sharkey, Michael A; Liddell, Susan; Allers, Thorsten; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Haloarchaeal alcohol dehydrogenases are exciting biocatalysts with potential industrial applications. In this study, two alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii (HvADH1 and HvADH2) were homologously expressed and subsequently purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography. The proteins appeared to copurify with endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases, and a double Δadh2 Δadh1 gene deletion strain was constructed to prevent this occurrence. Purified HvADH1 and HvADH2 were compared in terms of stability and enzymatic activity over a range of pH values, salt concentrations, and temperatures. Both enzymes were haloalkaliphilic and thermoactive for the oxidative reaction and catalyzed the reductive reaction at a slightly acidic pH. While the NAD(+)-dependent HvADH1 showed a preference for short-chain alcohols and was inherently unstable, HvADH2 exhibited dual cofactor specificity, accepted a broad range of substrates, and, with respect to HvADH1, was remarkably stable. Furthermore, HvADH2 exhibited tolerance to organic solvents. HvADH2 therefore displays much greater potential as an industrially useful biocatalyst than HvADH1.

  16. Regulation of enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase through its interactions with pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Quanhui; Tong, Wei; Bai, Xue; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jiyuan; Liu, Siqi

    2012-01-20

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) from thermophilic microorganisms are interesting enzymes that have their potential applications in biotechnology and potentially provide insight into the mechanisms of action of thermo-tolerant proteins. The molecular mechanisms of ADHs under thermal stress in vivo have yet to be explored. Herein, we employed a proteomic strategy to survey the possible interactions of secondary-ADH (2-ADH) with other proteins in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) cultured at 75°C and found that 2-ADH, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and several glycolytic enzymes coexisted in a protein complex. Using anion exchange chromatography, the elution profile indicated that the native 2-ADH was present in two forms, PFOR-bound and PFOR-free. Immuno-precipitation and pull down analysis further validated the interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR. The kinetic behaviours of 2-ADH either in the recombinant or native form were evaluated with different substrates. The enzyme activity of 2-ADH was inhibited in a non-competitive mode by PFOR, implying the interaction of 2-ADH and PFOR negatively regulated alcohol formation. In T. tengcongensis, PFOR is an enzyme complex located at the upstream of 2-ADH in the alcohol generation pathway. These findings, therefore, offered a plausible mechanism for how alcohol metabolism is regulated by hetero-interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR, especially in anaerobic thermophiles. PMID:22222371

  17. Hydroperoxidic inhibitor of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity, tightly bound to the enzyme-NAD+ complex, characteristically degrades the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Skurský, L; Rezác, M; Khan, A N; Zídek, L; Rocek, J

    1992-01-01

    The strong inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLAD) by p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide (XyHP) is only transient, XyHP behaves also as a pseudo-substrate of the enzyme and in the presence of NAD+, is degraded by HLAD to (as yet unidentified) non-inhibiting products while the NAD+ is converted to a derivative similar to the "NADX", originally observed in an analogous reaction of HLAD with hydrogen peroxide. The apparent KM for XyHP is approximately 10(4) times smaller than that for H2O2. The catalytic constant kcat for HLAD degradation of XyHP is two orders of magnitude less than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. XyHP inhibits both directions of the alcohol-aldehyde interconversion with equal potency. The first step of the inhibition mechanism is a tight binding of XyHP to the binary HLAD-NAD+ complex. PMID:1284958

  18. Interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase with tert-butylhydroperoxide: stimulation of the horse liver and inhibition of the yeast enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, A G; Winston, G W

    2000-08-01

    Preincubation of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) with the oxidative agent, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) results in a twofold stimulation of the ethanol dehydrogenase activity of this enzyme. This stimulation was dependent on tBOOH concentration up to 100 mM; above this concentration tBOOH did not further stimulate ethanol oxidation by HLADH. Active-site-directed reagents and classical ADH binary complexes were used to probe the possible mechanism of this activating effect. The rate and extent of stimulation by tBOOH is strongly reduced by binary complexes with NAD(+) or NADH, whose pyrophosphate groups bind to Arg-47 and Arg-369. In contrast stimulation by tBOOH was not prevented by AMP or the sulfhydryl reagents dithiothreitol and glutathione, suggesting, respectively, a lack of role for Lys-228 and sulfhydryl group oxidation in the stimulation by tBOOH. In contrast to the liver enzyme, treatment of yeast ADH (YADH) with tBOOH irreversibly inhibited its ethanol dehydrogenase activity. Inhibition of YADH by tBOOH approximated first-order rate kinetics with respect to enzyme at fixed concentrations of tBOOH between 0.5 to 300 mM. Four -SH groups per molecule of YADH were modified by tBOOH, whereas only two -SH groups were modified in HLADH. The stimulation of HLADH by tBOOH is suggested to be due to destabilization of the catalytic Zn-coordination sphere and amino acids associated with coenzyme binding in the active site, while inactivation of YADH appears to be associated with -SH group oxidation by the peroxide.

  19. A unique enzyme of acetic acid bacteria, PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, is also present in Frateuria aurantia.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-08-01

    A membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was purified from Frateuria aurantia LMG 1558(T). Although F. aurantia belongs to a group of γ-Proteobacteria, the characteristics of its PQQ-ADH were similar to the enzyme characteristics of the typical high-acetic acid-resistant bacterium Gluconacetobacter europaeus from the group of α-Proteobacteria. The PQQ-dependent ADH was solubilized from the membranes and purified after anionic, cationic, and affinity chromatography with specific activity of 117 U/mg. The purified enzyme was estimated to be composed of two subunits of ca. 72 and 45 kDa, as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme had maximum activity at pH 4.5 and showed the highest substrate specificity to ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol. The deduced sequences of cloned genes adhA and adhB encoding subunits I and II of PQQ-ADH showed 80 % amino acid (AA) identity to AdhA and 68 % AA identity to AdhB of Ga. europaeus V3 (LMG 18494). Because of the high similarity between genes encoding subunits I and II of PQQ-ADH and its homologous genes found in a distantly related taxonomic group of acetic acid bacteria, the results suggest the possibility of horizontal gene transfer between these two groups of genera.

  20. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  1. Pyrene excimer fluorescence of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase: a sensitive probe to investigate ligand binding and unfolding pathway of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Dasgupta, Debjani; Panda, Dulal

    2006-01-01

    The cysteine residues of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) were covalently modified by N-(1-pyrenyl) maleimide (PM). A maximum of 3.4 cysteines per YADH monomer could be modified by PM. The secondary structure of PM-YADH was found to be similar to that of the native YADH using far-UV circular dichroism. The covalent modification of YADH by PM inhibited the enzymatic activity indicating that the active site of the enzyme was altered. PM-YADH displayed maximum excimer fluorescence at an incorporation ratio of 2.6 mol of PM per monomeric subunit of YADH. Nucleotide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) divalent zinc and ethanol reduced the excimer fluorescence of PM-YADH indicating that these agents induce conformational changes in the enzyme. Guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding of YADH was analyzed using tryptophan fluorescence, pyrene excimer fluorescence and enzymatic activity. The unfolding of YADH was found to occur in a stepwise manner. The loss of enzymatic activity preceded the global unfolding of the protein. Further, changes in tryptophan fluorescence with increasing GdnHCl suggested that YADH was completely unfolded by 2.5 M GdnHCl. Interestingly, residual structures of YADH were detected even in the presence of 5 M GdnHCl using the excimer fluorescence of PM-YADH.

  2. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-07

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  3. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E.; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  4. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  5. The physiological role of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H A; Perkins, J R

    1970-07-01

    , but there is no strict parallelism between the capacity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase and dietary habit. 10. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase of gastric mucosa was much decreased in two out of the three germ-free rats tested. This is taken to indicate that the enzyme, like gastric urease, may be of microbial origin. 11. When the body was flooded with ethanol by the addition of 10% ethanol to the drinking water the alcohol concentration in the portal vein rose to 15mm and only a few percent of the incoming ethanol was cleared by the liver.

  6. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  7. An enzyme-amplified microtiter plate assay for ethanol: Its application to the detection of peanut ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Vercellotti, J.R.; Sanders, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    A calorimetric microliter plate assay for ethanol amplified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was developed. In the assay ethanol from a sample took part in a chain-reaction catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and amplified by ALDH in the presence of NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, and p-ibdonitrotetrazolium-violet (INT-violet)(a precursor of red product). The resultant reaction gave a red color, the intensity of which was proportional to the amount of ethanol present. Using the technique, the content of activity from peanuts of differing maturity and curing stages were determined respectively. Data showed that immature peanuts had a higher level of ethanol and a lower ADH activity than mature peanuts, and that the level of ethanol and ADH activity decreased with the curing time. This indicates that peanut maturity and curing have an effect on ethanol. Also, this implies that other peanut volatiles could be affected in the same way as ethanol, a major volatile in peanuts.

  8. Elevated glutathione level does not protect against chronic alcohol mediated apoptosis in recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A over-expressing alcohol metabolizing enzymes--alcohol dehydrogenase and Cytochrome P450 2E1.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2011-06-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol leads to liver injury. Ethanol-inducible Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) plays a critical role in alcohol mediated oxidative stress due to its ability to metabolize ethanol. In the present study, using the recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A that over-expresses the alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and CYP2E1; and control HepG2 cells, the mechanism and mode of cell death due to chronic ethanol exposure were studied. Untreated VL-17A cells exhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress when compared with untreated HepG2 cells. Chronic alcohol exposure, i.e., 100 mM ethanol treatment for 72 h caused a significant decrease in viability (47%) in VL-17A cells but not in HepG2 cells. Chronic ethanol mediated cell death in VL-17A cells was predominantly apoptotic, with increased oxidative stress as the underlying mechanism. Chronic ethanol exposure of VL-17A cells resulted in 1.1- to 2.5-fold increased levels of ADH and CYP2E1. Interestingly, the level of the antioxidant GSH was found to be 3-fold upregulated in VL-17A cells treated with ethanol, which may be a metabolic adaptation to the persistent and overwhelming oxidative stress. In conclusion, the increased GSH level may not be sufficient enough to protect VL-17A cells from chronic alcohol mediated oxidative stress and resultant apoptosis. PMID:21414402

  9. Partial Similarities Between Yeast and Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Jörnvall, Hans

    1973-01-01

    The primary structure of about half of the protein chain of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined and compared with the amino-acid sequences of other dehydrogenases. The enzyme is found to be distantly related to horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase, although these two proteins have different quaternary structures and subunit sizes. Some regions show no significant similarities, but long segments within the N-terminal parts of the molecules are homologous, suggesting a common and important function for these segments. Ancestral connections between some different dehydrogenases can be concluded and the degree of evolutionary changes may be estimated. PMID:4599620

  10. The role of hydration in enzyme activity and stability: 2. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity and stability in a continuous gas phase reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Russell, A J

    1996-03-20

    The degree of enzyme hydration is the one of the most important factors which can affect enzyme activity and stability in water-limited environments. Alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH) has been used as a model enzyme to study the effects of hydration on activity, stability, and cofactor stability with gas phase substrates. In all cases, the enzyme is essentially inactive until a temperature-independent degree of surface coverage by water molecules has been reached. The critical water content corresponds to 40-50% of a single monolayer. Careful control of the degree of hydration, by adjustments to gas humidity and temperature, enables the enzyme to be stabilized for periods exceeding 1 month, whereas in water the half-life of the enzyme is 30 min. The reaction with gas phase substrates follows a pseudo-first-order mechanism with an activation energy of 7.5 +/- kcal/mol, which is almost half of that in aqueous solution. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  12. Genetic and Biochemical Basis of Enzyme Activity Variation in Natural Populations. I. Alcohol Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John F.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies by various authors suggest that variation in gene regulation may be common in nature, and might be of great evolutionary consequence; but the ascertainment of variation in gene regulation has proven to be a difficult problem. In this study, we explore this problem by measuring alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in Drosophila melanogaster strains homozygous for various combinations of given second and third chromosomes sampled from a natural population. The structural locus (Adh) coding for ADH is on the second chromosome. The results show that: (1) there are genes, other than Adh, that affect the levels of ADH activity; (2) at least some of these "regulatory" genes are located on the third chromosome, and thus are not adjacent to the Adh locus; (3) variation exists in natural populations for such regulatory genes; (4) the effect of these regulatory genes varies as they interact with different second chromosomes; (5) third chromosomes with high-activity genes are either partially or completely dominant over chromosomes with low-activity genes; (6) the effects of the regulatory genes are pervasive throughout development; and (7) the third chromosome genes regulate the levels of ADH activity by affecting the number of ADH molecules in the flies. The results are consistent with the view that the evolution of regulatory genes may play an important role in adaptation. PMID:97168

  13. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a zinc enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, J; Chesters, J; Mills, C; Sadler, P J; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is given that tetrameric sorbitol dehydrogenase from sheep liver contains one zinc atom per subunit, most probably located at the active site, and no other specifically bound zinc or iron atom. In alcohol dehydrogenases that are structurally related to sorbitol dehydrogenase, more than one zinc atom per subunit can complicate investigations of zinc atom function. Therefore, sorbitol dehydrogenase will be particularly valuable for defining the precise roles of zinc in alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases, and for establishing correlations of structure and function with other important zinc-containing proteins. PMID:6370679

  14. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here

  15. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  16. The PduQ Enzyme Is an Alcohol Dehydrogenase Used to Recycle NAD+ Internally within the Pdu Microcompartment of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Fan, Chenguang; Sinha, Sharmistha; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica uses a bacterial microcompartment (MCP) for coenzyme B12-dependent 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) utilization (Pdu). The Pdu MCP consists of a protein shell that encapsulates enzymes and cofactors required for metabolizing 1,2-PD as a carbon and energy source. Here we show that the PduQ protein of S. enterica is an iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase used for 1,2-PD catabolism. PduQ is also demonstrated to be a new component of the Pdu MCP. In addition, a series of in vivo and in vitro studies show that a primary function of PduQ is to recycle NADH to NAD+ internally within the Pdu MCP in order to supply propionaldehyde dehydrogenase (PduP) with its required cofactor (NAD+). Genetic tests determined that a pduQ deletion mutant grew slower than wild-type Salmonella on 1,2-PD and that this phenotype was not complemented by a non-MCP associated Adh2 from Zymomonas that catalyzes the same reaction. This suggests that PduQ has a MCP-specific function. We also found that a pduQ deletion mutant had no growth defect in a genetic background having a second mutation that prevents MCP formation which further supports a MCP-specific role for PduQ. Moreover, studies with purified Pdu MCPs demonstrated that the PduQ enzyme can convert NADH to NAD+ to supply the PduP reaction in vitro. Cumulatively, these studies show that the PduQ enzyme is used to recycle NADH to NAD+ internally within the Pdu MCP. To our knowledge, this is the first report of internal recycling as a mechanism for cofactor homeostasis within a bacterial MCP. PMID:23077559

  17. The PduQ enzyme is an alcohol dehydrogenase used to recycle NAD+ internally within the Pdu microcompartment of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Fan, Chenguang; Sinha, Sharmistha; Bobik, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica uses a bacterial microcompartment (MCP) for coenzyme B(12)-dependent 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) utilization (Pdu). The Pdu MCP consists of a protein shell that encapsulates enzymes and cofactors required for metabolizing 1,2-PD as a carbon and energy source. Here we show that the PduQ protein of S. enterica is an iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase used for 1,2-PD catabolism. PduQ is also demonstrated to be a new component of the Pdu MCP. In addition, a series of in vivo and in vitro studies show that a primary function of PduQ is to recycle NADH to NAD(+) internally within the Pdu MCP in order to supply propionaldehyde dehydrogenase (PduP) with its required cofactor (NAD(+)). Genetic tests determined that a pduQ deletion mutant grew slower than wild-type Salmonella on 1,2-PD and that this phenotype was not complemented by a non-MCP associated Adh2 from Zymomonas that catalyzes the same reaction. This suggests that PduQ has a MCP-specific function. We also found that a pduQ deletion mutant had no growth defect in a genetic background having a second mutation that prevents MCP formation which further supports a MCP-specific role for PduQ. Moreover, studies with purified Pdu MCPs demonstrated that the PduQ enzyme can convert NADH to NAD(+) to supply the PduP reaction in vitro. Cumulatively, these studies show that the PduQ enzyme is used to recycle NADH to NAD(+) internally within the Pdu MCP. To our knowledge, this is the first report of internal recycling as a mechanism for cofactor homeostasis within a bacterial MCP.

  18. The role of hydration in enzyme activity and stability: 1. Water adsorption by alcohol dehydrogenase in a continuous gas phase reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Russell, A J

    1996-03-20

    The adsorption of water by alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH) has been measured in a continuous-flow gas reactor at varying temperatures. Adsorption isotherms in the presence of gaseous organic substrates are compared to those from organic-free gas mixtures. Almost no effect of the hydrophobic molecule on total water adsorption was observed. A rarely mentioned multilayer isotherm model from the 1930s, the Huttig's isotherm, has been found to fit the experimental data with extremely good accuracy. The model enables the calculation of both the heat of adsorption of water to the enzyme and the total amount of water necessary for monolayer coverage. The heat of adsorption of water in the first layer is approximately -16 kcal/mol. This tight binding of water, which is much higher than the heat of condensation of pure water, helps to explain the kinetic properties of YADH-catalyzed reactions on vapor phase substrates. While the monolayer coverage is temperature independent, the enzyme demonstrates hysteresis when transitioning between adsorption and desorption. The hysteresis observed in water sorption studies may also explain previously reported properties of the enzyme. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  20. Hypoxic and Anoxic Induction of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Roots and Shoots of Seedlings of Zea mays (Adh Transcripts and Enzyme Activity).

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, D. L.; Cobb, B. G.; Johnson, J. R.; Drew, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is one of a number of enzymes of glycolysis and fermentation known to be synthesized preferentially under low O2 conditions. We examined levels of Adh1 transcripts and of ADH activity in 5-mm root tips, root axes (the remainder of the seminal root), and shoots of maize (Zea mays L. cv TX 5855) seedlings. Seedlings with roots averaging about 60-mm long were transferred from fully aerobic conditions (solutions sparged with 40% [v/v] O2) to anaerobic (O2-free) conditions, or to an intermediate O2 concentration. There was no prior acclimation to low O2. In root tips, anoxia induced Adh1 transcripts and enzyme activity at 6 h, but this was followed by a rapid decline so that at 12 to 18 h neither were detectable and the root tips were dead. In contrast, higher levels of Adh1 transcripts and enzyme activity were maintained for at least 48 h in root axes and shoots. When induction at 6 h was measured over a wide range of O2 concentrations, a peak in ADH activity occurred in all tissues at 4% (v/v) O2. Maximum levels of transcripts, however, were in the range of 0 to 4% O2, depending on the tissue. The time course of hypoxic induction (at 4% O2) in root tips showed a peak in transcript levels at 6 h, whereas ADH activity continued to rise throughout the 24-h experiment. These results show that in root tips, ADH induction by anoxia was small and transient relative to induction by hypoxia. PMID:12231696

  1. Interactions between heparinoids and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, H; Valusová, E; Antalík, M

    1997-07-01

    The interaction between polysulfated polysaecharides (low-molecular-weight heparin LMWH, dextran sulfate DS and pentosan sulfate PS) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) was investigated. The fluorescence and UV spectra of YADH after adding the tested polysaccharides have confirmed the interaction between the enzyme and these compounds. Kinetic studies have shown that LMWH, DS and PS are inhibitors of YADH (mixed type with respect to NAD). The most potent inhibitor is PS (ID50=37.5 ng/ml, Ki=0.6 muM). The inhibition effect depends on the ionic strength (the inhibition decreased by about 50% in the presence of 100 mM Na2SO4) and pH value (the inhibition decreased at pH>7). The results indicate that the inhibition effect of these polyanions is caused by their electrostatic interactions with the NAD-binding region of YADH.

  2. Optimization of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-04-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently influence the immobilization efficiency, expressed in terms of residual activity and protein loading. Residual activity of 79% was achieved with ADH from bakers' yeast (YADH) after optimizing the immobilization parameters. A step-wise drying process has been found to be more effective than one-step drying. A hypothesis of deactivation through bubble nucleation during drying of the enzyme/glass bead suspension at low drying pressure (<45 kPa) is experimentally verified. In the case of ADH from Lactobacillus brevis (LBADH), >300% residual activity was found after drying. Hyperactivation of the enzyme is probably caused by structural changes in the enzyme molecule during the drying process. ADH from Thermoanaerobacter species (ADH T) is found to be stable under drying conditions (>15 kPa) in contrast to LBADH and YADH.

  3. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  4. The metabolism of fatty alcohols in lipid nanoparticles by alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dong, X; Mumper, R J

    2006-09-01

    Fatty alcohols are commonly used in lipid-based drug delivery systems including parenteral emulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (NPs). The purpose of these studies was to determine whether horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH), a NAD-dependent enzyme, could metabolize the fatty alcohols within the NPs and thus serve as a mechanism to degrade these NPs in the body. Solid nanoparticles (<100 nm) were engineered from oil-in-water microemulsion precursors using emulsifying wax NF as the oil phase and polyoxyethylene 20-stearyl ether (Brij 78) as the surfactant. Emulsifying wax contains both cetyl and stearyl alcohols. NPs were incubated with the enzyme and NAD+ at 37 degrees C for up to 48 h, and the concentrations of fatty alcohols were quantitatively determined over time by gas chromatography (GC). The concentrations of cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol within the NPs decreased to only 10-20% remaining after 15-24 h of incubation. In parallel, NP size, turbidity and the fluorescence intensity of NADH all increased over time. It was concluded that horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase/NAD+ was able to metabolize the fatty alcohols within the NPs, suggesting that NPs made of fatty alcohols may be metabolized in the body via endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme systems. PMID:16954110

  5. The metabolism of fatty alcohols in lipid nanoparticles by alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dong, X; Mumper, R J

    2006-09-01

    Fatty alcohols are commonly used in lipid-based drug delivery systems including parenteral emulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (NPs). The purpose of these studies was to determine whether horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH), a NAD-dependent enzyme, could metabolize the fatty alcohols within the NPs and thus serve as a mechanism to degrade these NPs in the body. Solid nanoparticles (<100 nm) were engineered from oil-in-water microemulsion precursors using emulsifying wax NF as the oil phase and polyoxyethylene 20-stearyl ether (Brij 78) as the surfactant. Emulsifying wax contains both cetyl and stearyl alcohols. NPs were incubated with the enzyme and NAD+ at 37 degrees C for up to 48 h, and the concentrations of fatty alcohols were quantitatively determined over time by gas chromatography (GC). The concentrations of cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol within the NPs decreased to only 10-20% remaining after 15-24 h of incubation. In parallel, NP size, turbidity and the fluorescence intensity of NADH all increased over time. It was concluded that horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase/NAD+ was able to metabolize the fatty alcohols within the NPs, suggesting that NPs made of fatty alcohols may be metabolized in the body via endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme systems.

  6. Histidine 51 facilitates proton transfer in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.M.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    Operating through a proton relay system, His-51 has been proposed to serve as a base during ethanol oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase. This residue is highly conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. They have used mutamer directed mutagenesis to change this residue to Gln-51. Diethyl pyrocarbonate treatment decreases the activity of the wild type enzyme 60-fold, whereas the Gln-51 enzyme is inactivated by only 5-fold. The rate of inactivation is also much slower with the mutant enzyme. They conclude that His-51 is the reactive residue in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. The mutation also alters the Km for acetaldehyde and the pH dependence of several kinetic constants. At pH 7.0 the Km for acetaldehyde is 18-fold higher in the Gln-51 enzyme, whereas Vmax for acetaldehyde reduction is the same as with the wild type enzyme. For ethanol oxidation the pH dependence of the log of Vmax and V/K shows a linear dependence with a slope of 0.5 and no discernible pK. They propose a mechanism that can explain these data. For the Gln-51 enzyme, after the ternary complex has formed in an Ordered Bi mechanism, a random component for proton release and hydride transfer occurs. With histidine at position 51, serving as a base, a more rapid proton release from the enzyme-NAD-ethanol complex precedes product formation.

  7. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  8. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase: amino acid substitution in the beta 2 beta 2 Oriental isozyme explains functional properties, establishes an active site structure, and parallels mutational exchanges in the yeast enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J; Vallee, B L; Bosron, W F; Li, T K

    1984-01-01

    The homodimeric Oriental beta 2 beta 2 isozyme of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase, corresponding to an allelic variant at the ADH2 gene locus, was studied in order to define the amino acid exchange in relation to the beta 1 beta 1 isozyme, the predominant allelic form among Caucasians. Sequence analysis reveals that the amino acid substitution occurs at position 7 of the largest CNBr fragment, corresponding to position 47 of the whole protein chain. Here, the beta 2 form has a histidine residue, while, in common with other characterized mammalian liver alcohol dehydrogenases, the beta 1 form has an arginine residue. This exchange does not affect the adjacent cysteine-46 residue, which is a protein ligand to the active-site zinc atom, thus clarifying previously inconsistent results. The histidine/arginine-47 mutational replacement corresponds to a position that binds the pyrophosphate group of the coenzyme NAD(H); this explains the functional differences between the beta 1 beta 1 and beta 2 beta 2 isozymes, including both a lower pH optimum and higher turnover number of beta 2 beta 2, which is likely to be the mutant form. The exchange demonstrates the existence of parallel but separate mutations in the evolution of alcohol dehydrogenases because these mammalian enzymes differ at exactly the same position by the same type of substitution as is found between a mutant and the wild-type constitutive forms of the corresponding yeast enzyme. PMID:6374651

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Sunagawa, M; Mori, A; Imai, C; Fukuda, M; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1989-06-01

    A genomic library of Acetobacter aceti DNA was constructed by using a broad-host-range cosmid vector. Complementation of a spontaneous alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient mutant resulted in the isolation of a plasmid designated pAA701. Subcloning and deletion analysis of pAA701 limited the region that complemented the deficiency in alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and showed that this region contained the full structural gene for the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme complex. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene showed homology with sequences of methanol dehydrogenase structural genes of Paracoccus denitrificans and Methylobacterium organophilum.

  10. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  11. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer.

  12. Crystal structure of cod liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase: substrate pocket and structurally variable segments.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, S.; el Ahmad, M.; Danielsson, O.; Jörnvall, H.; Eklund, H.

    1996-01-01

    The structural framework of cod liver alcohol dehydrogenase is similar to that of horse and human alcohol dehydrogenases. In contrast, the substrate pocket differs significantly, and main differences are located in three loops. Nevertheless, the substrate pocket is hydrophobic like that of the mammalian class I enzymes and has a similar topography in spite of many main-chain and side-chain differences. The structural framework of alcohol dehydrogenase is also present in a number of related enzymes like glucose dehydrogenase and quinone oxidoreductase. These enzymes have completely different substrate specificity, but also for these enzymes, the corresponding loops of the substrate pocket have significantly different structures. The domains of the two subunits in the crystals of the cod enzyme further differ by a rotation of the catalytic domains by about 6 degrees. In one subunit, they close around the coenzyme similarly as in coenzyme complexes of the horse enzyme, but form a more open cleft in the other subunit, similar to the situation in coenzyme-free structures of the horse enzyme. The proton relay system differs from the mammalian class I alcohol dehydrogenases. His 51, which has been implicated in mammalian enzymes to be important for proton transfer from the buried active site to the surface is not present in the cod enzyme. A tyrosine in the corresponding position is turned into the substrate pocket and a water molecule occupies the same position in space as the His side chain, forming a shorter proton relay system. PMID:8845755

  13. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  14. Physicochemical Characterization of a Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Annalisa; Thorne, Natasha; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Xin; Shen, Min; D'Auria, Sabato; Auld, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we characterize an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PyAeADHII). We have previously found that PyAeADHII has no activity when standard ADH substrates are used but is active when α-tetralone is used as substrate. Here, to gain insights into enzyme function, we screened several chemical libraries for enzymatic modulators using an assay employing α-tetralone. The results indicate that PyAeADHII activity in the presence of α-tetralone was inhibited by compounds such as flunarizine. We also examined metal coordination of the enzyme in solution by performing metal substitution of the enzyme-bound zinc (Zn2+) with cobalt. The solution-based absorption spectra for cobalt substituted PyAeADHII supports substitution at the structural Zn2+ site. To gain structural insight, we obtained the crystal structure of both wild-type and cobalt-substituted PyAeADHII at 1.75 Å and 2.20 Å resolution, respectively. The X-ray data confirmed one metal ion per monomer present only at the structural site with otherwise close conservation to other ADH enzymes. We next determined the co-crystal structure of the NADPH-bound form of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution to help define the active site region of the enzyme and this data shows close structural conservation with horse ADH, despite the lack of a catalytic Zn2+ ion in PyAeADHII. Modeling of α-tetralone into the NADPH bound structure suggests an arginine as a possible catalytic residue. The data presented here can yield a better understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases lacking the catalytic zinc as well as the structural features inherent to thermostable enzymes. PMID:23755111

  15. New model for polymerization of oligomeric alcohol dehydrogenases into nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Kyani, Anahita; Goliaei, Bahram; Ahmadian, Shahin; Sheibani, Nader

    2010-02-01

    Polymerization and self-assembly of proteins into nanoaggregates of different sizes and morphologies (nanoensembles or nanofilaments) is a phenomenon that involved problems in various neurodegenerative diseases (medicine) and enzyme instability/inactivity (biotechnology). Thermal polymerization of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (dimeric) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (tetrameric), as biotechnological ADH representative enzymes, was evaluated for the development of a rational strategy to control aggregation. Constructed ADH nuclei, which grew to larger amorphous nanoaggregates, were prevented via high repulsion strain of the net charge values. Good correlation between the variation in scattering and lambda(-2) was related to the amorphousness of the nanoaggregated ADHs, shown by electron microscopic images. Scattering corrections revealed that ADH polymerization was related to the quaternary structural changes, including delocalization of subunits without unfolding, i.e. lacking the 3D conformational and/or secondary-ordered structural changes. The results demonstrated that electrostatic repulsion was not only responsible for disaggregation but also caused a delay in the onset of aggregation temperature, decreasing maximum values of aggregation and amounts of precipitation. Together, our results demonstrate and propose a new model of self-assembly for ADH enzymes based on the construction of nuclei, which grow to formless nanoaggregates with minimal changes in the tertiary and secondary conformations. PMID:19444390

  16. Kinetic models for synthesis by a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, J.B.; Askins, K.J.; Taylor, K.B. )

    1993-07-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanearobium brockii at 25[degree] C and at 65[degree]C is more active with secondary than primary alcohols. The enzyme utilizes NADP and NADPH as cosubstrates better than NAD and NADH. The maximum velocities (V[sub m]) for secondary alcohols at 65[degree] C are 10 to 100 times higher than those at 25[degree] C, whereas the K[sub m] values are more comparable. At both 25[degree] C and 65[degree] C the substrate analogue 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol inhibited the oxidation of alcohol competitively with respect to cyclopentanol, and uncompetitively with respect to NADP. Dimethylsulfoxide inhibited the reduction of cyclopentanone competitively with respect to cyclopentanone, and uncompetitively with respect to NADPH. As a product inhibitor, NADP was competitive with respect to NADPH. These results demonstrate that the enzyme binds the nucleotide and then the alcohol or ketone to form a ternary complex which is converted to a product ternary complex that releases product and nucleotide in that order. At 25[degree] C, all aldehydes and ketones examined inhibited the enzyme at concentrations above their Michaelis constants. The substrate inhibition by cyclopentanone was incomplete, and it was uncompetitive with respect to NADPH. Furthermore, cyclopentanone as a product inhibitor showed intercept-linear, slope-parabolic inhibition with respect to cyclopentanol. These results indicate that cyclopentanone binds to the enzyme-NADP complex at high concentrations. The resulting ternary complex slowly dissociates NADP and cyclopentanone. At 65[degree] C, all of the secondary alcohols, with the exception of cyclohexanol, show substrate activation at high concentration.

  17. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  18. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the sera of patients with brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Human brain tissue contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and possess also aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In our last experiments we have shown that ADH and ALDH are present also in the brain tumour cells. Moreover the activities of total ADH and class I isoenzymes were significantly higher in cancer tissue than healthy cells. It can suggests that these changes may be reflected by enzyme activity in the serum of patients with brain cancer. Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 62 patients suffering from brain cancer (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. A statistically significant increase of class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes was found in the sera of patients with brain cancer. The median activity of this class isoenzyme in the patients group increased about 24 % in the comparison to the control level. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also significantly higher (26 %) among patients with brain tumour than healthy ones. The activities of other tested ADH isoenzymes and total ALDH were unchanged. The increase of the activity of total ADH and class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme in the sera of patients with brain cancer seems to be caused by the release of this isoenzyme from tumour's cells.

  19. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  20. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  1. Origins of the high catalytic activity of human alcohol dehydrogenase 4 studied with horse liver A317C alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Herdendorf, Timothy J; Plapp, Bryce V

    2011-05-30

    The turnover numbers and other kinetic constants for human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 ("stomach" isoenzyme) are substantially larger (10-100-fold) than those for human class I and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases. Comparison of the primary amino acid sequences (69% identity) and tertiary structures of these enzymes led to the suggestion that residue 317, which makes a hydrogen bond with the nicotinamide amide nitrogen of the coenzyme, may account for these differences. Ala-317 in the class I enzymes is substituted with Cys in human ADH4, and locally different conformations of the peptide backbones could affect coenzyme binding. This hypothesis was tested by making the A317C substitution in horse liver ADH1E and comparisons to the wild-type ADH1E. The steady-state kinetic constants for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and the reduction of benzaldehyde catalyzed by the A317C enzyme were very similar (up to about 2-fold differences) to those for the wild-type enzyme. Transient kinetics showed that the rate constants for binding of NAD(+) and NADH were also similar. Transient reaction data were fitted to the full Ordered Bi Bi mechanism and showed that the rate constants for hydride transfer decreased by about 2.8-fold with the A317C substitution. The structure of A317C ADH1E complexed with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol at 1.2 Å resolution is essentially identical to the structure of the wild-type enzyme, except near residue 317 where the additional sulfhydryl group displaces a water molecule that is present in the wild-type enzyme. ADH is adaptable and can tolerate internal substitutions, but the protein dynamics apparently are affected, as reflected in rates of hydride transfer. The A317C substitution is not solely responsible for the larger kinetic constants in human ADH4; thus, the differences in catalytic activity must arise from one or more of the other hundred substitutions in the enzyme.

  2. Elusive transition state of alcohol dehydrogenase unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2010-01-01

    For several decades the hydride transfer catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase has been difficult to understand. Here we add to the large corpus of anomalous and paradoxical data collected for this reaction by measuring a normal (> 1) 2° kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for the reduction of benzaldehyde. Because the relevant equilibrium effect is inverse (< 1), this KIE eludes the traditional interpretation of 2° KIEs. It does, however, enable the development of a comprehensive model for the “tunneling ready state” (TRS) of the reaction that fits into the general scheme of Marcus-like models of hydrogen tunneling. The TRS is the ensemble of states along the intricate reorganization coordinate, where H tunneling between the donor and acceptor occurs (the crossing point in Marcus theory). It is comparable to the effective transition state implied by ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory. Properties of the TRS are approximated as an average of the individual properties of the donor and acceptor states. The model is consistent with experimental findings that previously appeared contradictory; specifically, it resolves the long-standing ambiguity regarding the location of the TRS (aldehyde-like vs. alcohol-like). The new picture of the TRS for this reaction identifies the principal components of the collective reaction coordinate and the average structure of the saddle point along that coordinate. PMID:20457944

  3. Recommended nomenclature for the vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase gene family.

    PubMed

    Duester, G; Farrés, J; Felder, M R; Holmes, R S; Höög, J O; Parés, X; Plapp, B V; Yin, S J; Jörnvall, H

    1999-08-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family encodes enzymes that metabolize a wide variety of substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids, and lipid peroxidation products. Studies on 19 vertebrate animals have identified ADH orthologs across several species, and this has now led to questions of how best to name ADH proteins and genes. Seven distinct classes of vertebrate ADH encoded by non-orthologous genes have been defined based upon sequence homology as well as unique catalytic properties or gene expression patterns. Each class of vertebrate ADH shares <70% sequence identity with other classes of ADH in the same species. Classes may be further divided into multiple closely related isoenzymes sharing >80% sequence identity such as the case for class I ADH where humans have three class I ADH genes, horses have two, and mice have only one. Presented here is a nomenclature that uses the widely accepted vertebrate ADH class system as its basis. It follows the guidelines of human and mouse gene nomenclature committees, which recommend coordinating names across species boundaries and eliminating Roman numerals and Greek symbols. We recommend that enzyme subunits be referred to by the symbol "ADH" (alcohol dehydrogenase) followed by an Arabic number denoting the class; i.e. ADH1 for class I ADH. For genes we recommend the italicized root symbol "ADH" for human and "Adh" for mouse, followed by the appropriate Arabic number for the class; i.e. ADH1 or Adh1 for class I ADH genes. For organisms where multiple species-specific isoenzymes exist within a class, we recommend adding a capital letter after the Arabic number; i.e. ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C for human alpha, beta, and gamma class I ADHs, respectively. This nomenclature will accommodate newly discovered members of the vertebrate ADH family, and will facilitate functional and evolutionary studies. PMID:10424757

  4. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  5. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases.

  6. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. PMID:25280628

  7. Characterization of the Enantioselective Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Alcohol Dehydrogenase of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1635. 1. Different Enantiomeric Ratios of Whole Cells and Purified Enzyme in the Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Glycidol.

    PubMed

    Machado, S S; Wandel, U; Jongejan, J A; Straathof, A J; Duine, J A

    1999-01-01

    Resting cells of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1635 (ATCC 12874) show appreciable enantioselectivity (E=16-18) in the oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, glycidol. Distinctly lower values (E=7-9) are observed for the ferricyanide-coupled oxidation of glycidol by the isolated quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase, QH-ADH, which is responsible for the enantiospecific oxidation step in whole cells. The accuracy of E-values from conversion experiments could be verified using complementary methods for the measurement of enantiomeric ratios. Effects of pH, detergent, the use of artificial electron acceptors, and the presence of intermediate aldehydes, could be accounted for. Measurements of E-values at successive stages of the purification showed that the drop in enantioselectivity correlates with the separation of QH-ADH from the cytoplasmic membrane. It is argued that the native arrangement of QH-ADH in the membrane-associated complex favors the higher E-values. The consequences of these findings for the use of whole cells versus purified enzymes in biocatalytic kinetic resolutions of chiral alcohols are discussed.

  8. Optical spectroscopy of nicotinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from Amycolatopsis methanolica: a comparison with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase and UDP-galactose epimerase.

    PubMed

    Piersma, S R; Visser, A J; de Vries, S; Duine, J A

    1998-03-01

    The NADH absorbance spectrum of nicotinoprotein (NADH-containing) alcohol dehydrogenase from Amycolatopsis methanolica has a maximum at 326 nm. Reduced enzyme-bound pyridine dinucleotide could be reversibly oxidized by acetaldehyde. The fluorescence excitation spectrum for NADH bound to the enzyme has a maximum at 325 nm. Upon excitation at 290 nm, energy transfer from tryptophan to enzyme-bound NADH was negligible. The fluorescence emission spectrum (excitation at 325 nm) for NADH bound to the enzyme has a maximum at 422 nm. The fluorescence intensity is enhanced by a factor of 3 upon binding of isobutyramide (Kd = 59 microM). Isobutyramide acts as competitive inhibitor (Ki = 46 microM) with respect to the electron acceptor NDMA (N,N-dimethyl-p-nitrosoaniline), which binds to the enzyme containing the reduced cofactor. The nonreactive substrate analogue trifluoroethanol acts as a competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ethanol (Ki = 1.6 microM), which binds to the enzyme containing the oxidized cofactor. Far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the enzyme containing NADH and the enzyme containing NAD+ were identical, indicating that no major conformational changes occur upon oxidation or reduction of the cofactor. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra of NADH bound to the enzyme have a minimum at 323 nm (Deltaepsilon = -8.6 M-1 cm-1). The fluorescence anisotropy decay of enzyme-bound NADH showed no rotational freedom of the NADH cofactor. This implies a rigid environment as well as lack of motion of the fluorophore. The average fluorescence lifetime of NADH bound to the enzyme is 0.29 ns at 20 degreesC and could be resolved into at least three components (in the range 0.13-0.96 ns). Upon binding of isobutyramide to the enzyme-containing NADH, the average excited-state lifetime increased to 1.02 ns and could be resolved into two components (0.37 and 1.11 ns). The optical spectra of NADH bound to nicotinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase have blue-shifted maxima

  9. Thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 for enantioselective bioconversion of aromatic secondary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Zhang, Chong; Orita, Izumi; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fukui, Toshiaki; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-04-01

    A novel thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) showing activity toward aromatic secondary alcohols was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (TkADH). The gene, tk0845, which encodes an aldo-keto reductase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 31 kDa. It was highly thermostable with an optimal temperature of 90°C and a half-life of 4.5 h at 95°C. The apparent K(m) values for the cofactors NAD(P)(+) and NADPH were similar within a range of 66 to 127 μM. TkADH preferred secondary alcohols and accepted various ketones and aldehydes as substrates. Interestingly, the enzyme could oxidize 1-phenylethanol and its derivatives having substituents at the meta and para positions with high enantioselectivity, yielding the corresponding (R)-alcohols with optical purities of greater than 99.8% enantiomeric excess (ee). TkADH could also reduce 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone to (R)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol with high enantioselectivity (>99.6% ee). Furthermore, the enzyme showed high resistance to organic solvents and was particularly highly active in the presence of H2O-20% 2-propanol and H2O-50% n-hexane or n-octane. This ADH is expected to be a useful tool for the production of aromatic chiral alcohols.

  10. Mechanism of protection against alcoholism by an alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism: development of an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Meza, Mario; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske; Mura, Casilda V.; Sapag, Amalia; Israel, Yedy

    2010-01-01

    Humans who carry a point mutation in the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B*2; Arg47His) are markedly protected against alcoholism. Although this mutation results in a 100-fold increase in enzyme activity, it has not been reported to cause higher levels of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol known to deter alcohol intake. Hence, the mechanism by which this mutation confers protection against alcoholism is unknown. To study this protective effect, the wild-type rat cDNA encoding rADH-47Arg was mutated to encode rADH-47His, mimicking the human mutation. The mutated cDNA was incorporated into an adenoviral vector and administered to genetically selected alcohol-preferring rats. The Vmax of rADH-47His was 6-fold higher (P<0.001) than that of the wild-type rADH-47Arg. Animals transduced with rAdh-47His showed a 90% (P<0.01) increase in liver ADH activity and a 50% reduction (P<0.001) in voluntary ethanol intake. In animals transduced with rAdh-47His, administration of ethanol (1g/kg) produced a short-lived increase of arterial blood acetaldehyde concentration to levels that were 3.5- to 5-fold greater than those in animals transduced with the wild-type rAdh-47Arg vector or with a noncoding vector. This brief increase (burst) in arterial acetaldehyde concentration after ethanol ingestion may constitute the mechanism by which humans carrying the ADH1B*2 allele are protected against alcoholism.—Rivera-Meza, M., Quintanilla, M. E., Tampier, L., Mura, C. V., Sapag, A., Israel, Y. Mechanism of protection against alcoholism by an alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism: development of an animal model. PMID:19710201

  11. Direct Electrochemical Addressing of Immobilized Alcohol Dehydrogenase for the Heterogeneous Bioelectrocatalytic Reduction of Butyraldehyde to Butanol

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, S; Neugebauer, H; Haberbauer, M; Hinterberger, G; Sariciftci, N S

    2015-01-01

    Modified electrodes using immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes for the efficient electroreduction of butyraldehyde to butanol are presented as an important step for the utilization of CO2-reduction products. Alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized, embedded in an alginate–silicate hybrid gel, on a carbon felt (CF) electrode. The application of this enzyme to the reduction of an aldehyde to an alcohol with the aid of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), in analogy to the final step in the natural reduction cascade of CO2 to alcohol, has been already reported. However, the use of such enzymatic reductions is limited because of the necessity of providing expensive NADH as a sacrificial electron and proton donor. Immobilization of such dehydrogenase enzymes on electrodes and direct pumping of electrons into the biocatalysts offers an easy and efficient way for the biochemical recycling of CO2 to valuable chemicals or alternative synthetic fuels. We report the direct electrochemical addressing of immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase for the reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol without consumption of NADH. The selective reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol occurs at room temperature, ambient pressure and neutral pH. Production of butanol was detected by using liquid-injection gas chromatography and was estimated to occur with Faradaic efficiencies of around 40 %. PMID:26113881

  12. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic subjects with and without liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, F; Perez, J; Morancho, J; Pinto, B; Richart, C

    1990-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was measured in samples of liver tissue from a group of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects to determine whether decreased liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity is a consequence of ethanol consumption or liver damage. The alcoholic patients were classified further into the following groups: control subjects with no liver disease (group 1), subjects with non-cirrhotic liver disease (group 2), and subjects with cirrhotic liver disease (group 3). The non-alcoholic subjects were also divided, using the same criteria, into groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively. The analysis of the results showed no significant differences when mean alcohol dehydrogenase activities of alcoholic and non-alcoholic patients with similar degrees of liver pathology were compared (groups 1 v 4, 2 v 5, and 3 v 6. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was, however, severely reduced in patients with liver disease compared with control subjects. Our findings suggest that alcohol consumption does not modify hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity. The reduction in specific alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of liver damage. PMID:2379876

  13. Contribution of liver alcohol dehydrogenase to metabolism of alcohols in rats.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Leidal, Kevin G; Murch, Bruce P; Green, David W

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5-20 mmol/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmol/kgh. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5-10 mmol/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmol/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6±1 mmol/kg h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD(+) for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD(+) for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified.

  14. Structural determinants of stereospecificity in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, E G; Glasfeld, A; Ellington, A D; Benner, S A

    1991-01-01

    Replacing Leu-182 by Ala in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) yields a mutant that retains 34% of its kcat value and makes one stereochemical "mistake" every 850,000 turnovers (instead of approximately 1 error every 7,000,000,000 turnovers in native YADH) in its selection of the 4-Re hydrogen of NADH. Half of the decrease in stereochemical fidelity comes from an increase in the rate of transfer of the 4-Si hydrogen of NADH. The mutant also accepts 5-methylnicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a cofactor analog not accepted by native YADH. The stereospecificity of the mutant is lower still with analogs of NADH where the carboxamide group of the nicotinamide ring is replaced by groups with weaker hydrogen bonding potential. For example, with thio-NADH, the mutant enzyme makes 1 stereochemical "mistake" every 450 turnovers. Finally, the double mutant T157S/L182A, in which Thr-157 is replaced by Ser and Leu-182 is replaced by Ala, also shows decreased stereochemical fidelity. These results suggest that Si transfer in the mutant enzymes arises from NADH bound in a syn conformation in the active site and that this binding is not obstructed in native YADH by side chains essential for catalysis. PMID:1924300

  15. Structural determinants of stereospecificity in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, E G; Glasfeld, A; Ellington, A D; Benner, S A

    1991-10-01

    Replacing Leu-182 by Ala in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) yields a mutant that retains 34% of its kcat value and makes one stereochemical "mistake" every 850,000 turnovers (instead of approximately 1 error every 7,000,000,000 turnovers in native YADH) in its selection of the 4-Re hydrogen of NADH. Half of the decrease in stereochemical fidelity comes from an increase in the rate of transfer of the 4-Si hydrogen of NADH. The mutant also accepts 5-methylnicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a cofactor analog not accepted by native YADH. The stereospecificity of the mutant is lower still with analogs of NADH where the carboxamide group of the nicotinamide ring is replaced by groups with weaker hydrogen bonding potential. For example, with thio-NADH, the mutant enzyme makes 1 stereochemical "mistake" every 450 turnovers. Finally, the double mutant T157S/L182A, in which Thr-157 is replaced by Ser and Leu-182 is replaced by Ala, also shows decreased stereochemical fidelity. These results suggest that Si transfer in the mutant enzymes arises from NADH bound in a syn conformation in the active site and that this binding is not obstructed in native YADH by side chains essential for catalysis.

