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Sample records for alcohol deprivation effect

  1. Length of smoking deprivation moderates the effects of alcohol administration on urge to smoke

    PubMed Central

    Day, Anne M.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Spillane, Nichea S.; Metrik, Jane; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2014-01-01

    Although smoking deprivation is often used in laboratory studies to induce urges to smoke cigarettes, the optimal length of deprivation has not been established. Previous research showed that overnight abstinence from cigarettes led to high baseline urge to smoke that potentially masked alcohol’s acute effects on urge to smoke (Kahler et al., 2012). The current study examined whether alcohol’s effects on smoking urge were more pronounced when a shorter length of smoking deprivation was used (i.e., 3 hour instead of overnight abstinence). Using a balanced placebo design for alcohol administration, we found that participants experienced a significant increase in self-reported urge to smoke when administered alcohol after a 3-hour smoking deprivation (N=32), whereas this effect was smaller and nonsignificant when smokers were required to be abstinent overnight (N = 96). Research on factors that heighten smoking urges may find stronger effects if a 3-hour deprivation is used compared to using overnight abstinence. PMID:24556154

  2. The alcohol deprivation effect model for studying relapse behavior: a comparison between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Spanagel, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the psychological mechanisms and underlying neurobiology of relapse behavior is essential for improving the treatment of addiction. Because the neurobiology of relapse behavior cannot be well studied in patients, we must rely on appropriate animal models. The alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) is a phenomenon in laboratory animals that models a relapse-like drinking situation, providing excellent face and predictive validity. In rodents, relapse-like behavior is largely influenced by the genetic make-up of an animal. It is not clear which other factors are responsible for variability of this behavior, but there seems to be no correlation between levels of baseline alcohol intake and the occurrence, duration, and robustness of the ADE. Rats that undergo long-term alcohol drinking for several months with repeated deprivation phases develop a compulsive drinking behavior during a relapse situation, characterized by insensitivity to taste adulteration with quinine, a loss of circadian drinking patterns during relapse-like drinking, and a shift toward drinking highly concentrated alcohol solutions to rapidly increase blood alcohol concentrations and achieve intoxication. Some mouse strains also exhibit an ADE, but this is usually of shorter duration than in rats. However, compulsive drinking in mice during a relapse situation has yet to be demonstrated. We extend our review section with original data showing that during long-term alcohol consumption, mice show a decline in alcohol intake, and the ADE fades with repeated deprivation phases. Furthermore, anti-relapse compounds that produce reliable effects on the ADE in rats produce paradoxical effects in mice. We conclude that the rat provides a better model system to study alcohol relapse and putative anti-relapse compounds.

  3. Effects of alcohol and saccharin deprivations on concurrent ethanol and saccharin operant self-administration by alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Toalston, Jamie E; Oster, Scott M; Kuc, Kelly A; Pommer, Tylene J; Murphy, James M; Lumeng, Lawrence; Bell, Richard L; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2008-06-01

    Consumption of sweet solutions has been associated with a reduction in withdrawal symptoms and alcohol craving in humans. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of ethanol and saccharin (SACC) deprivations on operant oral self-administration. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats were allowed to lever press concurrently self-administer ethanol (15% vol/vol) and SACC (0.0125% g/vol) for 8 weeks. Rats were then maintained on daily operant access (nondeprived), deprived of both fluids (2 weeks), deprived of SACC and given 2 ml of ethanol daily, or deprived of ethanol and given 2 ml of SACC daily. All groups were then given 2 weeks of daily operant access to ethanol and SACC, followed by an identical second deprivation period. P rats responded more for ethanol than SACC. All deprived groups increased responding on the ethanol lever, but not on the SACC lever. Daily consumption of 2 ml ethanol decreased the duration of the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE). Home cage access to 2 ml of SACC also decreased the ADE but to a lesser extent than access to ethanol. A second deprivation period further increased and prolonged the expression of an ADE. These results show ethanol is a more salient reinforcer than SACC. With concurrent access to ethanol and SACC, P rats do not display a saccharin deprivation effect. Depriving P rats of both ethanol and SACC had the most pronounced effect on the magnitude and duration of the ADE, suggesting that there may be some interactions between ethanol and SACC in their CNS reinforcing effects.

  4. Effects of Chronic Alcohol and Repeated Deprivations on Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Levels in the Extended Amygdala of Inbred Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L.; Zhou, Feng C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dopaminergic (DA) activity in the extended amygdala (EA) has been known to play a pivotal role in mediating drug and alcohol addiction. Alterations of DA activity within the EA after chronic exposure to alcohol or substances of abuse are considered a major mechanism for the development of alcoholism and addiction. To date, it is not clear how different patterns of chronic alcohol drinking affect DA receptor levels. Therefore, the current studies investigated the effects of chronic ethanol consumption, with or without deprivations, on D1 and D2 receptor densities within the EA. Methods Inbred alcohol-preferring (iP) rats were divided into 3 groups with the following treatments: (1) water for 14 weeks; (2) continuous alcohol (C-Alc) for 14 weeks [24-hour concurrent access to 15 and 30% (v/v) ethanol]; or (3) repeatedly deprived of alcohol (RD-Alc) (24-hour concurrent access to 15 and 30% ethanol for 6 weeks, followed by 2 cycles of 2 weeks of deprivation of and 2 weeks of reexposure to ethanol access). At the end of 14 weeks, the rats were killed for autoradiographic labeling of D1 and D2 receptors. Results Compared with the water control group, both the C-Alc and the RD-Alc groups displayed increases in D1 receptor binding density in the anterior region of the Acb core, whereas the RD-Alc group displayed additional increases in D1 receptor binding density in anterior regions of the lateral and intercalated nuclei of the amygdala. Additionally, both C-Alc and RD-Alc rats displayed increases in D2 receptor binding density in anterior regions of the Acb shell and core, whereas RDAlc rats displayed additional increases in D2 receptor binding density in the dorsal striatum. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that 14-week extended alcohol drinking with continuous chronic or repeated deprivations increase binding sites of D1 and D2 receptors in specific regions of the EA with greater sensitivity in the anterior regions. The repeated deprivation has

  5. Effects Of Moderate Sleep Deprivation and Low-Dose Alcohol On Driving Simulator Performance and Perception In Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Vakulin, A.; Baulk, S.D.; Catcheside, P.G.; Anderson, R.; van den Heuvel, C.J.; Banks, S.; McEvoy, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the combined effects of sleep restriction and low-dose alcohol on driving simulator performance, EEG, and subjective levels of sleepiness and performance in the mid-afternoon. Design: Repeated measures with 4 experimental conditions. Normal sleep without alcohol, sleep restriction alone (4 hours) and sleep restriction in combination with 2 different low blood alcohol concentrations (0.025 g/dL and 0.035 g/dL). Setting: Sleep Laboratory, Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health. Participants: Twenty-one healthy young men, aged 18–30 years, mean (±SD) = 22.5(±3.7) years, BMI = 25(±6.7) kg/m2; all had normal sleep patterns and were free of sleep disorders. Measurements: Participants completed a 70-minute simulated driving session, commencing at 14:00. Driving parameters included steering deviation, braking reaction time, and number of collisions. Alpha and theta EEG activity and subjective driving performance and sleepiness were also measured throughout the driving task. Results: All measures were significantly affected by time. Steering deviation increased significantly when sleep restriction was combined with the higher dose alcohol. This combination also resulted in a significant increase in alpha/theta EEG activity throughout the drive, as well as greater subjective sleepiness and negative driving performance ratings compared to control or sleep restriction alone. Discussion: These data indicate that combining low-dose alcohol with moderate sleep restriction results in significant decrements to subjective alertness and performance as well as to some driving performance and EEG parameters. This highlights the potential risks of driving after consumption of low and legal doses of alcohol when also sleep restricted. Citation: Vakulin A; Baulk SD; Catcheside PG; Anderson R; van den Heuvel CJ; Banks S; McEvoy RD. Effects of moderate sleep deprivation and low-dose alcohol on driving simulator performance and perception in young men. SLEEP

  6. Circadian rhythms of water and alcohol intake: effect of REM-sleep deprivation and lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aalto, J; Kiianmaa, K

    1984-01-01

    The recently discovered increase in alcohol drinking produced by a 7 day period of rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep deprivation with a modified flowerpot technique and the subsequent decrease during REM-rebound were now examined through continual monitoring of drinking with a computer attached to drinkometers. REM-sleep deprivation abolished the circadian rhythms of both alcohol and water intake. The circadian rhythm of water drinking returned during the first post-deprivation day but alcohol drinking was almost eliminated during the first 18 hr and there was no circadian rhythm to the alcohol drinking on the following 3 days. In an additional study, the circadian rhythms of both water and alcohol intake were abolished by electrolytic lesioning of the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The lesion did not, however, alter the mean level of alcohol drinking. Thus the abolition of circadian rhythms is not sufficient for increasing alcohol consumption and the increase produced during REM-sleep deprivation appears to be mediated by other mechanisms.

  7. Effects of short deprivation and re-exposure intervals on the ethanol drinking behavior of selectively bred high alcohol-consuming rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Schultz, Jonathon A; Peper, Caron L; Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J

    2008-08-01

    Alcoholics generally display cycles of excessive ethanol intake, abstinence and relapse behavior. Using an animal model of relapse-like drinking, the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE), our laboratory has shown that repeated 2-week cycles of ethanol deprivation and re-exposure, following an initial 6-week access period, result in a robust ADE by alcohol-preferring (P) and high alcohol-drinking (HAD-1 and HAD-2) rats. These rat lines have been selectively bred to prefer a 10% ethanol solution over water. The present study examined whether P and HAD rats would display an ADE using much shorter ethanol deprivation and re-exposure intervals. Rats were given either continuous or periodic concurrent access to multiple concentrations (10%, 20%, and 30% [vol/vol]) of ethanol. The periodic protocol involved access to ethanol for 12 days followed by four cycles of 4 days of deprivation and 4 days of re-exposure to ethanol access. High-alcohol-drinking rats displayed a robust 24-h ADE upon first re-exposure (HAD-1: approximately 5 vs. 8g/kg/day; HAD-2: approximately 6 vs. 9g/kg/day, baseline vs. re-exposure), whereas P rats ( approximately 7 vs. 8g/kg/day) displayed a modest, nonsignificant, increase in 24-h intake. In a separate group of rats, ethanol intake and blood alcohol concentrations after the first hour of the fourth re-exposure cycle were HAD-1: 2.0g/kg and 97 mg%, HAD-2: 2.3g/kg and 73 mg%, and P: 1.2g/kg and 71 mg%; with all three lines displaying a robust first hour ADE. These findings suggest that (a) an ADE may be observed with short ethanol deprivation and re-exposure intervals in HAD rats, and (b) the genetic make-up of the P and HAD rats influences the expression of this ADE.

  8. Increased voluntary alcohol drinking concurrent with REM-sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Aalto, J; Kiianmaa, K

    1984-01-01

    The alcohol intake of twenty adult Long-Evans male rats was recorded before, during and after rapid eye movement sleep (REM) deprivation produced with the flowerpot technique modified by using a cuff pedestal and an electrified grid floor instead of water. The alcohol intake reached a steady level of 2.8 g/kg/day in the 3 weeks before REM deprivation. During seven REM-sleep deprivation days the alcohol intake was significantly elevated, finally increasing to 3.7 g/kg/day. A rebound decrease in alcohol drinking was then observed during the "REM-rebound" phase immediately after the termination of REM-sleep deprivation. The results suggest a possible vicious circle of REM-sleep deprivation increasing alcohol drinking and alcohol intake causing REM-sleep deprivation.

  9. Health Effects of Sleep Deprivation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    to get full antidepressant benefit from sleep deprivation. Cole and Muller 63 reported that when elderly depressives (57-79 years old, average age 69...Cole MG, Miller HF: Sleep deprivation in the treatment of elderly depressed patients. J Am Geriatr Soc 243:308-313, 1976. 64. Collins WE: Some effects...1:207-216, 1972. 259. Salin-Pascual RJ, Ortega-Soto H, Huerto-Delgadillo L, et al: The effect of total sleep deprivation on plasma melatonin and

  10. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) -induced reductions in alcohol intake during continuous access and following alcohol deprivation are not altered by restraint stress in alcohol-preferring (P) rats

    PubMed Central

    Bertholomey, Megan L.; Henderson, Angela N.; Badia-Elder, Nancy E.; Stewart, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) reduces anxiety-like behavior and alcohol intake in alcohol-preferring rats. The present experiment examined whether the effects of NPY on alcohol drinking are modulated by stress exposure during continuous access or following ethanol deprivation. Female P rats underwent 6 weeks of continuous access to 15% v/v ethanol and water prior to intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula implantation. Deprived rats underwent two cycles of 5 days of ethanol exposure followed by 2 days of ethanol deprivation, while non-deprived rats had uninterrupted access to ethanol. Stressed rats in both ethanol access groups were exposed to restraint stress for 1 hour 4-6 hours after ethanol was removed from the deprived group in both cycles. ICV infusions of 5.0 μg NPY or aCSF were administered 48 hours following the deprivation/stress procedure, after which ethanol was returned. Rats showed increased ethanol intake following ethanol deprivation compared to non-deprived controls. Food and water intake were increased, while ethanol intake was decreased, in rats infused with NPY. Stress did not increase ethanol intake or alter the response to NPY. Although no stress effects were found, the present experiment replicates previous findings regarding the effectiveness of NPY in reducing ethanol consumption. Future studies aimed at determining the extent to which stress may affect relapse to ethanol drinking and response to NPY would benefit from implementing different stress paradigms and varying the pattern of ethanol access. PMID:20937300

  11. Early Maternal Deprivation Enhances Voluntary Alcohol Intake Induced by Exposure to Stressful Events Later in Life

    PubMed Central

    Peñasco, Sara; Mela, Virginia; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio; Viveros, María-Paz; Marco, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to assess the impact of early life stress, in the form of early maternal deprivation (MD, 24 h on postnatal day, pnd, 9), on voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent male and female Wistar rats. During adolescence, from pnd 28 to pnd 50, voluntary ethanol intake (20%, v/v) was investigated using the two-bottle free choice paradigm. To better understand the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption, voluntary alcohol intake was also evaluated following additional stressful events later in life, that is, a week of alcohol cessation and a week of alcohol cessation combined with exposure to restraint stress. Female animals consumed more alcohol than males only after a second episode of alcohol cessation combined with restraint stress. MD did not affect baseline voluntary alcohol intake but increased voluntary alcohol intake after stress exposure, indicating that MD may render animals more vulnerable to the effects of stress on alcohol intake. During adolescence, when animals had free access to alcohol, MD animals showed lower body weight gain but a higher growth rate than control animals. Moreover, the higher growth rate was accompanied by a decrease in food intake, suggesting an altered metabolic regulation in MD animals that may interact with alcohol intake. PMID:25821601

  12. Surrogate alcohol containing methanol, social deprivation and public health in Novosibirsk, Russia.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Maria; Lachenmeier, Dirk; Hausler, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Surrogate alcohol, i.e. alcohol not intended or not officially intended for human consumption, continues to play an important role in alcohol consumption in Russia, especially for people with alcohol dependence. Among the different types of surrogate alcohol, there are windshield washer antifreeze liquids; these products are the cheapest kinds of non-beverage alcohol available and thus likely to be used by the most deprived and marginalised groups such as homeless people with alcohol dependence. Although it is well known, that non-beverage alcohol is used for consumption by various groups in Russia, and although there are laws to prohibit the use of methanol as part of windshield washer antifreeze liquids for the very reason that such products could be used as surrogate alcohol, we detected products in retail sale which were a mix of water and methanol only. Methanol poses serious health threats including blindness and death, and there had been repeated methanol deaths from surrogate alcohol in Russia over the last years. If law-enforcement does not change for surrogate products, we can expect more methanol-resulting deaths in the most deprived and marginalized groups of people with alcohol dependence in Russia. In addition, ingredients with questionable safety profiles such as formic acid should also be prohibited in non-beverage alcohol products that are likely to be consumed as surrogate alcohol.

  13. Alcohol drinking and deprivation alter basal extracellular glutamate concentrations and clearance in the mesolimbic system of alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Rodd, Zachary A; Engleman, Eric A; Bailey, Jason A; Lahiri, Debomoy K; McBride, William J

    2013-03-01

    The present study determined the effects of voluntary ethanol drinking and deprivation on basal extracellular glutamate concentrations and clearance in the mesolimbic system and tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol drinking would persistently increase basal glutamate neurotransmission. Three groups of alcohol-preferring (P) rats were used: 'water group (WG),' 'ethanol maintenance group (MG; 24-hour free choice water versus 15% ethanol)' and 'ethanol deprivation group (DG; 2 weeks of deprivation).' Quantitative microdialysis and Western blots were conducted to measure basal extracellular glutamate concentrations, clearance and proteins associated with glutamate clearance. Chronic alcohol drinking produced a 70-100% increase of basal extracellular glutamate concentrations in the posterior ventral tegmental area (4.0 versus 7.0 μM) and nucleus accumbens shell (3.0 versus 6.0 μM). Glutamate clearances were reduced by 30-40% in both regions of MG rats compared with WG rats. In addition, Western blots revealed a 40-45% decrease of excitatory amino transporter 1 (EAAT1) protein, but no significant changes in the levels of EAAT2 or cystine-glutamate antiporter in these regions of MG versus WG rats. The enhanced glutamate concentrations returned to control levels, accompanied by a recovery of glutamate clearance following deprivation. These results indicated that chronic alcohol drinking enhanced extracellular glutamate concentrations in the mesolimbic system, as a result, in part, of reduced clearance, suggesting that enhanced glutamate neurotransmission may contribute to the maintenance of alcohol drinking. However, because the increased glutamate levels returned to normal after deprivation, elevated glutamate neurotransmission may not contribute to the initiation of relapse drinking.

  14. Polygenic risk for alcohol dependence associates with alcohol consumption, cognitive function and social deprivation in a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Smith, Andrew H; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hall, Lynsey S; Fernandez-Pujals, Ana M; MacIntyre, Donald J; Smith, Blair H; Hocking, Lynne J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Thomson, Pippa A; Porteous, David J; Deary, Ian J; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2016-03-01

    Alcohol dependence is frequently co-morbid with cognitive impairment. The relationship between these traits is complex as cognitive dysfunction may arise as a consequence of heavy drinking or exist prior to the onset of dependence. In the present study, we tested the genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and alcohol dependence using polygenic risk scores (PGRS). We created two independent PGRS derived from two recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of alcohol dependence (SAGE GWAS: n = 2750; Yale-Penn GWAS: n = 2377) in a population-based cohort, Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) (n = 9863). Data on alcohol consumption and four tests of cognitive function [Mill Hill Vocabulary (MHV), digit symbol coding, phonemic verbal fluency (VF) and logical memory] were available. PGRS for alcohol dependence were negatively associated with two measures of cognitive function: MHV (SAGE: P = 0.009, β = -0.027; Yale-Penn: P = 0.001, β = -0.034) and VF (SAGE: P = 0.0008, β = -0.036; Yale-Penn: P = 0.00005, β = -0.044). VF remained robustly associated after adjustment for education and social deprivation; however, the association with MHV was substantially attenuated. Shared genetic variants may account for some of the phenotypic association between cognitive ability and alcohol dependence. A significant negative association between PGRS and social deprivation was found (SAGE: P = 5.2 × 10(-7) , β = -0.054; Yale-Penn: P = 0.000012, β = -0.047). Individuals living in socially deprived regions were found to carry more alcohol dependence risk alleles which may contribute to the increased prevalence of problem drinking in regions of deprivation. Future work to identify genes which affect both cognitive impairment and alcohol dependence will help elucidate biological processes common to both disorders.

  15. Effects of arsenic deprivation in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Uthus, E O

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of arsenic deprivation in hamsters. Male weanling Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a casein-corn-based diet containing approximately 12 ng arsenic/g. Controls were fed 1 microgram arsenic/g of diet, as Na2HAsO4.7 H2O. After 6 weeks arsenic deprivation elevated heart weight/body weight ratio and the concentration of liver zinc and decreased the concentrations of the plasma amino acids alanine, glycine, phenylalanine and taurine. Although no biological role has been found for arsenic, the findings indicate that the hamster is a suitable animal for arsenic deprivation studies and support the hypothesis that arsenic may have a physiological role that influences methionine/methyl metabolism.

  16. Polygenic risk for alcohol dependence associates with alcohol consumption, cognitive function and social deprivation in a population‐based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew H.; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Hall, Lynsey S.; Fernandez‐Pujals, Ana M.; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Smith, Blair H.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Thomson, Pippa A.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol dependence is frequently co‐morbid with cognitive impairment. The relationship between these traits is complex as cognitive dysfunction may arise as a consequence of heavy drinking or exist prior to the onset of dependence. In the present study, we tested the genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and alcohol dependence using polygenic risk scores (PGRS). We created two independent PGRS derived from two recent genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of alcohol dependence (SAGE GWAS: n = 2750; Yale‐Penn GWAS: n = 2377) in a population‐based cohort, Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) (n = 9863). Data on alcohol consumption and four tests of cognitive function [Mill Hill Vocabulary (MHV), digit symbol coding, phonemic verbal fluency (VF) and logical memory] were available. PGRS for alcohol dependence were negatively associated with two measures of cognitive function: MHV (SAGE: P = 0.009, β = −0.027; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.001, β = −0.034) and VF (SAGE: P = 0.0008, β = −0.036; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.00005, β = −0.044). VF remained robustly associated after adjustment for education and social deprivation; however, the association with MHV was substantially attenuated. Shared genetic variants may account for some of the phenotypic association between cognitive ability and alcohol dependence. A significant negative association between PGRS and social deprivation was found (SAGE: P = 5.2 × 10−7, β = −0.054; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.000012, β = −0.047). Individuals living in socially deprived regions were found to carry more alcohol dependence risk alleles which may contribute to the increased prevalence of problem drinking in regions of deprivation. Future work to identify genes which affect both cognitive impairment and alcohol dependence will help elucidate biological processes common to both disorders. PMID:25865819

  17. Cues of Fatigue: Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Sundelin, Tina; Lekander, Mats; Kecklund, Göran; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Olsson, Andreas; Axelsson, John

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the facial cues by which one recognizes that someone is sleep deprived versus not sleep deprived. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants: Forty observers (20 women, mean age 25 ± 5 y) rated 20 facial photographs with respect to fatigue, 10 facial cues, and sadness. The stimulus material consisted of 10 individuals (five women) photographed at 14:30 after normal sleep and after 31 h of sleep deprivation following a night with 5 h of sleep. Measurements: Ratings of fatigue, fatigue-related cues, and sadness in facial photographs. Results: The faces of sleep deprived individuals were perceived as having more hanging eyelids, redder eyes, more swollen eyes, darker circles under the eyes, paler skin, more wrinkles/fine lines, and more droopy corners of the mouth (effects ranging from b = +3 ± 1 to b = +15 ± 1 mm on 100-mm visual analog scales, P < 0.01). The ratings of fatigue were related to glazed eyes and to all the cues affected by sleep deprivation (P < 0.01). Ratings of rash/eczema or tense lips were not significantly affected by sleep deprivation, nor associated with judgements of fatigue. In addition, sleep-deprived individuals looked sadder than after normal sleep, and sadness was related to looking fatigued (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results show that sleep deprivation affects features relating to the eyes, mouth, and skin, and that these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people. Because these facial regions are important in the communication between humans, facial cues of sleep deprivation and fatigue may carry social consequences for the sleep deprived individual in everyday life. Citation: Sundelin T; Lekander M; Kecklund G; Van Someren EJW; Olsson A; Axelsson J. Cues of fatigue: effects of sleep deprivation on facial appearance. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1355-1360. PMID:23997369

  18. Sleep deprivation and the effect on exercise performance.

    PubMed

    VanHelder, T; Radomski, M W

    1989-04-01

    Sleep deprivation or partial sleep loss are common in work conditions as rotating shifts and prolonged work hours, in sustained military operations and in athletes competing in events after crossing several time zones or engaged in ultramarathon or triathlon events. Although it is well established that sleep loss has negative effects on mental performance, its effects on physical performance are equivocal. This review examines the latter question in light of recent studies published on this problem. Sleep deprivation of 30 to 72 hours does not affect cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise of varying intensity, or the aerobic and anaerobic performance capability of individuals. Muscle strength and electromechanical responses are also not affected. Time to exhaustion, however, is decreased by sleep deprivation. Although ratings of perceived exertion always increased during exercise in sleep-deprived (30 to 60 hours) subjects compared with normal sleep, this is not a reliable assessment of a subject's ability to perform physical work as the ratings of perceived exertion are dissociated from any cardiovascular changes in sleep deprivation. Examination of the various hormonal and metabolic parameters which have been measured in the studies reviewed reveals that the major metabolic perturbations accompanying sleep deprivation in humans are an increase in insulin resistance and a decrease in glucose tolerance. This may explain the reduction in observed time to exhaustion in sleep-deprived subjects. The role of growth hormone in mediating altered carbohydrate metabolism may be of particular relevance as to how sleep deprivation alters the supply of energy substrate to the muscle.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, D M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of alcohol on the heart include modification of the risk of coronary artery disease, the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, exacerbation of conduction disorders, atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias, and an increased risk of hypertension, hemorrhagic stroke, infectious endocarditis, and fetal heart abnormalities. PMID:2686174

  20. The psychotomimetic effects of short-term sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Oliver J; Brady, Francesca

    2009-10-01

    People experiencing sensory deprivation often report perceptual disturbances such as hallucinations, especially over extended periods of time. However, there is little evidence concerning short-term sensory deprivation and whether its effects differ depending on the individual concerned, and in particular their proneness to psychosis. This study explored whether perceptual disturbances could be elicited by a brief period of complete isolation from sound and vision in both highly hallucination prone and nonhallucination prone groups. Greater psychotomimetic experiences taking the form of perceptual disturbances, paranoia, and anhedonia were found across both groups when under sensory deprivation. In addition, hallucination-prone individuals experienced more perceptual disturbances when placed in short-term sensory deprivation than nonprone individuals. This result is discussed in terms of difficulties in source monitoring as a possible mechanism involved in proneness to hallucinations.

  1. The effect of dietary pyridoxine on arsenic deprivation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Uthus, E.O.; Poelllot, R. )

    1991-03-15

    In experiments on As deprivation, many findings indicate that As can affect enzymes or metabolites that are also influenced by vitamin B{sub 6}. Thus, an experiment was designed to ascertain the effect of pyridoxine (pyr) on As deprivation in rats. Male, weanling rats were fed an amino acid based diet containing 0.24% methionine (M) and less than 15 ng As/g. Dietary variables were As, 0 or 1 {mu}g/g; M, 0 or 3 g/kg; and pyridoxine, 0 or 10 mg/kg. After 10 weeks, growth was reduced by As, Pyr, or M deprivation. Both endogenous ({minus}PP) and pyridoxal phosphate-stimulated (+PP) RBC aspartate aminotransferase were decreased by Pyr deficiency. The ratio of +PP/{minus}PP, known as the activation coefficient (AC), was affected by an interaction between As and Pyr. Pyr deficiency resulted in a less marked increase in AC in the As-deprived rats than in the As-supplemented rats. Plasma Fe was slightly decreased by Pyr deficiency in the As-deprived rats but increased by Pyr deficiency in the As-supplemented rats. Plasma threonine and serine were increased by As supplementation in the Pyr-deficient rats but there was no effect of As supplementation in the Pyr-supplemented rats. Plasma alanine was decreased by As or Pyr deprivation. In Pyr deficiency, As deprivation had no effect on plasma glycine (G) in the M-deficient rats but decreased G in the M-supplemented rats. In the Pyr-supplemented rats, As had no effect on G, regardless of M. The findings indicate that As and Pyr interact to affect amino acid metabolism.

  2. Alcohol's Effects on the Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Health » Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol's Effects on the Body Drinking too much – on a ... hours after getting drunk. Learn more about alcohol’s effects on the body. Clinical Trials Get Updates Follow ...

  3. [Metabolic and endocrine effects of water and/or food deprivation in rats].

    PubMed

    Kasdallah, Abir Grissa; Mornagui, Bessem; Gharbi, Najoua; Machghoul, Salem; El-Fazâa, Saloua

    2005-05-01

    Metabolic and endocrine effects of water and/or food deprivation in rats. We aim at studying the effect of water deprivation, food deprivation and their combination for three days on adrenal cortex, pituitary-thyroid axis and vasopressinergic system activity in rats. Corticosterone level was determined by fluorimetric method. The levels of free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were determined by immunoenzymatic assay and vasopressin (AVP) level was determined by radio-immunoassay. In all three groups, basal levels of plasma corticosterone were increased. A thyroid dysfunction was shown after water deprivation, food deprivation and their combination reflected by a significant decrease in FT4 levels. Paradoxically, a significant decrease in TSH level was observed in food-deprived rats and in rats subjected to simultaneous food and water deprivation, while a slight and not significant decrease in TSH level was shown in water-deprived rats. A significant increase in plasma AVP level was observed after water deprivation and simultaneous water and food deprivation, while no change was found after food deprivation. The data indicated that water deprivation, food deprivation and their combination stimulated the adrenal cortex, thereby suggesting a stress state. On the other hand, it seems that nutritional stress modifies the pituitary-thyroid axis through mechanisms different from those of osmotic stress. Moreover, it seems that food deprivation partially prevented the stimulatory effect of water deprivation on vasopressinergic system.

  4. Neuropeptide Y administration into the amygdala suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats following multiple deprivations.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Stewart, Robert B; Badia-Elder, Nancy E

    2008-09-01

    The present experiment examines the effects of NPY administered into the amygdala on ethanol drinking by alcohol-preferring P rats following long-term continuous ethanol access, with and without multiple periods of imposed ethanol abstinence. P rats had access to 15% (v/v) ethanol and water for 11 weeks followed by 2 weeks of ethanol abstinence, re-exposure to ethanol for 2 weeks, 2 more weeks of ethanol abstinence, and a final ethanol re-exposure. Immediately prior to the second ethanol re-exposure, 4 groups of rats received bilateral infusions NPY (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 microg) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) into the amygdala. Two additional groups were given uninterrupted ethanol access and were infused with a single NPY dose (1.0 microg) or aCSF. The highest NPY dose (1.0 microg) suppressed ethanol intake for 24 h in rats with a history of ethanol abstinence (i.e. deprivation) periods, but had no effect in rats with a history of continuous ethanol access. Water and food intakes were not altered. These results suggest that the amygdala mediates the suppressive effects of centrally administered NPY on ethanol drinking, and that NPY may block relapse-like drinking by opposing the anxiogenic effects of ethanol abstinence.

  5. Neuropeptide Y Administration into the Amygdala Suppresses Ethanol Drinking in Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats Following Multiple Deprivations

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Stewart, Robert B.; Badia-Elder, Nancy E.

    2008-01-01

    The present experiment examines the effects of NPY administered into the amygdala on ethanol drinking by alcohol-preferring P rats following long-term continuous ethanol access, with and without multiple periods of imposed ethanol abstinence. P rats had access to 15% (v/v) ethanol and water for 11 weeks followed by 2 weeks of ethanol abstinence, re-exposure to ethanol for 2 weeks, 2 more weeks of ethanol abstinence, and a final ethanol re-exposure. Immediately prior to the second ethanol re-exposure, 4 groups of rats received bilateral infusions NPY (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 μg) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) into the amygdala. Two additional groups were given uninterrupted ethanol access and were infused with a single NPY dose (1.0 μg) or aCSF. The highest NPY dose (1.0 μg) suppressed ethanol intake for 24 hrs in rats with a history of ethanol abstinence (i.e. deprivation) periods, but had no effect in rats with a history of continuous ethanol access. Water and food intakes were not altered. These results suggest that the amygdala mediates the suppressive effects of centrally administered NPY on ethanol drinking, and that NPY may block relapse-like drinking by opposing the anxiogenic effects of ethanol abstinence. PMID:18499241

  6. Effects of sleep deprivation on short-term recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Polzella, D J

    1975-03-01

    A probe-recognition short-term memory paradigm was used to inquire into the precise effects of sleep deprivation on human memory. It was found that recognition performance, as measured by d', was generally impaired for each subjects after 24 hr of sleep deprivation. While d' was shown to decrease exponentially as the number of items intervening between the target and the probe increased, this decay rate was not affected by sleep loss. In addition there was confirmation of a previously observed increase in the positive skewness of reaction times after wakefulness. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that sleep deprivation increases the occurrence of lapses, periods of lowered reactive capacity, which prevent the encoding of items in short-term memory.

  7. Effect of sleep deprivation on the human metabolome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Sarah K; Ang, Joo Ern; Revell, Victoria L; Holmes, Ben; Mann, Anuska; Robertson, Francesca P; Cui, Nanyi; Middleton, Benita; Ackermann, Katrin; Kayser, Manfred; Thumser, Alfred E; Raynaud, Florence I; Skene, Debra J

    2014-07-22

    Sleep restriction and circadian clock disruption are associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The metabolic pathways involved in human sleep, however, have yet to be investigated with the use of a metabolomics approach. Here we have used untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography (LC)/MS metabolomics to examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation on plasma metabolite rhythms. Twelve healthy young male subjects remained in controlled laboratory conditions with respect to environmental light, sleep, meals, and posture during a 24-h wake/sleep cycle, followed by 24 h of wakefulness. Two-hourly plasma samples collected over the 48 h period were analyzed by LC/MS. Principal component analysis revealed a clear time of day variation with a significant cosine fit during the wake/sleep cycle and during 24 h of wakefulness in untargeted and targeted analysis. Of 171 metabolites quantified, daily rhythms were observed in the majority (n = 109), with 78 of these maintaining their rhythmicity during 24 h of wakefulness, most with reduced amplitude (n = 66). During sleep deprivation, 27 metabolites (tryptophan, serotonin, taurine, 8 acylcarnitines, 13 glycerophospholipids, and 3 sphingolipids) exhibited significantly increased levels compared with during sleep. The increased levels of serotonin, tryptophan, and taurine may explain the antidepressive effect of acute sleep deprivation and deserve further study. This report, to our knowledge the first of metabolic profiling during sleep and sleep deprivation and characterization of 24 h rhythms under these conditions, offers a novel view of human sleep/wake regulation.

  8. Aging worsens the effects of sleep deprivation on postural control.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Rébecca; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Falls increase with age and cause significant injuries in the elderly. This study aimed to determine whether age modulates the interactions between sleep deprivation and postural control and to evaluate how attention influences these interactions in the elderly. Fifteen young (24±2.7 y.o.) and 15 older adults (64±3.2 y.o.) stood still on a force plate after a night of sleep and after total sleep deprivation. Center of pressure range and velocity were measured with eyes open and with eyes closed while participants performed an interference task, a control task, and no cognitive task. Sleep deprivation increased the antero-posterior range of center of pressure in both age groups and center of pressure speed in older participants only. In elderly participants, the destabilizing effects of sleep deprivation were more pronounced with eyes closed. The interference task did not alter postural control beyond the destabilization induced by sleep loss in older subjects. It was concluded that sleep loss has greater destabilizing effects on postural control in older than in younger participants, and may therefore increase the risk of falls in the elderly.

  9. Sleep deprivation and its effects on object-selective attention.

    PubMed

    Chee, Michael W L; Tan, Jiat Chow; Parimal, Sarayu; Zagorodnov, Vitali

    2010-01-15

    Sleep deprivation (SD) affects attention but it is an open question as to whether all subtypes of attention are similarly affected. We investigated the effects of 24 h of total SD on object-selective attention. 26 healthy, young adults viewed quartets of alternating faces or place scenes and performed selective judgments on faces only, scenes only or both faces and scenes. Volunteers underwent fMRI following a normal night of sleep and again following approximately 24 h of total sleep deprivation in a counterbalanced fashion. Sleep deprivation resulted in slower and less accurate picture classification as well as poorer recognition memory for scenes. Attention strongly modulated activation in the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA). Task-related activation in the fronto-parietal cortex and PPA was reduced in SD, but the relative modulation of PPA activation by attention was preserved. Psychophysiological interaction between the left intra-parietal sulcus and the PPA that was clearly present after a normal night of sleep was reduced below threshold following SD suggesting that PPI may be a more sensitive method of detecting change in selective attention. Sleep deprivation may affect object-selective attention in addition to exerting a task-independent deficit in attention.

  10. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  11. Effects of 72-Hour Partial Sleep Deprivation on Human Behavioral and Physiological Response Measures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Ten adult males were subjected to partial sleep deprivation experiments in order to study the effects of progressive sleep deprivation on the basic...progressive loss of performance capability. Power spectral data also show changes as a function of sleep deprivation , indicating that one feature of this type of stress may be an alteration of basic human biorhythms. (Author)

  12. The effects of sleep deprivation on emotional empathy.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, Veronica; Burles, Ford; Ferrara, Michele; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that sleep loss has a detrimental effect on the ability of the individuals to process emotional information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that this negative effect extends to the ability of experiencing emotions while observing other individuals, i.e. emotional empathy. To test this hypothesis, we assessed emotional empathy in 37 healthy volunteers who were assigned randomly to one of three experimental groups: one group was tested before and after a night of total sleep deprivation (sleep deprivation group), a second group was tested before and after a usual night of sleep spent at home (sleep group) and the third group was tested twice during the same day (day group). Emotional empathy was assessed by using two parallel versions of a computerized test measuring direct (i.e. explicit evaluation of empathic concern) and indirect (i.e. the observer's reported physiological arousal) emotional empathy. The results revealed that the post measurements of both direct and indirect emotional empathy of participants in the sleep deprivation group were significantly lower than those of the sleep and day groups; post measurement scores of participants in the day and sleep groups did not differ significantly for either direct or indirect emotional empathy. These data are consistent with previous studies showing the negative effect of sleep deprivation on the processing of emotional information, and extend these effects to emotional empathy. The findings reported in our study are relevant to healthy individuals with poor sleep habits, as well as clinical populations suffering from sleep disturbances.

  13. Effects of Extreme Sleep Deprivation on Human Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan Tran; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Elizabeth T. Cady; Bradford Amstutz; Pete D. Elgin; Christopher Vowels; Gerald Deehan

    2007-04-01

    Sleep is a fundamental recuperative process for the nervous system. Disruption of this homeostatic drive can lead to severe impairments of the operator’s ability to perceive, recognize, and respond to emergencies and/or unanticipated events, putting the operator at risk. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive understanding of how sleep deprivation influences human performance is essential in order to counter fatigue or to develop mitigation strategies. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychological effects of prolonged sleep deprivation (approx. 75 hrs) over a four-day span on a general aviation pilot flying a fixed-based flight simulator. During the study, a series of tasks were employed every four hours in order to examine the pilot’s perceptual and higher level cognitive abilities. Overall, results suggest that the majority of cognitive and perceptual degradation occurs between 30-40 hours into the flight. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.

  14. Effects of monocular deprivation in the nucleus rotundus of zebra finches: a Nissl and deoxyglucose study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, K; Bischof, H J

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated in zebra finches the effects of monocular deprivation on morphological and physiological features of the nucleus rotundus, the thalamic relay station of the tectofugal pathway. In a first series of experiments neuron size and total volume were estimated in animals deprived for 20, 40 and at least 100 days and compared to values obtained from normally reared birds. Monocular closure for more than 40 days causes a marked hypertrophy in cells receiving their main input from the open eye, whereas the deprived cells are normal in size. However, with only 20 days of monocular deprivation both deprived and non-deprived rotundal neurons are larger than normal. This indicates that monocular closure has a biphasic effect: firstly, an unselective hypertrophy of deprived and non-deprived neurons, and secondly, a subsequent period of shrinkage of the deprived cells to normal values, while cells driven by the open eye remain hypertrophied. The total volume of the deprived n. rotundus turns out to be smaller in all age groups. In a second series of experiments the activity of the n. rotundus of animals monocularly deprived from birth for 100 days was investigated with the 2-deoxyglucose-method (Sokoloff et al. 1977). With binocular stimulation the activity of the deprived n. rotundus was reduced by about 40%. Depriving adult animals for 100 days does not result in asymmetric labeling of the n. rotundus. We interpretate the 2-DG data as evidence for the existence of a sensitive period for the effects of monocular deprivation. The anatomical data suggest, however, that the effects of monocular deprivation in birds are different from those observed in mammals.

  15. The effects of acute sleep deprivation during residency training.

    PubMed

    Bartle, E J; Sun, J H; Thompson, L; Light, A I; McCool, C; Heaton, S

    1988-08-01

    Verbal and symbol concentration, learning, problem solving, clear thinking, manual skills, and memory were tested in 42 surgical residents to assess the effects of acute sleep deprivation on specific neuropsychological parameters. A series of eight neuropsychological tests--digit symbols, digit vigilance, story memory, trail making, PASAT, Raven matrices, delayed story, and pegboard--and a questionnaire on mood states were completed by the residents both when fatigued (less than 4 hours of sleep: mean, 2.0 +/- 1.5 hours) and when rested (more than 4 hours of sleep: mean, 6.5 +/- 1.0 hours), with at least 7 days between tests. In order to eliminate the effects of learning from the first test series, randomization of residents was performed so that one half were first evaluated when rested and one half when fatigued. ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, and the Student t test were used to assess differences. In the acute sleep-deprived state, residents were less vigorous and more fatigued, depressed, tense, confused, and angry (p less than 0.05) than they were in rested state. Despite these changes in mood, however, the responses on all of the functional tests were no different statistically in those who were rested and those who were fatigued (even in those with less than 2 hours' sleep). We conclude that acute sleep deprivation of less than 4 hours alters mood state but does not change performance in test situations in which concentration, clear thinking, and problem solving are important.

  16. Effects of a selective sleep deprivation on subsequent anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Mougin, F; Bourdin, H; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Didier, J M; Toubin, G; Kantelip, J P

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a partial sleep deprivation on a subsequent supramaximal exercise evaluated from the 30 second Wingate test, and on the following recovery. To take into account the active muscle mass, the Wingate test was performed against a constant braking force related to the data of a force-velocity test conducted on a Monark cycle ergometer (Model 814 E with weights) one week before the experimental test. Eight highly trained athletes were enrolled for this study. The changes in ventilatory and metabolic responses were analyzed during and upon completion of physical 30 second exercise, taking place after two nights, in other words, after a reference night and after a night with reduced sleep. Partial sleep deprivation was obtained by delaying bedtime until 3 a.m. The 30 second Wingate test was performed between 9 a.m. and noon the following days, using a Monark ergometer (Model 814 F). The analyses of change scores disclosed that there were no main significant effects for measures of ventilation, lactates and pH(v) levels under the two experimental conditions. The peak power, the mean power output and the peak velocity recorded after partial sleep deprivation were not modified in comparison with the values obtained after the reference night. These findings suggest that acute sleep loss did not contribute to alterations in supramaximal exercise.

  17. The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Detection of Correlational and Causal Relationships, and Performance on an Engagement Skills Trainer Task in Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    nicotine regularly within the past year, whose daily caffeine intake exceeded 600 milligrams, whose alcohol consumption exceeded six beers/week or four...were asked to abstain from caffeine and alcohol consumption for 48 hours prior to arrival at the laboratory. Participants arrived at the laboratory on...and Belenky, G. 1993. Caffeine reversal of sleep deprivation effects on alertness and mood. Psychopharmacology. 112: 359-365. Previc, F. H

  18. SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report was confined to considering the effects of sleep deprivation , in man, with particular reference to studies of the resulting biochemical...have a limited value when taken separately: the biochemical and physiological changes that occur in response to sleep deprivation may depend...three separate heads: first, the biochemical changes resulting from sleep deprivation ; secondly, the physiological ones; and last, the changes in performance and behaviour. (Author)

  19. Antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation require astrocyte-dependent adenosine mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hines, D J; Schmitt, L I; Hines, R M; Moss, S J; Haydon, P G

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a debilitating condition with a lifetime risk of ten percent. Most treatments take several weeks to achieve clinical efficacy, limiting the ability to bring instant relief needed in psychiatric emergencies. One intervention that rapidly alleviates depressive symptoms is sleep deprivation; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. Astrocytes regulate responses to sleep deprivation, raising the possibility that glial signaling mediates antidepressive-like actions of sleep deprivation. Here, we found that astrocytic signaling to adenosine (A1) receptors was required for the robust reduction of depressive-like behaviors following 12 hours of sleep deprivation. As sleep deprivation activates synaptic A1 receptors, we mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation on depression phenotypes by administration of the A1 agonist CCPA. These results provide the first mechanistic insight into how sleep deprivation impacts mood, and provide a novel pathway for rapid antidepressant development by modulation of glial signaling in the brain. PMID:23321809

  20. Sex-dependent effects of sleep deprivation on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah L; Fry, Megan E; Johnson, Brandon L; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether the effects of sleep deprivation are limited to increasing the likelihood of experiencing a myocardial infarction or if sleep deprivation also increases the extent of myocardial injury. In this study, rats were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 96 h using the platform-over-water method. Control rats were subjected to the same condition except the control platform was large enough for the rats to sleep. Hearts from sleep deprived and control rats were subjected to 20 min ischemia on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Infarct size and post ischemic recovery of contractile function were unaffected by sleep deprivation in male hearts. In contrast, hearts from sleep-deprived females exhibited significantly larger infarcts than hearts from control females. Post ischemic recovery of rate pressure product and + dP/dT were significantly attenuated by sleep deprivation in female hearts, and post ischemic recovery of end diastolic pressure was significantly elevated in hearts from sleep deprived females compared to control females, indicating that post ischemic recovery of both systolic and diastolic function were worsened by sleep deprivation. These data provide evidence that sleep deprivation increases the extent of ischemia-induced injury in a sex-dependent manner.

  1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancratz, Diane R.

    This literature review defines Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and considers their causes, diagnoses, prevalence, and educational ramifications. Effects of alcohol during each of the trimesters of pregnancy are summarized. Specific diagnostic characteristics of FAS are listed: (1) growth deficiency, (2) a…

  2. The Effects of Two Types of Sleep Deprivation on Visual Working Memory Capacity and Filtering Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Sean P. A.; Anderson, Dane E.; Straus, Laura D.; Vogel, Edward K.; Perez, Veronica B.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has adverse consequences for a variety of cognitive functions. The exact effects of sleep deprivation, though, are dependent upon the cognitive process examined. Within working memory, for example, some component processes are more vulnerable to sleep deprivation than others. Additionally, the differential impacts on cognition of different types of sleep deprivation have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of one night of total sleep deprivation and 4 nights of partial sleep deprivation (4 hours in bed/night) on two components of visual working memory: capacity and filtering efficiency. Forty-four healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of the two sleep deprivation conditions. All participants were studied: 1) in a well-rested condition (following 6 nights of 9 hours in bed/night); and 2) following sleep deprivation, in a counter-balanced order. Visual working memory testing consisted of two related tasks. The first measured visual working memory capacity and the second measured the ability to ignore distractor stimuli in a visual scene (filtering efficiency). Results showed neither type of sleep deprivation reduced visual working memory capacity. Partial sleep deprivation also generally did not change filtering efficiency. Total sleep deprivation, on the other hand, did impair performance in the filtering task. These results suggest components of visual working memory are differentially vulnerable to the effects of sleep deprivation, and different types of sleep deprivation impact visual working memory to different degrees. Such findings have implications for operational settings where individuals may need to perform with inadequate sleep and whose jobs involve receiving an array of visual information and discriminating the relevant from the irrelevant prior to making decisions or taking actions (e.g., baggage screeners, air traffic controllers, military personnel, health care providers). PMID

  3. Effects of caloric deprivation and satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system

    PubMed Central

    Zverev, Yuriy P

    2004-01-01

    Background Sensitivity of the gustatory system could be modulated by a number of short-term and long-term factors such as body mass, gender, age, local and systemic diseases and pathological processes, excessive alcohol drinking, drug dependence, smoking, composition of oral fluid, state of oral hygiene, consumption of some foods among many others. A few studies have demonstrated the effects of hunger and caloric satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system in obese humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of short-term caloric deprivation and satiety on recognition taste thresholds of healthy, non-smoking, non-drinking, non-obese young male subjects. The two-alternative forced-choice technique was used to measure taste threshold. Results Recognition thresholds for sucrose and salt were significantly lower during fasting state than after a meal (t = 2.23, P < 0.05, and t = 2.86, P < 0.02, respectively) while the values of recognition thresholds for bitter substances in fasting state and after caloric loading did not differ significantly. Conclusions Short-term caloric deprivation in our study model was associated with increased taste sensitivity to sweet and salty substances compared to satiated state while taste sensitivity to bitter substances was not affected by the conditions of measurements. Selective modulation of sensitivity of the gustatory system might reflect the different biological importance of salty, sweet and bitter qualities of taste. PMID:15028115

  4. The effect of REM sleep deprivation on motivation for food reward.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Erin C; Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Harder, Bridgette K; Kelley, Ann E; Benca, Ruth M

    2005-08-30

    Prolonged sleep deprivation in rats produces a characteristic syndrome consisting of an increase in food intake yet a decrease in weight. Moreover, the increase in food intake generally precedes the weight loss, suggesting that sleep deprivation may affect appetitive behaviors. Using the multiple platform method to produce rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation, we investigated the effect of REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) on motivation for food reward utilizing food-reinforced operant tasks. In acquisition or maintenance of an operant task, REM sleep-deprived rats, with or without simultaneous food restriction, decreased responding for sucrose pellet reward in comparison to controls, despite the fact that all REM sleep-deprived rats lost weight. Furthermore, the overall response deficit of the REM sleep-deprived rats was due to a within-session decline in responding. REM sleep-deprived rats showed evidence of understanding the contingency of the task comparable to controls throughout deprivation period, suggesting that the decrements in responding were not primarily related to deficits in learning or memory. Rather, REM sleep deprivation appears to alter systems involved in motivational processes, reward, and/or attention.

  5. Alcohol Acute Effects in Aircrew

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    we derive the name "whiskey." In the Elizabethan era the physiological effects were known to Shakespeare , who in Hamlet noted that alcohol provoked...the Elizabethan era the physiological effects were alluded to by Porter in Hamlet , who noted alcohol provoked only "nose-painting, sleep and urine" (8...atlas of wine. London: Mitchell Beazley Pub, 1985. 7. Lord T. The World Guide to Spirits. pp. 6-27, 1979. 8. Shakespeare W. Macbeth. Act II, Scene 3

  6. Effects of area and family deprivation on risk factors for teenage pregnancy among 13-15-year-old girls.

    PubMed

    Smith, Debbie M; Elander, James

    2006-11-01

    Information is needed about how the effects of socio-economic deprivation on teenage pregnancy are mediated by proximal risk factors, in order to target area-wide and family interventions more effectively. Using a 2x2 factorial design, we tested the separate and interacting effects of area deprivation and family deprivation on six specific proximal risk factors for teenage pregnancy: early sexual activity, life expectations, knowledge and beliefs about contraceptives, attitude to abortion, beliefs about love, and use of local sexual health services. Data were collected from 201 13-15-year-old girls in deprived and non-deprived families living in deprived and more affluent areas of the United Kingdom. Area deprivation significantly increased early sexual activity, and both area and family deprivation significantly reduced life expectations. Significant interactions between area and family deprivation showed that the impact of living in a deprived area depends to some extent on family circumstances, with implications for targeting different types of intervention. Living in a deprived area increased early sexual activity much more markedly among girls in deprived families, so interventions to reduce early sexual activity could target individually deprived girls living in deprived areas. Living in a more affluent area increased life expectations, but only among girls in non-deprived families, so both area-wide and individually targeted interventions would be needed to raise life expectations among girls most at risk of teenage pregnancy.

  7. Effect of 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation on Auditory and Linguistic Perception: A Comparison among Young Controls, Sleep-Deprived Participants, Dyslexic Readers, and Aging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fostick, Leah; Babkoff, Harvey; Zukerman, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effects of 24 hr of sleep deprivation on auditory and linguistic perception and to assess the magnitude of this effect by comparing such performance with that of aging adults on speech perception and with that of dyslexic readers on phonological awareness. Method: Fifty-five sleep-deprived young adults were compared with 29…

  8. Effects of sleep deprivation on serum cortisol level and mental health in servicemen.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Tao; Sun, Xin-Yang; Yang, Ting-Shu; Zhang, Li-Yi; Yang, Jia-Lin; Bai, Jing

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on serum cortisol level and mental health and explore the correlations between them in servicemen. A total of 149 out of the 207 Chinese servicemen were randomly selected to go through 24hour sleep deprivation, leaving the rest (58) as the control group, before and after which their blood samples were drawn for cortisol measurement. Following the procedure, all the participants were administered the Military Personnel Mental Disorder Prediction Scale, taking the military norm as baseline. The results revealed that the post-deprivation serum cortisol level was positively correlated with the factor score of mania in the sleep deprivation group (rSp=0.415, p<0.001). Sleep deprivation could significantly increase serum cortisol level and may affect mental health in servicemen. The increase of serum cortisol level is significantly related to mania disorder during sleep deprivation.

  9. Some measures to reduce effects of prolonged sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Batejat, D

    1995-01-01

    Prolonged sleep deprivation is an exceptional situation, encountered in special environments such as sports, civilian and military, and which induces deficits in vigilance and performance. Among the array of measures which may be used to counteract these effects, the authors described a protocol using the combination of small naps, and administration of a pharmacological aid. A detailed description of advantages and drawbacks of each one of these measures is given, illustrated by several examples extracted from different studies. Four aspects of pharmacological aid are reviewed: the effects of amphetamines and amphetamine-like substances, caffeine, eugregoric substances, and the effect of the association small nap + eugregoric substances. The use of these various aids is discussed, and findings show that each one of them finds an application in a specific context.

  10. Effect of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on rat brain monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, M; Mallick, B N

    1993-08-01

    Monoamine oxidase, monoamine oxidase-A, and monoamine oxidase-B activities were compared in free moving, rapid eye movement sleep-deprived, recovered, and control rat brains. The activities were estimated in the whole brain, cerebrum, cerebellum, whole brainstem, medulla, pons, and midbrain. The flowerpot method was used for continuing deprivation for one, two, or four days. Monoamine oxidase activity decreased significantly in the cerebrum and the cerebellum of the sleep-deprived rats, whereas monoamine oxidase-A and monoamine oxidase-B were differentially affected. Medullary MAO-A was the first to be affected, showing an increase after just one day of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation, while longer deprivation decreased its activity. The activity of monoamine oxidase-B was not significantly affected in any brain areas of the deprived rats until after two days of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation. All the altered enzyme activities returned to control levels after recovery. Control experiments suggest that the decrease was primarily caused by the rapid eye movement sleep deprivation and was not due to nonspecific effects. These findings are consistent with past studies and may help to explain earlier observations. The results support the involvement of aminergic mechanisms in rapid eye movement sleep. The plausible reasons for the changes in the activities of monoamine oxidases, after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation, are discussed.

  11. An Overview of Sleep Deprivation and The Ameliorative Effects of Modafinil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    modafinil on plasma melatonin , cortisol and growth hormone rhythms, rectal temperature and performance in healthy subjects during 36h sleep deprivation...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP013763 TITLE: An Overview of Sleep Deprivation and The Ameliorative...Effects of Modafinil DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited rhis paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Sleep

  12. Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs when inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance, inadequate alertness, and deterioration in health. It is incompletely understood why humans need sleep, although some theories include energy conservation, restoration, and information processing. Sleep deprivation has many deleterious health effects. Residency programs have enacted strict work restrictions because of medically related errors due to sleep deprivation. Because obstetrics is an unpredictable specialty with long irregular hours, enacting a hospitalist program enhances patient safety, decreases malpractice risk, and improves the physician's quality of life by allowing obstetricians to get sufficient rest.

  13. Sleep deprivation effects on object discrimination task in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro-da-Silva, Jaquelinne; Silva, Priscila Fernandes; Nogueira, Marcelo Borges; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-03-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal vertebrate model for neurobehavioral studies with translational relevance to humans. Many aspects of sleep have been studied, but we still do not understand how and why sleep deprivation alters behavioral and physiological processes. A number of hypotheses suggest its role in memory consolidation. In this respect, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of sleep deprivation on memory in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using an object discrimination paradigm. Four treatments were tested: control, partial sleep deprivation, total sleep deprivation by light pulses, and total sleep deprivation by extended light. The control group explored the new object more than the known object, indicating clear discrimination. The partially sleep-deprived group explored the new object more than the other object in the discrimination phase, suggesting a certain degree of discriminative performance. By contrast, both total sleep deprivation groups equally explored all objects, regardless of their novelty. It seems that only one night of sleep deprivation is enough to affect discriminative response in zebrafish, indicating its negative impact on cognitive processes. We suggest that this study could be a useful screening tool for cognitive dysfunction and a better understanding of the effect of sleep-wake cycles on cognition.

  14. Effect of 72 h of Sleep Deprivation on the Iowa Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Lei; ZHOU, Renlai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on cognitive processes, including decision making. The present study investigated how 72 h of sleep deprivation influenced individual neural performance in the Iowa gambling task using event-related potential technology. Methods Eleven healthy male adults who participated in our study were randomized to be either in group with 72 h of social isolation condition or 72 h of sleep deprivation condition. Results Results showed that, in the feedback stage, the N250–400 amplitude was smaller in post-test than in pre-test for the sleep deprivation condition, especially in the frontal cortex. No significant difference between the pre-test and post-test condition was found in the social isolation condition. Conclusion These results suggested that 72 h of sleep deprivation affected an individual’s response to feedback stimuli, causing the individual to evaluate the stimuli slowly. PMID:28360813

  15. "The Glasgow effect?"- the result of the geographical patterning of deprived areas?

    PubMed

    Livingston, Mark; Lee, Duncan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this research was to examine whether the excess mortality found in Glasgow, compared to other cities in the UK ("Glasgow effect"), could be attributed to patterns of the distribution of deprived neighbourhoods within the cities. Data on mortality and deprivation at a neighbourhood scale were used to examine the impact of the patterning of neighbourhood deprivation on mortality in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. Analysis using a combination of GIS and statistical approaches, including a Moran׳s I test and Conditional Auto Regressive models to capture residual spatial autocorrelation, was carried out. The pattern of deprivation was found to be more dispersed in Glasgow compared to the other cities. The impact of surrounding deprivation at two different scales shows strong impact on neighbourhood health outcomes in Glasgow and Liverpool but not in Manchester, suggesting that patterning is not a major contribution to the excess mortality in Glasgow.

  16. Effects of oxygen deprivation on incubated rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated soleus muscle deprived of oxygen produces more lactate and alanine than oxygen-supplied muscle. Oxygenated muscle synthesized glutamine, while anoxic muscle used this amino acid. Oxygen deprivation decreased adenine nucleotides leading to the efflux of nucleosides. Protein synthesis and degradation responded differently to anoxia. Synthesis almost completely ceased, while proteolysis increased. Therefore, protein degradation in soleus muscle is enhanced when energy supplies and oxygen tension are low.

  17. Can economic deprivation protect health? Paradoxical multilevel effects of poverty on Hispanic children's wheezing.

    PubMed

    Collins, Timothy W; Kim, Young-an; Grineski, Sara E; Clark-Reyna, Stephanie

    2014-08-06

    Prior research suggests that economic deprivation has a generally negative influence on residents' health. We employ hierarchical logistic regression modeling to test if economic deprivation presents respiratory health risks or benefits to Hispanic children living in the City of El Paso (Texas, USA) at neighborhood- and individual-levels, and whether individual-level health effects of economic deprivation vary based on neighborhood-level economic deprivation. Data come from the US Census Bureau and a population-based survey of El Paso schoolchildren. The dependent variable is children's current wheezing, an established respiratory morbidity measure, which is appropriate for use with economically-deprived children with an increased likelihood of not receiving a doctor's asthma diagnosis. Results reveal that economic deprivation (measured based on poverty status) at both neighborhood- and individual-levels is associated with reduced odds of wheezing for Hispanic children. A sensitivity analysis revealed similar significant effects of individual- and neighborhood-level poverty on the odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Neighborhood-level poverty did not significantly modify the observed association between individual-level poverty and Hispanic children's wheezing; however, greater neighborhood poverty tends to be more protective for poor (as opposed to non-poor) Hispanic children. These findings support a novel, multilevel understanding of seemingly paradoxical effects of economic deprivation on Hispanic health.

  18. Effects of mental resilience on neuroendocrine hormones level changes induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinyang; Dai, Xuyan; Yang, Tingshu; Song, Hongtao; Yang, Jialin; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Liyi

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mental resilience on the changes of serum rennin, angiotensin, and cortisol level induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen. By random cluster sampling, a total of 160 servicemen, aged from 18 to 30, were selected to undergo 24-hour total sleep deprivation and administered the military personnel mental resilience scale after the deprivation procedure. The sleep deprivation procedure started at 8 a.m. on Day 8 and ended at 8 a.m. on Day 9 after 7 days of normal sleep for baseline preparation. Blood samples were drawn from the 160 participants at 8 a.m. respectively on Day 8 and Day 9 for hormonal measurements. All blood samples were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. As hypothesized, serum rennin, angiotensin II, and cortisol level of the participants after sleep deprivation were significantly higher than those before (P < 0.05). The changes of serum rennin and cortisol in the lower mental resilience subgroup were significantly greater (P < 0.05); problem-solving skill and willpower were the leading influence factors for the increases of serum rennin and cortisol respectively induced by sleep deprivation. We conclude that mental resilience plays a significant role in alleviating the changes of neurohormones level induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen.

  19. Effects of sleep deprivation and exercise on cognitive, motor performance and mood.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathon P R; McNaughton, Lars R; Polman, Remco C J

    2006-02-28

    This study examined the effect of 30 h of sleep deprivation and intermittent physical exercise, on both cognitive and psychomotor function as well subjective ratings of mood. Six subjects with the following physical characteristics participated in the study (Mean +/- S.D.): age 22 +/- 0.3 years, height 180 +/- 5 cm, body mass: 77 +/- 5 kg, VO2peak 44 +/- 5 ml kg(-1) min(-1). Three subjects engaged in normal sedentary activities while three others cycled on a cycle ergometer at 50% VO2peak for 20 min out of every 2 h during 30 h of sleep deprivation. One week later sleep deprivation was repeated with a cross over of subjects. Every 4 h, subjects completed simple and two-choice reaction time tasks at both rest and during exercise, a computerized tracking task, a number cancellation task, and an assessment of subjective mood state as measured by the POMS questionnaire. A 3 x 4 repeated measures ANOVA revealed that resting but not exercising reaction times were significantly slower with sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was also associated with significantly greater negative disturbances to subjective vigour, fatigue and depression assessed by the Profile of Mood States questionnaire. Compared to those who have been deprived of sleep alone, individuals that performed 5 h of intermittent moderate exercise during 30 h of sleep deprivation appeared to be more vulnerable to negative mood disturbances and impairment in reaction times. This could result in greater risk of accident due to a reduced capacity to respond quickly.

  20. Rural/urban mortality differences in England and Wales and the effect of deprivation adjustment.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Andrea; Farewell, Daniel; Roach, Paul; Dunstan, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Perceptions that rural populations are inevitably healthier and live longer than urban populations are increasingly being challenged. But very few publications have investigated the extent to which these putative differences can be explained by variation in area composition. Existing publications have tended to use conventional deprivation measures, often thought to mask rural deprivation by favourable averages. Further, they have typically been based on large and variably-sized geographical units, or confined to studies of a single region or cause of death. This study examines differences in mortality between rural and urban areas in the entire population of England and Wales for 2002-2004. It uses the most up-to-date small geographical units of similar size and homogeneity of population together with the recently-introduced Rural and Urban Area Classification, and adjusts for five different deprivation measures (including modern composite indices). The causes of death investigated were all-cause mortality, cancer, lung cancer, respiratory disease, circulatory disease, suicide and accidents. Particular points of focus for the study were the potential for interaction between deprivation and rurality, and the importance of choice of deprivation measure in quantifying the relationships between mortality, rurality and deprivation. Choice of deprivation measure was not found to alter the substantive conclusions of any analysis, and little evidence for differential effects of deprivation in rural and urban areas was uncovered. Differences between rural and urban areas in all-cause, circulatory disease and cancer mortality could largely be accounted for by adjusting for deprivation. For these causes of death, therefore, rural populations were not found to be inherently healthier than their urban counterparts. However, substantial residual differences between rural and urban areas were found in comparisons of mortality from lung cancer and respiratory disease, mortality

  1. Subgroup-dependent effects of voluntary alcohol intake on behavioral profiles in outbred Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Shima; Roman, Erika

    2014-12-15

    Experimental animal models are critical for understanding the genetic, environmental and neurobiological underpinnings of alcohol use disorders. Limited studies investigate alcohol-induced effects on behavior using free-choice paradigms. The aims of the present experiment were to study voluntary alcohol intake using a modified intermittent access paradigm, investigate the effects of voluntary alcohol intake on behavioral profiles in water- and alcohol-drinking rats, and select extreme low- and high-drinking animals for a more detailed behavioral characterization. Sixty outbred male Wistar rats were randomized into water and alcohol groups. Behavioral profiles in the multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) test were assessed prior to and after voluntary alcohol intake. The animals had intermittent access to 20% alcohol and water for three consecutive days per week for seven weeks. The results revealed increased alcohol intake over time. No major alcohol-induced differences on behavior profiles were found when comparing water- and alcohol-drinking animals. The high-drinking animals displayed an alcohol deprivation effect, which was not found in the low-drinking animals. High-drinking rats had lower risk-taking behavior prior to alcohol access and lower anxiety-like behavior after voluntary alcohol intake compared to low-drinking rats. In conclusion, the modified intermittent access paradigm may be useful for pharmacological manipulation of alcohol intake. With regard to behavior, the present findings highlights the importance of studying subgroup-dependent differences and add to the complexity of individual differences in behavioral traits of relevance to the vulnerability for excessive alcohol intake.

  2. Protective effect of alprazolam against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2008-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is considered as a risk factor for various diseases. Sleep deprivation leads to behavioral, hormonal, neurochemical and biochemical alterations in the animals. The present study was designed to explore the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of alprazolam against 72h sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice. In the present study, sleep deprivation caused anxiety-like behavior, weight loss, impaired ambulatory movements and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep-deprived mice brain. Treatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved behavioral alterations. Biochemically, alprazolam treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, reversed raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level. Combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) with lower dose of alprazolam (0.25mg/kg) significantly antagonized protective effect of alprazolam. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) with alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of alprazolam. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that alprazolam might produce protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and related oxidative damage.

  3. Effect of sleep deprivation on response threshold for signal detectability parameter, beta.

    PubMed

    Polzella, D J

    1978-12-01

    In contrast to a previous study (Deaton, Tobias, & Wilkinson, 1971), data are presented which demonstrate significant decreases in response bias (beta) as well as sensitivity (d') following one night of sleep deprivation. It is argued that previous failures to observe significant decreases in beta may be related to the disparity in the number of noise and signal-plus-noise trials in these experiments. The use of parametric analysis to test the effect of sleep deprivation on d' and beta is recommended.

  4. The effect of venlafaxine on behaviour, body weight and striatal monoamine levels on sleep-deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ricardo A; Cunha, Geanne M A; Borges, Karla Daisy M; de Bruin, Gabriela S; dos Santos-Filho, Emídio A; Viana, Glauce S B; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2004-11-01

    Partial sleep deprivation is clinically associated with fatigue, depressive symptoms and reduced memory. Previously, it has been demonstrated that venlafaxine, an atypical antidepressant, increases the levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in rat hippocampus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of venlafaxine on depression, anxiety, locomotor activity and memory in a model of REM sleep (REMs) deprivation in rats. We have also studied the influence of venlafaxine on monoamine levels in the striatum. Six groups of animals (N=20 each) were treated with saline or venlafaxine (1 or 10 mg/kg) during 10 days, submitted or not to REMs deprivation and studied with the forced swimming test of Porsolt (STP), plus-maze, passive avoidance and open-field tests right after sleep deprivation. Animals were also studied for passive avoidance 24 h later (rebound period). Brain samples for monoamine measurements were collected either immediately after REMs deprivation or after 24 h. Both REMs deprivation and venlafaxine showed an antidepressant effect. An anxiolytic effect was also observed after REMs deprivation. Previous treatment with venlafaxine blocked the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of REMs deprivation. REMs deprivation alone and treatment with venlafaxine 10 mg/kg increased locomotor activity, and this effect was inhibited by venlafaxine in REMs deprived rats. Both venlafaxine treatment and REMs deprivation induced weight loss. Venlafaxine treatment, but not REMs deprivation, induced an increase in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. The combination of REMs deprivation and venlafaxine treatment was associated with an increase in serotonin turnover 24 h after rebound sleep. In this study, venlafaxine treatment hindered most behavioral effects of REMs deprivation and was associated with an interference on dopamine and serotonin systems in the striatum.

  5. The effects of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team-based performance.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, June J; Vander Wood, Melissa A; O'Connell, Kristina L

    2011-07-01

    Teamwork is becoming increasingly common in today's workplaces; however, little research has examined how well teams perform under sleep deprivation conditions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team performance. A total of 24 participants were sleep deprived for 30 h and completed 16 h of sustained operations during the last portion of the sleep deprivation period. The participants completed the Wombat, a complex task including vigilance and cognitive components, with a partner in four 24-min testing sessions during the sustained operations period. The results indicated that team performance increased during the work period while, within each testing session, team performance on vigilance tasks remained stable and overall performance decreased. The current results suggest that performance on two-person teams results in improved performance but does not fully counteract the decreases in performance within each work period. Performance in two-person teams increased across an extended work shift under sleep deprivation conditions. However, vigilance performance remained stable while overall performance decreased when examining performance in 8-min segments. These results suggest that averaging team-based performance over a longer testing period may mask the negative effects of sleep deprivation. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Performance in two-person teams increased across an extended work shift under sleep deprivation conditions. However, vigilance performance remained stable while overall performance decreased when examining performance in 8-min segments. These results suggest that averaging team-based performance over a longer testing period may mask the negative effects of sleep deprivation.

  6. Loss of Arc renders the visual cortex impervious to the effects of sensory experience or deprivation.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Cortina L; Shepherd, Jason D; Tropea, Daniela; Wang, Kuan H; Bear, Mark F; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-04-01

    A myriad of mechanisms have been suggested to account for the full richness of visual cortical plasticity. We found that visual cortex lacking Arc is impervious to the effects of deprivation or experience. Using intrinsic signal imaging and chronic visually evoked potential recordings, we found that Arc(-/-) mice did not exhibit depression of deprived-eye responses or a shift in ocular dominance after brief monocular deprivation. Extended deprivation also failed to elicit a shift in ocular dominance or open-eye potentiation. Moreover, Arc(-/-) mice lacked stimulus-selective response potentiation. Although Arc(-/-) mice exhibited normal visual acuity, baseline ocular dominance was abnormal and resembled that observed after dark-rearing. These data suggest that Arc is required for the experience-dependent processes that normally establish and modify synaptic connections in visual cortex.

  7. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  8. The effects of light deprivation/blindness on testicular function of gerbil (Meriones hurrianae Jerdon).

    PubMed

    Dixit, V P; Sharma, O P; Agrawal, M

    1977-09-01

    1. Light deprivation either by enucleation or darkness resulted in a wide-spread testicular damage. The changes consisted of loss of type A spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and spermatozoa. 2. The atrophic testes of eyeless gerbils regenerated after 20 weeks and were indistinguishable from those of untreated, continuous light exposed animals. The reversible effects were not seen in continuous dark exposure. 3. Light deprivation (enucleation/continuous darkness) inhibits the synthesis of RNA, protein and sialic acid in the testes, epididymides and seminal vesicles. The testicular cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase activity was increased. 4. Haemoglobulin, haematrocrit and serum-transaminase levels were all the time within normal limits. Histological preparations of the liver showed normal architecture. 5. Reduced androgen production following a long term light deprivation was reflected in low levels of RNA and sialic acid in the testes and epididymides and shrunken Leydig cell nuclei. 6. In conclusion, light deprivation caused damage to the male genital tract of gerbils.

  9. Effect of Sleep Deprivation on the Male Reproductive System in Rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Ho; Lee, Seung Hoon; Bae, Jae Hyun; Shim, Ji Sung; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Young Sik; Shin, Chol

    2016-10-01

    There has been no study reporting on the influence of sleep deprivation on the male reproductive system including sperm quality. In this study, we hypothesized that sleep deprivation could lead to adverse effect on the male reproductive system. The rats were divided into three groups: 1) control (home-cage, n = 10); 2) SD4 (sleep deprivation for 4 days, n = 10); and 3) SD7 (sleep deprivation for 7 days, n = 10). Sleep deprivation was performed by a modified multiple platform method. Sperm quality (sperm motion parameters and counts), hormone levels (corticosterone and testosterone), and the histopathology of testis were evaluated and compared between the three groups. A statistically significant reduction (P = 0.018) was observed in sperm motility in the SD7 group compared to those of the control group. However, there were no significant differences in other sperm motion parameters, or in sperm counts of the testis and cauda epididymis between three groups. Compared with the control group, the SD4 (P = 0.033) and SD7 (P = 0.002) groups exhibited significant increases of corticosterone levels, but significant decreases of testosterone levels were found in the SD4 (P = 0.001) and SD7 (P < 0.001) groups. Seminiferous tubular atrophy and/or spermatid retention was partially observed in the SD4 and SD7 groups, compared with the normal histopathology of the control group. Sleep deprivation may have an adverse effect on the male reproductive system in rats.

  10. Effect of Sleep Deprivation on the Male Reproductive System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Young Sik

    2016-01-01

    There has been no study reporting on the influence of sleep deprivation on the male reproductive system including sperm quality. In this study, we hypothesized that sleep deprivation could lead to adverse effect on the male reproductive system. The rats were divided into three groups: 1) control (home-cage, n = 10); 2) SD4 (sleep deprivation for 4 days, n = 10); and 3) SD7 (sleep deprivation for 7 days, n = 10). Sleep deprivation was performed by a modified multiple platform method. Sperm quality (sperm motion parameters and counts), hormone levels (corticosterone and testosterone), and the histopathology of testis were evaluated and compared between the three groups. A statistically significant reduction (P = 0.018) was observed in sperm motility in the SD7 group compared to those of the control group. However, there were no significant differences in other sperm motion parameters, or in sperm counts of the testis and cauda epididymis between three groups. Compared with the control group, the SD4 (P = 0.033) and SD7 (P = 0.002) groups exhibited significant increases of corticosterone levels, but significant decreases of testosterone levels were found in the SD4 (P = 0.001) and SD7 (P < 0.001) groups. Seminiferous tubular atrophy and/or spermatid retention was partially observed in the SD4 and SD7 groups, compared with the normal histopathology of the control group. Sleep deprivation may have an adverse effect on the male reproductive system in rats. PMID:27550492

  11. The effects of smoking deprivation and nicotine administration on emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cinciripini, Paul M; Robinson, Jason D; Carter, Brian L; Lam, Cho; Wu, XiFeng; de Moor, Carl A; Baile, Walter F; Wetter, David W

    2006-06-01

    Although converging lines of evidence suggest that nicotine and mood are related at a fundamental biological level, this link has not been reliably demonstrated in laboratory studies. In this study, startle probe methodology was used to examine the effects of nicotine administration and deprivation on emotional processes associated with motivation. Smokers (N = 115) completed four laboratory sessions crossing deprivation (12-hr deprived vs. nondeprived) with nicotine spray (active vs. placebo). Participants viewed affective pictures (positive, negative, neutral) and pictures involving cigarette cues, while startle probes were administered. Deprivation decreased startle responding to cigarette cues, suggesting an activation of appetitive processes. Nicotine administration suppressed overall startle responding during deprivation. In addition, during deprivation, random exposure to negative stimuli over two blocks of trials resulted in decreased adaptation of the startle response, suggesting that some sensitization to negative emotional cues may take place during nicotine withdrawal. These effects are consistent with formulations of addiction, stressing that withdrawal may both increase the reinforcement salience of smoking stimuli and decrease habituation to negative emotional stimuli.

  12. The effects of oviposition-site deprivation on Anopheles gambiae reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, depends on availability of suitable surface water for oviposition. Short and long dry spells occur throughout the year in many parts of its range that limit its access to oviposition sites. Although not well understood, oviposition-site deprivation has been found to rapidly reduce egg batch size and hatch rate of several mosquito species. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess these effects of oviposition-site deprivation on An. gambiae and to evaluate the role of nutrition and sperm viability as mediators of these effects. Methods Anopheles gambiae adults (1–2 d old) from the G3 laboratory colony were assigned to the following treatment groups: oviposition-deprived (fed once and then deprived of oviposition site for 7 or 14 d), multiple-fed control (fed regularly once a week and allowed to lay eggs without delay), and age matched blood-deprived control (fed once, three days before water for oviposition was provided). Egg batch size and hatch rate were measured. In the second experiment two additional treatment groups were included: oviposition-deprived females that received either a second (supplemental) blood meal or virgin males (supplemental mating) 4 days prior to receiving water for oviposition. Results An. gambiae was highly sensitive to oviposition-site deprivation. Egg batch size dropped sharply to 0–3.5 egg/female within 14 days, due to reduced oviposition rate rather than a reduced number of eggs/batch. Egg hatch rate also fell dramatically to 0-2% within 7 days. The frequency of brown eggs that fail to tan was elevated. A supplemental blood meal, but not ‘supplemental insemination,’ recovered the oviposition rate of females subjected to oviposition-site deprivation. Similarly, a supplemental blood meal, but not ‘supplemental insemination,’ partly recovered hatch rate, but this increase was marginally significant (P < 0.069). Conclusions Even a short dry spell resulting in

  13. Communication Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abkarian, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review addresses studies of speech, language, and communication skills evidenced by children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. Concomitant physical, behavioral, intellectual, and learning patterns are reviewed, and symptoms presented by alcohol-exposed children are compared to those seen in other…

  14. Psychological Effect of an Analogue Traumatic Event Reduced by Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Porcheret, Kate; Holmes, Emily A.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Foster, Russell G.; Wulff, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To examine the effect of sleep deprivation compared to sleep, immediately after experimental trauma stimuli on the development of intrusive memories to that trauma stimuli. Design: Participants were exposed to a film with traumatic content (trauma film). The immediate response to the trauma film was assessed, followed by either total sleep deprivation (sleep deprived group, N = 20) or sleep as usual (sleep group, N = 22). Twelve hours after the film viewing the initial psychological effect of the trauma film was measured and for the subsequent 6 days intrusive emotional memories related to the trauma film were recorded in daily life. Setting: Academic sleep laboratory and participants' home environment. Participants: Healthy paid volunteers. Measurements and results: On the first day after the trauma film, the psychological effect as assessed by the Impact of Event Scale – Revised was lower in the sleep deprived group compared to the sleep group. In addition, the sleep deprived group reported fewer intrusive emotional memories (mean 2.28, standard deviation [SD] 2.91) compared to the sleep group (mean 3.76, SD 3.35). Because habitual sleep/circadian patterns, psychological health, and immediate effect of the trauma film were similar at baseline for participants of both groups, the results cannot be accounted for by pre-existing inequalities between groups. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that sleep deprivation on one night, rather than sleeping, reduces emotional effect and intrusive memories following exposure to experimental trauma. Citation: Porcheret K, Holmes EA, Goodwin GM, Foster RG, Wulff K. Psychological effect of an analogue traumatic event reduced by sleep deprivation. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1017–1025. PMID:26118556

  15. Effect of dietary nickel deprivation on vision, olfaction, and taste in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Uthus, Eric O; Penland, James G; Nielsen, Forrest H

    2014-10-01

    Early studies on dietary nickel deprivation found decreased reproduction rate in pigs and decreased insemination and conception rates in goats. Studies from our laboratory demonstrated that nickel deprivation impaired male reproductive function of rats. A physiological amount of nickel modulates the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (CNG channels) in vitro. Thus, because CNG channels have important roles in spermatozoa function, it was speculated that the impairment of reproduction by nickel deprivation was through an effect on CNG channels. Because CNG channels are found in retinal photoreceptor, olfactory receptor, and taste receptor cells, we hypothesized that nickel deprivation would also alter light/dark preference, odor preference to female rat urine, and taste preference/aversion in rats. In the light/dark Y-maze, nickel deprivation significantly decreased time spent in the dark arm by rats. The number of sniffs to estrous female urine was significantly increased only in nickel-supplemented rats. The number of licks at the saccharin bottle was significantly decreased by dietary nickel deprivation. These findings suggest that nickel has a biological role in the special senses: vision, olfaction and taste.

  16. Opiate effects on social behavior of juvenile dogs as a function of social deprivation.

    PubMed

    Knowles, P A; Conner, R L; Panksepp, J

    1989-07-01

    The relationship between opioids and social behavior was examined by administering morphine (an opioid agonist) and naloxone (an opioid antagonist) to juvenile dogs and measuring various social behaviors (e.g., tail wagging) in a large room. Drugs were administered following social deprivation and nondeprivation. It was hypothesized that morphine would ease effects of social deprivation while naloxone would result in behavior typical of untreated socially-deprived dogs. Social deprivation (24 hr) resulted in more contact with the experimenter and increased tail wagging relative to nondeprivation. Morphine (0.25 mg/kg) resulted in more contacts with the experimenter and entrances into the "experimenter's area" relative to vehicle injections. Further, morphine decreased and naloxone increased tail wagging in the dog's area and there was a significant social condition X drug interaction for that measure. Naloxone (0.25 mg/kg) increased wagging following nondeprivation while morphine decreased wagging following deprivation. These data support the hypotheses that social deprivation can increase social behaviors, and that social behavior is regulated by activity in brain opioid systems.

  17. Effects of 24-h and 36-h sleep deprivation on human postural control and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Gomez, S; Berg, S; Almbladh, P; Lindblad, J; Petersen, H; Magnusson, M; Johansson, R; Fransson, P A

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated whether human postural stability and adaptation were affected by sleep deprivation and the relationship between motor performance and subjective scores of sleepiness (visuo-anlogue sleepiness scores, VAS). Postural stability and subjective sleepiness were examined in 18 healthy subjects (mean age 23.8 years) following 24 and 36 h of continued wakefulness, ensured by portable EEG recordings, and compared to a control test where the assessments were made after a normal night of sleep. The responses were assessed using posturography with eyes open and closed, and vibratory proprioceptive stimulations were used to challenge postural control. Postural control was significantly affected after 24 h of sleep deprivation both in anteroposterior and in lateral directions, but less so after 36 h. Subjective VAS scores showed poor correlation with indicators of postural control performance. The clearest evidence that sleep deprivation decreased postural control was the reduction of adaptation. Also several near falls after 2-3 min during the posturographic tests showed that sleep deprivation might affect stability through momentary lapses of attention. Access to vision, somewhat, but not entirely reduced the effect of sleep deprivation. In conclusion, sleep deprivation can be a contributing factor to decreased postural control and falls.

  18. Effects of DA-Phen, a dopamine-aminoacidic conjugate, on alcohol intake and forced abstinence.

    PubMed

    Sutera, Flavia Maria; De Caro, Viviana; Cannizzaro, Carla; Giannola, Libero Italo; Lavanco, Gianluca; Plescia, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system plays a key role in drug reinforcement and is involved in the development of alcohol addiction. Manipulation of the DAergic system represents a promising strategy to control drug-seeking behavior. Previous studies on 2-amino-N-[2-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-propionamide (DA-Phen) showed in vivo effects as a DA-ergic modulator. This study was aimed at investigate DA-Phen effects on operant behavior for alcohol seeking behavior, during reinstatement following subsequent periods of alcohol deprivation. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were tested in an operant paradigm of self-administration; behavioral reactivity and anxiety like-behavior during acute abstinence were evaluated. A characterization of DA-Phen CNS targeting by its quantification in the brain was also carried out. Our findings showed that DA-Phen administration was able to reduce relapse in alcohol drinking by 50% and reversed the alterations in behavioral reactivity and emotionality observed during acute abstinence. In conclusion, DA-Phen can reduce reinstatement of alcohol drinking in an operant-drinking paradigm following deprivation periods and reverse abstinence-induced behavioral phenotype. DA-Phen activity seems to be mediated by the modulation of the DAergic transmission. However further studies are needed to characterize DA-Phen pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and its potential therapeutic profile in alcohol addiction.

  19. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on U.S. Navy Watchstander Performance Onboard the Independence Class Littoral Combat Ship (LCS 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Shipboard Operations: A Guide for Commanders Yokeley 2012 Effects of Sleep Deprivation on U.S. Navy Surface Ship Watchstander Performance using... Effects of sleep deprivation on U.S. Navy surface ship watchstander performance using alternative watch schedules (master’s thesis). Naval Postgraduate... SLEEP DEPRIVATION ON U.S. NAVY WATCHSTANDER PERFORMANCE ONBOARD THE INDEPENDENCE CLASS LITTORAL COMBAT SHIP (LCS 2) James D. Davey Lieutenant

  20. Gender differences in sleep deprivation effects on risk and inequality aversion: evidence from an economic experiment.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Michele; Bottasso, Anna; Tempesta, Daniela; Carrieri, Marika; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ponti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Excessive working hours--even at night--are becoming increasingly common in our modern 24/7 society. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is particularly vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss and, consequently, the specific behaviors subserved by the functional integrity of the PFC, such as risk-taking and pro-social behavior, may be affected significantly. This paper seeks to assess the effects of one night of sleep deprivation on subjects' risk and social preferences, which are probably the most explored behavioral domains in the tradition of Experimental Economics. This novel cross-over study employs thirty-two university students (gender-balanced) participating to 2 counterbalanced laboratory sessions in which they perform standard risk and social preference elicitation protocols. One session was after one night of undisturbed sleep at home, and the other was after one night of sleep deprivation in the laboratory. Sleep deprivation causes increased sleepiness and decreased alertness in all subjects. After sleep loss males make riskier decisions compared to the rested condition, while females do the opposite. Females likewise show decreased inequity aversion after sleep deprivation. As for the relationship between cognitive ability and economic decisions, sleep deprived individuals with higher cognitive reflection show lower risk aversion and more altruistic behavior. These results show that one night of sleep deprivation alters economic behavior in a gender-sensitive way. Females' reaction to sleep deprivation, characterized by reduced risky choices and increased egoism compared to males, may be related to intrinsic psychological gender differences, such as in the way men and women weigh up probabilities in their decision-making, and/or to the different neurofunctional substrate of their decision-making.

  1. Gender Differences in Sleep Deprivation Effects on Risk and Inequality Aversion: Evidence from an Economic Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Michele; Bottasso, Anna; Tempesta, Daniela; Carrieri, Marika; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ponti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Excessive working hours—even at night—are becoming increasingly common in our modern 24/7 society. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is particularly vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss and, consequently, the specific behaviors subserved by the functional integrity of the PFC, such as risk-taking and pro-social behavior, may be affected significantly. This paper seeks to assess the effects of one night of sleep deprivation on subjects’ risk and social preferences, which are probably the most explored behavioral domains in the tradition of Experimental Economics. This novel cross-over study employs thirty-two university students (gender-balanced) participating to 2 counterbalanced laboratory sessions in which they perform standard risk and social preference elicitation protocols. One session was after one night of undisturbed sleep at home, and the other was after one night of sleep deprivation in the laboratory. Sleep deprivation causes increased sleepiness and decreased alertness in all subjects. After sleep loss males make riskier decisions compared to the rested condition, while females do the opposite. Females likewise show decreased inequity aversion after sleep deprivation. As for the relationship between cognitive ability and economic decisions, sleep deprived individuals with higher cognitive reflection show lower risk aversion and more altruistic behavior. These results show that one night of sleep deprivation alters economic behavior in a gender-sensitive way. Females’ reaction to sleep deprivation, characterized by reduced risky choices and increased egoism compared to males, may be related to intrinsic psychological gender differences, such as in the way men and women weigh up probabilities in their decision-making, and/or to the different neurofunctional substrate of their decision-making. PMID:25793869

  2. Vascular effects of maternal alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Magness, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a significant field of scientific exploration primarily because of its negative effects on the developing fetus, which is specifically defined as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Though the effects on the mother are less explored compared with those on the fetus, alcohol produces multiple effects on the maternal vascular system. Alcohol has major effects on systemic hemodynamic variables, endocrine axes, and paracrine factors regulating vascular resistance, as well as vascular reactivity. Alcohol is also reported to have significant effects on the reproductive vasculature including alterations in blood flow, vessel remodeling, and angiogenesis. Data presented in this review will illustrate the importance of the maternal vasculature in the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and that more studies are warranted in this field. PMID:22730388

  3. Protective Effects of KH-204 in the Bladder of Androgen-Deprived Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the protective effects of the herbal formulation KH-204 in the bladder of androgen-deprived rats. Materials and Methods Male rats aged eight weeks were randomly divided into four groups, containing eight rats each: sham operation only (normal control group), androgen-deprived only (androgen-deprived control group), and androgen-deprived followed by treatment with 200 mg/kg or 400 mg/kg of KH-204. After 0.5 mg/kg of leuprorelin was subcutaneously injected in the androgen-deprived groups, the oral administration of either distilled water in the two control groups or KH-204 in the treatment group was continued for four weeks. Serum testosterone levels, RhoGEF levels, nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-related parameters, oxidative stress, and histologic changes were evaluated after treatment. Results Treatment with the herbal formulation KH-204 (1) increased serum testosterone levels; (2) restored the expression of RhoGEFs, endothelial NO synthase, and neuronal NO synthase; (3) increased the expression of superoxide dismutase; and (4) decreased bladder fibrosis. Conclusions Our results suggest that the positive effects of KH-204 on the urinary bladder may be attributed to its antioxidant effects or to an elevation in NO-cGMP activity. PMID:26331123

  4. Sleep-deprivation effect on human performance: a meta-analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candice D. Griffith; Candice D. Griffith; Sankaran Mahadevan

    2006-05-01

    Human fatigue is hard to define since there is no direct measure of fatigue, much like stress. Instead fatigue must be inferred from measures that are affected by fatigue. One such measurable output affected by fatigue is reaction time. In this study the relationship of reaction time to sleep deprivation is studied. These variables were selected because reaction time and hours of sleep deprivation are straightforward characteristics of fatigue to begin the investigation of fatigue effects on performance. Meta-analysis, a widely used procedure in medical and psychological studies, is applied to the variety of fatigue literature collected from various fields in this study. Meta-analysis establishes a procedure for coding and analyzing information from various studies to compute an effect size. In this research the effect size reported is the difference between standardized means, and is found to be -0.6341, implying a strong relationship between sleep deprivation and performance degradation.

  5. Effects of postweaning social and physical deprivation on locomotor activity patterns and explorative behavior in female CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Moritz; Schaefers, Andrea T U

    2010-05-01

    Social and physical deprivation during adolescence has detrimental consequences for brain maturation and cognitive functions. To test the hypothesis that social and physical deprivation during mouse adolescence would disrupt activity and exploration behavior, we exposed mice either to deprived or enriched rearing (postnatal days 21-60) and assessed activity and exploration of adult mice individually or in mixed treatment groups. In automated group compartments, deprived-reared mice displayed higher locomotor activity, reduced explorative behavior and shifted activity timing compared to enriched-reared mice. Contrastingly, distance and timing of wheel running were largely unaffected by deprived rearing. Our results demonstrate that postweaning social and physical deprivation has measurable effects on mouse locomotor and exploratory behavior, and that such effects may be discernable depending on the activity type studied. Our results further emphasize the importance of the sensitive postweaning period for shaping adult behavioral profiles.

  6. The effects of sleep deprivation on brain functioning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Almklov, Erin L; Drummond, Sean P A; Orff, Henry; Alhassoon, Omar M

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on cognitive performance and brain activation using functional MRI (fMRI) in older adults. The current study examines blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in older adults and younger adults during the sustained attention (GO) and response inhibition (NOGO) portions of a GO-NOGO cognitive task following 36 hr of total sleep deprivation. No significant performance differences were observed between the groups on the behavioral outcome measures of total hits and false alarms. Neuroimaging results, however, revealed a significant interaction between age-group and sleep-deprivation status. Specifically, older adults showed greater BOLD activation as compared to younger adults after 36 hours total sleep deprivation in brain regions typically associated with attention and inhibitory processes. These results suggest in order for older adults to perform the GO-NOGO task effectively after sleep deprivation, they rely on compensatory recruitment of brain regions that aide in the maintenance of cognitive performance.

  7. The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Choice Reaction Time and Anaerobic Power of College Student Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Morteza; Arabameri, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the effect of one night's sleep deprivation on anaerobic performance and Reaction time of subjects in the morning of the following day. Methods Eighteen male college student athletes were studied twice in a balanced, randomized design. Subjects were measured for peak power, mean power and Reaction time. Results The performance showed no significant difference in both tests of anaerobic power (peak power, mean power) over the sleep deprivation period (P= 0.3; P= 0.4 respectively), but reaction time differed significantly from baseline (P=0.003). Results support the hypothesis that sleep serves a function of cognitive restitution, particularly in the maintenance of attentional mechanisms. In the light of the above considerations. Conclusions It was concluded that short-term sleep deprivation is not effective on anaerobic performance, but adversely affects cognitive function such as Reaction Time. PMID:22461961

  8. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  9. Effects of monocular deprivation on the lateral geniculate nucleus in a primate.

    PubMed Central

    Sesma, M A; Irvin, G E; Kuyk, T K; Norton, T T; Casagrande, V A

    1984-01-01

    In many mammalian species, rearing with one eyelid closed produces a loss of vision in the deprived eye and a change in cell size in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In cats, the reduction in the size of deprived LGN cells has been correlated with a loss of one functional class of cells, Y cells. In primates, such as galago, LGN cells also exhibit marked changes in size with deprivation. In the present study we recorded from single cells in the LGN of monocularly deprived galagos to determine if such changes in cell size would be accompanied by changes in physiological properties. The results revealed no alterations in the distribution or functional properties of any cell class. The differences in the effects of monocular deprivation on the function of LGN cells in cats and primates are most easily explained by a fundamental difference in visual system anatomy. In cats, different classes of retinal afferents (X vs. Y) are in a position to compete for postsynaptic LGN neurons: in primates, segregation of cell classes into different layers may preclude such developmental interactions. PMID:6585797

  10. Exploring the effect of vitamin C on sleep deprivation induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Mhaidat, Nizar M; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Tashtoush, Noor H; Banihani, Saleem A; Abdul-razzak, Khalid K

    2015-04-01

    In the current study, the possible beneficial effect of vitamin C (VitC) against sleep deprivation induced memory impairment was examined. Chronic sleep deprivation was induced via placing rats in a modified multiple platform apparatus for 8h/day for a period of 6 weeks. Concomitantly, VitC was administered to animals at doses of 150 and 500 mg/kg/day. After 6 weeks of treatment, the radial arm water maze (RAWM) was used to test for spatial learning and memory performance. Moreover, the hippocampus was dissected; and levels/activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers glutathione reduced (GSH), glutathione oxidized (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), were evaluated. Results revealed that chronic sleep deprivation impaired short- and long-term memories (P<0.05). This impairment was prevented by chronic VitC treatments. In addition, VitC normalized sleep deprivation induced decreases in hippocamppal GSH/GSSG ratio (P<0.05), and activities of catalase, and SOD, and increase in GSSG levels (P<0.05). Collectively, spatial memory impairment was induced by chronic sleep deprivation, and VitC treatment prevented such impairment. This was possibly achieved via normalizing antioxidant defense mechanisms of the hippocampus.

  11. Organization of myelin in the mouse somatosensory barrel cortex and the effects of sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Kyrstle; Chu, Philip; Abramowitz, Jason; Steger, Robert; Ramos, Raddy L; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2013-04-01

    In rodents, the barrel cortex is a specialized area within the somatosensory cortex that processes signals from the mystacial whiskers. We investigated the normal development of myelination in the barrel cortex of mice, as well as the effects of sensory deprivation on this pattern. Deprivation was achieved by trimming the whiskers on one side of the face every other day from birth. In control mice, myelin was not present until postnatal day 14 and did not show prominence until postnatal day 30; adult levels of myelination were reached by the end of the second postnatal month. Unbiased stereology was used to estimate axon density in the interbarrel septal region and barrel walls as well as the barrel centers. Myelin was significantly more concentrated in the interbarrel septa/barrel walls than in the barrel centers in both control and sensory-deprived conditions. Sensory deprivation did not impact the onset of myelination but resulted in a significant decrease in myelinated axons in the barrel region and decreased the amount of myelin ensheathing each axon. Visualization of the oligodendrocyte nuclear marker Olig2 revealed a similar pattern of myelin as seen using histochemistry, but with no significant changes in Olig2+ nuclei following sensory deprivation. Consistent with the anatomical results showing less myelination, local field potentials revealed slower rise times following trimming. Our results suggest that myelination develops relatively late and can be influenced by sensory experience.

  12. The effect of sleep deprivation on BOLD activity elicited by a divided attention task.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Hughes, Matthew E; Croft, Rodney J; Howard, Mark E; Crewther, David; Kennedy, Gerard A; Owens, Katherine; Pierce, Rob J; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Johnston, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Sleep loss, widespread in today's society and associated with a number of clinical conditions, has a detrimental effect on a variety of cognitive domains including attention. This study examined the sequelae of sleep deprivation upon BOLD fMRI activation during divided attention. Twelve healthy males completed two randomized sessions; one after 27 h of sleep deprivation and one after a normal night of sleep. During each session, BOLD fMRI was measured while subjects completed a cross-modal divided attention task (visual and auditory). After normal sleep, increased BOLD activation was observed bilaterally in the superior frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal lobe during divided attention performance. Subjects reported feeling significantly more sleepy in the sleep deprivation session, and there was a trend towards poorer divided attention task performance. Sleep deprivation led to a down regulation of activation in the left superior frontal gyrus, possibly reflecting an attenuation of top-down control mechanisms on the attentional system. These findings have implications for understanding the neural correlates of divided attention and the neurofunctional changes that occur in individuals who are sleep deprived.

  13. Sensitivity and Validity of Psychometric Tests for Assessing Driving Impairment: Effects of Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Stefan; Perrier, Joy; Vuurman, Eric F.; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; Vermeeren, Annemiek

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess drug induced driving impairment, initial screening is needed. However, no consensus has been reached about which initial screening tools have to be used. The present study aims to determine the ability of a battery of psychometric tests to detect performance impairing effects of clinically relevant levels of drowsiness as induced by one night of sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty four healthy volunteers participated in a 2-period crossover study in which the highway driving test was conducted twice: once after normal sleep and once after one night of sleep deprivation. The psychometric tests were conducted on 4 occasions: once after normal sleep (at 11 am) and three times during a single night of sleep deprivation (at 1 am, 5 am, and 11 am). Results On-the-road driving performance was significantly impaired after sleep deprivation, as measured by an increase in Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP) of 3.1 cm compared to performance after a normal night of sleep. At 5 am, performance in most psychometric tests showed significant impairment. As expected, largest effect sizes were found on performance in the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT). Large effects sizes were also found in the Divided Attention Test (DAT), the Attention Network Test (ANT), and the test for Useful Field of View (UFOV) at 5 and 11 am during sleep deprivation. Effects of sleep deprivation on SDLP correlated significantly with performance changes in the PVT and the DAT, but not with performance changes in the UFOV. Conclusion From the psychometric tests used in this study, the PVT and DAT seem most promising for initial evaluation of drug impairment based on sensitivity and correlations with driving impairment. Further studies are needed to assess the sensitivity and validity of these psychometric tests after benchmark sedative drug use. PMID:25668292

  14. The effect of alcohol on athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Shirreffs, Susan M; Maughan, Ronald J

    2006-06-01

    The use of alcohol is often intimately associated with sport. As well as providing a source of energy, alcohol (ethanol) has metabolic, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and neuromuscular actions that may affect exercise performance. Strength is minimally affected, and performance impairments depend on the dose of alcohol and subject habituation to alcohol intake, exercise duration, environmental conditions, and other factors. Central nervous system function is impaired at high doses, resulting in decrements in cognitive function and motor skill, as well as behavioral changes that may have adverse effects on performance. Effects may persist for hours after intoxication.

  15. Effects of caffeine on electrophysiological and neuropsychological indices after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Andréa; Ferreira, Camila; Veiga, Heloisa; Cagy, Maurício; Piedade, Roberto; Pompeu, Fernando; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine is regarded as a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. The goal of this study was to analyze electrophysiological, motor, cognitive and behavioral changes produced by caffeine ingestion after sleep deprivation. Ten subjects were evaluated after sleep deprivation, comparing the ingestion of either 400 mg of caffeine or placebo, in a double-blind randomized study. The variables analyzed were: quantitative EEG, the event-related potential (ERP-P300) and cognitive responses. The most significant quantitative EEG results, which were characterized by moment x treatment interactions, were seen in alpha and theta relative power variables. A significant decrease in relative alpha and theta was observed in the caffeine group after sleep deprivation. In relation to caffeine stimulant effects, there were no significant differences in the other parameters.

  16. Effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on Pavlovian conditioning and responding for conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabbara, Rayane I; Maddux, Jean-Marie N; Beharry, Priscilla F; Iannuzzi, Jessica; Chaudhri, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    An appetitive Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS) can predict an unconditioned stimulus (US) and acquire incentive salience. We tested the hypothesis that US intensity and motivational state of the subject would influence Pavlovian learning and impact the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. To this end, we examined the effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning and responding for a conditioned reinforcer. Male Long-Evans rats (Harlan; 220-240 g) receiving 3% (3S) or 20% (20S) sucrose were either non-water deprived or given water for 1 hr per day. During Pavlovian conditioning sessions, half the rats in each concentration and deprivation condition received a 10-s CS paired with 0.2 ml of sucrose (16 trials/session; 3.2 ml/session). The remainder received unpaired CS and US presentations. Entries into a port where sucrose was delivered were recorded. Next, responding for conditioned reinforcement was tested, wherein pressing an active lever produced the CS and pressing an inactive lever had no consequences. CS-elicited port entries increased, and latency to the first CS-elicited port entry decreased across sessions in paired groups. Water deprivation augmented these effects, whereas sucrose concentration had no significant impact on behavior. Responding for conditioned reinforcement was observed in the 20S water-deprived, paired group. Thus, water deprivation can facilitate the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning, potentially by enhancing motivational state, and a high-intensity US and a high motivational state can interact to heighten the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. The effects of calorie restriction on operant-responding for alcohol in the alcohol preferring (iP) rat.

    PubMed

    Guccione, Lisa; Paolini, Antonio G; Penman, Jim; Djouma, Elvan

    2012-04-21

    Calorie restriction (CR) is well established in the research literature to have several beneficial effects on health and has also been found to induce anxiolytic effects in the rat. Heightened levels of stress and anxiety are often regarded as key precipitating factors of relapse to substance abuse and alcohol addiction. In this study, the potential implication of a 25% CR diet in altering drug-seeking and relapse like behaviour through its capacity to influence anxiolytic-like behavioural changes was investigated.Anxiety was assessed in all rats with the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test prior to being trained to operantly self-administer either 10% ethanol, or water. Differences were found between the groups in the percentage of open arm/total arm duration and open arm/total arm entries in the EPM,demonstrating the anxiolytic effects of CR25%. Both control and CR25% groups showed preference for alcohol vs. water, however, controls responded more for alcohol during the conditioning phase than the CR25% group. Controls exhibited an alcohol deprivation-effect (ADE) post abstinence, and a cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking post extinction however the CR25% did not. These results demonstrate that the anxiolytic effects of CR25% reduces operant responding for ethanol and inhibits relapse behaviour.Taken collectively, the results of this study suggest that in line with past research a CR25% dietary regime can induce anxiolytic effects in the alcohol preferring (iP) rat. Furthermore, it also reduces the intake of ethanol and inhibits the ADE and cue-induced relapse that is characteristic of addiction in this strain.

  18. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation.

  19. Effects of selective REM sleep deprivation on prefrontal gamma activity and executive functions.

    PubMed

    Corsi-Cabrera, M; Rosales-Lagarde, A; del Río-Portilla, Y; Sifuentes-Ortega, R; Alcántara-Quintero, B

    2015-05-01

    Given that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in executive functions and is deactivated and decoupled from posterior associative regions during REM sleep, that Gamma temporal coupling involved in information processing is enhanced during REM sleep, and that adult humans spend about 90 min of every 24h in REM sleep, it might be expected that REM sleep deprivation would modify Gamma temporal coupling and have a deteriorating effect on executive functions. We analyzed EEG Gamma activity and temporal coupling during implementation of a rule-guided task before and after REM sleep deprivation and its effect on verbal fluency, flexible thinking and selective attention. After two nights in the laboratory for adaptation, on the third night subjects (n=18) were randomly assigned to either selective REM sleep deprivation effectuated by awakening them at each REM sleep onset or, the same number of NREM sleep awakenings as a control for unspecific effects of sleep interruptions. Implementation of abstract rules to guide behavior required greater activation and synchronization of Gamma activity in the frontopolar regions after REM sleep reduction from 20.6% at baseline to just 3.93% of total sleep time. However, contrary to our hypothesis, both groups showed an overall improvement in executive task performance and no effect on their capacity to sustain selective attention. These results suggest that after one night of selective REM sleep deprivation executive functions can be compensated by increasing frontal activation and they still require the participation of supervisory control by frontopolar regions.

  20. Acuity-independent effects of visual deprivation on human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chuan; Pettet, Mark W; Norcia, Anthony M

    2014-07-29

    Visual development depends on sensory input during an early developmental critical period. Deviation of the pointing direction of the two eyes (strabismus) or chronic optical blur (anisometropia) separately and together can disrupt the formation of normal binocular interactions and the development of spatial processing, leading to a loss of stereopsis and visual acuity known as amblyopia. To shed new light on how these two different forms of visual deprivation affect the development of visual cortex, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to study the temporal evolution of visual responses in patients who had experienced either strabismus or anisometropia early in life. To make a specific statement about the locus of deprivation effects, we took advantage of a stimulation paradigm in which we could measure deprivation effects that arise either before or after a configuration-specific response to illusory contours (ICs). Extraction of ICs is known to first occur in extrastriate visual areas. Our ERP measurements indicate that deprivation via strabismus affects both the early part of the evoked response that occurs before ICs are formed as well as the later IC-selective response. Importantly, these effects are found in the normal-acuity nonamblyopic eyes of strabismic amblyopes and in both eyes of strabismic patients without amblyopia. The nonamblyopic eyes of anisometropic amblyopes, by contrast, are normal. Our results indicate that beyond the well-known effects of strabismus on the development of normal binocularity, it also affects the early stages of monocular feature processing in an acuity-independent fashion.

  1. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  2. Cellular and Mitochondrial Effects of Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Manzo-Avalos, Salvador; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is correlated with a wide spectrum of medical, psychological, behavioral, and social problems. Acute alcohol abuse causes damage to and functional impairment of several organs affecting protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Mitochondria participate with the conversion of acetaldehyde into acetate and the generation of increased amounts of NADH. Prenatal exposure to ethanol during fetal development induces a wide spectrum of adverse effects in offspring, such as neurologic abnormalities and pre- and post-natal growth retardation. Antioxidant effects have been described due to that alcoholic beverages contain different compounds, such as polyphenols as well as resveratrol. This review analyzes diverse topics on the alcohol consumption effects in several human organs and demonstrates the direct participation of mitochondria as potential target of compounds that can be used to prevent therapies for alcohol abusers. PMID:21318009

  3. Effects of CCN3 on rat cartilage endplate chondrocytes cultured under serum deprivation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    DING, LEI; WU, JINGPING; LI, DEFANG; WANG, HOULEI; ZHU, BIN; LU, WEI; XU, GUOXIONG

    2016-01-01

    The presence of apoptotic cells and loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) are common characteristics of degenerated cartilage endplates (CEPs). In addition, therapeutic efficacy is hampered by an incomplete understanding regarding the mechanisms underlying CEP homeostasis and degeneration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as important regulators of cell-ECM interactions, and have been identified as key mediators of nucleus pulposus ECM composition and tissue homeostasis. However, whether CCN3 is associated with CEP homeostasis has yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of CCN3 on the apoptosis and ECM synthesis of CEP cells cultured under serum deprivation. Rat CEP cells were confirmed to be of the chondrocytic phenotype by toluidine blue staining. The mRNA expression levels of CCN3 were markedly increased, and a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic rate was detected under serum deprivation conditions following treatment with recombinant CCN3, whereas CCN3 did not exert a proapoptotic effect on cells cultured under normal conditions. Furthermore, CCN3-treated cells exhibited a decrease in the expression levels of aggrecan and collagen II in both groups. These results suggested that CCN3 may act as a regulator, rather than an initiator, of serum deprivation-induced cellular apoptosis, and that CCN3 has a catabolic effect on the mediation of ECM synthesis under both normal and serum deprivation conditions. Therefore, CCN3 may represent a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of CEP degeneration. PMID:26795879

  4. Alcohol: its effect on handwriting.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, N G

    1986-04-01

    A series of research studies was conducted to determine if there would be changes in the handwriting of 35 men and women after they had been drinking. Handwriting samples were taken before the participants had consumed any alcohol and again after the drinking period had ended. Deterioration in the handwriting was charted. Based on this study, the handwriting could not be used in any way to measure accurately the blood alcohol concentration of a writer. The results of the handwriting comparisons are discussed.