  16. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F.; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism. PMID:23772048

  17. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C

    2013-09-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism.

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Kangiella koreensis.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Hong, Seung-Hye; Hong, Myoung-Ki; Pham, Tan-Viet; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are a group of dehydrogenase enzymes that facilitate the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes or ketones with the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. In bacteria, some alcohol dehydrogenases catalyze the opposite reaction as part of fermentation to ensure a constant supply of NAD(+). The adh gene from Kangiella koreensis was cloned and the protein (KkADH) was expressed, purified and crystallized. A KkADH crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 94.1, b = 80.9, c = 115.6 Å, β = 111.9°. Four monomers were present in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.55 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 51.8%.

  19. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Kangiella koreensis

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Hong, Seung-Hye; Hong, Myoung-Ki; Pham, Tan-Viet; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are a group of dehydrogenase enzymes that facilitate the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes or ketones with the reduction of NAD+ to NADH. In bacteria, some alcohol dehydrogenases catalyze the opposite reaction as part of fermentation to ensure a constant supply of NAD+. The adh gene from Kangiella koreensis was cloned and the protein (KkADH) was expressed, purified and crystallized. A KkADH crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.1, b = 80.9, c = 115.6 Å, β = 111.9°. Four monomers were present in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding V M of 2.55 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 51.8%. PMID:23989158

  20. Hydrostatic pressure induces conformational and catalytic changes on two alcohol dehydrogenases but no oligomeric dissociation.

    PubMed

    Dallet, S; Legoy, M D

    1996-05-01

    A comparison between the pressure effects on the catalysis of Thermoanaerobium brockii alcohol dehydrogenase (TBADH: a thermostable tetrameric enzyme) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH: a mesostable tetrameric enzyme) revealed a different behaviour. YADH activity is continuously inhibited by an increase of pressure, whereas YADH affinity seems less sensitive to pressure. TBADH activity is enhanced by pressure up to 100 MPa. TBADH affinity for alcoholic substrates increases if pressure increases, was TBADH affinity for NADP decreases when pressure increases. Hypothesis has been raised concerning the dissociation of oligomeric enzymes under high hydrostatic pressure ( < 200 MPa) [1]. But in the case of these two enzymes, unless the oligomers reassociate very quickly (< 1 min), the activity inhibition of YADH at all pressures and TBADH for pressures above 100 MPa is not correlated to subunit dissociation. Hence we suggest that enzymes under pressure encounter a molecular rearrangement which can either have a positive or a negative effect on activity. Finally, we have observed that the catalytic behaviour of alcohol dehydrogenases under pressure is connected to their thermostability.

  1. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  2. Leucaena sp. recombinant cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase: purification and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parth; Gupta, Neha; Gaikwad, Sushama; Agrawal, Dinesh C; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-02-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase is a broad substrate specificity enzyme catalyzing the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, leading to lignin formation in plants. Here, we report characterization of a recombinant CAD homologue (LlCAD2) isolated from Leucaena leucocephala. LlCAD2 is 80 kDa homo-dimer associated with non-covalent interactions, having substrate preference toward sinapaldehyde with Kcat/Km of 11.6×10(6) (M(-1) s(-1)), and a possible involvement of histidine at the active site. The enzyme remains stable up to 40 °C, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 0.002 and 5h, respectively. LlCAD2 showed optimal activity at pH 6.5 and 9 for reduction and oxidation reactions, respectively, and was stable between pH 7 and 9, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 7.5×10(-4) and 15 h, respectively. It is a Zn-metalloenzyme with 4 Zn(2+) per dimer, however, was inhibited in presence of externally supplemented Zn(2+) ions. The enzyme was resistant to osmolytes, reducing agents and non-ionic detergents. PMID:24064207

  3. A model system for QTL analysis: Effects of alcohol dehydrogenase genotype on alcohol pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.G.; Nightingale, B.; Whitfield, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    There is much interest in the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) - major genes which affect quantitative phenotypes. The relationship of polymorphism at known alcohol metabolizing enzyme loci to alcohol pharmacokinetics is a good model system. The three class I alcohol dehydrogenase genes are clustered on chromosome 4 and protein electrophoresis has revealed polymorphisms at the ADH2 and ADH3 loci. While different activities of the isozymes have been demonstrated in vitro, little work has been done in trying to relate ADH polymorphism to variation in ethanol metabolism in vivo. We previously measured ethanol metabolism and psychomotor reactivity in 206 twin pairs and demonstrated that most of the repeatable variation was genetic. We have now recontacted the twins to obtain DNA samples and used PCR with allele specific primers to type the ADH2 and ADH3 polymorphisms in 337 individual twins. FISHER has been used to estimate fixed effects of typed polymorphisms simultaneously with remaining linked and unlinked genetic variance. The ADH2*1-2 genotypes metabolize ethanol faster and attain a lower peak blood alcohol concentration than the more common ADH2*1-1 genotypes, although less than 3% of the variance is accounted for. There is no effect of ADH3 genotype. However, sib-pair linkage analysis suggests that there is a linked polymorphism which has a much greater effect on alcohol metabolism that those typed here.

  4. Characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and 3 from Neurospora crassa FGSC2489.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Cheol; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2007-08-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a key enzyme in the production and utilization of alcohols. Some also catalyze the formation of carboxylate esters from alcohols and aldehydes. The ADH1 and ADH3 genes of Neurospora crassa FGSC2489 were cloned and expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli to investigate their alcohol dehydrogenation and carboxylate ester formation abilities. Homology analysis and sequence alignment of amino acid sequence indicated that ADH1 and ADH3 of N. crassa contained a zinc-binding consensus sequence and a NAD(+)-binding motif and showed 54-75% identity with fungi ADHs. N. crassa ADH1 was expressed in E. coli to give a specific activity of 289 +/- 9 mU/mg using ethanol and NAD(+) as substrate and cofactor, respectively. Corresponding experiments on the expression and activity of ADH3 gave 4 mU/mg of specific activity. N. crassa ADH1 preferred primary alcohols containing C3-C8 carbons to secondary alcohols such as 2-propanol and 2-butanol. N. crassa ADH1 possessed 5.3 mU/mg of specific carboxylate ester-forming activity accumulating 0.4 mM of ethyl acetate in 18 h. Substrate specificity of various linear alcohols and aldehydes indicated that short chain-length alcohols and aldehydes were good substrates for carboxylate ester production. N. crassa ADH1 was a primary alcohol dehydrogenase using cofactor NAD(+) preferably and possessed carboxylate ester-forming activity with short chain alcohols and aldehydes. PMID:17516063

  5. Purification and characterization of benzyl alcohol- and benzaldehyde- dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Basu, Aditya; Phale, Prashant S

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 utilizes benzyl alcohol via catechol and methylnaphthalenes through detoxification pathway via hydroxymethylnaphthalenes and naphthaldehydes. Based on metabolic studies, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase (BADH) and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BZDH) were hypothesized to be involved in the detoxification pathway. BADH and BZDH were purified to apparent homogeneity and were (1) homodimers with subunit molecular mass of 38 and 57 kDa, respectively, (2) NAD(+) dependent, (3) broad substrate specific accepting mono- and di-aromatic alcohols and aldehydes but not aliphatic compounds, and (4) BADH contained iron and magnesium, while BZDH contained magnesium. BADH in the forward reaction converted alcohol to aldehyde and required NAD(+), while in the reverse reaction it reduced aldehyde to alcohol in NADH-dependent manner. BZDH showed low K (m) value for benzaldehyde as compared to BADH reverse reaction. Chemical cross-linking studies revealed that BADH and BZDH do not form multi-enzyme complex. Thus, the conversion of aromatic alcohol to acid is due to low K (m) and high catalytic efficiency of BZDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BADH is a novel enzyme and diverged during the evolution to gain the ability to utilize mono- and di-aromatic compounds. The wide substrate specificity of these enzymes enables strain to detoxify methylnaphthalenes to naphthoic acids efficiently.

  6. Importance of the structural zinc atom for the stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Magonet, E; Hayen, P; Delforge, D; Delaive, E; Remacle, J

    1992-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase is a tetrameric enzyme containing zinc. Initially we confirmed the presence of two zinc atoms per subunit. Incubation of the enzyme with increasing concentrations of dithiothreitol, a method for partial chelation, allowed first the reduction of four disulphide bridges per enzyme, but eventually was sufficient to chelate the structural zinc atom without having any effect on the zinc located in the active site. The enzyme activity was not affected but the enzyme became very sensitive to heat denaturation. Chelation by EDTA was also performed. Given its location at an external position in the globular protein, protected in each subunit by one disulphide bridge, the results establish that the second zinc atom present on each enzymic subunit plays a prominent conformational role, probably by stabilizing the tertiary structure of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Recovery experiments were performed by incubation of the native enzyme, or the dithiothreitol-treated enzyme, with a small amount of Zn2+. A stabilization effect was found when the structural zinc was re-incorporated after its removal by dithiothreitol. In all cases a large increase in activity was also observed, which was much greater than that expected based on the amount of re-incorporated zinc atom, suggesting the re-activation of some inactive commercial enzyme which had lost some of its original catalytic zinc atoms. PMID:1445195

  7. [Molecular evidences of non-ADH pathway in alcohol metabolism and Class III alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH3)].

    PubMed

    Haseba, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1), a key enzyme of alcohol metabolism, contributes around 70% to the systemic alcohol metabolism and also to the acceleration of the metabolism due to chronic alcohol consumption by increasing its liver content, if the liver damage or disease is not apparent. However, the contribution of ADH1 to alcohol metabolism decreases in case of acute alcohol poisoning or chronic alcohol consumption inducing liver damage or disease. On the contrary, non-ADH pathway, which is independent of ADH1, increases the contribution to alcohol metabolism in these cases, by complementing the reduced role of ADH1. The molecular substantiality of non-ADH pathway has been still unknown in spite of the long and hot controversy between two candidates of microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) and catalase. This research history suggests the existence of other candidates. Among ADH isozymes, Class III (ADH3) has the highest Km for ethanol and the highest resistance to pyrazole reagents of specific ADH inhibitors. This ADH3 was demonstrated to increase the contribution to alcohol metabolism in vivo dose-dependently, therefore, is a potent candidate of non-ADH pathway. Moreover, ADH3 is considered to increase the contribution to alcohol metabolism in case of alcoholic liver diseases, because the enzyme content increases in damaged tissues with increased hydrophobicity or the activity of the liver correlates with the accumulated alcohol consumptions of patients with alcoholic liver diseases. Such adaptation of ADH3 to alcohol metabolism in these pathological conditions makes patients possible to keep drinking a lot in spite of decrease of ADH1 activity and develops alcoholism seriously.

  8. Contribution of Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase to Metabolism of Alcohols in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Leidal, Kevin G.; Murch, Bruce P.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5–20 mmole/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmole/kg•h. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5–10 mmole/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmole/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6 ± 1 mmole/kg•h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD+ for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD+ for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD+ is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. PMID:25641189

  9. Complete amino acid sequence and characterization of the reaction mechanism of a glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Ryoko; Kubota, Humie; Hosoki, Tomoko; Ikehara, Kenji; Tanaka, Mieko

    2002-02-15

    A glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens) and its fundamental properties have been characterized. The enzyme catalyzes NAD-dependent dehydrogenation of aliphatic alcohols and amino alcohols. In this work, the complete amino acid sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase was determined by PCR method using genomic DNA of A. radiobacter as template. The enzyme comprises 336 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 36 kDa. The primary structure of the enzyme demonstrates a high homology to structures of alcohol dehydrogenases from Shinorhizobium meliloti (83% identity, 90% positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (65% identity, 76% positive). The two Zn(2+) ion binding sites, both the active site and another site that contributed to stabilization of the enzyme, are conserved in those enzymes. Sequences analysis of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase family using a hypothetical phylogenetic tree indicates that these three enzymes form a new group distinct from other members of the Zn-containing long-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. The physicochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from A. radiobacter were characterized as follows. (1) Stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from ethanol to NADH was categorized as pro-R type by NMR spectra of NADH formed in the enzymatic reaction using ethanol-D(6) was used as substrate. (2) Optimal pH for all alcohols with no amino group examined was pH 8.5 (of the C(2)-C(6) alcohols, n-amyl alcohol demonstrated the highest activity). Conversely, glucosaminitol was optimally dehydrogenated at pH 10.0. (3) The rate-determining step of the dehydrogenase for ethanol is deprotonation of the enzyme-NAD-Zn-OHCH(2)CH(3) complex to enzyme-NAD-Zn-O(-)CH(2)CH(3) complex and that for glucosaminitol is H(2)O addition to enzyme-Zn-NADH complex. PMID:11831851

  10. Complete amino acid sequence and characterization of the reaction mechanism of a glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Ryoko; Kubota, Humie; Hosoki, Tomoko; Ikehara, Kenji; Tanaka, Mieko

    2002-02-15

    A glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens) and its fundamental properties have been characterized. The enzyme catalyzes NAD-dependent dehydrogenation of aliphatic alcohols and amino alcohols. In this work, the complete amino acid sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase was determined by PCR method using genomic DNA of A. radiobacter as template. The enzyme comprises 336 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 36 kDa. The primary structure of the enzyme demonstrates a high homology to structures of alcohol dehydrogenases from Shinorhizobium meliloti (83% identity, 90% positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (65% identity, 76% positive). The two Zn(2+) ion binding sites, both the active site and another site that contributed to stabilization of the enzyme, are conserved in those enzymes. Sequences analysis of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase family using a hypothetical phylogenetic tree indicates that these three enzymes form a new group distinct from other members of the Zn-containing long-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. The physicochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from A. radiobacter were characterized as follows. (1) Stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from ethanol to NADH was categorized as pro-R type by NMR spectra of NADH formed in the enzymatic reaction using ethanol-D(6) was used as substrate. (2) Optimal pH for all alcohols with no amino group examined was pH 8.5 (of the C(2)-C(6) alcohols, n-amyl alcohol demonstrated the highest activity). Conversely, glucosaminitol was optimally dehydrogenated at pH 10.0. (3) The rate-determining step of the dehydrogenase for ethanol is deprotonation of the enzyme-NAD-Zn-OHCH(2)CH(3) complex to enzyme-NAD-Zn-O(-)CH(2)CH(3) complex and that for glucosaminitol is H(2)O addition to enzyme-Zn-NADH complex.

  11. The effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, H; Molnárová, M; Podhradský, D

    1998-12-01

    Heparin and pentosan polysulfate as organic polyanions inhibit yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermostability of alcohol dehydrogenase. Spectral and kinetic analyses showed that these compounds increase the thermal stability of the enzyme and eliminate entirely thermal aggregation. The thermostabilizing effect of unfractionated heparin and pentosan polysulfate was accelerated in the presence of NAD+. The addition of NAD+ (11 microM) to the incubation medium decreased the inhibition of the YADH activity in the presence of pentosan polysulfate (1.32 microM). Moreover, 38% of the residual activity of YADH was found after a 5-min incubation at 70 degrees C. These findings indicate that heparinoids not only modulate the enzyme activity but also can prevent the protein's thermal denaturation.

  12. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  13. Geometric specificity of alcohol dehydrogenases and its potential for separation of trans and cis isomers of unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, A M; Giannousis, P P

    1982-01-01

    The geometric specificity of three different alcohol dehydrogenases (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) (from yeast, from horse liver, and from Leuconostoc mesenteroides) in the reduction of trans- and cis-cinnamaldehydes has been investigated. All three enzymes display a remarkable trans specificity: they react with the trans isomer 7 to 647 times faster than with its cis counterpart. Experiments with the enzymatic reduction of 3-phenylpropionaldehyde, a saturated analog of cinnamaldehyde, have revealed that whereas trans-cinnamaldehyde possesses the "right" configuration for the active centers of the alcohol dehydrogenases, the cis isomer apparently does not fit the active centers well. All three alcohol dehydrogenases studied also exhibit a marked trans specificity in the reaction with alpha-methylcinnamaldehyde. The geometric specificity of alcohol dehydrogenases can be used for the production of otherwise hard to synthesize cis isomers of unsaturated aldehydes from their readily available trans counterparts: trans-cinnamaldehyde was irradiated with ultraviolet light (which converted it to a mixture of trans and cis isomers) then treated with NADH and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (which selectively reduces only trans aldehyde into the alcohol), and finally the mixture of cis-cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamyl alcohol was separated easily by preparative column chromatography. PMID:7048306

  14. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  15. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  16. Marked reduction of alcohol dehydrogenase in keratoconus corneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kanoff, J.M.; Shankardas, J.; Dimitrijevich, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To identify differentially expressed genes in keratoconus (KC) corneal fibroblasts. Methods Stromal keratocytes (having a fibroblast morphology) from KC keratoplasty specimens and eye bank donor corneas were isolated and expanded using a serum containing medium. RNA was isolated from three KC fibroblast cultures and five eye bank donor cornea fibroblast cultures. The targets from the cultured fibroblasts were hybridized to the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Western blot analyses of cell lysates were performed to examine protein levels of interest in the two groups. Protein levels of select differentially expressed genes were further examined by immunohistochemistry. Keratocyte staining of archived KC keratoplasty specimens were graded using a 0 to 3+ scale and compared to five archived whole globes having normal corneas as well as to 10 Fuchs’ dystrophy keratoplasty specimens. Results Microarray analysis revealed up to a 212 fold reduction in the mRNA levels of alcohol dehydrogenase (class 1) beta polypeptide (ADH1B) in KC fibroblasts (p=0.04). Decreased alcohol dehydrogenase in KC fibroblasts was confirmed by western blot analysis of early passage primary keratocyte cell lysates. Immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) against human liver alcohol dehydrogenase revealed a dramatic difference in protein staining in the keratocytes of the KC group compared to the normal cornea group. Immunohistochemistry also showed decreased immunostaining against alcohol dehydrogenase in the KC stromal sections compared to those obtained from Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy samples. Conclusions Decreased alcohol dehydrogenase in KC corneal fibroblasts represents a strong marker and possible mediator of keratoconus. PMID:19365573

  17. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  18. Stability and activity of alcohol dehydrogenases in W/O-microemulsions: enantioselective reduction including cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlich, B; Berger, H; Lade, M; Schomäcker, R

    2000-12-20

    Microemulsions provide an interesting alternative to classical methods for the conversion of less water-soluble substrates by alcohol dehydrogenase, but until now stability and activity were too low for economically useful processes. The activity and stability of the enzymes are dependent on the microemulsion composition, mostly the water and the surfactant concentration. Therefore, it is necessary to know the exact phase behavior of a given microemulsion reaction system and the corresponding enzyme behavior therein. Because of their economic and ecologic suitability polyethoxylated fatty alcohols were investigated concerning their phase behavior and their compatibility with enzymes in ternary mixtures. The phase behavior of Marlipal O13-60 (C13EO6 in industrial quality)/cyclohexane/water and its effect on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase from Yeast (YADH) and horse liver (HLADH) and the carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR) is presented in this study. Beside the macroscopic phase behavior of the reaction system, the viscosity of the system indicates structural changes of aggregates in the microemulsion. The changes of the enzyme activities with the composition are discussed on the basis of transitions from reverse micelles to swollen reverse micelles and finally, the transition to the phase separation. The formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii was used for the NADH-regeneration during reduction reactions. While the formate dehydrogenase did not show any kinetic effect on the microemulsion composition, the other enzymes show significant changes of activity and stability varying the water or surfactant concentration of the microemulsion. Under certain conditions, stability could be maintained with HLADH for several weeks. Successful experiments with semi-batch processes including cofactor regeneration and product separation were performed.

  19. NAD(P)-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Induced during Growth of Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo on Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Schräder, Thomas; Zarnt, Grit; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Different aldehyde dehydrogenases (AlDHs) were formed during growth of Ralstonia eutropha Bo on tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). One of these enzymes, AlDH 4, was purified and characterized as a homodimer containing no prosthetic groups, showing a strong substrate inhibition, and having an N-terminal sequence similar to those of various NAD(P)-dependent AlDHs. The conversion rate of THFA by the quinohemoprotein THFA dehydrogenase was increased by AlDH 4. PMID:11717302

  20. Yarrowia lipolytica dehydrogenase/reductase: an enzyme tolerant for lipophilic compounds and carbohydrate substrates.

    PubMed

    Napora, Kamila; Wrodnigg, Tanja M; Kosmus, Patrick; Thonhofer, Martin; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-06-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (YlSDR) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlSDR mediated oxidation was investigated with alcohols and unprotected carbohydrates spectrophotometrically, revealing a preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols. In reduction direction, YlSDR was highly active on ribulose and fructose, suggesting that the enzyme is a mannitol-2-dehydrogenase. In order to explore substrate tolerance especially for space-demanding, lipophilic protecting groups, 5-O-trityl-D-ribitol and 5-O-trityl-α,β-D-ribose were investigated as substrates: YlSDR oxidized 5-O-trityl-D-ribitol and 5-O-trityl-α,β-D-ribose and reduced the latter at the expense of NADP(H).

  1. Bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) in chlorophyte algal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William; Riveros-Rosas, Hector; González-Halphen, Diego

    2003-09-01

    Protein profiles of mitochondria isolated from the heterotrophic chlorophyte Polytomella sp. grown on ethanol at pH 6.0 and pH 3.7 were analyzed by Blue Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Steady-state levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were influenced by external pH. Levels of an abundant, soluble, mitochondrial protein of 85 kDa and its corresponding mRNA increased at pH 6.0 relative to pH 3.7. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the 85 kDa mitochondrial protein together with the corresponding cDNA identified it as a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) with strong similarity to homologues from eubacteria and amitochondriate protists. A mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acids precedes the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial protein. A gene encoding an ADHE homologue was also identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a photosynthetic relative of Polytomella. ADHE reveals a complex picture of sequence similarity among homologues. The lack of ADHE from archaebacteria indicates a eubacterial origin for the eukaryotic enzyme. Among eukaryotes, ADHE has hitherto been characteristic of anaerobes since it is essential to cytosolic energy metabolism of amitochondriate protists such as Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica. Its abundance and expression pattern suggest an important role for ADHE in mitochondrial metabolism of Polytomella under the conditions studied. The current data are compatible with the view that Polytomella ADHE could be involved either in ethanol production or assimilation, or both, depending upon environmental conditions. Presence of ADHE in an oxygen-respiring algal mitochondrion and co-expression at ambient oxygen levels with respiratory chain components is unexpected with respect to the view that eukaryotes acquired ADHE genes specifically as an adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle.

  2. Bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) in chlorophyte algal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William; Riveros-Rosas, Hector; González-Halphen, Diego

    2003-09-01

    Protein profiles of mitochondria isolated from the heterotrophic chlorophyte Polytomella sp. grown on ethanol at pH 6.0 and pH 3.7 were analyzed by Blue Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Steady-state levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were influenced by external pH. Levels of an abundant, soluble, mitochondrial protein of 85 kDa and its corresponding mRNA increased at pH 6.0 relative to pH 3.7. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the 85 kDa mitochondrial protein together with the corresponding cDNA identified it as a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) with strong similarity to homologues from eubacteria and amitochondriate protists. A mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acids precedes the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial protein. A gene encoding an ADHE homologue was also identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a photosynthetic relative of Polytomella. ADHE reveals a complex picture of sequence similarity among homologues. The lack of ADHE from archaebacteria indicates a eubacterial origin for the eukaryotic enzyme. Among eukaryotes, ADHE has hitherto been characteristic of anaerobes since it is essential to cytosolic energy metabolism of amitochondriate protists such as Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica. Its abundance and expression pattern suggest an important role for ADHE in mitochondrial metabolism of Polytomella under the conditions studied. The current data are compatible with the view that Polytomella ADHE could be involved either in ethanol production or assimilation, or both, depending upon environmental conditions. Presence of ADHE in an oxygen-respiring algal mitochondrion and co-expression at ambient oxygen levels with respiratory chain components is unexpected with respect to the view that eukaryotes acquired ADHE genes specifically as an adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle. PMID:14756315

  3. Influence of Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane on kinetic mechanism of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Trivić, S; Leskovac, V; Zeremski, J; Stancić, B; Anderson, B M

    1998-02-01

    Acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glyceraldehyde-3-P and 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde form Schiff bases in Tris. HCl buffers; the rates of formation and dissociation of Schiff bases, and equilibrium constants for their formation are very similar for the first three aldehydes. The steady-state kinetic constants for the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction, propan-1-ol + NAD+ reversible propionaldehyde + NADH + H+, have been determined in several Tris. HCl buffers of increasing concentration at pH 8.1. In the forward direction, oxidation of alcohol, most kinetic constants are increased by increasing concentrations of Tris. In the reverse direction, reduction of aldehyde, substrate, NADH, Tris and Schiff base were equilibrated before enzyme reaction was started. It was found that Schiff base, rather than Tris, binds to free enzyme competitively with respect to NADH. Tris and Schiff base do not influence the binding of aldehyde to enzyme in any way. PMID:9879514

  4. Structural insights into substrate specificity and solvent tolerance in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber DSM 44541.

    PubMed

    Karabec, Martin; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Tauber, Katharina C; Steinkellner, Georg; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Grogan, Gideon; Gruber, Karl

    2010-09-14

    The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber reveals possible reasons for its remarkable tolerance to organic co-solvents and suggests new directions for structure-informed mutagenesis to produce enzymes of altered substrate specificity or improved selectivity.

  5. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. The primary structure of the gamma 1 protein chain.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    The primary structure of the gamma 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme gamma 1 gamma 1 was deduced by characterization of 36 tryptic and 2 CNBr peptides. The polypeptide chain is composed of 373 amino acid residues. gamma 1 differs from the beta 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 21 positions, and from the E subunit of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 43 positions including a gap at position 128 as in the beta 1 subunit. All zinc-liganding residues from the E subunit of the horse protein and the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme are conserved, but like beta 1, gamma 1 also has an additional cysteine residue at position 286 (in the positional numbering system of the horse enzyme) due to a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most amino acid exchanges preserve the properties of the residues affected and are largely located on the surface of the molecules, away from the active site and the coenzyme binding region. However, eight positions with charge differences in relation to the E subunit of the horse enzyme are noticed. These result in a net positive charge increase of one in gamma 1 versus E, explaining the electrophoretic mobilities on starch gels. Of functional significance is the conservation of Ser-48 in gamma 1 relative to E. The residue is close to the active site but different (Thr-48) in the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme. Thus, the closer structural relationship between human gamma 1 and horse E enzyme subunit than between beta 1 and E is also reflected in functionally important residues, explaining a greater similarity between gamma 1 gamma 1 and EE than between beta 1 beta 1 and EE. PMID:6391921

  6. Uric acid substantially enhances the free radical-induced inactivation of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kittridge, K J; Willson, R L

    1984-05-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase ( YADH ) are inactivated when attacked by hydroxy free radicals (OH). Organic molecules with a high rate constant of reaction with OH such as ascorbate or urate can compete with the enzymes for these strongly oxidising radicals. However, although 10(-3)M ascorbate can substantially protect both LDH and YADH from OH attack, in the presence of 10(-3)M urate only LDH is protected. In the case of YADH an even greater degree of inactivation than with OH occurs. The extent of inactivation is considerably reduced when oxygen is absent, in agreement with a urate peroxy radical perhaps being partly responsible for the increased inactivation of the enzyme.

  7. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  8. Substrate Specificity of the Purified Primary Alcohol Dehydrogenases from Methanol-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sperl, George T.; Forrest, Hugh S.; Gibson, David T.

    1974-01-01

    Hyphomicrobium strain WC, Pseudomonas strain TP-1, and Pseudomonas strain W1 are capable of growth on methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy. Methanol-grown cells of each organism contain a primary alcohol dehydrogenase that has been purified to homogeneity. Each enzyme has a molecular weight of 120,000 and shows an in vitro requirement for phenazine methosulfate and ammonium ions for enzymatic activity. Normal aliphatic alcohols are oxidized rapidly by each enzyme. The presence of a methyl group on the carbon atom adjacent to the primary alcohol group lowers the enzymatic activity. This effect is reduced as the methyl substituent is moved further away from the hydroxyl group. The effect of other substituents on enzymatic activity is reported. Methanol, formaldehyde, and to a limited extent acetaldehyde are oxidized by the primary alcohol dehydrogenases. Higher aldehydes are not oxidized. A possible explanation for this specificity, with regard to aldehydes, is presented in terms of degree of hydration of the aldehyde. Images PMID:4828309

  9. Bioelectrochemistry of non-covalent immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase on oxidized diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Eduardo; Méndez, Jessica; Fonseca, José J; Griebenow, Kai; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2012-06-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are considered a biocompatible material mainly due to their non-cytotoxicity and remarkable cellular uptake. Model proteins such as cytochrome c and lysozyme have been physically adsorbed onto diamond nanoparticles, proving it to be a suitable surface for high protein loading. Herein, we explore the non-covalent immobilization of the redox enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (E.C.1.1.1.1) onto oxidized diamond nanoparticles for bioelectrochemical applications. Diamond nanoparticles were first oxidized and physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR and TEM. Langmuir isotherms were constructed to investigate the ADH adsorption onto the diamond nanoparticles as a function of pH. It was found that a higher packing density is achieved at the isoelectric point of the enzyme. Moreover, the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme on diamond nanoparticles was addressed under optimum pH conditions able to retain up to 70% of its initial activity. Thereafter, an ethanol bioelectrochemical cell was constructed by employing the immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase onto diamond nanoparticles, this being able to provide a current increment of 72% when compared to the blank solution. The results of this investigation suggest that this technology may be useful for the construction of alcohol biosensors or biofuel cells in the near future.

  10. Syringyl Lignin Is Unaltered by Severe Sinapyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Suppression in Tobacco[W

    PubMed Central

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N.; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D.; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreel, Kris; Boerjan, Wout; Halpin, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was challenged by the discovery of a novel sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that preferentially uses sinapaldehyde as a substrate and that was claimed to regulate S lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms. Consequently, most pathway schemes now show SAD (or SAD and CAD) at the sinapaldehyde reduction step, although functional evidence is lacking. We cloned SAD from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and suppressed it in transgenic plants using RNA interference–inducing vectors. Characterization of lignin in the woody stems shows no change to content, composition, or structure, and S lignin is normal. By contrast, plants additionally suppressed in CAD have changes to lignin structure and S:G ratio and have increased sinapaldehyde in lignin, similar to plants suppressed in CAD alone. These data demonstrate that CAD, not SAD, is the enzyme responsible for S lignin biosynthesis in woody angiosperm xylem. PMID:22158465

  11. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  12. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  13. Catalytic and Molecular Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo

    PubMed Central

    Zarnt, Grit; Schräder, Thomas; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    The quinohemoprotein tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol dehydrogenase (THFA-DH) from Ralstonia eutropha strain Bo was investigated for its catalytic properties. The apparent kcat/Km and Ki values for several substrates were determined using ferricyanide as an artificial electron acceptor. The highest catalytic efficiency was obtained with n-pentanol exhibiting a kcat/Km value of 788 × 104 M−1 s−1. The enzyme showed substrate inhibition kinetics for most of the alcohols and aldehydes investigated. A stereoselective oxidation of chiral alcohols with a varying enantiomeric preference was observed. Initial rate studies using ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates revealed that a ping-pong mechanism can be assumed for in vitro catalysis of THFA-DH. The gene encoding THFA-DH from R. eutropha strain Bo (tfaA) has been cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence showed an identity of up to 67% to the sequence of various quinoprotein and quinohemoprotein dehydrogenases. A comparison of the deduced sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence previously determined by Edman degradation analysis suggested the presence of a signal sequence of 27 residues. The primary structure of TfaA indicated that the protein has a tertiary structure quite similar to those of other quinoprotein dehydrogenases. PMID:11222593

  14. Structure of a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase involved in bioethanol generation in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    PubMed

    Extance, Jonathan; Crennell, Susan J; Eley, Kirstin; Cripps, Roger; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADHE) enzymes are found within many fermentative microorganisms. They catalyse the conversion of an acyl-coenzyme A to an alcohol via an aldehyde intermediate; this is coupled to the oxidation of two NADH molecules to maintain the NAD(+) pool during fermentative metabolism. The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) domain of an ADHE protein from the ethanol-producing thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has been determined to 2.5 Å resolution. This is the first structure to be reported for such a domain. In silico modelling has been carried out to generate a homology model of the aldehyde dehydrogenase domain, and this was subsequently docked with the ADH-domain structure to model the structure of the complete ADHE protein. This model suggests, for the first time, a structural mechanism for the formation of the large multimeric assemblies or `spirosomes' that are observed for this ADHE protein and which have previously been reported for ADHEs from other organisms.

  15. Effect of additives on gas-phase catalysis with immobilised Thermoanaerobacter species alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH T).

    PubMed

    Trivedi, A H; Spiess, A C; Daussmann, T; Büchs, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a strategy for preparing an efficient immobilised alcohol dehydrogenase preparation for a gas-phase reaction. The effects of additives such as buffers and sucrose on the immobilisation efficiency (residual activity and protein loading) and on the gas-phase reaction efficiency (initial reaction rate and half-life) of Thermoanaerobacter sp. alcohol dehydrogenase were studied. The reduction of acetophenone to 1-phenylethanol under in situ cofactor regeneration using isopropanol as co-substrate was used as a model reaction at fixed reaction conditions (temperature and thermodynamic activities). A strongly enhanced thermostability of the enzyme in the gas-phase reaction was achieved when the enzyme was immobilised with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7) containing sucrose five times the protein amount (on weight/weight basis). This resulted in a remarkable productivity of 200 g L(-1) day(-1) even at non-optimised reaction conditions. The interaction of additives with the enzyme and water affects the immobilisation and gas-phase efficiencies of the enzyme. However, it was not possible to predict the effect of additives on the gas-phase reaction efficiency even after knowing their effect on the immobilisation efficiency.

  16. Kinetics of irreversible inhibition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during modification by o-phthaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Le, W P; Yan, S X; Huang, M Q; Zhang, Y X; Zhou, H M

    The kinetic theory of the substrate reaction during irreversible inhibition of enzyme activity described previously has been applied to a study on the kinetics of the course of inactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) by o-phthaldehyde (OPTA). The microscopic constants for the reaction of the inactivators with the free enzyme and with the enzyme-substrate complexes were determined. The inactivation is a monophasic pseudo-first-order reaction with OPTA. The apparent rate constant A is independent of the OPTA concentration, indicating that the inactivation is a noncomplexing inhibition. The marked protective effect of substrates on the inactivation of YADH by OPTA has been observed. This result suggests that the modification of the enzyme by OPTA may occur at the active site.

  17. Kinetics of irreversible inhibition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during modification by 4,4'-dithiodipyridine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S Y; Xu, D; Wang, H R; Li, J; Zhou, H M

    1997-07-01

    The course of inactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) using 4,4'-dithiodipyridine (DSDP) has been studied in this paper. The results show that the reaction mechanism between DSDP and YADH is a competitive, complexing inhibition. The microscopic constants for the inactivation of the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex were determined. The presence of the substrate NAD+ offers strong protection for this enzyme against inactivation by DSDP. The above results suggest that two Cys residues are essential for activity and are situated at the active site. These essential Cys residues should be Cys-46 and Cys-174 which are ligands to the catalytic zinc ion. Another Cys residue, which can be modified by DSDP, is non-essential for activity of the enzyme.

  18. Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activity Are Substrate-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, A E; LoConte, Micaela A; Slade, Kristin M

    2016-06-28

    Enzymes operate in a densely packed cellular environment that rarely matches the dilute conditions under which they are studied. To better understand the ramifications of this crowding, the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) were monitored spectrophotometrically in the presence of high concentrations of dextran. Crowding decreased the maximal rate of the reaction by 40% for assays with ethanol, the primary substrate of YADH. This observation was attributed to slowed release of the reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide product, which is rate-limiting. In contrast, when larger alcohols were used as the YADH substrate, the rate-limiting step becomes hydride transfer and crowding instead increased the maximal rate of the reaction by 20-40%. This work reveals the importance of considering enzyme mechanism when evaluating the ways in which crowding can alter kinetics.

  19. Investigation of asymmetric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) reduction of acetophenone derivatives: effect of charge density.

    PubMed

    Naik, Hemantkumar G; Yeniad, Bahar; Koning, Cor E; Heise, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    In an effort to study the effect of substituent groups of the substrate on the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) reductions of aryl-alkyl ketones, several derivatives of acetophenone have been evaluated against ADHs from Lactobacillus brevis (LB) and Thermoanaerobacter sp. (T). Interestingly, ketones with non-demanding (neutral) para-substituents were reduced to secondary alcohols by these enzymes in enantiomerically pure form whereas those with demanding (ionizable) substituents could not be reduced. The effect of substrate size, their solubility in the reaction medium, electron donating and withdrawing properties of the ligand and also the electronic charge density distribution on the substrate molecules have been studied and discussed in detail. From the results, it is observed that the electronic charge distribution in the substrate molecules is influencing the orientation of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme and hence the ability to reduce the substrate.

  20. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Falus, Peter; Preost, Sylvain

    2008-09-26

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  1. Retinol dehydrogenases: membrane-bound enzymes for the visual function.

    PubMed

    Lhor, Mustapha; Salesse, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Retinoid metabolism is important for many physiological functions, such as differenciation, growth, and vision. In the visual context, after the absorption of light in rod photoreceptors by the visual pigment rhodopsin, 11-cis retinal is isomerized to all-trans retinal. This retinoid subsequently undergoes a series of modifications during the visual cycle through a cascade of reactions occurring in photoreceptors and in the retinal pigment epithelium. Retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) are enzymes responsible for crucial steps of this visual cycle. They belong to a large family of proteins designated as short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. The structure of these RDHs has been predicted using modern bioinformatics tools, which allowed to propose models with similar structures including a common Rossman fold. These enzymes undergo oxidoreduction reactions, whose direction is dictated by the preference and concentration of their individual cofactor (NAD(H)/NADP(H)). This review presents the current state of knowledge on functional and structural features of RDHs involved in the visual cycle as well as knockout models. RDHs are described as integral or peripheral enzymes. A topology model of the membrane binding of these RDHs via their N- and (or) C-terminal domain has been proposed on the basis of their individual properties. Membrane binding is a crucial issue for these enzymes because of the high hydrophobicity of their retinoid substrates.

  2. The conserved Glu-60 residue in Thermoanaerobacter brockii alcohol dehydrogenase is not essential for catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kleifeld, Oded; Shi, Shu Ping; Zarivach, Raz; Eisenstein, Miriam; Sagi, Irit

    2003-01-01

    Glu-60 of the zinc-dependent Thermoanaerobacter brockii alcohol dehydrogenase (TbADH) is a strictly conserved residue in all members of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family. Unlike most other ADHs, the crystal structures of TbADH and its analogs, ADH from Clostridium beijerinckii (CbADH), exhibit a unique zinc coordination environment in which this conserved residue is directly coordinated to the catalytic zinc ion in the native form of the enzymes. To explore the role of Glu-60 in TbADH catalysis, we have replaced it by alanine (E60A-TbADH) and aspartate (E60D-TbADH). Steady-state kinetic measurements show that the catalytic efficiency of these mutants is only four- and eightfold, respectively, lower than that of wild-type TbADH. We applied X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) and near-UV circular dichroism to characterize the local environment around the catalytic zinc ion in the variant enzymes in their native, cofactor-bound, and inhibited forms. We show that the catalytic zinc site in the studied complexes of the variant enzymes exhibits minor changes relative to the analogous complexes of wild-type TbADH. These moderate changes in the kinetic parameters and in the zinc ion environment imply that the Glu-60 in TbADH does not remain bound to the catalytic zinc ion during catalysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that a water molecule replaces this residue during substrate turnover. PMID:12592017

  3. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways. PMID:21416338

  4. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  5. The activity of class I, II, III and IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    The brain being highly sensitive to the action of alcohol is potentially susceptible to its carcinogenic effects. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the main enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism, which leads to the generation of carcinogenic acetaldehyde. Human brain tissue contains various ADH isoenzymes and possess also ALDH activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity in cancer tissues and healthy brain cells. The samples were taken from 62 brain cancer patients (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. The total activity of ADH, and activity of class I ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH and ALDH did not show statistically significant differences of activity in cancer and in normal cells. Analysis of the enzymes activity did not show significant differences depending on the location of the tumor. The differences in the activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase, and class I isoenzyme between cancer tissues and healthy brain cells might be a factor for metabolic changes and disturbances in low mature cancer cells and additionally might be a reason for higher level of acetaldehyde which can intensify the carcinogenesis.

  6. Biochemical characterization of ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural by alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates, which consist of sugars and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Before yeast ferments sugars to ethanol, it reduces toxic furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol in a prolonged lag phase. Bioreduction of furfural may shorten the lag phase. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (FurX) at the expense of ethanol (Li et al. 2011). The mechanism of the ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural by FurX and three homologous alcohol dehydrogenases was investigated. The reduction consisted of two individual reactions: ethanol-dependent reduction of NAD(+) to NADH and then NADH-dependent reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. The kinetic parameters of the coupled reaction and the individual reactions were determined for the four enzymes. The data indicated that limited NADH was released in the coupled reaction. The enzymes had high affinities for NADH (e.g., K ( d ) of 0.043 μM for the FurX-NADH complex) and relatively low affinities for NAD(+) (e.g., K ( d ) of 87 μM for FurX-NAD(+)). The kinetic data suggest that the four enzymes are efficient "furfural reductases" with either ethanol or NADH as the reducing power. The standard free energy change (ΔG°') for ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural was determined to be -1.1 kJ mol(-1). The physiological benefit for ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural is likely to replace toxic and recalcitrant furfural with less toxic and more biodegradable acetaldehyde.

  7. Adaptation of methods for glutamate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities to a centrifugal analyser: assessment of their clinical use in anoxic states of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, M D; Penberthy, L A; Berry, M N

    1987-01-01

    Sensitive, precise, and rapid methods for the measurement of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were developed on the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyser. The optimal pH for ADH in caucasians was 9.8. Non-linearity of ADH enzyme activity was observed when samples were diluted in saline; linearity was restored when inactivated serum was used as diluent. ADH was shown to be a sensitive index of liver anoxia due to cardiorespiratory disturbance (clinical sensitivity 90%) and generalised anoxia. GDH exhibited sensitivity equal to that of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) but was inferior to gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in the detection of specific liver disease. Both ADH and GDH were sensitive indicators of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:2890662

  8. A kinetic locking-on strategy for bioaffinity purification: further studies with alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    O'flaherty, M; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    1999-02-01

    The kinetic locking-on strategy improves the selectivity of protein purification procedures based on immobilized cofactor derivatives through use of enzyme-specific substrate analogues in irrigants to promote biospecific adsorption. This paper describes the development and application of this strategy to the one-chromatographic step affinity purification of NAD(P)+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases using 8'-azo-linked immobilized NAD(P)+, S6-linked and N6-linked immobilized NAD+, and N6-linked immobilized NADP+ derivatives. These studies were carried out using alcohol dehydrogenases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1), equine liver (HLADH, EC 1.1.1.1), and Thermoanaerobium brockii (TBADH, EC 1.1.1.2). The results reveal that the factors which require careful consideration before development of a truly biospecific system based on the locking-on strategy include: (i) the stability of the immobilized cofactor derivative; (ii) the spacer-arm composition of the affinity derivative; (iii) the accessible immobilized cofactor concentration; (iv) the soluble locking-on ligand concentration; (v) the dissociation constant of locking-on ligand, and (vi) the identification and elimination of nonbiospecific interference. The S6-linked immobilized NAD+ derivative (synthesized with a hydrophilic spacer arm) proved to be the most suitable of the affinity adsorbents investigated in the present study for use with the locking-on strategy. This conclusion was based primarily on the observations that this affinity adsorbent was stable, retained cofactor activity with the "test" enzymes under study, and was not prone to nonbiospecific interactions. Using this immobilized derivative in conjunction with the locking-on strategy, alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in a single affinity chromatographic step.

  9. An ultraviolet resonance Raman study of dehydrogenase enzymes and their interactions with coenzymes and substrates.

    PubMed

    Austin, J C; Wharton, C W; Hester, R E

    1989-02-21

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra, with 260-nm excitation, are reported for oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+ and NADH, respectively). Corresponding spectra are reported for these coenzymes when bound to the enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and liver and yeast alcohol dehydrogenases (LADH and YADH). The observed differences between the coenzyme spectra are interpreted in terms of conformation, hydrogen bonding, and general environment polarity differences between bound and free coenzymes and between coenzymes bound to different enzymes. The possibility of adenine protonation is discussed. UVRR spectra with 220-nm excitation also are reported for holo- and apo-GAPDH (GAPDH-NAD+ and GAPDH alone, respectively). In contrast with the 260-nm spectra, these show only bands due to vibrations of aromatic amino acid residues of the protein. The binding of coenzyme to GAPDH has no significant effect on the aromatic amino acid bands observed. This result is discussed in the light of the known structural change of GAPDH on binding coenzyme. Finally, UVRR spectra with 240-nm excitation are reported for GAPDH and an enzyme-substrate intermediate of GAPDH. Perturbations are reported for tyrosine and tryptophan bands on forming the acyl enzyme.

  10. Isolation and characterization of full-length putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Nur Athirah Abd; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-11-01

    Polygonum minus, locally named as Kesum is an aromatic herb which is high in secondary metabolite content. Alcohol dehydrogenase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohol and aldehyde with the presence of NAD(P)(H) as co-factor. The main focus of this research is to identify the gene of ADH. The total RNA was extracted from leaves of P. minus which was treated with 150 μM Jasmonic acid. Full-length cDNA sequence of ADH was isolated via rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE). Subsequently, in silico analysis was conducted on the full-length cDNA sequence and PCR was done on genomic DNA to determine the exon and intron organization. Two sequences of ADH, designated as PmADH1 and PmADH2 were successfully isolated. Both sequences have ORF of 801 bp which encode 266 aa residues. Nucleotide sequence comparison of PmADH1 and PmADH2 indicated that both sequences are highly similar at the ORF region but divergent in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR). The amino acid is differ at the 107 residue; PmADH1 contains Gly (G) residue while PmADH2 contains Cys (C) residue. The intron-exon organization pattern of both sequences are also same, with 3 introns and 4 exons. Based on in silico analysis, both sequences contain "classical" short chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases ((c) SDRs) conserved domain. The results suggest that both sequences are the members of short chain alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  11. Substitution of arginine for histidine-47 in the coenzyme binding site of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.M.; Plapp, B.V. )

    1990-06-12

    Molecular modeling of alcohol dehydrogenases suggests that His-47 in the yeast enzyme (His-44 in the protein sequence, corresponding to Arg-47 in the horse liver enzyme) binds the pyrophosphate of the NAD coenzyme. His-47 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoenzyme I was substituted with an arginine by a directed mutation. Steady-state kinetic results at pH 7.3 and 30{degree}C of the mutant and wild-type enzymes were consistent with an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. The substitution decreased dissociation constants by 4-fold for NAD{sup +} and 2-fold for NADH while turnover numbers were decreased by 4-fold for ethanol oxidation and 6-fold for acetaldehyde reduction. The magnitudes of these effects are smaller than those found for the same mutation in the human liver {beta} enzyme, suggesting that other amino acid residues in the active site modulate the effects of the substitution. The pH dependencies of dissociation constants and other kinetic constants were similar in the two yeast enzymes. Thus, it appears that His-47 is not solely responsible for a pK value near 7 that controls activity and coenzyme binding rates in the wild-type enzyme. The small substrate deuterium isotope effect above pH 7 and the single exponential phase of NADH production during the transient oxidation of ethanol by the Arg-47 enzyme suggest that the mutation makes an isomerization of the enzyme-NAD{sup +} complex limiting for turnover with ethanol.

  12. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension.

  13. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension. PMID:23578856

  14. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F.; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension. PMID:23578856

  15. Sequence and structural aspects of the functional diversification of plant alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Salzano, Francisco M; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Freitas, Loreta B

    2007-07-01

    The glycolytic proteins in plants are coded by small multigene families, which provide an interesting contrast to the high copy number of gene families studied to date. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes encode glycolytic enzymes that have been characterized in some plant families. Although the amino acid sequences of zinc-containing long-chain ADHs are highly conserved, the metabolic function of this enzyme is variable. They also have different patterns of expression and are submitted to differences in nonsynonymous substitution rates between gene copies. It is possible that the Adh copies have been retained as a consequence of adaptative amino acid replacements which have conferred subtle changes in function. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that there have been a number of separate duplication events within angiosperms, and that genes labeled Adh1, Adh2 and Adh3 in different groups may not be homologous. Nonsynonymous/synonymous ratios yielded no signs of positive selection. However, the coefficients of functional divergence (theta) estimated between the Adh1 and Adh2 gene groups indicate statistically significant site-specific shift of evolutionary rates between them, as well as between those of different botanical families, suggesting that altered functional constraints may have taken place at some amino acid residues after their diversification. The theoretical three-dimensional structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Arabis blepharophylla was constructed and verified to be stereochemically valid.

  16. The structure of the quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase of Acetobacter aceti modelled on that of methanol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium extorquens.

    PubMed

    Cozier, G E; Giles, I G; Anthony, C

    1995-06-01

    The 1.94 A structure of methanol dehydrogenase has been used to provide a model structure for part of a membrane quinohaemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase. The basic superbarrel structure and the active-site region are retained, indicating essentially similar mechanisms of action, but there are considerable differences in the external loops, particularly those involved in formation of the shallow funnel leading to the active site.

  17. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  18. The binding of an aminoazo dye carcinogen to a specific methionine residue in rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Coles, B; Beale, D; Miller, D; Lay, J; Kadlubar, F; Aitken, A; Ketterer, B

    1987-01-01

    On the administration of 3'-methyl-N,N-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene to rats pure aminoazo dye-bound alcohol dehydrogenase accounting for 45% of the total soluble protein bound aminoazo dye is isolated from the liver soluble supernatant. Tryptic digestion of that purified aminoazo dye-bound enzyme yields an aminoazo dye-bound nonapeptide which has a sequence identical to amino acids 301-309 in the known sequence of alcohol dehydrogenase (H. Jornvall and O. Markovic, Eur. J. Biochem., 29 (1972) 167-174) with the exception of methionine 306 which is replaced by an aminoazo dye modified amino acid. The nature of the aminoazo dye adduct was determined by studying the structure of the related tetrapeptide obtained by Pronase B digestion and shown by proton NMR spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy to have the structure 3-(Val. Asn. Pro. Homocystein-S-yl)-4-methylamino-3'-methylazobenzene. This carcinogen-protein adduct is assumed to arise from attack of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite, N-sulphonyloxy-4-methylamino-3'-methylazobenzene (FF. Kadlubar, J.A. Miller and E.C. Miller, Cancer Res., 36 (1976) 2350-2359) at the sulphur of methionine 306 followed by spontaneous S-demethylation. This highly specific reaction of carcinogen with alcohol dehydrogenase lowers its Vmax and increases its Km with cyclohexanone thereby reducing its catalytic efficiency for this substrate. This highly specific reaction of the carcinogen with alcohol dehydrogenase may be regarded as a major detoxication reaction.

  19. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1B genotype and fetal alcohol syndrome: a HuGE minireview.

    PubMed

    Green, Ridgely Fisk; Stoler, Joan Marilyn

    2007-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), 1 of the most common developmental disabilities in the United States, occurs at a rate of 0.5-2.0:1000 live births. Animal model, family, and twin studies suggest a genetic component to FAS susceptibility. Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) catalyze the rate-limiting step in alcohol metabolism. Studies of genetic associations with FAS have focused on the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) gene, comparing mothers and children with the alleles ADH1B*2 or ADH1B*3, associated with faster ethanol metabolism, with those homozygous for ADH1B*1. While most studies have found a protective effect for genotypes containing ADH1B*2 or ADH1B*3, results have been conflicting, and further investigation into the association between the ADH1B genotype and FAS is needed. Whether increased alcohol intake accounts for the elevated risk reported for the ADH1B*1/ADH1B*1 genotype should be addressed, and future studies would benefit from consistent case definitions, enhanced exposure measurements, larger sample sizes, and careful study design.

  20. Alcohol dehydrogenases from Scheffersomyces stipitis involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menggen; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xianxian

    2013-09-01

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are generated from biomass pretreatment. Scheffersomyces stipitis is able to reduce furfural and HMF to less toxic furanmethanol and furan-2,5-dimethanol; however, the enzymes involved in the reductive reaction still remain unknown. In this study, transcription responses of two known and five putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from S. stipitis were analyzed under furfural and HMF stress conditions. All the seven alcohol dehydrogenase genes were also cloned and overexpressed for their activity analyses. Our results indicate that transcriptions of SsADH4 and SsADH6 were highly induced under furfural and HMF stress conditions, and the proteins encoded by them exhibited NADH- and/or NADPH-dependent activities for furfural and HMF reduction, respectively. For furfural reduction, NADH-dependent activity was also observed in SsAdh1p and NAD(P)H-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. For HMF reduction, NADPH-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. SsAdh4p displayed the highest NADPH-dependent specific activity and catalytic efficiency for reduction of both furfural and HMF among the seven alcohol dehydrogenases. Enzyme activities of all SsADH proteins were more stable under acidic condition. For most SsADH proteins, the optimum temperature for enzyme activities was 30 °C and more than 50 % enzyme activities remained at 60 °C. Reduction activities of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, benzaldehyde, and phenylacetaldehyde were also observed in some SsADH proteins. Our results indicate that multiple alcohol dehydrogenases in S. stipitis are involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion. PMID:23912116

  1. Comparison of inactivation and conformational changes of native and apo yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chen, R; Zhou, H M

    1998-07-01

    The conformational changes of native and apo yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during thermal denaturation have been followed by fluorescence emission and circular dichroism spectra. A comparison of inactivation and conformational changes during thermal denaturation shows that for the native enzyme and for the apo-I YADH which has the conformational zinc removed, the extent of inactivation was larger than the extent of conformational changes at the same temperature. This result supported the suggestion by Tsou (Trends Biochem. Sci. 1986, 11, 427-429: Science 1993, 262, 380-381) that the enzyme active site is more flexible. The results also show that apo-I YADH without the conformational zinc was more easily inactivated with increasing incubation temperature, indicating that the stability of the apo-I YADH decreased. Kinetic analysis suggest that the substrate does not provide any protective effect during thermal inactivation of native and apo-I YADH.

  2. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHE(S77)). Interestingly, the ADHE(S77) was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration.

  3. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  4. Activity and Conformation of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase (YADH) Entrapped in Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Das; Mozumdar; Maitra

    2000-10-15

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) solubilized in reverse micelles of aerosol OT (i.e., AOT or sodium bis (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate) in isooctane has been shown to be catalytically more active than that in aqueous buffer under optimum conditions of pH, temperature, and water content in reverse micelles. Studies of the secondary structure conformational changes of the enzyme in reverse micelles have been made from circular dichroism spectroscopy. It has been seen that the conformation of YADH in reverse micelles is extremely sensitive to pH, temperature, and water content. A comparison has been made between the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the alpha-helix content in the conformation and it has been observed that the enzyme is most active at the maximum alpha-helix content. While the beta-sheet content in the conformation of the entrapped enzyme was found to be dependent on the enzyme-micelle interface interaction, the alpha-helix and random coil conformations are governed by the degree of entrapment and the extent of rigidity provided by the micelle core to the enzyme structure. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Genic Heterogeneity at Two Alcohol Dehydrogenase Loci in DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA and DROSOPHILA PERSIMILIS

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Jerry A.; Felton, Alexander A.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential electrophoretic survey of the second chromosome loci, alcohol dehydrogenase-6 (Adh-6) and octanol dehydrogenase ( Odh), was performed on 147 isochromosomal lines of Drosophila pseudoobscura and 60 lines of its sibling species, D. persimilis. Gels run with a variety of acrylamide concentrations and buffer pH's revealed the presence of 18 alleles of Adh-6 in the two species, where only eight had been previously detected by conventional electrophoretic methods. Only two alleles were added with our techniques to the previous total of nine in both species at the largely monomorphic Odh locus. Both enzymes show a predominance of one allele, with the other variants being fairly rare. There was no evidence of increased genetic divergence between the two species, but we found a striking increase in differentiation of Adh-6 alleles between the main body of D. pseudoobscura populations and the conspecific isolate from Bogotá, Colombia. These results are compared with our previous surveys of xanthine dehydrogenase in these species and discussed in reference to theories of genic polymorphism. PMID:17248763

  6. Salivary alcohol dehydrogenase in non-smoking and smoking alcohol-dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Jelski, Wojciech; Zalewska, Anna; Szulc, Agata; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2014-09-01

    Increasing attention to the importance of saliva testing is not surprising because smoking and alcohol drinking act synergistically on oral tissues, and their metabolite levels, e.g., acetaldehyde, are much higher in saliva than in blood. The activity of salivary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) comes from oral microbiota, mucosa, and salivary glands. The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of ADH in the oral health pathology of smoking (AS) and non-smoking (ANS) alcohol-dependent males. The results indicated that the AS group had a more significant and longer duration (until the 30th day of alcohol abstinence) decrease in ADH activity and output than the ANS group (until the 15th day of alcohol abstinence) compared to controls (social drinkers; C). The decreased salivary flow (SF) in alcoholics was observed longer in the ANS group (until the 30th day of alcohol abstinence), whereas in the AS group SF normalized at the 15th day, probably due to the irritating effect of tobacco smoke on the oral mucosa. Because saliva was centrifuged to remove cells and debris (including microbial cells), the detected salivary ADH activity was derived from salivary glands and/or oral mucosa. A more profound and longer decrease in ADH activity/output in smoking than non-smoking alcoholics was likely due to the damaged salivary glands and/or oral mucosa, caused by the synergistic effect of alcohol drinking and smoking. The lower values of salivary ADH in smoking than non-smoking alcoholics might also be partly due to the reversed/inhibited ADH reaction by high levels of accumulated acetaldehyde.

  7. Some properties of an alcohol dehydrogenase partially purified from baker's yeast grown without added zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, C J; Dickinson, F M

    1976-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was partially purified from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) grown in the presence of 20 muM-MnSO4 without added Zn2+ and from yeast grown in the presence of 1.8 muM-MnSO4. The enzyme from yeast grown with added Zn2+ has the same properties as the crystalline enzyme from commercial supplies of baker's yeast. The enzyme from yeast grown without added An2+ has quite different properties. It has a mol.wt. in the region of 72000 and an S 20 w of 5.8S. The values can be compared with a mol.wt. of 141000 and an S 20 w of 7.6S for the crystalline enzyme. ADP-ribose, a common impurity in commercial samples of NAD+, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the new enzyme (K1 = 0.5 muM), but is not so for the crystalline enzyme. The observed maximum rate of ethanol oxidation at pH 7.05 and 25 degrees C was decreased 12-fold by the presence of 0.06 mol of inhibitor/mol of NAD+ when using the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast, but with crystalline enzyme the maximum rate was essentially unchanged by this concentration of inhibitor. The kinetic characteristics for the two enzymes with ethanol, butan-1-ol, acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde as substrates are markedly different. These kinetic differences are discussed in relation to the mechanism of catalysis for the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast. PMID:179534

  8. Chronic alcoholism in rats induces a compensatory response, preserving brain thiamine diphosphate, but the brain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases are inactivated despite unchanged coenzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Yulia M; Kudryavtsev, Pavel A; Pylypchuk, Svetlana Yu; Chekhivska, Lilia I; Stepanenko, Svetlana P; Sergiichuk, Andrej A; Bunik, Victoria I

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine-dependent changes in alcoholic brain were studied using a rat model. Brain thiamine and its mono- and diphosphates were not reduced after 20 weeks of alcohol exposure. However, alcoholism increased both synaptosomal thiamine uptake and thiamine diphosphate synthesis in brain, pointing to mechanisms preserving thiamine diphosphate in the alcoholic brain. In spite of the unchanged level of the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate, activities of the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes decreased in alcoholic brain. The inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was caused by its increased phosphorylation. The inactivation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) correlated with a decrease in free thiols resulting from an elevation of reactive oxygen species. Abstinence from alcohol following exposure to alcohol reactivated OGDHC along with restoration of the free thiol content. However, restoration of enzyme activity occurred before normalization of reactive oxygen species levels. Hence, the redox status of cellular thiols mediates the action of oxidative stress on OGDHC in alcoholic brain. As a result, upon chronic alcohol consumption, physiological mechanisms to counteract the thiamine deficiency and silence pyruvate dehydrogenase are activated in rat brain, whereas OGDHC is inactivated due to impaired antioxidant ability.

  9. [Spectral study of the conformational change of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase induced by alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Yuan, J

    1998-02-01

    The conformational change of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase (YADH) at the different concentration of ethanol, n-propanol and ethylene glycol was studied by means of ultraviolet spectrum, fluorescence spectrum and circular dichroism spectrum. The results showed that the ultraviolet absorbance at 220nm and 280nm as well as the relative fluorescence intensity at 336nm of YADH increased with increasing alcohol concentration. The negative peakes at 208nm and 220nm of YADH in circular dichroism spectrum with the solvent of ethanol, ethylene glycol were obviously intensified, but the 220nm peak of YADH was increased in the presence of n-propanol while the 208nm peak was decreased and red-shifted in position as to completely lost. According to the data above, it indicates that the conformation of YADH was changed with losing activity at the various concentration of alcohol.

  10. Phylogeny and structure of the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Christian; Nord-Larsen, Pia Haugaard; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2012-10-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step of the monolignol biosynthesis, the conversion of cinnamyl aldehydes to alcohols, using NADPH as a cofactor. Seven members of the CAD gene family were identified in the genome of Brachypodium distachyon and five of these were isolated and cloned from genomic DNA. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR revealed differential expression of the cloned genes, with BdCAD5 being expressed in all tissues and highest in root and stem while BdCAD3 was only expressed in stem and spikes. A phylogenetic analysis of CAD-like proteins placed BdCAD5 on the same branch as bona fide CAD proteins from maize (ZmCAD2), rice (OsCAD2), sorghum (SbCAD2) and Arabidopsis (AtCAD4, 5). The predicted three-dimensional structures of both BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 resemble that of AtCAD5. However, the amino-acid residues in the substrate-binding domains of BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 are distributed symmetrically and BdCAD3 is similar to that of poplar sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (PotSAD). BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 expressed and purified from Escherichia coli both showed a temperature optimum of about 50 °C and molar weight of 49 kDa. The optimal pH for the reduction of coniferyl aldehyde were pH 5.2 and 6.2 and the pH for the oxidation of coniferyl alcohol were pH 8 and 9.5, for BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 respectively. Kinetic parameters for conversion of coniferyl aldehyde and coniferyl alcohol showed that BdCAD5 was clearly the most efficient enzyme of the two. These data suggest that BdCAD5 is the main CAD enzyme for lignin biosynthesis and that BdCAD3 has a different role in Brachypodium. All CAD enzymes are cytosolic except for BdCAD4, which has a putative chloroplast signal peptide adding to the diversity of CAD functions. PMID:23028019

  11. Alcohol dehydrogenases and an alcohol oxidase involved in the assimilation of exogenous fatty alcohols in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-05-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica can assimilate hydrophobic substrates, including n-alkanes and fatty alcohols. Here, eight alcohol dehydrogenase genes, ADH1-ADH7 and FADH, and a fatty alcohol oxidase gene, FAO1, were analyzed to determine their roles in the metabolism of hydrophobic substrates. A mutant deleted for all of these genes (ALCY02 strain) showed severely defective growth on fatty alcohols, and enhanced sensitivity to fatty alcohols in glucose-containing media. The ALCY02 strain grew normally on n-tetradecane or n-hexadecane, but exhibited slightly defective growth on n-decane or n-dodecane. It accumulated more 1-dodecanol and less dodecanoic acid than the wild-type strain when n-dodecane was fed. Expression of ADH1, ADH3 or FAO1, but not that of other ADH genes or FADH, in the ALCY02 strain restored its growth on fatty alcohols. In addition, a triple deletion mutant of ADH1, ADH3 and FAO1 showed similarly defective growth on fatty alcohols and on n-dodecane to the ALCY02 strain. Microscopic observation suggests that Adh1p and Adh3p are localized in the cytosol and Fao1p is in the peroxisome. These results suggest that Adh1p, Adh3p and Fao1p are responsible for the oxidation of exogenous fatty alcohols but play less prominent roles in the oxidation of fatty alcohols derived from n-alkanes.

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenases and an alcohol oxidase involved in the assimilation of exogenous fatty alcohols in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-05-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica can assimilate hydrophobic substrates, including n-alkanes and fatty alcohols. Here, eight alcohol dehydrogenase genes, ADH1-ADH7 and FADH, and a fatty alcohol oxidase gene, FAO1, were analyzed to determine their roles in the metabolism of hydrophobic substrates. A mutant deleted for all of these genes (ALCY02 strain) showed severely defective growth on fatty alcohols, and enhanced sensitivity to fatty alcohols in glucose-containing media. The ALCY02 strain grew normally on n-tetradecane or n-hexadecane, but exhibited slightly defective growth on n-decane or n-dodecane. It accumulated more 1-dodecanol and less dodecanoic acid than the wild-type strain when n-dodecane was fed. Expression of ADH1, ADH3 or FAO1, but not that of other ADH genes or FADH, in the ALCY02 strain restored its growth on fatty alcohols. In addition, a triple deletion mutant of ADH1, ADH3 and FAO1 showed similarly defective growth on fatty alcohols and on n-dodecane to the ALCY02 strain. Microscopic observation suggests that Adh1p and Adh3p are localized in the cytosol and Fao1p is in the peroxisome. These results suggest that Adh1p, Adh3p and Fao1p are responsible for the oxidation of exogenous fatty alcohols but play less prominent roles in the oxidation of fatty alcohols derived from n-alkanes. PMID:25805841

  13. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  14. Display of Bombyx mori Alcohol Dehydrogenases on the Bacillus subtilis Spore Surface to Enhance Enzymatic Activity under Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Chang, Cheng; Yao, Qin; Li, Guohui; Qin, Lvgao; Chen, Liang; Chen, Keping

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are oxidoreductases catalyzing the reversible oxidation of alcohols to corresponding aldehydes or ketones accompanied by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) as coenzyme. ADHs attract major scientific and industrial interest for the evolutionary perspectives, afforded by their wide occurrence in nature, and for their use in industrial synthesis. However, the low activity of ADHs under extremes of pH and temperature often limits their application. To obtain ADH with high activity, in this study, we used Bombyx mori alcohol dehydrogenases (BmADH) as foreign gene and constructed a recombinant integrative plasmid pJS700-BmADH. This pJS700-BmADH was transformed into Bacillus subtilis by double cross-over and produced an amylase inactivated mutant. The fusion protein containing BmADH was expressed on the spore surface and recognized by BmADH-specific antibody. We also assayed the alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the fusion protein together with the native BmADH at different pH and temperature levels, which indicated the recombinant enzyme exhibits activity over wider ranges of temperature and pH than its native form, perhaps due to the resistance properties of B. subtilis spores against adverse conditions. PMID:21738670

  15. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67.

  16. Activity and stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) entrapped in aerosol OT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Sarcar, S; Jain, T K; Maitra, A

    1992-02-20

    The activity and stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) entrapped in aerosol OT reverse micellar droplets have been investigated spectrophotometrically. Various physical parameters, e.g., water pool size, w(0), pH, and temperature, were optimized for YADH in water/AOT/isooctane reverse micelles. It was found that the enzyme exhibits maximum activity at w(0) = 28 and pH 8.1. It was more active in reverse micelles than in aqueous buffers at a particular temperature and was denatured at about 307 degrees C in both the systems. At a particular temperature YADH entrapped in reverse micelles was less stable than when it was dissolved in aqueous buffer.

  17. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-08-16

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  18. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  19. Escherichia coli derivatives lacking both alcohol dehydrogenase and phosphotransacetylase grow anaerobically by lactate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Escherichia coli mutants lacking alcohol dehydrogenase (adh mutants) cannot synthesize the fermentation product ethanol and are unable to grow anaerobically on glucose and other hexoses. Similarly, phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants (pta mutants) neither excrete acetate nor grow anaerobically. However, when a strain carrying an adh deletion was selected for anaerobic growth on glucose, spontaneous pta mutants were isolated. Strains carrying both adh and pta mutations were observed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to produce lactic acid as the major fermentation product. Various combinations of adh pta double mutants regained the ability to grow anaerobically on hexoses, by what amounts to a homolactic fermentation. Unlike wild-type strains, such adh pta double mutants were unable to grow anaerobically on sorbitol or on glucuronic acid. The growth properties of strains carrying various mutations affecting the enzymes of fermentation are discussed terms of redox balance.

  20. Zeta-crystallin, a novel protein from the guinea pig lens is related to alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Rodokanaki, A; Holmes, R K; Borrás, T

    1989-05-30

    zeta-Crystallin is a major component of the water-soluble proteins of the guinea pig lens. We have constructed a lens cDNA library from one- to seven-day-old guinea pigs in the plasmid Bluescript KS+ and used the 16 amino acid (aa) sequence of a CNBr peptide to design an oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe. Analysis of two positive clones and direct sequence of the 5' end of the RNA resulted in the completion of a most probably full-length mRNA comprising 1842 nucleotides (nt). The ATG start codon occurs 83 nt downstream from the 5' end. The open reading frame, ending with a stop codon at nt position 1070, predicts a protein of 328 aa with a calculated Mr of 35,071. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein data base reveals a significant similarity of zeta-crystallin with the enzyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  1. Study on immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase on nanocrystalline Ni-Co ferrites as magnetic support.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Mohammad; Nasir, Zeba; Khan, Mohd Shoeb; Lutfullah; Alam, Md Fazle; Younus, Hina; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The covalent binding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) enzyme complex in a series of magnetic crystalline Ni-Co nanoferrites, synthesized via sol-gel auto combustion technique was investigated. The structural analysis, morphology and magnetic properties of Ni-Co nanoferrites were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The comparative analysis of the HRTEM micrographs of bare magnetic nanoferrite particles and particles immobilized with enzyme revealed an uniform distribution of the particles in both the cases without undergoing change in the size which was found to be in the range 20-30 nm. The binding of YADH to Ni-Co nanoferrites and the possible binding mechanism have been suggested by comparing the FTIR results. The binding properties of the immobilized YADH enzyme were also studied by kinetic parameters, optimum operational pH, temperature, thermal stability and reusability. The immobilized YADH exhibits enhanced thermal stability as compared to the free enzyme over a wide range of temperature and pH, and showed good durability after recovery by magnetic separation for repeated use.

  2. The three zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenases from baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Leskovac, Vladimir; Trivić, Svetlana; Pericin, Draginja

    2002-12-01

    This review is a summary of our current knowledge of the structure, function and mechanism of action of the three zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenases, YADH-1, YADH-2 and YADH-3, in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The opening section deals with the substrate specificity of the enzymes, covering the steady-state kinetic data for its most known substrates. In the following sections, the kinetic mechanism for this enzyme is reported, along with the values of all rate constants in the mechanism. The complete primary structures of the three isoenzymes of YADH are given, and the model of the 3D structure of the active site is presented. All known artificial mutations in the primary structure of the YADH are covered in full and described in detail. Further, the chemical mechanism of action for YADH is presented along with the complement of steady-state and ligand-binding data supporting this mechanism. Finally, the bio-organic chemistry of the hydride-transfer reactions catalyzed by the enzyme is covered: this chemistry explains the narrow substrate specificity and the enantioselectivity of the yeast enzyme.

  3. Preparation of novel silica-coated alginate gel beads for efficient encapsulation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Song-Wei; Lu, Yang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Jiang, Zhong-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Biomimetic formation has undoubtedly inspired the preparation of novel organic-inorganic hybrid composites. In this study, silica-coated alginate gel beads were prepared by coating the surface of alginate gel beads with silica film derived from tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). The composition and structure of the silica film were characterized by FT-IR and SEM equipped with EDX. The swelling behavior of silica-coated alginate gel beads was studied to be more stable against swelling than that of alginate gel beads. The results showed that silica-coated alginate gel beads exhibited appropriate diffusion property. The effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of NADH in silica-coated alginate beads was 1.76 x 10(-10) m2/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient in alginate beads was 1.84 x 10(-10) m2/s. The model enzyme yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) was encapsulated in silica-coated alginate and pure alginate beads, respectively. Enzyme leakage of YADH in alginate gel beads was determined to be 32%, while the enzyme leakage in silica-coated alginate gel beads was as low as 11%. Furthermore, the relative activity of YADH in alginate gel beads decreased almost to zero after 10 recycles, while the relative activity of YADH in silica-coated alginate gel beads was 81.3%. The recycling stability of YADH in silica-coated alginate gel beads was found to be increased significantly mainly due to the effective inhibition of enzyme leakage by compact silica film.

  4. Study on immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase on nanocrystalline Ni-Co ferrites as magnetic support.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Mohammad; Nasir, Zeba; Khan, Mohd Shoeb; Lutfullah; Alam, Md Fazle; Younus, Hina; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The covalent binding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) enzyme complex in a series of magnetic crystalline Ni-Co nanoferrites, synthesized via sol-gel auto combustion technique was investigated. The structural analysis, morphology and magnetic properties of Ni-Co nanoferrites were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The comparative analysis of the HRTEM micrographs of bare magnetic nanoferrite particles and particles immobilized with enzyme revealed an uniform distribution of the particles in both the cases without undergoing change in the size which was found to be in the range 20-30 nm. The binding of YADH to Ni-Co nanoferrites and the possible binding mechanism have been suggested by comparing the FTIR results. The binding properties of the immobilized YADH enzyme were also studied by kinetic parameters, optimum operational pH, temperature, thermal stability and reusability. The immobilized YADH exhibits enhanced thermal stability as compared to the free enzyme over a wide range of temperature and pH, and showed good durability after recovery by magnetic separation for repeated use. PMID:25450541

  5. Purification and characterization of a zinc-dependent cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Leucaena leucocephala, a tree legume.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Brijesh; Pandey, Veda P; Shasany, A K; Dwivedi, U N

    2014-04-01

    A cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) from the secondary xylem of Leucaena leucocephala has been purified to homogeneity through successive steps of ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE cellulose, Sephadex G-75, and Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity column chromatographies. CAD was purified to 514.2 folds with overall recovery of 13 % and specific activity of 812. 5 nkat/mg. Native and subunit molecular masses of the purified enzyme were found to be ∼76 and ∼38 kDa, respectively, suggesting it to be a homodimer. The enzyme exhibited highest catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km 3.75 μM(-1) s(-1)) with cinnamyl aldehyde among all the substrates investigated. The pH and temperature optima of the purified CAD were pH 8.8 and 40 °C, respectively. The enzyme activity was enhanced in the presence of 2.0 mM Mg(2+), while Zn(2+) at the same concentration exerted an inhibitory effect. The inclusion of 2.0 mM EDTA in the assay system activated the enzyme. The enzyme was inhibited with caffeic acid and ferulic acid in a concentration-dependent manner, while no inhibition was observed with salicylic acid. Peptide mass analysis of the purified CAD by MALDI-TOF showed a significant homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of MDR superfamily. PMID:24532464

  6. Purification and characterization of an NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida maris for the synthesis of optically active 1-(pyridyl)ethanol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shigeru; Yano, Miho; Hasegawa, Junzo; Yasohara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    A novel (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (AFPDH) produced by Candida maris IFO10003 was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Toyopearl, and Phenyl-Toyopearl, and characterized. The relative molecular mass of the native enzyme was found to be 59,900 by gel filtration, and that of the subunit was estimated to be 28,900 on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the enzyme is a homodimer. It required NADH as a cofactor and reduced various kinds of carbonyl compounds, including ketones and aldehydes. AFPDH reduced acetylpyridine derivatives, β-keto esters, and some ketone compounds with high enantioselectivity. This is the first report of an NADH-dependent, highly enantioselective (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase isolated from a yeast. AFPDH is a very useful enzyme for the preparation of various kinds of chiral alcohols.

  7. Microbial production of methylketones: properties of purified yeast secondary alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.N.; Hou, C.T.; Laskin, A.I.; Derelanko, P.

    1981-06-01

    Secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH) was purified from extracts of a methanol-grown yeast, Pichia sp. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by ultracentrifugation and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified SADH has a molecular weight of 98,000 as determined by gel filtration and 102,000 as determined by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. The sedimentation constant s/sub 20,w/ was 6.0. The subunit size of the SADH was 48,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that it consists of two subunits. The purified SADH contained two atoms of zinc per mole of enzyme protein. SADH catalyzed the oxidation of secondary alcohols. Primary alcohols (C/sub 1/ to C/sub 8/ tested) were not oxidized. The purified SADH and extracts of various yeasts and bacteria also catalyzed the reduction of methylketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols in the presence of reduced NAD/sup +/ as an electron donor. Both reactions (oxidation of secondary alcohols in the presence of NAD/sup +/ and reduction of methylketones in the presence of reduced NAD/sup +/) catalyzed by the purified SADH were inhibited by metal-chelating agents, thio reagent, and by antisera prepared against the purified enzyme. The apparent K/sub m/ values for NAD/sup +/, reduced NAD/sup +/, reduced NAD/sup +/, 2-butanol, and 2-butanone are 0.05, 0.1, 0.4, and 1 mM, respectively. The purified enzyme preferentially oxidized (-)-2-butanol and (-)-2-octanol, the rate of oxidation of (+)-2-butanol and (+)-2-octanol was 36% and 13% of that of 100% with (-)-2-butanol and (-)-2-octanol, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for (-)-2-butanol and (+)-2-butanol were 3.0 and 0.75 mM, respectively. Antisera prepared against purified Pichia SADH cross-reacted with the SADH derived from bacteria. This suggests difference in immunological properties between yeast and bacterial SADH.

  8. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food.

  9. Suppression of cellulase and polygalacturonase and induction of alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes in avocado fruit mesocarp subjected to low oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Kanellis, A K; Solomos, T; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K A

    1991-05-01

    Expression of polygalacturonase and cellulase, two hydrolytic enzymes of avocado (Persea americana, cv Hass) fruit which are synthesized de novo during ripening, and alcohol dehydrogenase, a known anaerobic protein, were studied under different O(2) regimes. Low O(2) concentrations (2.5-5.5%) diminished the accumulation of polygalacturonase and cellulase proteins and the expression of their isoenzymes. This pattern of change in cellulase protein was also reflected in the steady-state amount of its mRNA. In contrast, 7.5 and 10% O(2) did not alter the changes observed in fruits ripened in air. On the other hand, alcohol dehydrogenase was induced in 2.5, 3.5, and 5.5% O(2) but not in 7.5 or 10% O(2). The recovery from the hypoxic stress upon returning the fruits back to air for 24 hours, was also a function of O(2) tensions under which the fruits were kept. Thus, the synthesis of polygalacturonase and cellulase was directly related to O(2) levels, while the activity of the isoenzymes of alcohol dehydrogenase was inversely related to O(2) levels. The results indicate that hypoxia exerts both negative and positive effects on the expression of certain genes and that these effects are initiated at the same levels of O(2).

  10. In vitro expression of Candida albicans alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakri, M M; Rich, A M; Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for oral cancer, possibly via its conversion to acetaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The oral commensal yeast Candida albicans may be one of the agents responsible for this conversion intra-orally. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) family of enzymes are involved in acetaldehyde metabolism in yeast but, for C. albicans it is not known which family member is responsible for the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In this study we determined the expression of mRNAs from three C. albicans Adh genes (CaADH1, CaADH2 and CaCDH3) for cells grown in different culture media at different growth phases by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. CaADH1 was constitutively expressed under all growth conditions but there was differential expression of CaADH2. CaADH3 expression was not detected. To investigate whether CaAdh1p or CaAdh2p can contribute to alcohol catabolism in C. albicans, each gene from the reference strain C. albicans SC5314 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts from an CaAdh1p-expressing S. cerevisiae recombinant, but not an CaAdh2p-expressing recombinant, or an empty vector control strain, possessed ethanol-utilizing Adh activity above endogenous S. cerevisiae activity. Furthermore, expression of C. albicans Adh1p in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous ScADH2 gene (known to convert ethanol to acetaldehyde in this yeast) had been deleted, conferred an NAD-dependent ethanol-utilizing, and so acetaldehyde-producing, Adh activity. We conclude that CaAdh1p is the enzyme responsible for ethanol use under in vitro growth conditions, and may contribute to the intra-oral production of acetaldehyde.

  11. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of two cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases from a liverwort Plagiochasma appendiculatum.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wu, Yifeng; Zhao, Yu; Han, Xiaojuan; Lou, Hongxiang; Cheng, Aixia

    2013-09-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) (EC 1.1.1.195) is a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis. It catalyzes cinnamyl aldehydes as substrates to form corresponding alcohols, the last step in monolignol biosynthesis. Almost all CAD members of land plants could be divided into three classes according to the phylogenetic analysis, together with gene structure and function. In the present investigation, two cDNAs encoding CADs were obtained from a Chinese liverwort Plagiochasma appendiculatum thallus library and were designated as PaCAD1 and PaCAD2. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PaCAD1 and PaCAD2 belonged to Class II. Full length cDNAs were heterologously expressed in E. coli and the recombinant PaCAD proteins displayed high activity levels using p-coumaryl, caffeyl, coniferyl, 5-hydroxyconiferyl and sinapyl aldehydes as substrates to form corresponding alcohols. The enzyme kinetics results showed that PaCAD1 and PaCAD2 used coniferyl aldehyde as the favourite substrate and showed high catalytic efficiency towards p-coumaryl aldehyde but lowest catalytic efficiency towards 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde. In accord with the higher lignin content in the thallus than in the callus, the expression level of PaCAD2 was also higher in thallus than in the callus. The expression of PaCAD1 and PaCAD2 was induced by Methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) treatment. This suggested that these two PaCADs played twin roles in lignin biosynthesis and the defencedefence of abiotic stress in P. appendiculatum. This is the first time that the CADs in liverworts have been functionally characterized.

  12. General base catalysis in a glutamine for histidine mutant at position 51 of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ehrig, T; Hurley, T D; Edenberg, H J; Bosron, W F

    1991-01-29

    On the basis of the three-dimensional structure of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase determined by X-ray crystallography, His 51 has been proposed to act as a general base during catalysis by abstracting a proton from the alcohol substrate. A hydrogen-bonding system (proton relay system) connecting the alcohol substrate and His 51 has been proposed to mediate proton transfer. We have mutated His 51 to Gln in the homologous human liver beta 1 beta 1 alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme which is expected to have a similar proton relay system. The mutation resulted in an about 6-fold drop in V/Kb (Vmax for ethanol oxidation divided by Km for ethanol) at pH 7.0 and a 12-fold drop at pH 6.5. V/Kb could be restored completely or partially by the presence of high concentrations of glycylglycine, glycine, and phosphate buffers. A Brønsted plot of the effect on V/Kb versus the pKa of these bases plus H2O and OH- was linear. Only secondary or tertiary amine buffers differed from linearity, presumably due to steric hindrance. These results suggest that His 51 acts as a general base catalyst during alcohol oxidation in the wild-type enzyme and can be functionally replaced in the mutant enzyme by general base catalysts present in the solvent. Steady-state kinetic constants for NAD+ and the trifluoroethanol inhibition patterns were similar between the wild-type and the mutant enzyme. Differences in the inhibition constants (Ki) of caprate and trifluoroethanol below pH 7.8 and in the pH dependence of Ki can be explained by the substitution of neutral Gln for positively charged His. PMID:1989677

  13. Characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH12) from Haloarcula marismortui, an extreme halophile from the Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Timpson, Leanne M; Alsafadi, Diya; Mac Donnchadha, Cillín; Liddell, Susan; Sharkey, Michael A; Paradisi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Haloarchaeal alcohol dehydrogenases are of increasing interest as biocatalysts in the field of white biotechnology. In this study, the gene adh12 from the extreme halophile Haloarcula marismortui (HmADH12), encoding a 384 residue protein, was cloned into two vectors: pRV1 and pTA963. The resulting constructs were used to transform host strains Haloferax volcanii (DS70) and (H1209), respectively. Overexpressed His-tagged recombinant HmADH12 was purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The His-tagged protein was visualized by SDS-PAGE, with a subunit molecular mass of 41.6 kDa, and its identity was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Purified HmADH12 catalyzed the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes and ketones, being optimally active in the presence of 2 M KCl. It was thermoactive, with maximum activity registered at 60°C. The NADP(H) dependent enzyme was haloalkaliphilic for the oxidative reaction with optimum activity at pH 10.0. It favored a slightly acidic pH of 6.0 for catalysis of the reductive reaction. HmADH12 was significantly more tolerant than mesophilic ADHs to selected organic solvents, making it a much more suitable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  14. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications.

  15. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications. PMID:27474326

  16. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group.

  17. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase of Rauwolfia serpentina cells: the key enzyme in biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Esaki, N; Nakai, S; Hashimoto, K; Uesato, S; Soda, K; Fujita, T

    1991-02-01

    Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols in plants, is unstable and has been only poorly characterized. However we have established conditions which stabilize the enzyme from Rauwolfia serpentina cells, and then purified it to homogeneity. It is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 44,000 and contains zinc ions. Various branched-chain allylic primary alcohols such as nerol, geraniol, and 10-hydroxygeraniol were substrates, but ethanol was inert. The enzyme exclusively requires NADP+ or NADPH as the cofactor. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that the nerol dehydrogenation proceeds by an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. NADP+ binds the enzyme first and then NADPH is the second product released from it. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the reaction products showed that 10-hydroxygeraniol undergoes a reversible dehydrogenation to produce 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial, which are oxidized further to give 10-oxogeranial, the direct precursor of iridodial. The enzyme has been found to exclusively transfer the pro-R hydrogen of NADPH to neral. The N-terminal sequence of the first 21 amino acids revealed no significant homology with those of various other proteins including the NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases registered in a protein data bank. PMID:1864846

  19. Aspartate 46, a second sphere ligand to the catalytic zinc, is essential for activity of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzhorn, A.J.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    The crystal structure of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) shows a hydrogen bond between the imidazole of His-67, a ligand to the active site zinc, and the carboxylate of Asp-49. Both residues are conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. Directed mutagenesis was used to replace the homologous Asp-46 in ADH I from S. cerevisiae with asparagine. The substitution did not alter the overall structure of the enzyme, as judged by CD measurements, but the removal of a negative charge was evident in electrophoresis, and in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The mutant and wild-type enzymes had similar zinc contents as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Active site titration and steady state kinetics indicated that binding of coenzymes, substrates and substrate analogs is 4-24 fold weaker in the asparagine enzyme. The turnover numbers were reduced by a factor of 70 for ethanol oxidation and 30 for acetaldehyde reduction at pH 7.3, 30/sup 0/C. Dead end inhibition studies and the kinetic isotope effect showed that NAD and ethanol binding follow a rapid equilibrium random mechanism as opposed to the ordered mechanism found for ADH I. They conclude that the carboxyl group of Asp-46 is essential for the electrostatic environment near the active site zinc. Amidation may affect the geometry and/or coordination of the metal complex.

  20. Construction of an integrated enzyme system consisting azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase for dye removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyi; Wei, Buqing; Zhao, Yuhua; Wang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and carcinogenic and are often present in industrial effluents. In this research, azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase were coupled for both continuous generation of the cofactor NADH and azo dye removal. The results show that 85% maximum relative activity of azoreductase in an integrated enzyme system was obtained at the conditions: 1U azoreductase:10U glucose 1-dehydrogenase, 250mM glucose, 1.0mM NAD(+) and 150μM methyl red. Sensitivity analysis of the factors in the enzyme system affecting dye removal examined by an artificial neural network model shows that the relative importance of enzyme ratio between azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase was 22%, followed by dye concentration (27%), NAD(+) concentration (23%) and glucose concentration (22%), indicating none of the variables could be ignored in the enzyme system. Batch results show that the enzyme system has application potential for dye removal.

  1. Biophysical and mutagenic analysis of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D S; Secundo, F; Phillips, R S; Dong, J; Scott, R A; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E adhB gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (secondary ADH) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at more than 10% of total protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified in high yield (67%) by heat-treatment at 85 degrees C and (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. Site-directed mutants (C37S, H59N, D150N, D150Eand D150C were analysed to test the peptide sequence comparison-based predictions of amino acids responsible for putative catalytic Zn binding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a protein-bound Zn atom with ZnS1(imid)1(N,O)3 co-ordination sphere. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry measured 0.48 Zn atoms per wild-type secondary ADH subunit. The C37S, H59N and D150N mutant enzymes bound only 0.11, 0.13 and 0.33 Zn per subunit respectively,suggesting that these residues are involved in Zn liganding. The D150E and D150C mutants retained 0.47 and 1.2 Zn atoms per subunit, indicating that an anionic side-chain moiety at this position preserves the bound Zn. All five mutant enzymes had enzyme specific activity 2.7-fold, increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 225-fold, and decreased the Km(app) for NAD+ 3-fold, supporting the prediction that the enzyme binds nicotinamide cofactor in a Rossmann fold. Our data indicate therefore that, unlike the liver primary ADH

  2. Protein engineering of alcohol dehydrogenase--1. Effects of two amino acid changes in the active site of yeast ADH-1.

    PubMed

    Murali, C; Creaser, E H

    1986-01-01

    One of the promises held out by protein engineering is the ability to alter predictably the properties of an enzyme to enable it to find new substrates or catalyse existing substrates more efficiently, such manipulations being of interest both enzymologically and, potentially, industrially. It has been postulated that in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH-1) certain amino acids such as Trp 93 and Thr 48 constrict the active site due to their bulky side chains and thus impede catalysis of molecules larger than ethanol. To study effects of enlarging the active site we have made two changes into YADH-1, replacing Trp 93 with Phe and Thr 48 with Ser. Kinetic experiments showed that this enzyme had marked increases in reaction velocity for the n-alcohols propanol, butanol, pentanol, hexanol, heptanol, octanol and cinnamyl alcohol compared to the parent, agreeing with the prediction that expanding the active site should facilitate the oxidation of larger alcohols. The substrate affinities were slightly reduced in the altered enzyme, possibly due to its having reduced hydrophobicity at Phe 93.

  3. Inactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by alkylperoxyl radicals. Characteristics and influence of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Videla, L A; Salim-Hanna, M; Lissi, E A

    1992-10-01

    The study of the interaction of alkylperoxyl radicals generated by the aerobic thermolysis of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) (AAP) with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) revealed a high reactivity of the enzyme, with an average of about 20 radicals per added YADH tetramer being needed to elicit its total inactivation. NAD+ enhanced YADH inactivation at NAD+/YADH molar ratios from 0.25 to 1, decreasing the rate of the process when added in excess to the enzyme concentration. At NADH/YADH molar ratios greater than 1, NADH exhibited a protective effect characterized by a poorly defined induction time and lower inactivation rates, which progressively increased during the reaction period. These changes occurred concomitantly with the oxidation of NADH into NAD+, which might counteract the protective effect of NADH. Under similar conditions, NADP+ did not modify AAP-induced YADH inactivation, while NADPH exhibited a modest protection at NADPH/YADH molar ratios greater than 1. It is concluded that YADH inactivation by alkylperoxyl radicals is strongly dependent on the redox state of the NADH-NAD+ couple, as the rates of the process at different time intervals inversely correlate with the respective NADH/NAD+ ratios.

  4. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells.

  5. Polyphosphazenes as tunable and recyclable supports to immobilize alcohol dehydrogenases and lipases: synthesis, catalytic activity, and recycling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cuetos, Aníbal; Valenzuela, María L; Lavandera, Iván; Gotor, Vicente; Carriedo, Gabino A

    2010-05-10

    The polyphosphazene {NP[O(2)C(12)H(7.5)(NH(2))(0.5)]}(n), prepared by reacting {NP[O(2)C(12)H(7.5)(NO(2))(0.5)]} with the Lalancette's reagent, was used for attaching enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A) and lipase (CAL-B). The resulting new biocatalysts exhibited great potential as tunable supports for enzymatic reactions in both aqueous and organic media. The material with immobilized ADH-A was as efficient as the commercial enzyme to perform stereoselective bioreductions of ketones in aqueous solutions and could be used for the reduction of various aliphatic and aromatic ketones up to 60 degrees C and recycled several times without significant loss of activity even after three months of storage. The biocatalyst obtained with CAL-B was more efficient than the free enzyme for kinetic resolutions in organic solvents and exhibited a moderately good capability of reutilization. PMID:20359182

  6. The oxidation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase-1 by hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Men, Lijie; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) plays an important role in the conversion of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones. YADH-1 is a zinc-containing protein, and it accounts for the major part of ADH activity in growing baker's yeast. To gain insight into how oxidative modification of the enzyme affects its function, we exposed YADH-1 to hydrogen peroxide in vitro and assessed the oxidized protein by LC-MS/MS analysis of proteolytic cleavage products of the protein and by measurements of enzymatic activity, zinc release, and thiol/thiolate loss. The results illustrated that Cys43 and Cys153, which reside at the active site of the protein, could be selectively oxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H). In addition, H2O2 induced the formation of three disulfide bonds: Cys43-Cys153 in the catalytic domain, Cys103-Cys111 in the noncatalytic zinc center, and Cys276-Cys277. Therefore, our results support the notion that the oxidation of cysteine residues in the zinc-binding domain of proteins can go beyond the formation of disulfide bond(s); the formation of Cys-SO2H and Cys-SO3H is also possible. Furthermore, most methionines could be oxidized to methionine sulfoxides. Quantitative measurement results revealed that, among all the cysteine residues, Cys43 was the most susceptible to H2O2 oxidation, and the major oxidation products of this cysteine were Cys-SO2H and Cys-SO3H. The oxidation of Cys43 might be responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme upon H2O2 treatment.