  5. Effects of food deprivation and metabolic fuel utilization on food hoarding by jirds (Meriones shawi).

    PubMed

    Demas, G E; Bartness, T J

    1999-08-01

    Food hoarding plays an important role in the energetic repertoire of a variety of mammalian species. Both food hoarding and food intake have been examined in rodents using several energetic challenges including food deprivation, treatment with metabolic fuel blockers, and enhancement of fuel storage. In the present experiment, we examined food hoarding by female jirds (Meriones shawi), a desert rodent species occupying the arid steppes and desert regions of Egypt. Jirds are prodigious hoarders in the field; however, virtually nothing is known about their hoarding within controlled laboratory settings. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation as well as alterations in metabolic fuel utilization (i.e., 2-deoxy-D-glucose and isophane insulin) on food hoarding and food intake were tested in female jirds using a simulated burrow system. Jirds decreased body mass and increased food consumption following either 32 or 56-h food deprivation. Food hoarding, however, was virtually abolished after food deprivation and treatment with 2-DG. In contrast, isophane insulin treatment had no effect on food consumption or hoarding in this species. Taken together, the present results suggest that total body mass (fat), rather than short-term metabolic fuel utilization, regulates both food consumption and hoarding in female jirds. In addition, these results provide a novel set of appetitive responses to these energetic challenges in small mammals.

  6. The Self-Awareness Reducing Effects of Alcohol Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Jay G.; And Others

    According to a recent model of some of the causes and effects of alcohol consumption, alcohol interferes with cognitive processes fundamental to a state of self-awareness. The effects of alcohol consumption and the expectancy that one had consumed alcohol on the self-awareness state were examined. Male subjects (N=46) consumed either alcohol or…

  7. The effect of socioeconomic deprivation on fracture incidence in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Johansen, Antony; Brennan, Julieann; Butler, John; Lyons, Ronan A

    2004-07-01

    Lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity vary in different social and income groups, and are known to be important influences on the incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Financial and social pressures are a common concern for older people. We set out to study the effect of socioeconomic deprivation on the incidence of fracture in older people and to compare the findings with those for younger groups. The All Wales Injury Surveillance System (AWISS) is a computerized system that collects injury data from most A&E departments throughout Wales. In this population-based study of 1.8 million people living in the 445 electoral tracts covered by AWISS in south, west, and northeastern Wales, we identified all 60,106 residents who presented with a fracture in 1999 and 2000. We linked details of their fracture with published Townsend deprivation scores for the electoral tract in which they were living and calculated fracture rates by fifths of deprivation. We observed the expected pattern of increasing fracture incidence in older age groups. Fracture incidence was significantly higher in electoral wards with poorer Townsend scores, resulting from a marked effect of socioeconomic deprivation on fracture incidence among younger adults with a rate ratio of 1.64 (95% CI, 1.57 to 1.72). This effect diminished with age, and was not observed in older age groups. At ages 85 and over the rate ratio was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01). Socioeconomic factors clearly play a part in the causation of fracture in younger adults. Lifestyle influences are important in older age groups, but socioeconomic deprivation does not appear to be a risk factor for the development of osteoporotic fractures in elderly people.

  8. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  9. The effect of sleep deprivation on leadership behaviour in military officers: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Pallesen, Ståle; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Espevik, Roar

    2016-12-01

    While several studies show that leaders frequently lack sleep, little is known about how this influences leadership behaviour. The present study encompasses an experiment that investigated how three main types of leadership behaviour: transformational (four sub-facets); transactional (two sub-facets); and passive-avoidant (two sub-facets) leadership differed across a rested and a long-term, partially sleep-deprived condition. A total of 16 military naval officers participated. In both conditions, the leaders managed a team of three subordinates in a navy navigation simulator, instructed to complete a specific mission (A or B). Both sleep state (rested or sleep deprived) and mission were counterbalanced. Leadership behaviour was video recorded and subsequently rated on the three leadership behaviours. Overall, the scores on transformational leadership (and on two of four sub-facets) and transactional leadership (on both sub-facets) decreased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition, whereas scores on passive-avoidant leadership overall (and on both sub-facets) increased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition. This study underscores the importance of including sleep as a potentially important determinant when assessing leadership effectiveness.

  10. Effect of hepatic portal infusion of water on water intake by water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, M; Adachi, A

    1992-11-01

    To determine whether or not hepatoportal osmoreceptive (or sodium-receptive) signals participate in the control of drinking, we examined the effects of portal infusion of water, 0.9% saline, and 1.8% saline on water intake by water-deprived rats. Infusion was started 0.5 h prior to the end of the water deprivation period for 3.5 h at a rate of 52 microliters/min through either a portal or a jugular catheter. After 24-h water deprivation, water intake was measured successively for 24 h without food. As a result of the water infusion tests, water intake of the portal infusion group was significantly less than that of the jugular infusion group during and after the infusion. Portal infusion of neither 0.9% nor 1.8% saline affected the water intake compared to similar infusion into the jugular vein. It is concluded that hypotonic stimulation of the hepatoportal osmoreceptor suppresses water intake in water-deprived rats. On the contrary, isotonic or hypertonic stimulation does not produce any change of water intake.

  11. The effect of early visual deprivation on the neural bases of multisensory processing.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Maria J S; Putzar, Lisa; Röder, Brigitte

    2015-06-01

    Developmental vision is deemed to be necessary for the maturation of multisensory cortical circuits. Thus far, this has only been investigated in animal studies, which have shown that congenital visual deprivation markedly reduces the capability of neurons to integrate cross-modal inputs. The present study investigated the effect of transient congenital visual deprivation on the neural mechanisms of multisensory processing in humans. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare responses of visual and auditory cortical areas to visual, auditory and audio-visual stimulation in cataract-reversal patients and normally sighted controls. The results showed that cataract-reversal patients, unlike normally sighted controls, did not exhibit multisensory integration in auditory areas. Furthermore, cataract-reversal patients, but not normally sighted controls, exhibited lower visual cortical processing within visual cortex during audio-visual stimulation than during visual stimulation. These results indicate that congenital visual deprivation affects the capability of cortical areas to integrate cross-modal inputs in humans, possibly because visual processing is suppressed during cross-modal stimulation. Arguably, the lack of vision in the first months after birth may result in a reorganization of visual cortex, including the suppression of noisy visual input from the deprived retina in order to reduce interference during auditory processing.

  12. Effects of sleep deprivation on brain bioenergetics, sleep, and cognitive performance in cocaine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Trksak, George H; Bracken, Bethany K; Jensen, J Eric; Plante, David T; Penetar, David M; Tartarini, Wendy L; Maywalt, Melissa A; Dorsey, Cynthia M; Renshaw, Perry F; Lukas, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    In cocaine-dependent individuals, sleep is disturbed during cocaine use and abstinence, highlighting the importance of examining the behavioral and homeostatic response to acute sleep loss in these individuals. The current study was designed to identify a differential effect of sleep deprivation on brain bioenergetics, cognitive performance, and sleep between cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants. 14 healthy control and 8 cocaine-dependent participants experienced consecutive nights of baseline, total sleep deprivation, and recovery sleep in the research laboratory. Participants underwent ³¹P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain imaging, polysomnography, Continuous Performance Task, and Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Following recovery sleep, ³¹P MRS scans revealed that cocaine-dependent participants exhibited elevated global brain β-NTP (direct measure of adenosine triphosphate), α-NTP, and total NTP levels compared to those of healthy controls. Cocaine-dependent participants performed worse on the Continuous Performance Task and Digit Symbol Substitution Task at baseline compared to healthy control participants, but sleep deprivation did not worsen cognitive performance in either group. Enhancements of brain ATP levels in cocaine dependent participants following recovery sleep may reflect a greater impact of sleep deprivation on sleep homeostasis, which may highlight the importance of monitoring sleep during abstinence and the potential influence of sleep loss in drug relapse.

  13. Methylphenidate and Pemoline: Effects on Sleepiness and Mood during Sleep Deprivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-04

    characteristics of these effects. However, pemoline differs from both the amphetamines and methylphenidate in that it is not addictive, not a drug of abuse . As...AD-A234 659 METHYLPHENIDATE AND PEMOLINE: EFFECTS ON SLEEPINESS AND MOOD DURING SLEEP DEPRIVATION L.T. MATTESON DTIC T.L. KELLY ELECTE H. BABKOFF MAY...CALIFORNIA 92186-5122 NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND BETHESDA, MARYLAND 91 5 01 022 METHYLPHENIDATE AND PENOLINE: EFFECTS ON

  14. The Effect of Total Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep on Cognitive on Performance and Brain Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    State University/University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Introduction: It has been documented that REM sleep recovers later than NREM ...AD Award Number: DAMD1I7-02-1-0201 TITLE: The Effect of Total Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep on Cognitive on Performance and Brain Function...changes in the brain substrate underlying the behavioral effects, and even less is known about the cerebral effects of recovery sleep . The overarching

  15. Effects of maternal deprivation on adrenal and behavioural responses in rats with anterodorsal thalami nuclei lesions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Molina, S; Rivarola, M A; Perassi, N I

    2002-07-26

    There is evidence that repeated maternal isolation of neonatal rats may influence both emotional behavior and Hypothalamic-Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) activity. On the other hand the Anterodorsal Thalami Nuclei (ADTN) exerts an inhibitory influence on the hypophyso-adrenal system under basal and stressful conditions. In the present work we investigated whether neonatal maternal deprivation produces long term effects on the ADTN regulation of behavioral patterns (open field test) and on HPA axis activity. Specifically, we sought to determine whether adult female rats with ADTN lesions, previously isolated for 4.5 hours daily during the first 3 weeks of life, react in endocrinologically and behaviourally distinct manner as compared to controls. The examined groups were: non maternally deprived (NMD)/sham lesioned, NMD/lesioned, maternally deprived (MD)/sham lesioned, MD/lesioned with and without the open field test. At 3 months MD/sham lesioned animals showed a marked decrease in ambulation (P < 0.01), and with ADTN lesion, the rearing values were lower (P < 0.01) and grooming higher (P < 0.05) than NMD. This last data would indicate a high emotional index. Regarding the activity of the HPA axis, maternal deprivation induced a significant decrease in plasma ACTH concentration both in sham and lesioned animals (P < 0.001), and plasma Corticosterone (C) increased in sham animals (P < 0.001). This data would indicate a higher sensitivity of the adrenal glands. After the open field test ACTH and C were different between deprived and non-deprived animals depending on the ADTN lesion. Taking into consideration the increase of ACTH levels in sham lesioned MD animals exposed to the test, we could conclude that this new situation was a stressful situation. Finally in the present work, it was very difficult to relate the behavioral parameters with the endocrine data. It is known that depending on the context, corticosteroids may produce opposite effects on emotional behavior via

  16. Amplification of hofmeister effect by alcohols.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun; Liu, Guangming

    2014-07-03

    We have demonstrated that Hofmeister effect can be amplified by adding alcohols to aqueous solutions. The lower critical solution temperature behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has been employed as the model system to study the amplification of Hofmeister effect. The alcohols can more effectively amplify the Hofmeister effect following the series methanol < ethanol < 1-propanol < 2-propanol for the monohydric alcohols and following the series d-sorbitol ≈ xylitol ≈ meso-erythritol < glycerol < ethylene glycol < methanol for the polyhydric alcohols. Our study reveals that the relative extent of amplification of Hofmeister effect is determined by the stability of the water/alcohol complex, which is strongly dependent on the chemical structure of alcohols. The more stable solvent complex formed via stronger hydrogen bonds can more effectively differentiate the anions through the anion-solvent complex interactions, resulting in a stronger amplification of Hofmeister effect. This study provides an alternative method to tune the relative strength of Hofmeister effect besides salt concentration.

  17. Short-term visual deprivation reduces interference effects of task-irrelevant facial expressions on affective prosody judgments

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Ineke; Nava, Elena; Röder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that neuroplasticity can be triggered by short-term visual deprivation in healthy adults. Specifically, these studies have provided evidence that visual deprivation reversibly affects basic perceptual abilities. The present study investigated the long-lasting effects of short-term visual deprivation on emotion perception. To this aim, we visually deprived a group of young healthy adults, age-matched with a group of non-deprived controls, for 3 h and tested them before and after visual deprivation (i.e., after 8 h on average and at 4 week follow-up) on an audio–visual (i.e., faces and voices) emotion discrimination task. To observe changes at the level of basic perceptual skills, we additionally employed a simple audio–visual (i.e., tone bursts and light flashes) discrimination task and two unimodal (one auditory and one visual) perceptual threshold measures. During the 3 h period, both groups performed a series of auditory tasks. To exclude the possibility that changes in emotion discrimination may emerge as a consequence of the exposure to auditory stimulation during the 3 h stay in the dark, we visually deprived an additional group of age-matched participants who concurrently performed unrelated (i.e., tactile) tasks to the later tested abilities. The two visually deprived groups showed enhanced affective prosodic discrimination abilities in the context of incongruent facial expressions following the period of visual deprivation; this effect was partially maintained until follow-up. By contrast, no changes were observed in affective facial expression discrimination and in the basic perception tasks in any group. These findings suggest that short-term visual deprivation per se triggers a reweighting of visual and auditory emotional cues, which seems to possibly prevail for longer durations. PMID:25954166

  18. Vasopressin and angiotensin II in reflex regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoids, and renin: effect of water deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, V. L.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) and vasopressin participate in baroreflex regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), glucocorticoid, and renin secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this participation is enhanced in water-deprived dogs, with chronically elevated plasma ANG II and vasopressin levels, compared with water-replete dogs. The baroreflex was assessed by infusing increasing doses of nitroprusside (0.3, 0.6, 1.5, and 3.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) in both groups of animals. To quantitate the participation of ANG II and vasopressin, the dogs were untreated or pretreated with the competitive ANG II antagonist saralasin, a V1-vasopressin antagonist, or combined V1/V2-vasopressin antagonist, either alone or in combination. The findings were as follows. 1) Larger reflex increases in ANG II, vasopressin, and glucocorticoids, but not ACTH, were produced in water-deprived dogs compared with water-replete dogs. 2) ANG II blockade blunted the glucocorticoid and ACTH responses to hypotension in water-deprived dogs, but not water-replete dogs. In contrast, vasopressin blockade reduced the ACTH response only in water-replete dogs. 3) Vasopressin or combined vasopressin and ANG II blockade reduced the plasma level of glucocorticoids related either to the fall in arterial pressure or to the increase in plasma ACTH concentration in water-replete dogs, and this effect was enhanced in water-deprived dogs. 4) In both water-deprived and water-replete animals, saralasin and/or a V1-antagonist increased the renin response to hypotension, but a combined V1/V2-antagonist did not. These results reemphasize the importance of endogenous ANG II and vasopressin in the regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoid, and renin secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Effects of naltrexone on post-abstinence alcohol drinking in C57BL/6NCRL and DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Tomie, Arthur; Azogu, Idu; Yu, Lei

    2013-07-01

    The present experiment evaluated the effects of naltrexone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, on post-abstinence alcohol drinking in C57BL/6NCRL and DBA/2J male mice. Home cage 2-bottle (alcohol vs. water) free-choice procedures were employed. During the pre-abstinence period, alcohol intake was much lower for the DBA/2J mice relative to the C57BL/6NCRL mice, and this strain difference was observed for groups receiving either 3% or 10% alcohol concentrations. The four-day abstinence period effectively reduced alcohol intakes (i.e., a negative alcohol deprivation effect, negative ADE) in both groups of DBA/2J mice, but had no effect on alcohol intakes in either group of C57BL/6NCRL mice. Both groups trained with 3% alcohol received the second four-day abstinence period, where the effects of acute administration of either naltrexone or saline on post-abstinence alcohol drinking were assessed. Naltrexone was more effective in reducing post-abstinence drinking of 3% alcohol in the DBA/2J mice than in the C57BL/6NCRL mice. In the DBA/2J mice, naltrexone further reduced, relative to saline-injected controls, the low levels of post-abstinence alcohol intake. Thus, the low baseline levels of alcohol drinking in DBA/2J mice were further diminished by the four-day abstinence period (negative ADE), and this suppressed post-abstinence level of alcohol drinking was still further reduced by acute administration of naltrexone. The results indicate that naltrexone is effective in reducing further the low levels of alcohol drinking induced by the negative ADE.

  20. Effects of alcohol on the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2013-09-01

    Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine, and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiologic and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease, and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system.

  1. The effects of alcohol on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kenneth Lyons

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol has profound effects on many aspects of fetal development. Although alterations of somatic growth and specific minor malformations of facial structure are most characteristic, the effects of alcohol on brain development are most significant in that they lead to substantial problems with neurobehavioral development. Since the initial recognition of the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a number of important observations have been made from studies involving both humans and animals. Of particular importance, a number of maternal risk factors have been identified, which may well be of relevance relative to the development of strategies for prevention of the FAS as well as intervention for those who have been affected. These include maternal age >30 years, ethnic group, lower socioeconomic status, having had a previously affected child, maternal under-nutrition, and genetic background. The purpose of this review is to discuss these issues as well as to set forth a number of questions that have not adequately been addressed relative to alcohol's effect on fetal development. Of particular importance is the critical need to identify the full spectrum of structural defects associated with the prenatal effects of alcohol as well as to establish a neurobehavioral phenotype. Appreciation of both of these issues is necessary to understand the full impact of alcohol on fetal development.

  2. Effects of irrigation deprivation during the harvest period on yield determinants in mature almond trees.

    PubMed

    Esparza, G; DeJong, T M; Weinbaum, S A; Klein, I

    2001-09-01

    Effects of irrigation deprivation during the harvest period on yield determinants in mature almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb cv. Nonpareil) trees were investigated during a 3-year field experiment. Return bloom and fruit set were measured on 2185 individually tagged spurs. Water stress resulting from irrigation deprivation during the harvest period, which purportedly coincides with the time of flower initiation, had no effect on the percentage of spurs that flowered or set fruit during subsequent years. Although water stress had no apparent effect on spur mortality, 66% of the tagged spurs died within 3 years. In addition, many spurs were vegetative by the third year, indicating the importance of spur renewal for sustained fruit production. Reductions in nut yield were evident after two successive years of irrigation deprivation during the harvest period. Regression analysis indicated a loss in yield of 7.7 kg tree(-1) in response to each 1 MPa decrease in stem water potential below -1.2 MPa during the previous seasons. The number of fruiting positions per tree (estimated indirectly for whole trees based on weight of current-year shoots > 5 cm in length) was negatively associated with water stress. Yield reduction in response to water stress during harvest appears to be a compound, multiyear effect, associated with reduced annual growth and renewal of fruiting positions.

  3. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  4. Drinking Patterns and Alcohol Use Disorders in São Paulo, Brazil: The Role of Neighborhood Social Deprivation and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, James C.; Saito, Luis Paulo; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Kutschenko, Andressa; Viana, Maria Carmen; Wang, Yuan-Pang; Martins, Silvia S.; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in high-income countries has investigated influences of socioeconomic inequalities on drinking outcomes such as alcohol use disorders (AUD), however, associations between area-level neighborhood social deprivation (NSD) and individual socioeconomic status with these outcomes have not been explored in Brazil. Thus, we investigated the role of these factors on drink-related outcomes in a Brazilian population, attending to male-female variations. Methods A multi-stage area probability sample of adult household residents in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area was assessed using the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI) (n = 5,037). Estimation focused on prevalence and correlates of past-year alcohol disturbances [heavy drinking of lower frequency (HDLF), heavy drinking of higher frequency (HDHF), abuse, dependence, and DMS-5 AUD] among regular users (RU); odds ratio (OR) were obtained. Results Higher NSD, measured as an area-level variable with individual level variables held constant, showed an excess odds for most alcohol disturbances analyzed. Prevalence estimates for HDLF and HDHF among RU were 9% and 20%, respectively, with excess odds in higher NSD areas; schooling (inverse association) and low income were associated with male HDLF. The only individual-level association with female HDLF involved employment status. Prevalence estimates for abuse, dependence, and DSM-5 AUD among RU were 8%, 4%, and 8%, respectively, with excess odds of: dependence in higher NSD areas for males; abuse and AUD for females. Among RU, AUD was associated with unemployment, and low education with dependence and AUD. Conclusions Regular alcohol users with alcohol-related disturbances are more likely to be found where area-level neighborhood characteristics reflect social disadvantage. Although we cannot draw inferences about causal influence, the associations are strong enough to warrant future longitudinal alcohol studies to explore

  5. Effects of sleep deprivation on autonomic and endocrine functions throughout the day and on exercise tolerance in the evening.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masaki; Endo, Naoya; Numao, Shigeharu; Takagi, Shun; Miyashita, Masashi; Midorikawa, Taishi; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on autonomic and endocrine functions during the day and on exercise tolerance in the evening. Ten healthy young males completed two, 2-day control and sleep deprivation trials. For the control trial, participants were allowed normal sleep from 23:00 to 07:00 h. For the sleep deprivation trial, participants did not sleep for 34 h. Autonomic activity was measured from 19:00 h on day 1 to 16:00 h on day 2 by frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability. Endocrine function was examined by measuring adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol from venous blood samples collected on day 2 at 09:00, 13:00, and 17:00 h and immediately after an exercise tolerance testing. Autonomic regulation, particularly parasympathetic regulation estimated from the high-frequency component of heart rate variability analysis, was significantly higher in the sleep deprivation trial than in the control trial in the morning and afternoon of day 2. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations were significantly higher at 09:00 and 13:00 h of day 2 under sleep deprivation. Heart rate during exercise was significantly lower following sleep deprivation. Therefore, the effects of sleep deprivation on autonomic regulation depend on the time of the day.

  6. Does Moderate Level of Alcohol Consumption Produce a Relaxation Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, William; Lockhart, Judy O.

    Although many individuals use alcohol to cope with stress (their behavior being based on the belief that alcohol can produce a relaxation effect), research has reported conflicting results on the effects of alcohol on tension reduction. A study was conducted to examine the psychophysiological effects of moderate levels of alcohol consumption under…

  7. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  8. Assessing water deprivation at the sub-river basin scale in LCA integrating downstream cascade effects.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Philippe; Roux, Philippe; Núñez, Montserrat; Belaud, Gilles; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2013-12-17

    Physical water deprivation at the midpoint level is assessed in water-related LCIA methods using water scarcity indicators (e.g., withdrawal-to-availability and consumption-to-availability) at the river basin scale. Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. This paper presents a methodology that can be used to derive midpoint characterization factors for water deprivation taking into account downstream cascade effects within a single river basin. This effect is considered at a finer scale because a river basin must be split into different subunits. The proposed framework is based on a two-step approach. First, water scarcity is defined at the sub-river basin scale with the consumption-to-availability (CTA) ratio, and second, characterization factors for water deprivation (CFWD) are calculated, integrating the effects on downstream sub-river basins. The sub-river basin CTA and CFWD were computed based on runoff data, water consumption data and a water balance for two different river basins. The results show significant differences between the CFWD in a given river basin, depending on the upstream or downstream position. Finally, an illustrative example is presented, in which different land planning scenarios, taking into account additional water consumption in a city, are assessed. Our work demonstrates how crucial it is to localize the withdrawal and release positions within a river basin.

  9. Environmentally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimnicht, Glen

    This paper discusses the meaning of environmental deprivation, specifically the effects of racial, ethnic, and cultural differences on education. Objectives are also given for a Head Start and Follow Through program. A child is environmentally deprived to the extent that he has not developed his intellectual ability and a positive self-image.…

  10. Anticipated effects of alcohol stimulate craving and impair inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Paul; Jennings, Emily; Rose, Abigail K

    2016-05-01

    A considerable evidence base has demonstrated that priming doses of alcohol impair inhibitory control and activate motivation to consume alcohol. There is, however, a lack of studies investigating the effect of placebo-alcohol on these processes and their association with alcohol outcome expectancies (AOE). We investigated the effect of placebo-alcohol on craving and inhibitory control, and the extent to which placebo effects correlated with AOE in 32 nondependent drinkers. Participants completed questionnaires assessing typical alcohol use (fortnightly alcohol consumption, AUDIT) and AOE (measured using the Alcohol Outcome Expectancy Scale). On a within-subjects basis participants consumed a placebo-alcohol drink and control drink. Measures of craving were taken pre- and postdrink, and participants completed a go/no-go task following the drink. Craving was increased by the placebo-alcohol and, importantly, placebo-alcohol impaired inhibitory control. Furthermore expectancies of cognitive and behavioral impairment were correlated with go/no-go task performance following a placebo. Increases in craving were associated with a range of elevated outcome expectancies. This suggests that the anticipated effects of alcohol can impair inhibitory control and increase craving; therefore studies using placebo versus alcohol comparisons relative to studies using a pure no-alcohol control are underestimating the real-world effect of alcohol on these processes, which is a combination of pharmacological and anticipated effects of alcohol. Furthermore, individual differences in AOE may influence reactivity to the anticipated effects of alcohol. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Bouts of responding on variable-interval schedules: effects of deprivation level.

    PubMed Central

    Shull, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Rats obtained food pellets on a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement by nose poking a lighted key. After training to establish baseline performance (with the mean variable interval set at either 60, 120, or 240 s), the rats were given free access to food during the hour just before their daily session. This satiation operation reduced the rate of key poking. Analysis of the interresponse time distributions (log survivor plots) indicated that key poking occurred in bouts. Prefeeding lengthened the pauses between bouts, shortened the length of bouts (less reliably), and had a relatively small decremental effect on the response rate within bouts. That deprivation level affects mainly between-bout pauses has been reported previously with fixed-ratio schedules. Thus, when the focus is on bouts, the performances maintained by variable-interval schedules and fixed-ratio schedules are similarly affected by deprivation. PMID:15239490

  12. Combined effects of food deprivation and food frequency on the amount and temporal distribution of schedule-induced drinking.

    PubMed

    Castilla, José Luis; Pellón, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    Under intermittent food schedules animals develop temporally organized behaviors throughout interfood intervals, with behaviors early in the intervals (interim) normally occurring in excess. Schedule-induced drinking (a prototype of interim, adjunctive behavior) is related to food deprivation and food frequency. This study investigated the interactions that resulted from combining different food-deprivation levels (70%, 80% or 90% free-feeding weights) with different food-occurrence frequencies (15-, 30- or 60-s interfood intervals) in a within-subjects design. Increases in food deprivation and food frequency generally led to increased licking, with greater differences due to food deprivation as interfood intervals became shorter. Distributions of licking were modestly shifted to later in the interfood interval as interfood intervals lengthened, a result that was most marked under 90% food deprivation, which also resulted in flatter distributions. It would therefore appear that food deprivation modulates the licking rate and the distribution of licking in different ways. Effects of food deprivation and food frequency are adequately explained by a theory of adjunctive behavior based on delayed food reinforcement, in contrast to alternative hypotheses.

  13. Effects of light deprivation in physical performance and psychophysiological responses to a time-to-exhaustion exercise test.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Fabiano A; Santos, Tony M; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Noakes, Timothy D; Pires, Flávio O

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that there is no effect of light deprivation in closed-loop exercise performance, however less is known about the open-loop exercise performance. Thus, we verified if light deprivation may affect performance and psychophysiological responses to a time-to-exhaustion (TE), constant intensity exercise test. Twelve men performed TE tests (at 80% WPEAK of maximal incremental test) in control and light-deprived condition. Gaseous exchange (VE and VO2), heart rate (HR) and vastus lateralis electromyography (EMG) were continuously assessed, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and associative thoughts to exercise (ATE) were obtained every 60s. Responses at absolute time of exercise matched by the shortest time to exhaustion, and responses at exhaustion were compared between conditions (P<0.05). Exhaustion was shortened (5.0 ± 1.6 min vs 6.4 ± 2.4 min) and RPE slope was elevated in light deprivation, when compared to control (P<0.05). Responses of VE, VO2 and RPE were greater at exhaustion in light deprivation TE test than at the equivalent, paired time in control test. However, responses were similar at exhaustion of both TE tests; the exception was the lower EMG when the light was deprived. The light deprivation shortened the exhaustion and increased RPE in TE test, until the attainment of similar maximal psychophysiological responses.

  14. Effect of food deprivation and maintenance diet composition on fat preference and acceptance in rats.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Z S; Synowski, S J

    High-fat diets typically elicit greater kcal intake and/or weight gain than low-fat diets. Palatability, caloric density, and the unique postingestive effects of fat have each been shown to contribute to high-fat diet hyperphagia. Because long-term intake reflects the sum of many individual eating episodes (meals), it is important to investigate factors that may modulate fat intake at a meal. The present studies used high-fat (hi-fat) and high-carbohydrate (hi-carb) liquid diets (both 2.3 kcal/mL) to assess the effect of hunger level (0 versus 24-h food deprivation) and fat content of the maintenance diet (12 versus 48%) on fat preference (when a choice among foods is offered in a two-bottle test), and acceptance (only one food offered) in male rats. Preference for hi-fat relative to hi-carb (two-bottle test) was enhanced by 24-h food deprivation, and by a high-fat maintenance diet. In contrast, neither deprivation nor maintenance diet composition influenced relative meal size (one-bottle test) of hi-fat and hi-carb: irrespective of test conditions, meal size of hi-fat was bigger than meal size of hi-carb.

  15. Mood and performance effects of caffeine in relation to acute and chronic caffeine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Richardson, N J; Rogers, P J; Elliman, N A; O'Dell, R J

    1995-10-01

    The mood and performance effects of caffeine deprivation (either 90 min, overnight, or at least 7 days) and ingestion (70 and 250 mg) were compared in young adults who were normally either moderate consumers (n = 49) or nonconsumers of caffeine (n = 18). Overnight caffeine deprivation produced dysphoric symptoms characteristic of caffeine withdrawal that were reduced, but still present, after longer-term abstinence. Acute caffeine intake affected the withdrawn consumers, nonwithdrawn consumers, and nonconsumers similarly. It increased jitteriness and decrease tiredness and headache. Furthermore, hand steadiness decreased as caffeine dose increased, whereas 70 mg, but not 250 mg, of caffeine was found to enhance performance on a simple reaction time task. These findings support the view that the negative effects experienced after overnight and longer-term caffeine deprivation play a significant role in influencing consumption of caffeine-containing drinks. Therefore, it would appear that to avoid the dysphoric symptoms resulting from both under- and overconsumption, regular caffeine consumers would have to regulate their caffeine intake fairly precisely.

  16. Cortical effects of brief daily periods of unrestricted vision during early monocular form deprivation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, E; Bi, H; Maruko, I; Zhang, B; Zheng, J; Wensveen, J; Harwerth, R S; Smith, E L; Chino, Y M

    2006-05-01

    Experiencing daily brief periods of unrestricted vision during early monocular form deprivation prevents or reduces the degree of resulting amblyopia. To gain insight into the neural basis for these "protective" effects, we analyzed the monocular and binocular response properties of individual neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of macaque monkeys that received intermittent unrestricted vision. Microelectrode-recording experiments revealed significant decreases in the proportion of units that were dominated by the treated eyes, and the magnitude of this ocular dominance imbalance was correlated with the degree of amblyopia. The sensitivity of V1 neurons to interocular spatial phase disparity was significantly reduced in all treated monkeys compared with normal adults. With unrestricted vision, however, there was a small but significant increase in overall disparity sensitivity. Binocular suppression was prevalent in monkeys with constant form deprivation but significantly reduced by the daily periods of unrestricted vision. If neurons exhibited consistent responses to stimulation of the treated eye, monocular response properties obtained by stimulation of the two eyes were similar. These results suggest that the observed protective effects of brief periods of unrestricted vision are closely associated with the ability of V1 neurons to maintain their functional connections from the deprived eye and that interocular suppression in V1 may play an important role in regulating synaptic plasticity of these monkeys.

  17. Handwriting changes under the effect of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Aşicioğlu, Faruk; Turan, Nurten

    2003-04-08

    Document examiners are often faced with difficulties in evaluating handwriting by persons under the influence of alcohol. Although numerous articles are available on the subject of alcohol influence on handwriting quality, most of them were based on empirical data such as "few" or "increased", without any statistical evaluation. The aim of this research is to determine whether previous observations on reported effects of alcohol on handwriting are valid and to establish the predictability of observing specific effects. A total of 73 participants, who completed all steps of the experiment, were surveyed. Handwriting samples were taken before and after the consumption of alcohol. The test form, including criteria of prior studies used by document examiners, was evaluated with the help of a Olympus X-Tr stereo microscope, direct and oblique angle lighting and a video spectral comparator (VSC 2000). Measurements were done by means of digital caliper, statistics using repeated measures ANOVA, Pearson correlation, Pearson Chi square test, McNemar test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. The results revealed that the handwriting parameters such as word lengths, height of upper and lower case letters, height of ascending letter, height of descending letter, spacing between words, number of angularity, number of tremor, and number of tapered ends are all significantly increased under the effect of alcohol. It was also determined that the significant correlation between the alteration of handwriting parameters such as height of upper and lower case letters, number of angularity, number of tapered ends and the amount of alcohol. Furthermore, it does not confirm the conclusions of previous studies stating that alcohol levels are not proper indicators. Our data strongly confirms that handwriting changes can be observed at any level of alcohol. None of the alterations in handwriting can be attributed to the effects of alcohol intake alone. However, the presence of some alterations

  18. Effect of water deprivation on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels in the Children's python (Antaresia childreni).

    PubMed

    Dupoué, Andréaz; Angelier, Frédéric; Lourdais, Olivier; Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François

    2014-02-01

    Corticosterone (CORT) secretion is influenced by endogenous factors (e.g., physiological status) and environmental stressors (e.g., ambient temperature). Heretofore, the impact of water deprivation on CORT plasma levels has not been thoroughly investigated. However, both baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT are expected to respond to water deprivation not only because of hydric stress per se, but also because CORT is an important mineralocorticoid in vertebrates. We assessed the effects of water deprivation on baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT, in Children's pythons (Antaresia childreni), a species that experiences seasonal droughts in natural conditions. We imposed a 52-day water deprivation on a group of unfed Children's pythons (i.e., water-deprived treatment) and provided water ad libitum to another group (i.e., control treatment). We examined body mass variations throughout the experiment, and baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT at the end of the treatments. Relative body mass loss averaged ~10% in pythons without water, a value 2 to 4 times higher compared to control snakes. Following re-exposition to water, pythons from the water-deprived treatment drank readily and abundantly and attained a body mass similar to pythons from the control treatment. Together, these results suggest a substantial dehydration as a consequence of water deprivation. Interestingly, stress-induced but not baseline CORT level was significantly higher in water-deprived snakes, suggesting that baseline CORT might not respond to this degree of dehydration. Therefore, possible mineralocorticoid role of CORT needs to be clarified in snakes. Because dehydration usually induces adjustments (reduced movements, lowered body temperature) to limit water loss, and decreases locomotor performances, elevated stress-induced CORT in water-deprived snakes might therefore compensate for altered locomotor performances. Future studies should test this hypothesis.

  19. Facilitation of task performance and removal of the effects of sleep deprivation by an ampakine (CX717) in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Linda J; Daunais, James B; Rogers, Gary A; Hampson, Robert E; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2005-09-01

    The deleterious effects of prolonged sleep deprivation on behavior and cognition are a concern in modern society. Persons at risk for impaired performance and health-related issues resulting from prolonged sleep loss would benefit from agents capable of reducing these detrimental effects at the time they are sleep deprived. Agents capable of improving cognition by enhancing brain activity under normal circumstances may also have the potential to reduce the harmful or unwanted effects of sleep deprivation. The significant prevalence of excitatory alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamatergic receptors in the brain provides a basis for implementing a class of drugs that could act to alter or remove the effects of sleep deprivation. The ampakine CX717 (Cortex Pharmaceuticals), a positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors, was tested for its ability to enhance performance of a cognitive, delayed match-to-sample task under normal circumstances in well-trained monkeys, as well as alleviate the detrimental effects of 30-36 h of sleep deprivation. CX717 produced a dose-dependent enhancement of task performance under normal alert testing conditions. Concomitant measures of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglc) during the task, utilizing positron emission tomography, revealed increased activity in prefrontal cortex, dorsal striatum, and medial temporal lobe (including hippocampus) that was significantly enhanced over normal alert conditions following administration of CX717. A single night of sleep deprivation produced severe impairments in performance in the same monkeys, accompanied by significant alterations in task-related CMRglc in these same brain regions. However, CX717 administered to sleep-deprived monkeys produced a striking removal of the behavioral impairment and returned performance to above-normal levels even though animals were sleep deprived. Consistent with this recovery, CMRglc in all but one brain

  20. Alcohol: A Nutrient with Multiple Salutary Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pownall, Henry J.; Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K.; Gotto, Antonio M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that cardiovascular disease is lower among alcohol consumers than among nonconsumers. Many of the metabolic effects of alcohol are mediated by its terminal metabolite, acetate, which has reported insulinemic properties. There have been few rational metabolic targets that underly its cardioprotective effects until it was reported that acetate, the terminal product of alcohol metabolism, is the ligand for G-protein coupled receptor 43 (GPCR43), which is highly expressed in adipose tissue. Here, we recast much of some of the major lipid and lipoprotein effects of alcohol in the context of this newly discovered G-protein and develop a mechanistic model connecting the interaction of acetate with adipose tissue-GPCR43 with these effects. According to our model, ingestions of acetate could replace alcohol as a means of improving plasma lipid risk factors, improving glucose disposal, and reducing cardiovascular disease. Future studies should include biochemical, cell, animal, and human tests of acetate on energy metabolism. PMID:25793631

  1. Alerting, orienting and executive control: the effects of sleep deprivation on attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Martella, Diana; Casagrande, Maria; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Sleep deprivation alters attentional functions like vigilance or tonic alerting (i.e., sustaining an alert state over a period of time). However, the effects of sleep loss on both orienting and executive control are still not clear, and no study has assessed whether sleep deprivation might affect the relationships among these three attentional systems. In order to investigate the efficiency of the three attentional networks--alerting, orienting and executive control--within a single task, we used the Attention Network Test (ANT). Eighteen right-handed male participants took part in the experiment, which took place on two consecutive days. On the first day, each participant performed a 20 min training session of the ANT. On the second day, participants remained awake for 24 h during which time the ANT was performed once at 5:00 p.m. and once at 4:00 a.m. Results showed an overall slowing of reaction times in the nocturnal session, indicating a strong decrease in vigilance. Furthermore, sleep deprivation did affect attentional orienting and executive control. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that the tonic component of alerting interacts with both attentional orienting and executive functions.

  2. Module number of default mode network: inter-subject variability and effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Liu, Huan; Hitchman, Glenn; Lei, Xu

    2015-01-30

    Sleep deprivation have shown its great influence on the default mode network (DMN). The DMN is a core system in resting state brain activity. Recent studies have focused on its subsystems and multiple functions. However, the individual specific organization of the DMN is rarely investigated. As the effects of sleep deprivation (SD) on mood are well documented, a more interesting question is whether changes in the processing of emotional information due to sleep deprivation are related to any specific topological properties of the DMN. In this study, we proposed an index, module number of DMN (mnDMN), to measure the specific modular structure of the DMN for each individual. Our results showed that the DMN was generally split into two modules after SD, and the decreased functional connectivity between the two modules was related to a worsening of the participants׳ self-reported emotional state. Furthermore, the mnDMN was correlated with participants' rating scores of high valence pictures in the SD session, indicating that the mnDMN might reflect mood valuation in the human brain. Overall, our research reveals the diversity of the DMN, and may contribute towards a better understanding of the properties and functions of the DMN.

  3. The effect of acute sleep deprivation and fatigue in cardiovascular perfusion students: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Ashley B; Snyder, Alexandra C; Fernandez, Adam L; Boan, Andrea D; Malek, Angela M; Sistino, Joseph J

    2012-09-01

    Sleep deprivation as a result of long working hours has been associated with an increased risk of adverse events in healthcare professions but not in cardiovascular perfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on cardiovascular perfusion students. Testing with high-fidelity simulation after 24 hours of sleep deprivation allowed investigators to assess user competency and the effect of fatigue on performance. After informed consent, seven senior perfusion students were enrolled in the study (three declined to participate). The qualitative portion of the study included a focus group session, whereas the quantitative portion included administration of questionnaires, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), as well as clinical skills assessment using high-fidelity simulation. Subjects were assessed at three different intervals of sleep deprivation over a 24-hour period: baseline (6:00 AM), 12 hours (6:00 PM), 16 hours (10:00 PM), and 24 hours (6:00 AM) of wakefulness. During each scenario, normally monitored bypass parameters, including mean arterial pressure, activated clotting times, partial pressures of oxygen, partial pressures of carbon dioxide, and venous flow, were manipulated, and the subjects were required to return the parameters to normal levels. In addition, the scenario required calculation of the final protamine dose (using a dose-response curve) and detection of electrocardiography changes. Each task was varied at the different simulation sessions to decrease the effect of learning. Despite any lack of sleep, we hypothesized that, because of repetition, the times to complete the task would decrease at each session. We also hypothesized that the ESS and SSS scores would increase over time. We expected that the students would anticipate which tasks were being evaluated and would react more quickly. The average ESS scores progressively increased at each time period

  4. Effect of dissolved oxygen in alcoholic beverages and drinking water on alcohol elimination in humans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Su-jin; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byung-jeong; Lee, Eun-sil; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2013-02-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in the metabolism of alcohol. An increased dissolved oxygen level in alcoholic beverages reportedly accelerates the elimination of alcohol. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen in alcohol and the supportive effect of oxygenated water on alcohol pharmacokinetics after the excessive consumption of alcohol, i.e., 540 ml of 19.5% alcohol (v/v). Fifteen healthy males were included in this randomized, 3 × 3 crossover study. Three combinations were tested: X, normal alcoholic beverage and normal water; Y, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and normal water; Z, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and oxygenated water. Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were determined by conversion of breath alcohol concentrations. Four pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), T(max), K(el), and AUCall) were obtained using non-compartmental analysis and the times to reach 0.05% and 0.03% BAC (T(0.05%) and T(0.03%)) were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's post hoc test. With combination Z, the BAC decreased to 0.05% significantly faster (p < 0.05) than with combination X. Analyzing the pharmacokinetic parameters, the mean K(el) was significantly higher for combination Z than for combinations X and Y (p < 0.05), whereas the mean values of C(max), T(max) and AUCall did not differ significantly among the combinations. Dissolved oxygen in drinks accelerates the decrease in BAC after consuming a large amount of alcohol. However, the oxygen dissolved in the alcoholic beverage alone did not have a sufficient effect in this case. We postulate that highly oxygenated water augments the effect of oxygen in the alcoholic beverage in alcohol elimination. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the supportive effect of ingesting additional oxygenated water after heavy drinking of normal alcoholic beverages.

  5. Behavioral and genetic effects promoted by sleep deprivation in rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Matos, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Alvarenga, Tathiana A; Hirotsu, Camila; Scorza, Fulvio A; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana; Noguti, Juliana; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2012-05-02

    The interaction between sleep deprivation and epilepsy has been well described in electrophysiological studies, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of sleep deprivation on locomotor activity and genetic damage in the brains of rats treated with saline or pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). After 50 days of pilocarpine or saline treatment, both groups were assigned randomly to total sleep deprivation (TSD) for 6 h, paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 24 h, or be kept in their home cages. Locomotor activity was assessed with the open field test followed by resection of brain for quantification of genetic damage by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Status epilepticus induced significant hyperactivity in the open field test and caused genetic damage in the brain. Sleep deprivation procedures (TSD and PSD) did not affect locomotor activity in epileptic or healthy rats, but resulted in significant DNA damage in brain cells. Although PSD had this effect in both vehicle and epileptic groups, TSD caused DNA damage only in epileptic rats. In conclusion, our results revealed that, despite a lack of behavioral effects of sleep deprivation, TSD and PSD induced genetic damage in rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced SE.

  6. The Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation and Fatigue in Cardiovascular Perfusion Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Ashley B.; Snyder, Alexandra C.; Fernandez, Adam L.; Boan, Andrea D.; Malek, Angela M.; Sistino, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Sleep deprivation as a result of long working hours has been associated with an increased risk of adverse events in healthcare professions but not in cardiovascular perfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on cardiovascular perfusion students. Testing with highfidelity simulation after 24 hours of sleep deprivation allowed investigators to assess user competency and the effect of fatigue on performance. After informed consent, seven senior perfusion students were enrolled in the study (three declined to participate). The qualitative portion of the study included a focus group session, whereas the quantitative portion included administration of questionnaires, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), as well as clinical skills assessment using high-fidelity simulation. Subjects were assessed at three different intervals of sleep deprivation over a 24-hour period: baseline (6:00 am), 12 hours (6:00 pm), 16 hours (10:00 pm), and 24 hours (6:00 am) of wakefulness. During each scenario, normally monitored bypass parameters, including mean arterial pressure, activated clotting times, partial pressures of oxygen, partial pressures of carbon dioxide, and venous flow, were manipulated, and the subjects were required to return the parameters to normal levels. In addition, the scenario required calculation of the final protamine dose (using a dose–response curve) and detection of electrocardiography changes. Each task was varied at the different simulation sessions to decrease the effect of learning. Despite any lack of sleep, we hypothesized that, because of repetition, the times to complete the task would decrease at each session. We also hypothesized that the ESS and SSS scores would increase over time. We expected that the students would anticipate which tasks were being evaluated and would react more quickly. The average ESS scores progressively increased at each time

  7. The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Dissociation and Profiles of Mood, and Its Association with Biochemical Changes

    PubMed Central

    SELVİ, Yavuz; KILIÇ, Sultan; AYDIN, Adem; GÜZEL ÖZDEMİR, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sleep deprivation is a method, which has being used in order to comprehend the functions of sleep both in healthy individuals and for the patients of depression with in treatment, for a long time. The objective of our present study is to examine the relation between hormonal values, which are known for being related to the effects of these said changes determined in the mood, dissociation and thought suppression in healthy individuals after one night of sleep deprivation implementation. Methods One night sleep deprivation was performed on a total of thirty-two healthy volunteers (16 males and 16 females) who were included in the study. Blood samples were taken from the individuals before and after sleep deprivation implementation in order to determine cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) and Thyroid Functions’ Levels tests. In order to evaluate the effects of the sleep deprivation on moods, “White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI)” has been conducted, with an aim of evaluating thought suppression, “Profile of Mood States (POMS)”, “Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES)” with a purpose of realizing any dissociation tendency. Results On the individuals who have been implemented for sleep deprivation, a decrease on depression and vigor-activity sub-scales values was detected, and an increase was determined on fatigue sub-scales values of “POMS”. While the values of DES were found to have been statistically increased after sleep deprivation, also a significant decrease was determined on WBSI values. Even if there hasn’t been any significant statistical change determined on cortisol levels after sleep deprivation, yet there had been some significant changes detected on Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), fT3, fT4, and DHEA-S levels. Decrease in “POMS” depression sub-scale values and increase on fatigue sub-scale values were determined on the individuals whose sT4 levels were found to be increased significantly in statistic

  8. Effect of sleep deprivation on tolerance of prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Martin, B J

    1981-01-01

    Acute loss of sleep produces few apparent physiological effects at rest. Nevertheless, many anecdotes suggest that adequate sleep is essential for optimum endurance athletic performance. To investigate this question, heavy exercise performance after 36 h without sleep was compared with that after normal sleep in eight subjects. During prolonged treadmill walking at about 80% of the VO2 max, sleep loss reduced work time to exhaustion by an average of 11% (p = 0.05). This decrease occurred despite doubling monetary incentives for subjects during work after sleeplessness. Subjects appeared to fall into "resistant" and "susceptible" categories: four showed less than a 5% change in performance after sleep loss, while four others showed decrements in exercise tolerance ranging from 15 to 40%. During the walk, sleep loss resulted in significantly greater perceived exertion (p less than 0.05), even though exercise heart rate and metabolic rate (VO2 and VCO2) were unchanged. Minute ventilation was significantly elevated during exercise after sleep loss ( p less than 0.05). Sleep loss failed to alter the continuous slow rises in VE and heart rate that occurred as work was prolonged. These findings suggest that the psychological effects of acute sleep loss may contribute to decreased tolerance of prolonged heavy exercise.

  9. The effects of chronic water deprivation on metabolic rate and long-trace taste-aversion conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Hinderliter, Charles F; Misanin, James R

    2006-05-01

    The effect of chronic water deprivation on metabolic rate and long-trace taste-aversion conditioning was examined in Wistar-derived rats. Subjects were either maintained on a water deprivation regimen or allowed free access to water for a seven-week period prior to conditioning. At conditioning, rats were presented a saccharin CS followed 0-, 45-, 90-, or 180-min later by an i.p. injection of LiCl. Additionally, pseudo-conditioned groups were presented the CS followed immediately by an injection of physiological saline. Heightened oxygen consumption in deprived subjects suggested that chronic water deprivation increased metabolic rate. While no differences in the amount of saccharin intake were observed at conditioning, percent preference for saccharin scores during a 24-h two-bottle water/saccharin test revealed that non-chronically deprived rats supported conditioning at longer CS-US intervals than did chronically water-deprived rats. Results are interpreted in terms of a time-contraction effect stemming from an alteration of an internal metabolic count-down timer.

  10. Effects of long-term sensory deprivation on asymmetric synapses in the whisker barrel field of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Machín, Raquel; Pérez-Cejuela, César G; Bjugn, Roger; Avendaño, Carlos

    2006-08-30

    Whisker trimming deprives the cortical barrel field from the patterned sensory input that derives from active touch but leaves passive tactile signals unaltered. We have studied in the rat barrel field, by stereological procedures, the effects of a sustained period of unilateral deprivation by whisker clipping during adolescence and early adulthood on (1) the surface density (SV) of asymmetric synapses, as determined from measuring the presynaptic membrane specializations, and (2) the numerical density of asymmetric synaptic profiles (NA), classified according to their postsynaptic target and their apparent curvature. Compared to control rats, the procedure did not change the overall volume of the region, the volume fraction occupied by each cortical layer, or the volume fraction occupied by unmyelinated axons and boutons. However, the deprived barrel cortex displayed an increase in SV in layers I and II, and an increase in NA in layer I and in the cortex as a whole, mainly due to an increase in profiles with a convex shape. Layer IV was the least affected by the deprivation. These results point to a net increase, rather than a decrease, of excitatory synapses in the deprived cortex, which could result from a deprivation-induced decrease in the rate of normal synapse loss. This effect occurs specifically in superficial layers, more involved in intracortical and cortico-cortical, rather than thalamo-cortical, processing.

  11. Dose-dependent model of caffeine effects on human vigilance during total sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sridhar; Laxminarayan, Srinivas; Wesensten, Nancy J; Kamimori, Gary H; Balkin, Thomas J; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-10-07

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant to counter sleep-loss effects. While the pharmacokinetics of caffeine in the body is well-understood, its alertness-restoring effects are still not well characterized. In fact, mathematical models capable of predicting the effects of varying doses of caffeine on objective measures of vigilance are not available. In this paper, we describe a phenomenological model of the dose-dependent effects of caffeine on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance of sleep-deprived subjects. We used the two-process model of sleep regulation to quantify performance during sleep loss in the absence of caffeine and a dose-dependent multiplier factor derived from the Hill equation to model the effects of single and repeated caffeine doses. We developed and validated the model fits and predictions on PVT lapse (number of reaction times exceeding 500 ms) data from two separate laboratory studies. At the population-average level, the model captured the effects of a range of caffeine doses (50-300 mg), yielding up to a 90% improvement over the two-process model. Individual-specific caffeine models, on average, predicted the effects up to 23% better than population-average caffeine models. The proposed model serves as a useful tool for predicting the dose-dependent effects of caffeine on the PVT performance of sleep-deprived subjects and, therefore, can be used for determining caffeine doses that optimize the timing and duration of peak performance.

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE): Implications For Rural Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, Rosalie; And Others

    This report reviews literature on the effects of maternal alcohol consumption on the fetus and the resulting impact on the learning abilities and behavior of children born with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Recent reports indicate that an estimated 73 percent of infants are exposed to alcohol before birth, resulting in varying degrees of learning…

  13. Parent Knowledge of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Michigan Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Faite R-P.

    This paper presents results of a survey of 297 parents in Michigan regarding their knowledge of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE), including their knowledge of the characteristics that typify alcohol-related birth defects and prevention measures. Parents surveyed had children in preschool regular education, preschool…

  14. Double Trouble? The Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Chronotype on Adolescent Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagys, Natasha; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Talbot, Lisa S.; Kaplan, Katherine A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two understudied risk factors that have been linked to emotional difficulties in adolescence are chronotype and sleep deprivation. This study extended past research by using an experimental design to investigate the role of sleep deprivation and chronotype on emotion in adolescents. It was hypothesized that sleep deprivation and an…

  15. The effectiveness of problem solving therapy in deprived South African communities: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of South Africans with a DSM-IV diagnosis receive no treatment for their mental health problems. There is a move to simplify treatment for common mental disorders (CMDs) in order to ease access. Brief problem solving therapy (PST) might fill the treatment gap for CMD's in deprived communities in South Africa. This pilot study evaluates the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of this PST program for CMD's in deprived communities around Cape Town. Methods A Dutch problem solving program was adapted and translated into English, Xhosa and Afrikaans and thereafter implemented in townships around Cape Town. An initial attempt to recruit participants for online PST proved difficult, and so the program was adapted to a booklet format. Volunteers experiencing psychological distress were invited to participate in the either individually or group delivered 5-week during self-help program. To evaluate the effectiveness, psychological distress was administered through self-report questionnaires. After completion of the intervention participants also rated the program on various acceptability aspects. Results Of 103 participants, 73 completed 5 weeks of brief PST in a booklet/workshop format. There were significantly more dropouts in those who used the booklet individually than in the group. Psychological distress measured on the K-10 and SRQ fell significantly and the program was evaluated positively. Conclusions The results suggest that brief problem solving in a booklet/workshop format may be an effective, feasible and acceptable short-term treatment for people with CMD's in deprived communities. In this setting, group delivery of PST had lower drop-out rates than individual delivery, and was more feasible and acceptable. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the effect of brief self-help PST more rigorously. PMID:21961801

  16. The effect of partial sleep deprivation on weight-lifting performance.

    PubMed

    Reilly, T; Piercy, M

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effects of partial sleep deprivation on submaximal and maximal weight-lifting tasks and on subjective states pre- and post-activity. Eight male subjects (aged 18-24 years) were restricted to a nightly ration of 3 h sleep for 3 successive nights after baseline measures on the first day. A 4 day period where normal sleep was permitted fulfilled a control condition, the normal and sleep-deprived conditions being counterbalanced and separated by 10 days. The weight-lifting tasks consisted of biceps curl, bench press, leg press, and dead lift. For each exercise a submaximal load, corresponding to a fixed value on a category ratio scale of exertion, was determined for 20 repetitions; the maximal lift for that exercise was then obtained. A profile of mood states and subjective sleepiness were determined at each test occasion, tests being conducted in the evening of each day. There was no significant effect of sleep loss on performance of maximal biceps curl (p < 0.05) but a significant effect was noted on maximal bench press, leg press, and dead lift (p < 0.001). Trend analysis indicated decreased performance in submaximal lifts for all the 4 tasks: the deterioration was significant after the second night of sleep loss (p < 0.01). Performing the lifts had little influence on sleepiness ratings which increased linearly with successive days of sleep loss. Mood states of confusion, vigour, and fatigue were affected significantly by the sleep deprivation regimen (p < 0.001), but there was no significant effect of sleep loss or anger, tension, and depression (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Investigating the effect of acute sleep deprivation on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis response to a psychosocial stressor.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ivan; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2017-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been previously identified as one potential mechanism that may explain the link between sleep deprivation and negative health outcomes. However, few studies have examined the direct association between sleep deprivation and HPA-axis functioning, particularly in the context of stress. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between acute sleep deprivation and HPA-axis reactivity to a psychosocial stressor. Participants included 40 healthy, young adults between the ages of 18-29. The current protocol included spending two nights in the laboratory. After an adaptation night (night 1), participants were randomized into either a sleep deprivation condition (29 consecutive hours awake) or a control condition (night 2). Following the second night, all participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Salivary cortisol was collected before, during, and after the TSST. Results indicated that there were significant group differences in cortisol stress reactivity. Specifically, compared to participants in the control condition, participants in the sleep deprivation condition had greater baseline (i.e., pre-stress) cortisol, yet a blunted cortisol response to the TSST. Taken together, a combination of elevated baseline cortisol (and its subsequent effect on HPA-axis regulatory processes) and a relative 'ceiling' on the amount of cortisol a laboratory stressor can produce may explain why participants in the sleep deprivation condition demonstrated blunted cortisol responses.