  7. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H.; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping

    2013-01-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q <0.05); and 19 and 6 SNPs, respectively, that were significantly associated with these two disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10−5 ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10−5 ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans. PMID:23468174

  8. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-07-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7-ADH1C-ADH1B-ADH1A-ADH6-ADH4-ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q < 0.05); and 19 and 6 SNPs, respectively, that were significantly associated with these two disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans.

  9. Effect of pressure on a heavy-atom isotope effect of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Girdaukas, Gary G; Northrop, Dexter B

    2006-02-15

    Hydrostatic pressure causes a monophasic decrease in the (13)C primary isotope effect expressed on the oxidation of benzyl alcohol by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. The primary isotope effect was measured by the competitive method, using whole-molecule mass spectrometry. The effect is, therefore, an expression of isotopic discrimination on the kinetic parameter V/K, which measures substrate capture. Moderate pressure increases capture by activating hydride transfer, the transition state of which must therefore have a smaller volume than the free alcohol plus the capturing form of enzyme [Cho, Y.-K.; Northrop, D. B. Biochemistry 1999, 38, 7470-7475]. The decrease in the (13)C isotope effect with increasing pressure means that the transition state for hydride transfer from the heavy atom must have an even smaller volume, measured here to be 13 mL.mol(-1). The pressure data factor the kinetic isotope effect into a semiclassical reactant-state component, with a null value of k(12)/k(13) = 1, and a transition-state component of Q(12)/Q(13) = 1.028 (borrowing Bell's nomenclature for hydrogen tunneling corrections). A similar experiment involving a deuterium isotope effect previously returned the same volume and null value, plus a pressure-sensitive isotope effect [Northrop, D. B.; Cho, Y.-K. Biochemistry 2000, 39, 2406-2412]. Consistent with precedence in the chemical literature, the latter suggested a possibility of hydrogen tunneling; however, it is unlikely that carbon can engage in significant tunneling at ambient temperature. The fact that the decrease in activation volumes for hydride transfer is equivalent when one mass unit is added to the carbon end of a scissile C-H bond and when one mass unit is added to the hydrogen end is significant and suggests a common origin.

  10. Dehydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol in isolated perfused rabbit skin, skin homogenate and purified dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bast, G E; Kampffmeyer, H G

    1998-01-01

    The formation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid from 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol was determined in (a) rabbit ears, single-pass perfused with a protein-free buffer, pH 7.4; (b) the microsomal fraction and its supernatant from homogenized rabbit skin; and (c) purified alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver and baker's yeast. The inhibition of product formation in (a) was about 60% by various 4-methylpyrazole concentrations, but metyrapone had no effect. Following ultracentrifugation, only the supernatant of homogenized skin showed product formation (apparent Vmay: 32 pmol/min per cm2 skin; apparent Km: 64 microM). 3-Phenoxybenzyl alcohol and ethanol dehydrogenation was similar by alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (apparent Km: 0.7 vs. 0.4 mM; apparent Vmax: 0.3 vs. 0.2 U/ microg protein). In baker's yeast, the apparent Km of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid formation was several times larger than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. The KI of 4-methylpyrazole for alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver was 0.6 (3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol) vs. 0.04 microM (ethanol). The KI for ethanol in baker's yeast was 470 microM. In conclusion dehydrogenation is an important metabolic pathway in the skin for xenobiotics with an aliphatic alcohol at a side chain. PMID:9885409

  11. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency ameliorates alcoholic fatty liver but worsens liver inflammation and fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyo-Jung; Won, Young-Suk; Park, Ogyi; Chang, Binxia; Duryee, Michael J.; Thiele, Geoffrey E.; Matsumoto, Akiko; Singh, Surendra; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Gao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from alcohol metabolism. Approximately 40~50% of East Asians carry an inactive ALDH2 gene and exhibit acetaldehyde accumulation after alcohol consumption. However, the role of ALDH2 deficiency in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury remains obscure. In the present study, wild-type and ALDH2−/− mice were subjected to ethanol feeding and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment, and liver injury was assessed. Compared with wild-type mice, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice had higher levels of malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adduct and greater hepatic inflammation, with higher hepatic IL-6 expression but surprisingly lower levels of steatosis and serum ALT. Higher IL-6 levels were also detected in ethanol-treated precision-cut-liver-slices from ALDH2−/− mice and in Kupffer cells isolated from ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than those levels in wild-type mice. In vitro incubation with MAA enhanced the LPS-mediated stimulation of IL-6 production in Kupffer cells. In agreement with these findings, hepatic activation of the major IL-6 downstream signaling molecule signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was higher in ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than in wild-type mice. An additional deletion of hepatic STAT3 increased steatosis and hepatocellular damage in ALDH2−/− mice. Finally, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice were more prone to CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis than ethanol-fed wild-type mice. Conclusions: ALDH2−/− mice are resistant to ethanol-induced steatosis but prone to inflammation and fibrosis via MAA-mediated paracrine activation of IL-6 in Kupffer cells. These findings suggest that alcohol, via acetaldehyde and its associated adducts, stimulates hepatic inflammation and fibrosis independent from causing hepatocyte death, and that ALDH2-deficient individuals may be resistant to steatosis and blood ALT elevation, but are

  13. Effect of zinc ions on conformational stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhou, H M

    2001-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase preparations were prepared with the conformational zinc ion removed (Apo-I YADH) and with both the conformational and catalytic zinc ions removed (Apo-II YADH). The unfolding of Apo-I YADH and Apo-II YADH during denaturation in urea solutions was then followed by fluorescence emission, circular dichroism, and second-derivative optical spectroscopies. Compared with the native enzyme, Apo-I YADH incurred some slight unfolding, and its stability against urea was markedly decreased, while Apo-II YADH incurred marked unfolding but contained residual ordered structure even at high urea concentrations. The results show that native YADH is more conformationally stable against urea denaturation than Apo-I YADH, indicating that the conformational Zn(2+) plays an important role in stabilizing the conformation of the YADH molecule. However, unfolding of the region around the conformational zinc ion is shown not to be the rate limited step in the unfolding of the molecule by the fact that the unfolding and inactivation rate constants of native and Apo-I YADH are the same. It is suggested that the catalytic zinc ion is more important in maintaining the structure of YADH. YADH lost its cooperative unfolding ability after the zinc ions were removed. The shape of the transition curves of Apo-I YADH suggests the existence of an unfolding intermediate. For both native and Apo-I YADH, inactivation occurs at much lower urea concentrations than that needed to produce significant conformational changes of the enzyme molecule. At urea concentration above 4 M, the inactivation rate constants are much higher than those of the fast phase of the reaction of unfolding. These results support the suggestion of flexibility at the active site of the enzyme (C. L. Tsou (1986) Trends Biochem. Sci., 11, 427-429; (1993) Science, 262, 308-381).

  14. Biosilica-coated kappa-carrageenan microspheres for yeast alcohol dehydrogenase encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Jiang, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Zhong-Yi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a novel polysaccharide/inorganic hybrid biocomposite was prepared through biomineralization-inspired process for efficient immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). YADH-encapsulated kappa-carrageenan microspheres (KCM) were first coated with chitosan, which was used to guide and catalyze the biomimetic formation of silica, and then coated with silica derived from tetraethoxysiliane (TEOS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with a energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) was employed to investigate the composition and thickness of silica film. Compared with KCM, the silica-coated kappa-carrageenan microspheres (SKCM) containing YADH exhibited improved anti-swelling and catalytic properties. Enzyme leakage of YADH in KCM was detected to be 63.9% after 1 h, while the enzyme leakage in SKCM was as low as 18.2%. The KCM adsorbed water promptly and after 1 h maximum water uptake can be as high as 1576 wt%, while the water uptake of SKCM was only 143 wt% even after 48 h. The optimum pH and temperature for encapsulated YADH were pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C, which were just the same as those for free YADH, but the encapsulated YADH exhibited broader pH and temperature ranges for high activity. Furthermore, the relative activity of YADH in KCM declined almost to zero after 8 recycles, while the relative activity of YADH in SKCM still maintained more than 50%. The significantly increased recycling stability of YADH in SKCM may be attributed to the effective inhibition of enzyme leakage by the compact biosilica layer.

  15. Identification and molecular characterization of the aco genes encoding the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, F B; Steinbüchel, A

    1994-01-01

    Use of oligonucleotide probes, which were deduced from the N-terminal sequences of the purified enzyme components, identified the structural genes for the alpha and beta subunits of E1 (acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase), E2 (dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase), and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) of the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system, which were designated acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of acoA (979 bp), acoB (1,014 bp), acoC (1,353 bp), and acoL (1,413 bp) as well as of acoS (933 bp), which encodes a protein with an M(r) of 34,421 exhibiting 64.7% amino acid identity to the Escherichia coli lipA gene product, were determined. These genes are clustered on a 6.1-kbp region. Heterologous expression of acoA, acoB, acoC, acoL, and acoS in E. coli was demonstrated. The amino acid sequences deduced from acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL for E1 alpha (M(r), 34,854), E1 beta (M(r), 36,184), E2 (M(r), 47,281), and E3 (M(r), 49,394) exhibited striking similarities to the amino acid sequences of the components of the Alcaligenes eutrophus acetoin-cleaving system. Homologies of up to 48.7% amino acid identity to the primary structures of the enzyme components of various 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes also were found. In addition, the respective genes of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes and of the acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system were organized very similarly, indicating a close relationship of the P. carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system to 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes. Images PMID:8110297

  16. Expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans and some properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Benjamin; Lowe, David J; Smith, Andrew T; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Demais, Stephane; Bray, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    Recent crystal structures of xanthine dehydrogenase, xanthine oxidase and related enzymes have paved the way for a detailed structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. One problem encountered when working with these proteins, especially with recombinant protein, is that the preparations tend to be heterogeneous, with only a fraction of the enzyme molecules being active. This is due to the incompleteness of post-translational modification, which for this protein is a complex, and incompletely understood, process involving incorporation of the Mo and Fe/S centres. The enzyme has been expressed previously in both Drosophila and insect cells using baculovirus. The insect cell system has been exploited by Iwasaki et al. [Iwasaki, Okamoto, Nishino, Mizushima and Hori (2000) J. Biochem (Tokyo) 127, 771-778], but, for the rat enzyme, yields a complex mixture of enzyme forms, containing around 10% of functional enzyme. The expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans is described. The purified protein has been analysed both functionally and spectroscopically. Its specific activity is indistinguishable from that of the enzyme purified from fruit flies [Doyle, Burke, Chovnick, Dutton, Whittle and Bray (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 239, 782-795], and it appears to be more active than recombinant xanthine dehydrogenase produced with the baculovirus system. EPR spectra of the recombinant Drosophila enzyme are reported, including parameters for the Fe/S centres. Only a very weak "Fe/SIII" signal (g(1,2,3), 2.057, 1.930, 1.858) was observed, in contrast to the strong analogous signal reported for the enzyme from baculovirus. Since this signal appears to be associated with incomplete post-translational modification, this is consistent with relatively more complete cofactor incorporation in the Aspergillus-produced enzyme. Thus we have developed a recombinant expression system for D. melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase, which can be used

  17. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  18. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  19. Rapid Microscale Isolation and Purification of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Cibacron Blue Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Chad; Moir, Neil

    1996-11-01

    A rapid microscale procedure has been developed for the isolation and purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Glass beads are used for cytolysis, PEG precipitation for partial purification and a cibacron blue affinity column for the final step. A 27.5 fold purification can be achieved in 2 - 3 hours.

  20. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Kinetics Laboratory: Enhanced Data Analysis and Student-Designed Mini-Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    A highly instructive, wide-ranging laboratory project in which students study the effects of various parameters on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase has been adapted for the upper-division biochemistry and physical biochemistry laboratory. Our two main goals were to provide enhanced data analysis, featuring nonlinear regression, and…

  1. Alkaline unfolding and salt-induced folding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase under high pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Le, W P; Yan, S X; Li, S; Zhong, H N; Zhou, H M

    1996-06-01

    The conformational changes of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during unfolding at alkaline pH have been followed by fluorescence emission and circular dichroism spectra. A result of comparison of inactivation and conformational changes shows that much lower values of alkaline pH are required to bring about inactivation than significant conformational change of the enzyme molecule. At pH 9.5, although the enzyme has been completely inactivated, no marked conformational changes can be observed. Even at pH 12, the apparently fully unfolded enzyme retains some ordered secondary structure. After removal of Zn2+ from the enzyme molecule, the conformational stability decreased. At pH 12 by adding the salt, the relatively unfolded state of denatured enzyme changes into a compact conformational state by hydrophobic collapsing. Folded states induced by salt bound ANS strongly, indicating the existence of increased hydrophobic surface. More extensive studies showed that although apo-YADH and holo-YADH exhibited similar behavior, the folding cooperative ability of apo-enzyme was lower than that of holo-enzyme. The above results suggest that the zinc ion plays an important role in helping the folding of YADH and in stabilizing its native conformation.

  2. Preparative isolation and analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza uralensis root using ultrafiltration combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao; Liu, Liangliang; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2014-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and effective assay based on ultrafiltration combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and high-speed countercurrent chromatography was developed for screening and purifying alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza uralensis root extract. Experiments were carried out to optimize binding conditions including alcohol dehydrogenase concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. By comparing the chromatograms, three compounds were found possessing alcohol dehydrogenase binding activity in Glycyrrhiza uralensis root. Under the target-guidance of ultrafiltration combined with the high-performance liquid chromatography experiment, liquiritin (1), isoliquiritin (2), and liquiritigenin (3) were separated by high-speed countercurrent chromatography using ethyl acetate/methanol/water (5:1:4) as the solvent system. The alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitory activities of these three isolated compounds were assessed; compound 2 showed strongest inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 8.95 μM. The results of the present study indicated that the combinative method using ultrafiltration, high-performance liquid chromatography and high-speed countercurrent chromatography could be widely applied for the rapid screening and isolation of enzyme inhibitors from complex mixtures.

  3. Substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Kinetic evaluation of binding and activation parameters controlling the catalytic cycles of unbranched, acyclic secondary alcohols and ketones as substrates of the native and active-site-specific Co(II)-substituted enzyme.

    PubMed

    Adolph, H W; Maurer, P; Schneider-Bernlöhr, H; Sartorius, C; Zeppezauer, M

    1991-11-01

    1. The steady-state parameters kcat and Km and the rate constants of hydride transfer for the substrates isopropanol/acetone; (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone; (S)-2-pentanol, (R)-2-pentanol/2-pentanone; 3-pentanol/3-pentanone; (S)-2-octanol and (R)-2-octanol have been determined for the native Zn(II)-containing horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) and the specific active-site-substituted Co(II)LADH. 2. A combined evaluation of steady-state kinetic data and rate constants obtained from stopped-flow measurements, allowed the determination of all rate constants of the following ordered bi-bi mechanism: E in equilibrium E.NAD in equilibrium E.NAD.R1R2 CHOH in equilibrium E.NADH.R1R2CO in equilibrium E.NADH in equilibrium E. 3. On the basis of the different substrate specificities of LADH and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), a procedure has been developed to evaluate the enantiomeric product composition of ketone reductions. 2-Butanone and 2-pentanone reductions revealed (S)-2-butanol (86%) and (S)-2-pentanol (95%) as the major products. 4. The observed enantioselectivity implies the existence of two productive ternary complexes; E.NADH.(pro-S) 2-butanone and E.NADH.(pro-R) 2-butanone. All rate constants describing the kinetic pathways of the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone have been determined. These data have been used to estimate the expected enantiomer product composition of 2-butanone reductions using apparent kcat/Km values for the two different ternary-complex configurations of 2-butanone. Additionally, these data have been used for computer simulations of the corresponding reaction cycles. Calculated, simulated and experimental data were found to be in good agreement. Thus, the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone is the first example of a LADH-catalyzed reaction for which the stereochemical course could be described in terms of rate constants of the underlying mechanism. 5. The effects of Co(II) substitution on the

  4. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  5. Subcellular localization of the NAD+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Avila, Eva E; Martínez-Alcaraz, Edith R; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Rivera-Baron, Elda I; Arias-Negrete, Sergio; Zazueta-Sandoval, Roberto

    2002-04-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is an ancient eukaryotic cell that shows morphologically atypical organelles and differs metabolically from higher eukaryotic cells. The aim of this study was to determine the subcellular localization of ameba NAD+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2). The enzyme activity was present in soluble and mainly in particulate material whose density was 1.105 in a sucrose gradient. By differential centrifugation, most of the ADH activity sedimented at 160,000 g (160,000-g pellet), similar to the Escherichia coli polymeric ADHE. In the Coomassie staining of the 160,000-g pellet analyzed by electrophoresis, a 96-kDa protein was more prominent than in other fractions; this band was recognized by antibodies against Lactococcus lactis ADHE. By gold labeling, the antibodies recognized the granular material that mainly constitutes the 160,000-g pellet and a material that sedimented along with the internal membrane vesicles. By negative staining, the 160,000-g fraction showed helical rodlike structures with an average length of 103 nm; almost no membrane vesicles were observed in this pellet. In internal membrane fractions, no rodlike structures were found, but protomerlike round structures were observed. These results indicate that the main amebic NAD+-dependent ADH2 activity is naturally organized as rodlike helical particles, similar to bacterial ADHE. Detection of ADH2 in membrane fractions might be explained by cosedimentation of the multimeric ADH during membrane purification.

  6. Characterization of thermotolerant Acetobacter pasteurianus strains and their quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kanchanarach, Watchara; Theeragool, Gunjana; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2010-01-01

    We isolated several thermotolerant Acetobacter species of which MSU10 strain, identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus, could grow well on agar plates at 41 degrees C, tolerate to 1.5% acetic acid or 4% ethanol at 39 degrees C, similarly seen with A. pasteurianus SKU1108 previously isolated. The MSU10 strain showed higher acetic acid productivity in a medium containing 6% ethanol at 37 degrees C than SKU1108 while SKU1108 strain could accumulate more acetic acid in a medium supplemented with 4-5% ethanol at the same temperature. The fermentation ability at 37 degrees C of these thermotolerant strains was superior to that of mesophilic A. pasteurianus IFO3191 strain having weak growth and very delayed acetic acid production at 37 degrees C even at 4% ethanol. Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) were purified from MSU10, SKU1108, and IFO3191 strains, and their properties were compared related to the thermotolerance. ADH of the thermotolerant strains had a little higher optimal temperature and heat stability than that of mesophilic IFO3191. More critically, ADHs from MSU10 and SKU1108 strains exhibited a higher resistance to ethanol and acetic acid than IFO3191 enzyme at elevated temperature. Furthermore, in this study, the ADH genes were cloned, and the amino acid sequences of ADH subunit I, subunit II, and subunit III were compared. The difference in the amino acid residues could be seen, seemingly related to the thermotolerance, between MSU10 or SKU1108 ADH and IFO 3191 ADH.

  7. Furfural reduction mechanism of a zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Kang, ChulHee; Hayes, Robert; Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Webb, Brian N.; Li, Qunrui; Hooper, Travis; Nissen, Mark S.; Xun, Luying

    2012-01-01

    Summary FurX is a tetrameric Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134. The enzyme rapidly reduces furfural with NADH as the reducing power. For the first time among characterized ADHs, the high-resolution structures of all reaction steps were obtained in a time-resolved manner, thereby illustrating the complete catalytic events of NADH-dependent reduction of furfural and the dynamic Zn2+ coordination among Glu66, water, substrate and product. In the fully closed conformation of the NADH complex, the catalytic turnover proved faster than observed for the partially closed conformation due to an effective proton transfer network. The domain motion triggered by NAD(H) association/dissociation appeared to facilitate dynamic interchanges in Zn2+ coordination with substrate and product molecules, ultimately increasing the enzymatic turnover rate. NAD+ dissociation appeared to be a slow process, involving multiple steps in concert with a domain opening and reconfiguration of Glu66. This agrees with the report that the cofactor is not dissociated from FurX during ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural, in which ethanol reduces NAD+ to NADH that is subsequently used for furfural reduction. PMID:22081946

  8. The activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase with nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate as coenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Dalziel, K.; Dickinson, F. M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The separation of nucleotide impurities from commercial NADP preparations by chromatography is described. All the preparations studied contained 0·1–0·2% of NAD. 2. The activity of pure crystalline liver alcohol dehydrogenase with NADP as coenzyme has been confirmed. Initial-rate data are reported for the reaction at pH 6·0 and 7·0 with ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates. With NADP and NADPH2 of high purity, the maximal specific rates were similar to those obtained with NAD and NADH2, but the Michaelis constants for the former coenzymes were much greater than those for the latter. 3. The oxidation of ethanol by NADP is greatly inhibited by NADH2, and this accounts for low values of certain initial-rate parameters obtained with commercial NADP preparations containing NAD. The kinetics of the inhibition are consistent with competitive inhibition in a compulsory-order mechanism. 4. Initial-rate data with NAD and NADPH2 do not conform to the requirements of the mechanism proposed by Theorell & Chance (1951), in contrast with results previously obtained with NAD and NADH2. The possibility that the deviations are due to competing nucleotide impurity in the oxidized coenzyme cannot be excluded. The data show that the enzyme reacts more slowly with, and has a smaller affinity for, NADP and NADPH2 than NAD and NADH2. 5. Phosphate behaves as a competitive inhibitor towards NADP. PMID:14340079

  9. Molecular control of the induction of alcohol dehydrogenase by ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoun, A.M.; Geer, B.W.; Heinstra, P.W.H. ); Corbin, V. ); McKechnie, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the major pathway for ethanol degradation, is induced in Drosophila melanogaster larvae by low concentrations of dietary ethanol. Two lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic products of the ADH pathway for ethanol degradation are not directly involved in the induction of Adh. First, the accumulation of the proximal transcript in Adh{sup n2} larvae was increased when the intracellular level of ethanol was elevated. In addition, the ADH activity, the proximal Adh mRNA, and the intracellular concentration of ethanol were elevated coordinately in wild-type larvae fed hexadeuterated-ethanol, which is metabolized more slowly than normal ethanol.l An examination of P element transformant lines with specific deletions in the 5{prime} regulatory DNA of the Adh gene showed that the DNA sequence between +604 and +634 of the start site of transcription from the distal promoter was essential for this induction. The DNA sequence between {minus}660 and about {minus}5,000 of the distal transcript start site was important for the down-regulation of the induction response.

  10. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from these enzymes were: AdhE1 > BdhB > BdhA ≈ YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2. For ethanol production, the contributions were: AdhE1 > BdhB > YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2 > BdhA. AdhE1 and BdhB are two essential enzymes for butanol and ethanol production. AdhE1 was relatively specific for butanol production over ethanol, while BdhB, YqhD, and SMB_P058 favor ethanol production over butanol. Butanol synthesis was increased in the adhE2 mutant, which had a higher butanol/ethanol ratio (8.15:1) compared with wild type strain (6.65:1). Both the SMB_P058 mutant and yqhD mutant produced less ethanol without loss of butanol formation, which led to higher butanol/ethanol ratio, 10.12:1 and 10.17:1, respectively. To engineer a more efficient butanol-producing strain, adhE1 could be overexpressed, furthermore, adhE2, SMB_P058, yqhD are promising gene inactivation targets. This work provides useful information guiding future strain improvement for butanol production. PMID:27321949

  11. Comparative enzymology-new insights from studies of an "old" enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-09-01

    Comparative enzymology explores the molecular mechanisms that alter the properties of enzymes to best fit and adapt them to the biotic demands and abiotic stresses that affect the cellular environment in which these protein catalysts function. For many years, comparative enzymology was primarily concerned with analyzing enzyme functional properties (e.g. substrate affinities, allosteric effectors, responses to temperature or pH, stabilizers, denaturants, etc.) in order to determine how enzyme properties were optimized to function under changing conditions. More recently it became apparent that posttranslational modifications of enzymes play a huge role in metabolic regulation. At first, such modifications appeared to target just crucial regulatory enzymes but recent work is showing that many dehydrogenases are also targets of posttranslational modification leading to substantial changes in enzyme properties. The present article focuses in particular on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) showing that stress-induced changes in enzyme properties can be linked with reversible posttranslational modifications; e.g. changes in the phosphorylation state of LDH occur in response to dehydration stress in frogs and anoxia exposure of turtles and snails. Furthermore, these studies show that LDH is also a target of other posttranslational modifications including acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination that change in response to anoxia or dehydration stress. Selected new methods for exploring posttranslational modifications of dehydrogenases are discussed and new challenges for the future of comparative enzymology are presented that will help to achieve a deeper understanding of biochemical adaptation through enzyme regulation. PMID:26688543

  12. Effects of high pressure on solvent isotope effects of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, D B; Cho, Y K

    2000-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the capture of a substrate alcohol by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase is biphasic. Solvent isotope effects accompany both phases and are expressed differently at different pressures. These differences allow the extraction of an inverse intrinsic kinetic solvent isotope effect of 1.1 (i.e., (D(2(O)))V/K = 0.9) accompanying hydride transfer and an inverse equilibrium solvent isotope effect of 2.6 (i.e., (D(2(O)))K(s) = 0.4) accompanying the binding of nucleotide, NAD(+). The value of the kinetic effect is consistent with a reactant-state E-NAD(+)-Zn-OH(2) having a fractionation factor of phi approximately 0.5 for the zinc-bound water in conjunction with a transition-state proton exiting a low-barrier hydrogen bond with a fractionation factor between 0.6 and 0.9. The value of the equilibrium effect is consistent with restrictions of torsional motions of multiple hydrogens of the enzyme protein during the conformational change that accompanies the binding of NAD(+). The absence of significant commitments to catalysis accompanying the kinetic solvent isotope effect means that this portion of the proton transfer occurs in the same reactive step as hydride transfer in a concerted chemical mechanism. The success of this analysis suggests that future measurements of solvent isotope effects as a function of pressure, in the presence of moderate commitments to catalysis, may yield precise estimates of intrinsic solvent isotope effects that are not fully expressed on capture at atmospheric pressure. PMID:10969022

  13. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  15. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  16. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  17. Functional analysis of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase involved in lignin biosynthesis in wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing-Hu

    2010-06-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step in the biosynthesis of monolignols. In the present study, a cDNA encoding a CAD was isolated from wheat, designated as TaCAD1. A genome-wide data mining in the wheat EST database revealed another 10 CAD-like homologues, namely TaCAD2 to TaCAD11. A phylogenetic analysis showed that TaCAD1 belonged to the bona fide CAD group involved in lignin synthesis. Two other putative CADs from the wheat genome (TaCAD2 and TaCAD4) also belonged to this group and were very close to TaCAD1, but lacked C-terminal domain, suggesting that they are pseudogenes. DNA gel blot analysis for the wheat genome showed two to three copies of CAD related to TaCAD1, but RNA gel blot analysis revealed only single band for TaCAD1, which was highly expressed in stem, with quite low expression in leaf and undetectable expression in root. The predicted three-dimension structure of TaCAD1 resembled that of AtCAD5, but two amino acid substitutions were identified in the substrate binding region. Recombinant TaCAD1 protein used coniferyl aldehyde as the most favoured substrate, also showed high efficiencies toward sinapyl and p-coumaryl aldehydes. TaCAD1 was an enzyme being pH-dependent and temperature-sensitive, and showing a typical random catalysing mechanism. At the milky stage of wheat, TaCAD1 mRNA abundance, protein level and enzyme activity in stem tissues were higher in a lodging-resistant cultivar (H4546) than in lodging-sensitive cultivar (C6001). These properties were correlated to the lignin contents and lodging indices of the two cultivars. These data suggest that TaCAD1 is the predominant CAD in wheat stem for lignin biosynthesis and is critical for lodging resistance.

  18. Effects of cavities at the nicotinamide binding site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase on structure, dynamics and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Rubach, Jon K; Plapp, Bryce V

    2014-02-11

    A role for protein dynamics in enzymatic catalysis of hydrogen transfer has received substantial scientific support, but the connections between protein structure and catalysis remain to be established. Valine residues 203 and 207 are at the binding site for the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme in liver alcohol dehydrogenase and have been suggested to facilitate catalysis with "protein-promoting vibrations" (PPV). We find that the V207A substitution has small effects on steady-state kinetic constants and the rate of hydrogen transfer; the introduced cavity is empty and is tolerated with minimal effects on structure (determined at 1.2 Å for the complex with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol). Thus, no evidence is found to support a role for Val-207 in the dynamics of catalysis. The protein structures and ligand geometries (including donor-acceptor distances) in the V203A enzyme complexed with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol or 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (determined at 1.1 Å) are very similar to those for the wild-type enzyme, except that the introduced cavity accommodates a new water molecule that contacts the nicotinamide ring. The structures of the V203A enzyme complexes suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that the diminished tunneling and decreased rate of hydride transfer (16-fold, relative to that of the wild-type enzyme) are not due to differences in ground-state ligand geometries. The V203A substitution may alter the PPV and the reorganization energy for hydrogen transfer, but the protein scaffold and equilibrium thermal motions within the Michaelis complex may be more significant for enzyme catalysis.

  19. Effects of aluminum on activity of krebs cycle enzymes and glutamate dehydrogenase in rat brain homogenate.

    PubMed

    Zatta, P; Lain, E; Cagnolini, C

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic agent for animals and humans that has been implicated as an etiological factor in several neurodegenerative diseases and as a destabilizer of cell membranes. Due to its high reactivity, Al3+ is able to interfere with several biological functions, including enzymatic activities in key metabolic pathways. In this paper we report that, among the enzymes that constitute the Krebs cycle, only two are activated by aluminum: alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase. In contrast, aconitase, shows decreased activity in the presence of the metal ion. Al3+ also inhibits glutamate dehydrogenase, an allosteric enzyme that is closely linked to the Krebs cycle. A possible correlation between aluminum, the Krebs cycle and aging processes is discussed.

  20. Studies of a Halophilic NADH Dehydrogenase. 1: Purification and Properties of the Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1973-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase obtained from an extremely halophilic bacterium was purified 570-fold by a combination of gel filtration, chromatography on hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex. The purified enzyme appeared to be FAD-linked and bad an apparent molecular weight of 64000. Even though enzyme activity was stimulated by NaCl, considerable activity (430 % of the maximum activity observed in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl) was observed in the absence of added NaCl. The enzyme was unstable when incubated in solutions of low ionic strength. The presence of NADH enhanced the stability of the enzyme.

  1. Protective effects of the alcohol dehydrogenase-ADH1B*3 allele on attention and behavior problems in adolescents exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Neil C; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase is a critical enzyme in the metabolism of alcohol. Expression of three alleles at the ADH1B locus results in enzymes that differ in turnover rate and affinity for alcohol. The ADH1B*3 allele, which appears to be unique to individuals of African descent, is associated with more rapid alcohol metabolism than the more prevalent ADH1B*1 allele. It has been previously demonstrated that the presence of at least one maternal ADH1B*3 allele confers a protective effect against alcohol teratogenicity in infants and children. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of the ADH1B*3 allele in the mother or child continues to be protective in alcohol-exposed individuals during adolescence. 186 adolescents and 167 mothers participating in a 14-year follow-up of the Detroit Longitudinal Cohort were genotyped for ADH1B alleles. Behavioral reports were obtained from classroom teachers. Frequencies of the ADH1B*3 allele were 17.6% in the mothers and 21.0% in the adolescents, which are consistent with the 15-20% expected for African Americans. Prenatal alcohol exposure was associated with increased attention problems and externalizing behaviors in adolescents born to mothers with two ADH1B*1 alleles but not in those whose mothers had at least one ADH1B*3 allele. A similar pattern was seen in relation to the presence or absence of an ADH1B*3 allele in the adolescent, which may have reflected the presence/absence of the maternal variant. This study is the first to demonstrate that the protective effects of the maternal ADH1B*3 allele continue to be evident during adolescence. These persistent individual differences in vulnerability of offspring to the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure are likely attributable to more rapid metabolism of alcohol that the ADH1B*3 variant confers on the mother, leading to a reduction of the peak blood alcohol concentration to which the fetus is exposed during each drinking episode.

  2. Subcellular Localization and Biochemical Comparison of Cytosolic and Secreted Cytokinin Dehydrogenase Enzymes from Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX, EC 1.5.99.12) degrades cytokinin hormones in plants. There are several differently targeted isoforms of CKX in cells of each plant. While most CKX enzymes appear to be localized in the apoplast or vacuoles, there is generally only one CKX per plant genome that lacks a t...

  3. Three alcohol dehydrogenase genes and one acetyl-CoA synthetase gene are responsible for ethanol utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Michael; Ottlik, Stephanie; Kövesi, Zsolt; Bauer, Benjamin; Matthäus, Falk; Barth, Gerold

    2016-10-01

    The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is able to utilize a wide range of different substrates like glucose, glycerol, ethanol, acetate, proteins and various hydrophobic molecules. Although most metabolic pathways for the utilization of these substrates have been clarified by now, it was not clear whether ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases or by an alternative oxidation system inside the cell. In order to detect the genes that are required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica, eight alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and one alcohol oxidase gene (FAO1) have been identified and respective deletion strains were tested for their ability to metabolize ethanol. As a result of this, we found that the availability of ADH1, ADH2 or ADH3 is required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica. A strain with deletions in all three genes is lacking the ability to utilize ethanol as sole carbon source. Although Adh2p showed by far the highest enzyme activity in an in vitro assay, the availability of any of the three genes was sufficient to enable a decent growth. In addition to ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, an acetyl-CoA synthetase encoding gene (ACS1) was found to be essential for ethanol utilization. As Y. lipolytica is a non-fermenting yeast, it is neither able to grow under anaerobic conditions nor to produce ethanol. To investigate whether Y. lipolytica may produce ethanol, the key genes of alcoholic fermentation in S. cerevisiae, ScADH1 and ScPDC1, were overexpressed in an ADH and an ACS1 deletion strain. However, instead of producing ethanol, the respective strains regained the ability to use ethanol as single carbon source and were still not able to grow under anaerobic conditions. PMID:27486067

  4. Three alcohol dehydrogenase genes and one acetyl-CoA synthetase gene are responsible for ethanol utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Michael; Ottlik, Stephanie; Kövesi, Zsolt; Bauer, Benjamin; Matthäus, Falk; Barth, Gerold

    2016-10-01

    The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is able to utilize a wide range of different substrates like glucose, glycerol, ethanol, acetate, proteins and various hydrophobic molecules. Although most metabolic pathways for the utilization of these substrates have been clarified by now, it was not clear whether ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases or by an alternative oxidation system inside the cell. In order to detect the genes that are required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica, eight alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and one alcohol oxidase gene (FAO1) have been identified and respective deletion strains were tested for their ability to metabolize ethanol. As a result of this, we found that the availability of ADH1, ADH2 or ADH3 is required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica. A strain with deletions in all three genes is lacking the ability to utilize ethanol as sole carbon source. Although Adh2p showed by far the highest enzyme activity in an in vitro assay, the availability of any of the three genes was sufficient to enable a decent growth. In addition to ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, an acetyl-CoA synthetase encoding gene (ACS1) was found to be essential for ethanol utilization. As Y. lipolytica is a non-fermenting yeast, it is neither able to grow under anaerobic conditions nor to produce ethanol. To investigate whether Y. lipolytica may produce ethanol, the key genes of alcoholic fermentation in S. cerevisiae, ScADH1 and ScPDC1, were overexpressed in an ADH and an ACS1 deletion strain. However, instead of producing ethanol, the respective strains regained the ability to use ethanol as single carbon source and were still not able to grow under anaerobic conditions.

  5. The Xenopus alcohol dehydrogenase gene family: characterization and comparative analysis incorporating amphibian and reptilian genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family uniquely illustrates the concept of enzymogenesis. In vertebrates, tandem duplications gave rise to a multiplicity of forms that have been classified in eight enzyme classes, according to primary structure and function. Some of these classes appear to be exclusive of particular organisms, such as the frog ADH8, a unique NADP+-dependent ADH enzyme. This work describes the ADH system of Xenopus, as a model organism, and explores the first amphibian and reptilian genomes released in order to contribute towards a better knowledge of the vertebrate ADH gene family. Results Xenopus cDNA and genomic sequences along with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were used in phylogenetic analyses and structure-function correlations of amphibian ADHs. Novel ADH sequences identified in the genomes of Anolis carolinensis (anole lizard) and Pelodiscus sinensis (turtle) were also included in these studies. Tissue and stage-specific libraries provided expression data, which has been supported by mRNA detection in Xenopus laevis tissues and regulatory elements in promoter regions. Exon-intron boundaries, position and orientation of ADH genes were deduced from the amphibian and reptilian genome assemblies, thus revealing syntenic regions and gene rearrangements with respect to the human genome. Our results reveal the high complexity of the ADH system in amphibians, with eleven genes, coding for seven enzyme classes in Xenopus tropicalis. Frogs possess the amphibian-specific ADH8 and the novel ADH1-derived forms ADH9 and ADH10. In addition, they exhibit ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ADH7, also present in reptiles and birds. Class-specific signatures have been assigned to ADH7, and ancestral ADH2 is predicted to be a mixed-class as the ostrich enzyme, structurally close to mammalian ADH2 but with class-I kinetic properties. Remarkably, many ADH1 and ADH7 forms are observed in the lizard, probably due to lineage-specific duplications. ADH4 is not

  6. Temperature and enzyme activity in poikilotherms. Isocitrate dehydrogenases in rainbow-trout liver

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Thomas W.; Hochachka, P. W.

    1971-01-01

    1. The kinetics of the thermally induced enzyme variants of the supernatant NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase from rainbow-trout liver are investigated. 2. Fish acclimatized to 2°C (cold-adapted enzyme) and 17°C (warm-adapted enzyme) show different relative distributions of the three NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase isoenzymes; this has been demonstrated with electrophoresis and electrofocusing techniques. 3. Plots of Km versus temperature for the cold-adapted and warm-adapted enzyme variants are complex in nature with apparent maximal enzyme–substrate affinity corresponding to the temperature at which the trout is acclimatized. Both substrates, dl-isocitrate and NADP+, give similar curves although the magnitude of the Km change with temperature is much decreased in the case of NADP+. 4. Ea values of approx. 18kcal/mol were determined for both the cold-adapted and warm-adapted enzyme variants. 5. In an attempt to determine how velocities can be increased at low temperatures, cation, pH requirements, metabolite and enzyme concentrations were examined. 6. NAD–isocitrate dehydrogenase could not be detected in trout tissues. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:4399398

  7. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  8. Similarity of Escherichia coli propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO product) and an unusual alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, T; Ingram, L O

    1989-01-01

    The gene that encodes 1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO) from Escherichia coli was sequenced. The reading frame specified a protein of 383 amino acids (including the N-terminal methionine), with an aggregate molecular weight of 40,642. The induction of fucO transcription, which occurred in the presence of fucose, was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. In E. coli, the primary fucO transcript was approximately 2.1 kilobases in length. The 5' end of the transcript began more than 0.7 kilobase upstream of the fucO start codon within or beyond the fucA gene. Propanediol oxidoreductase exhibited 41.7% identity with the iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase II from Zymomonas mobilis and 39.5% identity with ADH4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These three proteins did not share homology with either short-chain or long-chain zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes. We propose that these three unusual alcohol dehydrogenases define a new family of enzymes. Images PMID:2661535

  9. Similarity of Escherichia coli propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO product) and an unusual alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-07-01

    The gene that encodes 1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO) from Escherichia coli was sequenced. The reading frame specified a protein of 383 amino acids (including the N-terminal methionine), with an aggregate molecular weight of 40,642. The induction of fucO transcription, which occurred in the presence of fucose, was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. In E. coli, the primary fucO transcript was approximately 2.1 kilobases in length. The 5{prime} end of the transcript began more than 0.7 kilobase upstream of the fucO start codon within or beyond the fucA gene. Propanediol oxidoreductase exhibited 41.7% identity with the iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase II from Zymomonas mobilis and 39.5% identity with ADH4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These three proteins did not share homology with either short-chain or long-chain zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes. We propose that these three unusual alcohol dehydrogenases define a new family of enzymes.

  10. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  11. The Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene, adhE, Is Necessary for Ethanol Production in Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jonathan; Zheng, Tianyong; Hon, Shuen; Olson, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and Clostridium thermocellum are anaerobic thermophilic bacteria being investigated for their ability to produce biofuels from plant biomass. The bifunctional alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, is present in these bacteria and has been known to be important for ethanol formation in other anaerobic alcohol producers. This study explores the inactivation of the adhE gene in C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. Deletion of adhE reduced ethanol production by >95% in both T. saccharolyticum and C. thermocellum, confirming that adhE is necessary for ethanol formation in both organisms. In both adhE deletion strains, fermentation products shifted from ethanol to lactate production and resulted in lower cell density and longer time to reach maximal cell density. In T. saccharolyticum, the adhE deletion strain lost >85% of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity did not appear to be affected, although ALDH activity was low in cell extracts. Adding ubiquinone-0 to the ALDH assay increased activity in the T. saccharolyticum parent strain but did not increase activity in the adhE deletion strain, suggesting that ALDH activity was inhibited. In C. thermocellum, the adhE deletion strain lost >90% of ALDH and ADH activity in cell extracts. The C. thermocellum adhE deletion strain contained a point mutation in the lactate dehydrogenase gene, which appears to deregulate its activation by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, leading to constitutive activation of lactate dehydrogenase. IMPORTANCE Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and Clostridium thermocellum are bacteria that have been investigated for their ability to produce biofuels from plant biomass. They have been engineered to produce higher yields of ethanol, yet questions remain about the enzymes responsible for ethanol formation in these bacteria. The genomes of these bacteria encode multiple predicted aldehyde and alcohol

  12. Taraxerone enhances alcohol oxidation via increases of alcohol dehyderogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chang-Keun; Kim, Seung-Mi; Oh, Chang-Jin; Yang, Sun-A; Han, Byung-Hee; Mo, Eun-Kyoung

    2012-07-01

    The present study, taraxerone (d-friedoolean-14-en-3-one) was isolated from Sedum sarmentosum with purity 96.383%, and its enhancing effects on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities were determined: EC(50) values were 512.42 ± 3.12 and 500.16 ± 3.23 μM for ADH and ALDH, respectively. In order to obtain more information on taraxerone related with the alcohol metabolism, 40% ethanol (5 mL/kg body weight) with 0.5-1mM of taraxerone were administered to mice. The plasma alcohol and acetaldehyde concentrations of taraxerone-treated groups were significantly lowered than those of the control group (p<0.01): approximately 20-67% and 7-57% lowered for plasma alcohol and acetaldehyde, respectively. Compare to the control group, the ADH and ALDH expressions in the liver tissues were abruptly increased in the taraxerone-treated groups after ethanol exposure. In addition, taraxerone prevented catalase, superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione concentrations from the decrease induced by ethanol administration with the concentration dependent manner.

  13. Escherichia coli d-Malate Dehydrogenase, a Generalist Enzyme Active in the Leucine Biosynthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A.; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of d-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on d-malate as a carbon source, the d-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB− strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (l(+)-tartrate, d-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution. PMID:25160617

  14. New studies of the alcohol dehydrogenase cline in D. melanogaster from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pipkin, S B; Franklin-Springer, E; Law, S; Lubega, S

    1976-01-01

    An altitudinal cline of frequencies of alcohol dehydrogenase alleles occurs in D. melanogaster populations of southeastern Mexico. A similar cline of two aldehyde oxidase alleles is present, but frequencies of esterase-6 alleles are not distributed clinically. Collections were made from small dispersed populations. Some gene flow occurred throughout the lowlands according to the distribution of two moderately endemic autosomal inversions and five previously described inversions. The clines are believed dependent on a limited gene flow between temperature races of D. melanogaster.

  15. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Ethanol is a renewable biofuel, and it can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates that consist of sugar and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Yeast ferments sugar to ethanol, but furfural higher than 3 mM is inhibitory. It can take several days for yeast cells to reduce furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol before producing ethanol. Bioreduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol before fermentation may relieve yeast from furfural toxicity. We observed that Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a strict aerobe, rapidly reduced 17 mM furfural to less than 3 mM within 14 min with cell turbidity of 1.0 at 600 nm at 50°C. The rapid reduction consumed ethanol. The "furfural reductase" (FurX) was purified, and it oxidized ethanol to acetaldehyde and reduced furfural to furfuryl alcohol with NAD(+) as the cofactor. The protein was identified with mass spectrometry fingerprinting to be a hypothetical protein belonging to Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase family. The furX-inactivation mutant of C. necator JMP134 lost the ability to rapidly reduce furfural, and Escherichia coli producing recombinant FurX gained the ability. Thus, an alcohol dehydrogenase enabled bacteria to rapidly reduce furfural with ethanol as the reducing power.

  16. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  17. Kinetic analysis about the effects of neutral salts on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    The effects of salts on the rate constants of inactivation by heat of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 60.0 degrees C were measured. Different effects were observed at low and high salt concentrations. At high concentrations, some salts had stabilizing effects, while others were destabilizing. The effects of salts in the high concentration range examined can be described as follows: (decreased thermal stability) NaClO(4) < NaI = (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr < NH(4)Br < NaBr = KBr = CsBr = (no addition) < (CH(3))(4)NBr < KCl < KF < Na(2)SO(4) (increased thermal stability). The decreasing effect of NaClO(4) on YADH controlled the thermal stability of the enzyme absolutely and was not compensated by the addition of Na(2)SO(4), a salt which stabilized the enzyme. However, Na(2)SO(4) compensation did occur in response to the decrease in thermal stability caused by (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr. The rate constants of inactivation by heat (k (in)) of the enzyme were measured at various temperatures. Effective values of the thermodynamic activation parameters of thermal inactivation, activation of free energy (DeltaG (double dagger)), activation enthalpy (DeltaH (double dagger)), and activation entropy (DeltaS (double dagger)), were determined. The thermal stability of YADH in 0.8 M Na(2)SO(4) increased more than that of pyruvate kinase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, a moderate thermophile. The changes in the values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger) were great and showed a general compensatory tendency, with the exception of in the case of NaClO(4). The temperature for the general compensation effect (T (c)) was approximately 123 degrees C. With Na(2)SO(4), the thermal stability of YADH at a temperature below T (c) was greater than that in the absence of salt due to the higher values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger), respectively, and thus was an example of low-temperature enzymatic stabilization. With (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr, the thermal stability of YADH

  18. Non-alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated metabolism of methylazoxymethanol in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fiala, E.S.; Caswell, N.; Sohn, O.S.; Felder, M.R.; McCoy, G.D.; Weisburger, J.H.

    1984-07-01

    The concept that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is involved in the metabolism of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) was examined in a model consisting of two strains of the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, one of which has a normal complement of the enzyme (ADH(+)), and the other, which completely lacks it (ADH(-)). Both the ADH(+) and the ADH(-) strains rapidly metabolized (/sup 14/C)MAM, administered in the form of the acetic acid ester, (/sup 14/C) MAMOAc, to /sup 14/CO2, and the rates and extents of metabolism were virtually identical. Determination of O6-methylguanine and 7-methylguanine in liver DNA 6 and 24 hr after MAMOAc (25 mg/kg) administration showed that the levels of DNA methylation induced by the carcinogen were not significantly different in the two strains, indicating that both are capable of the metabolic activation of MAM to methylating species. Pyrazole, a potent inhibitor of ADH, inhibited MAM metabolism as well as liver DNA methylation in the ADH(+) strain; however similar inhibition of these processes also occurred in the ADH(-) strain. 3-Methylpyrazole, a weak or noninhibitor of ADH, also decreased the levels of MAM metabolism in both the ADH(+) and the ADH(-) strains. From these results, the authors conclude that ADH is not obligatory either in the metabolism or in the metabolic activation of MAM. As a possible alternative to ADH, liver microsomes were examined for their ability to metabolize MAM. In the presence of a NADPH-generating system, liver microsomes from both strains converted (/sup 14/C)MAM to /sup 14/CH3OH and /sup 14/CH2O, although liver microsomes from the ADH(-) strain were more active in this respect. The microsomal metabolism was sensitive to inhibition by CO as well as to inhibition by pyrazole and 3-methylpyrazole.

  19. The kinetics behavior of the reduction of formaldehyde catalyzed by Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) and partial uncompetitive substrate inhibition by NADH.

    PubMed

    Wen, Nuan; Liu, Wenfang; Hou, Yanhui; Zhao, Zhiping

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of methanol from CO2. Here, we report the steady-state kinetics for ADH, using a homogeneous enzyme preparation with formaldehyde as the substrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as the cofactor. When changing NADH concentrations with the fixed concentrations of HCHO (more or less than NADH), kinetic studies revealed a particular zigzag phenomenon for the first time. Increasing formaldehyde concentration can weaken substrate inhibition and improve catalytic efficiency. The kinetic mechanism of ADH was analyzed using the secondary fitting method. The double reciprocal plots (1/v∼1/[HCHO] and 1/[NADH]) strongly demonstrated that the substrate inhibition by NADH was uncompetitive versus formaldehyde and partial. In the direction of formaldehyde reduction, ADH has an ordered kinetic mechanism with formaldehyde adding to enzyme first and product methanol released last. The second reactant NADH can combine with the enzyme-methanol complex and then methanol dissociates from it at a slower rate than from enzyme-methanol. The reaction velocity depends on the relative rates of the alternative pathways. The addition of NADH also accelerates the releasing of methanol. As a result, substrate inhibition and activation occurred intermittently, and the zigzag double reciprocal plot (1/v∼1/[NADH]) was obtained.

  20. Stability engineering of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase and application for the synthesis of a polyamide 12 precursor.

    PubMed

    Kirmair, Ludwig; Seiler, Daniel Leonard; Skerra, Arne

    2015-12-01

    The thermostable NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsADH) was exploited with regard to the biocatalytic synthesis of ω-oxo lauric acid methyl ester (OLAMe), a key intermediate for biobased polyamide 12 production, from the corresponding long-chain alcohol. Recombinant BsADH was produced in Escherichia coli as a homogeneous tetrameric enzyme and showed high activity towards the industrially relevant substrate ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) with K M = 86 μM and 44 U mg(-1). The equilibrium constant for HLAMe oxidation to the aldehyde (OLAMe) with NAD(+) was determined as 2.16 × 10(-3) from the kinetic parameters of the BsADH-catalyzed forward and reverse reactions. Since BsADH displayed limited stability under oxidizing conditions, the predominant oxidation-prone residue Cys257 was mutated to Leu based on sequence homology with related enzymes and computational simulation. This substitution resulted in an improved BsADH variant exhibiting prolonged stability and an elevated inactivation temperature. Semi-preparative biocatalysis at 60 °C using the stabilized enzyme, employing butyraldehyde for in situ cofactor regeneration with only catalytic amounts of NAD(+), yielded up to 23 % conversion of HLAMe to OLAMe after 30 min. In contrast to other oxidoreductases, no overoxidation to the dodecanoic diacid monomethyl ester was detected. Thus, the mutated BsADH offers a promising biocatalyst for the selective oxidation of fatty alcohols to yield intermediates for industrial polymer production.

  1. Stability engineering of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase and application for the synthesis of a polyamide 12 precursor.

    PubMed

    Kirmair, Ludwig; Seiler, Daniel Leonard; Skerra, Arne

    2015-12-01

    The thermostable NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsADH) was exploited with regard to the biocatalytic synthesis of ω-oxo lauric acid methyl ester (OLAMe), a key intermediate for biobased polyamide 12 production, from the corresponding long-chain alcohol. Recombinant BsADH was produced in Escherichia coli as a homogeneous tetrameric enzyme and showed high activity towards the industrially relevant substrate ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) with K M = 86 μM and 44 U mg(-1). The equilibrium constant for HLAMe oxidation to the aldehyde (OLAMe) with NAD(+) was determined as 2.16 × 10(-3) from the kinetic parameters of the BsADH-catalyzed forward and reverse reactions. Since BsADH displayed limited stability under oxidizing conditions, the predominant oxidation-prone residue Cys257 was mutated to Leu based on sequence homology with related enzymes and computational simulation. This substitution resulted in an improved BsADH variant exhibiting prolonged stability and an elevated inactivation temperature. Semi-preparative biocatalysis at 60 °C using the stabilized enzyme, employing butyraldehyde for in situ cofactor regeneration with only catalytic amounts of NAD(+), yielded up to 23 % conversion of HLAMe to OLAMe after 30 min. In contrast to other oxidoreductases, no overoxidation to the dodecanoic diacid monomethyl ester was detected. Thus, the mutated BsADH offers a promising biocatalyst for the selective oxidation of fatty alcohols to yield intermediates for industrial polymer production. PMID:26329849

  2. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibition as a new potential therapeutic target for alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, P P; Kawamura, T; Chen, J; Koob, G F; Roberts, A J; Vendruscolo, L F; Repunte-Canonigo, V

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new and more effective treatments for alcohol abuse remains a priority. Alcohol intake activates glucocorticoids, which have a key role in alcohol's reinforcing properties. Glucocorticoid effects are modulated in part by the activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11β-HSD) acting as pre-receptors. Here, we tested the effects on alcohol intake of the 11β-HSD inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid 3β-O-hemisuccinate), which has been extensively used in the clinic for the treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcer and is active on both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 isoforms. We observed that CBX reduces both baseline and excessive drinking in rats and mice. The CBX diastereomer 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid 3β-O-hemisuccinate (αCBX), which we found to be selective for 11β-HSD2, was also effective in reducing alcohol drinking in mice. Thus, 11β-HSD inhibitors may be a promising new class of candidate alcohol abuse medications, and existing 11β-HSD inhibitor drugs may be potentially re-purposed for alcohol abuse treatment. PMID:26978742

  3. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, M.J.; Beekhuis, H.; Duursma, A.M.; Bouma, J.M.; Gruber, M.

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1, intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected SVI-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of T I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats.

  4. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  5. Variation of transition-state structure as a function of the nucleotide in reactions catalyzed by dehydrogenases. 1. Liver alcohol dehydrogenase with benzyl alcohol and yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase with benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, M; Fisher, M A; Cleland, W W

    1984-11-01

    Primary intrinsic deuterium and 13C isotope effects have been determined for liver (LADH) and yeast (YADH) alcohol dehydrogenases with benzyl alcohol as substrate and for yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with benzaldehyde as substrate. These values have also been determined for LADH as a function of changing nucleotide substrate. As the redox potential of the nucleotide changes from -0.320 V with NAD to -0.258 V with acetylpyridine-NAD, the product of primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects rises from 4 toward 6.5, while the primary 13C isotope effect drops from 1.025 to 1.012, suggesting a trend from a late transition state with NAD to one that is more symmetrical. The values of Dk (again the product of primary and secondary isotope effects) and 13k for YADH with NAD are 7 and 1.023, suggesting for this very slow reaction a more stretched, and thus symmetrical, transition state. With ALDH and NAD, the primary 13C isotope effect on the hydride transfer step lies in the range 1.3-1.6%, and the alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effect on the same step is at least 1.22, but 13C isotope effects on formation of the thiohemiacetal intermediate and on the addition of water to the thio ester intermediate are less than 1%. On the basis of the relatively large 13C isotope effects, we conclude that carbon motion is involved in the hydride transfer steps of dehydrogenase reactions.

  6. Regulated Expression of Three Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes in Barley Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Jacobsen, John V.; Zwar, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Three genes specify alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.; ADH) enzymes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (Adh 1, Adh 2, and Adh 3). Their polypeptide products (ADH 1, ADH 2, ADH 3) dimerize to give a total of six ADH isozymes which can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis and stained for enzyme activity. Under fully aerobic conditions, aleurone layers of cv Himalaya had a high titer of a single isozyme, the homodimer containing ADH 1 monomers. This isozyme was accumulated by the aleurone tissue during the later part of seed development, and survived seed drying and rehydration. The five other possible ADH isozymes were induced by O2 deficit. The staining of these five isozymes on electrophoretic gels increased progressively in intensity as O2 levels were reduced below 5%, and were most intense at 0% O2. In vivo35S labeling and specific immunoprecipitation of ADH peptides, followed by isoelectric focusing of the ADH peptides in the presence of 8 molar urea (urea-IEF) demonstrated the following. (a) Aleurone layers incubated in air synthesized ADH 1 and a trace of ADH 2; immature layers from developing seeds behaved similarly. (b) At 5% O2, synthesis of ADH 2 increased and ADH 3 appeared. (c) At 2% and 0% O2, the synthesis of all three ADH peptides increased markedly. Cell-free translation of RNA isolated from aleurone layers, followed by immunoprecipitation and urea-IEF of in vitro synthesized ADH peptides, showed that levels of mRNA for all three ADH peptides rose sharply during 1 day of O2 deprivation. Northern hybridizations with a maize Adh 2 cDNA clone established that the clone hybridized with barley mRNA comparable in size to maize Adh 2 mRNA, and that the level of this barley mRNA increased 15- to 20-fold after 1 day at 5% or 2% O2, and about 100-fold after 1 day at 0% O2. We conclude that in aleurone layers, expression of the three barley Adh genes is maximal in the absence of O2, that regulation of mRNA level is likely to be a major controlling factor, and

  7. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  8. Alcohol Dehydrogenase-1B (rs1229984) and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (rs671) Genotypes Are Strong Determinants of the Serum Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels of Japanese Alcoholic Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are common in drinkers. The fast-metabolizing alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by the ADH1B*2 allele (vs. ADH1B*1/*1 genotype) and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 encoded by the ALDH2*2 allele (vs. ALDH2*1/*1 genotype) modify ethanol metabolism and are prevalent (≈90% and ≈40%, respectively) in East Asians. We attempted to evaluate the associations between the ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes and lipid levels in alcoholics. Methods The population consisted of 1806 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who had undergone ADH1B and ALDH2 genotyping and whose serum TG, total cholesterol, and HDL-C levels in the fasting state had been measured within 3 days after admission. Results High serum levels of TG (≥150 mg/dl), HDL-C (>80 mg/dl), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C calculated by the Friedewald formula ≥140 mg/dl) were observed in 24.3%, 16.8%, and 15.6%, respectively, of the subjects. Diabetes, cirrhosis, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) affected the serum lipid levels. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of the ADH1B*2 allele and the active ALDH2*1/*1 genotype increased the odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval) for a high TG level (2.22 [1.67–2.94] and 1.39 [0.99–1.96], respectively), and decreased the OR for a high HDL-C level (0.37 [0.28–0.49] and 0.51 [0.37–0.69], respectively). The presence of the ADH1B*2 allele decreased the OR for a high LDL-C level (0.60 [0.45–0.80]). The ADH1B*2 plus ALDH2*1/*1 combination yielded the highest ORs for high TG levels and lowest OR for a high HDL-C level. The genotype effects were more prominent in relation to the higher levels of TG (≥220 mg/dl) and HDL-C (≥100 mg/dl). Conclusions The fast-metabolizing ADH1B and active ALDH2, and especially a combination of the two were strongly associated with higher serum TG levels and lower serum HDL-C levels of alcoholics. The fast

  9. Ethanol-Induced Alcohol Dehydrogenase E (AdhE) Potentiates Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence. PMID:25312953

  10. Ethanol-induced alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) potentiates pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence.

  11. Structure of Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase at 2.9-Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Brändén, Carl-Ivar; Eklund, Hans; Nordström, Bo; Boiwe, Torne; Söderlund, Gustaf; Zeppezauer, Eila; Ohlsson, Ingrid; Åkeson, Åke

    1973-01-01

    The conformation of the polypeptide chain in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1), as well as the binding sites for some inhibitor molecules, have been determined from x-ray crystallographic data to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Each subunit of the dimeric molecule is organized into two parts unequal in size and separated by a wide and deep active-site cleft. The adenosine moiety of the coenzyme is bound within the smaller region. Interactions between these coenzyme-binding substructures define the subunit contact area of the molecule. The “catalytic” zinc atoms are bound at the bottom of the clefts about 20 Å from the surface of the molecule. The coenzyme binding region has a main-chain conformation very similar to a corresponding region in lactate and malate dehydrogenase. It is suggested that this substructure is a general one for binding of nucleotides and, in particular, the coenzyme NAD+. PMID:4365379

  12. Inhibition of some respiration and dehydrogenase enzyme systems in Escherichia coli NCTC 5933 by phenoxyethanol.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P; Beveridge, E G; Crone, P B

    1977-01-01

    Low concentrations (less than 0.2% w/v) of phenoxyethanol stimulated both the rate of respiration and total oxygen uptakes of Escherichia coli NCTC 5933 suspensions with glucose and other substrates, whilst higher concentrations (0.2--0.6% w/v) although still below those showing significant bactericidal activity, produced progressive levels of inhibition. The degree of respiratory inhibition varied with different substrates in the order malate less than succinate less than pyruvate less than or equal to glucose less than lactate, and suggested appreciable inhibition at a point after malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This suggestion was supported by the use of tetrazolium salts as alternative electron acceptors, and by cytochrome difference spectra, which together implicated malate dehydrogenase as the most likely site of action. Isolated dehydrogenase enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in cell-free preparations were unaffected by high concentrations of phenoxyethanol (0.8% w/v) with the exception of malate dehydrogenase which was inhibited in extracts to extents similar to those of malate oxidation by intact bacteria. Lineweaver-Burke plots for malate dehydrogenase activity in the presence of phenoxyethanol suggested a competitive inhibition of the oxaloacetic acid-limited reaction and a non-competitive inhibition of the NADH-limited reaction. Accordingly, Ki values were found to be low when the rate of reaction was limited by oxaloacetic acid concentration yet relatively high when NADH was rate limiting.

  13. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene

  14. The protective effects of osmolytes on yeast alcohol dehydrogenase conformational stability and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong-Yan; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Gong, Cheng-Liang; Xu, Wei-An

    2010-08-01

    The protective effects of four osmolytes (trehalose, dimethysulfoxide, glycine and proline) on the conformational stability and aggregation of guanidine-denatured yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) have been investigated in this paper. The results show that the four osmolytes protect YADH against unfolding and inactivation by reducing ki (inactivation rate constants), increasing DeltaDeltaGi (transition free energy changes at 25 degrees C), increasing Cm (value for the midpoint of denaturation) and decreasing its ANS-binding fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, these osmolytes can prevent YADH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner during YADH refolding.

  15. The multifunctional isopropyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Phytomonas sp. could be the result of a horizontal gene transfer from a bacterium to the trypanosomatid lineage.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Sara M; Altabe, Silvia G; Opperdoes, Fred R; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2003-09-19

    Isopropyl alcohol dehydrogenase (iPDH) is a dimeric mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), so far detected within the Trypanosomatidae only in the genus Phytomonas. The cloning, sequencing, and heterologous expression of the two gene alleles of the enzyme revealed that it is a zinc-dependent medium-chain ADH. Both polypeptides have 361 amino acids. A mitochondrial targeting sequence was identified. The mature proteins each have 348 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 37 kDa. They differ only in one amino acid, which can explain the three isoenzymes and their respective isoelectric points previously found. A phylogenetic analysis locates iPDH within a cluster with fermentative ADHs from bacteria, sharing 74% similarity and 60% identity with Ralstonia eutropha ADH. The characterization of the two bacterially expressed Phytomonas enzymes and the comparison of their kinetic properties with those of the wild-type iPDH and of the R. eutropha ADH strongly support the idea of a horizontal gene transfer event from a bacterium to a trypanosomatid to explain the origin of the iPDH in Phytomonas. Phytomonas iPDH and R. eutropha ADH are able to use a wide range of substrates with similar Km values such as primary and secondary alcohols, diols, and aldehydes, as well as ketones such as acetone, diacetyl, and acetoin. We speculate that, as for R. eutropha ADH, Phytomonas iPDH acts as a safety valve for the release of excess reducing power. PMID:12853449

  16. Membrane-bound quinoprotein D-arabitol dehydrogenase of Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3257: a versatile enzyme for the oxidative fermentation of various ketoses.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Fujii, Y; Ghaly, M F; Toyama, H; Shinagawa, E; Matsushita, K

    2001-12-01

    Solubilization of membrane-bound quinoprotein D-arabitol dehydrogenase (ARDH) was done successfully with the membrane fraction of Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3257. In enzyme solubilization and subsequent enzyme purification steps, special care was taken to purify ARDH as active as it was in the native membrane, after many disappointing trials. Selection of the best detergent, keeping ARDH as the holoenzyme by the addition of PQQ and Ca2+, and of a buffer system involving acetate buffer supplemented with Ca2+, were essential to treat the highly hydrophobic and thus labile enzyme. Purification of the enzyme was done by two steps of column chromatography on DEAE-Toyopearl and CM-Toyopearl in the presence of detergent and Ca2+. ARDH was homogenous and showed a single sedimentation peak in analytical ultracentrifugation. ARDH was dissociated into two different subunits upon SDS-PAGE with molecular masses of 82 kDa (subunit I) and 14 kDa (subunit II), forming a heterodimeric structure. ARDH was proven to be a quinoprotein by detecting a liberated PQQ from SDS-treated ARDH in HPLC chromatography. More preliminarily, an EDTA-treated membrane fraction lost the enzyme activity and ARDH activity was restored to the original level by the addition of PQQ and Ca2+. The most predominant unique character of ARDH, the substrate specificity, was highly versatile and many kinds of substrates were oxidized irreversibly by ARDH, not only pentitols but also other polyhydroxy alcohols including D-sorbitol, D-mannitol, glycerol, meso-erythritol, and 2,3-butanediol. ARDH may have its primary function in the oxidative fermentation of ketose production by acetic acid bacteria. ARDH contained no heme component, unlike the type II or type III quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and did not react with primary alcohols.

  17. Manipulating cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) expression in flax affects fibre composition and properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent decades cultivation of flax and its application have dramatically decreased. One of the reasons for this is unpredictable quality and properties of flax fibre, because they depend on environmental factors, retting duration and growing conditions. These factors have contribution to the fibre composition, which consists of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and pectin. By far, it is largely established that in flax, lignin reduces an accessibility of enzymes either to pectin, hemicelluloses or cellulose (during retting or in biofuel synthesis and paper production). Therefore, in this study we evaluated composition and properties of flax fibre from plants with silenced CAD (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase) gene, which is key in the lignin biosynthesis. There is evidence that CAD is a useful tool to improve lignin digestibility and/or to lower the lignin levels in plants. Results Two studied lines responded differentially to the introduced modification due to the efficiency of the CAD silencing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that flax CAD belongs to the “bona-fide” CAD family. CAD down-regulation had an effect in the reduced lignin amount in the flax fibre cell wall and as FT-IR results suggests, disturbed lignin composition and structure. Moreover introduced modification activated a compensatory mechanism which was manifested in the accumulation of cellulose and/or pectin. These changes had putative correlation with observed improved fiber’s tensile strength. Moreover, CAD down-regulation did not disturb at all or has only slight effect on flax plants’ development in vivo, however, the resistance against flax major pathogen Fusarium oxysporum decreased slightly. The modification positively affected fibre possessing; it resulted in more uniform retting. Conclusion The major finding of our paper is that the modification targeted directly to block lignin synthesis caused not only reduced lignin level in fibre, but also affected amount and

  18. In vitro characterization of an enzymatic redox cascade composed of an alcohol dehydrogenase, an enoate reductases and a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Oberleitner, Nikolin; Peters, Christin; Rudroff, Florian; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Mihovilovic, Marko D.

    2014-01-01

    An artificial enzyme cascade composed of an alcohol dehydrogenase, an enoate reductase and a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was investigated in vitro to gain deeper mechanistic insights and understand the assets and drawbacks of this multi-step biocatalysis. Several substrates composed of different structural motifs were examined and provided access to functionalized chiral compounds in high yields (up to >99%) and optical purities (up to >99%). Hence, the applicability of the presented enzymatic cascade was exploited for the synthesis of biorenewable polyesters. PMID:24746588

  19. Purification and characterization of a primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from two strains of Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed Central

    Ismaiel, A A; Zhu, C X; Colby, G D; Chen, J S

    1993-01-01

    Two primary alcohols (1-butanol and ethanol) are major fermentation products of several clostridial species. In addition to these two alcohols, the secondary alcohol 2-propanol is produced to a concentration of about 100 mM by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii. An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been purified to homogeneity from two strains (NRRL B593 and NESTE 255) of 2-propanol-producing C. beijerinckii. When exposed to air, the purified ADH was stable, whereas the partially purified ADH was inactivated. The ADHs from the two strains had similar structural and kinetic properties. Each had a native M(r) of between 90,000 and 100,000 and a subunit M(r) of between 38,000 and 40,000. The ADHs were NADP(H) dependent, but a low level of NAD(+)-linked activity was detected. They were equally active in reducing aldehydes and 2-ketones, but a much lower oxidizing activity was obtained with primary alcohols than with secondary alcohols. The kcat/Km value for the alcohol-forming reaction appears to be a function of the size of the larger alkyl substituent on the carbonyl group. ADH activities measured in the presence of both acetone and butyraldehyde did not exceed activities measured with either substrate present alone, indicating a common active site for both substrates. There was no similarity in the N-terminal amino acid sequence between that of the ADH and those of fungi and several other bacteria. However, the N-terminal sequence had 67% identity with those of two other anaerobes, Thermoanaerobium brockii and Methanobacterium palustre. Furthermore, conserved glycine and tryptophan residues are present in ADHs of these three anaerobic bacteria and ADHs of mammals and green plants. Images PMID:8349550

  20. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  1. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  2. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate, is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production. In alpha (sub 2) beta (sub 2)-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha) -C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites has not yet been understood. To understand the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95-Angstrom resolution. We propose a model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through a concerted approximately 2-Angstrom shuttle-like motion of its heterodimers. Similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase with functionally related enzymes suggests that this newly defined shuttle-like motion of domains is common to the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  3. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms and a new strategy for prevention and screening for cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Omori, Tai; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The ethanol in alcoholic beverages and the acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption are Group 1 human carcinogens (WHO, International Agency for Research on Cancer). The combination of alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, the inactive heterozygous aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 genotype (ALDH2*1/*2) and the less-active homozygous alcohol dehydrogenase-1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1) increases the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in a multiplicative fashion in East Asians. In addition to being exposed to locally high levels of ethanol, the UADT is exposed to a very high concentration of acetaldehyde from a variety of sources, including that as an ingredient of alcoholic beverages per se and that found in tobacco smoke; acetaldehyde is also produced by salivary microorganisms and mucosal enzymes and is present as blood acetaldehyde. The inefficient degradation of acetaldehyde by weakly expressed ALDH2 in the UADT may be cri! tical to the local accumulation of acetaldehyde, especially in ALDH2*1/*2 carriers. ADH1B*1/*1 carriers tend to experience less intense alcohol flushing and are highly susceptible to heavy drinking and alcoholism. Heavy drinking by persons with the less-active ADH1B*1/*1 leads to longer exposure of the UADT to salivary ethanol and acetaldehyde. The ALDH2*1/*2 genotype is a very strong predictor of synchronous and metachronous multiple SCCs in the UADT. High red cell mean corpuscular volume (MCV), esophageal dysplasia, and melanosis in the UADT, all of which are frequently found in ALDH2*1/*2 drinkers, are useful for identifying high-risk individuals. We invented a simple flushing questionnaire that enables prediction of the ALDH2 phenotype. New health appraisal models that include ALDH2 genotype, the simple flushing questionnaire, or MCV are powerful tools for devising a new strategy for prevention and screening for UADT cancer in East Asians.

  4. Harnessing functional plasticity of enzymes: a fluorogenic probe for imaging 17beta-HSD10 dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Froemming, Mary K; Sames, Dalibor

    2007-11-21

    In this paper, we describe the development of a fluorogenic substrate for 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 10 (17beta-HSD10), which is a multifunctional metabolic enzyme fulfilling several metabolic roles (beta-oxidation of fatty acids, catabolism of isoleucine, and metabolism of steroids). In recent years, it has emerged as an important stress and pathological marker in neurons and glial cells (expression down-regulation in Parkinson's disease, up-regulation and association with beta-amyloid peptide in Alzheimer's disease). Through the iterative molecular design and chemical synthesis described herein, compound 1 was developed, which possesses all required properties for a selective optical reporter substrate: alcohol-ketone optical switching, the ability to function as a good enzyme substrate (expressed in kinetic parameters), cell permeability, and cell retention. Probe 1 provides a blue-to-green/yellow bright switch and enables non-invasive, real-time imaging of 17beta-HSD10 in live human cells. The selectivity of reporter 1 was established by the quantitative correlation of metabolic activity to protein expression in human kidney cell line HEK-293T. PMID:17958419

  5. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  6. Slowed Diffusion and Excluded Volume Both Contribute to the Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Steady-State Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Samuel H; Lockwood, Schuyler P; Hargreaves, Dominique I; Slade, David J; LoConte, Micaela A; Logan, Bridget E; McLaughlin, Erin E; Conroy, Michael J; Slade, Kristin M

    2015-09-29

    To understand the consequences of macromolecular crowding, studies have largely employed in vitro experiments with synthetic polymers assumed to be both pure and "inert". These polymers alter enzyme kinetics by excluding volume that would otherwise be available to the enzymes, substrates, and products. Presented here is evidence that other factors, in addition to excluded volume, must be considered in the interpretation of crowding studies with synthetic polymers. Dextran has a weaker effect on the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) than its small molecule counterpart, glucose. For glucose, the decreased Vmax values directly correlate with slower translational diffusion and the decreased Km values likely result from enhanced substrate binding due to YADH stabilization. Because dextran is unable to stabilize YADH to the same extent as glucose, this polymer's ability to decrease Km is potentially due to the nonideality of the solution, a crowding-induced conformational change, or both. Chronoamperometry reveals that glucose and dextran have surprisingly similar ferricyanide diffusion coefficients. Thus, the reduction in Vmax values for glucose is partially offset by an additional macromolecular crowding effect with dextran. Finally, this is the first report that supplier-dependent impurities in dextran affect the kinetic parameters of YADH. Taken together, our results reveal that caution should be used when interpreting results obtained with inert synthetic polymeric agents, as additional effects from the underlying monomer need to be considered.

  7. Surface functionalization of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles for covalent immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gui-yin; Zhou, Zhi-de; Li, Yuan-jian; Huang, Ke-long; Zhong, Ming

    2010-12-01

    A novel and efficient immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC1.1.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been developed by using the surface functionalization of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3O 4/KCTS) as support. The magnetic Fe 3O 4/KCTS nanoparticles were prepared by binding chitosan alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KCTS) onto the surface of magnetic Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles. Later, covalent immobilization of YADH was attempted onto the Fe 3O 4/KCTS nanoparticles. The effect of various preparation conditions on the immobilized YADH process such as immobilization time, enzyme concentration and pH was investigated. The influence of pH and temperature on the activity of the free and immobilized YADH using phenylglyoxylic acid as substrate has also been studied. The optimum reaction temperature and pH value for the enzymatic conversion catalyzed by the immobilized YADH were 30 °C and 7.4, respectively. Compared to the free enzyme, the immobilized YADH retained 65% of its original activity and exhibited significant thermal stability and good durability.

  8. Thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard: Analysis of in vitro biotransformation by mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases using nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.; Hodgson, Ernest

    2006-06-15

    Thiodiglycol (2,2'-bis-hydroxyethylsulfide, TDG), the hydrolysis product of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, has been implicated in the toxicity of sulfur mustard through the inhibition of protein phosphatases in mouse liver cytosol. The absence of any inhibitory activity when TDG was present in assays of pure enzymes, however, led us to investigate the possibility for metabolic activation of TDG to inhibitory compound(s) by cytosolic enzymes. We have successfully shown that mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) rapidly oxidize TDG in vitro, but the classic spectrophotometric techniques for following this reaction provided no information on the identity of TDG intermediates and products. The use of proton NMR to monitor the oxidative reaction with structural confirmation by independent synthesis allowed us to establish the ultimate product, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetic acid, and to identify an intermediate equilibrium mixture consisting of 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde hydrate and the cyclic 1,4-oxathian-2-ol. The intermediate nature of this mixture was determined spectrophotometrically when it was shown to drive the production of NADH when added to ADH and NAD.

  9. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities and ethanol tolerance in Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit-fly species and their hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) system is one of the earliest known models of molecular evolution, and is still the most studied in Drosophila. Herein, we studied this model in the genus Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae). Due to the remarkable advantages it presents, it is possible to cross species with different Adh genotypes and with different phenotype traits related to ethanol tolerance. The two species studied here each have a different number of Adh gene copies, whereby crosses generate polymorphisms in gene number and in composition of the genetic background. We measured certain traits related to ethanol metabolism and tolerance. ADH specific enzyme activity presented gene by environment interactions, and the larval protein content showed an additive pattern of inheritance, whilst ADH enzyme activity per larva presented a complex behavior that may be explained by epistatic effects. Regression models suggest that there are heritable factors acting on ethanol tolerance, which may be related to enzymatic activity of the ADHs and to larval mass, although a pronounced environmental effect on ethanol tolerance was also observed. By using these data, we speculated on the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance and its inheritance as well as of associated traits. PMID:21637665

  10. Slowed Diffusion and Excluded Volume Both Contribute to the Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Steady-State Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Samuel H; Lockwood, Schuyler P; Hargreaves, Dominique I; Slade, David J; LoConte, Micaela A; Logan, Bridget E; McLaughlin, Erin E; Conroy, Michael J; Slade, Kristin M

    2015-09-29

    To understand the consequences of macromolecular crowding, studies have largely employed in vitro experiments with synthetic polymers assumed to be both pure and "inert". These polymers alter enzyme kinetics by excluding volume that would otherwise be available to the enzymes, substrates, and products. Presented here is evidence that other factors, in addition to excluded volume, must be considered in the interpretation of crowding studies with synthetic polymers. Dextran has a weaker effect on the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) than its small molecule counterpart, glucose. For glucose, the decreased Vmax values directly correlate with slower translational diffusion and the decreased Km values likely result from enhanced substrate binding due to YADH stabilization. Because dextran is unable to stabilize YADH to the same extent as glucose, this polymer's ability to decrease Km is potentially due to the nonideality of the solution, a crowding-induced conformational change, or both. Chronoamperometry reveals that glucose and dextran have surprisingly similar ferricyanide diffusion coefficients. Thus, the reduction in Vmax values for glucose is partially offset by an additional macromolecular crowding effect with dextran. Finally, this is the first report that supplier-dependent impurities in dextran affect the kinetic parameters of YADH. Taken together, our results reveal that caution should be used when interpreting results obtained with inert synthetic polymeric agents, as additional effects from the underlying monomer need to be considered. PMID:26333028

  11. Molecular analysis of mutant and wild type alcohol dehydrogenase alleles from Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Wild type alcohol dehydrogenase polypeptides (ADH) from Drosophila melanogaster transformants were examined using western blots and polyclonal antiserum specific for Drosophila melanogaster ADH. Mutants induced in Drosophila spermatozoa at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus using X-rays, 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) or ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were characterized using genetic complementation tests, western blots, Southern blots, northern blots and enzymatic amplification of the Adh locus. Genetic complementation tests showed that 22/30 X-ray-induced mutants, and 3/13 ENU and EMS induced mutants were multi-locus deficiencies. Western blot analysis of the intragenic mutations showed that 4/7 X-ray-induced mutants produced detectable polypeptides, one of which was normal in molecular weight and charge. In contrast 8/10 intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants produced normal polypeptides. Southern blot analysis showed that 5/7 intragenic X-ray induced mutants and all 10 of the intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants were normal with respect to the alleles they were derived from.

  12. Elemental sulfur: toxicity in vivo and in vitro to bacterial luciferase, in vitro yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Cetkauskaite, Anolda; Pessala, Piia; Södergren, Anders

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the effects and the modes of action of elemental sulfur (S(0)) in bioluminescence and respiration of Vibrio fischeri cells and the enzymes crude luciferase, pure catalase, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Metallic copper removed sulfur and reduced the toxicity of acetone extracts of sediment samples analyzed in the bioluminescence test. The sulfur inhibition of cell bioluminescence was noncompetitive with decanal, the luciferase substrate; reversible, with maximum toxicity after 15 min (EC(50) = 11.8 microg/L); and almost totally recovered after 2 h. In vitro preincubation of crude luciferase extract with sulfur (0.28 ppm) weakly inhibited bioluminescence at 5 min, but at 30 min the inhibition reached 60%. Increasing the concentration of sulfur in the parts per million concentration range in vitro decreased bioluminescence, which was not constant, but depended on exposure time, and no dead-end/total inhibition was observed. The redox state of enzymes in the in vitro system significantly affected inhibition. Hydrogen peroxide restored fully and the reducing agent dithiothreitol, itself toxic, restored only partially luciferase activity in the presence of sulfur. Sulfur (5.5 ppm) slightly inhibited ADH and catalase, and dithiothreitol enhanced sulfur inhibition. High sulfur concentrations (2.2 ppm) inhibited the bioluminescence and enhanced the respiration rate of V. fischeri cells. Elemental sulfur data were interpreted to show that sulfur acted on at least a few V. fischeri cell sites: reversibly modifying luciferase at sites sensitive to/protected by oxidative and reducing agents and by affecting electron transport processes, resulting in enhanced oxygen consumption. Sulfur together with an enzyme reducing agent inhibited the oxidoreductive enzymes ADH and catalase, which have --SH groups, metal ion cofactors, or heme, respectively, in their active centers. PMID:15269910

  13. Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on lipoamide dehydrogenase, a member of three multi-enzyme complexes

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Aditya; Bryk, Ruslana; Shi, Shuangping; Rhee, Kyu; Rath, Poonam; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Nathan, Carl

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adapts to persist in a nutritionally limited macrophage compartment. Lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), the third enzyme (E3) in Mtb’s pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH), also serves as E1 of peroxynitrite reductase/peroxidase (PNR/P), which helps Mtb resist host reactive nitrogen intermediates. In contrast to Mtb lacking dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), the E2 of PDH and PNR/P, Lpd-deficient Mtb is severely attenuated in wild type and immunodeficient mice. This suggests that Lpd has a function that DlaT does not share. When DlaT is absent, Mtb upregulates an Lpd-dependent branched chain keto-acid dehydrogenase (BCKADH) encoded by pdhA, pdhB, pdhC and lpdC. Without Lpd, Mtb cannot metabolize branched chain amino acids and potentially toxic branched chain intermediates accumulate. Mtb deficient in both DlaT and PdhC phenocopies Lpd-deficient Mtb. Thus, Mtb critically requires BCKADH along with PDH and PNR/P for pathogenesis. These findings position Lpd as a potential target for anti-infectives against Mtb. PMID:21238944

  14. Mitochondrial complex I, aconitase, and succinate dehydrogenase during hypoxia-reoxygenation: modulation of enzyme activities by MnSOD.

    PubMed

    Powell, Charles S; Jackson, Robert M

    2003-07-01

    Both NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) and aconitase are inactivated partially in vitro by superoxide (O2-.) and other oxidants that cause loss of iron from enzyme cubane (4Fe-4S) centers. We tested whether hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R) by itself would decrease lung epithelial cell NADH dehydrogenase, aconitase, and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and whether transfection with adenoviral vectors expressing MnSOD (Ad.MnSOD) would inhibit oxidative enzyme inactivation and thus confirm a mechanism involving O2-. Human lung carcinoma cells with alveolar epithelial cell characteristics (A549 cells) were exposed to <1% O2-5% CO2 (hypoxia) for 24 h followed by air-5% CO2 for 24 h (reoxygenation). NADH dehydrogenase activity was assayed in submitochondrial particles; aconitase and SDH activities were measured in cell lysates. H-R significantly decreased NADH dehydrogenase, aconitase, and SDH activities. Ad.MnSOD increased mitochondrial MnSOD substantially and prevented the inhibitory effects of H-R on enzyme activities. Addition of alpha-ketoglutarate plus aspartate, but not succinate, to medium prevented cytotoxicity due to 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. After hypoxia, cells displayed significantly increased dihydrorhodamine fluorescence, indicating increased mitochondrial oxidant production. Inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase, aconitase, and SDH activities during reoxygenation are due to excess O2-. produced in mitochondria, because enzyme inactivation can be prevented by overexpression of MnSOD. PMID:12665464

  15. Enzyme-triggered and self-cleaving fragrant alcohol precursors.

    PubMed

    Flachsmann, Felix; Gautschi, Markus; Bachmann, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The high volatility and water solubility of many natural perfumery alcohols leads to their rapid loss in fabric-care and personal-care applications. A dramatically enhanced substantivity is achieved by the use of fragrance precursors as controlled-release systems. In the first part of this article, we present multi-odorant precursors, in which the enzymatic cleavage of esters or carbonates of fragrant alcohols triggers subsequent steps leading to the release of fragrant ketones, lactones, and additional fragrant alcohols. In the second part, a study on oligocarbonates of fragrant alcohols is presented. Therein, the outstanding enzyme-independent performance of gluconolactone oligocarbonate 27 for the long-lasting release of (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol is highlighted. We show that these polyfunctional compounds undergo complex rearrangements and intramolecular substitution reactions which lead to the observed release kinetics.

  16. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline beta-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. The immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato beta-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcohol fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%.

  17. Alcohol vapour detection at the three phase interface using enzyme-conducting polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Winther-Jensen, Orawan; Kerr, Robert; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn

    2014-02-15

    Immobilisation of enzymes on a breathable electrode can be useful for various applications where the three-phase interface between gas or chemical vapour, electrolyte and electrode is crucial for the reaction. In this paper, we report the further development of the breathable electrode concept by immobilisation of alcohol dehydrogenase into vapour-phase polymerised poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) that has been coated onto a breathable membrane. Typical alcohol sensing, whereby the coenzyme β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed as a redox-mediator, was successfully used as a model reaction for the oxidation of ethanol. This indicates that the ethanol vapour from the backside of the membrane has access to the active enzyme embedded in the electrode. The detecting range of the sensor is suitable for the detection of ethanol in fruit juices and for the baseline breath ethanol concentration of drunken driving. After continuous operation for 4.5h the system only showed a 20% decrease in the current output. The electrodes maintained 62% in current output after being refrigerated for 76 days. This work is continuing the progress of the immobilisation of specific enzymes for certain electrochemical reactions whereby the three-phase interface has to be maintained and/or the simultaneous separation of gas from liquid is required.

  18. Effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on 5-fluorouracil-related metabolic enzymes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomomi; Kato, Keizo; Long, Nguyen Khanh; Makita, Hiroki; Yonemoto, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kazuki; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Lifestyle, particularly smoking and alcohol consumption, may induce and/or inhibit drug metabolism. In order to reveal the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-related metabolic enzymes, namely thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD; a sole catabolic enzyme of 5-FU), orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) and thymidine phosphorylase, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, the mRNA expression of these enzymes was investigated in 29 surgical specimens and compared by the Brinkman index and drinking years. The surgical specimens were divided into normal and tumor regions and were independently analyzed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was a significantly positive correlation between DPD mRNA expression in these tissues and Brinkman index/drinking years, with OPRT mRNA expression being significantly correlated to the Brinkman index in tumor tissues. These results revealed that lifestyle habits, including smoking and alcohol consumption, may vary the activity of the 5-FU-related metabolic enzymes. DPD is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolic pathway of 5-FU. Therefore, smoking and alcohol consumption may reduce the anticancer activity of 5-FU, possibly through the induction of DPD activity. PMID:24772313

  19. Effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on 5-fluorouracil-related metabolic enzymes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, TOMOMI; KATO, KEIZO; LONG, NGUYEN KHANH; MAKITA, HIROKI; YONEMOTO, KAZUHIRO; IIDA, KAZUKI; TAMAOKI, NARITAKA; HATAKEYAMA, DAIJIRO; SHIBATA, TOSHIYUKI

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle, particularly smoking and alcohol consumption, may induce and/or inhibit drug metabolism. In order to reveal the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-related metabolic enzymes, namely thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD; a sole catabolic enzyme of 5-FU), orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) and thymidine phosphorylase, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, the mRNA expression of these enzymes was investigated in 29 surgical specimens and compared by the Brinkman index and drinking years. The surgical specimens were divided into normal and tumor regions and were independently analyzed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was a significantly positive correlation between DPD mRNA expression in these tissues and Brinkman index/drinking years, with OPRT mRNA expression being significantly correlated to the Brinkman index in tumor tissues. These results revealed that lifestyle habits, including smoking and alcohol consumption, may vary the activity of the 5-FU-related metabolic enzymes. DPD is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolic pathway of 5-FU. Therefore, smoking and alcohol consumption may reduce the anticancer activity of 5-FU, possibly through the induction of DPD activity. PMID:24772313

  20. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by acetaminophen: Assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Pin; Liao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ting-Lun; Lee, Shou-Lun; Liu, Jong-Kang; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-11-01

    Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used over-the-counter analgesic, antipyretic medications. Use of acetaminophen and alcohol are commonly associated. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen might affect bioavailability of ethanol by inhibiting gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, potential inhibitions by acetaminophen of first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol, catalyzed by the human ADH family and by relevant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, remain undefined. ADH and ALDH both exhibit racially distinct allozymes and tissue-specific distribution of isozymes, and are principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. In this study, we investigated acetaminophen inhibition of ethanol oxidation with recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and inhibition of acetaldehyde oxidation with recombinant human ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. The investigations were done at near physiological pH 7.5 and with a cytoplasmic coenzyme concentration of 0.5 mM NAD(+). Acetaminophen acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH enzymes, with the slope inhibition constants (Kis) ranging from 0.90 mM (ADH2) to 20 mM (ADH1A), and the intercept inhibition constants (Kii) ranging from 1.4 mM (ADH1C allozymes) to 19 mM (ADH1A). Acetaminophen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition for ALDH2 (Kis = 3.0 mM and Kii = 2.2 mM), but competitive inhibition for ALDH1A1 (Kis = 0.96 mM). The metabolic interactions between acetaminophen and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic to subtoxic plasma levels of acetaminophen (i.e., 0.2-0.5 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μm) in target tissues, acetaminophen could inhibit ADH1C allozymes (12-26%) and ADH2 (14-28%) in the liver and small intestine, ADH4 (15-31%) in the stomach, and ALDH1A1 (16-33%) and ALDH2 (8.3-19%) in all 3 tissues. The

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenase of class IV (sigma sigma-ADH) from human stomach. cDNA sequence and structure/function relationships.

    PubMed

    Farrés, J; Moreno, A; Crosas, B; Peralba, J M; Allali-Hassani, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Jörnvall, H; Parés, X

    1994-09-01

    Human stomach mucosa contains a characteristic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme, sigma sigma-ADH. Its cDNA has been cloned from a human stomach library and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 59-70% identities with the other human ADH classes, demonstrating that the stomach enzyme represents a distinct structure, constituting class IV, coded by a separate gene, ADH7. The amino acid identity with the rat stomach class IV ADH is 88%, which is intermediate between constant and variable dehydrogenases. This value reflects higher conservation than for the classical liver enzymes of class I, compatible with a separate functional significance of the class IV enzyme. Its enzymic features can be correlated with its structural characteristics. The residues lining the substrate-binding cleft are bulky and hydrophobic, similar to those of the class I enzyme; this explains the similar specificity of both classes, compatible with the origin of class IV from class I. Position 47 has Arg, in contrast to Gly in the rat class IV enzyme, but this Arg is still associated with an extremely high activity (kcat = 1510 min-1) and weak coenzyme binding (KiaNAD+ = 1.6 mM). Thus, the strong interaction with coenzyme imposed by Arg47 in class I is probably compensated for in class IV by changes that may negatively affect coenzyme binding: Glu230, His271, Asn260, Asn261, Asn363. The still higher activity and weaker coenzyme binding of rat class IV (kcat = 2600 min-1, KiaNAD = 4 mM) can be correlated to the exchanges to Gly47, Gln230 and Tyr363. An important change at position 294, with Val in human and Ala in rat class IV, is probably responsible for the dramatic difference in Km values for ethanol between human (37 mM) and rat (2.4 M) class IV enzymes.

  2. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  3. Uniform expression of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in epithelia regenerated with cultured normal, immortalised and malignant human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, J J; Hansson, A; Nilsson, J A; Höög, J O; Grafström, R C

    2001-01-01

    The human oral epithelium is a target for damage from the inhalation of formaldehyde. However, most experimental studies on this chemical have relied on laboratory animals that are obligatory nose breathers, including rats and mice. Therefore, in vitro model systems that mimic the structure of the human oral epithelium and which retain normal tissue-specific metabolic competence are desirable. Based on the established role of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3), also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, as the primary enzyme catalysing the detoxification of formaldehyde, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of ADH3 in organotypic epithelia regenerated with normal (NOK), immortalised (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human oral keratinocytes. Organotypic epithelia, usually consisting of 5-10 cell layers, were produced at the air-liquid interface of collagen gels containing human oral fibroblasts, after culture for 10 days in a standardised serum-free medium. Immunochemical staining demonstrated uniform expression of ADH3 in these organotypic epithelia, as well as in the epithelial cells of oral tissue. The specificity of the ADH3 antiserum was ascertained from the complete neutralisation of the immunochemical reaction with purified ADH3 protein. Assessment of the staining intensities indicated that the expression levels were similar among the regenerated epithelia. Furthermore, the regenerated epithelia showed similar ADH3 expression to the epithelium in oral tissue. Therefore, a tissue-like expression pattern for ADH3 can be generated from the culture of various oral keratinocyte lines in an organotypic state. Similar expression levels among the various cell lines indicate the preservation of ADH3 during malignant transformation, and therefore that NOK, SVpgC2a and SqCC/Y1 represent functional models for in vitro studies of formaldehyde metabolism in human oral mucosa.