  18. Sex-related effects of sleep deprivation on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castañeda, Rocio E.; Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Martínez-QUEZADA, Carlos J.; Jauregui-Huerta, Fernando; Grcia-Estrada, Joaquin; Ramos-Zuñiga; Luquin; Gonzalez-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and depressive symptoms are generated after paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD). However, it is not clear whether PSD produces differential effects between females and males. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PSD on anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors between sexes. Male and female BALB/c mice were divided in three groups: the control group, the 48-h PSD group and the 96-h PSD group. Immediately after PSD protocols, the forced swimming and open field test were applied. Sucrose consumption test was used to evaluate the middle-term effect of PSD. We found that corticosterone serum levels showed significant differences in the 96-h PSD females as compared to 96-h PSD males. In the open-field test, the 48-h and 96-h PSD females spent more time at the periphery of the field, and showed high locomotion as compared to males. In the elevated plus maze, the 48-h PSD females spent more time in closed arms than males, which is compatible with anxiety-like behavior. The forced swim test indicated that the 96-h PSD males spent more time swimming as compared to the 96-h PSD females. Remarkably, the 96-h PSD males had lower sucrose intake than the 96-h PSD females, which suggest that male mice have proclivity to develop a persistent depressive-like behavior late after PSD. In conclusion, male mice showed a significant trend to depressive-like behaviors late after sleep deprivation. Conversely, female have a strong tendency to display anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors immediately after sleep deprivation. PMID:26548630

  19. Effects of autoimmune NGF deprivation in the adult rabbit and offspring.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E M; Gorin, P D; Osborne, P A; Rydel, R E; Pearson, J

    1982-05-20

    An experimental autoimmune approach to the production of nerve growth factor deprivation, which we have previously described in the rat and guinea pig, has been applied to the rabbit. This species was chosen for study because of several potential advantages. The rabbit produces large litters and has a relatively short gestation period. More importantly, rabbits generate high titers of antibody against mouse NGF and large amounts of maternal antibody are passively transferred to the developing rabbit fetus compared to most other species, particularly the rat. The sympathetic nervous system of adult rabbit immunized against mouse NGF underwent degeneration with up to an 85% decrease in neuronal numbers in the superior cervical ganglion after 10 months of immunization, thus providing further evidence that NGF is required for the survival of mature sympathetic neurons. Despite the fact that newborn rabbits born to anti-NGF producing mothers had much higher titers of anti-NGF than did rats, the effects on the developing sympathetic and sensory nervous systems were not found to be any greater than in rats. Reductions in norepinephrine levels in the heart and spleen of adult rabbits born to anti-NGF producing mothers were greater than in small intestine. Prenatal exposure to maternal anti-NGF caused reductions (up to 70%) in the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. Substance-P immunoreactivity was reduced in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord of rabbit exposed to maternal anti-NGF. These changes, however, were not greater than seen in the rat. We conclude that although the rabbits offers some advantage in the study of the effects of NGF deprivation in the adult animal, it appears less well suited than the rat or guinea pig to the study of the effects of NGF deprivation on development.

  20. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's how many accidents occur. continue What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  1. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  2. Effect of baicalin on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced endothelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Si; Li, Shi; Zhu, Lei; Fang, Shu-Huan; Chen, Jun-Li; Xu, Qing-Qing; Li, Hong-Ying; Luo, Na-Chuan; Yang, Cong; Luo, Dan; Li, Lin; Ma, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    Baicalin, a plant-derived flavonoid, has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects on ischemia-like or excitotoxic injury. To confirm this function and explore the possible mechanism, we investigated the protective effect of baicalin on an in-vitro model of ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation-treated endothelial cell). In the present study, we found that baicalin (100 μM) inhibited cell death, reduced cell membrane damage, and maintained the integrity of the nucleus. Flow cytometric analysis and Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide double staining results showed that the necroptosis ratio decreased with baicalin treatment. Western blot analysis showed that baicalin regulated the expression of RIP-1 and RIP-3 in bEnd.3 cells and the use of detection kits showed that baicalin inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in oxygen-glucose deprivation-treated bEnd.3 cells. These results indicated that baicalin effectively alleviated the oxidative stress, decreased the proportion of cells undergoing necrosis, and reduced cell damage.

  3. Opposite effects of sleep deprivation on the continuous reaction times in patients with liver cirrhosis and normal persons.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Mette Munk; Frøjk, Jesper; de Muckadell, Ove B Schaffalitzky; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    The continuous reaction times (CRT) method describes arousal functions. Reaction time instability in a patient with liver disease indicates covert hepatic encephalopathy (cHE). The effects of sleep deprivation are unknown although cirrhosis patients frequently suffer from sleep disorders. The aim of this study was to determine if sleep deprivation influences the CRT test. Eighteen cirrhosis patients and 27 healthy persons were tested when rested and after one night's sleep deprivation. The patients filled out validated sleep quality questionnaires. Seven patients (38%) had unstable reaction times (a CRTindex < 1.9) compatible with cHE. In these patients, the wakefulness improved or normalized their reaction speed and CRTindex (p = 0.01). There was no change in the other patients' reaction speed or stability. Seven patients (38%) reported poor sleep that was not related to their CRT tests before or after the sleep deprivation. In the healthy participants, the sleep deprivation slowed their reaction times by 11% (p < 0.0001) and in 7 persons (25%) destabilized them. The acute sleep deprivation normalized or improved the reaction time stability of the patients with a CRTindex below 1.9 and had no effect in the patients with a CRTindex above 1.9. There was no relation between reported sleep quality and reaction time results. Thus, in cirrhosis patients, sleep disturbances do not lead to 'falsely' slowed and unstable reaction times. In contrast, the acute sleep deprivation slowed and destabilized the reaction times of the healthy participants. This may have negative consequences for decision-making.

  4. Effect of alcohol references in music on alcohol consumption in public drinking places.

    PubMed

    Engels, Rutger C M E; Slettenhaar, Gert; ter Bogt, Tom; Scholte, Ron H J

    2011-01-01

    People are exposed to many references to alcohol, which might influence their consumption of alcohol directly. In a field experiment, we tested whether textual references to alcohol in music played in bars lead to higher revenues of alcoholic beverages. We created two databases: one contained songs referring to alcohol, the parallel database contained songs with matching artists, tempo, and energetic content, but no references to alcohol. Customers of three bars were exposed to either music textually referring to alcohol or to the control condition, resulting in 23 evenings in both conditions. Bartenders were instructed to play songs with references to alcohol (or not) during a period of 2 hours each of the evenings of interest. They were not blind to the experimental condition. The results showed that customers who were exposed to music with textual references to alcohol spent significantly more on alcoholic drinks compared to customers in the control condition. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence that alcohol-related lyrics directly affect alcohol consumption in public drinking places. Since our study is one of the first testing direct effects of music lyrics on consumption, our small-scale, preliminary study needs replication before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  5. The effect of selective REM-sleep deprivation on the consolidation and affective evaluation of emotional memories.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Christian D; Pulst, Julika; Krause, Fanny; Elsner, Marike; Baving, Lioba; Pedersen, Anya; Prehn-Kristensen, Alexander; Göder, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Emotion boosts the consolidation of events in the declarative memory system. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is believed to foster the memory consolidation of emotional events. On the other hand, REM sleep is assumed to reduce the emotional tone of the memory. Here, we investigated the effect of selective REM-sleep deprivation, SWS deprivation, or wake on the affective evaluation and consolidation of emotional and neutral pictures. Prior to an 9-h retention interval, sixty-two healthy participants (23.5 ± 2.5 years, 32 female, 30 male) learned and rated their affect to 80 neutral and 80 emotionally negative pictures. Despite rigorous deprivation of REM sleep or SWS, the residual sleep fostered the consolidation of neutral and negative pictures. Furthermore, emotional arousal helped to memorize the pictures. The better consolidation of negative pictures compared to neutral ones was most pronounced in the SWS-deprived group where a normal amount of REM sleep was present. This emotional memory bias correlated with REM sleep only in the SWS-deprived group. Furthermore, emotional arousal to the pictures decreased over time, but neither sleep nor wake had any differential effect. Neither the comparison of the affective ratings (arousal, valence) during encoding and recognition, nor the affective ratings of the recognized targets and rejected distractors supported the hypothesis that REM sleep dampens the emotional reaction to remembered stimuli. The data suggest that REM sleep fosters the consolidation of emotional memories but has no effect on the affective evaluation of the remembered contents.

  6. Effects of sleep deprivation on measures of the febrile reaction and the recovery of somatovisceral functions and sleep in endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Lapshina, K V; Ekimova, I V

    2010-05-01

    Electroencephalographic methods were used to study the effects of total sleep deprivation on thermoregulatory measures of the fever response in pigeons (Columba livia): brain temperature, peripheral vasomotor reactions, thoracic muscle contractile activity, and the recovery of somatic functions and the time characteristics of waking and sleep in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia. Sleep deprivation during the period in which the quantity of slow-wave sleep increased on administration of LPS induced decreases in the latent period of fever onset and in the duration of fever, along with more significant increases in brain temperature and the level of muscle contractile activity as compared with the effects of LPS alone. The period after sleep deprivation was characterized by more prolonged recovery of muscle contractile activity and the time characteristics of sleep and waking states, along with more prolonged compensatory "rebound" of slow-wave sleep as compared with the effects of sleep deprivation alone. Thus, sleep deprivation in endotoxemia led to decreases in the latent period of fever onset, exacerbation of fever, and increases in the latent period of recovery of physiological functions.

  7. Correlates of Baclofen Effectiveness in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Shukla, Tulika; Bokka, Spandana; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima; Chand, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a global concern. Baclofen has shown promise as an anti-craving agent but its efficiency remains to be settled. We reviewed 549 male cases diagnosed with alcohol dependence who received Acamprosate (201) or Baclofen (348). ‘Time to first drink’ was compared between two groups and multiple regression analysis was done in baclofen group to identify correlates of effectiveness. There was a significant difference in outcome measure between Baclofen (M = 4.44, SD = 3.75) and Acamprosate group (M = 3.73, SD = 2.19); t (547) = 2.45, P = 0.01. Initial regression analysis with six predictor variables (average daily alcohol units, current age, age at onset of dependence, family history, duration of dependence and dose of baclofen in mg/day) showed significant correlation of outcome variable with only two predictor variables — dose of baclofen and average daily intake. Using the hierarchical method it was found that ‘dose of baclofen’ and ‘average alcohol intake’ explain a significant amount of variance in ‘time to first drink’. [F (1, 345) = 182.8, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.52, R2adjusted = 0.51]. This information can be used to select patients in long term longitudinal studies and may explain variable results seen in clinical trials of baclofen done earlier. PMID:26664095

  8. Dual conception of risk in the Iowa Gambling Task: effects of sleep deprivation and test-retest gap.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    Risk in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is often understood in terms of intertemporal choices, i.e., preference for immediate outcomes in favor of delayed outcomes is considered risky decision making. According to behavioral economics, healthy decision makers are expected to refrain from choosing the short-sighted immediate gain because, over time (10 trials of the IGT), the immediate gains result in a long term loss (net loss). Instead decision makers are expected to maximize their gains by choosing options that, over time (10 trials), result in delayed or long term gains (net gain). However, task choices are sometimes made on the basis of the frequency of reward and punishment such that frequent rewards/infrequent punishments are favored over infrequent rewards/frequent punishments. The presence of these two attributes (intertemporality and frequency of reward) in IGT decision making may correspond to the emotion-cognition dichotomy and reflect a dual conception of risk. Decision making on the basis of the two attributes was tested under two conditions: delay in retest and sleep deprivation. An interaction between sleep deprivation and time delay was expected to attenuate the difference between the two attributes. Participants were 40 male university students. Analysis of the effects of IGT attribute type (intertemporal vs. frequency of reinforcement), sleep deprivation (sleep deprivation vs. no sleep deprivation), and test-retest gap (short vs. long delay) showed a significant within-subjects effect of IGT attribute type thus confirming the difference between the two attributes. Sleep deprivation had no effect on the attributes, but test-retest gap and the three-way interaction between attribute type, test-retest gap, and sleep deprivation were significantly different. Post-hoc tests revealed that sleep deprivation and short test-retest gap attenuated the difference between the two attributes. Furthermore, the results showed an expected trend of increase in

  9. A Time for Learning and a Time for Sleep: The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Contextual Fear Conditioning at Different Times of the Day

    PubMed Central

    Hagewoud, Roelina; Whitcomb, Shamiso N.; Heeringa, Amarins N.; Havekes, Robbert; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation negatively affects memory consolidation, especially in the case of hippocampus-dependent memories. Studies in rodents have shown that 5 hours of sleep deprivation immediately following footshock exposure selectively impairs the formation of a contextual fear memory. In these studies, both acquisition and subsequent sleep deprivation were performed in the animals' main resting phase. However, in everyday life, subjects most often learn during their active phase. Design: Here we examined the effects of sleep deprivation on memory consolidation for contextual fear in rats when the task was performed at different times of the day, particularly, at the beginning of the resting phase or right before the onset of the active phase. Measurements and Results: Results show that sleep deprivation immediately following training affects consolidation of contextual fear, independent of time of training. However, in the resting phase memory consolidation was impaired by 6 hours of posttraining sleep deprivation, whereas, in the active phase, the impairment was only seen after 12 hours of sleep deprivation. Since rats sleep at least twice as much during the resting phase compared with the active phase, these data suggest that the effect of sleep deprivation depends on the amount of sleep that was lost. Also, control experiments show that effects of sleep deprivation were not related to the amount of stimulation the animals received and were therefore not likely an indirect effect of the sleep-deprivation method. Conclusion: These results support the notion that sleep immediately following acquisition, independent of time of day, promotes memory consolidation and that sleep deprivation may disrupt this process depending on the amount of sleep that is lost. Citation: Hagewoud R; Whitcomb SN; Heeringa AN; Havekes R; Koolhaas JM; Meerlo P. A time for learning and a time for sleep: the effect of sleep deprivation on contextual fear conditioning at

  10. Effects of sleep deprivation on Color-Word, Emotional, and Specific Stroop interference and on self-reported anxiety.

    PubMed

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Sanchez-Ortuno, Montserrat; Charles, André; Taillard, Jacques; Valtat, Cédric; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was principally to assess the impact of sleep deprivation on interference performance in short Stroop tasks (Color-Word, Emotional, and Specific) and on subjective anxiety. Subjective sleepiness and performance on a psychomotor sustained attention task were also investigated to validate our protocol of sleep deprivation. Twelve healthy young subjects were tested at four-hourly intervals through a 36-h period of wakefulness under a constant routine protocol. Analyses of variance for repeated measurements revealed that self-assessment of sleepiness on a visual analogue scale as well as mean reaction time performance on the sustained attention task, both for the first minute and for 10 min of testing, were worsened by sleep deprivation. Analyses revealed an increase in self-reported anxiety scores on the STAI questionnaire but did not reveal any significant effect after sleep deprivation either on indexes of interference or on accuracy in Stroop tasks. However, analyses showed sensitivity to circadian effect on verbal reaction times in the threat-related (Emotional) and sleep-related (Specific) Stroop tasks. We concluded that 36 h of prolonged wakefulness affect self-reported anxiety and Emotional Stroop task resulting in a cognitive slowing. Moreover, total sleep deprivation does not affect interference control in any of the three short Stroop tasks.

  11. Effects of Alcoholism Severity and Smoking on Executive Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Glass, J.M.; Buu, A.; Adams, K.M.; Nigg, J.T.; Puttler, L.I.; Jester, J.M.; Zucker, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neurocognitive deficits in chronic alcoholic men are well documented and include impairments in memory, visual-spatial processing, problem solving and executive function. The cause of these deficits is unclear, but could include direct effects of alcohol toxicity, pre-existing cognitive deficits that may predispose towards substance abuse, comorbid psychiatric disorders (e.g., depression) and comorbid abuse of substances other than alcohol. For example, cigarette smoking occurs at a much higher rate among persons with alcoholism and has been linked to poor cognitive performance. Until recently, the negative effects of smoking on cognitive function in alcoholism have been ignored. Methods The effects of alcoholism and smoking are examined in a community recruited sample of alcoholic and non-alcoholic men (N=240) using standard neuropsychological measures and reaction-time measures of executive function. Alcoholism severity was measured as an average of alcoholism diagnoses across the study duration (12 yrs). Smoking was measured in pack-years. Results Both alcoholism and smoking were negatively correlated with a composite executive function score. For component measures, alcoholism was negatively correlated with a broad range of measures, whereas smoking was negatively correlated with measures that emphasize response speed. In regression analyses, both smoking and alcoholism are significant predictors of executive function composite. However; when IQ is included in the regression analyses, alcoholism severity is no longer a significant predictor. Conclusions Both smoking and alcoholism were related to executive function. However, the effect of alcoholism on EF was not independent of IQ, suggesting that the alcoholism effect was generalized, perhaps affecting a wide range of cognitive abilities of which executive function is a component. On the other hand, the effect of smoking on measures relying on response speed were independent of IQ, suggesting a more

  12. The effect of video game training on the vision of adults with bilateral deprivation amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Taek; Maurer, Daphne; Lewis, Terri L

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia is a condition involving reduced acuity caused by abnormal visual input during a critical period beginning shortly after birth. Amblyopia is typically considered to be irreversible during adulthood. Here we provide the first demonstration that video game training can improve at least some aspects of the vision of adults with bilateral deprivation amblyopia caused by a history of bilateral congenital cataracts. Specifically, after 40 h of training over one month with an action video game, most patients showed improvement in one or both eyes on a wide variety of tasks including acuity, spatial contrast sensitivity, and sensitivity to global motion. As well, there was evidence of improvement in at least some patients for temporal contrast sensitivity, single letter acuity, crowding, and feature spacing in faces, but not for useful field of view. The results indicate that, long after the end of the critical period for damage, there is enough residual plasticity in the adult visual system to effect improvements, even in cases of deep amblyopia caused by early bilateral deprivation.

  13. Contrasting effects of glutamine deprivation on apoptosis induced by conventionally used anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Valter, Kadri; Chen, Lian; Kruspig, Björn; Maximchik, Polina; Cui, Hengmin; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Gogvadze, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Tumor cells dependence on glutamine offers a rationale for their elimination via targeting of glutamine metabolism. The aim of this work was to investigate how glutamine deprivation affects the cellular response to conventionally used anticancer drugs. To answer this question, neuroblastoma cells were pre-incubated in a glutamine-free medium and treated with cisplatin or etoposide. Obtained results revealed that glutamine withdrawal affected cellular response to therapeutic drugs in a different manner. Glutamine deprivation suppressed etoposide-induced, but markedly stimulated cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Suppression of etoposide-induced cell death correlated with a downregulation of p53 expression, which, among other functions, regulates the expression of death receptor 5, one of the activators of caspase-8. In contrast, stimulation of cisplatin-induced cell death involved reactive oxygen species-mediated downregulation of FLIP-S, an inhibitor of caspase-8. As a result, the activity of caspase-8 was stimulated causing cleavage of the pro-apoptotic protein Bid, which is involved in the permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and the release of pro-apoptotic factors, such as cytochrome c from mitochondria. Thus, suppression of glutamine metabolism can sensitize tumor cells to treatment and could be utilized for anti-cancer therapy. However, it should be done cautiously, since adverse effects may occur when combined with an inappropriate therapeutic drug.

  14. Water deprivation enhances the inhibitory effect of natriuretic peptides on cAMP synthesis in rat renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Geoffrey E; Li, Xiaohong; Rosado, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of water deprivation on the expression of atrial natiruretic peptide (ANP)(1-28) binding sites in rat kidney. Water deprivation increased the B(max) of glomerular binding sites for ANP(1-28) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)(1-22) without modifying their affinity, an effect that was prevented in the presence of C-atrial natriuretic factor (C-ANF), suggesting that natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) binding sites might be enhanced. Our results indicate that ANP(1-28), CNP(1-22), and C-ANF inhibit cAMP synthesis directly stimulated by forskolin or by the physiological agonists histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The inhibitory effect was found to be significantly greater in water-deprived rats than in controls. Our observations suggest that this effect must be attributed to the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein, because the 67- and 77-kDa NPR-C-like proteins show high and low affinities for CNP(1-22), respectively, and the enhanced inhibitory effect of CNP on cAMP generation in water-deprived rats was detected at subnanomolar concentrations. In addition, using affinity cross-linking studies we have observed that water deprivation increases the expression of the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein, and HS-142, which binds to NPR-A and the 77-kDa NPR-C-like but not the 67-kDa protein, reduced ligand internalization without affecting cAMP inhibition by ANP(1-28). Finally, we have found that ligand binding to the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein is reduced by GTPgammaS, suggesting that this receptor is associated with a G protein in renal glomeruli. The enhanced inhibitory role of natriuretic peptides on cAMP synthesis induced by water deprivation may influence glomerular function in the rat kidney.

  15. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A What's in this article? ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  16. The effects of reverse monocular deprivation in monkeys. I. Psychophysical experiments.

    PubMed

    Harwerth, R S; Smith, E L; Crawford, M L; von Noorden, G K

    1989-01-01

    Monkeys had one eye closed at about 30 days of age for 14, 30, 60, or 90 days, then opened, and the fellow eye closed for another 120 days. The animals then had at least 10 months of binocular visual experience before behavioral training and testing were begun. All subjects were used in a series of psychophysical investigations during the next two years. The results of the behavioral studies indicated that the initially deprived eyes (IDE) of the two monkeys that were subjected to initial deprivation periods of 14 or 30 days recovered normal or near-normal spatial contrast sensitivity. In contrast, the two animals which underwent longer periods of initial deprivation showed incomplete recovery, especially for high spatial frequency stimuli. All of the monkeys exhibited a reduction in spatial contrast sensitivity for their reverse deprived eyes (RDE); the earlier the onset of the reverse-deprivation procedures (i.e., the shorter the initial period of deprivation), the greater the deficit in the RDE's spatial contrast sensitivity. Measurements of temporal contrast sensitivity showed that all of the subjects' IDEs had normal or near-normal sensitivity levels. However, the reverse-deprivation procedures initiated at 90 days of age or earlier produced a frequency-dependent reduction in the RDE's temporal modulation sensitivity. The measures of increment-threshold spectral sensitivity revealed that only the RDE of the monkey that had the shortest initial deprivation period had an abnormal spectral sensitivity function. The results demonstrate that many of the severe behavioral deficits produced by early monocular form deprivation can be recovered via reverse-deprivation procedures. However, depending upon the length of the initial deprivation period and the age at which the reversal procedure is initiated, the second deprivation period can also adversely affect the functional capacity of the RDE.

  17. Effect of amphetamine on sucrose-reinforced lever pressing: interaction with food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Samson, H H

    1986-07-01

    Rats were trained to lever press on a Fixed Ratio Schedule 8 using sucrose reinforcement in one of two feeding conditions: ad lib food and water available in the home cage; reduced feeding in order to maintain the animals at 80% of their free feeding body weight. The effect of three doses of d-amphetamine (0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg) on lever pressing was examined for each feeding condition. A systematic decrease in responding as dose increased was found in the ad lib feeding condition while only the highest dose had any effect on responding in the food restricted animals. Thus, it appeared that the effect of food deprivation was to shift the amphetamine dose-response curve to the right.

  18. Effects of alcohol and lorazepam during extinction of alcohol self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anne; Duka, Theodora; Stephens, David N

    2003-09-01

    Systemic injections of alcohol have previously been reported to 'prime' or to reinstate self-administration of alcohol in rats, and it has been suggested that the priming effects of drugs are related to their stimulus properties. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of lorazepam, which cross-generalizes with alcohol in animal drug-discrimination studies, in rats trained to self-administer 7% alcohol in an operant paradigm. Once animals were trained, extinction tests were carried out twice weekly, before which rats were injected with either vehicle, alcohol (0.063-0.5 g/kg, i.p.) or lorazepam (0.03-0.25 mg/kg, i.p.). Alcohol did not increase responding for alcohol during extinction. Doses of 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg reduced alcohol-appropriate lever pressing (p < 0.05 versus 0 g/kg), with the largest dose also suppressing general activity (p < 0.02 versus 0 g/kg). Lorazepam also reduced alcohol-appropriate responding, in a behaviourally specific manner; doses of 0.03 mg/kg and above decreased lever pressing (p < 0.05 versus 0 mg/kg), whereas general activity was depressed at 0.06 mg/kg and larger doses (p < 0.05 versus 0 mg/kg). Although lorazepam mimicked the effect of alcohol at doses predicted to do so on the basis of their relative potency in drug discrimination studies, neither alcohol nor lorazepam primed rats to respond for alcohol. By contrast, the pattern of results suggested that, in this model, they 'satiated' or substituted for alcohol, resulting in a reduced motivation to respond.

  19. The effectiveness of alcohol control policies on alcohol-related traffic fatalities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chang, Koyin; Wu, Chin-Chih; Ying, Yung-Hsiang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple alcohol control policies have been enacted since the early 1980s to keep drunk drivers off the roads and to prevent more alcohol-related traffic fatalities. In this paper, we analyze nine traffic policies to determine the extent to which each policy contributes to effective alcohol-related fatality prevention. Compared with the existing literature, this paper addresses a more comprehensive set of traffic policies. In addition, we used a panel GLS model that holds regional effects and state-specific time effects constant to analyze their impact on alcohol-related fatalities with two distinct rates: alcohol-related traffic deaths per capita and alcohol-related traffic deaths per total traffic deaths. While per capita alcohol-related traffic deaths is used more often in other studies, alcohol-related traffic deaths per total traffic deaths better reflects the impact of policies on deterring drunk driving. In addition, regional analyses were conducted to determine the policies that are more effective in certain regions. The findings of this study suggest that zero tolerance laws and increased beer taxes are the most effective policies in reducing alcohol-related fatalities in all regions.

  20. Developmental effect of light deprivation on synaptic plasticity of rats’ hippocampus: implications for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Talaei, Sayyed Alireza; Azami, Abolfazl; Salami, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): There are few reports have demonstrated the effect of a change-in-light experience on the structure and function of hippocampus. A change-in-light experience also affects the circadian pattern of melatonin secretion. This study aimed to investigate developmental effect of exogenous melatonin on synaptic plasticity of hippocampus of light deprived rats. Materials and Methods: The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 2μg/5μl melatonin was evaluated on the basic and tetanized field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) recorded in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway of normal light-reared (LR) and dark-reared (DR) rats at 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age. Using RT-PCR and western blotting, developmental changes in the expression of melatonin receptors, MT1 and MT2, in the hippocampus were also evaluated. Results: The amplitude of basic responses decreased across age in the LR rats. While light deprivation increased the amplitude of baseline fEPSPs, it decreased the degree of potentiation in post-tetanus responses. Melatonin injection also increased the amplitude of fEPSPs and suppressed the induction of long-term potentiation in both LR and DR rats. The expression of melatonin receptors increased in the hippocampus during brain development, and dark rearing reversed the expression patterns of both receptors. Conclusion: Although melatonin changed basic and tetanized responses of CA1 neurons across age during critical period of brain development, the pattern of its effects did not match the expression pattern of melatonin receptors in the hippocampus. Thus, the effects of melatonin on hippocampal neuronal responses may be exerted through other ways, like intercellular molecules and nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:27746873

  1. Treatment with tianeptine induces antidepressive-like effects and alters the neurotrophin levels, mitochondrial respiratory chain and cycle Krebs enzymes in the brain of maternally deprived adult rats.

    PubMed

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Santos, Maria Augusta B dos; Tomaz, Débora B; Antunes, Altamir R; Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Maternally deprived rats were treated with tianeptine (15 mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming and open field tests. The BDNF, NGF and energy metabolism were assessed in the rat brain. Deprived rats increased the immobility time, but tianeptine reversed this effect and increased the swimming time; the BDNF levels were decreased in the amygdala of the deprived rats treated with saline and the BDNF levels were decreased in the nucleus accumbens within all groups; the NGF was found to have decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens of the deprived rats; citrate synthase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine and the creatine kinase was decreased in the hippocampus and amygdala of the deprived rats; the mitochondrial complex I and II-III were inhibited, and tianeptine increased the mitochondrial complex II and IV in the hippocampus of the non-deprived rats; the succinate dehydrogenase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine. So, tianeptine showed antidepressant effects conducted on maternally deprived rats, and this can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  2. Effect of thermal stress and water deprivation on the acetylcholinesterase activity of the pig brain and hypophyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adejumo, D. O.; Egbunike, G. N.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of direct exposure of boars to thermal stress for 1 h daily for 5 days and to acute water deprivation for 24 or 48 h were studied on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of porcine brain and hypophysial regions. Mean ambient temperatures, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures in the open were significantly higher than inside the pen. Heat stress induced a rise in AChE activities in the pons, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, mid-brain and medulla oblongata. However, no significant changes were observed in the cerebral cortex, adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. Water deprivation significantly ( P<0.05) depressed AChE activity to varying extents depending on the duration of water restriction. Thus AChE activity in the amygdala was depressed by water deprivation for 24 h but partially restored at 48 h. The pons and medulla oblongata were comparable to the amygdala in this respect. The adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis were relatively unaffected.

  3. Effects of alcohol mixed with energy drink and alcohol alone on subjective intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Andrea; Hemberger, Sophie Helene; Loidl, Alexandra; Dufek, Stephanie; Pablik, Eleonore; Fodor, Sugarka; Herle, Marion; Aufricht, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that the combination of caffeine-containing drinks together with alcohol might reduce the subjective feelings of alcohol intoxication-the so-called "masking effect". In this study, we aimed to review the effects of alcohol in combination with caffeine or energy drink with special focus on the "masking effect". Fifty-two healthy male volunteers were analysed concerning breath alcohol concentration and subjective sensations of intoxication using a 18 item Visual Analogue Scale in a randomised, double-blinded, controlled, four treatments cross-over trial after consumption of (A) placebo, (B) alcohol (vodka 37.5% at a dose of 46.5 g ethanol), (C) alcohol in combination with caffeine at a dose of 80 mg (equivalent to one 250 ml can of energy drink) and (D) alcohol in combination with energy drink at a dose of 250 ml (one can). Primary variables were headache, weakness, salivation and motor coordination. Out of four primary variables, weakness and motor coordination showed a statistically significant difference between alcohol and non-alcohol group, out of 14 secondary variables, five more variables (dizziness, alterations in sight, alterations in walking, agitation and alterations in speech) also showed significant differences due mainly to contrasts with the non-alcohol group. In none of these end points, could a statistically significant effect be found for the additional ingestion of energy drink or caffeine on the subjective feelings of alcohol intoxication. This within-subjects study does not confirm the presence of a "masking effect" when combining caffeine or energy drink with alcohol.

  4. The Effects of Alcohol on Spiders: What Happens to Web Construction after Spiders Consume Alcohol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Victor E.

    2006-01-01

    In the high school experiment reported in this paper, spiders were provided with 40% ethanol (ETOH) in order to determine the effects of alcohol on the web-spinning ability of orb weaver spiders. It was hypothesized that alcohol would have a deleterious effect on the number of radii, number of cells, and area of cells in the webs of orb weaving…

  5. A new automated method for rat sleep deprivation with minimal confounding effects on corticosterone and locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H C; Dematteis, Maurice; Joosten, Ruud N J M A; Eggels, Leslie; Sandberg, Hans; Schirris, Mischa; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-03-15

    The function of sleep in physiology, behaviour and cognition has become a primary focus of neuroscience. Its study inevitably includes experimental sleep deprivation designs. However, concerns exist regarding confounds like stress, increased locomotor activity levels, and decreased motivation to perform operant tasks induced by the methods employed. We here propose a novel procedure for sleep deprivation in rats and evaluate how it affects sleep, corticosterone concentration profiles, locomotor activity levels, and motivation to perform an operant task. Before, during and after 12h of total sleep deprivation by means of gradually increasing the rotation variability and the speed of a novel automated, two-compartment sleep deprivation device, sleep-wake states were assessed by electroencephalography (n=21), brain extracellular corticosterone concentrations using microdialysis (n=11), locomotor activity by infrared measurements (n=8), and operant performance using a fixed-interval-fixed-ratio task (n=16). Sleep was effectively prevented during the procedure; rats on average slept less than 1% of the time (0.8±0.2%, mean±standard error). Brain corticosterone concentrations were mildly increased during the procedure, but did not exceed normal peak concentrations. Locomotor activity was not only increased during the procedure, but also did not exceed the peak levels found during undisturbed wakefulness. Food restriction to 12 g/rat/day prevented sleep deprivation from reducing the motivation to perform an operant task. This novel procedure can be applied to sleep deprive rats in a highly effective way, while keeping corticosterone and locomotor activity within the normal range.

  6. Effects of methylphenidate on the impairment of spontaneous alternation behavior in mice intermittently deprived of REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Niijima-Yaoita, Fukie; Nagasawa, Yuka; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Arai, Yuichiro; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-11-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. We have previously shown that abnormal behaviors elicited by intermittent rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation stress may fulfill the profile of a model of ADHD. It is well known that the impairment of spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) in the Y-maze indicates inattentive features of ADHD model animals. On the other hand, it has been reported that nitric oxide (NO) in the hippocampus is required for SAB. In this study, using mice, we investigated whether intermittent REM sleep deprivation stress causes changes in SAB and the expression of NO synthase (NOS) mRNA and in the levels of NO metabolites in the hippocampus. Mice were deprived of REM sleep intermittently by the small-platform method (20 h/day) for 3 days. The SAB, the level of nitrite and expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA in the hippocampus, but not neuronal NOS (nNOS), were significantly decreased by intermittent REM sleep deprivation stress. The decreased levels of SAB, nitrite and iNOS mRNA were significantly increased by methylphenidate treatment, which is used clinically to treat ADHD symptoms. Moreover, these improvement effects of methylphenidate on SAB and the nitrite level were decreased by the administration of selective iNOS and eNOS inhibitors. However, the eNOS inhibitor decreased both nitrate and total NOx levels of the hippocampus in saline treated intermittent REM sleep-deprived mice. These results suggest that the impairment of SAB induced by intermittent REM sleep deprivation stress may serve as a model of the inattention symptom in ADHD. Further, the ameliorating effects of methylphenidate on the impairment of SAB may be mediated through NO production mainly by iNOS in the hippocampus of mice.

  7. The Effect of Cancer Warning Statements on Alcohol Consumption Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle I.; Glance, David; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Pratt, Iain S.; Slevin, Terry; Liang, Wenbin; Wakefield, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In response to increasing calls to introduce warning labels on alcoholic beverages, this study investigated the potential effectiveness of alcohol warning statements designed to increase awareness of the alcohol-cancer link. A national online survey was administered to a diverse sample of Australian adult drinkers (n = 1,680). Along with…

  8. Effectiveness of Alcohol Media Literacy Programmes: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindmarsh, Chloe S.; Jones, Sandra C.; Kervin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol media literacy is an emerging field that aims to address the link between exposure to alcohol advertising and subsequent expectancies and behaviours for children and adolescents. The design, rigour and results of alcohol media literacy programmes vary considerably, resulting in a number of unanswered questions about effectiveness. To…

  9. Effects of Alcohol on the Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The endocrine system ensures a proper communication between various organs of the body to maintain a constant internal environment. The endocrine system also plays an essential role in enabling the body to respond and appropriately cope with changes in the internal or external environments, such as respond to stress and injury. These functions of the endocrine system to maintain body homeostasis are aided by its communication with the nervous system, immune system and body’s circadian mechanism. Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiological and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system. PMID:24011889

  10. Quantitative analysis of EEG effects following experimental marginal magnesium and boron deprivation.

    PubMed

    Penland, J G

    1995-12-01

    Magnesium (115 and 315 mg/d) and boron (0.23 and 3.23 mg/d) were fed in a double-blind Latin squares design to 13 healthy postmenopausal women (aged 50-78 years) living on a metabolic unit. An eight-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during the last week of each of four 6-week dietary periods. Power and coherence measures were determined for each of four EEG frequency bands: delta (1-3 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (13-18 Hz). Compared to high dietary magnesium, the low magnesium intake increased total power in the frontal regions and right temporal and parietal regions and resulted in frequency-specific increases in left occipital delta power, theta power in all but the left temporal region, alpha power in the right frontal and right temporal regions, and beta power in the frontal regions. The proportion of theta to total power in the parietal regions also increased with the low magnesium intake. While magnesium effects were observed primarily during eyes-closed conditions, effects of dietary boron on EEG power were found only during eyes-open conditions. Relative to high dietary boron, the low boron intake increased delta power in the left parietal and left occipital regions, increased the proportion of delta to total power in the frontal regions, and decreased relative right frontal theta, right frontal alpha, and left frontal beta power. Additional magnesium and boron effects were evident in the measures of EEG coherence. Thus relatively short periods of marginal magnesium and boron deprivation can affect brain function in healthy older women. The findings extend previous qualitative observations of increased CNS activity following severe magnesium deprivation and deficiency to cases of experimentally induced marginal magnesium deficiency, and verify CNS hyperexcitability by quantitative analysis of the EEG.

  11. [Effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation on elaboration and differentiation of alimentary conditioned reflexes].

    PubMed

    Koridze, M G; Nemsadze, N D

    1980-01-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation of cats by means of awakening them without any significant emotional stress does not affect the acquisition of sound discrimination. Paradoxical sleep deprivation by Jouvet's method producing emotional stress impairs the acquisition of sound discrimination. However, it fails to affect the reproduction of preliminary elaborated sound discrimination.

  12. Physical Growth and Maturation Following Early Severe Institutional Deprivation: Do They Mediate Specific Psychopathological Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Schlotz, Wolff; Rutter, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The authors' previous work and the data reported in the preceding chapters of this monograph provide conclusive evidence of the persistent nature of the negative impact of early severe deprivation. Institutional deprivation, despite the good outcomes for many, was often associated with substantial impairment and disorder across a wide range of…

  13. Specificity of psychomotor reactions in the conditions of support deprivation including effects of countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichiporuk, Igor; Ivanov, Oleg

    Activity of the cosmonaut demands high level of psychomotor reactions (PMR) which can vary during space flight under the influences of psychophysiological state’s variability and unusual inhabitancy that causes the necessity of PMR estimation’s inclusion into quality monitoring of capacity for work (CW). A main objective of research was a study of features of visual-motor reactions (VMR) and elements of CW of the person within simulation of microgravity effects via 7-day dry immersion (DI) in healthy male-volunteers 20-35 years old. The experimental data were received which testified to peculiarities of VMR and recognition of simple figures of main colors of a visible spectrum (red, green, blue, the RGB-standard) in the conditions of the DI characterized by support deprivation and decreased proprioceptive afferentation - in a control series and in a series with use of mioelectrostimulation as a countermeasure.

  14. Effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation and stress on passive avoidance behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian Hong; van den Buuse, Maarten; Tian, Shao Wen; Ma, Yuan Ye

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that several types of stress can induce memory impairment. However, the memory effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD), a stressor in itself, are unclear. We therefore compared passive avoidance behavior of rats undergoing PSD and PSD stress yoked-control (PSC) using the "reversed flowerpot method." When rats were kept isolated on a PSC platform for 24 h immediately after criterion training, retention trials showed impaired aversive memory storage. When delayed for 24 h after criterion training, PSC stress did not disrupt retention performance. In rats subjected to PSD, either immediately or 24 h after criterion training, there was no disruption of aversive memory consolidation. These results suggest that, during stress, paradoxical sleep plays a role in erasing aversive memory traces, in line with the theory that we "dream in order to forget."

  15. Effects of Systematically Depriving Access to Computer-Based Stimuli on Choice Responding with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyer, Howard S.; Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Three adults with intellectual disabilities participated to investigate the effects of reinforcer deprivation on choice responding. The experimenter identified the most preferred audio-visual (A-V) stimulus and the least preferred visual-only stimulus for each participant. Participants did not have access to the A-V stimulus for 5 min, 5 and 24 h.…

  16. The Effects of Foster Care Intervention on Socially Deprived Institutionalized Children's Attention and Positive Affect: Results from the BEIP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghera, Melissa M.; Marshall, Peter J.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.; Smyke, Anna T.; Guthrie, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Background: We examined the effects of a foster care intervention on attention and emotion expression in socially deprived children in Romanian institutions. Methods: Institutionalized children were randomized to enter foster care or to remain under institutional care. Subsequently, the institutionalized and foster care groups, along with a…

  17. Effect of feed deprivation and insulin-like growth hormone on indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a hormone that promotes growth by both increasing protein synthesis and decreasing protein degradation. This study utilizes a comparative slaughter approach to determine the effect of feed deprivation and IGF-I treatment on weight loss and indices of protein ...

  18. The choice behaviour of pigs in a Y maze: effects of deprivation of feed, social contact and bedding.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Paul H; Smith, Kenneth; Karlen, Marcus G; Arnold, Naomi A; Moeller, Steven J; Barnett, John L

    2011-06-01

    We examined effects of deprivation of feed, social contact and bedding on the choice behaviour in Y maze tests. Eighty pigs were used to study two main effects: feed (estimated voluntary feed intake (VFI) vs. 70% VFI) and bedding (presence vs. absence), experiment 1; social contact (full vs. restricted) and bedding (presence vs. absence), experiment 2; and feed (as in experiment 1) and social contact (as in experiment 2), experiment 3. Overall pigs consistently chose feed and social contact over bedding. While social contact was more preferred than feed in experiment 3, there was substantial variation between pigs in their choice behaviour. The overall choice behaviour in experiment 3 contradicts previous research, but differences such as the preference methodology as well as the level of deprivation, level of reward and cost involved in accessing reward, may be responsible. Average daily weight gain (ADG) was affected in experiment 3: both feed and social restriction reduced ADG. While the feed effect is expected, one interpretation of the social effect is that social deprivation, through stress, may have reduced ADG. These results provide limited support for the notion that deprivation of a highly preferred resource may disrupt biological function.

  19. Glutamine supplementation and deprivation: effect on artificially reared rat small intestinal morphology.

    PubMed

    Potsic, Bradley; Holliday, Nicolette; Lewis, Pat; Samuelson, Donald; DeMarco, Vincent; Neu, Josef

    2002-09-01

    The mechanisms of how glutamine benefits critically ill patients have not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary and endogenously produced glutamine on small intestinal morphology using light and transmission electron microscopy in artificially reared rat pups. It was hypothesized that deprivation of dietary glutamine leads to intestinal disease that is exacerbated by inhibition of glutamine synthetase by methionine sulfoximine (MS). Rat pups were placed into five different test groups: The first was a reference group that was reared by their mother. The other four groups were reared artificially and received a 10% Travasol amino acid solution at 5 g/kg per day, which does not contain glutamine, added to a mixture containing carbohydrates, lipids, and vitamins. This dose was chosen because it represents an approximation of the amount of glutamine these rats would be receiving in a normal rat diet (approximately 40 g/kg per day total protein, 10 to 15% of which is glutamine + glutamate). The glutamine was manipulated by adding glutamine (Q) or MS or both. The four groups were as follows: MS-Q-, MS-Q+, MS+Q-, and MS+Q+. Light microscopy revealed the greatest blunting of villus height in the ileum of rats from the MS+Q- group when compared with the MS-Q+ group (123 +/- 48.9 micro m versus 207 +/- 36 microm, p < 0.05). The other two groups exhibited intermediate villus heights, but all were shorter than the villi from the mother-reared animals. The number of villi per unit length of bowel was also lowest in the animals that were treated with MS and not provided with dietary glutamine. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated breakdown of the epithelial junctions in the glutamine-deprived and glutamine synthetase-inhibited intestines. Glutamine-deprived animals also displayed sloughing of microvilli, decreased actin cores, and degeneration of the terminal web. In summary, these studies support the hypothesis that

  20. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents and other adults use alcohol socially — having beer or wine with dinner, for example — alcohol seems ... besides just hanging out in someone's basement drinking beer all night. Plan a trip to the movies, ...

  1. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  2. Preschool Teacher Attitude and Knowledge Regarding Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Faite R-P.

    The Centers for Disease Control estimate that each year more than 8,000 Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) babies are born, and that many more babies go undiagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE), a less severe condition. FAS and FAE have been identified as major contributors to poor memory, shorter attention spans, lower IQs, diminished achievement…

  3. Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Possible Prenatal Alcohol-Related Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This guide provides a review of the characteristics of children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or possible prenatal alcohol-related effects (PPAE) and describes specific intervention strategies. Section 1 offers a general review of the diagnostic procedures, the prevalence of FAS and the physical, educational, and behavioral characteristics of…

  4. Caution: Alcohol Advertising and the Surgeon General's Alcohol Warnings May Have Adverse Effects on Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Deborah J.; Snyder, Leslie B.

    A study investigated the effects of the newly introduced Surgeon General's alcohol warnings and advertisements on college students. One hundred fifty-nine undergraduates in communication sciences at the University of Connecticut viewed slides of alcohol products, with or without advertisements and warnings. Following the viewings, subjects filled…

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects-- Support for Teachers and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Susanna V.; Norton, Terry L.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews genesis of fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects in children. Identifies physical characteristics and behavioral indicators found and provides three checklists of observable signs for both disorders. Recommends seven steps for educators to follow in seeking assistance with these conditions. (DLH)

  6. Secondhand Effects of Student Alcohol Use Reported by Neighbors of Colleges: The Role of Alcohol Outlets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Henry; Lee, Jae Eun; Hall, John; Wagenaar, Alexander C.; Lee, Hang

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship of a college's level of binge drinking and the number of alcohol outlets to lowered quality of neighborhood life through secondhand effects. Analysis indicated that the number of nearby alcohol outlets was an important factor mediating the relationship between colleges, especially those with high rates of binge drinking,…

  7. Neurotranscriptomics: The Effects of Neonatal Stimulus Deprivation on the Rat Pineal Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Stephen W.; Coon, Steven L.; Savastano, Luis E.; Mullikin, James C.; Fu, Cong; Klein, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The term neurotranscriptomics is used here to describe genome-wide analysis of neural control of transcriptomes. In this report, next-generation RNA sequencing was using to analyze the effects of neonatal (5-days-of-age) surgical stimulus deprivation on the adult rat pineal transcriptome. In intact animals, more than 3000 coding genes were found to exhibit differential expression (adjusted-p < 0.001) on a night/day basis in the pineal gland (70% of these increased at night, 376 genes changed more than 4-fold in either direction). Of these, more than two thousand genes were not previously known to be differentially expressed on a night/day basis. The night/day changes in expression were almost completely eliminated by neonatal removal (SCGX) or decentralization (DCN) of the superior cervical ganglia (SCG), which innervate the pineal gland. Other than the loss of rhythmic variation, surgical stimulus deprivation had little impact on the abundance of most genes; of particular interest, expression levels of the melatonin-synthesis-related genes Tph1, Gch1, and Asmt displayed little change (less than 35%) following DCN or SCGX. However, strong and consistent changes were observed in the expression of a small number of genes including the gene encoding Serpina1, a secreted protease inhibitor that might influence extracellular architecture. Many of the genes that exhibited night/day differential expression in intact animals also exhibited similar changes following in vitro treatment with norepinephrine, a superior cervical ganglia transmitter, or with an analog of cyclic AMP, a norepinephrine second messenger in this tissue. These findings are of significance in that they establish that the pineal-defining transcriptome is established prior to the neonatal period. Further, this work expands our knowledge of the biological process under neural control in this tissue and underlines the value of RNA sequencing in revealing how neurotransmission influences cell biology. PMID

  8. Neurotranscriptomics: The Effects of Neonatal Stimulus Deprivation on the Rat Pineal Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Stephen W; Coon, Steven L; Savastano, Luis E; Mullikin, James C; Fu, Cong; Klein, David C

    2015-01-01

    The term neurotranscriptomics is used here to describe genome-wide analysis of neural control of transcriptomes. In this report, next-generation RNA sequencing was using to analyze the effects of neonatal (5-days-of-age) surgical stimulus deprivation on the adult rat pineal transcriptome. In intact animals, more than 3000 coding genes were found to exhibit differential expression (adjusted-p < 0.001) on a night/day basis in the pineal gland (70% of these increased at night, 376 genes changed more than 4-fold in either direction). Of these, more than two thousand genes were not previously known to be differentially expressed on a night/day basis. The night/day changes in expression were almost completely eliminated by neonatal removal (SCGX) or decentralization (DCN) of the superior cervical ganglia (SCG), which innervate the pineal gland. Other than the loss of rhythmic variation, surgical stimulus deprivation had little impact on the abundance of most genes; of particular interest, expression levels of the melatonin-synthesis-related genes Tph1, Gch1, and Asmt displayed little change (less than 35%) following DCN or SCGX. However, strong and consistent changes were observed in the expression of a small number of genes including the gene encoding Serpina1, a secreted protease inhibitor that might influence extracellular architecture. Many of the genes that exhibited night/day differential expression in intact animals also exhibited similar changes following in vitro treatment with norepinephrine, a superior cervical ganglia transmitter, or with an analog of cyclic AMP, a norepinephrine second messenger in this tissue. These findings are of significance in that they establish that the pineal-defining transcriptome is established prior to the neonatal period. Further, this work expands our knowledge of the biological process under neural control in this tissue and underlines the value of RNA sequencing in revealing how neurotransmission influences cell biology.

  9. Effects of age on recovery of body weight following REM sleep deprivation of rats.

    PubMed

    Koban, Michael; Stewart, Craig V

    2006-01-30

    Chronically enforced rapid eye (paradoxical) movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) of rats leads to a host of pathologies, of which hyperphagia and loss of body weight are among the most readily observed. In recent years, the etiology of many REM-SD-associated pathologies have been elucidated, but one unexplored area is whether age affects outcomes. In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats at 2, 6, and 12 months of age were REM sleep-deprived with the platform (flowerpot) method for 10-12 days. Two-month-old rats resided on 7-cm platforms, while 10-cm platforms were used for 6- and 12-month-old rats; rats on 15-cm platforms served as tank controls (TCs). Daily changes in food consumption (g/kg(0.67)) and body weight (g) during baseline, REM-SD or TCs, and post-experiment recovery in home cages were determined. Compared to TCs, REM-SD resulted in higher food intake and decreases in body weight. When returned to home cages, food intake rapidly declined to baseline levels. Of primary interest was that rates of body weight gain during recovery differed between the age groups. Two-month-old rats rapidly restored body weight to pre-REM-SD mass within 5 days; 6-month-old rats were extrapolated by linear regression to have taken about 10 days, and for 12-month-old rats, the estimate was about 35 days. The observation that restoration of body weight following its loss during REM-SD may be age-dependent is in general agreement with the literature on aging effects on how mammals respond to stress.

  10. The Effects of Alcohol on the Fetus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furey, Eileen M.

    1982-01-01

    The article explores recent findings on Fatal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), patterns of malformation, alcohol and other drugs, the toxicity of ethanol, the incidence of FAS, and implications of the syndrome. (Author)

  11. Effects of Alcohol on a Fetus

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen to the fetus. 5 • Toxic byproducts of alcohol metabolism may become concentrated in the brain and contribute to the development of an FASD. 6 Alcohol Placenta Uterine Lining Umbilical Cord Figure 1: Transmission ...

  12. Effects of food deprivation on the hypothalamic feeding-regulating peptides gene expressions in serotonin depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Hagimoto, Marina; Matsuura, Takanori; Ohkubo, Junichi; Ohno, Motoko; Maruyama, Takashi; Ishikura, Toru; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Uezono, Yasuhito; Toyohira, Yumiko; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Ueta, Yoichi

    2014-03-01

    We examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT) depletion induced by peripheral injection of 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) on the expression of feeding-regulating peptides expressions by using in situ hybridization histochemistry in adult male Wistar rats. PCPA pretreatment had no significant effect on basal levels of oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide-Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or orexin in the hypothalamus. Food deprivation for 48 h caused a significant decrease in CRH, TRH, POMC, and CART, and a significant increase in NPY, AgRP and MCH. After PCPA treatment, POMC and CART did not decrease despite food deprivation. NPY was significantly increased by food deprivation with PCPA, but was attenuated compared to food deprivation without PCPA. These results suggest that the serotonergic system in the hypothalamus may be involved in the gene expression of POMC, CART, and NPY related to feeding behavior.

  13. Effect of berberine on nitric oxide production during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion in OLN-93 oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nadjafi, Shabnam; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmad; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Coptidis rhizoma, on Nitric Oxide (NO) production, as a possible involved factor, during excitotoxic injury in oligodendroglial cells were evaluated. The overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors which is known as the excitotoxicity, is an important phenomenon because of the contribution in acute injury to the central nervous system, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, oligodendrocyte loss and demyelinating diseases as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Intracellular Ca2+ overload, have a key role during excitotoxic injury and such increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ triggers a series of events such as production of NO that end to cell death. Previous report showed the protective effects of berberine on ischemic-induced excitotoxic insult in oligodendrocytes. Hereby, we intended to know if the NO production could be associated with oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic damage in oligodendrocyte; moreover, the alteration of NO production could be considered as an involved mechanism for protective effect of berberine in such condition. Therefore, the effect of berberine (2 μM) on NO production during oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h reperfusion in oligodendrocytes were examined. The OLN-93 cell line (a permanent immature rat oligodendrocyte) was used as a model of oligodendrocyte. Thirty minutes-oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h reperfusion was used to induce excitotoxicity. NO production was evaluated by Griess method. Our results demonstrated that berberine (2 μM) significantly decreased NO production during 30 min oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. It seems that blockade of NO production by berberine may also participate in oligodendroglial cell protection against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced insult.