  4. Cloning and expression of a putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Entamoeba histolytica and its application to immunological examination.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Hara, Y; Kimoto, T; Okuno, Y; Minekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, T

    1996-01-01

    To clone and express the genes encoding major antigens of Entamoeba histolytica, we constructed a lambda gt11 cDNA library for E. histolytica HM1:IMSS and screened it with pooled sera from patients with amoebiasis. A 1,223-bp cDNA was cloned (clone 1223), and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence predicted to be encoded by the open reading frame of clone 1223 consisted of 396 residues and showed 32.5 and 32.3% homology to the NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenases I and II (bdhA and bdhB) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, respectively. In addition, 29 of the 34 consensus positions of bdhA and bdhB were also well conserved in clone 1223. The recombinant protein expressed from clone 1223 had an estimated molecular mass of 43.5 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The antigenicity and specificity of the recombinant protein were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using sera obtained from two clinical groups of patients with amoebiasis and a group of healthy controls. The recombinant protein had potent and specific antigenicity. In all, 53 serum samples (88.3%) from 60 patients with amoebiasis were positive for immunoglobulin G antibody against the recombinant protein, with a mean optical density value of 0.42. In contrast, 53 of 54 healthy control serum samples were negative, with only 1 positive serum sample showing the lower optical density value. These results suggested that clone 1223 is promising in terms of providing a useful antigen for the accurate serodiagnosis of amoebiasis and that the gene encodes a putative alcohol dehydrogenase of E. histolytica. PMID:8705667

  5. Assessment of freshness and freeze-thawing of sea bream fillets (Sparus aurata) by a cytosolic enzyme: Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Watier, Denis; Masson, Pierre-Yves; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid; Grard, Thierry; Lencel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of freshness and freeze-thawing of fish fillets was carried out by assessment of autolysis of cells using a cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Autolysis plays an important role in spoilage of fish and postmortem changes in fish tissue are due to the breakdown of the cellular structures and release of cytoplasmic contents. The outflow of a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, was studied in sea bream fillets and the Sparus aurata fibroblasts (SAF-1) cell-line during an 8day storage period at +4°C. A significant increase of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed, especially after 5days of storage. The ratio between the free and the total lactate dehydrogenase activity is a promising predictive marker to measure the quality of fresh fish fillets. The effect of freeze-thawing on cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and lysosomal α-d-glucosidase activities was also tested. Despite the protecting effect of the tissue compared to the cell-line, a loss of lactate dehydrogenase activity, but not of α-d-glucosidase, was observed. In conclusion, lactate dehydrogenase may be used as a marker to both assess freshness of fish and distinguish between fresh and frozen-thawed fish fillets.

  6. Assessment of freshness and freeze-thawing of sea bream fillets (Sparus aurata) by a cytosolic enzyme: Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Watier, Denis; Masson, Pierre-Yves; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid; Grard, Thierry; Lencel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of freshness and freeze-thawing of fish fillets was carried out by assessment of autolysis of cells using a cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Autolysis plays an important role in spoilage of fish and postmortem changes in fish tissue are due to the breakdown of the cellular structures and release of cytoplasmic contents. The outflow of a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, was studied in sea bream fillets and the Sparus aurata fibroblasts (SAF-1) cell-line during an 8day storage period at +4°C. A significant increase of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed, especially after 5days of storage. The ratio between the free and the total lactate dehydrogenase activity is a promising predictive marker to measure the quality of fresh fish fillets. The effect of freeze-thawing on cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and lysosomal α-d-glucosidase activities was also tested. Despite the protecting effect of the tissue compared to the cell-line, a loss of lactate dehydrogenase activity, but not of α-d-glucosidase, was observed. In conclusion, lactate dehydrogenase may be used as a marker to both assess freshness of fish and distinguish between fresh and frozen-thawed fish fillets. PMID:27211667

  7. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  8. Mechanism of thermal aggregation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I: role of intramolecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Markossian, Kira A; Golub, Nikolay V; Khanova, Helen A; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Poliansky, Nikolay B; Muranov, Konstantin O; Kurganov, Boris I

    2008-09-01

    Kinetics of thermal aggregation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I (yADH) have been studied using dynamic light scattering at a fixed temperature (56 degrees C) and under the conditions where the temperature was elevated at a constant rate (1 K/min). The initial parts of the dependences of the hydrodynamic radius on time (or temperature) follow the exponential law. At rather high values of time splitting of the population of aggregates into two components occurs. It is assumed that such peculiarities of the kinetics of thermal aggregation of yADH are due to the presence of a sequence -YSGVCHTDLHAWHGDWPLPVK- in the polypeptide chain possessing chaperone-like activity. Thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of yADH have been calculated from the differential scanning calorimetry data.

  9. The partial purification and characterization of cytosol alcohol dehydrogenase from Astasia

    PubMed Central

    Morosoli, Rolf; Bégin-Heick, Nicole

    1974-01-01

    1. The cytosol alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol–NAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) of Astasia longa was partially purified and characterized from cells grown in the presence of air+CO2 (95:5) or of O2+CO2 (95:5). 2. Under both these growth conditions, the cells contained a fraction, ADHII, which was characterized by its electrophoretic properties, by a high degree of resistance to heat inactivation, by a sharp pH optimum at 8.2 and by its kinetic properties. The estimated molecular weight of this fraction was approx. 150000, which is similar to that of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. 3. Cells grown in air+CO2 (95:5) contain another fraction, ADHI, which can be further separated into two subfractions by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. This was termed fraction `ADHI-air'. 4. In addition to fraction ADHII, cells grown in the presence of O2 have a twofold increase in fraction ADHI-air activity as well as two new fractions that could not be demonstrated in air-grown cells. These new fractions which we have called fraction `ADHI-O2', account for about 10% of the total activity. 5. The ADHI fractions (air) and (O2) have similar broad pH–activity curves and similar kinetic properties, both having a lower Km for ethanol and NAD than fraction ADHII. However, they differ from each other with respect to their activity with various substrates. The estimated molecular weight of these two ADHI fractions and their chromatographic behaviour on hydroxyapatite and on DEAE-cellulose also distinguish them. ImagesPLATE 1Fig. 1. PMID:4455216

  10. Changes in soluble sugar, starch, and alcohol dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to N2 diluted atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Crispi, M. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Proper exchange of atmospheric gases is important for normal root and shoot metabolism in plants. This study was conducted to determine how restricted air supply affects foliar carbohydrates, while using the marker enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to report on the oxygenation status of the rootzone. Fourteen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants grown singly in 7-ml tubes containing agarified nutrient medium were placed in coupled Magenta vessels and exposed for six days to either ambient air or one of six different air/nitrogen dilutions. Redox potential of the agar medium was measured immediately after harvesting and freezing leaf tissue, and then root systems were quickly extracted from the agar and frozen for subsequent analyses. Redox potential measurements indicated that this series of gas mixtures produced a transition from hypoxia to anoxia in the root zones. Root ADH activity increased at higher rates as the redox potential neared anoxic levels. In contrast, ADH mRNA expression quickly neared its maximum as the medium became hypoxic and showed little further increase as it became anoxic. Foliar carbohydrate levels increased 1.5- to 2-fold with decreased availability of metabolic gases, with starch increasing at higher concentrations of air than soluble carbohydrate. The results serve as a model for plant performance under microgravity conditions, where absence of convective air movement prevents replenishment of metabolic gases.

  11. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  12. [Lactate dehydrogenase and Krebs cycle enzyme activity in rat liver during the growth of transplanted and spontaneous tumors].

    PubMed

    Morozkina, T S

    1978-03-01

    Certain distinctions in the mouse and rat liver responses to transplanted and spontaneous tumours have been discovered at the initial periods of their growth. The most pronounced changes (the mosaic distribution of enzymatic activity in the lobe) are observed in the case of spontaneous tumours. Activities the Krebs cycle enzymes, especially of NAD-dependent enzymes are seen inhibited in the tumour-bearing liver at the terminal periods of growth of both spontaneous and transplanted tumours; lactate dehydrogenase activity increases (with the exception of mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase in the rat liver with transplanted sarcomas). PMID:684845

  13. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  14. Radiochemical detection of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase: distribution of the indomethacin sensitive enzyme in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ivins, J.; Penning, T.

    1986-05-01

    Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase catalyzes the NADP/sup +/ dependent oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which are potent proximate carcinogens. The authors have developed a highly sensitive radiochemical assay for this enzyme in which the oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-cyclohexadiene, a model substrate for trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogens, is coupled to O-methylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyl transferase. Using S-adenosyl-(/sup 3/H-methyl)-methionine as methyl donor at a specific activity of 0.1 nCi/pmol and extracting the product, /sup 3/H-o-methoxyphenol, the assay provides a 5000 fold increase in sensitivity over the existing spectrophotometric method. The radiochemical assay was validated by comparing the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ values for rat liver cytosol with those derived spectrophotometrically. In both instances there was close agreement between values (K/sub m/ = 0.77 +/- 0.11 mM and V/sub max/ = 2.14 +/- 0.13 nmoles/min/mg protein determined radiochemically; K/sub m/ = 0.96 +/- 0.10 mM and V/sub max/ = 6.31 +/- 0.50 nmoles/min/mg protein determined spectrophotometrically). Using the radiochemical method, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in the following rat tissues: liver > lung > heart > small intestine > testis > seminal vesicle > bladder > prostate > spleen. Specific activities ranged between 0.944 and 0.016 nmoles/min/mg protein. In liver, lung, and testis, which are sites of PAH metabolism, the dehydrogenase is sensitive to inhibition by low ..mu..M concentrations of indomethacin, suggesting that this drug can prevent the detoxification of proximate carcinogens by this route.

  15. Multi-enzyme catalyzed rapid ethanol lowering in vitro.

    PubMed

    Whitmire, D R; Chambers, R P; Dillon, A R

    1991-10-01

    Ethanol was oxidized to acetate by an enzyme system using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (YALDH), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) recycling NAD in two model duodenal fluids and in canine duodenal aspirate in vitro. Sufficient enzyme activities were maintained to convert as much as 34% of the original ethanol to acetate with negligible acetaldehyde accumulation.

  16. Human class II (pi) alcohol dehydrogenase has a redox-specific function in norepinephrine metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mårdh, G; Dingley, A L; Auld, D S; Vallee, B L

    1986-01-01

    Studies of the function of human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have revealed substrates that are virtually unique for class II ADH (pi ADH). It catalyzes the formation of the intermediary glycols of norepinephrine metabolism, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol, from the corresponding aldehydes 3,4-dihydroxymandelaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymandelaldehyde with Km values of 55 and 120 microM and kcat/Km ratios of 14,000 and 17,000 mM-1 X min-1; these are from 60- to 210-fold higher than those obtained with class I ADH isozymes. The catalytic preference of class II ADH also extends to benzaldehydes. The kcat/Km values for the reduction of benzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde by pi ADH are from 9- to 29-fold higher than those for a class I isozyme, beta 1 gamma 2 ADH. Furthermore, the norepinephrine aldehydes are potent inhibitors of alcohol (ethanol) oxidation by pi ADH. The high catalytic activity of pi ADH-catalyzed reduction of the aldehydes in combination with a possible regulatory function of the aldehydes in the oxidative direction leads to essentially "unidirectional" catalysis by pi ADH. These features and the presence of pi ADH in human liver imply a physiological role for pi ADH in the degradation of circulating epinephrine and norepinephrine. PMID:3466164

  17. Construction and co-expression of plasmid encoding xylitol dehydrogenase and a cofactor regeneration enzyme for the production of xylitol from D-arabitol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2012-07-15

    The biotransformation of D-arabitol into xylitol was investigated with focus on the conversion of D-xylulose into xylitol. This critical conversion was accomplished using Escherichia coli to co-express a xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Gluconobacter oxydans and a cofactor regeneration enzyme gene which was a glucose dehydrogenase gene from Bacillus subtilis for system 1 and an alcohol dehydrogenase gene from G. oxydans for system 2. Both systems efficiently converted D-xylulose into xylitol without the addition of expensive NADH. Approximately 26.91 g/L xylitol was obtained from around 30 g/L D-xylulose within system 1 (E. coli Rosetta/Duet-xdh-gdh), with a 92% conversion yield, somewhat higher than that of system 2 (E. coli Rosetta/Duet-xdh-adh, 24.9 g/L, 85.2%). The xylitol yields for both systems were more than 3-fold higher compared to that of the G. oxydans NH-10 cells (7.32 g/L). The total turnover number (TTN), defined as the number of moles of xylitol formed per mole of NAD(+), was 32,100 for system 1 and 17,600 for system 2. Compared with that of G. oxydans NH-10, the TTN increased by 21-fold for system 1 and 11-fold for system 2, hence, the co-expression systems greatly enhanced the NADH supply for the conversion, benefiting the practical synthesis of xylitol.

  18. A new cofactor in prokaryotic enzyme: Tryptophan tryptophylquinone as the redox prosthetic group in methylamine dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, W.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Wemmer, D.E. ); Chistoserdov, A.; Lidstrom, M.E. )

    1991-05-10

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH), an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} enzyme from numerous methylotrophic soil bacteria, contains a novel quinonoid redox prosthetic group that is covalently bound to its small {beta} subunit through two amino acyl residues. A comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the gene sequence of the small subunit for the enzyme from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with the published amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation method, allowed the identification of the amino acyl constituents of the cofactor as two tryptophyl residues. This information was crucial for interpreting {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectral data collected for the semicarbazide- and carboxymethyl-derivatized bis(tripeptidyl)-cofactor of MADH from bacterium W3A1. The cofactor is composed of two cross-linked tryptophyl residues. Although there are many possible isomers, only one is consistent with all the data: The first tryptophyl residue in the peptide sequence exists as an indole-6,7-dione, and is attached at its 4 position to the 2 position of the second, otherwise unmodified, indole side group. Contrary to earlier reports, the cofactor of MADH is not 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a derivative thereof, of pro-PQQ. This appears to be the only example of two cross-linked, modified amino acyl residues having a functional role in the active site of an enzyme, in the absence of other cofactors or metal ions.

  19. Broadening the cofactor specificity of a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase using rational protein design introduces novel kinetic transient behavior.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elliot; Wheeldon, Ian R; Banta, Scott

    2010-12-01

    Cofactor specificity in the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily has been well studied, and several groups have reported the rational alteration of cofactor specificity in these enzymes. Although most efforts have focused on mesostable AKRs, several putative AKRs have recently been identified from hyperthermophiles. The few that have been characterized exhibit a strong preference for NAD(H) as a cofactor, in contrast to the NADP(H) preference of the mesophilic AKRs. Using the design rules elucidated from mesostable AKRs, we introduced two site-directed mutations in the cofactor binding pocket to investigate cofactor specificity in a thermostable AKR, AdhD, which is an alcohol dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus. The resulting double mutant exhibited significantly improved activity and broadened cofactor specificity as compared to the wild-type. Results of previous pre-steady-state kinetic experiments suggest that the high affinity of the mesostable AKRs for NADP(H) stems from a conformational change upon cofactor binding which is mediated by interactions between a canonical arginine and the 2'-phosphate of the cofactor. Pre-steady-state kinetics with AdhD and the new mutants show a rich conformational behavior that is independent of the canonical arginine or the 2'-phosphate. Additionally, experiments with the highly active double mutant using NADPH as a cofactor demonstrate an unprecedented transient behavior where the binding mechanism appears to be dependent on cofactor concentration. These results suggest that the structural features involved in cofactor specificity in the AKRs are conserved within the superfamily, but the dynamic interactions of the enzyme with cofactors are unexpectedly complex.

  20. The structure of Haemophilus influenzae prephenate dehydrogenase suggests unique features of bifunctional TyrA enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydrogenase from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20 is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate and the NAD(P)+-dependent oxidative decarboxyl­ation of prephenate to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in tyrosine biosynthesis. The crystal structure of the prephenate dehydrogenase component (HinfPDH) of the TyrA protein from H. influenzae Rd KW20 in complex with the inhibitor tyrosine and cofactor NAD+ has been determined to 2.0 Å resolution. HinfPDH is a dimeric enzyme, with each monomer consisting of an N-terminal α/β dinucleotide-binding domain and a C-terminal α-helical dimerization domain. The structure reveals key active-site residues at the domain interface, including His200, Arg297 and Ser179 that are involved in catalysis and/or ligand binding and are highly conserved in TyrA proteins from all three kingdoms of life. Tyrosine is bound directly at the catalytic site, suggesting that it is a competitive inhibitor of HinfPDH. Comparisons with its structural homologues reveal important differences around the active site, including the absence of an α–β motif in HinfPDH that is present in other TyrA proteins, such as Synechocystis sp. arogenate dehydrogenase. Residues from this motif are involved in discrimination between NADP+ and NAD+. The loop between β5 and β6 in the N-terminal domain is much shorter in HinfPDH and an extra helix is present at the C-terminus. Furthermore, HinfPDH adopts a more closed conformation compared with TyrA proteins that do not have tyrosine bound. This conformational change brings the substrate, cofactor and active-site residues into close proximity for catalysis. An ionic network consisting of Arg297 (a key residue for tyrosine binding), a water molecule, Asp206 (from the loop between β5 and β6) and Arg365′ (from the additional C-terminal helix of the adjacent monomer) is observed that might be involved in gating the active site. PMID:20944228

  1. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin. PMID:25772736

  2. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin.

  3. Development of an Alcohol Dehydrogenase Biosensor for Ethanol Determination with Toluidine Blue O Covalently Attached to a Cellulose Acetate Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Alpat, Şenol; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel voltammetric ethanol biosensor was constructed using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Firstly, alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified by cellulose acetate (CA) bonded to toluidine blue O (TBO). Secondly, the surface was covered by a glutaraldehyde/bovine serum albumin (BSA) cross-linking procedure to provide a new voltammetric sensor for the ethanol determination. In order to fabricate the biosensor, a new electrode matrix containing insoluble Toluidine Blue O (TBO) was obtained from the process, and enzyme/coenzyme was combined on the biosensor surface. The influence of various experimental conditions was examined for the characterization of the optimum analytical performance. The developed biosensor exhibited sensitive and selective determination of ethanol and showed a linear response between 1 × 10−5 M and 4 × 10−4 M ethanol. A detection limit calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio was 5.0 × 10−6 M. At the end of the 20th day, the biosensor still retained 50% of its initial activity. PMID:22315566

  4. Biotransformation of CL-20 by a dehydrogenase enzyme from Clostridium sp. EDB2.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study, a marine isolate Clostridium sp. EDB2 degraded 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) under anaerobic conditions (Bhushan B, Halasz A, Thiboutot S, Ampleman G, Hawari J (2004c) Chemotaxis-mediated biodegradation of cyclic nitramine explosives RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by Clostridium sp. EDB2. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 316:816-821); however, the enzyme responsible for CL-20 degradation was not known. In the present study, we isolated and purified an enzyme, from strain EDB2, responsible for CL-20 degradation. The enzyme was membrane-associated and NADH-dependent and had a molecular weight of 56 kDa (with SDS-PAGE). N-terminal amino acid sequence of enzyme revealed that it belonged to dehydrogenase class of enzymes. The purified enzyme degraded CL-20 at a rate of 18.5 nmol/h mg protein under anaerobic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen mass balance of the products were 100 and 64%, respectively. In LC-MS-MS studies, we detected three different initial metabolites from CL-20, i.e., mono-nitroso derivative, denitrohydrogenated product, and double-denitrated isomers with molecular weight of 422, 393, and 346 Da, corresponding to presumed empirical formulas of C(6)H(6)N(12)O(11), C(6)H(7)N(11)O(10), and C(6)H(6)N(10)O(8), respectively. Identity of all the three metabolites were confirmed by using ring-labeled [(15)N]CL-20 and the nitro-group-labeled [(15)NO(2)]CL-20. Taken together, the above data suggested that the enzyme degraded CL-20 via three different routes: Route A, via two single electron transfers necessary to release two nitro-groups from CL-20 to produce two double-denitrated isomers; Route B, via a hydride transfer necessary to produce a denitrohydrogenated product; and Route C, via transfer of two redox equivalents to CL-20 necessary to produce a mono-nitroso derivative of CL-20. This is the first biochemical study which showed that CL-20 degradation can be initiated via more than one pathway.

  5. Biotransformation of CL-20 by a dehydrogenase enzyme from Clostridium sp. EDB2.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study, a marine isolate Clostridium sp. EDB2 degraded 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) under anaerobic conditions (Bhushan B, Halasz A, Thiboutot S, Ampleman G, Hawari J (2004c) Chemotaxis-mediated biodegradation of cyclic nitramine explosives RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by Clostridium sp. EDB2. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 316:816-821); however, the enzyme responsible for CL-20 degradation was not known. In the present study, we isolated and purified an enzyme, from strain EDB2, responsible for CL-20 degradation. The enzyme was membrane-associated and NADH-dependent and had a molecular weight of 56 kDa (with SDS-PAGE). N-terminal amino acid sequence of enzyme revealed that it belonged to dehydrogenase class of enzymes. The purified enzyme degraded CL-20 at a rate of 18.5 nmol/h mg protein under anaerobic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen mass balance of the products were 100 and 64%, respectively. In LC-MS-MS studies, we detected three different initial metabolites from CL-20, i.e., mono-nitroso derivative, denitrohydrogenated product, and double-denitrated isomers with molecular weight of 422, 393, and 346 Da, corresponding to presumed empirical formulas of C(6)H(6)N(12)O(11), C(6)H(7)N(11)O(10), and C(6)H(6)N(10)O(8), respectively. Identity of all the three metabolites were confirmed by using ring-labeled [(15)N]CL-20 and the nitro-group-labeled [(15)NO(2)]CL-20. Taken together, the above data suggested that the enzyme degraded CL-20 via three different routes: Route A, via two single electron transfers necessary to release two nitro-groups from CL-20 to produce two double-denitrated isomers; Route B, via a hydride transfer necessary to produce a denitrohydrogenated product; and Route C, via transfer of two redox equivalents to CL-20 necessary to produce a mono-nitroso derivative of CL-20. This is the first biochemical study which showed that CL-20 degradation can be initiated via more than one pathway. PMID:15841370

  6. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  7. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, Mario J; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A; Falconieri, Veronica; Subramaniam, Sriram; Milne, Jacqueline L S

    2016-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an "open" or "closed" state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes.

  8. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Borgnia, Mario J.; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A.; Falconieri, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an “open” or “closed” state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  9. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, Mario J; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A; Falconieri, Veronica; Subramaniam, Sriram; Milne, Jacqueline L S

    2016-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an "open" or "closed" state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  11. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E.

    2010-10-28

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 {angstrom} resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg{sup 2+} and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. However, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate intermediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH.

  12. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family. PMID:25591389

  13. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family.

  14. The effects of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases on disorders of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clay; Gasparetto, Maura; Jordan, Craig; Pollyea, Daniel A; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis involves the orderly production of millions of blood cells per second from a small number of essential bone marrow cells termed hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Ethanol suppresses normal hematopoiesis resulting in leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia and may also predispose to the development of diseases such as myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute leukemia. Currently the exact mechanisms by which ethanol perturbs hematopoiesis are unclear. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene family plays a major role in the metabolism of reactive aldehydes derived from ethanol in the liver and other organs. At least one of the ALDH isoforms, ALDH1A1, is expressed at high levels in HSCs in humans, mice, and other organisms. Recent data indicate that ALDH1A1 and possibly other ALDH isoforms may metabolize reactive aldehydes in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells as they do in the liver and elsewhere. In addition, loss of these ALDHs leads to perturbation of a variety of cell processes that may predispose HSCs to disorders in growth and leukemic transformation. From these findings, we suggest a hypothesis that the cytopenias and possible increased risk of MDS and acute leukemia in heavy alcohol users is due to polymorphisms in genes responsible for metabolism of alcohol derived reactive aldehydes and repair of their DNA adducts in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells. In the article, we will summarize the biological properties of hematopoietic cells and diseases related to ethanol consumption, discuss molecular characteristics of ethanol metabolism, and describe a model to explain how ethanol derived reactive aldehydes may promote HSC damage. PMID:25427917

  15. Isolation of an enzyme complex with carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity containing corrinoid and nickel from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Terlesky, K C; Nelson, M J; Ferry, J G

    1986-01-01

    Fast protein liquid chromatography of cell extract from methanol- or acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila resolved two peaks of CO dehydrogenase activity. The activity of one of the CO dehydrogenases was sixfold greater in acetate-grown compared with methanol-grown cells. This CO dehydrogenase was purified to apparent homogeneity (70 mumol of methyl viologen reduced per min per mg of protein) and made up greater than 10% of the cellular protein of acetate-grown cells. The native enzyme (Mr 250,000) formed aggregates with an Mr of approximately 1,000,000. The enzyme contained five subunits (Mrs 89,000, 71,000, 60,000, 58,000, and 19,000), suggesting a multifunctional enzyme complex. Nickel, iron, cobalt, zinc, inorganic sulfide, and a corrinoid were present in the complex. The UV-visible spectrum suggested the presence of iron-sulfur centers. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum contained g values of 2.073, 2.049, and 2.028; these features were broadened in enzyme that was purified from cells grown in the presence of medium enriched with 61Ni, indicating the involvement of this metal in the spectrum. The pattern of potassium cyanide inhibition indicated that cyanide binds at or near the CO binding site. The properties of the enzyme imply an involvement in the dissimilation of acetate to methane, possibly by cleavage of acetate or activated acetate. Images PMID:3023296

  16. Effects of cannabis and tobacco on the enzymes of alcohol metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marselos, M; Vasiliou, V; Malamas, M; Alikaridis, F; Kefalas, T

    1991-01-01

    The effects of cannabis and tobacco on the enzymes of ethanol metabolism were studied in the Wistar rat. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AlDH) were measured in the liver and the brain, after treatment with an extract of cannabis resin, with an extract of tobacco leaves, or with nicotine. A condensate of cannabis resin extract was collected in a smoking machine, using a tobacco cigarette as the vehicle. Unsmoked or smoked cannabis extracts were dissolved in olive oil and were given i.p. (twice daily, for 7 days). In both cases, a similar dose level was used in terms of starting material (raw cannabis resin), estimated at about 100 mg/kg body weight. Control animals were treated either with olive oil, or with the same amount of smoked condensate obtained from a reference cigarette. Nicotine was dissolved in olive oil and it was given i.p. (10 micrograms/kg, twice daily for 7 days). An extract of unsmoked tobacco was dissolved in olive oil and was given with the same schedule, at a dose which was estimated to correspond to about 10 micrograms nicotine/kg b.w. All groups of animals received an additional i.p. injection on day 8, one hour before sacrifice. Our results showed that unsmoked cannabis inhibited the hepatic activities of the microchondrial AlDH (low-Km and high-Km), the hepatic low-Km cytosolic AlDH (p less than 0.001), and the low-Km mitochondrial AlDH of the brain (p less than 0.001). Administration of smoked cannabis to the animals inhibited the hepatic mitochondrial low-Km AlDH (p less than 0.001), but it did not influence the brain enzymes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Origin and evolution of a new gene descended from alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Begun, D J

    1997-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is highly conserved in size, organization, and amino acid sequence. Adh-psi was hypothesized to be a pseudogene derived from an Adh duplication in the repleta group of Drosophila; however, several results from molecular analyses of this gene conflict with currently held notions of molecular evolution. Perhaps the most difficult observations to reconcile with the pseudogene hypothesis are that the hypothetical replacement sites of Adh-psi evolve only slightly more quickly than replacement sites of closely related, functional Adh genes, and that the replacement sites of the pseudogenes evolve considerably more slowly than neighboring silent sites. The data have been presented as a paradox that challenges our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA sequence divergence. Here I show that Adh-psi is actually a new, functional gene recently descended from an Adh duplication. This descendant recruited approximately 60 new N-terminal amino acids, is considerably more basic than ADH, and is evolving at a faster rate than Adh. Furthermore, though the descendant is clearly functional, as inferred from molecular evolution and population genetic data, it retains no obvious ADH activity. This probably reflects functional divergence from its Adh ancestor.

  18. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene is nested in the outspread locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, S.; Greig, S.; Davis, T.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the structure and expression of the outspread (osp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work showed that chromosomal breakpoints associated with mutations of the osp locus map to both sides of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh), suggesting that Adh and the adjacent gene Adh{sup r} are nested in osp. We extended a chromosomal walk and mapped additional osp mutations to define the maximum molecular limit of osp as 119 kb. We identified a 6-kb transcript that hybridizes to osp region DNA and is altered or absent in osp mutants. Accumulation of this RNA peaks during embryonic and pupal periods. The osp cDNAs comprise two distinct classes based on alternative splicing patterns. The 5{prime} end of the longest cDNA was extended by PCR amplification. When hybridized to the osp walk, the 5{prime} extension verifies that Adh and Adh{sup r} are nested in osp and shows that osp has a transcription unit of {ge}74 kb. In situ hybridization shows that osp is expressed both maternally and zygotically. In the ovary, osp is transcribed in nurse cells and localized in the oocyte. In embryos, expression is most abundant in the developing visceral and somatic musculature. 55 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Determination of Kinetic Isotope Effects in Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Transition Path Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Matthew; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The experimental determination of kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems can be a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive process. In this study, we use the Chandler-Bolhius method for the determination of reaction rates within transition path sampling (rTPS) to determine the primary kinetic isotope effect in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). In this study, normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) was applied to the transferring hydride/deuteride in order to correctly incorporate quantum effects into the molecular simulations. Though previous studies have used rTPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. Due to the fact that particle transfer is not wholly indicative of the chemical step, this method cannot be used to determine reaction rate constants in YADH. However, it is possible to determine the transition rate constant of the particle transfer, and the kinetic isotope effect of that step. This method provides a set of tools to determine kinetic isotope effects with the atomistic detail of molecular simulations.

  20. Selection variability for Arg48His in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B among Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Evsyukov, Alexey; Ivanov, Denis

    2013-08-01

    The variant His at codon 48 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1B) results in more efficient ethanol metabolism than with the "typical" codon 48Arg. In this study we introduced selection properties of Arg48His genotypes of ADH1B and estimated fitness in four ethnic-geographical clusters in Asia. Population genetics models were employed that derive observed gene frequencies from fitness relationships among genotypes, to infer the selection pattern of polymorphisms in an indirect manner. The data were analyzed using the model of "complete stationary distribution" by Wright that takes into account random genetic drift, pressure of migrations, mutations, and selection as influential factors of gene frequency. We found that the different population groups showed some variation in the types of selection for Arg48His. Han Chinese from eastern and southeastern China and the Japanese and Korean populations showed stabilizing selection, while the groups from Central Asian and Indochina showed divergent selection. However, all the groups demonstrated a strong positive selection for Arg48His. PMID:25019189

  1. Developmentally Regulated RNA Transcripts Coding for Alcohol Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA AFFINIDISJUNCTA

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Robert G.; Brennan, Mark D.; Dickinson, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The organization of the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in Drosophila affinidisjuncta has been determined by physically mapping Adh RNA transcripts to cloned genomic DNA. Two distinct transcript types accumulate with developmental specificity. Because only a single genomic Adh locus is detected in D. affinidisjuncta , and since all Adh transcripts appear to be identical except at their termini, the two Adh RNA types are products of the same gene. One type of transcript, abundant in adults, contains a small 5' terminal exon that is completely lacking in the other type of transcript, which accumulates in larvae. This 5' end difference suggests that the D. affinidisjuncta Adh gene, like the homologous gene from the distantly related species D. melanogaster, is expressed from two promoters. According to the transcription map, these D. affinidisjuncta promoters are separated by approximately 560 base pairs of genomic DNA sequence. D. affinidisjuncta Adh transcripts also resemble D. melanogaster Adh transcripts in both their overall organization and their developmental distribution. Multiple 3' ends are responsible for the size heterogeneity of both types of D. affinidisjuncta Adh RNA, and some of these also appear with stage specificity. PMID:2429897

  2. Nitric oxide inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase in fresh-cut apples ( Malus domestica Borkh).

    PubMed

    Amissah, Joris Gerald Niilante; Hotchkiss, Joseph H; Watkins, Chris B

    2013-11-20

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite treatment on alcohol dehydrogenase activity and the shelf life of apple tissue were investigated. Fresh-cut apple slices were stored for 2 days at 6 °C in 0.25-1% NO (v/v, balance N2) or 100% N2 atmospheres. Slices were also treated with 1% NO or 2 mM sodium nitrite (NaNO2) for 20 min, stored for 6 weeks in 100% N2 at 6 °C, and analyzed for acetaldehyde, ethanol, and ethyl acetate accumulation, firmness, and color. Compared with N2 or deionized water controls, treatment with 1% NO or 2 mM NaNO2 inhibited ethanol accumulation, whereas that of acetaldehyde increased. Ethyl acetate accumulation was inhibited only by NO. Slice firmness was not affected by NO or NaNO2 treatment, but slices were darker than the untreated controls. NO and nitrite may extend the shelf life of fresh-cut produce with low concentrations of phenolic compounds.

  3. Ethanol at low concentrations protects glomerular podocytes through alcohol dehydrogenase and 20-HETE.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ellen T; Zhou, Jianping; Eckert, Ryan; Genochio, David; Sharma, Rishi; Oni, Olurinde; De, Alok; Srivastava, Tarak; Sharma, Ram; Savin, Virginia J; Sharma, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest cardiovascular and renal benefits of ingesting small amounts of ethanol. Effects of ethanol, role of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in podocytes of the glomerular filtration barrier have not been reported. We found that mouse podocytes at baseline generate 20-HETE and express ADH but not CYP2e1. Ethanol at high concentrations altered the actin cytoskeleton, induced CYP2e1, increased superoxide production and inhibited ADH gene expression. Ethanol at low concentrations upregulated the expression of ADH and CYP4a12a. 20-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite generated by CYP4a12a, blocked the ethanol-induced cytoskeletal derangement and superoxide generation. Ethanol at high concentration or ADH inhibitor increased glomerular albumin permeability in vitro. 20-HETE and its metabolite produced by ADH activity, 20-carboxy-arachidonic acid, protected the glomerular permeability barrier against an ADH inhibitor, puromycin or FSGS permeability factor. We conclude that ADH activity is required for glomerular function, 20-HETE is a physiological substrate of ADH in podocytes and that podocytes are useful biosensors to understand glomeruloprotective effects of ethanol.

  4. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  5. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  6. Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Contribute to Sex-Related Differences in Clearance of Zolpidem in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Cody J.; Strope, Jonathan D.; Beedie, Shaunna; Ley, Ariel M.; Holly, Alesia; Calis, Karim; Farkas, Ronald; Parepally, Jagan; Men, Angela; Fadiran, Emmanuel O.; Scott, Pamela; Jenkins, Marjorie; Theodore, William H.; Sissung, Tristan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The recommended zolpidem starting dose was lowered in females (5 mg vs. 10 mg) since side effects were more frequent and severe than those of males; the mechanism underlying sex differences in pharmacokinetics (PK) is unknown. We hypothesized that such differences were caused by known sex-related variability in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) expression. Methods: Male, female, and castrated male rats were administered 2.6 mg/kg zolpidem, ± disulfiram (ADH/ALDH pathway inhibitor) to compare PK changes induced by sex and gonadal hormones. PK analyses were conducted in rat plasma and rat brain. Key findings: Sex differences in PK were evident: females had a higher CMAX (112.4 vs. 68.1 ug/L) and AUC (537.8 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L) than uncastrated males. Castration induced an earlier TMAX (0.25 vs. 1 h), greater CMAX (109.1 vs. 68.1 ug/L), and a corresponding AUC increase (339.7 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L). Administration of disulfiram caused more drastic CMAX and TMAX changes in male vs. female rats that mirrored the effects of castration on first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the observed PK differences may be caused by ADH/ALDH expression. Brain concentrations paralleled plasma concentrations. Conclusion: These findings indicate that sex differences in zolpidem PK are influenced by variation in the expression of ADH/ALDH due to gonadal androgens. PMID:27574509

  7. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Jun; Nakamura, Toru; Song, In-Ja; Ito, Takuro; Ochiai, Toshinori; Kanno, Akira; Kameya, Toshiaki; Maki, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    Background Nuclear genes determine the vast range of phenotypes that are responsible for the adaptive abilities of organisms in nature. Nevertheless, the evolutionary processes that generate the structures and functions of nuclear genes are only now be coming understood. The aim of our study is to isolate the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes in two distantly related legumes, and use these sequences to examine the molecular evolutionary history of this nuclear gene. Results We isolated the expressed Adh genes from two species of legumes, Sophora flavescens Ait. and Wisteria floribunda DC., by a RT-PCR based approach and found a new Adh locus in addition to homologues of the Adh genes found previously in legumes. To examine the evolution of these genes, we compared the species and gene trees and found gene duplication of the Adh loci in the legumes occurred as an ancient event. Conclusion This is the first report revealing that some legume species have at least two Adh gene loci belonging to separate clades. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these genes resulted from relatively ancient duplication events. PMID:15836788

  8. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: Analysis through the use of alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sofer, W.H.

    1986-12-01

    Our original objective was to understand the mechanism of mutagenesis of several important mutagens in higher organisms. Our approach was to try to deduce this mechanism by working backwards from its final effects. The strategy that we used in an effort to carry out our studies was to make mutations in the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Drosophila melanogaster and sequence the modified genes. Most of our work was focused on an array of mutants that we had induced with formaldehyde, a potent mutagen in Drosophila, and with ethyl methane sulfonate. Over the course of the project period we cloned and sequenced the ADH gene from four formalde-induced mutants and from one EMS mutant. We showed that the four formaldehyde-induced mutants contained small deletions within the protein-coding region of their ADH genes ranging in size from between 6 and 34 bp. The one EMS-induced mutant was shown by DNA sequencing to bear an AT to GC sequence change at a tryptophan codon near the c-terminal coding portion of the gene. These results have significantly increased our understanding of the mechanism(s) of mutagenesis in higher organisms. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Molecular cloning, functional analysis of three cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) genes in the leaves of tea plant, Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Qiang; Jiang, Zheng-Zhong; Tang, Lei; Li, Ye-Yun; Wei, Chao-Ling; Jiang, Chang-Jun; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-02-15

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) is considered to be a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, but little was known about CADs in tea plants (Camellia sinensis). A full-length cDNA sequence (CsCAD2) was isolated by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) in Ectropis oblique feeding-induced tea plants, and another two full-length cDNA sequences (CsCAD1 and CsCAD3) were obtained from a transcriptome obtained by deep sequencing. However, they showed only 20-54% identities. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they belonged to three different families. DNA gel blotting analysis revealed that two copies of CsCAD1 and CsCAD2 genes existed in tea genome, but CsCAD3 likely had only one copy. Recombinant proteins of these CsCADs were produced in Escherichia coli. The activity of purified recombinant CsCAD2 protein was up to 0.43 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, the other two recombinant proteins had lower activities, probably due to incomplete refolding. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that while CsCAD3 was strongly up-regulated in tea plants after E. oblique attack and mechanical damage, CsCAD1 and CsCAD2 showed only moderate or no changes in transcript levels. Treatment of defence-related hormones methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and salicylic acid (SA) elevated the expression of CsCAD1 and CsCAD2, but decreased the transcript abundance of CsCAD3. The transcript levels of CsCAD2 did not change after applying abscisic acid (ABA), whereas CsCAD1 and CsCAD3 were induced. These results suggested that these three CsCAD genes in tea plants may play a role in defense against insects and pathogens and adaptation to abiotic stresses and these genes likely have divergant functions.

  10. Phosphorescence maxima and triplet state lifetimes of NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ in ternary complexes with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rousslang, K; Allen, L; Ross, J B

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the phosphorescence emission and decay times of NAD+ and its fluorescent etheno derivative, epsilon-NAD+, in the pyrazole ternary complex with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We show that the epsilon-NAD+ triplet state, as well as the tryptophan triplet state, can be utilized to monitor the coenzyme-enzyme interaction. The decays of NAD+ and AMP are single exponential, and the lifetimes are the same within experimental error. The phosphorescence lifetimes, evaluated as single exponentials, are slightly shorter in epsilon-NAD+ than they are in epsilon-AMP. Whereas the decay of epsilon-AMP was adequately fit by a single exponential with a time constant of very close to 0.5 s, it was necessary to fit the decay of epsilon-NAD+ to a double exponential. Ternary complexes with NAD+ excited at 297 nm exhibit decay kinetics nearly identical to those of ADH by itself. On the other hand, when excitation of the epsilon-NAD+ ternary complex is provided at 313 nm, where there is very little absorption by either tryptophan residue, the decay law of the ternary complex is similar to that of epsilon-NAD+ in solution. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ quench tryptophan phosphorescence in ADH. Normalizing the phosphorescence intensity to the 0-0 vibronic band assigned to Trp-15 (blue-edge), we calculate a 21% decrease in the phosphorescence associated with Trp-314 at stoichiometric saturation of the coenzyme binding sites with NAD+ in the ternary complex. When the active sites are saturated with epsilon-NAD+, the relative phosphorescence due to Trp-314 decreases by 63%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase are essential for energy metabolism under oxidative stress in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Erika; Encalada, Rusely; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro Entamoeba histolytica pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (EhPFOR) kinetic properties and the effect of oxidative stress on glycolytic pathway enzymes and fluxes in live trophozoites were evaluated. EhPFOR showed a strong preference for pyruvate as substrate over other oxoacids. The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by a long period of saturating O(2) exposure (IC(50) 0.034 mm), whereas short-term exposure (< 30 min) leading to > 90% inhibition allowed for partial restoration by addition of Fe(2+). CoA and acetyl-CoA prevented, whereas pyruvate exacerbated, inactivation induced by short-term saturating O(2) exposure. Superoxide dismutase was more effective than catalase in preventing the inactivation, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved. Hydrogen peroxide caused inactivation in an Fe(2+)-reversible fashion that was not prevented by the coenzymes, suggesting different mechanisms of enzyme inactivation by ROS. Structural analysis on an EhPFOR 3D model suggested that the protection against ROS provided by coenzymes could be attributable to their proximity to the Fe-S clusters. After O(2) exposure, live parasites displayed decreased enzyme activities only for PFOR (90%) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; 68%) of the bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (EhADH2), whereas acetyl-CoA synthetase remained unchanged, explaining the increased acetate and lowered ethanol fluxes. Remarkably, PFOR and ALDH activities were restored after return of the parasites to normoxic conditions, which correlated with higher ethanol and lower acetate fluxes. These results identified amebal PFOR and ALDH of EhADH2 activities as markers of oxidative stress, and outlined their relevance as significant controlling steps of energy metabolism in parasites subjected to oxidative stress. PMID:20629749

  12. Cellulase and alcohol dehydrogenase immobilized in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films and their molecular-level effects upon contact with cellulose and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Dilmer; Camilo, Fernanda Ferraz; Caseli, Luciano

    2014-02-25

    The key challenges for producing devices based on nanostructured films with control over the molecular architecture are to preserve the catalytic activity of the immobilized biomolecules and to provide a reliable method for determining the intermolecular interactions and the accommodation of molecules at very small scales. In this work, the enzymes cellulase and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were coimmobilized with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, and their biological activities were assayed by accommodating the structure formed in contact with cellulose. For this purpose, the polysaccharide was dissolved in an ionic liquid, 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMImCl), and dropped on the top of the hybrid cellulase-ADH-DPPC LB film. The interactions between cellulose and ethanol, which are the catalytic substrates of the enzymes as well as important elements in the production of second-generation fuels, were then investigated using polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Investigation of the secondary structures of the enzymes was performed using PM-IRRAS, through which the presence of ethanol and cellulose was observed to highly affect the structures of ADH and cellulase, respectively. The detection of products formed from the catalyzed reactions as well as the changes of secondary structure of the enzymes immobilization could be carried out, which opens the possibility to produce a means for producing second-generation ethanol using nanoscale arrangements.

  13. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70–4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  14. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R.; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M.; Martin, William F.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Ronimus, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn2+ cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn2+ cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. PMID:26175150

  15. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions.

  16. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  17. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions. PMID:19198723

  18. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  19. Retinaldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes regulate colon enteric nervous system structure and function.

    PubMed

    Wright-Jin, Elizabeth C; Grider, John R; Duester, Gregg; Heuckeroth, Robert O

    2013-09-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) forms from the neural crest-derived precursors that colonize the bowel before differentiating into a network of neurons and glia that control intestinal function. Retinoids are essential for normal ENS development, but the role of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism in development remains incompletely understood. Because RA is produced locally in the tissues where it acts by stimulating RAR and RXR receptors, RA signaling during development is absolutely dependent on the rate of RA synthesis and degradation. RA is produced by three different enzymes called retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH1, RALDH2 and RALDH3) that are all expressed in the developing bowel. To determine the relative importance of these enzymes for ENS development, we analyzed whole mount preparations of adult (8-12-week old) myenteric and submucosal plexus stained with NADPH diaphorase (neurons and neurites), anti-TuJ1 (neurons and neurites), anti-HuC/HuD (neurons), and anti-S100β (glia) in an allelic series of mice with mutations in Raldh1, Raldh2, and Raldh3. We found that Raldh1-/-, Raldh2+/-, Raldh3+/- (R1(KO)R2(Het)R3(Het)) mutant mice had a reduced colon myenteric neuron density, reduced colon myenteric neuron to glia ratio, reduced colon submucosal neuron density, and increased colon myenteric fibers per neuron when compared to the wild type (WT; Raldh1WT, Raldh2WT, Raldh3WT) mice. These defects are unlikely to be due to defective ENS precursor migration since R1(KO)R2(Het)R3(KO) mice had increased enteric neuron progenitor migration into the distal colon compared to WT during development. RALDH mutant mice also have reduced contractility in the colon compared to WT mice. These data suggest that RALDH1, RALDH2 and RALDH3 each contribute to ENS development and function.

  20. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. PMID:27317665

  1. Role of ammonia in the activiation of methanol dehydrogenase/cytochrome C(L) enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjumon, Ancy

    Recent advancement in enzyme catalysis has opened ways to design efficient biocatalysts, bio-sensors and bio-fuel cells. An in-depth knowledge about the mechanism of the reaction taking place within the enzymes is of great importance to achieve these goals. In this dissertation, various computation methods are applied to investigate the mechanism behind enzyme catalysis in the presence of compounds called activators. Methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) is a well-known bio-catalyst that can oxidize excess of methanol from the environment to formaldehyde. The enzyme works well within the bacterial environment, but under in vitro, it loses activity. Ammonia is used as an activator to restore the activity of MDH. The Monte Carlo search using simulated annealing metaheuristic method is conducted to explore the binding of MDH with its natural electron acceptor Cytochrome cL in varying concentration of ammonia. The main aim behind this is to explore the interaction energy between the enzymes under the influence of its activator. The concentration of ammonia is varied from 0 to 5 ammonia molecules. Moving deeper into the active site of MDH, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were performed to investigate the position and effect of ammonia in the active site amino acids of MDH. The concentration of ammonia was varied from 0 to 55.39 mM. It was proposed that ammonia may form a complex conjugate with the cofactor of MDH (Pyrroloquinoline quinone) to assist in the oxidation of methanol. Two of the most debated methanol oxidation mechanisms, Addition-Elimination reaction and Hydride-Transfer mechanism, were used to investigate the role of ammonia in the oxidation of methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) was applied to explore the methanol oxidation mechanism in the presence of ammonia. Models of varying size that best represent the active site of MDH were tested for this purpose. The interaction energy obtained after the docking of MDH and Cytochrome cL (CL) indicate

  2. Tryptophan in Alcoholism Treatment I:  Kynurenine Metabolites Inhibit the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Low Km Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity, Elevate Blood Acetaldehyde Concentration and Induce Aversion to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina; Steptoe, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims were to provide proofs of mechanism and principle by establishing the ability of kynurenine metabolites to inhibit the liver mitochondrial low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity after administration and in vivo, and to induce aversion to alcohol. Methods: Kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) were administered to normal male Wistar rats and ALDH activity was determined both in vitro in liver homogenates and in vivo (by measuring blood acetaldehyde following ethanol administration). Alcohol consumption was studied in an aversion model in rats and in alcohol-preferring C57 mice. Results: ALDH activity was significantly inhibited by all three metabolites by doses as small as 1 mg/kg body wt. Blood acetaldehyde accumulation after ethanol administration was strongly elevated by KA and 3-HK and to a lesser extent by 3-HAA. All three metabolites induced aversion to alcohol in rats and decreased alcohol preference in mice. Conclusions: The above kynurenine metabolites of tryptophan induce aversion to alcohol by inhibiting ALDH activity. An intellectual property covering the use of 3-HK and 3-HAA and derivatives thereof in the treatment of alcoholism by aversion awaits further development. PMID:21896552

  3. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  4. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  5. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Ju, Hyunsu; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <0.2% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 were observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. PMID:24625836

  6. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding.