  14. The Pronociceptive Effect of Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation in Rats: Evidence for a Role of Descending Pain Modulation Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tomim, Dabna H; Pontarolla, Felipe M; Bertolini, Jessica F; Arase, Mauricio; Tobaldini, Glaucia; Lima, Marcelo M S; Fischer, Luana

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pronociceptive effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) are not known. In this study, we asked whether PSD increases tonic nociception in the formalin test, decreases the antinociceptive effect of morphine administered into the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and disrupts endogenous descending pain modulation. PSD for either 24 or 48 h significantly increased formalin-induced nociception and decreased mechanical nociceptive paw withdrawal threshold. The maximal antinociceptive effect induced by morphine (0.9-9 nmol, intra-PAG) was significantly decreased by PSD. The administration of a low dose of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline (30-300 pmol, intra-PAG), decreased nociception in control rats, but not in paradoxical-sleep-deprived ones. Furthermore, the administration of the cholecystokinin (CCK) 2 receptor antagonist, YM022 (0.5-2 pmol) in the rostral ventral medulla (RVM), decreased nociception in paradoxical-sleep-deprived rats but not in control ones. While a dose of the CCK 2 receptor agonist, CCK-8 (8-24 pmol intra-RVM), increased nociception in control rats, but not in paradoxical-sleep-deprived ones. In addition, the injection of lidocaine (QX-314, 2%, intra-RVM) decreased nociception in sleep-deprived rats, but not in control rats, while the lesion of the dorsolateral funiculus prevented the pronociceptive effect of PSD. Finally, PSD significantly increased c-Fos expression in the RVM. Therefore, PSD increases pain independently of its duration or of the characteristic of the nociceptive stimulus and decreases morphine analgesia at the PAG. PSD appears to increase pain by decreasing descending pain inhibitory activity and by increasing descending pain facilitatory activity.

  15. Disuse exaggerates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefferan, Theresa E.; Kennedy, Angela M.; Evans, Glenda L.; Turner, Russell T.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse is associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis. However, comorbidity factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related bone fractures. Suboptimal mechanical loading of the skeleton, an established risk factor for bone loss, may occur in some alcohol abusers due to reduced physical activity, muscle atrophy, or both. The effect of alcohol consumption and reduced physical activity on bone metabolism has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical disuse alters bone metabolism in a rat model for chronic alcohol abuse. METHODS: Alcohol was administered in the diet (35% caloric intake) of 6-month-old male rats for 4 weeks. Rats were hindlimb-unloaded the final 2 weeks of the experiment to prevent dynamic weight bearing. Afterward, cortical bone histomorphometry was evaluated at the tibia-fibula synostosis. RESULTS: At the periosteal surface of the tibial diaphysis, alcohol and hindlimb unloading independently decreased the mineralizing perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate. In addition, alcohol, but not hindlimb unloading, increased endocortical bone resorption. The respective detrimental effects of alcohol and hindlimb unloading to inhibit bone formation were additive; there was no interaction between the two variables. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced weight bearing accentuates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone in adult male rats by further inhibiting bone formation. This finding suggests that reduced physical activity may be a comorbidity factor for osteoporosis in alcohol abusers.

  16. The Effects of Alcohol on Marital Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieze, Irene Hanson; Knoble, Jaime

    Although alcohol is frequently cited by battered wives and the general public as a cause of marital violence, few researchers actually propose a direct causal relationship between alcohol and marital violence. Interviews were conducted to investigate the role of alcohol in the violent marriages of 185 women and the nonviolent marriages of 89…

  17. Alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence and related harms in Spain, and the effect of treatment-based interventions on alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Rehm, Maximilien X; Shield, Kevin D; Gmel, Gerrit; Gual, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption in Spain has traditionally followed the Mediterranean drinking pattern, featuring daily drinking with meals, beer as the preferred beverage, and comparatively little drinking to intoxication. Alcohol dependence (AD), one of the most detrimental disorders caused by alcohol, was prevalent in 0.2% of women and 1.2% of men, corresponding to 31,200 women and 186,000 men in Spain with AD in 2005 in the age group of 15 to 64 year. These prevalence estimates of alcohol dependence are likely underestimated due to limitations in the World Mental Health Survey which cannot be fully corrected for; however, the estimates of AD for Spain represent the most accurate and up to date estimates available. Alcohol creates a significant health burden in Spain with 11.3 premature deaths in women per 100,000 aged 15 to 64 years, and 40.9 premature deaths in men per 100,000 in the same age group were due to alcohol consumption (data for 2004). This amounts to 8.4% of all female deaths and 12.3% of all the male deaths in this age group being attributable to alcohol consumption. A large percentage of these harms were due to heavy alcohol consumption and AD. AD is undertreated in Spain, with less than 10% of all people with AD treated. For those who are treated, psychotherapy is the most utilized form of treatment to avoid relapse. If 40% of AD patients in Spain were treated with pharmacological treatment (the most effective treatment method), 2.2% of female and 6.2% of male deaths due to AD would be prevented within one year. Thus by increasing treatment rates is an important means of reducing the alcohol-attributable mortality and health burden in Spain.

  18. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MEN DURING SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The effects of 84 hours of sleep deprivation were examined in a group of six young men and compared with a group of six controls. Subjects were... sleep deprivation , physiological regulating systems are relatively unaffected by sleep loss. (Author)

  20. The Protective Effects of Neighborhood Collective Efficacy on British Children Growing Up in Deprivation: A Developmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Odgers, Candice L.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Tach, Laura M.; Sampson, Robert J.; Taylor, Alan; Matthews, Charlotte L.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the influence of neighborhood-level deprivation and collective efficacy on children’s antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10 years. Latent growth curve modeling was applied to characterize the developmental course of antisocial behavior among children in the E-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, an epidemiological cohort of 2,232 children. Children in deprived versus affluent neighborhoods had higher levels of antisocial behavior at school entry (24.1 vs. 20.5, p < .001) and a slower rate of decline from involvement in antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10 (−0.54 vs. −0.78, p < .01). Neighborhood collective efficacy was negatively associated with levels of antisocial behavior at school entry (r =−.10, p < .01) but only in deprived neighborhoods; this relationship held after controlling for neighborhood problems and family-level factors. Collective efficacy did not predict the rate of change in antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10. Findings suggest that neighborhood collective efficacy may have a protective effect on children living in deprived contexts. PMID:19586172

  1. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Targa, Adriano D.S.; Rodrigues, Lais S.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Lima, Marcelo M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  2. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL…

  3. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    PubMed

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-03

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  4. Sleep deprivation effects on growth factor expression in neonatal rats: a potential role for BDNF in the mediation of delta power.

    PubMed

    Hairston, Ilana S; Peyron, Christelle; Denning, Daniel P; Ruby, Norman F; Flores, Judith; Sapolsky, Robert M; Heller, H Craig; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2004-04-01

    The sleeping brain differs from the waking brain in its electrophysiological and molecular properties, including the expression of growth factors and immediate early genes (IEG). Sleep architecture and homeostatic regulation of sleep in neonates is distinct from that of adults. Hence, the present study addressed the question whether the unique homeostatic response to sleep deprivation in neonates is reflected in mRNA expression of the IEG cFos, brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in the cortex. As sleep deprivation is stressful to developing rats, we also investigated whether the increased levels of corticosterone would affect the expression of growth factors in the hippocampus, known to be sensitive to glucocorticoid levels. At postnatal days 16, 20, and 24, rats were subjected to sleep deprivation, maternal separation without sleep deprivation, sleep deprivation with 2 h recovery sleep, or no intervention. mRNA expression was quantified in the cortex and hippocampus. cFos was increased after sleep deprivation and was similar to control level after 2 h recovery sleep irrespective of age or brain region. BDNF was increased by sleep deprivation in the cortex at P20 and P24 and only at P24 in the hippocampus. FGF2 increased during recovery sleep at all ages in both brain regions. We conclude that cortical BDNF expression reflects the onset of adult sleep-homeostatic response, whereas the profile of expression of both growth factors suggests a trophic effect of mild sleep deprivation.

  5. Food Deprivation and Exercise in the Heat: Thermoregulatory and Metabolic Effects,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    levels. Prolonged food deprivation (48 and 72h) resulted in significant (p 0.01) hypertriglyceridemia and hyperlactacidemia subsequent (p 0.01... hypertriglyceridemia and hyperlactacidemia subsequent to exercise. Levels of sodium, potassium, urea nitrogen, and creatine phosphokiinase were unaffected

  6. Food Deprivation and Exercise in the Heat: Thermoregulatory and Metabolic Effects,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-05

    reductions in circula- ting insulin levels. Prolonged food deprivation (48 and 72h) resulted in significant (P .01) hypertriglyceridemia and... hypertriglyceridemia and hyperlactacidemia subsequent to exercise. Levels of sodium, potassium, urea nitrogen, and creatine phosphokinase were

  7. Neuroprotective effects of (-)-linalool against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeon; Seol, Geun Hee; Ryu, Sangwoo; Choi, In-Young

    2016-04-01

    (-)-Linalool, a major component of many essential oils, is widely used in cosmetics and flavoring ingredients as well as in traditional medicines. Although various in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that (-)-linalool has anti-convulsant, anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, its anti-ischemic/hypoxic effects have yet to be determined. This study assessed the neuroprotective effects of (-)-linalool against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced cortical neuronal injury, an in vitro model of ischemic stroke. (-)-Linalool significantly attenuated OGD/R-evoked cortical neuronal injury/death, although it did not inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced excitotoxicity. (-)-Linalool significantly reduced intracellular oxidative stress during OGD/R-induced injury, as well as scavenging peroxyl radicals (Trolox equivalents or TE = 3.8). This anti-oxidant effect was found to correlate with the restoration of OGD/R-induced decreases in the activities of SOD and catalase. In addition, (-)-linalool inhibited microglial migration induced by monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine released by OGD/R. These findings show that (-)-linalool has neuroprotective effects against OGD/R-induced neuronal injury, which may be due to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Detailed examination of the anti-ischemic mechanisms of (-)-linalool may indicate strategies for the development of drugs to treat cerebral ischemic injury.

  8. Sexually dimorphic effects of postnatal allopregnanolone on the development of anxiety behavior after early deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zimmerberg, Betty; Kajunski, Elizabeth W

    2004-07-01

    Stress early in life exerts persistent detrimental effects on brain development. In this experiment, a rodent model of child neglect, early deprivation (ED), was used to investigate the role of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone [AlloP; 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP)] in the development of anxiety behavior. Subjects were either undisturbed controls or ED: separated individually for 6 h per day from postnatal day (PN) 2 to 6. Control and ED subjects were also either noninjected, vehicle-injected or injected with 5 mg/kg AlloP prior to the isolation. At PN 7, responses to 2.5 or 5 microg icv injections of AlloP were determined for separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Tolerance to the USV-reducing effect of daily AlloP was seen in control but not ED pups, and daily AlloP reversed the expected ED suppression of USVs. As adults, controls treated with postnatal AlloP were less anxious than all other groups on the elevated plus maze. ED counteracted this effect. Male controls showed a reversal of the typical sex difference. There were no effects on open-field activity. These results suggest that the neonatal brain is responsive to alterations in AlloP levels, and that neuroactive progesterone metabolites may play a role in mediating the development of stress-related sex differences.

  9. Effects of isoflavones on alcohol pharmacokinetics and alcohol-drinking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, R C; Li, T K

    1998-12-01

    Puerarin, daidzin, and daidzein are 3 major isoflavonoid compounds isolated from Pueraria lobata, an edible vine used widely in China for various medicinal purposes. We studied the antiinebriation and the antidipsotropic effects of these antioxidants in rats. Daidzin and daidzein shortened alcohol-induced sleep time (loss of righting reflex) in rats that were given ethanol intragastrically but not in those given ethanol intraperitoneally. When daidzin was given to animals intragastrically with the ethanol solution, the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was found to peak later and be lower than in control rats that were given only the ethanol solution. BACs also receded more slowly if daidzin was fed to the animals. None of the 3 isoflavonoid compounds administered orally affected liver alcohol dehydrogenase or aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, as was reported for intraperitoneal administration. Further experiments indicated that the suppression of the BAC by daidzin was due mainly to delay of stomach emptying. All 3 compounds suppressed voluntary alcohol consumption in alcohol-preferring rats. The decrease in alcohol consumption was accompanied by an increase in water intake, so that the total volume of liquid consumed daily remained unchanged. Daily food consumption and body weight gain were not affected. Alcohol preference returned to baseline levels after the isoflavonoids were discontinued. We postulate that the suppression of alcohol reinforcement produced by these compounds is mediated centrally in the brain reward pathway.

  10. Identifying adverse effects of area-based health policy: An ethnographic study of a deprived neighbourhood in England.

    PubMed

    Williams, Oli

    2017-03-17

    Health interventions commonly have adverse effects. Addressing these could significantly improve health outcomes. This paper addresses an adverse effect common in the promotion of health behaviours: exacerbation of health inequalities between low- and high-socioeconomic groups. Health behaviours - particularly, physical activity - are positioned within the context of social inequality and the inequitable spatial distribution of resources. Area-based health policy that targets deprived areas is assessed for its capacity to promote health behaviours without exacerbating inequality. Data are derived from a 16-month ethnography in a deprived English neighbourhood that was the target of area-based intervention that prioritised the promotion of physical activity. Findings provide evidence of adverse intervention effects that further disadvantaged the low-socioeconomic population. Analysis demonstrates how this was ultimately the outcome of localised policy drifting away from initial commitments to equitable service access. These findings increase understanding of the processes through which adverse intervention effects arise and how they can be mitigated.

  11. Quantitative EEG Monitoring of Vigilance: Effects of Sleep Deprivation, Circadian Phase and Sympathetic Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan

    1999-01-01

    Shuttle astronauts typically sleep only 6 to 6.5 hours per day while in orbit. This sleep loss is related to recurrent sleep cycle shifting--due to mission-dependent orbital mechanics and mission duration requirements-- and associated circadian displacement of sleep, the operational demands of space flight, noise and space motion sickness. Such sleep schedules are known to produce poor subjective sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, reduced attention, negative mood, slower reaction times, and impaired daytime alertness. Countermeasures to allow crew members to obtain an adequate amount of sleep and maintain adequate levels of neurobehavioral performance are being developed and investigated. However, it is necessary to develop methods that allow effective and attainable in-flight monitoring of vigilance to evaluate the effectiveness of these countermeasures and to detect and predict online critical decrements in alertness/performance. There is growing evidence to indicate that sleep loss and associated decrements in neurobehavioral function are reflected in the spectral composition of the electroencephalogram (EEG) during wakefulness as well as in the incidence of slow eye movements recorded by the electro-oculogram (EOG). Further-more, our preliminary data indicated that these changes in the EEG during wakefulness are more pronounced when subjects are in a supine posture, which mimics some of the physiologic effects of microgravity. Therefore, we evaluate the following hypotheses: (1) that during a 40-hour period of wakefulness (i.e., one night of total sleep deprivation) neurobehavioral function deteriorates, the incidence of slow eye-movements and EEG power density in the theta frequencies increases especially in frontal areas of the brain; (2) that the sleep deprivation induced deterioration of neurobehavioral function and changes in the incidence of slow eye movements and the spectral composition of the EEG are more pronounced when subjects are in a supine

  12. Female rats are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Shabani, Mohammad

    2012-03-17

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) may alter subsequent learning and memory capacity. There are differences in both the intensity and direction of responses of the male and female species to the same environmental stimuli and experimental conditions. In the present study, we examined the extent of the effects of PSD for 72h on spatial learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, corticosterone levels, and the body weight in male as well as in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats. Multiple platform method was used for PSD induction. Spatial learning and memory and anxiety-like behavior were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task and open field test, respectively. The data showed that PSD could not significantly affect subsequent spatial learning and short-term memory in male rats, while it significantly impaired the performance of the intact and OVX female rats. The PSD-intact and -OVX female rats showed more memory impairment than the PSD-male animals. Those impairments do not appear to be due to elevated stress level, since the plasma corticosterone did not significantly change following PSD induction. The open field data showed that PSD significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in all experimental groups. In addition, PSD had a reducing effect on the mean body weight of female groups. Such results suggest that the female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance.

  13. Muscle and bone effects of androgen deprivation therapy: current and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ada S; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer and treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) affect significant numbers of the male population. Endocrine effects of ADT are a critical consideration in balancing the benefits and risks of treatment on long-term survival and quality of life. This review highlights the latest advances in androgen manipulation in prostate cancer with an emphasis on the effects of ADT on muscle and bone, which universally affects the health and well-being of men undergoing ADT for prostate cancer. Muscle mass declines with ADT; however, the evidence that this correlates with a decrease in muscle strength or a decrease in physical performance is discordant. Cortical bone decay also occurs in association with an increase in fracture risk, hence optimization of musculoskeletal health in men undergoing ADT is crucial. The role of exercise, and current and emerging anabolic therapies for muscle as well as various new strategies to prevent loss of bone mass in men undergoing ADT are discussed. Future well-designed, prospective, controlled studies are required to elucidate the effects of ADT on physical performance, which are currently lacking, and larger randomized controlled trials are required to test the efficacy of medical therapies and exercise interventions to target proven deficits and to ensure safety in men with prostate cancer.

  14. Ethanol drinking reduces extracellular dopamine levels in the posterior ventral tegmental area of nondependent alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Engleman, Eric A; Keen, Elizabeth J; Tilford, Sydney S; Thielen, Richard J; Morzorati, Sandra L

    2011-09-01

    Moderate ethanol exposure produces neuroadaptive changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system in nondependent rats and increases measures of DA neuronal activity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, moderate ethanol drinking and moderate systemic exposure elevates extracellular DA levels in mesocorticolimbic projection regions. However, the neuroadaptive changes subsequent to moderate ethanol drinking on basal DA levels have not been investigated in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). In the present study, adult female alcohol-preferring (P) rats were divided into alcohol-naive, alcohol-drinking, and alcohol-deprived groups. The alcohol-drinking group had continuous access to water and ethanol (15%, vol/vol) for 8 weeks. The alcohol-deprived group had 6 weeks of access followed by 2 weeks of ethanol deprivation, 2 weeks of ethanol re-exposure, followed again by 2 weeks of deprivation. The deprived rats demonstrated a robust alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) on ethanol reinstatement. The alcohol-naïve group had continuous access to water only. In the last week of the drinking protocol, all rats were implanted with unilateral microdialysis probes aimed at the posterior VTA and no-net-flux microdialysis was conducted to quantify extracellular DA levels and DA clearance. Results yielded significantly lower basal extracellular DA concentrations in the posterior VTA of the alcohol-drinking group compared with the alcohol-naive and alcohol-deprived groups (3.8±0.3nM vs. 5.0±0.5nM [P<.02] and 4.8±0.4nM, [P<.05], respectively). Extraction fractions were significantly (P<.0002) different between the alcohol-drinking and alcohol-naive groups (72±2% vs. 46±4%, respectively) and not significantly different (P=.051) between alcohol-deprived and alcohol-naive groups (61±6% for the alcohol-deprived group). The data indicate that reductions in basal DA levels within the posterior VTA occur after moderate chronic ethanol intake in nondependent P rats. This reduction may

  15. The effect of prior alcohol consumption on the ataxic response to alcohol in high-alcohol preferring mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brandon M.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that ethanol-naïve high-alcohol preferring (HAP) mice, genetically predis-posed to consume large quantities of alcohol, exhibited heightened sensitivity and more rapid acute functional tolerance (AFT) to alcohol-induced ataxia compared to low-alcohol preferring mice. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of prior alcohol self-administration on these responses in HAP mice. Naïve male and female adult HAP mice from the second replicate of selection (HAP2) underwent 18 days of 24-h, 2-bottle choice drinking for 10% ethanol vs. water, or water only. After 18 days of fluid access, mice were tested for ataxic sensitivity and rapid AFT following a 1.75 g/kg injection of ethanol on a static dowel apparatus in Experiment 1. In Experiment 2, a separate group of mice was tested for more protracted AFT development using a dual-injection approach where a second, larger (2.0 g/kg) injection of ethanol was given following the initial recovery of performance on the task. HAP2 mice that had prior access to alcohol exhibited a blunted ataxic response to the acute alcohol challenge, but this pre-exposure did not alter rapid within-session AFT capacity in Experiment 1 or more protracted AFT capacity in Experiment 2. These findings suggest that the typically observed increase in alcohol consumption in these mice may be influenced by ataxic functional tolerance development, but is not mediated by a greater capacity for ethanol exposure to positively influence within-session ataxic tolerance. PMID:25454537

  16. Protective Effect of 25Mg-Porphyrin-Fullerene Nanoparticles on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Injury in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Peivand; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Adeli, Sharareh; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of 25Mg-Porphyrin-Fullerene nanoparticles, (25MgPMC16) smart ferroporphyrin nanoparticles, on PC12 cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. In order to explore its effect on cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation conditions, the cultures were pretreated with 25MgPMC16 24 hours prior to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. To initiate the oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion, the cell culture medium was replaced with a glucose-free medium and the cells were transferred to a humidified incubation chamber in a mixture of 95% N2 and 5% CO2 at 37° C for 30, 60 and 120 min. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Exposure of PC12 cells to 30, 60 and 120 min oxygen-glucose deprivation significantly decreased the cell viability. Pretreatment of the cultures with 25MgPMC16 significantly increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment, the cultures with MK-801 (10 µM), a non-competitive NMDA antagonist, has attenuated the cell death after 30 min oxygen-glucose deprivation. We concluded that 25MgPMC16 could protect PC12 cells against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced cell injury in a concentration-dependent manner. That could be due to the effect of 25MgPMC16 on ATP synthesis and the antioxidant effects of its components.

  17. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotor-stimulant effects and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Luis P; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Hollais, André W; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Costa, Jacqueline M; Berro, Laís F; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Wuo-Silva, Raphael; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that a prolonged period (48 h) of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) potentiates amphetamine (AMP)-induced behavioral sensitization, an animal model of addiction-related neuroadaptations. In the present study, we examined the effects of an acute short-term deprivation of total sleep (TSD) (6h) on AMP-induced behavioral sensitization in mice and compared them to the effects of short-term PSD (6 h). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice underwent TSD (experiment 1-gentle handling method) or PSD (experiment 2-multiple platforms method) for 6 h. Immediately after the sleep deprivation period, mice were tested in the open field for 10 min under the effects of saline or 2.0 mg/kg AMP. Seven days later, to assess behavioral sensitization, all of the mice received a challenge injection of 2.0 mg/kg AMP and were tested in the open field for 10 min. Total, peripheral, and central locomotion, and grooming duration were measured. TSD, but not PSD, potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by an acute injection of AMP and this effect was due to an increased locomotion in the central squares of the apparatus. Similarly, TSD facilitated the development of AMP-induced sensitization, but only in the central locomotion parameter. The data indicate that an acute period of TSD may exacerbate the behavioral effects of AMP in mice. Because sleep architecture is composed of paradoxical and slow wave sleep, and 6-h PSD had no effects on AMP-induced hyperlocomotion or sensitization, our data suggest that the deprivation of slow wave sleep plays a critical role in the mechanisms that underlie the potentiating effects of TSD on both the acute and sensitized addiction-related responses to AMP.

  18. The effects of sleep restriction and sleep deprivation in producing false memories.

    PubMed

    Chatburn, Alex; Kohler, Mark J; Payne, Jessica D; Drummond, Sean P A

    2017-01-01

    False memory has been claimed to be the result of an associative process of generalisation, as well as to be representative of memory errors. These can occur at any stage of memory encoding, consolidation, or retrieval, albeit through varied mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to experimentally determine: (i) if cognitive dysfunction brought about by sleep loss at the time of stimulus encoding can influence false memory production; and (ii) whether this relationship holds across sensory modalities. Subjects undertook both the Deese-Roedigger-McDermott (DRM) false memory task and a visual task designed to produce false memories. Performance was measured while subjects were well-rested (9h Time in Bed or TIB), and then again when subjects were either sleep restricted (4h TIB for 4 nights) or sleep deprived (30h total SD). Results indicate (1) that partial and total sleep loss produced equivalent effects in terms of false and veridical verbal memory, (2) that subjects performed worse after sleep loss (regardless of whether this was partial or total sleep loss) on cued recognition-based false and veridical verbal memory tasks, and that sleep loss interfered with subjects' ability to recall veridical, but not false memories under free recall conditions, and (3) that there were no effects of sleep loss on a visual false memory task. This is argued to represent the dysfunction and slow repair of an online verbal associative process in the brain following inadequate sleep.

  19. The use of dietary supplements to alleviate androgen deprivation therapy side effects during prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Dueregger, Andrea; Heidegger, Isabel; Ofer, Philipp; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E

    2014-10-21

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of male cancer death in Western societies, is typically androgen-dependent, a characteristic that underlies the rationale of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Approximately 90% of patients initially respond to ADT strategies, however many experience side effects including hot flashes, cardiotoxicity, metabolic and musculoskeletal alterations. This review summarizes pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the ability of dietary supplements to alleviate adverse effects arising from ADT. In particular, we focus on herbal compounds, phytoestrogens, selenium (Se), fatty acids (FA), calcium, and Vitamins D and E. Indeed, there is some evidence that calcium and Vitamin D can prevent the development of osteoporosis during ADT. On the other hand, caution should be taken with the antioxidants Se and Vitamin E until the basis underlying their respective association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and PCa tumor development has been clarified. However, many other promising supplements have not yet been subjected large-scale clinical trials making it difficult to assess their efficacy. Given the demographic trend of increased PCa diagnoses and dependence on ADT as a major therapeutic strategy, further studies are required to objectively evaluate these supplements as adjuvant for PCa patients receiving ADT.

  20. The Use of Dietary Supplements to Alleviate Androgen Deprivation Therapy Side Effects during Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dueregger, Andrea; Heidegger, Isabel; Ofer, Philipp; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of male cancer death in Western societies, is typically androgen-dependent, a characteristic that underlies the rationale of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Approximately 90% of patients initially respond to ADT strategies, however many experience side effects including hot flashes, cardiotoxicity, metabolic and musculoskeletal alterations. This review summarizes pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the ability of dietary supplements to alleviate adverse effects arising from ADT. In particular, we focus on herbal compounds, phytoestrogens, selenium (Se), fatty acids (FA), calcium, and Vitamins D and E. Indeed, there is some evidence that calcium and Vitamin D can prevent the development of osteoporosis during ADT. On the other hand, caution should be taken with the antioxidants Se and Vitamin E until the basis underlying their respective association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and PCa tumor development has been clarified. However, many other promising supplements have not yet been subjected large-scale clinical trials making it difficult to assess their efficacy. Given the demographic trend of increased PCa diagnoses and dependence on ADT as a major therapeutic strategy, further studies are required to objectively evaluate these supplements as adjuvant for PCa patients receiving ADT. PMID:25338271

  1. Alcohol's effect on aggression identification: a two-channel theory.

    PubMed

    Lange, James E

    2002-03-01

    Identification of ambiguous behaviors may be affected by alcohol first by the activation of associated mental representations and second by an increase in the imbiber's motivation of need for closure (NFC; A. Kruglanski, 1989), because cognitive effort is increased for epistemic activities. Combined, these effects should increase correspondence between mental representations of alcohol and the identification of others' behaviors. Three studies were conducted to test this hypothesis. The results were consistent with this hypothesis: Participants who associated alcohol with amiable concepts perceived less aggressive intent when blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were high versus low. Alternatively, those who associated alcohol with aggressive concepts perceived the same or more aggressive intent when BACs were high versus low. Priming alcohol concepts and trait-level NFC were also sufficient to replicate these effects.

  2. [Neuroprotective effects of the effective components group of xiaoshuantongluo against oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary cultured rat cortical neurons].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin-Mei; Pang, Xiao-Bin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Bao-Quan; Chen, Ruo-Yun; Du, Guan-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of the effective components group of Xiaoshuantongluo (XECG) on neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cortical cultures isolated from SD rat cortex at day 3 and the possible mechanism. Cells were divided into control group, OGD model group and XECG group (1, 3 and 10 mg x L(-1)). The cell viability was assessed with MTT assay and the LDH release rate was measured by enzyme label kit. The cell apoptosis was analyzed using Hoechst staining. RT-PCR was applied to detect the mRNA levels of JAK2 and STAT3. Western blotting was used to detect the expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, p-JAK2 and p-STAT3 proteins. Results showed that XECG resulted in an obvious resistance to oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell apoptosis and decrement of cell viability, decrease the cell LDH release rate. XECG could adjust the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins and increase Bcl-2/Bax ratio, up-regulate the expression of p-JAK2 and p-STAT3. In conclusion, XECG could protect against the neuronal injury cells exposed to OGD, which may be relevant to the promotion of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway, and impact the expression of Bax and Bcl-2.

  3. Bilateral cochlear implants in children: Effects of auditory experience and deprivation on auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Litovsky, Ruth Y; Gordon, Karen

    2016-08-01

    Spatial hearing skills are essential for children as they grow, learn and play. These skills provide critical cues for determining the locations of sources in the environment, and enable segregation of important sounds, such as speech, from background maskers or interferers. Spatial hearing depends on availability of monaural cues and binaural cues. The latter result from integration of inputs arriving at the two ears from sounds that vary in location. The binaural system has exquisite mechanisms for capturing differences between the ears in both time of arrival and intensity. The major cues that are thus referred to as being vital for binaural hearing are: interaural differences in time (ITDs) and interaural differences in levels (ILDs). In children with normal hearing (NH), spatial hearing abilities are fairly well developed by age 4-5 years. In contrast, most children who are deaf and hear through cochlear implants (CIs) do not have an opportunity to experience normal, binaural acoustic hearing early in life. These children may function by having to utilize auditory cues that are degraded with regard to numerous stimulus features. In recent years there has been a notable increase in the number of children receiving bilateral CIs, and evidence suggests that while having two CIs helps them function better than when listening through a single CI, these children generally perform worse than their NH peers. This paper reviews some of the recent work on bilaterally implanted children. The focus is on measures of spatial hearing, including sound localization, release from masking for speech understanding in noise and binaural sensitivity using research processors. Data from behavioral and electrophysiological studies are included, with a focus on the recent work of the authors and their collaborators. The effects of auditory plasticity and deprivation on the emergence of binaural and spatial hearing are discussed along with evidence for reorganized processing from both

  4. Benzodiazepine effects on licking responses for sodium chloride solutions in water-deprived male rats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Steven J; Higgs, Suzanne

    2005-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the effects of a centrally active benzodiazepine receptor agonist, midazolam maleate, on the microstructure of licking responses for a range of sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions in mildly water-deprived male rats. Doses of midazolam were chosen (0.3-3.0 mg/kg. i.p.) which have been characterised in studies of licking responses for several different kinds of nutrients. NaCl concentrations (0.075 M-0.45 M) were chosen to cover a range of taste preferences and acceptability. A brief-contact testing session was employed to focus on the initial determinants of licking responses (i.e. taste palatability), and to minimise any contribution of post-ingestional effects. The results indicate the midazolam significantly increased the total number of licks recorded across all salt concentrations, but that it had no effect on the number of bouts of licking. Instead, midazolam specifically enhanced the mean duration of licking bouts, an effect that was most evident at the weaker but more acceptable NaCl concentrations (0.075 M and 0.15 M). In addition, midazolam diminished the intrabout rate of licking across all salt concentrations. These results confirm that benzodiazepines can exert a specific pattern of effects on the microstructure of licking for salt solutions. They are discussed in terms of the oropharyngeal stimulation controlling intake and the palatability or "liking" hypothesis for the effects of benzodiazepines on taste stimuli, and indicate that the hypothesis is applicable to salt solution ingestive behaviour.

  5. The effects of sleep and sleep deprivation on task-switching performance.

    PubMed

    Couyoumdjian, Alessandro; Sdoia, Stefano; Tempesta, Daniela; Curcio, Giuseppe; Rastellini, Elisabetta; DE Gennaro, Luigi; Ferrara, Michele

    2010-03-01

    Neural systems of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) involved in executive functions are particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation (SD). In this study, we investigated whether SD selectively affects specific components of the executive control processes involved in task-switching performance. Two different tasks are performed in rapid and random succession in this procedure, so that the to-be-executed task may change from one trial to the next (switch trial), or may be repeated (repetition trial). Task-switches are usually slower than task repetitions, giving way to the 'switch cost'. One hundred and eight university students were assigned randomly to the sleep (S) or the SD group. Each of them was tested on a task-switching paradigm before and after an experimental night (S or SD), and after one recovery night. SD impaired both task-switching accuracy and speed. A higher proportion of errors and increased switch costs after SD have been observed, compared to normal sleep. Control analyses on switch and repetition trials showed that the SD group was significantly worse only on the switch trials. The effects of SD are reverted by one night of recovery sleep. It is concluded that the ability to adjust behaviour rapidly and flexibly to changing environmental demands, which relies on the functional integrity of the PFC, is impacted negatively by sleep loss.

  6. Acute Total and Chronic Partial Sleep Deprivation: Effects on Neurobehavioral Functions, Waking EEG and Renin-Angiotensin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan

    1999-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation leads to decrements in neurobehavioral performance and changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations as well as the incidence of slow eye movements ad detected in the electro-oculogram (EOG) during wakefulness. Although total sleep deprivation is a powerful tool to investigate the association of EEG/EOG and neurobehavioral decrements, sleep loss during space flight is usual only partial. Furthermore exposure to the microgravity environment leads to changes in sodium and volume homeostasis and associated renal and cardio-endocrine responses. Some of these changes can be induced in head down tilt bedrest studies. We integrate research tools and research projects to enhance the fidelity of the simulated conditions of space flight which are characterized by complexity and mutual interactions. The effectiveness of countermeasures and physiologic mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral changes and renal-cardio endocrine changes are investigated in Project 3 of the Human Performance Team and Project 3 of the Cardiovascular Alterations Team respectively. Although the. specific aims of these two projects are very different, they employ very similar research protocols. Thus, both projects investigate the effects of posture/bedrest and sleep deprivation (total or partial) on outcome measures relevant to their specific aims. The main aim of this enhancement grant is to exploit the similarities in research protocols by including the assessment of outcome variables relevant to the Renal-Cardio project in the research protocol of Project 3 of the Human Performance Team and by including the assessment of outcome variables relevant to the Quantitative EEG and Sleep Deprivation Project in the research protocols of Project 3 of the Cardiovascular Alterations team. In particular we will assess Neurobehavioral Function and Waking EEG in the research protocols of the renal-cardio endocrine project and renin-angiotensin and cardiac function in the research

  7. Evaluation of the effect of pentoxifylline on sleep-deprivation induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Tashtoush, Noor H; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Mhaidat, Nizar M

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of Pentoxifylline (PTX) to prevent sleep deprivation induced memory impairment probably through decreasing oxidative stress. Sleep deprivation was chronically induced 8 h/day for 6 weeks in rats using modified multiple platform model. Concurrently, PTX (100 mg/kg) was administered to animals on daily basis. After 6 weeks of treatment, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using the Radial Arm Water Maze. Additionally, the hippocampus was dissected; and levels/activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers glutathione reduced (GSH), glutathione oxidized (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were assessed. The results show that chronic sleep deprivation impaired short- and long-term memories, which was prevented by chronic treatment with PTX. Additionally, PTX normalized sleep deprivation-induced reduction in the hippocampus GSH/GSSG ratio (P < 0.05), and activities of GPx, catalase, and SOD (P < 0.05). In conclusion, chronic sleep deprivation induces memory impairment, and treatment with PTX prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus.

  8. Effects of acute sleep deprivation on motor and reversal learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Kang, Mihwa; Ramesh, Priyanka V; Klann, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Sleep supports the formation of a variety of declarative and non-declarative memories, and sleep deprivation often impairs these types of memories. In human subjects, natural sleep either during a nap or overnight leads to long-lasting improvements in visuomotor and fine motor tasks, but rodent models recapitulating these findings have been scarce. Here we present evidence that 5h of acute sleep deprivation impairs mouse skilled reach learning compared to a matched period of ad libitum sleep. In sleeping mice, the duration of total sleep time during the 5h of sleep opportunity or during the first bout of sleep did not correlate with ultimate gain in motor performance. In addition, we observed that reversal learning during the skilled reaching task was also affected by sleep deprivation. Consistent with this observation, 5h of sleep deprivation also impaired reversal learning in the water-based Y-maze. In conclusion, acute sleep deprivation negatively impacts subsequent motor and reversal learning and memory.

  9. Effects of sensory deprivation on columnar organization of neuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Schierloh, Anja; Eder, Matthias; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    We examined whether sensory deprivation during formation of the cortical circuitry influences the pattern of intracortical single-cell connections in rat barrel cortex. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons were recorded in vitro using patch-clamp techniques. In order to evoke EPSPs, presynaptic neurons were stimulated by photolytically applied glutamate, thus generating action potentials. Synaptic connections between the stimulated and the recorded neuron were identified by the occurrence of PSPs following photostimulation. Sensory deprivation changed the pattern of projections from L4 and L2/3 neurons to L2/3 pyramidal cells. In slices of non-deprived rats 86% of the total presynaptic neurons were located in the first and only 10% in the second barrel column. Deprivation changed these values to 67% and 26%, respectively. Therefore, the probability of presynaptic cells projecting to L2/3 neurons was shifted from adjacent to more remote barrel columns. These results indicate that deprivation of sensory input influences the pattern of intracortical connections.

  10. Time-on-task and sleep deprivation effects are evidenced in overlapping brain areas.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Christopher L; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-11-15

    Both sleep deprivation and extended task engagement (time-on-task) have been shown to degrade performance in tasks evaluating sustained attention. Here we used pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) to study participants engaged in a demanding selective attention task. The participants were imaged twice, once after a normal night of sleep and once after approximately 24h of total sleep deprivation. We compared task-related changes in BOLD signal alongside ASL-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes. We also collected resting baseline CBF data prior to and following task performance. Both BOLD fMRI and ASL identified spatially congruent task activation in ventral visual cortex and fronto-parietal regions. Sleep deprivation and time-on-task caused a decline of both measures in ventral visual cortex. BOLD fMRI also revealed such declines in fronto-parietal cortex. Only early visual cortex showed a significant upward shift in resting baseline CBF following sleep deprivation, suggesting that the neural consequences of both SD and ToT are primarily evident in task-evoked signals. We conclude that BOLD fMRI is preferable to pASL in studies evaluating sleep deprivation given its better signal to noise characteristics and the relative paucity of state differences in baseline CBF.

  11. The effect of deprivation on the developmental activities of adolescent rugby union players in Wales.

    PubMed

    Winn, Charles O N; Ford, Paul R; McNarry, Melitta A; Lewis, Jason; Stratton, Gareth

    2016-12-26

    The developmental activities of rugby union players and their interaction with deprivation remain to be elucidated. Five-hundred and ninety elite junior rugby union players (14.8 ± 0.5 years) were split into deprivation quintiles. These players subsequently completed a participant history questionnaire to record their involvement in rugby and other sports. Players accumulated 1987 ± 1297 h in rugby between 6 and 15 years of age. During the mini rugby stage (6-10 years of age), players accumulated an average of 113 ± 105, 89 ± 69 and 43 ± 19 h per year in rugby play, practice and competition, respectively. Moreover, 461 players engaged in an average of two other sports during the mini rugby stage. During the junior rugby stage (11-15 years of age), players accumulated 179 ± 98, 115 ± 90 and 64 ± 26 h per year in rugby practice, play and competition, respectively, and 538 players took part in three other sports. Players who were more deprived accumulated less rugby hours and participated in fewer other sports, but age milestones were not different between deprivation quintiles. There were no differences within developmental activities in rugby between deprivation groups.

  12. Alcohol expectancies: effects of gender, age, and family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, L H; Davis, T M; Adesso, V J; Lukas, S E

    1997-01-01

    To explore the effects of gender, age, and positive (FH+) and negative (FH-) family history of alcoholism on alcohol-related expectancies, the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ) was administered to 627 college students (female n = 430). In an attempt to control for consumption effects, only individuals who described themselves as heavy drinkers were included in the study. A 2 (Family History) x 2 (Gender) x 2 (Age Range) multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted on the six scales of the AEQ. Results indicated that FH+ females under the age of 20 years reported stronger expectancies of social and physical pleasure than did FH- females. Results also suggested that females over the age of 20 reported significantly lower expectancies of global, positive effects compared to all other subjects, regardless of family history of alcoholism. Finally, both male and female subjects under the age of 20 reported greater expectancies of global, positive effects, sexual enhancement, feelings of increased power and aggression, and social assertion compared to individuals over the age of 20. These results indicate that alcohol-related expectancies vary as a function of age, gender, and family history of alcoholism.

  13. The effects of neonatal paternal deprivation on pair bonding, NAcc dopamine receptor mRNA expression and serum corticosterone in mandarin voles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; An, Shucheng; Tai, Fadao; Zhang, Xia; He, Fengqin; Wang, Jianli; An, Xiaolei; Wu, Ruiyong

    2012-05-01

    High levels of paternal care are important for the development of social behavior in monogamous rodents. However, the effects of paternal care on the formation of pair bonding and underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms, especially the involvements of dopamine system and corticosterone, are not well understood. We investigated effects of paternal deprivation on pair bonding in mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus), a socially monogamous rodent. Paternal deprivation was found to inhibit the formation of pair bonding in females according to partner preference tests (PPT). Paternal deprivation also reduced body contact behavior and increased aggression in males and females in PPT. During social interaction tests (SIT), paternal deprivation was found to reduce investigative and aggressive behaviors but increase body contact and self-grooming in females, and reduce staring, aggression, body contact and self-grooming in males when interacting with the opposite sex. Paternal deprivation reduced the expression of dopamine 1-type receptor (D1R) mRNA and dopamine 2-type receptor (D2R) mRNA in the nucleus accumbens of female offspring in later life, but enhanced mRNA expression of these two dopamine receptors in males. After three days of cohabitation the expression of D1R mRNA and D2R mRNA was negatively correlated for voles reared by two parents, but positively correlated in paternally deprived animals. Paternal deprivation reduced serum corticosterone levels in females but had the opposite effect in males. Three days of cohabitation did not alter corticosterone levels of PD females, but reduced it in PC females. Our results provide substantial evidence that paternal deprivation inhibits the formation of pair bonding in female mandarin voles and alters social behavior later in life. These behavioral variations were possibly associated with sex-specific alterations in the expression of two types of dopamine receptors and serum corticosterone levels induced by paternal

  14. Impairments of brain and behavior: the neurological effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Oscar-Berman, M; Shagrin, B; Evert, D L; Epstein, C

    1997-01-01

    Chronic heavy drinking and alcoholism can have serious repercussions for the functioning of the entire nervous system, particularly the brain. These effects include changes in emotions and personality as well as impaired perception, learning, and memory. Neuropathological and imaging techniques have provided evidence of physical brain abnormalities in alcoholics, such as atrophy of nerve cells and brain shrinkage. At the cellular level, alcohol appears to directly affect brain function in a variety of ways, primarily by interfering with the action of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and other neurotransmitters. Neurological disorders also can result from vitamin deficiency and liver disease, two health problems that commonly occur with alcoholism. Other hypotheses, based on factors such as aging, gender, and genetics, have been developed to explain various alcohol-related neurological consequences. Many pharmacological treatments to improve neuropsychological functioning in alcoholics have been tested, but none has proved entirely successful. With prolonged abstinence, however, slow recovery of cognitive functioning can occur in some cases.

  15. The Adverse Effects of Alcohol on Vitamin A Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Clugston, Robin D.; Blaner, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review is to explore the relationship between alcohol and the metabolism of the essential micronutrient, vitamin A; as well as the impact this interaction has on alcohol-induced disease in adults. Depleted hepatic vitamin A content has been reported in human alcoholics, an observation that has been confirmed in animal models of chronic alcohol consumption. Indeed, alcohol consumption has been associated with declines in hepatic levels of retinol (vitamin A), as well as retinyl ester and retinoic acid; collectively referred to as retinoids. Through the use of animal models, the complex interplay between alcohol metabolism and vitamin A homeostasis has been studied; the reviewed research supports the notion that chronic alcohol consumption precipitates a decline in hepatic retinoid levels through increased breakdown, as well as increased export to extra-hepatic tissues. While the precise biochemical mechanisms governing alcohol’s effect remain to be elucidated, its profound effect on hepatic retinoid status is irrefutable. In addition to a review of the literature related to studies on tissue retinoid levels and the metabolic interactions between alcohol and retinoids, the significance of altered hepatic retinoid metabolism in the context of alcoholic liver disease is also considered. PMID:22690322

  16. Sustained Partial Sleep Deprivation: Effects on Immune Modulation and Growth Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullington, Janet M.

    1999-01-01

    The vulnerability to medical emergencies is greatest in space where there are real limits to the availability or effectiveness of ground based assistance. Moreover, astronaut safety and health maintenance will be of increasing importance as we venture out into space for extended periods of time. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanisms of the regulatory physiology of homeostatic systems (sleep, circadian, neuroendocrine, fluid and nutritional balance) and the key roles played in adaptation. This synergy project has combined aims of the "Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team"; the "Immunology, Infection and Hematology Team"; and the "Muscle Alterations and Atrophy Team", to broadly address the effects of long term sleep reduction, as is frequently encountered in space exploration, on neuroendocrine, neuroimmune and circulating growth factors. Astronaut sleep is frequently curtailed to averages of between 4- 6.5 hours per night. There is evidence that this amount of sleep is inadequate for maintaining optimal daytime functioning. However, there is a lack of information concerning the effects of chronic sleep restriction, or reduction, on regulatory physiology in general, and there have been no controlled studies of the cumulative effects of chronic sleep reduction on neuroendocrine and neuroimmune parameters. This synergy project represents a pilot study designed to characterize the effects of chronic partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on neuroendocrine, neuroimmune and growth factors. This project draws its subjects from two (of 18) conditions of the larger NSBRI project, "Countermeasures to Neurobehavioral Deficits from Cumulative Partial Sleep Deprivation During Space Flight", one of the projects on the "Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team ". For the purposes of this study, to investigate the effects of chronic sleep loss on neuroendocrine and neuroimmune function, we have focused on the two extreme sleep conditions

  17. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Katrin; Plomp, Rosina; Lao, Oscar; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean±SD: 23±5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g., PER1-3, REV-ERBα) remained unaffected. These data suggest that the core clock mechanism in peripheral oscillators is compromised during acute sleep deprivation.

  18. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Phase Synchronization as Assessed by Wavelet Phase Coherence Analysis of Prefrontal Tissue Oxyhemoglobin Signals

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lingguo; Zhang, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Fangyi; Liu, Heshan; Li, Zengyong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To reveal the physiological mechanism of the decline in cognitive function after sleep deprivation, a within-subject study was performed to assess sleep deprivation effects on phase synchronization, as revealed by wavelet phase coherence (WPCO) analysis of prefrontal tissue oxyhemoglobin signals. Materials and Methods Twenty subjects (10 male and 10 female, 25.5 ± 3.5 years old) were recruited to participate in two tests: one without sleep deprivation (group A) and the other with 24 h of sleep deprivation (group B). Before the test, each subject underwent a subjective evaluation using visual analog scales. A cognitive task was performed by judging three random numbers. Continuous recordings of the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals were obtained from both the left and right prefrontal lobes during rest, task, and post-task periods. The WPCO of cerebral Delta [HbO2] signals were analyzed for these three periods for both groups A and B. Results Six frequency intervals were defined: I: 0.6–2 Hz (cardiac activity), II: 0.145–0.6 Hz (respiratory activity), III: 0.052–0.145 Hz (myogenic activity), IV: 0.021–0.052 Hz (neurogenic activity), V: 0.0095–0.021 Hz (nitric oxide related endothelial activity) and VI: 0.005–0.0095 Hz (non-nitric oxide related endothelial activity). WPCO in intervals III (F = 5.955, p = 0.02) and V (F = 4.7, p = 0.037) was significantly lower in group B than in group A at rest. During the task period, WPCO in intervals III (F = 5.175, p = 0.029) and IV (F = 4.585, p = 0.039) was significantly lower in group B compared with group A. In the post-task recovery period, the WPCO in interval III (F = 6.125, p = 0.02) was significantly lower in group B compared with group A. Reaction time was significantly prolonged, and the accuracy rate and F1 score both declined after sleep deprivation. Conclusions The decline in WPCO after sleep deprivation indicates reduced phase synchronization between left and right prefrontal

  19. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaini, Ramesh R.; Hu, Chien-An A.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  20. The Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Alcohol Expectancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancy (AEs) research has enhanced our understanding of how anticipated alcohol effects confer risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, extant AE measures have limitations within 1 or more of the following areas: assessing a comprehensive range of effects, specifying the hypothetical number of drinks consumed,…

  1. A test of the effects of acute sleep deprivation on general and specific self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms: an experimental extension.

    PubMed

    Babson, Kimberly A; Trainor, Casey D; Feldner, Matthew T; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2010-09-01

    Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite model of anxiety and depression, these findings replicate and extend prior research by suggesting sleep deprivation among individuals without current Axis I disorders increases both state symptoms of anxiety and depression specifically, and general distress more broadly. Extending this work to clinical samples and prospectively testing mechanisms underlying these effects are important future directions in this area of research.

  2. Do social relations buffer the effect of neighborhood deprivation on health-related quality of life? Results from the LifeLines Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Klijs, Bart; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F; Kibele, Eva U B; Smidt, Nynke

    2017-03-01

    We investigated whether social relations buffer the effect of neighborhood deprivation on mental and physical health-related quality of life. Baseline data from the LifeLines Cohort Study (N=68,111) and a neighborhood deprivation index were used to perform mixed effect linear regression analyses. Results showed that fewer personal contacts (b, 95%CI: -0.88(-1.08;-0.67)) and lower social need fulfillment (-4.52(-4.67;-4.36)) are associated with lower mental health-related quality of life. Higher neighborhood deprivation was also associated with lower mental health related quality of life (-0.18(-0.24;-0.11)), but only for those with few personal contacts or low social need fulfillment. Our results suggest that social relations buffer the effect of neighborhood deprivation on mental health-related quality of life.

  3. GABRA2 markers moderate the subjective effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Magdalena; Weerts, Elise M; McCaul, Mary E; Guo, Xiuqing; Yan, Xiaofei; Kranzler, Henry R; Li, Ning; Wand, Gary S

    2013-03-01

    Individual differences in subjective responses (SRs) to alcohol are moderated by genetic variants and may be risk factors for the development of alcohol use disorders. Variation in the GABA(A) α2 receptor subunit gene (GABRA2) has been associated with alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, we examined whether individual differences in SRs, which reflect sensitivity to the effects of alcohol, are associated with variation in GABRA2. Sixty-nine healthy subjects (21-30 years) underwent a laboratory-based within-session cumulative oral alcohol dosing procedure, achieving a mean peak blood alcohol level of 100.4 mg/dl (standard error = 2.5). Subjective assessments were obtained throughout the session, including ascending and descending limbs of the alcohol curve. We genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the chromosome 4 region spanning GABRA2 and analyzed the effect of genotype and haplotypes on subjective responses to alcohol. Population substructure was characterized through the use of ancestry informative markers. Individual SNP analysis demonstrated that carriers of the minor alleles for SNPs rs279858, rs279844, rs279845, rs279826, rs279828 and rs279836 had lower 'Negative' alcohol effects scores than individuals homozygous for the common allele at each SNP (P = 0.0060, P = 0.0035, P = 0.0045, P = 0.0043, P = 0.0037 and P = 0.0061, respectively). Haplotype effects of block 1 showed concordant results with SNPs in this block (P = 0.0492 and P = 0.0150 for haplotypes 1 and 4, respectively). The minor alleles for several of these SNPs have previously been associated with AD. Our findings provide further evidence that variation within GABRA2 is associated with attenuated negative responses to alcohol, a known risk factor for vulnerability to alcohol use disorders.

  4. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  5. Serum testosterone level predicts the effective time of androgen deprivation therapy in metastatic prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. However, whether serum testosterone levels, using a cut-off point of 50 ng dl-1 , are related to the effective time of ADT in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients remains controversial. Moreover, recent studies have shown that some patients may benefit from the addition of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy. To date, no studies have been able to distinguish patients who will benefit from the combination of ADT and docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 206 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and showed progression to castrate-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC). Serum testosterone levels were measured prospectively after ADT for 1, 3, and 6 months. The endpoint was the time to CRPC. In univariate and multivariate analyses, testosterone levels <50 ng dl-1 were not associated with the effective time of ADT. Receiver operating characteristic and univariate analysis showed that testosterone levels of ≤25 ng dl-1 after the first month of ADT offered the best overall sensitivity and specificity for prediction of a longer time to CRPC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08-1.96; P = 0.013). Our results show that serum testosterone level of 25 ng dl-1 plays a prognostic role in prostate cancer patients receiving ADT. A testosterone value of 25 ng dl-1 after the first month of ADT can distinguish patients who benefit from ADT effectiveness for only a short time. These patients may need to receive ADT and concurrent docetaxel chemotherapy.

  6. Serum testosterone level predicts the effective time of androgen deprivation therapy in metastatic prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. However, whether serum testosterone levels, using a cut-off point of 50 ng dl−1, are related to the effective time of ADT in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients remains controversial. Moreover, recent studies have shown that some patients may benefit from the addition of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy. To date, no studies have been able to distinguish patients who will benefit from the combination of ADT and docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 206 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and showed progression to castrate-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC). Serum testosterone levels were measured prospectively after ADT for 1, 3, and 6 months. The endpoint was the time to CRPC. In univariate and multivariate analyses, testosterone levels <50 ng dl−1 were not associated with the effective time of ADT. Receiver operating characteristic and univariate analysis showed that testosterone levels of ≤25 ng dl−1 after the first month of ADT offered the best overall sensitivity and specificity for prediction of a longer time to CRPC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08–1.96; P = 0.013). Our results show that serum testosterone level of 25 ng dl−1 plays a prognostic role in prostate cancer patients receiving ADT. A testosterone value of 25 ng dl−1 after the first month of ADT can distinguish patients who benefit from ADT effectiveness for only a short time. These patients may need to receive ADT and concurrent docetaxel chemotherapy. PMID:26975487

  7. Nutrient deprivation induces the Warburg effect through ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-An; Chao, Yee; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2013-05-01

    The Warburg effect is known to be crucial for cancer cells to acquire energy. Nutrient deficiencies are an important phenomenon in solid tumors, but the effect on cancer cell metabolism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrate that starvation of HeLa cells by incubation with Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS) induced cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Notably, HBSS starvation increased lactate production, cytoplasmic pyruvate content and decreased oxygen consumption, but failed to change the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or the glucose uptake. We found that HBSS starvation rapidly induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) activation and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation, both of which were inhibited by compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), NAC (a ROS scavenger), and the dominant negative mutant of AMPK. Our data further revealed the involvement of ROS production in AMPK activation. Moreover, DCA (a PDK inhibitor), NAC, and compound C all significantly decreased HBSS starvation-induced lactate production accompanied by enhancement of HBSS starvation-induced cell apoptosis. Not only in HeLa cells, HBSS-induced lactate production and PDH phosphorylation were also observed in CL1.5, A431 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, we for the first time demonstrated that a low-nutrient condition drives cancer cells to utilize glycolysis to produce ATP, and this increases the Warburg effect through a novel mechanism involving ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of PDK. Such an event contributes to protecting cells from apoptosis upon nutrient deprivation.

  8. The beneficial effects of leptin on REM sleep deprivation-induced cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Fu; Su, Chun-Lin; Chang, Chih-Hua; Chen, Yu-Wen; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-05-17

    Leptin, a 167 amino acid peptide, is synthesized predominantly in the adipose tissues and plays a key role in the regulation of food intake and body weight. Recent studies indicate that leptin receptor is expressed with high levels in many brain regions that may regulate synaptic plasticity. Here we show that deprivation of rapid eye movement (REMD) sleep resulted in impairment of both cue and contextual fear memory. In parallel, surface expression of GluR1 was reduced in the amygdala. Intraperitoneal injection of leptin to the REMD mice rescued memory impairment and reversed surface GluR1 reduction. Using whole-cell recording to evaluate the synaptic function of the thalamus-lateral amygdala (LA) pathway, we found a decrease in frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) concomitant with reduced AMPA/NMDA ratios in the REMD mice. By contrast, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) was increased. The effects of REMD on mEPSCs and AMPA/NMDA ratio could be reversed by leptin treatment, whereas on PPR it could not. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a dual protein/lipid phosphatase, down-regulates the effect of the PI-3 kinase pathway. Fear conditioning increased whereas REMD led to a decrease in the phosphorylated states of PTEN, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), and the effects of REMD were reversed by leptin. These results suggest that both pre- and postsynaptic functions of the thalamus-LA pathway were altered by fear conditioning and REMD in opposite directions. Leptin treatment reversed REMD-induced memory deficits primarily by a postsynaptic action by restoring surface expression of GluR1 without affecting PPR.

  9. The compensatory effect of regular exercise on long-term memory impairment in sleep deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    Salari, Maryam; Sheibani, Vahid; Saadati, Hakimeh; Pourrahimi, Alimohammad; khaksarihadad, Mohammad; Esmaeelpour, Khadijeh; Khodamoradi, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have been shown that exercise can improve short-term spatial learning, memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in sleep deprived female rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise on sleep deprivation (SD) induced impairment in hippocampal dependent long-term memory in female rats. Intact and ovariectomized female rats were used in the current study. Exercise protocol was 4 weeks treadmill running. Twenty four hour SD was induced by using multiple platform apparatus after learning phase. Spatial learning and long-term memory was examined by using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. Our results indicated that sleep deprivation impaired long term memory in the intact and ovariectomized female rats, regardless of reproductive status (p<0.05) and treadmill exercise compensated this impairment (p<0.05). In conclusion the results of the current study confirmed the negative effect of SD on cognitive functions and regular exercise seems to protect rats from these factors, however more investigations need to be done.

  10. Effects of sleep deprivation on cardiorespiratory functions of the runners and volleyball players during rest and exercise.

    PubMed

    Azboy, O; Kaygisiz, Z

    2009-03-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation on male runners (age 18.1 +/- 0.35) and volleyball players (age 17.8 +/- 0.36) has not been investigated. Therefore, we studied the possible effect of sleep deprivation in the sportsmen. The athletes performed spirometric tests at rest and then incremental exercise test on ergometer following one night sleep and one night (25-30 h) sleeplessness. Several standard measurements of spirometric function showed no significant change following sleep loss. Sleep loss raised resting oxygen uptake (VO2) in the runners and resting carbon dioxide production (VCO2) in both the runners and the volleyball players (p < 0.05). However, it left heart rate (HR), respiratory quotient (R), minute ventilation (VE) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) unchanged at rest in both groups. Sleep loss decreased time to exhaustion in the volleyball players (p < 0.01). In the runners and the volleyball players, sleep loss did not alter exercise values of HR, VO2, VCO2, R and SaO2, but it reduced exercise VE (p < 0.05). We suggest that one night sleep deprivation may reduce exercise performance by decreasing exercise VE and time to exhaustion. We also indicate that sleep loss may decrease more the performance of volleyball players than that of runners.

  11. Risk factors for adverse life outcomes in fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Streissguth, Ann P; Bookstein, Fred L; Barr, Helen M; Sampson, Paul D; O'Malley, Kieran; Young, Julia Kogan

    2004-08-01

    Clinical descriptions of patients with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) suggest major problems with adaptive behavior. Five operationally defined adverse outcomes and 18 associated risk/protective factors were examined using a Life History Interview with knowledgeable informants of 415 patients with FAS or FAE (median age 14 years, range 6-51; median IQ 86, range 29-126). Eighty percent of these patients were not raised by their biological mothers. For adolescents and adults, the life span prevalence was 61% for Disrupted School Experiences, 60% for Trouble with the Law, 50% for Confinement (in detention, jail, prison, or a psychiatric or alcohol/drug inpatient setting), 49% for Inappropriate Sexual Behaviors on repeated occasions, and 35% for Alcohol/Drug Problems. The odds of escaping these adverse life outcomes are increased 2- to 4-fold by receiving the diagnosis of FAS or FAE at an earlier age and by being reared in good stable environments.

  12. A Naturalistic Alcohol Availability Experiment: Effects on Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraushaar, Kevin; Alsop, Brent

    Previous investigators have looked at many types of criminal offenses in order to determine alcohol involvement in crime. This longitudinal (4-year) naturalistic experimental and control designed study examined the effects of change in alcohol availability on rates of offending in a small provincial region of New Zealand following the closure of…

  13. Negative Effects of Alcohol on Physical Fitness and Athletic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiken, Gail B.

    1991-01-01

    Alcohol consumption affects virtually every organ and system of the body. The article examines the negative physiological and psychomotor effects of short-term alcohol consumption relevant to physical fitness and athletic performance. Educators must be responsible for reaching students and discussing the issue. (SM)

  14. Fetal Alcohol Effects in Children: Cognitive, Educational, and Behavioral Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sheldon

    The effects of alcohol on the developing fetus are examined. Noted is the existence of both structural problems (such as microcephaly and cardiac anomalies) and behavioral problems (such as mental retardation and speech and language deficits). The potential damage of alcohol at a very early stage of fetal development is discussed. It is thought…

  15. Sex Differences in Alcohol's Effect on Responses to Provocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Katharine G.; And Others

    Studies on alcohol and aggression have tended to use male subjects and to employ negative shock deliveries as the measure of aggression. This study was conducted to investigate sex differences in alcohol's effect on aggression and to examine the impact of providing both positive and negative response options. Male (N=48) and female (N=48)…

  16. The effect of intravitreal injection of vehicle solutions on form deprivation myopia in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alexander H; Siegwart, John T; Frost, Michael R; Norton, Thomas T

    2016-04-01

    lntravitreal injection of substances dissolved in a vehicle solution is a common tool used to assess retinal function. We examined the effect of injection procedures (three groups) and vehicle solutions (four groups) on the development of form deprivation myopia (FDM) in juvenile tree shrews, mammals closely related to primates, starting at 24 days of visual experience (about 45 days of age). In seven groups (n = 7 per group), the myopia produced by monocular form deprivation (FD) was measured daily for 12 days during an 11-day treatment period. The FD eye was randomly selected; the contralateral eye served as an untreated control. The refractive state of both eyes was measured daily, starting just before FD began (day 1); axial component dimensions were measured on day 1 and after eleven days of treatment (day 12). Procedure groups: the myopia (treated eye - control eye refraction) in the FD group was the reference. The sham group only underwent brief daily anesthesia and opening of the conjunctiva to expose the sclera. The puncture group, in addition, had a pipette inserted daily into the vitreous. In four vehicle groups, 5 μL of vehicle was injected daily. The NaCl group received 0.85% NaCl. In the NaCl + ascorbic acid group, 1 mg/mL of ascorbic acid was added. The water group received sterile water. The water + ascorbic acid group received water with ascorbic acid (1 mg/mL). We found that the procedures associated with intravitreal injections (anesthesia, opening of the conjunctiva, and puncture of the sclera) did not significantly affect the development of FDM. However, injecting 5 μL of any of the four vehicle solutions slowed the development of FDM. NaCl had a small effect; myopia development in the last 6 days (-0.15 ± 0.08 D/day) was significantly less than in the FD group (-0.55 ± 0.06 D/day). NaCl + Ascorbic acid further slowed the development of FDM on several treatment days. H2O (-0.09 ± 0.05 D/day) and H2O + ascorbic acid

  17. Sensorimotor and physiological effects of various alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed Central

    Kalant, H.; LeBlanc, A. E.; Wilson, A.; Homatidis, S.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of a standard dose of alcohol (1.3 g/kg) in the form of Canadian rye whisky, Canadian beer and a sparkling table wine were compared with those of a nonalcoholic carbonated control beverage. Sixteen young male and eight female subjects, all moderate drinkers, were tested in a Latin square design. Measurements were made on the pursuit rotor and quantitative Romberg tests, and of skin temperature, heart rate, malar flush and blood alcohol concentration during the prealcohol baseline period and at regular intervals over the 4-hour drinking period. The three alcoholic beverages produced blood alcohol curves that did not differ significantly. All three alcoholic beverages produced increasing sensorimotor impairment over time, which corresponded in degree to the increasing blood alcohol concentration. There were no significant differences between the three beverages on either the sensorimotor or physiological measures at any blood alcohol value. The results of this study indicate that the degree of impairment after alcohol ingestion in a socially relevant manner is not dependent on the type of beverage consumed, but only on the resulting blood alcohol concentration. PMID:1131767

  18. Effect of alcohol consumption selenium bioavailability in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study was done to determine the effects of alcohol consumption on selenium bioavailability in initially Se-depleted rats. Weanling male rats were fed a Se deficient basal diet for 4 weeks and then for the subsequent 4 weeks were supplemented at 0.031 mg Se/Kg or at 0.085 mg Se/Kg of diet in the form of high Se yeast. During the Se repletion period alcohol replaced medium chain triglycerides in the diet at three levels: 0%, 10% and 20% of calories. Dietary Se level significantly affected urinary Se, fecal Se, Se absorption, Se balance whole blood Se, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, liver Se concentration, and total liver Se content. Alcohol consumption significantly increased liver Se concentrations and total liver Se in rats fed the adequate Se diet. In rates fed the low Se diet, this pattern was not shown. There was a significant interaction between alcohol and Se level in terms of liver Se concentration and total liver Se. In the first week of Se repletion, fecal Se. Se absorption and Se balance were significantly higher in the 10% alcohol group fed the low Se repletion diet compared to rats given 0% and 20% alcohol in the same Se group. In the final week Se repletion the parameters of Se balance were not affected by alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption did not influence whole blood Se and whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity; however alcohol consumption significantly reduced growth rate at both Se levels.

  19. Alcohol Use Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... less effect than before? Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such ...

  20. The effect of amino acid deprivation on the transfer of iron through Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Guenievre; Stevens, Valerie; Cottin, Sarah; McArdle, Harry J

    2017-03-01

    Iron (Fe) metabolism is modified by many nutritional factors. Amino acids (AA) play a central role in various biological processes, such as protein synthesis and energy supply. However, the influence of AA status on iron metabolism has not been investigated. Here, we test whether AA alters iron metabolism in an intestinal cell model. Both Fe uptake and transfer across the cell monolayer were significantly increased by non-essential AA deficiency (both p<0.001) while only Fe transfer was increased by essential AA deficiency (p<0.0001). Both essential and non-essential AA deficiency decreased DMT1 (±IRE) exon1A mRNA expression (respectively p=0.0007 and p=0.006) and increased expression of ferritin heavy chain. DMT1+IRE (also expressing exon1A or 1B) mRNA levels were decreased by essential AA deficiency (p=0.012). The mRNA levels of total DMT1 were also decreased by essential, but not non-essential, AA deficiency (p=0.006). Hepcidin levels were increased significantly by non-essential amino acid deprivation (p=0.047). Protein levels of ferroportin and/or ferritin heavy chain were not altered by AA deficiency, suggesting that they had no effect on Fe efflux or storage in the cell, though iron content of ferritin could be increased. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that AA status affects iron transport and the expression of genes related to iron metabolism in Caco-2 cells, although the changes observed are not sufficient to explain the alteration in iron transport. We hypothesise that the effect on Fe transfer is mediated through an increased movement across the cell layer, rather than transfer across the cell membranes.

  1. Regional and time-dependent neuroprotective effect of hypothermia following oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Allard, Justine; Paci, Paula; Vander Elst, Luce; Ris, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    The neuroprotective effect of hypothermia has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models of cerebral ischemia. In regard to the hippocampus, previous studies have mainly focused on CA1 pyramidal neurons, which are very vulnerable to ischemia. But the dentate gyrus (DG), in which neuronal proliferation occurs, can also be damaged by ischemia. In this study, we explored the neuroprotective effect of postischemic hypothermia in different areas of the hippocampus after mild or severe ischemia. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures were prepared from 6- to 8-day-old rats and maintained for 12 days. Cultures were exposed to 25 or 35 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Neuronal damage was quantified after 6, 24, 48, and 72 h by propidium iodide fluorescence. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was induced 1 h after the end of OGD and was maintained for a period of 24 h. Short OGD produced delayed neuronal damage in the CA1 area and in the DG and to a lesser extend in the CA3 area. Damage in CA1 pyramidal cells was totally prevented by hypothermia whereas neuroprotection was limited in the DG. Thirty-five-minute OGD induced more rapid and more severe cell death in the three regions. In this case, hypothermia induced 1 h after OGD was unable to protect CA1 pyramidal cells whereas hypothermia induced during OGD was able to prevent cell loss. This study provides evidence that neuroprotection by hypothermia is limited to specific areas and depends on the severity of the ischemia.

  2. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  3. A single dose of S-ketamine induces long-term antidepressant effects and decreases oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Carlessi, Anelise S; Titus, Stephanie E; Abelaira, Helena M; Ignácio, Zuleide M; da Luz, Jaine R; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Florentino, Drielly; Vieira, Andriele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, João

    2015-11-01

    Ketamine, an antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, has produced rapid antidepressant effects in patients with depression, as well as in animal models. However, the extent and duration of the antidepressant effect over longer periods of time has not been considered. This study evaluated the effects of single dose of ketamine on behavior and oxidative stress, which is related to depression, in the brains of adult rats subjected to maternal deprivation. Deprived and nondeprived Wistar rats were divided into four groups nondeprived+saline; nondeprived+S-ketamine (15 mg/kg); deprived+saline; deprived+S-ketamine (15 mg/kg). A single dose of ketamine or saline was administrated during the adult phase, and 14 days later depressive-like behavior was assessed. In addition, lipid damage, protein damage, and antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in the rat brain. Maternal deprivation induces a depressive-like behavior, as verified by an increase in immobility and anhedonic behavior. However, a single dose of ketamine was able to reverse these alterations, showing long-term antidepressant effects. The brains of maternally deprived rats had an increase in protein oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation, but administration of a single dose of ketamine reversed this damage. The activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in the deprived rat brains. However, ketamine was also able to reverse these changes. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a single dose of ketamine is able to induce long-term antidepressant effects and protect against neural damage caused by oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation.

  4. Antivascular Effects of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation for Prostate Cancer: An In Vivo Human Study Using Susceptibility and Relaxivity Dynamic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzi, Roberto; Padhani, Anwar R.; Taylor, N. Jane; Collins, David J.; D'Arcy, James A.; Stirling, J. James; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The antivascular effects of androgen deprivation have been investigated in animal models; however, there has been minimal investigation in human prostate cancer. This study tested the hypothesis that androgen deprivation causes significant reductions in human prostate tumor blood flow and the induction of hypoxia at a magnitude and in a time scale relevant to the neoadjuvant setting before radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients were examined, each with five multi-parameter magnetic resonance imaging scans: two scans before the commencement of androgen suppression, one scan after 1 month of hormone treatment, and two further scans after 3 months of therapy. Quantitative parametric maps of the prostate informing on relative blood flow (rBF), relative blood volume (rBV), vascular permeability (transfer constant [K{sup trans}]), leakage space (v{sub e}) and blood oxygenation (intrinsic relaxivity [R{sub 2}*]) were calculated. Results: Tumor blood volume and blood flow decreased by 83% and 79%, respectively, in the first month (p < 0.0001), with 74% of patients showing significant changes. The proportion of individual patients who achieved significant changes in T1 kinetic parameter values after 3 months of androgen deprivation for tumor measurements was 68% for K{sup trans} and 53% for v{sub e} By 3 months, significant increases in R{sub 2}* had occurred in prostate tumor, with a rise of 41.1% (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Androgen deprivation induces profound vascular collapse within 1 month of starting treatment. Increased R{sub 2}* in regions of prostate cancer and a decrease in blood volume suggest a reduction in tumor oxygenation.

  5. Effect of total sleep deprivation on postprandial metabolic and insulin responses in shift workers and non-shift workers.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Sophie M T; Hampton, Shelagh M; Finn, Rebecca E; Skene, Debra J

    2010-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that shift workers are at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease which may, in part, be related to metabolic and hormonal changes. Partial sleep deprivation, a common consequence of rotating shift work, has been shown to affect glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The current study investigated the effects of one night of total sleep deprivation, as a proxy for the first night shift, on postprandial glucose, insulin and lipid (triacylglycerols (TAGs) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs)) responses under controlled laboratory conditions in shift workers and non-shift workers. Eleven experienced shift workers (35.7+/-7.2 years, mean+/-s.d.) who had worked in shifts for 8.7+/-5.25 years were matched with 13 non-shift workers who had worked for 32.8+/-6.4 years. After an adaptation night and a baseline sleep night, volunteers were kept awake for 30.5 h, followed by a nap (4 h) and recovery sleep. Blood samples were taken prior to and after a standard breakfast following baseline sleep, total sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Basal TAG levels prior to the standard breakfast were significantly lower after sleep deprivation, indicating higher energy expenditure. Basal NEFA levels were significantly lower after recovery sleep. Postprandial insulin and TAG responses were significantly increased, and the NEFA response was decreased after recovery sleep, suggestive of insulin insensitivity. Although there were no overall significant differences between non-shift workers and shift workers, non-shift workers showed significantly higher basal insulin levels, lower basal NEFA levels, and an increased postprandial insulin and a decreased NEFA response after recovery sleep. In future, the reasons for these inter-group differences are to be investigated.

  6. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  7. Slow wave activity and slow oscillations in sleepwalkers and controls: effects of 38 h of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Sleepwalkers have been shown to have an unusually high number of arousals from slow wave sleep and lower slow wave activity (SWA) power during the night than controls. Because sleep deprivation increases the frequency of slow wave sleep (SWS) arousals in sleepwalkers, it may also affect the expression of the homeostatic process to a greater extent than shown previously. We thus investigated SWA power as well as slow wave oscillation (SWO) density in 10 sleepwalkers and nine controls at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. There was a significant increase in SWA during participants' recovery sleep, especially during their second non-rapid eye movement (NREM) period. SWO density was similarly increased during recovery sleep's first two NREM periods. A fronto-central gradient in SWA and SWO was also present on both nights. However, no group differences were noted on any of the 2 nights on SWA or SWO. This unexpected result may be related to the heterogeneity of sleepwalkers as a population, as well as our small sample size. SWA pressure after extended sleep deprivation may also result in a ceiling effect in both sleepwalkers and controls.

  8. The Protective Effects of Buzui on Acute Alcoholism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-Chao; Gao, Shu-di; Hu, Xiao-yu; Yi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of a traditional buzui recipe in anti-inebriation treatment. Buzui consists of Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis, Fructus Chebulae, Fructus Mume, Fructus Crataegi, Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli, and Excrementum Bombycis. The buzui mixture was delivered by gavage, and ethanol was delivered subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of buzui on the righting reflex, inebriation rates, and the survival curve are depicted. Blood alcohol concentrations, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were recorded. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as malonaldehyde (MDA) levels, were also measured. Our results demonstrated that a traditional buzui recipe showed significant effects on promoting wakefulness and the prevention of acute alcohol intoxication, accelerating the metabolism of alcohol in the liver and reducing the oxidative damage caused by acute alcoholism. PMID:26884793

  9. Vasopressin release induced by water deprivation - Effects of centrally administered saralasin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Dundore, R. L.; Wurpel, J. N. D.; Severs, W. B.; Barbella, Y. R.

    1983-01-01

    Uncertainty exists as to whether endogenous angiotensin activates brain mechanisms controlling vasopressin (AVP) secretion during dehydration. Various doses of saralasin were injected into a lateral cgrebroventricle (IVT) of conscious, male rats deprived of water for 48 h. The rats were killed at different times. The concentration of AVP in the plasma p(AVP), measured by radioimmunoassay, was unaffected by saralasin. IVT pretreatment with 1-Sar-8-Ile-angiotensin II blocked maximal AVP release by IVT angiotensin, but this pretreatment did not reduce p(AVP) after 24, 48 or 72 hr water deprivation. A 3-hour continuous IVT infusion of CSF or saralasin (10 micrograms/hour) into 48-hour water-deprived rats revealed equivalent p(AVP) concentration and urine volumes. When the infusions were continued for 3 h more with water available, control and saralasin-treated rats: (1) drank at similar rates, (2) excreted similar amounts of urine, and (3) reduced their p(AVP) concentration levels to the same extent. IVT saralasin did not affect p(AVP) concentration of rats dehydrated with hypertonic NaCl. Combined IVT saralasin and atropine reduced p(AVP) concentration of 48-hour water deprived rats about 30 percent (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that redundancy exists for sensing, integrating and releasing vasopressin in dehydrated rats.

  10. The Effect of Early Deprivation on Executive Attention in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loman, Michelle M.; Johnson, Anna E.; Westerlund, Alissa; Pollak, Seth D.; Nelson, Charles A.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children reared in deprived environments, such as institutions for the care of orphaned or abandoned children, are at increased risk for attention and behavior regulation difficulties. This study examined the neurobehavioral correlates of executive attention in post institutionalized (PI) children. Methods: The performance and…

  11. The Beneficial Effects of Leptin on REM Sleep Deprivation-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsiao-Fu; Su, Chun-Lin; Chang, Chih-Hua; Chen, Yu-Wen; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Leptin, a 167 amino acid peptide, is synthesized predominantly in the adipose tissues and plays a key role in the regulation of food intake and body weight. Recent studies indicate that leptin receptor is expressed with high levels in many brain regions that may regulate synaptic plasticity. Here we show that deprivation of rapid eye movement…

  12. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Cognitive Ability and Skills of Pediatrics Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storer, James S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The cognitive and skills performances of sleep-deprived pediatrics residents were measured by using questions like those on the pediatrics board certification examination and using tasks that required coordination and dexterity. Implications of findings are discussed in the context of the controversy over the structure and process of medical…

  13. Prior regular exercise reverses the decreased effects of sleep deprivation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Darvishzadeh-Mahani, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main candidate to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in sleep deprived male rats. In addition, our previous findings demonstrate that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and/or sleep deprivation (SD) on the levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of female rats. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present experiment. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and sleep deprivation was accomplished using the multiple platform method. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis were used to evaluate the level of BDNF mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus respectively. Our results showed that protein and mRNA expression of BDNF was significantly (p<0.05) decreased after 72 h SD in OVX rats in compared with other groups. Furthermore, sleep deprived OVX rats under exercise conditions had a significant (p<0.05) up-regulation of the BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that regular exercise can exert a protective effect against hippocampus-related functions and impairments induced by sleep deprivation probably by inducing BDNF expression.

  14. Direct and indirect effects of alcohol expectancies on alcohol-related problems.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Alexander; Kraus, Ludwig; Piontek, Daniela; Mueller, Stefanie; Demmel, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates pathways from alcohol outcome expectancies to alcohol-related problems (ARPs), considering alcohol volume and episodic heavy drinking (EHD) as potential mediators. It is further examined whether these pathways vary by age. The population-based sample comprised 6,823 individuals aged 18 to 64 years reporting alcohol use in the past year. Direct and indirect effects of five alcohol expectancies (social assertiveness, tension reduction, sexual enhancement, cognitive impairment, aggression) and alcohol use (average daily intake, EHD) on a latent measure of ARPs (six items of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) were investigated. A multiple-group structural equation model with three age groups (18 to 24, 25 to 44, 45 to 64 years) was examined. In individuals aged 18 to 24 years, social assertiveness expectancies were positively associated with average intake and EHD, which in turn were associated with more ARPs. In addition, expectancies related to cognitive impairment and aggression were directly linked to more ARPs without mediation in this age group. In individuals aged 25 years and older, tension reduction expectancies were associated with more ARPs through increased average intake. In contrast, high scores on cognitive impairment were associated with lower average intake and in turn with fewer ARPs. Challenging expectancies of sociability in young and expectancies of relaxation in mid adulthood might help decrease high-risk drinking and subsequently ARPs. Considering negative alcohol expectancies may help to identify younger individuals at high risk for ARPs, even if they have not previously exhibited repeated excessive drinking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?...

  16. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?...

  17. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?...

  18. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?...

  19. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?...

  20. Effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and modafinil challenge on sleep rebound after paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, R C S; Andersen, M L; Shih, M C; Tufik, S

    2008-01-01

    Sleep loss is both common and critically relevant to our society and might lead to the abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine and modafinil. Since psychoactive substance abuse often occurs within a scenario of sleep deficit, the purpose of this investigation was to compare the sleep patterns of rats challenged with cocaine (7 mg/kg, ip), methamphetamine (7 mg/kg, ip), or modafinil (100 mg/kg, ip) subsequent to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 96 h. Our results show that, immediately after 96 h of PSD, rats (10 per group) that were injected with a psychostimulant presented lower percentages of paradoxical sleep compared to those injected with saline (P < 0.01). Regarding slow wave sleep (SWS), rats injected with psychostimulants after PSD presented a late rebound (on the second night subsequent to the injection) in the percentage of this phase of sleep when compared to PSD rats injected with saline (P < 0.05). In addition, the current study has produced evidence of the characteristic effect of each drug on sleep architecture. Home cage control rats injected with modafinil and methamphetamine showed a reduction in SWS compared with the saline group. Methamphetamine affected sleep patterns most, since it significantly reduced paradoxical sleep, SWS and sleep efficiency before and after PSD compared to control (P < 0.05). Cocaine was the psychostimulant causing the least changes in sleep pattern in relation to those observed after saline injection. Therefore, our results suggest that abuse of these psychostimulants in a PSD paradigm aggravates their impact on sleep patterns.

  1. Protective effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa against serum/glucose deprivation-induced PC12 cells injury

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Elham; Hosseini, Azar; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Findings natural products with antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties has been one of the interesting challenges in the search for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including ischemic stroke. Serum/glucose deprivation (SGD) has been used as a model for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage during ischemia in vitro and for the expansion of neuroprotective drugs against ischemia-induced brain injury. Recent studies showed that Hibiscus sabdariffa exert pharmacological actions such as potent antioxidant. Therefore, in this study we investigated the protective effect of extract of H. sabdariffa against SGD-induced PC12 cells injury. Materials and Methods: Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of H. sabdariffa extract (HSE) for 2 hr, and then exposed to SGD condition for 6, 12 and 18 hr. Results: SGD caused a major reduction in cell viability after 6, 12, and 18 hr as compared with control cells (p< 0.001). Pretreatment with HSE (30-500 𝜇g/mL) significantly increased cell viability following SGD insult for 6, 12 and 18 hr. A significant increase in cell apoptosis was seen in cells under SGD condition after 12hr as compared with control cells (p< 0.001). Pretreatment with HSE significantly decreased cell apoptosis subsequent SGD conditionafter12hr at concentration of 60, 125 and 250. Conclusion: These data showed that HSE had a protective property under SGD condition in PC12 cells, suggesting that H. sabdariffa has the potential to be used as a new therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26101756

  2. [Sleep deprivation in somnambulism. Effect of arousal, deep sleep and sleep stage changes].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Neissner, V; Schwarzmayr, P; Meier-Ewert, K

    1998-06-01

    Diagnosis of parasomnias in the sleep laboratory is difficult since the nocturnal behavior reported by the patients often does not show up in the laboratory. To test the efficacy of sleep deprivation as a tool to provoke somnambulism we investigated ten patients (three women and seven men, mean age 27 +/- 3.4) with somnambulism. Their standard polysomnographies and videomonitored nocturnal behavior was compared to that of sex- and age-matched controls and to polysomnography and behavior after sleep deprivation. Patients with parasomnias and controls did not show significant differences in sleep parameters with the exception of longer arousal duration in controls, which was nonsignificant. In magnetic resonance tomography, patients with parasomnias did not reveal abnormality of the brain that might explain release of nocturnal behavior. Sleep deprivation led to significantly reduced number of arousals, reduced arousal index, significantly prolonged arousal duration and more stage shifts from all sleep stages (nonsignificant). Complex behavior during sleep increased under sleep deprivation, whereas sleepwalking did not increase. The majority of complex behavior during sleep is triggered by stage shifts and not by arousal in the sense of the arousal definition of the American Sleep Disorder Society. Complex behavior in sleep is stereotypical and nonviolent. Its complexity seems to depend on the duration and intensity of arousals. Sleep deprivation can be recommended as an efficacious method of increasing complex behavior in sleep, which is a preliminary stage of sleepwalking. Concerning the underlying pathology it seems to be important to register the quality and duration of stimuli that trigger arousals instead of focusing the number of arousals alone.

  3. Don’t Always Prefer My Chosen Objects: Low Level of Trait Autonomy and Autonomy Deprivation Decreases Mere Choice Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Zhe; Tao, Tuoxin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Choice effect is a robust phenomenon in which even “mere choice” that does not include actual choosing actions could result in more preference for the self-chosen objects over other-chosen objects. In the current research, we proposed that autonomy would impact the mere choice effect. We conducted two studies to examine the hypothesis. The results showed that the mere choice effect measured by Implicit Association Test (IAT) significantly decreased for participants with lower levels of trait autonomy (Study 1) and when participants were primed to experience autonomy deprivation (Study 2). The theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:27148132

  4. Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Patterns of Performance on IQ and Visual Motor Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen; Zielinski, Sharon

    This study explored relationships between intelligence and visual motor ability and patterns of impairment of visual motor ability in children prenatally affected by alcohol. Fourteen children (mean age 8.2 years) diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and 50 children with possible fetal alcohol effects (FAE) were assessed with the Bender…

  5. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Leder, Johannes; Ketturat, Charlene; Dresler, Martin; Faber, Nadira Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by – more or less qualified – advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) ×2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compared participants with one night of total sleep deprivation to participants with a night of regular sleep. Competency of advisor was manipulated within subjects. We found that sleep deprived participants show increased advice taking. An interaction of condition and competency of advisor and further post-hoc analyses revealed that this effect was more pronounced for the medium competency advisor compared to the high competency advisor. Furthermore, sleep deprived participants benefited more from an advisor of high competency in terms of stronger improvement in judgmental accuracy than well-rested participants. PMID:27109507

  6. Effects of alcohol on human carboxylesterase drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Meibohm, Bernd; Laizure, S. Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) and human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) play an important role in metabolizing many medications. Alcohol is a known inhibitor of these enzymes but the relative effect on CES1 and CES2 is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of alcohol on the metabolism of specific probes for CES1 (oseltamivir) and CES2 (aspirin). Methods The effect of alcohol on CES1- and CES2-mediated probe drug hydrolysis was determined in vitro using recombinant human carboxylesterase. To characterize the in vivo effects of alcohol, healthy volunteers received each probe drug alone and in combination with alcohol followed by blood sample collection and determination of oseltamivir, aspirin, and respective metabolite pharmacokinetics. Results Alcohol significantly inhibited oseltamivir hydrolysis by CES1 in vitro but did not affect aspirin metabolism by CES2. Alcohol increased the oseltamivir area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0-6 h by 27% (range 11-46%, p=0.011) and decreased the metabolite/oseltamivir AUC 0-6 h ratio by 34% (range 25-41%, p<0.001). Aspirin pharmacokinetics were not affected by alcohol. Conclusions Alcohol significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of oseltamivir by CES1 both in vitro and in humans, but did not affect the hydrolysis of aspirin to salicylic acid by CES2. These results suggest that alcohol's inhibition of CES1 could potentially result in clinically significant drug interactions with other CES1-substrate drugs, but it is unlikely to significantly affect CES2-substrate drug hydrolysis. PMID:25511794

  7. Experimental effects of chocolate deprivation on cravings, mood, and consumption in high and low chocolate-cravers.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Dominguez, Silvia; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Sonia; Martín, María; Warren, Cortney S

    2012-02-01

    This study examined how deprivation of chocolate affects state-level chocolate cravings, mood, and chocolate consumption in high and low trait-level chocolate-cravers. After identifying high and low chocolate cravers (N=58), half of the participants were instructed not to eat any chocolate for 2weeks. This created four experimental groups: deprived high-cravers (n=14), deprived low-cravers (n=14), non-deprived high-cravers (n=15), and non-deprived low-cravers (n=15). Following 2-week deprivation, state-level food cravings, mood, and chocolate intake were measured in a laboratory setting and compared across groups. Analyses revealed that anxiety increased over time for high-cravers (both deprived and non-deprived); state-level chocolate- and food-craving increased over time for both deprived groups and non-deprived high-cravers; non-deprived high-cravers ate the most chocolate; and, high-cravers were more joyful and guilty than low-cravers after eating chocolate in the laboratory. Theoretically, these results suggest that chocolate consumption may be better explained by trait-level of chocolate craving than by deprivation and highlighted significant differences in mood, state-level cravings, and chocolate intake between cravers and non-cravers following deprivation.

  8. Recognizing and Managing Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects: A Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreight, Brenda

    A family counselor and mother of adopted children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects (FAS/E) offers practical advice and information on dealing with FAS/E's lifelong effects on behavior and learning. The book begins by discussing the historical, medical, and social aspects of FAS/E, and details common behavioral characteristics associated with…

  9. Secondhand effects of alcohol use among students in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Pham Bich; Knibbe, Ronald A.; Bao Giang, Kim; De Vries, Nanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In many countries worldwide, heavy drinking can cause harm not only to drinkers but also to those around them. Objective To examine the prevalence and predictors of secondhand effects of alcohol use among students in Vietnam. Design In this cross-sectional study, a multistage sampling strategy was used to select 6,011 students (from the first to final study year) of 12 universities/faculties in four provinces in Vietnam. During class, students filled in a questionnaire asking for demographic information, and about alcohol-related problems and details of secondhand effects of alcohol during the past year. Exploratory factor analysis of the secondhand effects indicated two factors: non-bodily harm and bodily harm. A logistic regression model was used to explore the association between predictors and non-bodily harm and bodily harm. Results The prevalence of secondhand effects of alcohol is high among students in Vietnam: 77.5% had non-bodily effects and 34.2% had bodily effects. More than 37% of the population reported three to four non-bodily effects and more than 12% reported two to three bodily harms due to the drinking of others. However, most respondents who reported secondhand effects experienced these less than once per month. Factors most strongly associated with the yearly non-bodily harm were the weekly drinking habits of the people the respondents live with, and living in a smaller city; the factor most strongly associated with the yearly bodily harm was the respondent's own alcohol-related problems. Moreover, weekly drinking habits of the people the respondents live with, and respondent's own alcohol-related problems are strongly associated with the frequent experience of non-bodily and bodily effects of alcohol. Conclusions In addition to dealing with alcohol-related harm of drinkers themselves, preventing secondhand effects should also be a major focus of prevention policy. PMID:25735459

  10. Self-Control and the Effects of Movie Alcohol Portrayals on Immediate Alcohol Consumption in Male College Students

    PubMed Central

    Koordeman, Renske; Anschutz, Doeschka J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In movies, alcohol-related cues are frequently depicted and there is evidence for a link between movie alcohol cues and immediate alcohol consumption. Less is known about factors influencing immediate effects movie alcohol exposure on drinking. The exertion of self-control is thought to be important in avoiding or resisting certain temptations. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the immediate effects of movie alcohol portrayals on drinking of male social drinkers and to assess the moderating role of self-control in this relation. It was hypothesized that participants would drink more when exposed to movie alcohol portrayals and that especially participants with low self-control would be affected by these portrayals. Methods: A between-subjects design comparing two movie conditions (alcohol or no portrayal of alcohol) was used, in which 154 pairs of male friends (ages 18–30) watched a 1-h movie in a semi-naturalistic living room setting. Their alcohol consumption while watching was examined. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing self-control as well as their self-reported weekly alcohol use. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to test the effects of movie condition on alcohol comsumption. Results: Self-control moderated the relation between movie condition and alcohol consumption. Assignment to the alcohol movie condition increased alcohol consumption during the movie for males with high self-control but not for males with low self-control. Conclusion: Viewing a movie with alcohol portrayals can lead to higher alcohol consumption in a specific sample of young men while watching a movie. PMID:25691873

  11. Effects of monocular deprivation on the spatial pattern of visually induced expression of c-Fos protein.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, K; Imamura, K; Watanabe, Y

    2012-01-27

    We studied the pattern of expression of a protein product (c-Fos) of immediate-early gene (IEG) in the visual cortex of rats and mice. The basal expression of c-Fos was very low and visual exposure revealed a large number of c-Fos immunopositive cells in the visual cortex. We found that monocular deprivation during the sensitive period of ocular dominance (OD) plasticity significantly changed both the amount and pattern of c-Fos expression upon monocular stimulation of either eye. The number of immunopositive cells in layer IV of binocular subfields of the primary visual cortex (Oc1B) ipsilateral to the stimulated eye was found to be the most sensitive index of the effects of monocular deprivation during the sensitive period, that is, opened eye stimulation induced significantly larger numbers of c-Fos immunopositive cells, whereas closed eye stimulation induced significantly smaller numbers compared with those induced by monocular stimulation in control animals. In the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus, the pattern of expression of c-Fos following monocular stimulation was not affected by preceding monocular deprivation. Monocular deprivation imposed after the sensitive period did not affect the pattern of induction of c-Fos. Notably, in age-matched old animals that had been raised in total darkness and then experienced monocular deprivation, the distribution and numbers of c-Fos-expressing cells in visual cortex exhibited the same alterations as found in young animals during the sensitive period. These findings suggest that the present activity mapping method using c-Fos as a molecular marker is useful for examining the activity-dependent regulation of cortical plasticity, and provides an alternative method to conventional electrophysiological recording. This method is particularly powerful when applied to knockout or transgenic mice in which sampling biases in electrophysiological recording have been considered inevitable. Furthermore, these

  12. Effects of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on the feeding behavior in the laboratory rat with a description of the cuff pedestal technique.

    PubMed

    Elomaa, E

    1985-01-01

    The cuff pedestal technique, with which it is possible to use the test animal as its own control both before and after REMs deprivation, was described. The validity of this modified procedure for REMs deprivation was tested with reference to the electrophysiological sleep correlates using 6 adult rats deprived of REMs for 3 days. The stress effects of the cuff pedestal treatment were assessed in terms of adrenal weights in 12 rats. The duration of REMs deprivation in this experiment was 5 days. The effects of REMs deprivation on locomotor activity and food intake were studied in 8 juvenile rats exposed to REMs deprivation by lowering the cuffs for 6 days after 3 baseline days with the cuffs raised. 24 h recordings of meal pattern data were obtained from 8 adult rats during one baseline day, during the first and sixth day of REMs deprivation and during the second day after termination of REMs deprivation. The main results were as follows: The procedure of placing experimentally naive rats on small pedestals surrounded by water inhibited normal food intake for several days. Concomitant weight losses were of the same order as have been reported to occur in control rats on large pedestals. This finding suggests that both the large and small pedestals should be equipped with movable cuffs and that actual deprivation should be started by lowering the cuffs only when the animals have exceeded their original weights. The electrophysiological sleep/waking cycle of rats adapted to living on the pedestal with the cuff raised was similar to that reported in rats under ordinary laboratory conditions. Lowering of the cuffs for 3 days resulted in an almost total disappearance of REMs. A prominent rebound increase of REMs occurred after raising of the cuffs. Rats kept for fourteen days on pedestals with the cuffs raised displayed an increase of about 20% in the weights of the adrenal bodies. A quite similar adrenal hypertrophy, however, also occurs in rats living under enriched

  13. Searching for an environmental effect of parental alcoholism on offspring alcohol use disorder: A genetically-informed study of children of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Turkheimer, Eric; Emery, Robert E.; Harden, K. Paige; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    The children-of-twins design was used to isolate a potentially causal environmental impact of having an alcoholic parent on offspring alcohol use disorder by examining whether the children of alcoholics were at a higher risk for alcohol use disorders than the children of non-alcoholic parents even after correlated familial factors were controlled. Participants were 1,224 male and female twins from 836 twin pairs selected from the Australian Twin Registry, 2,334 of their 18–39 year-old offspring, and 983 spouses of the twins. Lifetime histories of DSM-IV alcohol use disorders were obtained by structured psychiatric telephone interviews conducted individually with each of the family members. Comparisons of the offspring of twins discordant for alcoholism indicated that there was no longer a statistically significant difference between the children of alcoholics and the children of non-alcoholics after genetic and family environmental factors correlated with having an alcoholic parent were controlled. The results of this study suggest that the direct causal effect of being exposed to an alcoholic parent on offspring alcohol use disorder is modest at best. PMID:18729607

  14. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

  15. Food deprivation increases the low-dose locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2013-10-01

    Acute and chronic states of food deprivation result in increased sensitivity to a variety of natural reinforcers as well as to drugs of abuse. Food deprived animals show increased locomotor activity during periods of food deprivation, as well as increased locomotor stimulant responses to drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamine, morphine, and ethanol, implying that drugs of abuse act in part on neural systems that underlie responses towards food. To determine whether this effect extends to an invertebrate, highly genetically tractable animal, the locomotor stimulant effects of low dose ethanol were assessed under a variety of feeding conditions in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Food deprivation resulted in strain specific increases in ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity in most strains tested, although elevated baseline activity confounded interpretation in some strains. Experiments conducted with Canton S flies found that the effects of food deprivation on the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol increased with the duration of deprivation, and could be blocked by refeeding the flies with standard food or sucrose, but not yeast, immediately prior to the ethanol exposure. Life-span extending dietary depletion procedures or previous periods of food deprivation did not affect the response to ethanol, indicating that only animals in an acutely food deprived state are more sensitive to the stimulant effects of ethanol. These results suggest that increased sensitivity to the stimulant effects of some drugs of abuse might reflect an evolutionarily conserved neural mechanism that underlies behavioral responses to natural reinforcers and drugs of abuse. The identification of this mechanism, and the genes that underlie its development and function, will constitute a novel approach towards the study of alcohol abuse and dependence.

  16. Effect of particle size on the alcohol yield from corn

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.E.; Hegg, R.O.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effect of particle size on the conversion of corn to ethanol. Standard analytical procedures were used to measure carbohydrates, sugar, and alcohol. The highest yield obtained was 2.4 gal/bu with the average being 1.8 gal/bu. The results showed that particle size has little effect on alcohol yield. 7 refs.

  17. Effect of non-alcoholic beer on Subjective Sleep Quality in a university stressed population.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Bravo, R; Galán, C; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Cubero, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Sleep deprivation affects the homeostasis of the physiological functions in the human organism. Beer is the only beverage that contains hops, a plant which has a sedative effect. Our objective is to determine the improvement of subjective sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The sample was conducted among a population of 30 university students. The study took place during a period of 3 weeks, the first 7 days were used for the Control, and during the following 14 days the students ingested beer (were asked to drink non-alcoholic beer) while having dinner. The results revealed that Subjective Sleep Quality improved in the case of those students who drank one beer during dinner compared to the Control, this is corroborated by the fact that Sleep Latency decreased (p < 0.05) compared to their Control. The overall rating Global Score of Quality of Sleep also improved significantly (p < 0.05). These results confirm that the consumption of non-alcoholic beer at dinner time helps to improve the quality of sleep at night.

  18. Palatable solutions during paradoxical sleep deprivation: reduction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and lack of effect on energy imbalance.

    PubMed

    Suchecki, D; Antunes, J; Tufik, S

    2003-09-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) induces increased energy expenditure in rats, insofar as rats eat more but loose weight throughout the deprivation period. In the present study, rats were offered water, saccharin or sucrose to drink during the deprivation period, since it has been proposed that carbohydrates reduce the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. Rats were submitted to the flower pot technique for 96 h. During the PSD period, they were weighed daily and food and fluid intake was assessed twice a day. At the end of the PSD period, rats were killed and plasma concentrations of glucose, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were assayed. Compared to their control counterparts, all paradoxical sleep-deprived rats consumed more food, but lost weight. Paradoxical sleep-deprived rats given sucrose drank more than their control counterparts (especially in the light phase of the light/dark cycle). Paradoxical sleep-deprived rats showed increased food intake during all periods throughout the experiment, with peak intake during the dark phase and nadir during the light phase of the light/dark cycle. All paradoxical sleep-deprived rats showed lower glucose plasma levels than control rats and increased relative adrenal weight. However, when given saccharin or sucrose, paradoxical sleep-deprived rats showed lower concentrations of ACTH and corticosterone than their water-provided counterparts, indicating that palatable fluids were capable of lowering HPA axis activation produced by PSD. The fact that PSD induced energy imbalance regardless of the relative attenuation of the HPA axis activity produced by saccharin or sucrose suggests that the HPA axis may play only a secondary role in this phenomenon, and that other mechanisms may account for this effect. The data also suggest that supply of palatable fluids can be an additional modification to reduce the stress of the flower pot method.

  19. Effects of stress upon psychophysiological responses and performance following sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, R.; Lester, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The usefulness of psychological and physiological variables in predicting performance under stress of 48 hours of sleep deprivation was investigated. Performance tests, with subjects of different ego strength personalities, in concept acquisition, reading comprehension, word association, word memory, and anagrams were conducted, and physiological measurements of (1) the phasic and tonic electrodermal, (2) galvanic skin response, (3) thermal skin resistance, (4) heart rate, (5) respiration, and (6) plethysmographic finger pulse volumn were recorded. It was found that the changes in the pattern of performance were the result of testing subjects at times when they would normally be sleeping, and that sleep deprivation longer than 48 hours must be maintained to produce changes in simple or well learned tasks.

  20. The effect of a REM sleep deprivation procedure on different aspects of memory function in humans.

    PubMed

    Saxvig, Ingvild West; Lundervold, Astri Johansen; Grønli, Janne; Ursin, Reidun; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Portas, Chiara Maria

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that memory is dependent on the occurrence of REM sleep. Research has mainly focused on two distinct types of memory function, declarative and procedural, and it seems that the latter may more directly depend on REM sleep. Memory consolidation has been more investigated than acquisition, maintenance, and recall, despite the fact that sleep may affect flow of information into/from storage. Moreover, tests have often been limited to stimuli within only one modality (usually visual or verbal). This study aimed to clarify the role of REM sleep in memory by investigating aspects of memory function, processing, and modality in the same experimental setting. Tests of acquisition and consolidation of multiple aspects of memory function within the visual and verbal modalities were administrated to subjects before and after REM sleep deprivation. Results show that test performance was not affected by REM sleep deprivation.

  1. Ethnic density and area deprivation: neighbourhood effects on Māori health and racial discrimination in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Bécares, Laia; Cormack, Donna; Harris, Ricci

    2013-07-01

    Some studies suggest that ethnic minority people are healthier when they live in areas with a higher concentration of people from their own ethnic group, a so-called ethnic density effect. To date, no studies have examined the ethnic density effect among indigenous peoples, for whom connections to land, patterns of settlement, and drivers of residential location may differ from ethnic minority populations. The present study analysed the Māori sample from the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey to examine the association between increased Māori ethnic density, area deprivation, health, and experiences of racial discrimination. Results of multilevel regressions showed that an increase in Māori ethnic density was associated with decreased odds of reporting poor self-rated health, doctor-diagnosed common mental disorders, and experienced racial discrimination. These associations were strengthened after adjusting for area deprivation, which was consistently associated with increased odds of reporting poor health and reports of racial discrimination. Our findings show that whereas ethnic density is protective of the health and exposure to racial discrimination of Māori, this effect is concealed by the detrimental effect of area deprivation, signalling that the benefits of ethnic density must be interpreted within the current socio-political context. This includes the institutional structures and racist practices that have created existing health and socioeconomic inequities in the first place, and maintain the unequal distribution of concentrated poverty in areas of high Māori density. Addressing poverty and the inequitable distribution of socioeconomic resources by ethnicity and place in New Zealand is vital to improving health and reducing inequalities. Given the racialised nature of access to goods, services, and opportunities within New Zealand society, this also requires a strong commitment to eliminating racism. Such commitment and action will allow the benefits

  2. Ethnic density and area deprivation: Neighbourhood effects on Māori health and racial discrimination in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Bécares, Laia; Cormack, Donna; Harris, Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Some studies suggest that ethnic minority people are healthier when they live in areas with a higher concentration of people from their own ethnic group, a so-called ethnic density effect. To date, no studies have examined the ethnic density effect among indigenous peoples, for whom connections to land, patterns of settlement, and drivers of residential location may differ from ethnic minority populations. The present study analysed the Māori sample from the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey to examine the association between increased Māori ethnic density, area deprivation, health, and experiences of racial discrimination. Results of multilevel regressions showed that an increase in Māori ethnic density was associated with decreased odds of reporting poor self-rated health, doctor-diagnosed common mental disorders, and experienced racial discrimination. These associations were strengthened after adjusting for area deprivation, which was consistently associated with increased odds of reporting poor health and reports of racial discrimination. Our findings show that whereas ethnic density is protective of the health and exposure to racial discrimination of Māori, this effect is concealed by the detrimental effect of area deprivation, signalling that the benefits of ethnic density must be interpreted within the current socio-political context. This includes the institutional structures and racist practices that have created existing health and socioeconomic inequities in the first place, and maintain the unequal distribution of concentrated poverty in areas of high Māori density. Addressing poverty and the inequitable distribution of socioeconomic resources by ethnicity and place in New Zealand is vital to improving health and reducing inequalities. Given the racialised nature of access to goods, services, and opportunities within New Zealand society, this also requires a strong commitment to eliminating racism. Such commitment and action will allow the benefits

  3. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  4. Effect of noble gases on oxygen and glucose deprived injury in human tubular kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Maleeha; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Li, Yuantao; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2010-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been shown to be protective in preconditioning settings against renal ischemic injury. The aims of this study were to determine the protective effects of the other noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, on human tubular kidney HK2 cells in vitro. Cultured human renal tubular cells (HK2) were exposed to noble gas preconditioning (75% noble gas; 20% O(2); 5% CO(2)) for three hours or mock preconditioning. Twenty-four hours after gas exposure, cell injury was provoked with oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) culture medium for three hours. Cell viability was assessed 24 h post-OGD by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Other cohorts of cultured cells were incubated in the absence of OGD in 75% noble gas, 20% O(2) and 5% CO(2) and cellular signals phospho-Akt (p-Akt), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blotting. OGD caused a reduction in cell viability to 0.382 +/- 0.1 from 1.0 +/- 0.15 at control (P < 0.01). Neon, argon and krypton showed no protection from injury (0.404 +/- 0.03; 0.428 +/- 0.02; 0.452 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). Helium by comparison significantly enhanced cell injury (0.191 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01). Xenon alone exerted a protective effect (0.678 +/- 0.07; P < 0.001). In the absence of OGD, helium was also detrimental (0.909 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Xenon caused an increased expression of p-Akt, HIF-1alpha and Bcl-2, while the other noble gases did not modify protein expression. These results suggest that unlike other noble gases, preconditioning with the anesthetic noble gas xenon may have a role in protection against renal ischemic injury.

  5. Opposing Effects of Alcohol on the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Tasha; Helms, Christa; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have described a dose-dependent effect of alcohol on human health with light to moderate drinkers having a lower risk of all-cause mortality than abstainers, while heavy drinkers are at the highest risk. In the case of the immune system, moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced inflammation and improved responses to vaccination, while chronic heavy drinking is associated with a decreased frequency of lymphocytes and increased risk of both bacterial and viral infections. However, the mechanisms by which alcohol exerts a dose-dependent effect on the immune system remain poorly understood due to a lack of systematic studies that examine the effect of multiple doses and different time courses. This review will summarize our current understanding of the impact of moderate versus excessive alcohol consumption on the innate and adaptive branches of the immune system derived from both in vitro as well as in vivo studies carried out in humans and animal model studies. PMID:26375241

  6. Effects of alcohol intake on time-based event expectations.

    PubMed

    Kunchulia, Marina; Thomaschke, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Previous evidence suggests that alcohol affects various forms of temporal cognition. However, there are presently no studies investigating whether and how alcohol affects on time-based event expectations. Here, we investigated the effects of alcohol on time-based event expectations. Seventeen healthy volunteers, aged between 19 and 36 years, participated. We employed a variable foreperiod paradigm with temporally predictable events, mimicking a computer game. Error rate and reaction time were analyzed in placebo (0 g/kg), low dose (0.2 g/kg) and high dose (0.6 g/kg) conditions. We found that alcohol intake did not eliminate, but substantially reduced, the formation of time-based expectancy. This effect was stronger for high doses, than for low doses, of alcohol. As a result of our studies, we have evidence that alcohol intake impairs time-based event expectations. The mechanism by which the level of alcohol impairs time-based event expectations needs to be clarified by future research.

  7. Effect of total sleep deprivation on reaction time and waking EEG activity in man.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, I; Ramos, J; Arce, C; Guevara, M A; Corsi-Cabrera, M

    1995-06-01

    Nine paid volunteers were sleep deprived over a period of 40 hours. Every 2 hours during total sleep deprivation (TSD) and after recovery sleep, oral temperature (OT), reaction time (RT) in a vigilance task and electroencephalogram (EEG) with eyes open and closed (C3, C4, T3 and T4) were recorded. Ten artifact-free samples from each condition were Fourier transformed. Absolute power was calculated for six bands. Analyses of variance with deprivation and time of day as factors showed the following significant results: 1) TSD induced an increase in RT, of theta power in all derivations, of beta power in both centrals and a decrease of alpha power with eyes closed; OT was not affected. 2) All bands showed a peak of power at 1800 hours, 2 hours in advance of the OT acrophase at 2000 hours. All variables recovered baseline values after 1 night of sleep. Significant linear correlations of hours of wakefulness with EEG and RT, and of EEG power with OT and RT, were observed. The present findings show a linear increase in EEG power and RT with TSD, and a diurnal oscillation of EEG power, which is independent of TSD.

  8. Osmoregulation in water-deprived rats drinking hypertonic saline: effect of area postrema lesions.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E M; Craver, C F; Curtis, K S; Peacock-Kinzig, K A; Sved, A F; Smith, J C

    2001-03-01

    Rats drank rapidly when 0.3 M NaCl was the only drinking fluid available after overnight water deprivation, consuming approximately 200 ml/24 h. Although such large intakes of this hypertonic solution initially elevated plasma osmolality, excretion of comparable volumes of urine more concentrated than 300 meq Na(+)/l ultimately appears to restore plasma osmolality to normal levels. Rats drank approximately 100 ml of 0.5 M NaCl after overnight water deprivation, but urine Na(+) concentration (U(Na)) did not increase sufficiently to achieve osmoregulation. When an injected salt load exacerbated the initial dehydration caused by water deprivation, rats increased U(Na) to void the injected load and did not significantly alter 24-h intake of 0.3 or 0.5 M NaCl. Rats with lesions of area postrema had much higher saline intakes and lower U(Na) than did intact control rats; nonetheless, they appeared to osmoregulate well while drinking 0.3 M NaCl but not while drinking 0.5 M NaCl. Detailed analyses of drinking behavior by intact rats suggest that individual bouts were terminated by some rapid postabsorptive consequence of the ingested NaCl load that inhibited further NaCl intake, not by a fixed intake volume or number of licks that temporarily satiated thirst.