    PubMed

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Calhoun, William J

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease.

  7. Combining Laue diffraction and molecular dynamics to study enzyme intermediates: Formation of the Michaelis complex in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bash, P.A.; Stoddard, B.L.; Dean, A.

    1996-12-31

    Two separate techniques, Lane diffraction and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have been developed to allow the visualization and assessment of transient structural states and conformations motions in macromolecules. Recent studies on isocitrate dehydrogenase show that computational MD simulations of an enzymatic Michaelis complex are consistent with difference Fourier election-density maps of the same structure from a Lane experiment. The use of MD facilitates modeling of atoms into regions of experimental density that are poorly defined, due to missing and inaccurate low-resolution diffraction terms that degrade the X-ray scattering contribution from mobile atoms in the active site. The combination of these techniques is used to generate a model for the Michaelis complex of the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase with substrate isocitrate and coenzyme nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). This concerted use of time-resolved X-ray crystallography and of MD simulations has clear importance for the study of enzyme dynamics and function.

  8. Structural and Kinetic Evidence That Catalytic Reaction of Human UDP-glucose 6-Dehydrogenase Involves Covalent Thiohemiacetal and Thioester Enzyme Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Sigrid; Chaikuad, Apirat; Klimacek, Mario; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Oppermann, Udo; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid by UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (UGDH) occurs through the four-electron oxidation of the UDP-glucose C6 primary alcohol in two NAD+-dependent steps. The catalytic reaction of UGDH is thought to involve a Cys nucleophile that promotes formation of a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate in the course of the first oxidation step. The thiohemiacetal undergoes further oxidation into a thioester, and hydrolysis of the thioester completes the catalytic cycle. Herein we present crystallographic and kinetic evidence for the human form of UGDH that clarifies participation of covalent catalysis in the enzymatic mechanism. Substitution of the putative catalytic base for water attack on the thioester (Glu161) by an incompetent analog (Gln161) gave a UGDH variant (E161Q) in which the hydrolysis step had become completely rate-limiting so that a thioester enzyme intermediate accumulated at steady state. By crystallizing E161Q in the presence of 5 mm UDP-glucose and 2 mm NAD+, we succeeded in trapping a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate and determined its structure at 2.3 Å resolution. Cys276 was covalently modified in the structure, establishing its role as catalytic nucleophile of the reaction. The thiohemiacetal reactive C6 was in a position suitable to become further oxidized by hydride transfer to NAD+. The proposed catalytic mechanism of human UGDH involves Lys220 as general base for UDP-glucose alcohol oxidation and for oxyanion stabilization during formation and breakdown of the thiohemiacetal and thioester enzyme intermediates. Water coordinated to Asp280 deprotonates Cys276 to function as an aldehyde trap and also provides oxyanion stabilization. Glu161 is the Brønsted base catalytically promoting the thioester hydrolysis. PMID:22123821

  9. Phytophenols in whisky lower blood acetaldehyde level by depressing alcohol metabolism through inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (class I) in mice.

    PubMed

    Haseba, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Junichi; Sato, Shigeo; Abe, Yuko; Ohno, Youkichi

    2008-12-01

    We recently reported that the maturation of whisky prolongs the exposure of the body to a given dose of alcohol by reducing the rate of alcohol metabolism and thus lowers the blood acetaldehyde level (Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31:77s-82s). In this study, administration of the nonvolatile fraction of whisky was found to lower the concentration of acetaldehyde in the blood of mice by depressing alcohol metabolism through the inhibition of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Four of the 12 phenolic compounds detected in the nonvolatile fraction (caffeic acid, vanillin, syringaldehyde, ellagic acid), the amounts of which increase during the maturation of whisky, were found to strongly inhibit mouse ADH 1 (class I). Their inhibition constant values for ADH 1 were 0.08, 7.9, 15.6, and 22.0 mumol/L, respectively, whereas that for pyrazole, a well-known ADH inhibitor, was 5.1 mumol/L. The 2 phenolic aldehydes and ellagic acid exhibited a mixed type of inhibition, whereas caffeic acid showed the competitive type. When individually administered to mice together with ethanol, each of these phytophenols depressed the elimination of ethanol, thereby lowering the acetaldehyde concentration of blood. Thus, it was demonstrated that the enhanced inhibition of liver ADH 1 due to the increased amounts of these phytophenols in mature whisky caused the depression of alcohol metabolism and a consequent lowering of blood acetaldehyde level. These substances are commonly found in various food plants and act as antioxidants and/or anticarcinogens. Therefore, the intake of foods rich in them together with alcohol may not only diminish the metabolic toxicity of alcohol by reducing both the blood acetaldehyde level and oxidative stress, but also help limit the amount of alcohol a person drinks by depressing alcohol metabolism.

  10. Maintenance of homeostasis of endogenous ethanol as a method for the therapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nikolaenko, V N

    2001-03-01

    We propose a new method for the therapy of alcoholism based on maintenance of homeostasis of endogenous ethanol and inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase with emetine. After the standard antialcohol therapy, activity of this enzyme remained high or even increased, and pathological alcohol addiction also increased. Emetine normalized activity of alcohol dehydrogenase and suppressed pathological alcohol addiction. After this therapy more than 50% patients achieved stable remissions from alcoholism over 1 year, which indicated high efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH), designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into three groups respectively, namely long-, medium-, and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into six medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and –insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed. PMID:27242871

  12. An experimental test for lineage-specific position effects on alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Mark L.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1998-01-01

    Independent transgene insertions differ in expression based on their location in the genome; these position effects are of interest because they reflect the influence of genome organization on gene regulation. Position effects also represent potentially insurmountable obstacles to the rigorous functional comparison of homologous genes from different species because (i) quantitative variation in expression of each gene across genomic positions (generalized position effects, or GPEs) may overwhelm differences between the genes of interest, or (ii) divergent genes may be differentially sensitive to position effects, reflecting unique interactions between each gene and its genomic milieu (lineage-specific position effects, or LSPEs). We have investigated both types of position-effect variation by applying our method of transgene coplacement, which allows comparisons of transgenes in the same position in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report an experimental test for LSPE in Drosophila. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes of D. melanogaster and Drosophila affinidisjuncta differ in both tissue distribution and amounts of ADH activity. Despite this striking regulatory divergence, we found a very high correlation in overall ADH activity between the genes of the two species when placed in the same genomic position as assayed in otherwise Adh-null adults and larvae. These results argue against the influence of LSPE for these sequences, although the effects of GPE are significant. Our new findings validate the coplacement approach and show that it greatly magnifies the power to detect differences in expression between transgenes. Transgene coplacement thus dramatically extends the range of functional and evolutionary questions that can be addressed by transgenic technology. PMID:9861000

  13. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH), designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into three groups respectively, namely long-, medium-, and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into six medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed. PMID:27242871

  14. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study.

    PubMed

    De Weck, Z; Pande, J; Kägi, J H

    1987-07-28

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change of measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for NAD+ than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD+-pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD+-oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD+ is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change.

  15. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway. PMID:26755859

  16. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway. PMID:26755859

  17. Yeast peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme: (3R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains A and B are required for optimal growth on oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Qin, Y M; Marttila, M S; Haapalainen, A M; Siivari, K M; Glumoff, T; Hiltunen, J K

    1999-10-01

    The yeast peroxisomal (3R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/2-enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 (multifunctional enzyme type 2; MFE-2) has two N-terminal domains belonging to the short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. To investigate the physiological roles of these domains, here called A and B, Saccharomyces cerevisiae fox-2 cells (devoid of Sc MFE-2) were taken as a model system. Gly(16) and Gly(329) of the S. cerevisiae A and B domains, corresponding to Gly(16), which is mutated in the human MFE-2 deficiency, were mutated to serine and cloned into the yeast expression plasmid pYE352. In oleic acid medium, fox-2 cells transformed with pYE352:: ScMFE-2(aDelta) and pYE352::ScMFE-2(bDelta) grew slower than cells transformed with pYE352::ScMFE-2, whereas cells transformed with pYE352::ScMFE-2(aDeltabDelta) failed to grow. Candida tropicalis MFE-2 with a deleted hydratase 2 domain (Ct MFE- 2(h2Delta)) and mutational variants of the A and B domains (Ct MFE- 2(h2DeltaaDelta), Ct MFE- 2(h2DeltabDelta), and Ct MFE- 2(h2DeltaaDeltabDelta)) were overexpressed and characterized. All proteins were dimers with similar secondary structure elements. Both wild type domains were enzymatically active, with the B domain showing the highest activity with short chain and the A domain with medium and long chain (3R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA substrates. The data show that the dehydrogenase domains of yeast MFE-2 have different substrate specificities required to allow the yeast to propagate optimally on fatty acids as the carbon source.

  18. Characterization of two novel alcohol short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases from Ralstonia eutropha H16 capable of stereoselective conversion of bulky substrates.

    PubMed

    Magomedova, Zalina; Grecu, Andreea; Sensen, Christoph W; Schwab, Helmut; Heidinger, Petra

    2016-03-10

    Biocatalysis has significant advantages over organic synthesis in the field of chiral molecule production and several types of stereoselective enzymes are already in use in industrial biotechnology. However, there is still a high demand for new enzymes capable of transforming bulky molecules with sufficient operability. In order to reveal novel high-potential biocatalysts, the complete genome of the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 was screened for potential short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs). We were able to identify two (S)-enantioselective SDRs named A5 and B3. These showed clear preference towards long-chain and aromatic secondary alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, with diaryl diketone benzil as one of the best substrates. In addition the phylogenetic analysis of all enzyme types, which are known to facilitate benzil reduction, revealed at least two separate evolutionary clusters. Our results indicate the biotechnological potential of SDRs A5 and B3 for the production of chiral compounds with potential commercial value.

  19. Unusual NADPH conformation in the crystal structure of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori in complex with NADP(H) and substrate docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyung Hye; Zhuang, Ningning; Chen, Cong; Song, Jae-Young; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Kon Ho

    2012-02-17

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase is a zinc- and NADPH-dependent dehydrogenase catalyzing the reversible conversion of p-hydroxycinnamaldehydes to their corresponding hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. A CAD homolog from Helicobacter pylori (HpCAD) possesses broad substrate specificities like the plant CADs and additionally a dismutation activity converting benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol and benzoic acid. We have determined the crystal structure of HpCAD complexed with NADP(H) at 2.18Å resolution to get a better understanding of this class of CAD outside of plants. The structure of HpCAD is highly homologous to the sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase and the plant CAD with well-conserved residues involved in catalysis and zinc binding. However, the NADP(H) binding mode of the HpCAD has been found to be significantly different from those of plant CADs.

  20. The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Candida albicans is a surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Navarro, I; Gil, M L; Casanova, M; O'Connor, J E; Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1997-01-01

    A lambda gt11 cDNA library from Candida albicans ATCC 26555 was screened by using pooled sera from two patients with systemic candidiasis and five neutropenic patients with high levels of anti-C. albicans immunoglobulin M antibodies. Seven clones were isolated from 60,000 recombinant phages. The most reactive one contained a 0.9-kb cDNA encoding a polypeptide immunoreactive only with sera from patients with systemic candidiasis. The whole gene was isolated from a genomic library by using the cDNA as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region showed homology (78 to 79%) to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TDH1 to TDH3 genes coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and their amino acid sequences showed 76% identity; thus, this gene has been named C. albicans TDH1. A rabbit polyclonal antiserum against the purified cytosolic C. albicans GAPDH (polyclonal antibody [PAb] anti-CA-GAPDH) was used to identify the GAPDH in the beta-mercaptoethanol extracts containing cell wall moieties. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of GAPDH at the C. albicans cell surface, particularly on the blastoconidia. Semiquantitative flow cytometry analysis showed the sensitivity of this GAPDH form to trypsin and its resistance to be removed with 2 M NaCl or 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The decrease in fluorescence in the presence of soluble GAPDH indicates the specificity of the labelling. In addition, a dose-dependent GAPDH enzymatic activity was detected in intact blastoconidia and germ tube cells. This activity was reduced by pretreatment of the cells with trypsin, formaldehyde, and PAb anti-CA-GAPDH. These observations indicate that an immunogenic, enzymatically active cell wall-associated form of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH is found at the cell surface of C. albicans cells. PMID:9260938

  1. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition.

  3. An aryl-alcohol oxidase of Pleurotus sapidus: heterologous expression, characterization, and application in a 2-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Ilya; Javeed, Aysha; Luig, Hanno; Lochnit, Günter; Rühl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidases (AAOs) are enzymes supporting the degradation of lignin by fungal derived class II peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi. AAOs are able to generate H2O2 as a by-product via oxidation of an aryl-alcohol into its correspondent aldehyde. In this study, an AAO was heterologously expressed in a basidiomycete host for the first time. The gene for an AAO of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus sapidus, a close relative to the oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, was cloned into an expression vector and put under control of the promotor of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene 2 (gpdII) of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The expression vector was transformed into the model basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea, and several positive transformants were obtained. The best producing transformants were grown in shake-flasks and in a stirred tank reactor reaching enzymatic activities of up to 125 U L(-1) using veratryl alcohol as a substrate. The purified AAO was biochemically characterized and compared to the previously described native and recombinant AAOs from other Pleurotus species. In addition, a two-enzyme system comprising a dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) from Mycetinis scorodonius and the P. sapidus AAO was successfully employed to bleach the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 5. PMID:27138199

  4. Subcellular localization and biochemical comparison of cytosolic and secreted cytokinin dehydrogenase enzymes from maize.

    PubMed

    Smehilová, Mária; Galuszka, Petr; Bilyeu, Kristin D; Jaworek, Pavel; Kowalska, Marta; Sebela, Marek; Sedlárová, Michaela; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX; EC 1.5.99.12) degrades cytokinin hormones in plants. There are several differently targeted isoforms of CKX in plant cells. While most CKX enzymes appear to be localized in the apoplast or vacuoles, there is generally only one CKX per plant genome that lacks a translocation signal and presumably functions in the cytosol. The only extensively characterized maize CKX is the apoplastic ZmCKX1; a maize gene encoding a non-secreted CKX has not previously been cloned or characterized. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the maize non-secreted CKX gene (ZmCKX10), elucidate the subcellular localization of ZmCKX10, and compare its biochemical properties with those of ZmCKX1. Expression profiling of ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX10 was performed in maize tissues to determine their transcript abundance and organ-specific expression. For determination of the subcellular localization, the CKX genes were fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and overexpressed in tomato hairy roots. Using confocal microscopy, the ZmCKX1-GFP signal was confirmed to be present in the apoplast, whereas ZmCKX10-GFP was detected in the cytosol. No interactions of ZmCKX1 with the plasma membrane were observed. While roots overexpressing ZmCKX1-GFP formed significantly more mass in comparison with the control, non-secreted CKX overexpression resulted in a small reduction in root mass accumulation. Biochemical characterization of ZmCKX10 was performed using recombinant protein produced in Pichia pastoris. In contrast to the preference for 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) as an electron acceptor and trans-zeatin, N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenine (iP) and N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenosine (iPR) as substrates for ZmCKX1, the non-secreted ZmCKX10 had a range of suitable electron acceptors, and the enzyme had a higher preference for cis-zeatin and cytokinin N-glucosides as substrates. PMID:19436049

  5. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  6. Alcohol Selectivity in a Synthetic Thermophilic n-Butanol Pathway Is Driven by Biocatalytic and Thermostability Characteristics of Constituent Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Andrew J.; Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Garrison, G. Dale; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    n-Butanol is generated as a natural product of metabolism by several microorganisms, but almost all grow at mesophilic temperatures. A synthetic pathway for n-butanol production from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) that functioned at 70°C was assembled in vitro from enzymes recruited from thermophilic bacteria to inform efforts for engineering butanol production into thermophilic hosts. Recombinant versions of eight thermophilic enzymes (β-ketothiolase [Thl], 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase [Hbd], and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase [Crt] from Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis; trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase [Ter] from Spirochaeta thermophila; bifunctional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/alcohol dehydrogenase [AdhE] from Clostridium thermocellum; and AdhE, aldehyde dehydrogenase [Bad], and butanol dehydrogenase [Bdh] from Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514) were utilized to examine three possible pathways for n-butanol. These pathways differed in the two steps required to convert butyryl-CoA to n-butanol: Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (C. thermocellum), Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (Thermoanaerobacter X514), and Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-Bad-Bdh. n-Butanol was produced at 70°C, but with different amounts of ethanol as a coproduct, because of the broad substrate specificities of AdhE, Bad, and Bdh. A reaction kinetics model, validated via comparison to in vitro experiments, was used to determine relative enzyme ratios needed to maximize n-butanol production. By using large relative amounts of Thl and Hbd and small amounts of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol was observed in vitro, but with a 60% decrease in the predicted pathway flux. With more-selective hypothetical versions of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol is predicted, with a 19% increase in pathway flux. Thus, more-selective thermophilic versions of Bad, Bdh, and AdhE are needed to fully exploit biocatalytic n-butanol production at elevated temperatures. PMID:26253677

  7. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes1,2. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication. PMID:23416793

  8. Biomimetic enzyme nanocomplexes and their use as antidotes and preventive measures for alcohol intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Du, Juanjuan; Yan, Ming; Lau, Mo Yin; Hu, Jay; Han, Hui; Yang, Otto O.; Liang, Sheng; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Shi, Linqi; Chen, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Organisms have sophisticated subcellular compartments containing enzymes that function in tandem. These confined compartments ensure effective chemical transformation and transport of molecules, and the elimination of toxic metabolic wastes. Creating functional enzyme complexes that are confined in a similar way remains challenging. Here we show that two or more enzymes with complementary functions can be assembled and encapsulated within a thin polymer shell to form enzyme nanocomplexes. These nanocomplexes exhibit improved catalytic efficiency and enhanced stability when compared with free enzymes. Furthermore, the co-localized enzymes display complementary functions, whereby toxic intermediates generated by one enzyme can be promptly eliminated by another enzyme. We show that nanocomplexes containing alcohol oxidase and catalase could reduce blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice, offering an alternative antidote and prophylactic for alcohol intoxication.

  9. Mössbauer characterization of the Fe-S center in the catalytic metal binding site of alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C.; Dietrich, H.; Maret, W.; Zeppezauer, M.; Montiel-Montoya, R.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1986-02-01

    Iron in its divalent and trivalent form can be substituted in the catalytic zinc site of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (HLADH). Fe-HLADH in either oxidation state does not show enzymatic activity in the oxidation of ethanol. Nevertheless, Mössbauer studies of this material are of considerable interest, because they elucidate the effect of pH and coenzyme-induced conformational changes of the protein on the metal ion. It is of importance to note that zinc itself due to the lack of suitable chromophoric and magnetic properties does not provide any comparable information.

  10. Effects of Molybdate, Tungstate, and Selenium Compounds on Formate Dehydrogenase and Other Enzyme Systems in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Harry G.; Lester, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    The role of selenium and molybdenum in the metabolism of Escherichia coli was explored by growing cells in a simple salts medium and examining the metabolic consequences of altering the concentration of molybdenum and selenium compounds in the medium. The addition of tungstate increased the molybdate deficiency of this medium, as reflected by lowered levels of enzyme systems previously recognized to require compounds of molybdenum and selenium for their formation [formate-dependent oxygen reduction, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) (EC 1.2.2.1), and nitrate reductase (EC 1.9.6.1)]. The requirement for selenium and molybdenum appears to be unique to the enzymes of formate and nitrate metabolism since molybdate- and selenite-deficient medium had no effect on the level of several dehydrogenase and oxidase systems, for which the electron donors were reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, succinate, d- or l-lactate, and glycerol. In addition, no effect was observed on the growth rate or cell yield with any carbon source tested (glucose, glycerol, dl-lactate, acetate, succinate, and l-malate) when the medium was deficient in molybdenum and selenium. dl-Selenocystine was about as effective as selenite in stimulating the formation of formate dehydrogenase, whereas dl-selenomethionine was only 1% as effective. In aerobic cells, an amount of FDH was formed such that 3,200 or 3,800 moles of formate were oxidized per min per mole of added selenium (added as dl-selenocystine or selenite, respectively). PMID:4555402

  11. Disruption of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase for increased hydrogen production and its effect on metabolic flux in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxin; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Liyan; Zhang, Chong; Yang, Cheng; Xing, Xinhui

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes from glucose was enhanced by deleting the targeted ldhA and adh genes responsible for two NADH-consuming pathways which consume most NADH generated from glycolysis. Compared with the wild-type, the hydrogen yield of IAM1183-ΔldhA increased 1.5 fold. Metabolic flux analysis showed both IAM1183-ΔldhA and IAM1183-Δadh exhibited significant changes in flux, including enhanced flux towards the hydrogen generation. The lactate production of IAM1183-ΔldhA significantly decreased by 91.42%, while the alcohol yield of IAM1183-Δadh decreased to 30%. The mutant IAM1183-ΔldhA with better hydrogen-producing performance was selected for further investigation in a 5-L fermentor. The hydrogen production of IAM1183-ΔldhA was 2.3 times higher than the wild-type. Further results from the fermentation process showed that the pH decreased to 5.39 levels, then gradually increased to 5.96, indicating that some acidic metabolites might be degraded or uptaken by cells.

  12. Enzymes extracted from apple peels have activity in reducing higher alcohols in Chinese liquors.

    PubMed

    Han, Qi'an; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Lv, Hongliang; Du, Shuangkui

    2014-10-01

    As the unavoidable byproducts of alcoholic fermentation, higher alcohols are unhealthy compounds widespread in alcoholic drinks. To investigate the activity of apple crude enzymes toward higher alcohols in liquors, five kinds of apple peels, namely, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Red Star, and Jonagold, were chosen to prepare enzymes, and three kinds of Chinese liquors, namely, Xifeng (containing 45% ethanol), Taibai (containing 50% ethanol), and Erguotou (containing 56% ethanol), were tested. Enzymes were prepared in the forms of liquid solution, powder, and immobilized enzymes using sodium alginate (SA) and chitosan. The treatment was carried out at 37 °C for 1 h. The relative amounts of different alcohols (including ethanol, 1-propanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol, isoamylol, and 1-hexanol) were measured using gas chromatography (GC). Conditions for preparing SA-immobilized Fuji enzymes (SA-IEP) were optimized, and the obtained SA-IEP (containing 0.3 g of enzyme) was continuously used to treat Xifeng liquor eight times, 20 mL per time. Significant degradation rates (DRs) of higher alcohols were observed at different degrees, and it also showed enzyme specificity according to the apple varieties and enzyme preparations. After five repeated treatments, the DRs of the optimized Fuji SA-IEP remained 70% for 1-hexanol and >15% for other higher alcohols.

  13. Degradation of Swainsonine by the NADP-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenase A1R6C3 in Arthrobacter sp. HW08

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhai, A’guan; Zhang, Yanqi; Qiu, Kai; Wang, Jianhua; Li, Qinfan

    2016-01-01

    Swainsonine is an indolizidine alkaloid that has been found in locoweeds and some fungi. Our previous study demonstrated that Arthrobacter sp. HW08 or its crude enzyme extract could degrade swainsonie efficiently. However, the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we used label-free quantitative proteomics method based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to dissect the mechanism of swainsonine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. HW08. The results showed that 129 differentially expressed proteins were relevant to swainsonine degradation. These differentially expressed proteins were mostly related to the biological process of metabolism and the molecular function of catalytic activity. Among the 129 differentially expressed proteins, putative sugar phosphate isomerase/epimerase A1R5X7, Acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A0JZ95, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase A1R6C3 were found to contribute to the swainsonine degradation. Notably, NADP-dependent alcohol dehyrodgenase A1R6C3 appeared to play a major role in degrading swainsonine, but not as much as Arthrobacter sp. HW08 did. Collectively, our findings here provide insights to understand the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria. PMID:27196926

  14. Determining structure and function of steroid dehydrogenase enzymes by sequence analysis, homology modeling, and rational mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Duax, William L; Thomas, James; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Huether, Robert; Habegger, Lukas; Weeks, Charles M

    2005-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, approximately 300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of approximately 40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30-40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3beta-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3alpha,20beta-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3alpha,20beta-HSD, UDPGE, and 3beta-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3beta-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model.

  15. Determining Structure and Function of Steroid Dehydrogenase Enzymes by Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling, and Rational Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    DUAX, WILLIAM L.; THOMAS, JAMES; PLETNEV, VLADIMIR; ADDLAGATTA, ANTHONY; HUETHER, ROBERT; HABEGGER, LUKAS; WEEKS, CHARLES M.

    2006-01-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, ~300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of ~40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30–40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3β-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3α,20β-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3α,20β-HSD, UDPGE, and 3β-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3β-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model. PMID:16467263

  16. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticum produce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains of C. thermocellum produce ethanol at lower yields (∼50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in their adhE genes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, the adhE genes from six strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains of T. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain of C. thermocellum has acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels. When single amino acid mutations in AdhE that caused increased NADPH-linked ADH activity were introduced into C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum, ethanol production increased in both organisms. Structural analysis of the wild-type and mutant AdhE proteins was performed to provide explanations for the cofactor specificity change on a molecular level. IMPORTANCE This work describes the characterization of the AdhE enzyme from different strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum are thermophilic anaerobes that have been engineered to make high yields of ethanol and can solubilize components of

  17. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  18. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of vitamin BI, is a cofactor of enzymes catalyzing reactions involving the cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond adjacent to an oxo group. TPP-dependent enzymes show a common mechanism of TPP activation by: (1) forming the ionic N-H...O(sup -) hydrogen bonding between the N1' atom of the aminopirymidine ring of the coenzyme and intrinsic gamma-carboxylate group of glutamate and (2) imposing an "active" V-conformation that brings the N4' atom of the aminopirymidine to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H.. .N hydrogen bonding with the thiazolium C2 atom. Within these two hydrogen bonds that rapidly exchange protons, protonation of the N1' atom is strictly coordinated with the deprotonation of the 4' -amino group and eventually abstraction of the proton from C2. The human pyruvate dehydrogenase Elp, component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of the pyruvate followed by the reductive acetylation of the lipoyl group of dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase. Elp is alpha(sub 2)beta(sub2)-heterotetrameric with a molecular mass of I54 kDa, which has two catalytic sites, each providing TPP and magnesium ion as cofactors and each formed on the interface between the PP and PYR domains. The dynamic nonequivalence of two otherwise chemically equivalent catalytic sites has been observed and the flip-flop mechanism was suggested, according to which two active sites affect each other and in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the sites at any given moment. Based on specific futures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase including rigid and flexible connections between domains that bind the cofactor we propose a mechanistic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme. We postulate that the dynamic protein environment drives the exchange of tautomers in the 4' -aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor through a concerted shuttl-like motion of

  19. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between -328 and -272 bp which confers retinoic acid activation. This region was also demonstrated to confer retinoic acid responsiveness on the ADH1 and ADH2 genes in heterologous promoter fusions. Within a 34-bp stretch, the ADH3 retinoic acid response element (RARE) contains two TGACC motifs and one TGAAC motif, both of which exist in RAREs controlling other genes. A block mutation of the TGACC sequence located at -289 to -285 bp eliminated the retinoic acid response. As assayed by gel shift DNA binding studies, the RARE region (-328 to -272 bp) of ADH3 bound the human retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) and was competed for by DNA containing a RARE present in the gene encoding RAR beta. Since ADH catalyzes the conversion of retinol to retinal, which can be further converted to retinoic acid by aldehyde dehydrogenase, these results suggest that retinoic acid activation of ADH3 constitutes a positive feedback loop regulating retinoic acid synthesis. Images PMID:1996113

  20. Engineered ketol-acid reductoisomerase and alcohol dehydrogenase enable anaerobic 2-methylpropan-1-ol production at theoretical yield in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Sabine; Liu, Xiang; Meyerowitz, Joseph T; Snow, Christopher D; Chen, Mike M Y; Arnold, Frances H

    2011-05-01

    2-methylpropan-1-ol (isobutanol) is a leading candidate biofuel for the replacement or supplementation of current fossil fuels. Recent work has demonstrated glucose to isobutanol conversion through a modified amino acid pathway in a recombinant organism. Although anaerobic conditions are required for an economically competitive process, only aerobic isobutanol production has been feasible due to an imbalance in cofactor utilization. Two of the pathway enzymes, ketol-acid reductoisomerase and alcohol dehydrogenase, require nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH); glycolysis, however, produces only nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH). Here, we compare two solutions to this imbalance problem: (1) over-expression of pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase PntAB and (2) construction of an NADH-dependent pathway, using engineered enzymes. We demonstrate that an NADH-dependent pathway enables anaerobic isobutanol production at 100% theoretical yield and at higher titer and productivity than both the NADPH-dependent pathway and transhydrogenase over-expressing strain. Our results show how engineering cofactor dependence can overcome a critical obstacle to next-generation biofuel commercialization.

  1. Determination of the effects of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1B and ADH1C polymorphisms on alcohol dependence in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Ekin Ozgur; Kocak, Aytaç; Senol, Ender; Celik, Handan Ak; Coskunol, Hakan; Berdeli, Afig; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2012-03-01

    Alcoholism is a complex genetically influenced disorder which refers to alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. There are controversial results on the role of gene polymorphisms in alcohol dependence in the literature. Differences in population groups and selective inclusion criteria for alcohol dependence may affect results. In this study, we investigated the role of ADH1B Arg48His (rs1229984) and, ADH1C Ile350Val (rs698) gene polymorphisms in Turkish population. 100 healthy volunteers and 75 patients who were admitted to Ege University Alcohol Dependence Unit enrolled in the study. We found significant increase both in ADH1B (Arg48His) polymorphism Arg allele and Arg/Arg genotype frequency in patients. No profound connection between alcohol dependence and ADH1C Ile350Val gene polymorphism was detected. Alcohol dependence is an important health problem that depends on many genetic and environmental factors but we think that it is possible to interpret genetic risk for developing early diagnostic methods and treatment strategies by comprehensive linkage and association studies.

  2. Structure-Guided Engineering of Lactococcus lactis Alcohol Dehydrogenase LlAdhA for Improved Conversion of Isobutyraldehyde to Isobutanol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Bastian, Sabine; Snow, Christopher D.; Brustad, Eric M.; Saleski, Tatyana E.; Xu, Jian-He; Meinhold, Peter; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase LlAdhA from Lactococcus lactis and its laboratory-evolved variant LlAdhARE1 at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. LlAdhARE1, which contains three amino acid mutations (Y50F, I212T, and L264V), was engineered to increase the microbial production of isobutanol (2-methylpropan-1-ol) from isobutyraldehyde (2-methylpropanal). Structural comparison of LlAdhA and LlAdhARE1 indicates that the enhanced activity on isobutyraldehyde stems from increases in the protein’s active site size, hydrophobicity, and substrate access. Further structure-guided mutagenesis generated a quadruple mutant (Y50F/N110S/I212T/L264V), whose KM for isobutyraldehyde is ~17-fold lower and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) is ~160-fold higher than wild-type LlAdhA. Combining detailed structural information and directed evolution, we have achieved significant improvements in non-native alcohol dehydrogenase activity that will facilitate the production of next-generation fuels such as isobutanol from renewable resources. PMID:22974724

  3. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities.

  4. Evidence for the Degradation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Candida utilis During Rapid Enzyme Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, Brian A.

    1978-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) from the food yeast Candida utilis was found to be rapidly inactivated when cultures were starved of a carbon source. The addition of glutamate or alanine to the starvation medium stimulated the rate of inactivation. Loss of enzyme activity was irreversible since the reappearance of enzyme activity, following the addition of glucose to carbon-starved cultures, was blocked by cycloheximide. A specific rabbit antibody was prepared against the NADP-GDH from C. utilis and used to quantitate the enzyme during inactivation promoted by carbon starvation. The amount of precipitable antigenic material paralleled the rapid decrease of enzyme activity observed after transition of cells from NH4+-glucose to glutamate medium. No additional small-molecular-weight protein was precipitated by the antibody as a result of the inactivation, suggesting that the enzyme is considerably altered during the primary steps of the inactivation process. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of the reappearance of enzyme activity after enzyme inactivation showed that increase of NADP-GDH activity was almost totally due to de novo synthesis, ruling out the possibility that enzyme activity modulation is achieved by reversible covalent modification. Enzyme degradation was also measured during steady-state growth and other changes in nitrogen and carbon status of the culture media. In all instances so far estimated, the enzyme was found to be very stable and not normally subject to high rates of degradation. Therefore, the possibility that inactivation was caused by a change in the ratio of synthesis to degradation can be excluded. Images PMID:24041

  5. Evidence for lateral transfer of genes encoding ferredoxins, nitroreductases, NADH oxidase, and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 from anaerobic prokaryotes to Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Julie E J; Wang, Amy; Field, Jessica; Morrison, Hilary G; McArthur, Andrew G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Loftus, Brendan J; Samuelson, John

    2002-04-01

    Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are amitochondriate, microaerophilic protists which use fermentation enzymes like those of bacteria to survive anaerobic conditions within the intestinal lumen. Genes encoding fermentation enzymes and related electron transport peptides (e.g., ferredoxins) in giardia organisms and amebae are hypothesized to be derived from either an ancient anaerobic eukaryote (amitochondriate fossil hypothesis), a mitochondrial endosymbiont (hydrogen hypothesis), or anaerobic bacteria (lateral transfer hypothesis). The goals here were to complete the molecular characterization of giardial and amebic fermentation enzymes and to determine the origins of the genes encoding them, when possible. A putative giardia [2Fe-2S]ferredoxin which had a hypothetical organelle-targeting sequence at its N terminus showed similarity to mitochondrial ferredoxins and the hydrogenosomal ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis (another luminal protist). However, phylogenetic trees were star shaped, with weak bootstrap support, so we were unable to confirm or rule out the endosymbiotic origin of the giardia [2Fe-2S]ferredoxin gene. Putative giardial and amebic 6-kDa ferredoxins, ferredoxin-nitroreductase fusion proteins, and oxygen-insensitive nitroreductases each tentatively supported the lateral transfer hypothesis. Although there were not enough sequences to perform meaningful phylogenetic analyses, the unique common occurrence of these peptides and enzymes in giardia organisms, amebae, and the few anaerobic prokaryotes suggests the possibility of lateral transfer. In contrast, there was more robust phylogenetic evidence for the lateral transfer of G. lamblia genes encoding an NADH oxidase from a gram-positive coccus and a microbial group 3 alcohol dehydrogenase from thermoanaerobic prokaryotes. In further support of lateral transfer, the G. lamblia NADH oxidase and adh3 genes appeared to have an evolutionary history distinct from those of E. histolytica.

  6. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive.

  7. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  8. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  9. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    PubMed

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  10. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76–1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80–1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54–0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28–6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89–4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06–5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  11. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2 displayed a

  12. Structural Studies of the Final Enzyme in the alpha-Aminoadipate Pathway-Saccharopine Dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Burk,D.; Hwang, J.; Kwok, E.; Marrone, L.; Goodfellow, V.; Dmitrienko, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2007-01-01

    The 1.64 Angstroms structure of the apoenzyme form of saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows the enzyme to be composed of two domains with similar dinucleotide binding folds with a deep cleft at the interface. The structure reveals homology to alanine dehydrogense, despite low primary sequence similarity. A model of the ternary complex of SDH, NAD, and saccharopine identifies residues Lys77 and Glu122 as potentially important for substrate binding and/or catalysis, consistent with a proton shuttle mechanism. Furthermore, the model suggests that a conformational change is required for catalysis and that residues Lys99 and Asp281 may be instrumental in mediating this change. Analysis of the crystal structure in the context of other homologous enzymes from pathogenic fungi and human sources sheds light into the suitability of SDH as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  13. Structural and Functional Insights into (S)-Ureidoglycolate Dehydrogenase, a Metabolic Branch Point Enzyme in Nitrogen Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Il; Shin, Inchul; Cho, Suhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Rhee, Sangkee

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism is one of essential processes in living organisms. The catabolic pathways of nitrogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the storage and recovery of nitrogen. In Escherichia coli, two different, interconnecting metabolic routes drive nitrogen utilization through purine degradation metabolites. The enzyme (S)-ureidoglycolate dehydrogenase (AllD), which is a member of l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family, converts (S)-ureidoglycolate, a key intermediate in the purine degradation pathway, to oxalurate in an NAD(P)-dependent manner. Therefore, AllD is a metabolic branch-point enzyme for nitrogen metabolism in E. coli. Here, we report crystal structures of AllD in its apo form, in a binary complex with NADH cofactor, and in a ternary complex with NADH and glyoxylate, a possible spontaneous degradation product of oxalurate. Structural analyses revealed that NADH in an extended conformation is bound to an NADH-binding fold with three distinct domains that differ from those of the canonical NADH-binding fold. We also characterized ligand-induced structural changes, as well as the binding mode of glyoxylate, in the active site near the NADH nicotinamide ring. Based on structural and kinetic analyses, we concluded that AllD selectively utilizes NAD+ as a cofactor, and further propose that His116 acts as a general catalytic base and that a hydride transfer is possible on the B-face of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. Other residues conserved in the active sites of this novel l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family also play essential roles in catalysis. PMID:23284870

  14. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  15. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    PubMed

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hassan, Maizom

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity towards

  16. A tightly bound quinone functions in the ubiquinone reaction sites of quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase of an acetic acid bacterium, Gluconobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazunobu; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Mizuguchi, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2008-10-01

    Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of acetic acid bacteria is a membrane-bound enzyme that functions as the primary dehydrogenase in the ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. It consists of three subunits and has a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the active site and four heme c moieties as electron transfer mediators. Of these, three heme c sites and a further site have been found to be involved in ubiquinone (Q) reduction and ubiquinol (QH2) oxidation respectively (Matsushita et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1409, 154-164 (1999)). In this study, it was found that ADH solubilized and purified with dodecyl maltoside, but not with Triton X-100, had a tightly bound Q, and thus two different ADHs, one having the tightly bound Q (Q-bound ADH) and Q-free ADH, could be obtained. The Q-binding sites of both the ADHs were characterized using specific inhibitors, a substituted phenol PC16 (a Q analog inhibitor) and antimycin A. Based on the inhibition kinetics of Q2 reductase and ubiquinol-2 (Q2H2) oxidase activities, it was suggested that there are one and two PC16-binding sites in Q-bound ADH and Q-free ADH respectively. On the other hand, with antimycin A, only one binding site was found for Q2 reductase and Q2H2 oxidase activities, irrespective of the presence of bound Q. These results suggest that ADH has a high-affinity Q binding site (QH) besides low-affinity Q reduction and QH2 oxidation sites, and that the bound Q in the QH site is involved in the electron transfer between heme c moieties and bulk Q or QH2 in the low-affinity sites.

  17. Determination of the in vivo NAD:NADH ratio in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase as sensor reaction.

    PubMed

    Bekers, K M; Heijnen, J J; van Gulik, W M

    2015-08-01

    With the current quantitative metabolomics techniques, only whole-cell concentrations of NAD and NADH can be quantified. These measurements cannot provide information on the in vivo redox state of the cells, which is determined by the ratio of the free forms only. In this work we quantified free NAD:NADH ratios in yeast under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the lumped reaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase as sensor reactions. We showed that, with an alternative accurate acetaldehyde determination method, based on rapid sampling, instantaneous derivatization with 2,4 diaminophenol hydrazine (DNPH) and quantification with HPLC, the ADH-catalysed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde can be applied as a relatively fast and simple sensor reaction to quantify the free NAD:NADH ratio under anaerobic conditions. We evaluated the applicability of ADH as a sensor reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in anaerobic glucose-limited chemostats under steady-state and dynamic conditions. The results found in this study showed that the cytosolic redox status (NAD:NADH ratio) of yeast is at least one order of magnitude lower, and is thus much more reduced, under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic glucose-limited steady-state conditions. The more reduced state of the cytosol under anaerobic conditions has major implications for (central) metabolism. Accurate determination of the free NAD:NADH ratio is therefore of importance for the unravelling of in vivo enzyme kinetics and to judge accurately the thermodynamic reversibility of each redox reaction.

  18. A New View of Alcohol Metabolism and Alcoholism—Role of the High-Km Class III Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH3)

    PubMed Central

    Haseba, Takeshi; Ohno, Youkichi

    2010-01-01

    The conventional view is that alcohol metabolism is carried out by ADH1 (Class I) in the liver. However, it has been suggested that another pathway plays an important role in alcohol metabolism, especially when the level of blood ethanol is high or when drinking is chronic. Over the past three decades, vigorous attempts to identify the enzyme responsible for the non-ADH1 pathway have focused on the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) and catalase, but have failed to clarify their roles in systemic alcohol metabolism. Recently, using ADH3-null mutant mice, we demonstrated that ADH3 (Class III), which has a high Km and is a ubiquitous enzyme of ancient origin, contributes to systemic alcohol metabolism in a dose-dependent manner, thereby diminishing acute alcohol intoxication. Although the activity of ADH3 toward ethanol is usually low in vitro due to its very high Km, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is markedly enhanced when the solution hydrophobicity of the reaction medium increases. Activation of ADH3 by increasing hydrophobicity should also occur in liver cells; a cytoplasmic solution of mouse liver cells was shown to be much more hydrophobic than a buffer solution when using Nile red as a hydrophobicity probe. When various doses of ethanol are administered to mice, liver ADH3 activity is dynamically regulated through induction or kinetic activation, while ADH1 activity is markedly lower at high doses (3–5 g/kg). These data suggest that ADH3 plays a dynamic role in alcohol metabolism, either collaborating with ADH1 or compensating for the reduced role of ADH1. A complex two-ADH model that ascribes total liver ADH activity to both ADH1 and ADH3 explains the dose-dependent changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters (β, CLT, AUC) of blood ethanol very well, suggesting that alcohol metabolism in mice is primarily governed by these two ADHs. In patients with alcoholic liver disease, liver ADH3 activity increases, while ADH1 activity decreases, as alcohol

  19. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  20. Fasciola gigantica: enzymes of the ornithine-proline-glutamate pathway--characterization of delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Mohamed, Tarek M; Fahmy, Afaf S; El-Badry, Mohamed O; Abdel-Gany, Somia S

    2008-01-01

    Ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), proline oxidase (PO), Delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR), and Delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CD) were assessed in Fasciola gigantica. All enzymes are involved in the conversion of ornithine into glutamate and proline. High levels of P5CD suggest that the direction of the metabolic flow from ornithine is more toward glutamate than proline. F. gigantica P5CD1 and P5CD2 were separated from the majority of contaminating proteins in crude homogenate using a CM-cellulose column. A Sephacryl S-200 column was employed for P5CD2 to obtain pure enzyme with increased specific activity. The molecular mass of P5CD2 was estimated to be 50kDa using a Sephacryl S-200 column and SDS-PAGE. It migrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE, indicating a monomeric enzyme. P5CD2 had Km values of 1.44mM and 0.37mM for NAD and P5C, respectively. P5CD2 oxidized a number of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, where the aromatic compounds had higher affinity toward the enzyme. All amino acids examined had partial inhibitory effects on the enzyme. While 3mM AMP caused 31% activation of enzyme, 3mM ADP and ATP inhibited activity by 18% and 23%, respectively. Apart from Cu2+, the divalent cations that were studied caused partial inhibitory effects on the enzyme. PMID:17655846

  1. Comparison of fluorescence properties of wild type and the W15F mutant of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftink, Maurice R.; Wong, Cing-Yuen; Park, Doo-Hong; Shearer, Gretchen L.; Plapp, Bryce V.

    1994-08-01

    Horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase is a homodimeric protein; each subunit has two tryptophan residues that are in distinctly different microenvironments. Trp-15 is located on the surface and Trp-314 is buried at the intersubunit interface. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence studies have enabled the assignment of parameters, e.g., quantum yield, emission maximum, decay times, to the individual tryptophan residues of the protein. We have prepared, by site-directed mutagenesis, the mutated W15F protein and have characterized its fluorescence properties. We show that the Trp-314 of the mutant experiences an apolar microenvironment, but that the fluorescence decay and exposure to solute quenchers of the mutant are somewhat different than was expected from the assignments for the wild type.

  2. The bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase controls ethanol and acetate production in Entamoeba histolytica under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Erika; Encalada, Rusely; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Néquiz, Mario; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2013-01-16

    By applying metabolic control analysis and inhibitor titration we determined the degree of control (flux control coefficient) of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) over the fluxes of fermentative glycolysis of Entamoeba histolytica subjected to aerobic conditions. The flux-control coefficients towards ethanol and acetate formation determined for PFOR titrated with diphenyleneiodonium were 0.07 and 0.09, whereas for ADHE titrated with disulfiram were 0.33 and -0.19, respectively. ADHE inhibition induced significant accumulation of glycolytic intermediates and lower ATP content. These results indicate that ADHE exerts significant flux-control on the carbon end-product formation of amoebas subjected to aerobic conditions. PMID:23201265

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the gene cluster encoding two subunits of membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter polyoxogenes.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, T; Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Tayama, K; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Nishiyama, M; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1991-02-16

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Acetobacter polyoxogenes NBI1028 is composed of a 72 kDa subunit and a 44 kDa cytochrome c subunit. The amino acid sequences of the two regions of the 72 kDa subunit were determined to prepare oligonucleotides for the purpose of amplification of a DNA fragment corresponding to the intermediate region by the polymerase chain reaction. A 0.5 kb DNA fragment thus amplified was used as the probe to clone a 7.0 kb PstI fragment coding for the whole 72 kDa subunit. Nucleotide sequencing and immunoblot analysis revealed that the cloned fragment contained the full structural genes for the 72 kDa and the 44 kDa subunits and they were clustered with the same transcription polarity. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene for the 72 kDa subunit showed homology with that of the 72 kDa subunit from ADH of A. aceti and those of methanol dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacteria. The 72 and 44 kDa subunits contained one and three typical haem binding sequences, respectively.