  9. Associations of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptom Dimensions with Smoking Deprivation Effects in Adult Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, L. Cinnamon; Ameringer, Katherine J.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying relations of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptom dimensions to individual facets of the tobacco withdrawal syndrome could elucidate the mechanisms linking ADHD and regular smoking. This study examined the unique relations of inattention (IN) and hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) symptom dimensions of ADHD to a variety of tobacco withdrawal symptoms. 132 community-dwelling adult smokers recruited without regard to ADHD status completed a self-report measure of ADHD symptoms experienced over the past 6 months at a baseline visit. At two subsequent experimental sessions (one following overnight tobacco deprivation and one nondeprived; order counterbalanced), participants completed measures of tobacco withdrawal symptoms, mood, and desire to smoke. Preliminary analyses showed that higher levels of IN and HI symptoms were both associated with higher levels of negative affect and concentration difficulties during nondeprived (“baseline”) states (Ps < .01). Over and above nondeprived ratings, higher levels of HI symptoms were associated with larger deprivation-induced increases in negative affect, concentration problems, and desire to smoke, particularly for negative affect relief, during deprived states (Ps < .01). ADHD symptoms, particularly HI symptoms, are associated with more severe exacerbations in abstinence-induced withdrawal symptoms, which could be an important mechanism of ADHD-smoking comorbidity. These findings suggest the need for clinical studies examining the role of these unique and potentially more severe withdrawal profiles experienced by smokers with high-levels of ADHD symptoms in smoking reinstatement and cessation outcomes. PMID:24731115

  10. On the effects of higher alcohols on red wine aroma.

    PubMed

    de-la-Fuente-Blanco, Arancha; Sáenz-Navajas, María-Pilar; Ferreira, Vicente

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to assess the aromatic sensory contribution of the four most relevant wine higher alcohols (isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, methionol and β-phenylethanol) on red wine aroma. The four alcohols were added at two levels of concentration, within the natural range of occurrence, to eight different wine models (WM), close reconstitutions of red wines differing in levels of fruity (F), woody (W), animal (A) or humidity (H) notes. Samples were submitted to discriminant and descriptive sensory analysis. Results showed that the contribution of methionol and β-phenylethanol to wine aroma was negligible and confirmed the sensory importance of the pair isobutanol-isoamyl alcohol. Sensory effects were only evident in WM containing intense aromas, demonstrating a strong dependence on the aromatic context. Higher alcohols significantly suppress strawberry/lactic/red fruity, coconut/wood/vanilla and humidity/TCA notes, but not the leather/animal/ink note. The spirit/alcoholic/solvent character generated by higher alcohols has been shown to be wine dependent.

  11. Effects of alcohol and frustration on experimental graffiti.

    PubMed

    Norlander, T; Nordmarker, A; Archer, T

    1998-12-01

    This study aimed to examine effects between alcohol and frustration in regard to graffiti. Forty-two subjects, 21 men and 21 women were randomly assigned in equal numbers to each of the three experimental groups, namely a Control group, an Alcohol group, and an Alcohol + Frustration group (alcohol dose: 1 ml 100% alcohol/kg body weight). For the purposes of this experiment, a test (AET) was constructed that provided scores of "scrawling-graffiti" (i.e., the amount of scrawling on pictures), "destruction", "aggression", and "sexuality". An elaboration test and a test measuring the "dispositional optimism" were also applied. The primary results indicated that (a) the Alcohol + Frustration group scored significantly higher on scrawling-graffiti compared to the Control group, (b) female subjects performed graffiti-scrawling to a greater extent than male subjects in all three groups, (c) women scored significantly higher on elaboration as compared to men. These results were interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that alcohol intake by itself is unlikely to induce destructive behavior unless accompanied by a "provocative" factor (e.g. frustration) that precipitates the putative expressions of aggressiveness.

  12. Effects of alcohol ingestion following exercise on postprandial lipemia.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, M S; AL-Bayatti, M F

    2001-01-01

    The study determined the effect of alcohol ingestion postexercise on postprandial lipemia during recovery. The mean values were compared with those obtained in a control experiment during which no alcohol was given. Nineteen normolipidemic subjects (11 males and 8 females) performed two exercise trials at an intensity corresponding to 70% VO2max for 35 min. In a random order, alcoholic (0.7 g/kg) or alcohol-free drinks were given 1 h after the completion of exercise. Venous blood samples were obtained pre- (before breakfast) and postexercise and pre- and postprandially during recovery. Total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol showed no change with exercise or alcohol ingestion. In the control trial, when subjects consumed a standardized lunch, triglycerides showed no significant change, but when alcohol was consumed postexercise triglyceride concentration increased substantially 5 h during recovery in both males and females. The mechanism responsible for the rise in triglyceride concentration during recovery when alcohol was ingested following exercise is not known, but this appears to be a late phenomenon.

  13. Effect of alcohol consumption on selenium (Se) bioavailability in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.K.; Snook, J.T.; Yang, F.L.

    1986-03-01

    This study was done to determine the effects of alcohol ingestion on Se bioavailability in initially Se-depleted rats. Weanling male rats were fed a Se deficient (0.012 mg/kg) basal diet for 4 weeks and then for the subsequent 4 weeks were supplemented at 0.031 mg Se/kg or at 0.085 mg Se/kg of diet in the form of high Se yeast. During the Se repletion period alcohol replaced medium chain triglycerides in the diet at 3 levels: 0%, 10%, and 20% of calories. Dietary Se level significantly (P < .0001) affected urinary Se, fecal Se, Se absorption, Se balance, whole blood Se, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, and liver Se. In rats fed the higher Se diet total liver Se increased 50% when 20% rather than 0% alcohol was given. In rats fed the lower Se diet total liver Se decreased 12% as dietary alcohol increased from 0 to 20%. There was a significant (P < .0015) interaction between alcohol and Se level. All the other parameters for Se bioavailability were not affected by alcohol consumption. However, alcohol consumption significantly reduced growth rate at both Se levels.

  14. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behavior modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant; Kumar, Puneet

    2011-03-01

    Sleep deprivation for 72 h caused anxiety like behavior, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep deprived mice brain. Treatment with melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared to control (sleep deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared to control (72 h sleep-deprived) animals. A combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg, ip) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg, ip) with lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg, ip) with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of melatonin as compared to their effect per se. The results suggest that melatonin may produce its protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like behavior and related oxidative damage.

  15. Interactive effects of contextual cues and acute alcohol intoxication on the associations between alcohol expectancy activation and urge to drink.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the joint effects of contextual cues and alcohol intoxication on the associations between activation of positive and negative alcohol expectancies in memory and self-reported urges to drink alcohol after a laboratory alcohol administration. Young adult heavy drinkers were randomly assigned to drink a moderate dose of alcohol or a placebo (alcohol manipulation), and then listened to positive or negative drinking scenarios (cue manipulation). Before and after these manipulations, participants completed an alcohol expectancy Stroop task assessing positive and negative expectancy activation, as well as self-report measures of urges to drink. Regression analyses revealed that the alcohol and cue manipulations had a joint, moderating impact on the associations between expectancy activation and postcue changes in urge to drink. Specifically, both increased activation of negative expectancies and decreased activation of positive expectancies predicted decreases in urges to drink, but only for intoxicated participants in the negative cue condition. There were no associations between expectancy activation and urges to drink for those in the positive cue condition regardless of beverage condition. Results suggest that whether memory activation of alcohol expectancies has an impact on urge to drink after alcohol is on board may depend on the relevance of the activated expectancies to the current drinking context. This process appears to be influenced by a complex interaction between contextual cues in the environment and the pharmacological effects of alcohol.

  16. The effect of different alcoholic beverages on blood alcohol levels, plasma insulin and plasma glucose in humans.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, L C; Couri, S; Trugo, N F; Lollo, P C B

    2014-09-01

    In the present work we studied the effects of four alcoholic beverages on blood alcohol levels, plasma insulin concentrations and plasma glucose concentrations in men and women. The volunteers were healthy non-smokers and they were divided according to sex into two groups of ten individuals. The alcoholic beverages used in the study were beer, red wine, whisky and "cachaça". In men, ingestion of the distilled drinks promoted a spike in blood alcohol levels more quickly than ingestion of the fermented drinks. In women, beer promoted the lowest blood alcohol levels over the 6h of the experiment. Whisky promoted highest blood alcohol levels in both sexes. The ingestion of wine promoted a significant difference in relation to the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as a function of gender. The ingestion of cachaça by women produced BAC levels significantly smaller than those obtained for wine.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neural Stem Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Bak, Seong Wan; Choi, Hojin; Park, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Young Joo; Yoon, Moon-Young; Koh, Seong-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Deprivation of oxygen and glucose is the main cause of neuronal cell death during cerebral infarction and can result in severe morbidity and mortality. In general, the neuroprotective therapies that are applied after ischemic stroke have been unsuccessful, despite many investigations. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) plays an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and in modulating the coenzyme A (CoA)/acyl-CoA ratio. We investigated the protective effects of ALCAR against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in neural stem cells (NSCs). We measured cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, and intracellular signaling protein levels after treatment with varying concentrations of ALCAR under OGD for 8 h. ALCAR protected NSCs against OGD by reducing apoptosis and restoring proliferation. Its protective effects are associated with increases in the expression of survival-related proteins, such as phosphorylated Akt (pAkt), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3b (pGSK3b), B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Ki-67 in NSCs that were injured by OGD. ALCAR also reduced the expression of death-related proteins, such as Bax, cytosolic cytochrome C, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3. We concluded that ALCAR exhibits neuroprotective effects against OGD-induced damage to NSCs by enhancing the expression of survival signals and decreasing that of death signals.

  18. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H.

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA. PMID:27867486

  19. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices.

    PubMed

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  20. Layer- and cell-type-specific subthreshold and suprathreshold effects of long-term monocular deprivation in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Medini, Paolo

    2011-11-23

    Connectivity and dendritic properties are determinants of plasticity that are layer and cell-type specific in the neocortex. However, the impact of experience-dependent plasticity at the level of synaptic inputs and spike outputs remains unclear along vertical cortical microcircuits. Here I compared subthreshold and suprathreshold sensitivity to prolonged monocular deprivation (MD) in rat binocular visual cortex in layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramids (4Ps and 2/3Ps) and in thick-tufted and nontufted layer 5 pyramids (5TPs and 5NPs), which innervate different extracortical targets. In normal rats, 5TPs and 2/3Ps are the most binocular in terms of synaptic inputs, and 5NPs are the least. Spike responses of all 5TPs were highly binocular, whereas those of 2/3Ps were dominated by either the contralateral or ipsilateral eye. MD dramatically shifted the ocular preference of 2/3Ps and 4Ps, mostly by depressing deprived-eye inputs. Plasticity was profoundly different in layer 5. The subthreshold ocular preference shift was sevenfold smaller in 5TPs because of smaller depression of deprived inputs combined with a generalized loss of responsiveness, and was undetectable in 5NPs. Despite their modest ocular dominance change, spike responses of 5TPs consistently lost their typically high binocularity during MD. The comparison of MD effects on 2/3Ps and 5TPs, the main affected output cells of vertical microcircuits, indicated that subthreshold plasticity is not uniquely determined by the initial degree of input binocularity. The data raise the question of whether 5TPs are driven solely by 2/3Ps during MD. The different suprathreshold plasticity of the two cell populations could underlie distinct functional deficits in amblyopia.

  1. The alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats--animal models of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A; Bell, Richard L; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this article is to review the literature on the utility of using the selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) lines of rats in studies examining high alcohol drinking in adults and adolescents, craving-like behavior, and the co-abuse of alcohol with other drugs. The P line of rats meets all of the originally proposed criteria for a suitable animal model of alcoholism. In addition, the P rat exhibits high alcohol-seeking behavior, demonstrates an alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) under relapse drinking conditions, consumes amounts of ethanol during adolescence equivalent to those consumed in adulthood, and co-abuses ethanol and nicotine. The P line also exhibits excessive binge-like alcohol drinking, attaining blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 200 mg% on a daily basis. The HAD replicate lines of rats have not been as extensively studied as the P rats. The HAD1,2 rats satisfy several of the criteria for an animal model of alcoholism, e.g., these rats will voluntarily consume ethanol in a free-choice situation to produce BACs between 50 and 200 mg%. The HAD1,2 rats also exhibit an ADE under repeated relapse conditions, and will demonstrate similar levels of ethanol intake during adolescence as seen in adults. Overall, the P and HAD1,2 rats have characteristics attributed to an early onset alcoholic, and can be used to study various aspects of alcohol use disorders.

  2. Effects of Time of Day and Sleep Deprivation on Motorcycle-Driving Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bougard, Clément; Espié, Stéphane; Larnaudie, Bruno; Moussay, Sébastien; Davenne, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether motorcycle handling capabilities – measured by means of the efficiency of emergency manoeuvres – were dependent on prior sleep deprivation and time of day. Twelve male participants voluntarily took part in four test sessions, starting at 6 a.m., 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 6 p.m., following a night either with or without sleep. Each test session comprised temperature and sleepiness measurements, before three different types of motorcycling tests were initiated: (1) stability in straight ahead riding at low speed (in “slow motion” mode and in “brakes and clutch” mode), (2) emergency braking and (3) crash avoidance tasks performed at 20 kph and 40 kph. The results indicate that motorcycle control at low speed depends on time of day, with an improvement in performance throughout the day. Emergency braking performance is affected at both speeds by time of day, with poorer performance (longer total stopping distance, reaction time and braking distance) in the morning, and also by sleep deprivation, from measurements obtained at 40 kph (incorrect initial speed). Except for a tendency observed after the sleepless night to deviate from the initial speed, it seems that crash avoidance capabilities are quite unaffected by the two disturbance factors. Consequently, some motorcycle handling capabilities (stability at low speed and emergency braking) change in the same way as the diurnal fluctuation observed in body temperature and sleepiness, whereas for others (crash avoidance) the participants were able to maintain their initial performance level despite the high levels of sleepiness recorded after a sleepless night. Motorcycle riders have to be aware that their handling capabilities are limited in the early morning and/or after sleep deprivation. Both these situations can increase the risk of falls and of being involved in a road accident. PMID:22761881

  3. The Long-Term Effectiveness of the Family Check-Up on School-Age Conduct Problems: Moderation by Neighborhood Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel S.; Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Brennan, Lauretta M.; Choe, Daniel E.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Gardner, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest that neighborhood deprivation is a unique risk factor in child and adolescent development of problem behavior. We sought to examine whether previously established intervention effects of the Family Check-Up (FCU) on child conduct problems at age 7.5 would persist through age 9.5, and whether neighborhood deprivation would moderate these effects. In addition, we examined whether improvements in parent-child interaction during early childhood associated with the FCU would be related to later reductions in child aggression among families living in the highest-risk neighborhoods. Using a multisite cohort of at-risk children identified on the basis of family, child, and socioeconomic risk and randomly assigned to the FCU, intervention effects were found to be moderated by neighborhood deprivation, such that they were only directly present for those living at moderate versus extreme levels of neighborhood deprivation. Additionally, improvements in child aggression were evident for children living in extreme neighborhood deprivation when parents improved the quality of their parent-child interaction during the toddler period (i.e., moderated mediation). Implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the possibilities and possible limitations in prevention of early problem behavior for those children living in extreme and moderate levels of poverty. PMID:26646197

  4. [Effect of sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials and brain stem auditory evoked potentials in epileptics].

    PubMed

    Urumova, L T; Kovalenko, G A; Tsunikov, A I; Sumskiĭ, L I

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on the first study of the evoked activity of the brain in epileptic patients (n = 20) following sleep deprivation. An analysis of the data obtained has revealed a tendency to the shortening of the peak latent intervals of visual evoked potentials in the range of 100-200 mu sec and the V component and the interpeak interval III-V of evoked auditory trunk potentials in patients with temporal epilepsy. The phenomenon may indicate the elimination of stabilizing control involving the specific conductive pathways and, possibly, an accelerated conduction of a specific sensor signal.

  5. Effectiveness of alcohol media literacy programmes: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Chloe S; Hindmarsh, Chloe S; Jones, Sandra C; Kervin, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol media literacy is an emerging field that aims to address the link between exposure to alcohol advertising and subsequent expectancies and behaviours for children and adolescents. The design, rigour and results of alcohol media literacy programmes vary considerably, resulting in a number of unanswered questions about effectiveness. To provide insight into some of these questions, a systematic literature review of alcohol media literacy studies was conducted. The review was guided by the following research question: What considerations are needed to develop an effective school-based alcohol media literacy programme? On the basis of a critical synthesis of 10 interventions (published in the period 1997 to May 2014), our findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the descriptive, methodological and outcome characteristics of this small body of significant research. The review provides considerations for future alcohol media literacy programmes, including the need for an interactive pedagogical approach within the naturalistic school setting, implementation fidelity and a holistic approach to programme evaluation, a means for maintaining relevance, consideration of gender differences, relevance for an international audience and use of follow-up and longitudinal data.

  6. A meta-analysis of brief alcohol interventions for adolescents and young adults: Variability in effects across alcohol measures

    PubMed Central

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Risser, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Brief alcohol interventions are one approach for reducing drinking among youth, but may vary in effectiveness depending on the type of alcohol assessments used to measure effects. Objectives To conduct a meta-analysis that examined the effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions for adolescents and young adults, with particular emphasis on exploring variability in effects across outcome measurement characteristics. Method Eligible studies were those using an experimental or quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of a brief alcohol intervention on a post-intervention alcohol use measure for youth ages 11–30. A comprehensive literature review identified 190 unique samples that were included in the meta-analysis. Taking a Bayesian approach, we used random-effects multilevel models to estimate the average effect and model variability across outcome measurement types. Results Brief alcohol interventions led to significant reductions in self-reported alcohol use among adolescents ( g¯ = 0.25, 95% CrI [0.13, 0.37]) and young adults ( g¯ = 0.15, 95% CrI [0.12, 0.18]). These results were consistent across outcomes with varying reference periods, but varied across outcome construct type and assessment instruments. Among adolescents, effects were larger when measured using the Timeline Followback; among young adults, effects were smaller when measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Conclusion The strength of the beneficial effects of brief alcohol interventions on youth’s alcohol use may vary depending upon the outcome measure utilized. Nevertheless, significant effects were observed across measures. Although effects were modest in size, they were clinically significant and show promise for interrupting problematic alcohol use trajectories among youth. PMID:26905387

  7. Stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol: lessons from rodent and primate models.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Christian; Guarnieri, Douglas J; Quertemont, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    In several animal species including humans, the acute administration of low doses of alcohol increases motor activity. Different theories have postulated that alcohol-induced hyperactivity is causally related to alcoholism. Moreover, a common biological mechanism in the mesolimbic dopamine system has been proposed to mediate the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol. Numerous studies have examined whether alcohol-induced hyperactivity is related to alcoholism using a great variety of animal models and several animal species. However, there is no review that has summarized this extensive literature. In this article, we present the various experimental models that have been used to study the relationship between the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol in rodents and primates. Furthermore, we discuss whether the theories hypothesizing a causal link between alcohol-induced hyperactivity and alcoholism are supported by published results. The reviewed findings indicate that animal species that are stimulated by alcohol also exhibit alcohol preference. Additionally, the role of dopamine in alcohol-induced hyperactivity is well established since blocking dopaminergic activity suppresses the stimulant effects of alcohol. However, dopamine transmission plays a much more complex function in the motivational properties of alcohol and the neuronal mechanisms involved in alcohol stimulation and reward are distinct. Overall, the current review provides mixed support for theories suggesting that the stimulant effects of alcohol are related to alcoholism and highlights the importance of animal models as a way to gain insight into alcoholism.

  8. Effects of biperiden on sleep at baseline and after 72 h of REM sleep deprivation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Salin-Pascual, R J; Jimenez-Anguiano, A; Granados-Fuentes, D; Drucker-Colin, R

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of the muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden in cats. In the first experiment a dose-response analysis was performed with intraventricular injection (IV ventricle) of biperiden. In the second experiment after REM sleep deprivation cats were injected with either biperiden (0.1 mg/kg) or saline. Biperiden produced a reduction in REM sleep percentage and an increase in REM sleep latency with these high doses. The 0.1 mg/kg biperiden dose, which did not suppress REM sleep at baseline, did reduce the REM sleep rebound. The present study suggests a modulatory role of biperiden on REM sleep regulatory processes. The fact that an effect of biperiden is noted only at the high doses suggests that at these doses the drug is influencing non-M1 receptors. Changes in the sensitivity of these receptors as a result of REM sleep deprivation might explain why a dose of biperiden will reduce REM sleep rebound, while being ineffective in suppressing REM sleep at baseline.

  9. Effects of Patterned Sound Deprivation on Short- and Long-Term Plasticity in the Rat Thalamocortical Auditory System In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, Chloe N.; Rosen, Laura G.; Rodier, Simon G.; Dringenberg, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal sensory experience plays a significant role in the maturation and synaptic stabilization of sensory cortices, such as the primary auditory cortex (A1). Here, we examined the effects of patterned sound deprivation (by rearing in continuous white noise, WN) during early postnatal life on short- and long-term plasticity of adult male rats using an in vivo preparation (urethane anesthesia). Relative to age-matched control animals reared under unaltered sound conditions, rats raised in WN (from postnatal day 5 to 50–60) showed greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) of field potentials in A1 induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN). In contrast, analyses of short-term plasticity using paired-pulse stimulation (interstimulus intervals of 25–1000 ms) did not reveal any significant effects of WN rearing. However, LTP induction resulted in a significant enhancement of paired-pulse depression (PPD) for both rearing conditions. We conclude that patterned sound deprivation during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of heightened, juvenile-like long-term plasticity (LTP) into adulthood. Further, the enhanced PPD following LTP induction provides novel evidence that presynaptic mechanisms contribute to thalamocortical LTP in A1 under in vivo conditions. PMID:26881106

  10. Effects of contingent and noncontingent nicotine on lever pressing for liquids and consumption in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Hanan; Martin, Jeffrey; Vitouchanskaia, Cristina; Dar, Reuven; Shalev, Uri

    2017-01-05

    Nicotine has been proposed to be a primary reinforcer and a reinforcement enhancer. To date, no studies have examined whether nicotine enhances consummatory behaviors or only operant responding (appetitive behaviors). Experiments were designed to test whether contingent and noncontingent nicotine enhance lever pressing for and consumption of fluids in water-deprived rats. Animals were water-deprived throughout all experiments. They were trained to press two levers under a variable interval (VI-20, 1-35s). Their lever pressing and water consumption were measured after noncontingent subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of nicotine (1mg/kg), and in 3 choice conditions (water and quinine solution (18µg/ml); water and nicotine (32µg/ml) solution; quinine (18µg/ml) and nicotine (32µg/ml) solutions) where nicotine was thus delivered contingently upon lever pressing. The effects of nicotine (1mg/kg; s.c.) on the consumption of water in a time-limited free access (1h) paradigm were assessed. Nicotine significantly increased lever pressing and the number of earned reinforcements on both levers in the two choice conditions and when administered s.c. compared to all groups that did not receive nicotine. However, under no condition did animals consume more fluids than baseline. Under the time-limited free access condition nicotine reduced water consumption. Although our findings do not support a reinforcing effect for nicotine, they are consistent with the incentive-amplification hypothesis. Its relevance for human smoking is yet unclear.

  11. Recovery after prolonged sleep deprivation: residual effects of slow-release caffeine on recovery sleep, sleepiness and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Maurice; Batéjat, Denise; Coste, Olivier; Doireau, Philippe; Chauffard, Françoise; Enslen, Marc; Lagarde, Didier; Pierard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    A long work schedule often results in sleep deprivation, sleepiness, impaired performance and fatigue. We investigated the residual effects of slow-release caffeine (SRC) on sleep, sleepiness and cognitive performance during a 42-hour recovery period following a 64-hour continuous wakefulness period in 16 healthy males, according to a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Three hundred milligrams of SRC or placebo was given twice a day at 21:00 and 9:00 during the first 48 h of wakefulness. Recovery sleep was analysed with electroencephalography (EEG) and wrist actigraphy, daytime sleepiness with continuous EEG, sleep latency tests and actigraphy and cognitive functions with computerized tests from the NATO AGARD STRES battery. Both drug groups exhibited almost the same sleep architecture with a rebound of slow-wave sleep during both recovery nights and of REM sleep during the second night. Wakefulness level and cognitive functions were similarly impaired in both groups on the first day of recovery and partially returned to baseline on the second. To conclude, SRC appears to have no unwanted side-effects on recovery sleep, wakefulness and cognitive performance after a long period of sleep deprivation and might therefore be a useful choice over other psychostimulants for a long work schedule.

  12. Effects of Patterned Sound Deprivation on Short- and Long-Term Plasticity in the Rat Thalamocortical Auditory System In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Soutar, Chloe N; Rosen, Laura G; Rodier, Simon G; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal sensory experience plays a significant role in the maturation and synaptic stabilization of sensory cortices, such as the primary auditory cortex (A1). Here, we examined the effects of patterned sound deprivation (by rearing in continuous white noise, WN) during early postnatal life on short- and long-term plasticity of adult male rats using an in vivo preparation (urethane anesthesia). Relative to age-matched control animals reared under unaltered sound conditions, rats raised in WN (from postnatal day 5 to 50-60) showed greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) of field potentials in A1 induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN). In contrast, analyses of short-term plasticity using paired-pulse stimulation (interstimulus intervals of 25-1000 ms) did not reveal any significant effects of WN rearing. However, LTP induction resulted in a significant enhancement of paired-pulse depression (PPD) for both rearing conditions. We conclude that patterned sound deprivation during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of heightened, juvenile-like long-term plasticity (LTP) into adulthood. Further, the enhanced PPD following LTP induction provides novel evidence that presynaptic mechanisms contribute to thalamocortical LTP in A1 under in vivo conditions.

  13. Searching for an environmental effect of parental alcoholism on offspring alcohol use disorder: a genetically informed study of children of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Slutske, Wendy S; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Turkheimer, Eric; Emery, Robert E; Harden, K Paige; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2008-08-01

    The children-of-twins design was used to isolate a potentially causal environmental impact of having an alcoholic parent on offspring alcohol use disorder, by an examination of whether the children of alcoholics were at a higher risk for alcohol use disorders than were the children of nonalcoholic parents, even after correlated familial factors were controlled. Participants were 1,224 male and female twins from 836 twin pairs selected from the Australian Twin Registry, 2,334 of the twins' 18-39-year-old offspring, and 983 spouses of the twins. Lifetime histories of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) alcohol use disorders were obtained by structured, psychiatric, telephone interviews conducted individually with each of the family members. Comparisons of the offspring of twins who were discordant for alcoholism indicated that there was no longer a statistically significant difference between the children of alcoholics and the children of nonalcoholics after genetic and family environmental factors correlated with having an alcoholic parent were controlled. The results of this study suggest that the direct causal effect of being exposed to an alcoholic parent on offspring alcohol use disorder is modest at best.

  14. Effect of sulphur deprivation on osmotic potential components and nitrogen metabolism in oilseed rape leaves: identification of a new early indicator.

    PubMed

    Sorin, Elise; Etienne, Philippe; Maillard, Anne; Zamarreño, Angel-Mari; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Arkoun, Mustapha; Jamois, Frank; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Identification of early sulphur (S) deficiency indicators is important for species such as Brassica napus, an S-demanding crop in which yield and the nutritional quality of seeds are negatively affected by S deficiency. Because S is mostly stored as SO4 (2-) in leaf cell vacuoles and can be mobilized during S deficiency, this study investigated the impact of S deprivation on leaf osmotic potential in order to identify compensation processes. Plants were exposed for 28 days to S or to chlorine deprivation in order to differentiate osmotic and metabolic responses. While chlorine deprivation had no significant effects on growth, osmotic potential and nitrogen metabolism, Brassica napus revealed two response periods to S deprivation. The first one occurred during the first 13 days during which plant growth was maintained as a result of vacuolar SO4 (2-) mobilization. In the meantime, leaf osmotic potential of S-deprived plants remained similar to control plants despite a reduction in the SO4 (2-) osmotic contribution, which was fully compensated by an increase in NO3 (-), PO4 (3-) and Cl(-) accumulation. The second response occurred after 13 days of S deprivation with a significant reduction in growth, leaf osmotic potential, NO3 (-) uptake and NO3 (-) reductase activity, whereas amino acids and NO3 (-) were accumulated. This kinetic analysis of S deprivation suggested that a ([Cl(-)]+[NO3 (-)]+[PO4 (3-)]):[SO4 (2-)] ratio could provide a relevant indicator of S deficiency, modified nearly as early as the over-expression of genes encoding SO4 (2-) tonoplastic or plasmalemmal transporters, with the added advantage that it can be easily quantified under field conditions.

  15. The effects of US state income inequality and alcohol policies on symptoms of depression and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Claire; Liu, Xinhua; Diez Roux, Ana V; Link, Bruce G; Hasin, Deborah

    2004-02-01

    Mental health is likely to be influenced by contextual variables that emerge only at the level of the group. We studied the effect of two such group-level variables, within-state income inequality and alcohol tax policy, on symptoms of current depression and alcohol dependence in a US national sample, controlling for state-level and individual characteristics. A cross-sectional US national probability sample provided the individual-level data. State income data were obtained from the 1990 US census. The Gini coefficient (raw and adjusted) indicated income inequality. Outcome measures included current symptoms of depression and alcohol dependence. Controlling for individual-level variables and state median income, the odds of depressive symptoms was not positively associated with state income inequality. Controlling for individual-level variables, state median income and alcohol distribution method, a weak negative association between Gini and alcohol dependence was observed in women, but this association disappeared after additional adjustment for beer tax. No association was observed in men. Higher state beer tax was significantly associated with lower prevalence of alcohol dependence symptoms for both men and women. The results suggest that state income inequality does not increase the experience of alcohol dependence or depression symptoms. However, evidence was found for a protective effect of increased beer taxation against alcohol dependence symptoms, suggesting the need to further consider the impact of alcohol policies on alcohol use disorders.

  16. The effect of cannabis compared with alcohol on driving.

    PubMed

    Sewell, R Andrew; Poling, James; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of both alcohol and cannabis use and the high morbidity associated with motor vehicle crashes has lead to a plethora of research on the link between the two. Drunk drivers are involved in 25% of motor vehicle fatalities, and many accidents involve drivers who test positive for cannabis. Cannabis and alcohol acutely impair several driving-related skills in a dose-related fashion, but the effects of cannabis vary more between individuals than they do with alcohol because of tolerance, differences in smoking technique, and different absorptions of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in marijuana. Detrimental effects of cannabis use vary in a dose-related fashion, and are more pronounced with highly automatic driving functions than with more complex tasks that require conscious control, whereas alcohol produces an opposite pattern of impairment. Because of both this and an increased awareness that they are impaired, marijuana smokers tend to compensate effectively while driving by utilizing a variety of behavioral strategies. Combining marijuana with alcohol eliminates the ability to use such strategies effectively, however, and results in impairment even at doses which would be insignificant were they of either drug alone. Epidemiological studies have been inconclusive regarding whether cannabis use causes an increased risk of accidents; in contrast, unanimity exists that alcohol use increases crash risk. Furthermore, the risk from driving under the influence of both alcohol and cannabis is greater than the risk of driving under the influence of either alone. Future research should focus on resolving contradictions posed by previous studies, and patients who smoke cannabis should be counseled to wait several hours before driving, and avoid combining the two drugs.

  17. THE EFFECT OF CANNABIS COMPARED WITH ALCOHOL ON DRIVING

    PubMed Central

    Poling, James; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of both alcohol and cannabis use and the high morbidity associated with motor vehicle crashes has lead to a plethora of research on the link between the two. Drunk drivers are involved in 25% of motor vehicle fatalities, and many accidents involve drivers who test positive for cannabis. Cannabis and alcohol acutely impair several driving-related skills in a dose-related fashion, but the effects of cannabis vary more between individuals than they do with alcohol because of tolerance, differences in smoking technique, and different absorptions of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in marijuana. Detrimental effects of cannabis use vary in a dose-related fashion, and are more pronounced with highly automatic driving functions than with more complex tasks that require conscious control, whereas with alcohol produces an opposite pattern of impairment. Because of both this and an increased awareness that they are impaired, marijuana smokers tend to compensate effectively while driving by utilizing a variety of behavioral strategies. Combining marijuana with alcohol eliminates the ability to use such strategies effectively, however, and results in impairment even at doses which would be insignificant were they of either drug alone. Epidemiological studies have been inconclusive regarding whether cannabis use causes an increased risk of accidents; in contrast, unanimity exists that alcohol use increases crash risk. Furthermore, the risk from driving under the influence of both alcohol and cannabis is greater than the risk of driving under the influence of either alone. Future research should focus on resolving contradictions posed by previous studies, and patients who smoke cannabis should be counseled to wait several hours before driving, and avoid combining the two drugs. PMID:19340636

  18. Large-Scale Brain Network Coupling Predicts Total Sleep Deprivation Effects on Cognitive Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lubin; Zhai, Tianye; Zou, Feng; Ye, Enmao; Jin, Xiao; Li, Wuju; Qi, Jianlin; Yang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between large-scale brain networks have received most attention in the study of cognitive dysfunction of human brain. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the coupling strength of large-scale brain networks will reflect the pressure for sleep and will predict cognitive performance, referred to as sleep pressure index (SPI). Fourteen healthy subjects underwent this within-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study during rested wakefulness (RW) and after 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Self-reported scores of sleepiness were higher for TSD than for RW. A subsequent working memory (WM) task showed that WM performance was lower after 36 h of TSD. Moreover, SPI was developed based on the coupling strength of salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN). Significant increase of SPI was observed after 36 h of TSD, suggesting stronger pressure for sleep. In addition, SPI was significantly correlated with both the visual analogue scale score of sleepiness and the WM performance. These results showed that alterations in SN-DMN coupling might be critical in cognitive alterations that underlie the lapse after TSD. Further studies may validate the SPI as a potential clinical biomarker to assess the impact of sleep deprivation. PMID:26218521

  19. Recovering from Early Deprivation: Attachment Mediates Effects of Caregiving on Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    McGoron, Lucy; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Smyke, Anna T.; Drury, Stacy S.; Nelson, Charles A.; Gregas, Mathew C.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children exposed to early institutional rearing are at risk for developing psychopathology. The present investigation examines caregiving quality and the role of attachment security as they relate to symptoms of psychopathology in young children exposed to early institutionalization. Methods Participants were enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), a longitudinal intervention study of children abandoned and placed in institutions at or shortly after birth. Measures included observed caregiving when children were 30 months of age, observed attachment security at 42 months and caregiver reports of children’s psychopathology at 54 months. At 54 months, some children remained in institutions, others were in foster care, others had been adopted domestically, and still others had been returned to their biological families. Thus, the children had experienced varying amounts of institutional rearing. Results After controlling for gender, quality of caregiving when children were 30 months old was associated with symptoms of multiple domains of psychopathology at 54 months of age. Ratings of security of attachment at 42 months mediated the associations between quality caregiving at 30 months and fewer symptoms of psychopathology at 54 months. Conclusions Among deprived young children, high quality caregiving at 30 months predicted reduced psychopathology and functional impairment at 54 months. Security of attachment mediated this relationship. Interventions for young children who have experienced deprivation may benefit from explicitly targeting caregiver-child attachment relationships. PMID:22721591

  20. Effects of Depression on Treatment Motivation in Male Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    CENGİSİZ, Cengiz; DEVECİ, Artuner; YAPICI, Aslıhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment motivation in alcohol dependents is usually viewed as a strong predictor of seeking treatment and treatment success. The conditions affecting motivation in alcohol dependence, however, has not been clarified. In this study, it is aimed to determine the effects of depression on treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence. Methods The present study included 34 male alcohol dependents presenting to outpatient clinics in Manisa Hospital of Mental Disorders and Hospital of Celal Bayar University. The patients underwent evaluation using the socio-demographic and clinical information form, DSM-IV SCID-I Clinical Version, Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (TMQ), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Results A significant relationship was found between the total score of TMQ and HDRS (p=.039). Conclusion We believe that the present study, in which we examined the relationship between treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence and depression, would provide a significant contribution to literature. It is also important to investigate other factors that may affect treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence. Studies with larger samples are needed on this topic.

  1. The effect of cancer warning statements on alcohol consumption intentions

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle I.; Glance, David; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Pratt, Iain S.; Slevin, Terry; Liang, Wenbin; Wakefield, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In response to increasing calls to introduce warning labels on alcoholic beverages, this study investigated the potential effectiveness of alcohol warning statements designed to increase awareness of the alcohol–cancer link. A national online survey was administered to a diverse sample of Australian adult drinkers (n = 1,680). Along with attitudinal, intentions and demographic items, the survey included an online simulation that exposed respondents to one of six cancer warning statements delivered across a range of situational contexts. Half of the statements made general reference to cancer and half mentioned specific forms of cancer. Respondents reported on the believability, convincingness and personal relevance of the warning statements. Pre- and post-exposure data were captured relating to respondents’ alcohol consumption intentions. Of the six statements tested, Alcohol increases your risk of bowel cancer produced the highest scores across all outcome measures. All statements produced favorable changes in alcohol consumption intentions, including among high-risk drinkers. There is thus the potential for these and similar statements to be used as a suite of rotating warning messages located on alcoholic beverage labels and applied in various public education contexts. PMID:26787351

  2. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  3. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on Redox Regulation in Rat Brain: Involvement of NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Nevena V.; Jevtić, Gordana; Stojković, Tihomir; Velimirović, Milica; Aksić, Milan; Poleksić, Joko; Nikolić, Tatjana; Aleksić, Dubravka; Radonjić, Vidosava; Filipović, Branislav; Petronijević, Nataša D.

    2017-01-01

    Maternal deprivation (MD) causes perinatal stress, with subsequent behavioral changes which resemble the symptoms of schizophrenia. The NADPH oxidase is one of the major generators of reactive oxygen species, known to play a role in stress response in different tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the long-term effects of MD on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91phox, p22phox, p67phox, p47phox, and p40phox). Activities of cytochrome C oxidase and respiratory chain Complex I, as well as the oxidative stress parameters using appropriate spectrophotometric techniques were analyzed. Nine-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to a 24 h maternal deprivation and sacrificed at young adult age. The structures affected by perinatal stress, cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate nuclei were investigated. The most prominent findings were increased expressions of gp91phox in the cortex and hippocampus, increased expression of p22phox and p40phox, and decreased expression of gp91phox, p22phox, and p47phox in the caudate nuclei. Complex I activity was increased in all structures except cortex. Content of reduced glutathione was decreased in all sections while region-specific changes of other oxidative stress parameters were found. Our results indicate the presence of long-term redox alterations in MD rats.

  4. Effect of sleep deprivation and driving duration on the useful visual field in younger and older subjects during simulator driving.

    PubMed

    Rogé, Joceline; Pébayle, Thierry; El Hannachi, Saida; Muzet, Alain

    2003-06-01

    Nine older subjects (40-51 years) and 10 younger subjects (18-30 years) took part in two one-hour driving sessions. They performed a very monotonous task during which they had to follow a vehicle either after a complete night of sleep or after one night of sleep deprivation. While driving their useful visual field was assessed by introducing signals that would appear on the whole road scene. The analysis of the data indicates that the ability to process peripheral signals deteriorates with age, driving duration and sleep deprivation. However, the effects of these three variables on the peripheral visual ability are not similar in a dual task. The driver's useful visual field changes with age and prolongation of the monotonous driving activity according to a tunnel vision phenomenon. On the other hand, a sleep debt deteriorates the useful visual field according to a general interference phenomenon. These results are discussed in terms of decrease in the level of arousal and increase of fatigue.

  5. The effects of total sleep deprivation on brain functional organization: mutual information analysis of waking human EEG.

    PubMed

    Na, Sun Hee; Jin, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Soo Yong

    2006-11-01

    Sleep deprivation can affect the waking electroencephalogram (EEG) that may reflect functional organization of the brain. We examined the effect of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on functional organization between different cortical areas from the waking EEG. Waking EEG data were recorded from 18 healthy male volunteers with eyes closed after 8-h night's sleep and after 24 h of TSD. The averaged cross mutual information (A-CMI) after 24 h of TSD were compared to before TSD. 24 h of TSD yielded the decreased A-CMIs in the inter-hemispheric C3-F4, C3-F8, and C3-C4 pairs: therefore, the electrodes that contribute to pairs with significant decrease of A-CMI were C3, F4, F8, and C4. The decreased A-CMIs between C3 and right frontal and central brain areas after 24 h of TSD may reflect the changes of cortico-cortical functional organization by homeostatic process during TSD. Our results of the frontal-area-related A-CMI decreases may support that the frontal brain regions are related to the homeostatic deterioration of brain function due to TSD.

  6. Effects of one night of partial sleep deprivation upon diurnal rhythms of accuracy and consistency in throwing darts.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Benjamin J; Waterhouse, Jim

    2009-05-01

    Sixty subjects were tested five times per waking day on two occasions for accuracy and reliability in throwing 20 darts at a target. Two experimental conditions were investigated: following a normal nocturnal sleep (7-8 h sleep, normal) and after having retired to bed 4 h later than normal the previous night but rising at the normal time (3-4 h sleep, sleep deprivation). Sublingual (core) temperature and subjective estimates of alertness and fatigue were measured in all sessions. Performance at throwing darts was assessed by three methods: mean distance of the dart from the bulls-eye; number of times the target was missed; and variability of the scores from the darts thrown. There was no evidence that performance was affected by physical fatigue arising during the course of throwing the 20 darts. All variables showed significant diurnal rhythms, those of alertness and performance being phased over 1 h earlier than core temperature, and that of fatigue over 1 h earlier than the inverse of temperature. Core temperature was not affected by sleep deprivation, but all other variables showed significant changes, indicative of mood and performance decrement. Increasing time awake was associated with decreased alertness and increased fatigue, as well as slight negative effects upon performance. We conclude that the simple task of throwing darts at a target provides information about chronobiological changes in circumstances where time awake and sleep loss might affect psychomotor performance.

  7. Effects of time-of-day and partial sleep deprivation on short-term maximal performances of judo competitors.

    PubMed

    Souissi, Nizar; Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Dogui, Mohamed; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim

    2013-09-01

    This study assessed the effects of partial sleep deprivation on short-term maximal performances of judokas in the morning and afternoon of the following day. In a randomized design, 12 judokas completed the maximal voluntary contraction, the handgrip, and the Wingate tests before and after a judo combat. Measurements were performed at 09:00 and 16:00 hours after a reference-normal sleep night and 2 conditions of 4-hour partial sleep deprivation timed at the beginning (SDB) or at the end of the night (SDE). The results showed that muscle power and strength were significantly higher at 16:00 than 09:00 hours (p < 0.05). These diurnal variations disappeared after SDB and SDE and after the combat. In addition, SDE resulted in significant decreases of short-term maximal performance in the afternoon (p < 0.01). In conclusion, SDE decreased muscle strength and power at 16:00 hours and, therefore, might have blunted the diurnal variations of short-term maximal exercise. Thus, early rising is more detrimental than late bedtime to muscle strength and power for judo athletes when competitions are scheduled in the afternoon hours.

  8. Alcohol's effects on brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Edith V; Harris, R Adron; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, rigorous examination of brain function, structure, and attending factors through multidisciplinary research has helped identify the substrates of alcohol-related damage in the brain. One main area of this research has focused on the neuropsychological sequelae of alcoholism, which has resulted in the description of a pattern of sparing and impairment that provided an essential understanding of the functional deficits as well as of spared capabilities that could be useful in recovery. These studies have elucidated the component processes of memory, problem solving, and cognitive control, as well as visuospatial, and motor processes and their interactions with cognitive control processes. Another large area of research has focused on observable brain pathology, using increasingly sophisticated imaging technologies--progressing from pneumoencephalography to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI--that have enabled ever more detailed insight into brain structure and function. These advancements also have allowed analysis of the course of brain structural changes through periods of drinking, abstinence, and relapse.

  9. Effects of acute alcohol consumption and processing of emotion in faces: Implications for understanding alcohol-related aggression.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-08-01

    The negative consequences of chronic alcohol abuse are well known, but heavy episodic consumption ("binge drinking") is also associated with significant personal and societal harms. Aggressive tendencies are increased after alcohol but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. While effects on behavioural control are likely to be important, other effects may be involved given the widespread action of alcohol. Altered processing of social signals is associated with changes in social behaviours, including aggression, but until recently there has been little research investigating the effects of acute alcohol consumption on these outcomes. Recent work investigating the effects of acute alcohol on emotional face processing has suggested reduced sensitivity to submissive signals (sad faces) and increased perceptual bias towards provocative signals (angry faces) after alcohol consumption, which may play a role in alcohol-related aggression. Here we discuss a putative mechanism that may explain how alcohol consumption influences emotional processing and subsequent aggressive responding, via disruption of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)-amygdala connectivity. While the importance of emotional processing on social behaviours is well established, research into acute alcohol consumption and emotional processing is still in its infancy. Further research is needed and we outline a research agenda to address gaps in the literature.

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Drugs/Alcohol: Characteristics and Educational Implications of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Cocaine/Polydrug Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soby, Jeanette M.

    This book presents the characteristics of children affected by prenatal drug exposure, fetal alcohol syndrome, fetal alcohol effects, and fetal cocaine/polydrug effects. It outlines incidence, service needs, prevention, and identification. The medical literature on the physical, cognitive, and behavioral characteristics of this population is…

  11. Adverse Effects of Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Defining the Problem and Promoting Health Among Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Philip J.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plays a central role in the management of men with locally advanced, recurrent, and metastatic prostate cancer. Because most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will die of something other than their cancer, treatment-related adverse effects are highly relevant to their long-term health. Benefits of ADT in each clinical setting must be weighed against ADT-related adverse effects. ADT is detrimental to several metabolic end points and to bone health. ADT has been prospectively shown to cause decreased lean muscle mass, increased fat mass, weight gain, increased cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin resistance, and loss of bone mineral density. In population-based analyses it has been associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, clinical fractures, and cardiovascular disease. Data-driven recommendations for managing these adverse effects are needed. Currently the authors advocate the use of adapted practice guidelines developed to prevent diabetes, fractures, and coronary heart disease in the general population. PMID:20141678

  12. Negative effects of curcumin on liver injury induced by alcohol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Long; Song, Chang Ho; Chai, Ok Hee

    2012-12-01

    Curcumin is known for its antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties in liver damage. However, the negative effects of curcumin on alcoholic liver damage are seldom reported. In this study, both advantageous and disadvantageous functions of curcumin on alcoholic liver injury were observed. In order to determine the effects of curcumin on liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, 5% ethanol and/or curcumin (1 × 10(-3) or 1 × 10(-4)  m) were injected intravenously in mice. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to determine the value of liver injury by optical density analyses. Liver histology was evaluated by an experienced hepatopathologist blinded to the type of treatment received by the animals. Ethanol accelerates serum levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), liver injury, production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) during 5% ethanol-induced liver injury. 1 × 10(-3)  m curcumin accelerates liver injury and liver cellular edema during only 5% ethanol-induced liver injury evolution, whereas 1 × 10(-4)  m curcumin does not lead to (or protect) alcoholic liver injury. Therefore, it is suggested that curcumin may have dual effects on alcoholic liver injury depending on its concentration.

  13. Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Killen, Shaun S; Marras, Stefano; McKenzie, David J

    2014-03-15

    While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food

  14. The comparative effects of clozapine versus haloperidol on initiation and maintenance of alcohol drinking in male alcohol-preferring P rat.

    PubMed

    Chau, David T; Khokhar, Jibran Y; Dawson, Ree; Ahmed, Jayme; Xie, Haiyi; Green, Alan I

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol use disorder, characterized by modest levels of alcohol use, commonly occurs in patients with schizophrenia and dramatically worsens their course. Recent data indicate that the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol, decreases alcohol drinking both in patients with schizophrenia and also in the Syrian golden hamster, an animal model of moderate alcohol drinking. The present study was designed to assess the comparative effects of clozapine and haloperidol in the alcohol-preferring (P) rat, an animal model of alcoholism. First, the study investigated the comparative effects of clozapine and haloperidol on initiation of alcohol consumption in P rats, which models the early stage of alcoholism. Second, the study assessed the comparative effects of clozapine and haloperidol on maintenance of chronic alcohol consumption in P rats to provide a clue as to whether either drug may also limit alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent patients. Clozapine attenuated the initiation of alcohol drinking and development of alcohol preference while haloperidol did not. However, neither clozapine nor haloperidol attenuated maintenance of chronic alcohol drinking. Taken together, the current data suggest that clozapine, but not haloperidol, may be effective at reducing alcohol abuse or non-dependent drinking and the P rat, used within an alcohol initiation paradigm, and may differentiate the effects of clozapine and haloperidol on alcohol drinking.

  15. Effects of response requirement and alcohol on human aggressive responding.

    PubMed Central

    Cherek, D R; Spiga, R; Egli, M

    1992-01-01

    Nine men participated in two experiments to determine the effects of increased response requirement and alcohol administration on free-operant aggressive responding. Two response buttons (A and B) were available. Pressing Button A was maintained by a fixed-ratio 100 schedule of point presentation. Subjects were instructed that completion of each fixed-ratio 10 on Button B resulted in the subtraction of a point from a fictitious second subject. Button B presses were defined as aggressive because they ostensibly resulted in the presentation of an aversive stimulus to another person. Aggressive responses were engendered by a random-time schedule of point loss and were maintained by initiation of intervals free of point loss. Instructions attributed these point losses to Button B presses of the fictitious other subject. In Experiment 1, increasing the ratio requirement on Button B decreased the number of ratios completed in 4 of 5 subjects. In Experiment 2, the effects of placebo and three alcohol doses (0.125, 0.25, and 0.375 g/kg) were determined when Button B presses were maintained at ratio values of 20, 40 and 80. Three subjects who reduced aggressive responding with increasing fixed-ratio values reduced aggressive responding further at higher alcohol doses. One subject who did not reduce aggressive responding with increasing fixed-ratio values increased aggressive responding at the highest alcohol dose. The results of this study support suggestions that alcohol alters aggressive behavior by reducing the control of competing contingencies. PMID:1447545

  16. Renal and hormonal effects of water deprivation in late-term pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Salas, Sofía P; Giacaman, Andrea; Vío, Carlos P

    2004-09-01

    Water-retaining hormones are stimulated during pregnancy allowing normal volume expansion. Because pregnant rats actively retain water, we postulate that water deprivation (WD) would cause a greater reduction in plasma volume in pregnant than in nonpregnant rats. To test this hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley pregnant and nonpregnant rats were water-deprived for 48 hours. At day 19 of pregnancy, or in the corresponding day in nonpregnant rats, they were randomly assigned to either a WD or a control (C) pair-fed group (n=10 to 12 per group). WD significantly reduced body weight, food intake, and creatinine clearance, and increased urinary osmolality in nonpregnant and pregnant rats. WD reduced plasma volume in a similar proportion in nonpregnant and pregnant rats (nonpregnant rats C=13.1+/-0.4, WD=11.0+/-0.2; pregnant rats C=19.4+/-0.7, WD=16.8+/-0.5 mL, P<0.001). Both groups of pregnant rats had a similar reduction in blood pressure. Plasma renin activity (nonpregnant rats C=6.1+/-1.1, WD=20.5+/-2.0; pregnant rats C=49+/-9.7, WD=94+/-12 ng angiotensin I/mL per hour, P<0.001) and plasma aldosterone levels were increased by pregnancy and further increased by WD. WD significantly reduced urinary kallikrein. WD caused a significant reduction in fetal but not placental weights. Present data indicate that 48-hour WD reduced renal kallikrein and further stimulated water-retaining hormones. We speculate that these are compensatory changes contributing to the maintenance of pregnancy in response to WD.

  17. Effect of global and regional sympathetic blockade on arterial pressure during water deprivation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Veitenheimer, Britta J; Engeland, William C; Guzman, Pilar A; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2012-10-15

    Forty-eight hours of water deprivation (WD) in conscious rats results in a paradoxical increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Previous studies suggest this may be due to increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). However, this remains to be investigated in conscious, freely behaving animals. The purpose of this study was to determine, in conscious rats, the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in mediating WD-induced increases in MAP and to identify which vascular beds are targeted by increased SNA. Each rat was chronically instrumented with a radiotelemetry transmitter to measure MAP and heart rate (HR) and an indwelling venous catheter for plasma sampling and/or drug delivery. MAP and HR were continuously measured during a 2-day baseline period followed by 48 h of WD and then a recovery period. By the end of the WD period, MAP increased by ∼15 mmHg in control groups, whereas HR did not change significantly. Chronic blockade of α(1)/β(1)-adrenergic receptors significantly attenuated the WD-induced increase in MAP, suggesting a role for global activation of the SNS. However, the MAP response to WD was unaffected by selective denervations of the hindlimb, renal, or splanchnic vascular beds, or by adrenal demedullation. In contrast, complete adrenalectomy (with corticosterone and aldosterone replaced) significantly attenuated the MAP response to WD in the same time frame as α(1)/β(1)-adrenergic receptor blockade. These results suggest that, in conscious water-deprived rats, the SNS contributes to the MAP response and may be linked to release of adrenocortical hormones. Finally, this sympathetically mediated response is not dependent on increased SNA to one specific vascular bed.

  18. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Chisholm, Dan; Fuhr, Daniela C

    2009-06-27

    This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol, in the areas of education and information, the health sector, community action, driving while under the influence of alcohol (drink-driving), availability, marketing, pricing, harm reduction, and illegally and informally produced alcohol. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses show that policies regulating the environment in which alcohol is marketed (particularly its price and availability) are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. Enforced legislative measures to reduce drink-driving and individually directed interventions to already at-risk drinkers are also effective. However, school-based education does not reduce alcohol-related harm, although public information and education-type programmes have a role in providing information and in increasing attention and acceptance of alcohol on political and public agendas. Making alcohol more expensive and less available, and banning alcohol advertising, are highly cost-effective strategies to reduce harm. In settings with high amounts of unrecorded production and consumption, increasing the proportion of alcohol that is taxed could be a more effective pricing policy than a simple increase in tax.

  19. Effects of school, family and alcohol marketing communication on alcohol use and intentions to drink among Thai students.

    PubMed

    Kheokao, Jantima K; Kirkgulthorn, Tassanee; Yingrengreung, Siritorn; Singhprapai, Phuwasith

    2013-07-04

    This study explored effects of family, school, and marketing communications on alcohol use and intention to drink of Thai students. We conducted a survey in which 5,184 students participated. Respondents were selected randomly from school districts throughout Thailand. In this survey we measured the exposure to, reception of, and perceptions concerning alcohol marketing communication, school absenteeism and achievement, family alcohol use, students' alcohol use, and drinking intentions. Findings indicated students' low alcohol use, moderate intention to drink, and high prevalence of family drinking. The levels of exposure and also the information receptivity to alcohol media marketing of Thai students were low. The respondents had a high level of media literacy on alcohol marketing communication. Multiple regression and focus group discussions provided support for the contention that there were significant effects of school achievement, absenteeism and media marketing communication on alcohol use (R2 = 14%) and intention to drink (R2 = 11%). Therefore, consideration of relevant school and alcohol policies, including monitoring of media marketing communication, will be needed.