  4. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  5. Ethanol Metabolism by HeLa Cells Transduced with Human Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes: Control of the Pathway by Acetaldehyde Concentration†

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Michinaga; Cyganek, Izabela; Sanghani, Paresh C.; Cho, Won Kyoo; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human class I alcohol dehydrogenase 2 isoenzymes (encoded by the ADH1B locus) have large differences in kinetic properties; however, individuals inheriting the alleles for the different isoenzymes exhibit only small differences in alcohol elimination rates. This suggests that other cellular factors must regulate the activity of the isoenzymes. Methods The activity of the isoenzymes expressed from ADH1B*1, ADH1B*2, and ADH1B*3 cDNAs was examined in stably transduced HeLa cell lines, including lines which expressed human low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). The ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol was compared with that of HeLa cells expressing rat class I ADH (HeLa-rat ADH cells), rat hepatoma (H4IIEC3) cells, and rat hepatocytes. Results The isoenzymes had similar protein half-lives in the HeLa cells. Rat hepatocytes, H4IIEC3 cells, and HeLa-rat ADH cells oxidized ethanol much faster than the cells expressing the ADH1B isoenzymes. This was not explained by high cellular NADH levels or endogenous inhibitors; but rather because the activity of the β1 and β2 ADHs were constrained by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, as shown by the increased rate of ethanol oxidation by cell lines expressing β2 ADH plus ALDH2. Conclusion The activity of the human β2 ADH isoenzyme is sensitive to inhibition by acetaldehyde, which likely limits its activity in vivo. This study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low steady–state acetaldehyde concentration in hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. PMID:21166830

  6. Proteomic comparison of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar and the role of E. histolytica alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul H; Chen, Minghe; Zhang, Xiaochun; Clark, C Graham; Townsend, R Reid; Stanley, Samuel L

    2009-01-01

    The protozoan intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica infects millions of people worldwide and is capable of causing amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess. The closely related species Entamoeba dispar colonizes many more individuals, but this organism does not induce disease. To identify molecular differences between these two organisms that may account for their differential ability to cause disease in humans, we used two-dimensional gel-based (DIGE) proteomic analysis to compare whole cell lysates of E. histolytica and E. dispar. We observed 141 spots expressed at a substantially (>5-fold) higher level in E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS than E. dispar and 189 spots showing the opposite pattern. Strikingly, 3 of 4 proteins consistently identified as different at a greater than 5-fold level between E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and E. dispar were identical to proteins recently identified as differentially expressed between E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and the reduced virulence strain E. histolytica Rahman. One of these was E. histolytica alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (EhADH3). We found that E. histolytica possesses a higher level of NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activity than E. dispar and that some EhADH3 can be localized to the surface of E. histolytica. Episomal overexpression of EhADH3 in E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in only subtle phenotypic differences in E. histolytica virulence in animal models of amebic colitis and amebic liver abscess, making it difficult to directly link EhADH3 levels to virulence differences between E. histolytica and less-pathogenic Entamoeba.

  7. The 3-D Structure of a folate-dependent dehydrogenase / cyclohydrolase bifunctional enzyme at 1.5A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire,M.; Li, Y.; MacKenzie, R.; Cygler, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interconversion of two major folate one-carbon donors occurs through the sequential activities of AND(P)-dependent methylene[H{sub 4}]folate dehydrogenase (D) and methenyl[H{sub 4}]folate cyclohydrolase (C). These activities often coexist as part of a multifunctional enzyme and there are several lines of evidence suggesting that their substrates bind at overlapping sites. Little is known, however, about the nature of this site or the identity of the active-site residues for this enzyme family. We have determined, to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, the structure of a dimer of the D/C domain of the human trifunctional cytosolic enzyme with bound NADP cofactor, using the MAD technique. The D/C subunit is composed of two {alpha}/{beta} domains that assemble to form a wide cleft. The cleft walls are lined with highly conserved residues and NADP is bound along one wall. The NADP-binding domain has a Rossmann fold, characterized by a modified diphosphate-binding loop fingerprint - GXSXXXG. Dimerization occurs by antiparallel interaction of two NADP-binding domains. Superposition of the two subunits indicates domain motion occurs about a well-defined hinge region. Analysis of the structure suggests strongly that folate-binding sites for both activities are within the cleft, providing direct support for the proposed overlapping site model. The orientation of the nicotinamide ring suggests that in the dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction hydride transfer occurs to the pro-R side of the ring. The identity of the cyclohydrolase active site is not obvious. We propose that a conserved motif - Tyr52-X-X-X-Lys56 - and/or a Ser49-Gln100-Pro102 triplet have a role in this activity.

  8. Relevance of Frank's solvent classification as typically aqueous and typically non-aqueous to activities of firefly luciferase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and alpha-chymotrypsin in aqueous binaries.

    PubMed

    Fadnavis, Nitin Wasantrao; Seshadri, Ramanujam; Sheelu, Gurrala; Madhuri, Kallakunta Vasantha

    2005-01-15

    Effects of cosolvent concentration on activity of fire fly luciferase, alpha-chymotrypsin, and alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) have been studied for several solvents with varying hydrophobicities (logP from +1.0 to -1.65) and polarities (dielectric constant from 7.4 to 109). The inhibitory effect of the cosolvent is examined in light of Frank's classification of solvents into 'typically aqueous (TA)' and 'typically non-aqueous (TNA).' The solvent concentration at which the enzyme activity decreases to half, the C(50) values, for TA solvents such as 1-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone, 2-butoxyethanol, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, tetrahydrofuran, t-butanol, and ethanol correlate quite well with their critical hydrophobic interaction concentration, rather than logP, while those for TNA solvents such as acetonitrile, dimethyl formamide, formamide, and dimethyl sulfoxide correlate well with logP. The interactions of TA solvents with proteins appear to be governed mainly by hydrophobic interactions while both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions play important role in case of TNA solvents.

  9. Differing features of proteins in membranes may result in antioxidant or prooxidant action: opposite effects on lipid peroxidation of alcohol dehydrogenase and albumin in liposomal systems.

    PubMed

    Riedl, A; Shamsi, Z; Anderton, M; Goldfarb, P; Wiseman, A

    1996-02-01

    The influence of 3 thiol-containing compounds, bovine serum albumin (fatty acid free: BSA), glutathione (GSH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) on lipid peroxidation in multilamellar liposomes, prepared from ox-brain phospholipid, was investigated. Thiol-compounds were added either before liposome formation, or after liposome formation; and their effects compared to a positive control. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), an acidic hydrophilic protein, displays a small, concentration dependent, antioxidant effect when added to preformed liposomes. A much larger antioxidant effect was observed when the BSA was entrapped inside the liposome, by adding BSA just prior to liposome preparation. In contrast, a Zn(2+) containing redox enzyme, YADH, a basic hydrophobic membrane-associating protein, displays a large pro-oxidant effect at much lower concentrations especially when entrapped inside the liposome. This was observed also with GSH; but per mole of -SH, YADH was about 18 times as powerful a pro-oxidant perhaps because of structural changes to the membrane. Oxidized glutathione and N-acetylcysteine were also pro-oxidant (cysteine and cystine showed little effect). Formation of thiyl radicals may occur in the presence of iron ions with these pro-oxidant sulphur-containing compounds. Partial protection against lipid peroxidation was observed with EDTA, desferrioxamine and protoporphyrin (IX), potent iron-chelating agents.

  10. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nickolas A; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-08-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content. PMID:26265762

  11. Deletion of a conserved regulatory element in the Drosophila Adh gene leads to increased alcohol dehydrogenase activity but also delays development.

    PubMed Central

    Parsch, J; Russell, J A; Beerman, I; Hartl, D L; Stephan, W

    2000-01-01

    In vivo levels of enzymatic activity may be increased through either structural or regulatory changes. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in an experimental test for selective differences between these two mechanisms. The well-known ADH-Slow (S)/Fast (F) amino acid replacement leads to a twofold increase in activity by increasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Disruption of a highly conserved, negative regulatory element in the Adh 3' UTR also leads to a twofold increase in activity, although this is achieved by increasing in vivo Adh mRNA and protein concentrations. These two changes appear to be under different types of selection, with positive selection favoring the amino acid replacement and purifying selection maintaining the 3' UTR sequence. Using transgenic experiments we show that deletion of the conserved 3' UTR element increases adult and larval Adh expression in both the ADH-F and ADH-S genetic backgrounds. However, the 3' UTR deletion also leads to a significant increase in developmental time in both backgrounds. ADH allozyme type has no detectable effect on development. These results demonstrate a negative fitness effect associated with Adh overexpression. This provides a mechanism whereby natural selection can discriminate between alternative pathways of increasing enzymatic activity. PMID:10978287

  12. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content. PMID:26265762

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of proton transfer processes and the dissociation of Zn2+-bound water in alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Nadolny, C; Zundel, G

    1997-08-01

    The following complexes were investigated by Fourier transform difference spectroscopy: binary complexes of alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast (YADH) and horse liver (LADH) with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and adenosine (5')-diphospho(5)-beta-D-ribose (ADP-Rib); the binary complex of Zn2+-free YADH with NAD+, the ternary complex of LADH with NAD+ and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. After addition of NAD+ to YADH and LADH, protonation of the N1 atom of the adenine ring of NAD+ is observed. It is shown that this proton arises from the dissociation of the Zn2+-bound water. The interaction of the Zn2+ ion with water is very strong, since this interaction is not just an electrostatic interaction. If the Zn2+ ions are in a tetrahedral environment, a large covalent contribution also occurs. If ADP-Rib is present instead of NAD+, no protonation of the N1 atom of the adenine ring of ADP-Rib is found, which demonstrates that the positively charged nicotinamide ring favors the conduction of the positive charge. All these results confirm the mechanism of Brändén et al. (1975): the Zn2+-bound water is split and the arising (OH)- deprotonates the alcohol. In the case of the ternary complex of LADH with NAD+ and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, we demonstrate that the alcohol is deprotonated and the alcoholate ion is bound directly to the Zn2+ ion. The conduction of the proton from the active site to the N1 atom of adenine occurs via a hydrogen-bonded chain with large proton polarizability due to collective proton motion. The nature and mechanism of this pathway are discussed on the basis of data from previous studies.

  14. Influence of gender on ethanol-induced ventricular myocyte contractile depression in transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinhong; Esberg, Lucy B; Ye, Gang; Borgerding, Anthony J; Ren, Bonnie H; Aberle, Nicholas S; Epstein, Paul N; Ren, Jun

    2003-03-01

    Acute ethanol exposure depresses ventricular contractility and contributes to alcoholic cardiomyopathy in both men and women chronically consuming ethanol. However, a gender-related difference in the severity of myopathy exists with female being more sensitive to ethanol-induced tissue damage. Acetaldehyde (ACA), the major oxidized product of ethanol, has been implicated to play a role in the pathogenesis and gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, possibly due to its direct cardiac effect and interaction with estrogen. This study was designed to compare the effects of cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which converts ethanol into ACA, on the cardiac contractile response to ethanol in ventricular myocytes isolated from age-matched adult male and female transgenic (ADH) and wild-type (FVB) mice. Mechanical properties were measured with an IonOptix SoftEdge system. ACA production was assessed by gas chromatography. The ADH myocytes from both genders exhibited similar mechanical properties but a higher efficacy to produce ACA compared to FVB myocytes. Exposure to ethanol (80-640 mg/dl) for 60 min elicited concentration-dependent decrease of cell shortening in both FVB and ADH groups. The ethanol-induced depression on cell shortening was significantly augmented in female but not male ADH group. ADH transgene did not exacerbate the ethanol-induced inhibition of maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening in either gender. In addition, neither ethanol nor ADH transgene affect the duration of shortening and relengthening in male or female mice. These data suggest that females may be more sensitive to ACA-induced cardiac contractile depression than male, which may attribute to the gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

  15. The two-step electrochemical oxidation of alcohols using a novel recombinant PQQ alcohol dehydrogenase as a catalyst for a bioanode.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A bioanode has been developed based on the oxidation of ethanol by the recombinant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putidaKT2440 heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The apo form of the recombinant protein (PpADH) was purified and displayed catalytic activity for binding PQQ in the presence of Ca(2+). PpADH exhibited broad substrate specificity towards various alcohols and aldehydes. The Km values for the aldehydes of PpADH were increased compared to those for the alcohols, whereas the kcat values were unaltered. For instance, the Km values at T=298.15K (25 °C) for ethanol and acetaldehyde were 0.21 (± 0.02)mM and 5.8 (± 0.60)mM, respectively. The kcat values for ethanol and acetaldehyde were 24.8 (± 1.2) s(-1) and 31.1 (± 1.2) s(-1), respectively. The aminoferrocene was used as an electron transfer mediator between PpADH and the electrode during electrochemical experiments. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of alcohol and acetaldehyde by PpADH were also observed in this system. The electric charge for the oxidation of ethanol (Q = 2.09 × 10(-3) · C) was increased two-fold compared to that for the oxidation of acetaldehyde (Q = 0.95 × 10(-3) · C), as determined by chronoamperometric measurements. Thus, we have electrochemically demonstrated the two-step oxidation of ethanol to acetate using only PpADH.

  16. Joining Astrobiology to Medicine, Resurrecting Ancient Alcohol Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, M. A.; Uryasev, O.; Davis, R. W.; Chamberlin, S. G.; Benner, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    We apply an astrobiological approach to understand how primates responded to the emergence of ethanol in their environment by resurrecting two enzymes involved in the degradation of ethanol, alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrgenase.

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1B1: Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Mitochondrial Acetaldehyde-Metabolizing Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Chen, Ying; Brocker, Chad; Donald, Elizabeth; Jackson, Brian C.; Orlicky, David J.; Thompson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol-induced damage is largely attributed to its toxic metabolite, acetaldehyde. Clearance of acetaldehyde is achieved by its oxidation, primarily catalyzed by the mitochondrial class II aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). ALDH1B1 is another mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) that shares 75% peptide sequence homology with ALDH2. Recent population studies in whites suggest a role for ALDH1B1 in ethanol metabolism. However, to date, no formal documentation of the biochemical properties of ALDH1B1 has been forthcoming. In this current study, we cloned and expressed human recombinant ALDH1B1 in Sf9 insect cells. The resultant enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography to homogeneity. The kinetic properties of purified human ALDH1B1 were assessed using a wide range of aldehyde substrates. Human ALDH1B1 had an exclusive preference for NAD+ as the cofactor and was catalytically active toward short- and medium-chain aliphatic aldehydes, aromatic aldehydes, and the products of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde. Most importantly, human ALDH1B1 exhibited an apparent Km of 55 μM for acetaldehyde, making it the second low Km ALDH for metabolism of this substrate. The dehydrogenase activity of ALDH1B1 was sensitive to disulfiram inhibition, a feature also shared with ALDH2. The tissue distribution of ALDH1B1 in C57BL/6J mice and humans was examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analysis. The highest expression occurred in the liver, followed by the intestinal tract, implying a potential physiological role for ALDH1B1 in these tissues. The current study is the first report on the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human ALDH1B1 protein. PMID:20616185

  18. High efficiency preparation and characterization of intact poly(vinyl alcohol) dehydrogenase from Sphingopyxis sp.113P3 in Escherichia coli by inclusion bodies renaturation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongxu; Yang, Yu; Peng, Zhengcong; Zhang, Dongxu; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) dehydrogenase (PVADH, EC 1.1.99.23) is an enzyme which has potential application in textile industry to degrade the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in waste water. Previously, a 1,965-bp fragment encoding a PVADH from Sphingopyxis sp. 113P3 was synthesized based on the replacement of the rare codons in Escherichia coli (E. coli). In this work, the deduced mature PVADH (mPVADH) gene of 1,887 bp was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inserted into the site between NcoI and HindIII in pET-32a(+). The constructed recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli Rosetta (DE3). In shake flask, the fusion protein of thioredoxin (Trx)-mPVADH was expressed precisely; however, Trx-mPVADH was found to accumulate mainly as inclusion bodies. After isolating, dissolving in buffer containing urea, purification, dialysis renaturation, and digesting with recombinant enterokinase/His (rEK/His), the bioactive mPVADH fragments were obtained with protein concentration of 0.56 g/L and enzymatic activity of 194 U/mL. The K m and V max values for PVA 1799 were 2.33 mg/mL and 15.7 nmol/(min·mg protein), respectively. (1)H-NMR and infrared (IR) spectrum demonstrated that its biological function was oxidizing hydroxyl groups of PVA 1799 to form diketone, and PVA 1799 could be degraded completely by successive treatment with mPVADH and oxidized PVA hydrolase (OPH).

  19. Low-interference washing-free electrochemical immunosensor using glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as an enzyme label.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gorachand; Park, Seonhwa; Singh, Amardeep; Seo, Jeongwook; Kim, Sinyoung; Yang, Haesik

    2015-04-01

    In washing-free electrochemical detection, various redox and reactive species cause significant interference. To minimize this interference, we report a washing-free electrochemical immunosensor using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and glycerol-3-phosphate (GP) as an enzyme label and its substrate, respectively, because the reaction of FAD-dependent dehydrogenases with dissolved O2 is slow and the level of GP preexisting in blood is low (<0.1 mM). A combination of a low electrocatalytic indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode and fast electron-mediating Ru(NH3)6(3+) is employed to obtain a high signal-to-background ratio via proximity-dependent electron mediation of Ru(NH3)6(3+) between the ITO electrode and the GPDH label. Electrochemical oxidation of GPDH-generated Ru(NH3)6(2+) is performed at 0.05 V vs Ag/AgCl, at which point the electrochemical interference is very low. When a washing-free immunosensor is applied to cardiac troponin I detection in human serum, the calculated detection limit is approximately 10 pg/mL, indicating that the immunosensor is very sensitive in spite of the use of washing-free detection with a short detection period (10 min for incubation and 100 s for electrochemical measurement). The low-interference washing-free electrochemical immunosensor shows good promise for fast and simple point-of-care testing.

  20. Molecular cloning of a plant betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme implicated in adaptation to salinity and drought.

    PubMed Central

    Weretilnyk, E A; Hanson, A D

    1990-01-01

    Many plants, as well as other organisms, accumulate betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a nontoxic or protective osmolyte under saline or dry conditions. In plants, the last step in betaine synthesis is catalyzed by betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8), a nuclear-encoded chloroplastic enzyme. A cDNA clone for BADH (1812 base pairs) was selected from a lambda gt10 cDNA library derived from leaves of salt-stressed spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The library was screened with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to amino acid sequences of two peptides prepared from purified BADH. The authenticity of the clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis; this analysis demonstrated the presence of a 1491-base-pair open reading frame that contained sequences encoding 12 peptide fragments of BADH. The clone hybridized to a 1.9-kilobase mRNA from spinach leaves; this mRNA was more abundant in salt-stressed plants, consistent with the known salt induction of BADH activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the BADH cDNA sequence showed substantial similarities to those for nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenases (EC 1.2.1.3 and EC 1.2.1.5) from several sources, including absolute conservation of a decapeptide in the probable active site. Comparison of deduced and determined amino acid sequences indicated that the transit peptide may comprise only 7 or 8 residues, which is atypically short for precursors to stromal proteins. Images PMID:2320587

  1. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Erin M.G.; Anderson, David G.R.; Florang, Virginia R.; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D.; Doorn, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites towards ALDH were investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition. PMID:20954713

  2. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase 2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Allen, Erin M G; Anderson, David G R; Florang, Virginia R; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2010-11-15

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites toward ALDH was investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. The ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, as compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition.

  3. Recent Update on Human Lactate Dehydrogenase Enzyme 5 (hLDH5) Inhibitors: A Promising Approach for Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rani, Reshma; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-01-28

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (hLDH5), a glycolytic enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to lactate coupled with oxidation of NADH to NAD(+), plays a crucial role in the promotion of glycolysis in invasive tumor cells. Recently, hLDH5 has been considered a vital therapeutic target for invasive cancers. Selective inhibition of hLDH5 using small molecules holds potential prospects for the treatment of cancer and associated diseases. Consequently, significant progress has been made in the discovery of selective small-molecule hLDH5 inhibitors displaying remarkable inhibitory potencies. The purpose of this review is to discuss briefly the roles of hLDH isoforms and to compile small hLDH5 inhibitors into groups based on their chemical classes and pharmacological applications.

  4. The preparation of nylon-tube-supported hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the use of the co-immobilized enzymes in the automated determination of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D L; Campbell, J; Hornby, W E

    1975-01-01

    Triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate was used to O-alkylate nylon-tube thus producing the imidate salt of the nylon which was further made to react with 1,6-diaminohexane. 2. Hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) were immobilized on the amino-substituted nylon tube through glutaraldeyde and bisimidates. 3. The effect of varying the conditions of O-alkylation and the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon tube-hexokinase derivatives was determined. 4. The effect of varying the amount of enzyme immobilized on the activity of nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was determined. 5. The thermal stability of nylon-tube-hexokinase and nylon-tube-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase derivatives was studied. 6. Different ratios of hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were co-immobilized on nylon tube, and the rate of conversion of glucose into 6-phosphogluconolactone was compared with the individual activities of the immobilized enzymes. 7. Hexokinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase co-immobilized on nylon tube were used in the automated analysis of glucose. PMID:1167161

  5. Monoclonal antibodies for structure-function studies of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, a lipid-dependent membrane-bound enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adami, P; Duncan, T M; McIntyre, J O; Carter, C E; Fu, C; Melin, M; Latruffe, N; Fleischer, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used to study structure-function relationships of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) (EC 1.1.1.30), a lipid-requiring mitochondrial membrane enzyme with an absolute and specific requirement for phosphatidylcholine (PC) for enzymic activity. The purified enzyme (apoBDH, devoid of phospholipid and thereby inactive) can be re-activated with preformed phospholipid vesicles containing PC or by short-chain soluble PC. Five of six mAbs cross-react with BDH from bovine heart and rat liver, including two mAbs to conformational epitopes. One mAb was found to be specific for the C-terminal sequence of BDH and served to: (1) map endopeptidase cleavage and epitope sites on BDH; and (2) demonstrate that the C-terminus is essential for the activity of BDH. Carboxypeptidase cleavage of only a few (< or = 14) C-terminal amino acids from apoBDH (as detected by the loss of C-terminal epitope for mAb 3-10A) prevents activation by either bilayer or soluble PC. Further, for BDH in bilayers containing PC, the C-terminus is protected from carboxy-peptidase cleavage, whereas in bilayers devoid of PC the C-terminus is cleaved, and subsequent activation by PC is precluded. We conclude that: (1) the C-terminus of BDH is essential for enzymic activity, consistent with the prediction, from primary sequence analysis, that the PC-binding site is in the C-terminal domain of BDH; and (2) the allosteric activation of BDH by PC in bilayers protects the C-terminus from carboxypeptidase cleavage, indicative of a PC-induced conformational change in the enzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7686368

  6. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes. PMID:27580341

  7. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes.

  8. Isozyme multiplicity with anomalous dimer patterns in a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Effects on the activity and quaternary structure of residue exchanges at "nonfunctional" sites in a native protein.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, O; Shafqat, J; Estonius, M; el-Ahmad, M; Jörnvall, H

    1996-11-19

    The isozymes of class III alcohol dehydrogenase/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase from cod were characterized. They exhibited three unexpected properties of general interest. First, these dimeric isozymes, derived from two types of subunit (h and l, for high- and low-activity forms), were recovered from liver preparations in only the homodimeric ll and heterodimeric hl combinations. Dissociation and reassociation of the isolated hl form in vitro also resulted in lower yields of the hh than the ll homodimer, although class III subunits are usually freely associable over wide borders of divergence (human and Drosophila). The h and l primary structures show that both chain types are characteristic of class III enzymes, without large amino acid replacements at positions of known subunit interactions. Hence, the hh dimer partial restriction indicates nontraditional alterations at h-subunit interfaces. The structure provides a possible explanation, in the form of h-chain modifications that may influence the anchoring of a loop at positions of two potentially deamidative beta-aspartyl shifts at distant Asn-Gly structures. Second the ll and hl forms differ in enzymatic properties, having 5-fold different K(m) values for NAD+ at pH 8, different K(m) values for S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione (10 versus 150 microM), and different specific activities (4.5 versus 41 units/mg), with ll resembling and hl deviating from human and other class III alcohol dehydrogenases. However, functional residues lining substrate and coenzyme pockets in the known conformations of homologous forms are largely identical in the two isozymes [only minor conservative exchanges of Val/Leu116, Val/Leu203, Ile/Val224, and Ile/Val269 (numbering system of the human class I enzyme)], again indicating effects from distantly positioned h-chain replacements. Third, the two isozymes differ a surprising amount in amino acid sequence (18%, the same as the piscine/ human difference), reflecting a

  9. Oxidation of methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol with human alcohol dehydrogenases and the inhibition by ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Shih, Hsuan-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chou; Li, Yeung-Pin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2011-05-30

    Human alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) include multiple isozymes with broad substrate specificity and ethnic distinct allozymes. ADH catalyzes the rate-limiting step in metabolism of various primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. The oxidation of common toxic alcohols, that is, methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol by the human ADHs remains poorly understood. Kinetic studies were performed in 0.1M sodium phosphate buffer, at pH 7.5 and 25°C, containing 0.5 mM NAD(+) and varied concentrations of substrate. K(M) values for ethanol with recombinant human class I ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, and ADH1C2, and class II ADH2 and class IV ADH4 were determined to be in the range of 0.12-57 mM, for methanol to be 2.0-3500 mM, for ethylene glycol to be 4.3-2600mM, and for isopropanol to be 0.73-3400 mM. ADH1B3 appeared to be inactive toward ethylene glycol, and ADH2 and ADH4, inactive with methanol. The variations for V(max) for the toxic alcohols were much less than that of the K(M) across the ADH family. 4-Methylpyrazole (4MP) was a competitive inhibitor with respect to ethanol for ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1C1 and ADH1C2, and a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH1B3, ADH2 and ADH4, with the slope inhibition constants (K(is)) for the whole family being 0.062-960 μM and the intercept inhibition constants (K(ii)), 33-3000 μM. Computer simulation studies using inhibition equations in the presence of alternate substrate ethanol and of dead-end inhibitor 4MP with the determined corresponding kinetic parameters for ADH family, indicate that the oxidation of the toxic alcohols up to 50mM are largely inhibited by 20 mM ethanol or by 50 μM 4MP with some exceptions. The above findings provide an enzymological basis for clinical treatment of methanol and ethylene glycol poisoning by 4MP or ethanol with pharmacogenetic perspectives.

  10. A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 from Arachis diogoi, expressed in resistance responses against late leaf spot pathogen, induces cell death when transexpressed in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Rampuria, Sakshi; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kirti, Pulugurtha B

    2016-03-01

    A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (AdZADH2) was significantly upregulated in a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi treated with conidia of late leaf spot (LLS) pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. This upregulation was not observed in a comparative analysis of cultivated peanut, which is highly susceptible to LLS. This zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase possessed a Rossmann fold containing NADB domain in addition to the MDR domain present in all previously characterized plant ADH genes/proteins. Transient over-expression of AdZADH2 under an estradiol inducible promoter (XVE) resulted in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in tobacco leaf. However, the same level of cell death was not observed when the domains were transiently expressed individually. Cell death observed in tobacco was associated with overexpression of cell death related proteins, antioxidative enzymes such as SOD, CAT and APX and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. In A. diogoi, AdZADH2 expression was significantly upregulated in response to the plant signaling hormones salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and sodium nitroprusside. PMID:27047748

  11. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  12. Phylogenetically-based variation in the regulation of the Calvin cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in algae.

    PubMed

    Maberly, Stephen C; Courcelle, Carine; Groben, Rene; Gontero, Brigitte

    2010-03-01

    Aquatic photosynthesis is responsible for about half of the global production and is undertaken by a huge phylogenetic diversity of algae that are poorly studied. The diversity of redox-regulation of phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was investigated in a wide range of algal groups under standard conditions. Redox-regulation of PRK was greatest in chlorophytes, low or absent in a red alga and most chromalveolates, and linked to the number of amino acids between two regulatory cysteine residues. GAPDH regulation was not strongly-related to the different forms of this enzyme and was less variable than for PRK. Addition of recombinant CP12, a protein that forms a complex with PRK and GAPDH, to crude extracts inhibited GAPDH and PRK inversely in the Plantae, but in most chromalveolates had little effect on GAPDH and inhibited or stimulated PRK depending on the species. Patterns of enzyme regulation were used to produce a phylogenetic tree in which cryptophytes and haptophytes, at the base of the chromalveolates, formed a distinct clade. A second clade comprised only chromalveolates. A third clade comprised a mixture of Plantae, an excavate and three chromalveolates: a marine diatom and two others (a xanthophyte and eustigmatophyte) that are distinguished by a low content of chlorophyll c and a lack of fucoxanthin. Regulation of both enzymes was greater in freshwater than in marine taxa, possibly because most freshwaters are more dynamic than oceans. This work highlights the importance of understanding enzyme regulation in diverse algae if their ecology and productivity is to be understood.

  13. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  14. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  15. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  16. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  17. Multiple forms of octopine dehydrogenase in Strombus luhuanus (mollusca, gastropoda, strombidae): genetic basis of polymorphism, properties of the enzymes, and relationship between the octopine dehydrogenase phenotype and the accumulation of anaerobic end products during exercise.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J; England, W R

    1982-10-01

    Octopine dehydrogenase (ODH) is electrophoretically polymorphic in the gastropod mollusk Strombus luhuanus. The frequencies of the six electrophoretic phenotypes in the Heron Island population, together with the molecular weight values of 38,000 obtained for each of the three forms of the enzyme, demonstrate that the monomeric enzyme is encoded by three codominant alleles at a single locus. The purified allozymes are indistinguishable in terms of Km values for substrates, product inhibition by octopine and NAD, pH optima, and substrate inhibition by pyruvate. No statistically significant correlations were found between the ODH phenotype and the maximum activities of ODH or alanopine dehydrogenase, the capacity for anaerobic muscle work, or the accumulation of octopine or strombine/alanopine during exercise. It would appear that the ODH allozymes may be functionally equivalent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:7181845

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gre2p, an NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Breicha, Klaus; Müller, Marion; Hummel, Werner; Niefind, Karsten

    2010-07-01

    Gre2p [Genes de respuesta a estres (stress-response gene)] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a monomeric enzyme of 342 amino acids with a molecular weight of 38.1 kDa. The enzyme catalyses both the stereospecific reduction of keto compounds and the oxidation of various hydroxy compounds and alcohols by the simultaneous consumption of the cofactor NADPH and formation of NADP(+). Crystals of a Gre2p complex with NADP(+) were grown using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1). The current diffraction resolution is 3.2 A. In spite of the monomeric nature of Gre2p in solution, packing and self-rotation calculations revealed the existence of two Gre2p protomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold noncrystallographic axis.

  19. Review of Glucose Oxidases and Glucose Dehydrogenases: A Bird's Eye View of Glucose Sensing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Stefano; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The evolution from first-generation through third-generation glucose sensors has witnessed the appearance of a number of very diverse oxidoreductases, which vary tremendously in terms of origin, structure, substrate specificity, cofactor used as primary electron acceptor, and acceptable final electron acceptor. This article summarizes our present knowledge of redox enzymes currently utilized in commercially available glucose monitoring systems to promote a fuller appreciation of enzymatic properties and principles employed in blood glucose monitoring to help avoid potential errors. PMID:22027299

  20. Expression of gluconeogenic enzymes and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in liver of diabetic mice after acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Korie B; Corbell, Kathryn A; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh; Broderick, Tom L

    2014-01-01

    During acute exercise, normoglycemia is maintained by a precise match between hepatic glucose production and its peripheral utilization. This is met by a complex interplay of hepatic responses and glucose uptake by muscle. However, the effect of a single bout of exercise on hepatic gluconeogenesis, corticosterone (CORT) secretion, and glucose homeostasis in the db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. Diabetic db/db and lean control littermates were subjected to a 30 minute session of treadmill running and sacrificed either immediately after exercise or 8 hours later. Plasma glucose levels were markedly increased in db/db mice after exercise, whereas no change in glucose was observed in lean mice. Post-exercise measurements revealed that plasma CORT levels were also significantly increased in db/db mice compared to lean mice. Plasma hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone and pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone levels were reciprocally decreased in both db/db and lean mice after exercise, indicating intact feedback mechanisms. Protein expression, determined by Western blot analysis, of the glucocorticoid receptor in liver was significantly increased in db/db mice subjected to prior exercise. In liver of db/db mice, a significant increase in the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was noted compared to lean mice after exercise. However, no change in the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) α or β was observed in db/db mice. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 was increased significantly in db/db mice compared to lean mice after exercise. Our results show differences in plasma glucose and protein expression of gluconeogenic enzymes after acute exercise between lean and diabetic db/db mice. The db/db diabetic mouse is hyperglycemic after acute exercise. This hyperglycemic state may be explained, in part, by enhanced endogenous CORT secretion and regulated hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and 11

  1. Point-of-Care Quantitative Measure of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael; Glader, Bertil; Cotten, Michael; Kleinert, Jairus; Pamula, Vamsee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Widespread newborn screening on a point-of-care basis could prevent bilirubin neurotoxicity in newborns with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We evaluated a quantitative G6PD assay on a digital microfluidic platform by comparing its performance with standard clinical methods. METHODS: G6PD activity was measured quantitatively by using digital microfluidic fluorescence and the gold standard fluorescence biochemical test on a convenience sample of 98 discarded blood samples. Twenty-four samples were designated as G6PD deficient. RESULTS: Mean ± SD G6PD activity for normal samples using the digital microfluidic method and the standard method, respectively, was 9.7 ± 2.8 and 11.1 ± 3.0 U/g hemoglobin (Hb), respectively; for G6PD-deficient samples, it was 0.8 ± 0.7 and 1.4 ± 0.9 U/g Hb. Bland-Altman analysis determined a mean difference of –0.96 ± 1.8 U/g Hb between the digital microfluidic fluorescence results and the standard biochemical test results. The lower and upper limits for the digital microfluidic platform were 4.5 to 19.5 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.2 to 3.7 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The lower and upper limits for the Stanford method were 5.5 to 20.7 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.1 to 2.8 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The measured activity discriminated between G6PD-deficient samples and normal samples with no overlap. CONCLUSIONS: Pending further validation, a digital microfluidics platform could be an accurate point-of-care screening tool for rapid newborn G6PD screening. PMID:26459646

  2. Impact of multiple Alcohol Dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms on risk of laryngeal, esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    An, Jiaze; Zhao, Junsheng; Zhang, Xiyang; Ding, Rui; Geng, Tingting; Feng, Tian; Jin, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol intake is positively associated with the risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers; but its effect on gastric or colorectal cancer is controversial. Previous study had identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) genes associated with UADT cancers in European and Japanese populations. We sought to determine if these SNPs associated with laryngeal, esophageal, gastric or colorectal cancer in Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study among 1577 cases and 1013 healthy controls from northwest China. Five SNPs associated with UADT cancers risk were selected from previous genome-wide association studies and genotyped using Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age and gender. We identified that the minor alleles of rs1789924 and rs971074 were associated with decreased risk of laryngeal cancer (OR = 0.311; 95% CI = 0.161-0.602; P < 0.001) and esophagus cancer (OR = 0.711; 95% CI = 0.526-0.962; P = 0.027) in allelic model analysis, respectively. In the genetic model analysis, we found the “C/T” genotype of rs1789924 was associated with decreased laryngeal cancer risk in codominant model (P = 0.046) and overdominant model (P = 0.013); the “C/T-T/T” genotype of rs1789924 was associated with reduced risk of laryngeal cancer under dominant model (P = 0.013). Additionally, none of the SNPs was associated with gastric or colorectal cancer in our study. Our data shed new light on the association between ADH SNPs and respiratory and digestive tract cancers susceptibility in the Han Chinese population. PMID:26396927

  3. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from Mucor mucedo, an enzyme of the sexual hormone pathway: purification, and cloning of the corresponding gene.

    PubMed

    Czempinski, K; Kruft, V; Wöstemeyer, J; Burmester, A

    1996-09-01

    We have purified the NADP-dependent 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from the zygomycete Mucor mucedo. The enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of trisporic acid, the sexual hormone of zygomycetes, which induces the first steps of zygophore development. Protein was obtained from the (-) mating type of M. mucedo after induction with trisporic acid, and purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography steps. On SDS-PAGE a band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa was ascribed to the enzyme. After transferring onto PVDF membranes the protein was digested with endoprotease Lys-C, and several peptides were sequenced. Oligonucleotides derived from protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic M. mucedo DNA. The PCR fragment was used as probe for isolation of the corresponding cDNA and complete genomic DNA clones. Comparison of protein and DNA sequence data showed that the cloned fragment corresponded to the purified protein. Search for similarity with protein sequences of the Swiss-Prot database revealed a relationship to enzymes belonging to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA with the labelled cloned fragment detected a single-copy gene in both mating types of M. mucedo. PCR with genomic DNA from other zygomycetes gave rise to several fragments. Hybridization analysis with the cloned M. mucedo fragment showed that a fragment of similar length cross-hybridized in Blakeslea trispora (Choanephoraceae) as well as in Parasitella parasitica and Absidia glauca (Mucoraceae). The promoter region of the gene contains DNA elements with similarity to a cAMP-regulated gene of Dictyostelium discoideum.

  4. Novel mutations in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) are distributed throughout the protein and result in altered enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; de Koning, T J; Geboers, A J J M; van den Berg, I E T; Berger, R; Klomp, L W J

    2009-05-01

    Three-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is a rare recessive inborn error in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine characterized clinically by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. The biochemical abnormalities associated with this disorder are low concentrations of L-serine, D-serine, and glycine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Only two missense mutations (p.V425M and p.V490M) have been identified in PHGDH, the gene encoding 3-PGDH, but it is currently unclear how these mutations in the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain of the protein affect enzyme function. We now describe five novel mutations in five patients with 3-PGDH deficiency; one frameshift mutation (p.G238fsX), and four missense mutations (p.R135W, p.V261M, p.A373T, and p.G377S). The missense mutations were located in the nucleotide binding and regulatory domains of 3-PGDH and did not affect steady-state expression, protein stability, and protein degradation rates. Patients' fibroblasts displayed a significant, but incomplete, reduction in maximal enzyme activities associated with all missense mutations. In transient overexpression studies in HEK293T cells, the p.A373T, p.V425M, and p.V490M mutations resulted in almost undetectable enzyme activities. Molecular modeling of the p.R135W and p.V261M mutations onto the partial crystal structure of 3-PGDH predicted that these mutations affect substrate and cofactor binding. This prediction was confirmed by the results of kinetic measurements in fibroblasts and transiently transfected HEK293T cells, which revealed a markedly decreased V(max) and an increase in K(m) values, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that missense mutations associated with 3-PGDH deficiency either primarily affect substrate binding or result in very low residual enzymatic activity. PMID:19235232

  5. Molecular characterization of the first two enzymes of the pentose-phosphate pathway of Trypanosoma brucei. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconolactonase.

    PubMed

    Duffieux, F; Van Roy, J; Michels, P A; Opperdoes, F R

    2000-09-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protists that have part of their glycolytic pathway sequestered inside peroxisome-like organelles: the glycosomes. So far, at least one enzyme of the pentose-phosphate pathway has been found to be associated partially with glycosomes. Here, we describe how two genes from Trypanosoma brucei, coding for the first two enzymes of the pentose-phosphate pathway, i.e. glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconolactonase, were identified by in silico screening of trypanosome genome project data bases. These genes were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the lactonase sequence revealed that it contained a C-terminal peroxisome targeting signal in agreement with its subcellular localization in the bloodstream form trypanosome (15% glycosomal and 85% cytosolic). However, the dehydrogenase sequence did not reveal any targeting signal, despite its localization inside glycosomes. The corresponding enzymes have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and their biochemical characteristics have been determined.

  6. Acid-induced folding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase under low pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Le, W P; Yan, S X; Zhang, Y X; Zhou, H M

    1996-04-01

    Under conditions of low pH, the conformational states of holo-YADH and apo-YADH were examined by protein intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence, and far-UV CD measurements. The results obtained show that a low ionic strength, with the addition of HCl, the holo- and apo- YADH denatured gradually to reach the ultimate unfolded conformation in the vicinity of pH 2.0 and 2.5, respectively. With the decrease of pH from 7.0 to 2.0, the fluorescence emission decreased markedly, with its emission maximum red-shifting from 335 to 355 nm, indicating complete exposure of the buried tryptophan residues to the solvent. The far-UV CD spectra show the loss of the arrayed secondary structure, though the acid-denatured enzyme still maintained a partially arrayed secondary structure. A further decrease in pH by increasing the concentration of HClO4 induced a cooperative folding of the denatured enzyme to a compact conformation with the properties of a molten globule, described previously by Goto et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 573-577 (1990)]. More extensive studies showed that although apo-YADH and holo-YADH exhibited similar behavior, the folding cooperative ability of apo-YADH was lower than that of the holo-enzyme. From the above results, it is suggested that the zinc ion plays an important role in the proper folding of YADH and in stabilizing its native conformation.

  7. Application of nicotin amide-adenine dinucleotide analogs for clinical enzymology: alcohol dehydrogenase activity in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Kimura, A; Minato, S; Tamaoki, H; Mizushima, H

    1976-06-01

    The activities of alcohol dehydrogease(ADH) in serum and in the subcellular fractions of rat liver were determined with n-amyl alcohol or ethanol as substrate and thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme. It was found that the enzyme's activity ratio on the amyl alcohol and ethanol(A/E value) of serum and on the particulate fractions of the liver were different, but the A/E value of the soluble fraction was similar to that of serum. The A/E value of the particulate fractions were higher than that of the soluble fraction. From the results of experimental liver damage in the rat, it seems that estimation of the A/E value of ADH activity in serum is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of active liver injury. Since the A/E values of patients' sera differed from those of the normal subjects, the estimation of the A/E value of serum may give diagnostic information on liver injury, especially in chronic liver injury. PMID:179739

  8. Replacing Escherichia coli NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with a NADP-dependent enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum facilitates NADPH dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Irene; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Lin, Henry; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2008-11-01

    Reactions requiring reducing equivalents, NAD(P)H, are of enormous importance for the synthesis of industrially valuable compounds such as carotenoids, polymers, antibiotics and chiral alcohols among others. The use of whole-cell biocatalysis can reduce process cost by acting as catalyst and cofactor regenerator at the same time; however, product yields might be limited by cofactor availability within the cell. Thus, our study focussed on the genetic manipulation of a whole-cell system by modifying metabolic pathways and enzymes to improve the overall production process. In the present work, we genetically engineered an Escherichia coli strain to increase NADPH availability to improve the productivity of products that require NADPH in its biosynthesis. The approach involved an alteration of the glycolysis step where glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) is oxidized to 1,3 bisphophoglycerate (1,3-BPG). This reaction is catalyzed by NAD-dependent endogenous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) encoded by the gapA gene. We constructed a recombinant E. coli strain by replacing the native NAD-dependent gapA gene with a NADP-dependent GAPDH from Clostridium acetobutylicum, encoded by the gene gapC. The beauty of this approach is that the recombinant E. coli strain produces 2 mol of NADPH, instead of NADH, per mole of glucose consumed. Metabolic flux analysis showed that the flux through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, one of the main pathways that produce NADPH, was reduced significantly in the recombinant strain when compared to that of the parent strain. The effectiveness of the NADPH enhancing system was tested using the production of lycopene and epsilon-caprolactone as model systems using two different background strains. The recombinant strains, with increased NADPH availability, consistently showed significant higher productivity than the parent strains.

  9. Replacing Escherichia coli NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with a NADP-dependent enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum facilitates NADPH dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Irene; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Lin, Henry; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2008-11-01

    Reactions requiring reducing equivalents, NAD(P)H, are of enormous importance for the synthesis of industrially valuable compounds such as carotenoids, polymers, antibiotics and chiral alcohols among others. The use of whole-cell biocatalysis can reduce process cost by acting as catalyst and cofactor regenerator at the same time; however, product yields might be limited by cofactor availability within the cell. Thus, our study focussed on the genetic manipulation of a whole-cell system by modifying metabolic pathways and enzymes to improve the overall production process. In the present work, we genetically engineered an Escherichia coli strain to increase NADPH availability to improve the productivity of products that require NADPH in its biosynthesis. The approach involved an alteration of the glycolysis step where glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) is oxidized to 1,3 bisphophoglycerate (1,3-BPG). This reaction is catalyzed by NAD-dependent endogenous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) encoded by the gapA gene. We constructed a recombinant E. coli strain by replacing the native NAD-dependent gapA gene with a NADP-dependent GAPDH from Clostridium acetobutylicum, encoded by the gene gapC. The beauty of this approach is that the recombinant E. coli strain produces 2 mol of NADPH, instead of NADH, per mole of glucose consumed. Metabolic flux analysis showed that the flux through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, one of the main pathways that produce NADPH, was reduced significantly in the recombinant strain when compared to that of the parent strain. The effectiveness of the NADPH enhancing system was tested using the production of lycopene and epsilon-caprolactone as model systems using two different background strains. The recombinant strains, with increased NADPH availability, consistently showed significant higher productivity than the parent strains. PMID:18852061

  10. Effects of water activity and aqueous solvent ordering on thermal stability of lysozyme, alpha-chymotrypsinogen A, and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Matsue, S; Fujii, T; Miyawaki, O

    2001-06-12

    Effects of water activity (aW) and solvent ordering were separately analyzed on the thermal unfolding of lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsinogen A, and also on the thermal deactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) in aqueous solutions with various additives. With the coexistence of additives, water activity was the determinant of the extent of the change in the thermal stability of proteins while solvent ordering was the determinant of the direction of the change. The parameter alpha, determined from the activity coefficient of water, representing the deviation of aW from that of the ideal solution, was useful as a quantitative index of the solvent ordering showing good correlations with the unfolding temperature and enthalpy of lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsinogen A and also with the thermal deactivation rate constant of YADH at a constant aW. Solvent ordering seemed to affect the thermal stability of proteins mainly through its effect on the intramolecular hydrophobic interaction among amino acid residues in a protein molecule but the contribution of the electrostatic interaction including hydrogen bonding through the change in permittivity of solution was also suggested.

  11. Fast quantification of ethanol in whole blood specimens by the enzymatic alcohol dehydrogenase method. Optimization by experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Skuterud, Bjørn; Larssen, Bente R; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Smith-Kielland, Anne

    2005-01-01

    A sensitive, fast, simple, and high-throughput enzymatic method for the quantification of ethanol in whole blood (blood) on Hitachi 917 is presented. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde using the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which is concurrently reduced to form NADH. Method development was performed with the aid of factorial design, varying pH, and concentrations of NAD+ and ADH. The linear range increased and reaction end point decreased with increasing NAD+ concentration and pH. The method was linear in the concentration range 0.0024-0.4220 g/dL. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.0007 g/dL and 0.0024 g/dL, respectively. Relative standard deviations for the repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were in the ranges 0.7-5.7% and 1.6-8.9%, respectively. The correlation coefficient when compared with headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detection methods was 0.9903. Analysis of authentic positive blood specimens gave results that were slightly lower than those of the reference method.

  12. Promoter Strength Comparisons of Maize Shrunken 1 and Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 Promoters in Mono- and Dicotyledonous Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, R. M.; Ashraf, M.; Vasil, V.; Hannah, L. C.; Vasil, I. K.; Ferl, R.

    1988-01-01

    Promoter strengths of two maize alcohol dehydrogenase genes, Adh1 and Adh2, and the maize shrunken-1 gene, Sh1, were evaluated by transient expression in cultured protoplasts of Panicum maximum, Triticum monococcum, and Daucus carota. Promoter elements were