  20. Alcohol effects on synaptic transmission in periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia; McCall, Nora M.; Lopez, Alberto J.; Kash, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dopamine (DA) signaling in regulating the rewarding properties of drugs, including alcohol, has been widely studied. The majority of these studies, however, have focused on the DA neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and their projections to the nucleus accumbens. DA neurons within the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) have been shown to regulate reward but little is known about the functional properties of these neurons, or how they are modified by drugs of abuse. This lack of knowledge is likely due to the highly heterogeneous cell composition of the vPAG, with both γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and glutamate neurons present in addition to DA neurons. In this study, we performed whole-cell recordings in a TH–eGFP transgenic mouse line to evaluate the properties of vPAG-DA neurons. Following this initial characterization, we examined how both acute and chronic alcohol exposure modify synaptic transmission onto vPAG-DA neurons. We found minimal effects of acute alcohol exposure on GABA transmission, but a robust enhancement of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in vPAG-DA. Consistent with this effect on excitatory transmission, we also found that alcohol caused an increase in firing rate. These data were in contrast to the effects of chronic intermittent alcohol exposure, which had no significant impact on either inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission on the vPAG-DA neurons. These data add to a growing body of literature that points to alcohol having both region-dependent and cell-type dependent effects on function. PMID:23597415

  1. The Effect of Noscapine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation on Primary Murine Cortical Neurons in High Glucose Condition.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Gelareh; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmed; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we set out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of noscapine (0.5-2 µM) in presence of D-glucose on primary murine foetal cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h. recovery. Cell viability, nitric oxide production and intracellular calcium ((ca(2+))i) levels were evaluated by MTT assay, the modified Griess method and Fura-2 respectively. 25 and 100 mM D-glucose could, in a concentration dependent manner, improve cell viability and decrease NO production and (ca(2+))i level in neuronal cells after ischemic insult. Moreover, pre-incubation of cells with noscapine, noticeably enhanced protective effects of 25 and 100 mM D-glucose compared to similar conditions without noscapine pre-treatment. In fact, noscapine attenuated NO production in a dose-dependent fashion, after 30 minutes (min) OGD, during high-glucose (HG) condition in cortical neurons. Pretreatment with 2 μM noscapine and 25 or 100 mM D-glucose, was shown to decrease the rise in (ca(2+))i induced by Sodium azide/glucose deprivation (chemical OGD) model. These effects were more pronounced than that of 25 or 100 mM D-glucose alone. The present study demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of HG before an ischemic insult were augmented by pre-treatment with noscapine. Our results also suggested that the neuroprotection offered by both HG and noscapine involve attenuation of NO production and (ca(2+))i levels stimulated by the experimental ischemia in cortical neurons.

  2. The Effect of Noscapine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation on Primary Murine Cortical Neurons in High Glucose Condition

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Gelareh; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmed; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we set out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of noscapine (0.5-2 µM) in presence of D-glucose on primary murine foetal cortical neurons after oxygen–glucose deprivation/24 h. recovery. Cell viability, nitric oxide production and intracellular calcium ((ca2+)i) levels were evaluated by MTT assay, the modified Griess method and Fura-2 respectively. 25 and 100 mM D-glucose could, in a concentration dependent manner, improve cell viability and decrease NO production and (ca2+)i level in neuronal cells after ischemic insult. Moreover, pre-incubation of cells with noscapine, noticeably enhanced protective effects of 25 and 100 mM D-glucose compared to similar conditions without noscapine pre-treatment. In fact, noscapine attenuated NO production in a dose-dependent fashion, after 30 minutes (min) OGD, during high-glucose (HG) condition in cortical neurons. Pretreatment with 2 μM noscapine and 25 or 100 mM D-glucose, was shown to decrease the rise in (ca2+)i induced by Sodium azide/glucose deprivation (chemical OGD) model. These effects were more pronounced than that of 25 or 100 mM D-glucose alone. The present study demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of HG before an ischemic insult were augmented by pre-treatment with noscapine. Our results also suggested that the neuroprotection offered by both HG and noscapine involve attenuation of NO production and (ca2+)i levels stimulated by the experimental ischemia in cortical neurons. PMID:27642321

  3. Food deprivation explains effects of mouthbrooding on ovaries and steroid hormones, but not brain neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs, in an African cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Carpenter, Russ E; Lee, Malinda; Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2012-06-01

    Feeding behavior and reproduction are coordinately regulated by the brain via neurotransmitters, circulating hormones, and neuropeptides. Reduced feeding allows animals to engage in other behaviors important for fitness, including mating and parental care. Some fishes cease feeding for weeks at a time in order to provide care to their young by brooding them inside the male or female parent's mouth. Maternal mouthbrooding is known to impact circulating hormones and subsequent reproductive cycles, but neither the full effects of food deprivation nor the neural mechanisms are known. Here we ask what effects mouthbrooding has on several physiological processes including gonad and body mass, brain neuropeptide and receptor gene expression, and circulating steroid hormones in a mouthbrooding cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni. We ask whether any observed changes can be explained by food deprivation, and show that during mouthbrooding, ovary size and circulating levels of androgens and estrogens match those seen during food deprivation. Levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) mRNA in the brain were low in food-deprived females compared to controls and in mouthbrooding females compared to gravid females. Levels of mRNA encoding two peptides involved in regulating feeding, hypocretin and cholecystokinin, were increased in the brains of food-deprived females. Brain mRNA levels of two receptors, GnRH receptor 2 and NPY receptor Y8c, were elevated in mouthbrooding females compared to the fed condition, but NPY receptor Y8b mRNA was differently regulated by mouthbrooding. These results suggest that many, but not all, of the characteristic physiological changes that occur during mouthbrooding are consequences of food deprivation.

  4. [Effect of phenibut on the behavior of experimental animals under conditions of voluntary chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Voronkov, A V; Borodkina, L E

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phenibut on the locomotor and orientation-research activity, as well as on the alcohol and food motivation, was studied on experimental animals under conditions of voluntary chronic alcoholism. Phenibut decreased the manifestations of alcohol-induced behavioral disorders and reduced alcohol motivation.

  5. Effects of Alcohol on Women's Risky Sexual Decision Making during Social Interactions in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki, Tina

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examined the effects of alcohol on women's sexual decision making during a laboratory social interaction with a potential dating partner. Participants completed an assessment of sex-related alcohol expectancies, were randomly assigned to consume alcohol, no alcohol, or a placebo, and then interacted with a male confederate.…

  6. Sleep deprivation induced anxiety and anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Selma Arzu; Oztürk, Levent; Kurt, Cem; Bulut, Erdogan; Sut, Necdet; Vardar, Erdal

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1) following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements), (2) following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3) following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02) whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance. Key pointsShort time total sleep deprivation (30 hours) increases state anxiety without any competition stress.Anaerobic performance parameters such as peak power, mean power and minimum power may not show a distinctive difference from anaerobic performance in a normal sleep day despite the high anxiety level induced by short time sleep deprivation.Partial sleep deprivation does not affect anxiety level and anaerobic performance of the next day.

  7. Literacy-Based Supports for Young Adults with FAS/FAE [Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Margaret; Belanger, Joe

    During a 1-year period, a study investigated the contributions made by 3 literacy-based supports (support circles, cognitive compensatory tools, and cognitive enhancement tools) to the lives of 5 young adults, aged 16-34, with FAS/FAE (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects). Four of the five subjects had IQs (intelligence quotients) above…

  8. Beliefs about Alcohol and the College Experience as Moderators of the Effects of Perceived Drinking Norms on Student Alcohol Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Lizabeth A.; Novak, Katherine B.

    2010-01-01

    Many students view the abuse of alcohol as integral to the student role. Thus, they feel entitled to drink heavily without sanction. OLS regression was used to assess the extent to which these beliefs about alcohol and the college experience moderate the effects of descriptive and injunctive campus drinking norms on students' levels of alcohol…

  9. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Color-Word, Emotional, and Specific Stroop Interference and on Self-Reported Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Sanchez-Ortuno, Montserrat; Charles, Andre; Taillard, Jacques; Valtat, Cedric; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was principally to assess the impact of sleep deprivation on interference performance in short Stroop tasks (Color-Word, Emotional, and Specific) and on subjective anxiety. Subjective sleepiness and performance on a psychomotor sustained attention task were also investigated to validate our protocol of sleep deprivation.…

  10. Increased alcohol consumption in rats after subchronic antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Alén, Francisco; Orio, Laura; Gorriti, Miguel Á; de Heras, Raquel Gómez; Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Pozo, Miguel Ángel; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2013-09-01

    The use of antidepressants for alcoholism in humans has been a matter of controversy in recent years. Despite the existence of an important co-morbidity for depression and alcoholism, some studies suggest that the use of antidepressants could worsen the prognosis of alcoholism. However, there is a lack of studies in animal models exploring this phenomenon. In the present study, we show how the 15-d treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or venlafaxine (50 mg/kg) affected alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) and subsequent alcohol consumption. Initially, fluoxetine reduced ADE and venlafaxine did not affect it. However, in the following days, both antidepressants increased alcohol consumption, an effect that was found to last at least 5 wk. Fluoxetine treatment was shown to cause a locomotor sensitized response to a challenge dose of amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg), indicating the presence of a supersensitive dopaminergic transmission. In summary, antidepressant treatment may increase alcohol consumption in rats after a period of alcohol deprivation and this could be related to alterations in the reward circuitry. This finding confirms in an animal model previous reports in humans that may limit the use of antidepressants for alcoholism.

  11. Alcohol, aggression and assertiveness in men: dosage and expectancy effects.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, J S; Schneider, H G; Myatt, C R

    1984-05-01

    The effect of alcohol on aggression and assertiveness was examined in 54 men college students. A 2 (high vs low dosage expectancy) x 3 (0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 ml of 95% alcohol per kg of body weight) design was used. There was an increase in self-reported aggression at the moderate dosage but an increase only in profanity at the high dosage. The expectancy manipulation also produced an increase in self-reported aggression. Actual dosage and dosage expectancy did not influence assertiveness.

  12. Effectiveness of a nonrinse, alcohol-free antiseptic hand wash.

    PubMed

    Moadab, A; Rupley, K F; Wadhams, P

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a novel surfactant, allantoin, and benzalkonium chloride hand sanitizer using the US Food and Drug Administration's method for testing antiseptic hand washes that podiatric physicians and other health-care personnel use. The alcohol-free product, HandClens, was compared with an alcohol-based product, Purell. Independent researchers from the California College of Podiatric Medicine conducted the study using 40 volunteer students from the class of 2001. The results show that HandClens outperformed Purell and met the regulatory requirements for a hand sanitizer. Purell failed as an antimicrobial hand wash and was less effective than a control soap used in the study.

  13. Evidence for neuroprotective effect of sulbutiamine against oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Jeehyun; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Kang, Kui Dong

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampus is one of the earliest brain regions that gets affected by ischemia, however, no pharmacological therapy exists yet that can fully counteract the ischemic damage. Here we study the effect of sulbutiamine, a synthetic thiamine analogue that can cross the blood-brain barrier easily, on hippocampal neurons under an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We find that exposure to OGD in the presence of sulbutiamine significantly increases neuronal viability and enhances electrophysiological properties such as excitatory synaptic transmissions and intrinsic neuronal membrane input resistance in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, here we report, for the first time, the neuroprotective evidence of sulbutiamine on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons under OGD, which may have beneficial implications as a possible therapeutic agent/substance against ischemic insult.

  14. The effects of deprivation on the time spent examining crime scenes and the recovery of DNA and fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Adderley, Richard; Bond, John W

    2008-01-01

    DNA and fingerprint identifications are now accepted as an integral part of the investigation of a wide range of criminal offences from burglary and auto crime to serious and major crime. Despite this, there is still much variation between U.K. police forces in the recovery of fingerprint and DNA material from crime scenes. Analysis of burglary and auto crime data for Northamptonshire, U.K., during a 3-year period has enabled an examination of the relationship between the deprivation of the neighborhood in which the crime was committed and the level of service provided by Crime Scene Examiners. The results indicate that the time spent examining a crime scene for forensic evidence is not affected by the deprivation of the neighborhood. Further, there is no statistical significance between deprivation and the recovery of fingerprints from the crime scene. The relationship between deprivation and DNA recovery is, however, statistically significant with DNA being recovered more frequently from less deprived neighborhoods.

  15. Food Deprivation Effects on Carbohydrate Levels and Their Relation to Mortality of Western Cherry Fruit Fly, Rhagoletis indifferens, Exposed to Spinosad Bait

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional state of tephritid fruit flies affects various behaviors. The objectives of this study were to determine food deprivation effects on carbohydrate levels and their relation to feeding responses to spinosad bait (GF-120® Naturalyte® Fruit Fly Bait), measured indirectly by mortality, i...

  16. The Effect of a Perceptual-Motor Intervention Programme on Learning Readiness of Grade R Learners from South African Deprived Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Myrtle; Janse van Rensburg, Ona; Pienaar, Anita E.; Ellis, Suria

    2016-01-01

    South Africa consists of developed and developing contexts. This article reports on a study undertaken to determine the effect of a Perceptual--motor Intervention Programme in learning readiness of Grade R learners from deprived environments. Le Roux's Group Test for School Readiness was used as baseline assessments to establish the school…

  17. Alcohol Use and the Effects on University Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Charles H.; Leonard, Valorie M.; Lebrasseur, Rolland

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of alcohol consumption on university undergraduate students in eight management schools in the province of Ontario, Canada. The study establishes two contrasting groups--the socially oriented and the academically oriented. It elaborates on the potential consequences that excessive drinking may have on the learning,…

  18. Mood Effects of Alcohol and Expectancies during the Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adesso, Vincent J.; Freitag, Wendy J.

    This research attempted to develop a profile of women's moods across the menstrual cycle and to determine alcohol's effects upon those moods. The Profile of Mood States was used to measure mood in 96 female college students who were heavy drinkers. Subjects were randomly assigned to the cells of the balanced placebo design with equal numbers in…

  19. Light deprivation produces a sexual dimorphic effect on neural excitability and depression-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chanyi; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yun-Feng

    2016-10-28

    Light sensory experience plays a crucial role in the regulation of mood, and light deficiency is considered as one important factor potentially leading to depression. Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from depression. However, the physiological mechanism underlying sex differences in the prevalence, incidence and morbidity risk of depression is still poorly understood. The potential causal relationship between sex dimorphic behavioral deficits and altered intrinsic electrophysiological properties of Layer V pyramidal cells (L5PCs) in the motor cortex was investigated using a mouse model with depression-like behavior that was induced by light deprivation. The depression-like behavior was characterized by increased immobility and decreased activity in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Compared with male depressive-like mice, light deprivation (LD) induced longer immobile behavior while shorter active behavior in female depressive-like mice, indicating that LD produces a sexual dimorphic effect on depression-like behavior with more severe depressive-like symptoms in females. LD induced lower locomotor activity in female depressive-like mice as evidenced by the significant decrease in pole-climbing and swimming during the anti-static fatigue test and exhaustive swimming test correspondingly. LD also significantly decreased the intrinsic excitability of L5PCs in female depressive-like mice, which may explain the reduced active behavior and locomotor activity of female mice. Collectively, it indicates that LD produces a sexual dimorphic effect on the depression-like behavior, locomotor activity and neural excitability in mice, and may suggest a causal relationship between the more severe depressive conditions and decreased neural excitability of L5PCs in female mice. These divergent findings from male and female depressive-like mice may provide one potential route to the physiological mechanism underlying sex differences in the prevalence of

  20. WHAT IS LACKING, STATEMENT ON SENSORY DEPRIVATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REGAN, J.

    THIS PAPER, WHICH ANNOUNCES THE THEME OF A SEMINAR ON THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND LEARNING, QUESTIONS THE VIEW THAT A CHILD'S POOR SCHOOL PERFORMANCE DERIVES FROM AN IMPOVERISHED SENSORY EXPERIENCE. A DEPRIVED TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT IS DEPICTED TO CAST DOUBTS ON THIS THEORY. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE EFFECTS OF SENSORY DEPRIVATION IS INCLUDED. THIS…

  1. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  2. Novel environment influences the effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation upon brain and peripheral cytokine gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Noah T.; Sams, David W.; Brown, Audrey C.; Dumaine, Jennie E.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep loss increases inflammatory mediators in brain and peripheral tissues, but the mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. Male C57BL/6j mice were exposed to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 24 h using the modified multiple platform (MMP) technique (platforms over water) or two different controls: home cage or a dry platform cage, which constituted a novel environment. PSD mice exhibited increased IL-1β and TNF-α pro-inflammatory gene expression in brain (hypothalamus, hippocampus, pre-frontal cortex), as well as in peripheral tissues (liver, spleen), when compared with home-cage controls. In addition, among PSD mice, TGFβ1, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was increased in pre-frontal cortex, liver, and spleen in conjunction with elevated serum corticosterone concentration relative to home-cage controls. However, these differences were nearly abolished when PSD mice were compared with control mice subjected to a dry MMP cage, suggesting that simply exposing mice to a novel environment can induce an acute inflammatory response. PMID:26806035

  3. Serum osmolality and effects of water deprivation in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Natalie H.; Isaza, Ramiro; Hall, James S.; Wiedner, Ellen; Conrad, Bettina L.; Wamsley, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    Serum from 21 healthy, captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) was evaluated by measured and calculated osmolality. Serum osmolality results for this population of Asian elephants had a median of 261 mOsm/kg and an interquartile interval of 258–269 mOsm/kg when measured by freezing point osmometry and a median of 264 mOsm/kg and an interquartile interval of 257–269 mOsm/kg when measured by vapor pressure osmometry. These values are significantly lower than values reported in other mammalian species and have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Calculated osmolality produced unreliable results and needs further study to determine an appropriate formula and its clinical application in this species. A 16-hr water deprivation test in 16 Asian elephants induced a small, subclinical, but statistically significant increase in measured serum osmolality. Serum osmolality, blood urea nitrogen, and total protein by refractometer were sensitive indicators of hydration status. Serum osmolality measurement by freezing point or vapor pressure osmometry is a useful adjunct to routine clinical tests in the diagnostic evaluation of elephants. PMID:22643341

  4. Visual depth perception in normal and deprived rats: effects of environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, L; Braschi, C; Maffei, L

    2013-04-16

    A proper maturation of stereoscopic functions requires binocular visual experience and early disruption of sensory-driven activity can result in long-term or even permanent visual function impairment. Amblyopia is one paradigmatic case of visual system disorder, with early conditions of functional imbalance between the two eyes leading to severe deficits of visual acuity and depth-perception abilities. In parallel to the reduction of neural plasticity levels, the brain potential for functional recovery declines with age. Recent evidence has challenged this traditional view and experimental paradigms enhancing experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain have been described. Here, we show that environmental enrichment (EE), a condition of increased cognitive and sensory-motor stimulation, restores experience-dependent plasticity of stereoscopic perception in response to sensory deprivation well after the end of the critical period and reinstates depth-perception abilities of adult amblyopic animals in the range of normal values. Our results encourage efforts in the clinical application of paradigms based on EE as an intervention strategy for treating amblyopia in adulthood.

  5. Effects of Alcohol Injection in Rat Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Mazoch, Mathew J.; Cheema, Gulraiz A.; Suva, Larry J.; Thomas, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the injection of dehydrated alcohol has been successful for the treatment of Morton's neuroma in the foot. In this study, we determined the cellular effect of injection of alcohol into and around the sciatic nerve of rats, and measured the extent of cell necrosis and/or any associated histologic or inflammatory changes. Methods Twenty-two male (~375g) Wistar rats were randomized into two groups each receiving alcohol injections into or around the sciatic nerve after nerve exposure under sterile technique. Group 1 rats were injected with a 0.5ml solution of 0.5% Marcaine in the left sciatic nerve as a control group. In the right sciatic nerve a 0.5ml solution of 4% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine was injected. Group 2 rats received 0.5ml of 20%ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the left sciatic nerve and 0.5 ml of 30% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the right sciatic nerve. In each group, the rats were placed in 3 subgroups: intraneural, perineural, perimuscular injections. All rats were sacrificed and tissue harvested for histologic evaluation at day 10 post injection. Results No evidence of alcohol-associated cell necrosis, apoptosis or apparent inflammation was observed in histologic specimens of any injected nerves, perineural tissue, or muscles in controls or experimental groups regardless of concentration of ethanol injected on day 10. Conclusion We concluded that alcohol injection (≤30% ethanol) into and/or around the sciatic nerve or the adjacent muscle of rats has no histologic evidence of necrosis or inflammation to the nerve or surrounding tissue. There was no observable histological change in apoptosis, or cell number, in response to the alcohol injection. PMID:25097192

  6. Protective effect of Nigella sativa extract and thymoquinone on serum/glucose deprivation-induced PC12 cells death.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S H; Tayarani-Najaran, Z; Asghari, M; Sadeghnia, H R

    2010-05-01

    The serum/glucose deprivation (SGD)-induced cell death in cultured PC12 cells represents a useful in vitro model for the study of brain ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae) and its active component thymoquinone (TQ) has been known as a source of antioxidants. In the present study, the protective effects of N. sativa and TQ on cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in cultured PC12 cells were investigated under SGD conditions. PC12 cells were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum, 100 units/ml penicillin, and 100 microg/ml streptomycin. Cells were seeded overnight and then deprived of serum/glucose for 6 and 18 h. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of N. sativa extract (15.62-250 microg/ml) and TQ (1.17-150 microM) for 2 h. Cell viability was quantitated by MTT assay. Intracellular ROS production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF-DA) as a probe. SGD induced significant cells toxicity after 6, 18, or 24 h (P < 0.001). Pretreatment with N. sativa (15.62-250 microg/ml) and TQ (1.17-37.5 microM) reduced SGD-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells after 6 and 18 h. A significant increase in intracellular ROS production was seen following SGD (P < 0.001). N. sativa (250 microg/ml, P < 0.01) and TQ (2.34, 4.68, 9.37 microM, P < 0.01) pretreatment reversed the increased ROS production following ischemic insult. The experimental results suggest that N. sativa extract and TQ protects the PC12 cells against SGD-induced cytotoxicity via antioxidant mechanisms. Our findings might raise the possibility of potential therapeutic application of N. sativa extract and TQ for managing cerebral ischemic and neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Prey targeting by the infrared-imaging snake Python molurus: effects of experimental and congenital visual deprivation.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Woodward, O M; Church, D R; Calisch, G

    2001-02-15

    Boid and crotaline snakes possess two distinct types of organ evolved to image radiant electromagnetic energy: the lateral eye, which responds to visible light, and the pit organ, which responds to infrared radiation. While infrared imaging may allow accurate predatory targeting in complete absence of visual information, both infrared and visual information are probably normally involved in prey targeting. We examined the roles of vision and infrared imaging in Python molurus predatory performance under conditions of (1) high visual contrast; (2) very low visual contrast; (3) complete blinding; (4) experimental monocular occlusion; and (5) congenital monocularity. Normally sighted pythons were equally successful at targeting white (BALB/c) and black (C57BL6/J) mice (Mus domesticus) against a black background. Binocularly occluded snakes exhibited strike angles and distances similar to non-occluded snakes, but exhibited lower strike success, suggesting that high visible contrast is not required for accurate targeting, but that precise targeting depends to some degree upon visual information. Strike angles, distances and latencies were indistinguishable between snakes subjected to experimental monocular occlusion and normally sighted snakes. However, snakes congenitally lacking one eye preferentially targeted on the sighted side. Thus, accurate targeting of highly mobile homeothermic prey by Python can be accomplished with little or no visual information, but performance can be affected by complete visual deprivation or by alteration of visual input during development. The developmental effects of early visual deprivation in this system provide a novel opportunity to investigate the neural integration of two electromagnetic radiation-imaging systems in a single animal.

  8. Improved effect of the combination naltrexone/D-penicillamine in the prevention of alcohol relapse-like drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Orrico, Alejandro; Martí-Prats, Lucía; Cano-Cebrián, María J; Granero, Luis; Polache, Ana; Zornoza, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are licensed drugs for treating alcohol use disorders; nonetheless, clinical studies have evidenced their limited effectiveness. Preclinical findings indicate that opioid receptor (OR) antagonists, such as naltrexone (NTX), reduce the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE). However, a detailed analysis of published data shows the existence of a delayed increase in ethanol consumption after continuous OR blockade, a phenomenon originally called as 'delayed ADE'. We have recently reported that D-penicillamine (DP) is able to prevent ADE through a mechanism dependent on the inactivation of acetaldehyde, the main metabolite of ethanol. Hypothetically, OR activation would be triggered by acetaldehyde after ethanol consumption. Hence, we conjecture that the combination of NTX and DP, due to their distinct but complementary mechanisms to impede OR activation, may be more efficacious in the prevention of the ADE and, specifically, the 'delayed ADE'. Herein, we compare the effects of the combination NTX/DP (NTX: 2×5 mg/kg SC injection daily/DP: SC infusion (0.25 mg/h)) versus NTX on the ADE in long-term ethanol-experienced rats. As expected, NTX-treated animals displayed a delayed ADE. However, NTX/DP treatment prevented this delayed effect. Our present data indicate that this combination therapy shows an adequate anti-relapse preclinical efficacy being able to overcome the preclinical limitations of NTX alone.

  9. Axial myopia induced by a monocularly-deprived facemask in guinea pigs: A non-invasive and effective model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhao, Hailan; Wang, Ruiqing; Jia, Ding; Jiang, Liqin; Xie, Ruozhong; Qu, Jia

    2006-04-01

    .05; compared to the contralateral eyes). Both the MDF and lid-sutured groups had a similar development in myopia and vitreous length (MDF vs lid-suturing: p>0.05 at all timepoints, one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction). This development was significantly faster than in the normal control group (MDF or lid-suture vs normal control: p<0.05 to <0.01 from 2 to 8 weeks, one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction). The radius of corneal curvature in the lid-sutured group was significantly greater than in either the MDF group or the normal control group since 4 weeks of form deprivation (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction). Treatment with MDFs is as effective as the lid-suture in inducing axial myopia in guinea pigs. This method is non-invasive and allows evaluation of the same group of animals at different timepoints so that the number of animals required could be minimized without affecting the accuracy of the results.

  10. Automatically-Activated Attitudes as Mechanisms for Message Effects: The Case of Alcohol Advertisements.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Catherine E; Slater, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    Alcohol advertisements may influence impulsive, risky behaviors indirectly, via automatically-activated attitudes toward alcohol. Results from an experiment in which participants were exposed to either four alcohol advertisements, four control advertisements, or four drunk driving public service advertisements, suggested that alcohol advertisements had more measurable effects on implicit, than on explicit attitude measures. Moreover, there were significant indirect paths from alcohol advertisement exposure through automatically-activated alcohol attitudes on willingness to engage in risky alcohol-related behaviors, notably drinking and driving. A mechanism that may explain how these advertisements activate automatic, non-deliberative alcohol attitudes was investigated. Associative evidence was found supportive of an evaluative conditioning mechanism, in which positive responses to an alcohol advertisement may lead to more positive automatically-activated attitudes toward alcohol itself.

  11. Automatically-Activated Attitudes as Mechanisms for Message Effects: The Case of Alcohol Advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Catherine E.; Slater, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol advertisements may influence impulsive, risky behaviors indirectly, via automatically-activated attitudes toward alcohol. Results from an experiment in which participants were exposed to either four alcohol advertisements, four control advertisements, or four drunk driving public service advertisements, suggested that alcohol advertisements had more measurable effects on implicit, than on explicit attitude measures. Moreover, there were significant indirect paths from alcohol advertisement exposure through automatically-activated alcohol attitudes on willingness to engage in risky alcohol-related behaviors, notably drinking and driving. A mechanism that may explain how these advertisements activate automatic, non-deliberative alcohol attitudes was investigated. Associative evidence was found supportive of an evaluative conditioning mechanism, in which positive responses to an alcohol advertisement may lead to more positive automatically-activated attitudes toward alcohol itself. PMID:21258609

  12. Breath Alcohol Estimation Training: Behavioral Effects and Predictors of Success

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Elizabeth R.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Liguori, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) estimation training has been effective in increasing estimation accuracy in social drinkers. Predictors of estimation accuracy may identify populations to target for training, yet potential predictors typically are not evaluated. In addition, the therapeutic efficacy of estimation training as a preventive strategy for problematic drinking is unknown. Methods: Forty-six social drinkers with a recent binge history were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group (n = 23 per group). In each of three sessions (pretraining, training, testing), participants consumed alcohol (0.32, 0.24, 0.16 and 0.08 g/kg, in random order) every 30 min (total dose: 0.8 g/kg). Participants provided five BrAC estimates within 3 h of alcohol administration. The intervention group, but not control group, received internal and external training. During testing, participants provided BrAC estimates, but received no feedback. Participants returned for two follow-up visits to complete self-report measures. Results: BrAC estimation training improved intervention group estimation accuracy within the laboratory. Together, training, low trait anxiety and low risk expectancy predicted high testing accuracy. There were no significant group differences in subsequent alcohol consumption, behavior under the influence or risk expectancy regarding potentially hazardous behaviors. Conclusion: BrAC estimation training is effective in the laboratory but may not translate into naturalistic settings. PMID:23695976

  13. Alcohol use disorder: pathophysiology, effects, and pharmacologic options for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wackernah, Robin C; Minnick, Matthew J; Clapp, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) continue to be a concerning health issue worldwide. Harmful alcohol use leads to 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide. Multiple options exist for the management of dependence on alcohol, not all of which are approved by drug-regulating agencies. Current practice in treating AUD does not reflect the diversity of pharmacologic options that have potential to provide benefit, and guidance for clinicians is limited. Few medications are approved for treatment of AUD, and these have exhibited small and/or inconsistent effects in broad patient populations with diverse drinking patterns. The need for continued research into the treatment of this disease is evident in order to provide patients with more specific and effective options. This review describes the neurobiological mechanisms of AUD that are amenable to treatment and drug therapies that target pathophysiological conditions of AUD to reduce drinking. In addition, current literature on pharmacologic (both approved and non-approved) treatment options for AUD offered in the United States and elsewhere are reviewed. The aim is to inform clinicians regarding the options for alcohol abuse treatment, keeping in mind that not all treatments are completely successful in reducing craving or heavy drinking or increasing abstinence. PMID:24648792

  14. Effects of food deprivation and type of prey on predation by Notiophilus biguttatus F. (Carabidae) on springtails (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Ernsting, G

    1977-01-01

    With diurnally active predators like Notiophilus biquttatus F. food deprivation is involved in predation in two ways: as a consequence of food shortage (i.e., low prey density), and as a consequence of the night period. The pattern of food intake after deprivation at night has been studied with respect to two prey species and differently deprived predators. They prey species represent a locomotory active one (Orchesella cincta) and a locomotory inactive one (Tomocerus minor). It appears that the rate of predation after deprivation shows a distinct pattern, initially high and then slowing to a more or less constant value. This pattern is influenced by food deprivation and type of prey. The beetles preying on O. cincta consumed more prey than those preying on T. minor. The more deprived predators compensated for deprivation by a higher daily predation when O. cincta was the prey, but not when T. minor was. Consequences of these findings are discussed with respect to diet composition and functional response.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of the Central and Peripheral Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Lesion on PERIOD-2 Protein in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Maret, Stephanie; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: That sleep deprivation increases the brain expression of various clock genes has been well documented. Based on these and other findings we hypothesized that clock genes not only underlie circadian rhythm generation but are also implicated in sleep homeostasis. However, long time lags have been reported between the changes in the clock gene messenger RNA levels and their encoded proteins. It is therefore crucial to establish whether also protein levels increase within the time frame known to activate a homeostatic sleep response. We report on the central and peripheral effects of sleep deprivation on PERIOD-2 (PER2) protein both in intact and suprachiasmatic nuclei-lesioned mice. Design: In vivo and in situ PER2 imaging during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Settings: Mouse sleep-recording facility. Participants: Per2::Luciferase knock-in mice. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Six-hour sleep deprivation increased PER2 not only in the brain but also in liver and kidney. Remarkably, the effects in the liver outlasted those observed in the brain. Within the brain the increase in PER2 concerned the cerebral cortex mainly, while leaving suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) levels unaffected. Against expectation, sleep deprivation did not increase PER2 in the brain of arrhythmic SCN-lesioned mice because of higher PER2 levels in baseline. In contrast, liver PER2 levels did increase in these mice similar to the sham and partially lesioned controls. Conclusions: Our results stress the importance of considering both sleep-wake dependent and circadian processes when quantifying clock-gene levels. Because sleep deprivation alters PERIOD-2 in the brain as well as in the periphery, it is tempting to speculate that clock genes constitute a common pathway mediating the shared and well-known adverse effects of both chronic sleep loss and disrupted circadian rhythmicity on metabolic health. Citation: Curie T, Maret S, Emmenegger Y, Franken P. In

  16. Protective effect of Liv.52 on alcohol-induced fetotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gopumadhavan, S; Jagadeesh, S; Chauhan, B L; Kulkarni, R D

    1993-10-01

    The adverse effects of maternal alcohol consumption on the development of the fetus are well known. The adverse effects of ethanol on the liver are now believed to be due to acetaldehyde formed as an intermediate metabolite of ethanol. Liv.52 has been shown to bring about faster elimination of acetaldehyde from the body and thus prevent alcoholic liver damage. Other toxic effects of alcohol may also be due to acetaldehyde and may be prevented by Liv.52. In this study, rats were given 20% (v/v) ethanol in drinking water, during the gestation period, and the effect on maternal body weight and fetal outcome was noted. The protective effect of Liv.52 administration during the gestation period was studied. The results show that ethanol ingestion caused a decrease in gestational weight gain, total fetal weight, and number of live fetuses. There were increases in resorptions. Liv.52 administration reduced the deleterious effects of ethanol. The concentration of acetaldehyde in the amniotic fluid of ethanol-consuming animals was 0.727 microgram/ml. Liv.52 administration lowered it to 0.244 microgram/ml. The protective effect of Liv.52 could be due to the rapid elimination of acetaldehyde.

  17. Resistance to change of alcohol self-administration: effects of alcohol-delivery rate on disruption by extinction and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Shahan, Timothy A

    2007-03-01

    A common finding in resistance to change research with food-maintained operant behavior is that the persistence of behavior depends on the rate of reinforcement delivered in the context in which the behavior occurs. The present experiment evaluated the effects of rate of response-dependent alcohol delivery on the resistance to change of rats' alcohol self-administration in the face of disruption produced by extinction and a range of doses of naltrexone (1.0, 3.0, 10.0 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Rats responded for a 10% alcohol solution in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging a higher rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 15 s) in the presence of one stimulus and a lower rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 45 s) in the presence of another stimulus. Baseline response rates and resistance to extinction were higher in the presence of the stimulus associated with higher rates of alcohol delivery. This finding is consistent with studies of the resistance to change of food-maintained behavior. The rate of alcohol delivered in the components, however, did not systematically affect resistance to disruption by naltrexone. One interpretation of this finding from the perspective of behavioral momentum theory is that naltrexone may decrease the impact of alcohol-associated stimuli on the persistence of drinking by reducing sensitivity to the relative reinforcement conditions arranged in the presence of different stimuli.

  18. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  19. Facts on the Effects of Alcohol. Clearinghouse Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Gail Gleason

    Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is one of the few alcohols that humans can drink. This alcohol is a byproduct of yeast's reaction with the sugars in fruit or vegetable juice and the process stops naturally with about an 11 to 14 percent alcoholic concentration, although distillation can greatly increase the alcoholic content. Once ingested, most alcohol…

  20. The effects of economic deprivation on psychological well-being among the working population of Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Stefan; Endrass, Jerome; Schweizer, Ivo; Teng, Hsun-Mei; Rossler, Wulf; Gallo, William T

    2006-01-01

    Background The association between poverty and mental health has been widely investigated. There is, however, limited evidence of mental health implications of working poverty, despite its representing a rapidly expanding segment of impoverished populations in many developed nations. In this study, we examined whether working poverty in Switzerland, a country with substantial recent growth among the working poor, was correlated with two dependent variables of interest: psychological health and unmet mental health need. Methods This cross-sectional study used data drawn from the first 3 waves (1999–2001) of the Swiss Household Panel, a nationally representative sample of the permanent resident population of Switzerland. The study sample comprised 5453 subjects aged 20–59 years. We used Generalized Estimating Equation models to investigate the association between working poverty and psychological well-being; we applied logistic regression models to analyze the link between working poverty and unmet mental health need. Working poverty was represented by dummy variables indicating financial deficiency, restricted standard of living, or both conditions. Results After controlling other factors, restricted standard of living was significantly (p < .001) negatively correlated with psychological well-being; it was also associated with approximately 50% increased risk of unmet mental health need (OR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.17 – 2.06). Conclusion The findings of this study contribute to our understanding of the potential psychological impact of material deprivation on working Swiss citizens. Such knowledge may aid in the design of community intervention programs to help reduce the individual and societal burdens of poverty in Switzerland. PMID:16952322

  1. Neurophysiological Effects of Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Adults, a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Ursula M. H.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kloet, Reina W.; Boellaard, Ronald; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) may induce fatigue, neurocognitive slowing and mood changes, which are partly compensated by stress regulating brain systems, resulting in altered dopamine and cortisol levels in order to stay awake if needed. These systems, however, have never been studied in concert. At baseline, after a regular night of sleep, and the next morning after TSD, 12 healthy subjects performed a semantic affective classification functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task, followed by a [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Saliva cortisol levels were acquired at 7 time points during both days. Affective symptoms were measured using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI) and visual analogue scales. After TSD, perceived energy levels, concentration, and speed of thought decreased significantly, whereas mood did not. During fMRI, response speed decreased for neutral words and positive targets, and accuracy decreased trendwise for neutral words and for positive targets with a negative distracter. Following TSD, processing of positive words was associated with increased left dorsolateral prefrontal activation. Processing of emotional words in general was associated with increased insular activity, whereas contrasting positive vs. negative words showed subthreshold increased activation in the (para)hippocampal area. Cortisol secretion was significantly lower after TSD. Decreased voxel-by-voxel [11C]raclopride binding potential (BPND) was observed in left caudate. TSD induces widespread cognitive, neurophysiologic and endocrine changes in healthy adults, characterized by reduced cognitive functioning, despite increased regional brain activity. The blunted HPA-axis response together with altered [11C]raclopride binding in the basal ganglia indicate that sustained wakefulness requires involvement of additional adaptive biological systems. PMID:25608023

  2. Resistance training minimizes catabolic effects induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Mônico-Neto, Marcos; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lee, Kil Sun; Phillips, Stuart M; Giampá, Sara Quaglia de Campos; Souza, Helton de Sá; Dáttilo, Murilo; Medeiros, Alessandra; de Moraes, Wilson Max; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) can induce muscle atrophy. We aimed to investigate the changes underpinning SD-induced muscle atrophy and the impact of this condition on rats that were previously submitted to resistance training (RT). Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were randomly allocated into 1 of 5 groups: control, sham, SD (for 96 h), RT, and RT+SD. The major outcomes of this study were muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and the abundance of select proteins involved in muscle protein synthesis and degradation pathways. SD resulted in muscle atrophy; however, when SD was combined with RT, the reduction in muscle fiber CSA was attenuated. The levels of IGF-1 and testosterone were reduced in SD animals, and the RT+SD group had higher levels of these hormones than the SD group. Corticosterone was increased in the SD group compared with the control group, and this increase was minimized in the RT+SD group. The increases in corticosterone concentrations paralleled changes in the abundance of ubiquitinated proteins and the autophagic proteins LC3 and p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that corticosterone may trigger these changes. SD induced weight loss, but this loss was minimized in the RT+SD group. We conclude that SD induced muscle atrophy, probably because of the increased corticosterone and catabolic signal. High-intensity RT performed before SD was beneficial in containing muscle loss induced by SD. It also minimized the catabolic signal and increased synthetic activity, thereby minimizing the body's weight loss.

  3. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Understanding the Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Supporting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) affect a significant number of children in this country. This article addresses diagnostic issues related to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and other alcohol-related disabilities, discusses associated features and behaviors of FASD, and introduces interventions to support children with FASD in…

  4. Alcohol and group formation: a multimodal investigation of the effects of alcohol on emotion and social bonding.

    PubMed

    Sayette, Michael A; Creswell, Kasey G; Dimoff, John D; Fairbairn, Catharine E; Cohn, Jeffrey F; Heckman, Bryan W; Kirchner, Thomas R; Levine, John M; Moreland, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    We integrated research on emotion and on small groups to address a fundamental and enduring question facing alcohol researchers: What are the specific mechanisms that underlie the reinforcing effects of drinking? In one of the largest alcohol-administration studies yet conducted, we employed a novel group-formation paradigm to evaluate the socioemotional effects of alcohol. Seven hundred twenty social drinkers (360 male, 360 female) were assembled into groups of 3 unacquainted persons each and given a moderate dose of an alcoholic, placebo, or control beverage, which they consumed over 36 min. These groups' social interactions were video recorded, and the duration and sequence of interaction partners' facial and speech behaviors were systematically coded (e.g., using the facial action coding system). Alcohol consumption enhanced individual- and group-level behaviors associated with positive affect, reduced individual-level behaviors associated with negative affect, and elevated self-reported bonding. Our results indicate that alcohol facilitates bonding during group formation. Assessing nonverbal responses in social contexts offers new directions for evaluating the effects of alcohol.

  5. Cannabis effects on driving longitudinal control with and without alcohol.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Rebecca L; Brown, Timothy L; Milavetz, Gary; Spurgin, Andrew; Pierce, Russell S; Gorelick, David A; Gaffney, Gary; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-11-01

    Although evidence suggests cannabis impairs driving, its driving-performance effects are not fully characterized. We aimed to establish cannabis' effects on driving longitudinal control (with and without alcohol, drivers' most common drug combination) relative to psychoactive ∆(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) blood concentrations. Current occasional (≥1×/last 3 months, ≤3 days per week) cannabis smokers drank placebo or low-dose alcohol, and inhaled 500 mg placebo, low (2.9%), or high (6.7%) THC vaporized cannabis over 10 min ad libitum in separate sessions (within-subject, six conditions). Participants drove (National Advanced Driving Simulator, University of Iowa) simulated drives 0.5-1.3 h post-inhalation. Blood and breath alcohol samples were collected before (0.17 and 0.42 h) and after (1.4 and 2.3 h) driving. We evaluated the mean speed (relative to limit), standard deviation (SD) of speed, percent time spent >10% above/below the speed limit (percent speed high/percent speed low), longitudinal acceleration, and ability to maintain headway relative to a lead vehicle (headway maintenance) against blood THC and breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC). In N=18 completing drivers, THC was associated with a decreased mean speed, increased percent speed low and increased mean following distance during headway maintenance. BrAC was associated with increased SD speed and increased percent speed high, whereas THC was not. Neither was associated with altered longitudinal acceleration. A less-than-additive THC*BrAC interaction was detected in percent speed high (considering only non-zero data and excluding an outlying drive event), suggesting cannabis mitigated drivers' tendency to drive faster with alcohol. Cannabis was associated with slower driving and greater headway, suggesting a possible awareness of impairment and attempt to compensate. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The effects of androgen deprivation therapy on cardiac function and heart failure: implications for management of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Scott; Butler, Javed; Hershatter, Bruce W; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Conflicting clinical evidence regarding the possible association between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with heart failure in men with prostate cancer is reviewed, including 2 population-based registries showing such an association, and 1 showing no association. Studies of the effects of androgens on cardiomyocyte contractility at the molecular level, the effects of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, particularly cardiac function, and the beneficial effects of testosterone therapy for patients with heart failure might help illuminate this controversy. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of ADT on end points of heart failure. The authors weigh the possible adverse effects of ADT on cardiac function and heart failure against its known benefits to cancer outcomes, defined according to published, randomized trials, in a discussion of the implications of the preclinical and clinical literature on the management of prostate cancer in men at risk for heart failure. In the absence of conclusive evidence that ADT causes heart failure, the authors discuss clinical situations in which ADT may be delayed, given on a short-term or intermittent basis, or withheld from treatment with the goal of reducing the risks of heart failure without compromising prostate cancer outcomes.

  7. Arachidonic acid has protective effects on oxygen-glucose deprived astrocytes mediated through enhancement of potassium channel TREK-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Zhang, Guangru; Song, Chunli; Wang, Xuexi; Qian, Weina; Wang, Zhuanling; Liu, Yanan; Gong, Sheng; Zhou, Shuning

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain diseases. The newly discovered potassium channel "TREK-1" is a promising target for therapies against neurodegeneration. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an n-6 PUFA, as well as a potent TREK-1 activator. We previously showed that TREK-1 is expressed at high levels in astrocytes. However, the effect of AA on astrocytes in ischemia remains unknown. Here, we assessed the effects of 3-30μM AA on astrocyte apoptosis, glutamate uptake, and expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and TREK-1 under different conditions. Under normal conditions, 3-30μM AA showed no effect on astrocytic apoptosis or TREK-1 expression, whereas glutamate uptake decreased significantly and its change paralleled the decreased expression of GLT-1. When astrocytes were subjected to 4h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), 10μM AA markedly alleviated OGD-induced cell death, recovering from 63.50±1.90% to 82.96±4.63% of the control value. AA also rescued the decreased glutamate uptake and increased mRNA, as well as protein levels of GLT-1 and TREK-1. Our results provide new evidence of a protective effect of AA on astrocytes under OGD conditions, suggesting that a low concentration of AA may protect against brain ischemic diseases.

  8. Effect of kai xin san on learning and memory in a rat model of paradoxical sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Ping; Yan, Juan-Juan; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhang, Gang-Qiang; Zhou, Xiao-Jiang; Yu, Bing-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of kai xin san (KXS, at doses of 500, 250, and 125 mg/kg body weight per day), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, on learning and memory in paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD)-induced cognition deficit rats. Two behavior tests (the Open Field test and the Morris water maze task) were used for testing the effects of KXS on a PSD-induced learning and memory deficit model. Furthermore, its effect on the glutamic acid (GLU) and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) levels in the brain tissue, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) expression in the hippocampus was also tested. KXS exerted the greatest cognition against the 48 h PSD-induced cognitive deficit and these effects may be mediated by decreasing the GLU and GABA levels and increasing the levels of BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB. This study indicates that the effect of KXS on learning and memory in a rat model of PSD could be associated with the modulation of neurotransmitter levels and the expression of some genes in the brain that contribute to memory functions.

  9. Effect of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can be severely damage to the brain development in fetuses. This study investigates the effects of maternal ethanol consumption on brain development in mice embryos. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were intragastrically gavaged with ethanol (3g/Kg bwt) twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and imaged using a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system. 3D images of the mice embryo brain were obtained and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. The average volumes of the left and the right volumes of 5 embryos each alcohol-exposed and control embryos were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3, respectively. The results suggest that the left and right ventricle volumes of brain are much larger in the alcohol-exposed embryos as compared to control embryos indicating alcohol-induced developmental delay.

  10. Widespread effects of alcohol on white matter microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Salat, David H.; Lindemer, Emily; Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy L.; Shepel, Juli; Williams, Victoria; Venne, Jonathan R.; Milberg, William P.; McGlinchey, Regina E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that chronic misuse of alcohol may preferentially affect the integrity of frontal white matter tracts, which can impact executive functions important to achieve and maintain abstinence. Methods Global and regional white matter (WM) microstructure was assessed using diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) for 31 abstinent alcoholics with an average of 25 years of abuse and approximately 5 years of sobriety and 20 nonalcoholic control participants. Data processing was conducted with FreeSurfer and FSL processing streams. Voxelwise processing of the FA data was carried out using TBSS (Tract-Based Spatial Statistics). Clusters of significance were created to provide a quantitative summary of highly significant regions within the voxel wise analysis. Results Widespread, bilateral reductions in FA were observed in abstinent alcoholics as compared to nonalcoholic control participants in multiple frontal, temporal, parietal, and cerebellar WM tracts. FA in the left inferior frontal gyrus was associated with drinking severity. Conclusions The present study found widespread reductions in WM integrity in a group of abstinent alcoholics compared to nonalcoholic control participants, with most pronounced effects in frontal and superior tracts. Decreased FA throughout the frontostriatal circuits that mediate inhibitory control may result in impulsive behavior and inability to maintain sobriety. PMID:25406797

  11. Differential onset of infantile deprivation produces distinctive long-term effects in adult ex-laboratory chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Kalcher, Elfriede; Franz, Cornelia; Crailsheim, Karl; Preuschoft, Signe

    2008-12-01

    Maternal or social deprivation during early infancy inevitably produces social deficiencies in juvenile chimpanzees. Hypothesizing such deficiencies to persist into adulthood (a), and, as in humans, a sensitive period in early infancy for attachment formation (b), we predicted and found behavioral differences in resocialized adult ex-laboratory chimpanzees after about 20 years of solitary confinement depending on their age at onset of deprivation: early deprived (ED; mean: 1.2 years) chimpanzees engaged significantly less in social interactions, spent less time associated, and showed more nonsocial idiosyncrasies than did late deprived (LD; mean: 3.6 years) chimpanzees. In addition to these individual attributes relational qualities, specifically the combination of ED and LD chimpanzees within social groups, have an impact on social recovery. LDs can best exploit their social potential in the company of other LDs and EDs tend to stagnate in their recovery when socialized with other EDs.

  12. Effects of low doses of alcohol on delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol's effects in pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Subramanian, M.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Pregnant rats were intubated with 50 mg/kg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or with THC plus alcohol to determine if a low dose of alcohol would significantly increase blood levels of THC. On the basis of this study, a second study was conducted in which pregnant rats were intubated with THC plus alcohol from gestation day six to parturition. THC reduced birth weights but did not significantly affect litter size or passive avoidance learning. Alcohol did not have a significant effect on offspring birth weight nor did it interact with THC to affect offspring.

  13. Intervention timing and effect of PJ34 on astrocytes during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuan; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Qiao-Ying; Cao, Xu; Zou, Liang-Yu; Chu, Xiao-Fan

    2015-06-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays as a double edged sword in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, hinging on its effect on the intracellular energy storage and injury severity, and the prognosis has relationship with intervention timing. During ischemia injury, apoptosis and oncosis are the two main cell death pathway sin the ischemic core. The participation of astrocytes in ischemia-reperfusion induced cell death has triggered more and more attention. Here, we examined the protective effects and intervention timing of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34, by using a mixed oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) model of primary rat astrocytes in vitro, which could mimic the ischemia-reperfusion damage in the "ischemic core". Meanwhile, cell death pathways of various PJ34 treated astrocytes were also investigated. Our results showed that PJ34 incubation (10 μmol/L) did not affect release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from astrocytes and cell viability or survival 1 h after OGDR. Interestingly, after 3 or 5 h OGDR, PJ34 significantly reduced LDH release and percentage of PI-positive cells and increased cell viability, and simultaneously increased the caspase-dependent apoptotic rate. The intervention timing study demonstrated that an earlier and longer PJ34 intervention during reperfusion was associated with more apparent protective effects. In conclusion, earlier and longer PJ34 intervention provides remarkable protective effects for astrocytes in the "ischaemic core" mainly by reducing oncosis of the astrocytes, especially following serious OGDR damage.

  14. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  15. Effect of two GABA-ergic drugs on the cognitive functions of rapid eye movement in sleep-deprived and recovered rats

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lidao; Si, Lengge; Wang, Yuehong; Wuyun, Gerile; Bo, Agula

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is closely associated with nervous functions. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of gabazine and tiagabine on the cognitive functions (CF) of REM sleep-deprived and sleep recovered rats. Rats were divided into REM sleep deprivation, blank control (CC) and environmental groups. The REM sleep deprivation group was further divided into non-operation (nonOP), sham-operated (Sham), gabazine (SR) and tiagabine groups. Each group was evaluated over five time points: Sleep deprived for 1 day (SD 1 day), SD 3 day, SD 5 day, sleep recovery 6 h (RS 6 h) and RS 12 h. A rat model of REM sleep deprivation was established by a modified multi-platform water method, with CF assessed by Morris water maze. Hypothalamic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid contents were measured via high performance liquid chromatography. The number and morphology of hypocretin (Hcrt) neurons and Fos in the hypothalamus, and GABAARα1-induced integral optical density were detected by immunofluorescence. Compared to the CC group, the nonOP and Sham group rats CF were significantly diminished, Fos-positive and Fos-Hcrt double positive cells were significantly increased, and GABA content and GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly elevated (P<0.05). The tiagabine and CC groups exhibited similar results at three time points. The CF of rats in the SR group were diminished and the number of Fos-positive and Fos-Hcrt double positive cells were significantly increased (P<0.05) at RS 6 h and RS l2 h. GABA content and GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly increased in the SR group at all time points (P<0.05), whereas only GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly increased in the tiagabine group at SD 5 day (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that REM sleep deprivation diminished CF, increased the number of Hcrt neurons, GABA content and GABAARα1 expression. Furthermore, all alterations were positively correlated with

  16. Effect of two GABA-ergic drugs on the cognitive functions of rapid eye movement in sleep-deprived and recovered rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lidao; Si, Lengge; Wang, Yuehong; Wuyun, Gerile; Bo, Agula

    2016-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is closely associated with nervous functions. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of gabazine and tiagabine on the cognitive functions (CF) of REM sleep-deprived and sleep recovered rats. Rats were divided into REM sleep deprivation, blank control (CC) and environmental groups. The REM sleep deprivation group was further divided into non-operation (nonOP), sham-operated (Sham), gabazine (SR) and tiagabine groups. Each group was evaluated over five time points: Sleep deprived for 1 day (SD 1 day), SD 3 day, SD 5 day, sleep recovery 6 h (RS 6 h) and RS 12 h. A rat model of REM sleep deprivation was established by a modified multi-platform water method, with CF assessed by Morris water maze. Hypothalamic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid contents were measured via high performance liquid chromatography. The number and morphology of hypocretin (Hcrt) neurons and Fos in the hypothalamus, and GABAARα1-induced integral optical density were detected by immunofluorescence. Compared to the CC group, the nonOP and Sham group rats CF were significantly diminished, Fos-positive and Fos-Hcrt double positive cells were significantly increased, and GABA content and GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly elevated (P<0.05). The tiagabine and CC groups exhibited similar results at three time points. The CF of rats in the SR group were diminished and the number of Fos-positive and Fos-Hcrt double positive cells were significantly increased (P<0.05) at RS 6 h and RS l2 h. GABA content and GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly increased in the SR group at all time points (P<0.05), whereas only GABAARα1 expression levels were significantly increased in the tiagabine group at SD 5 day (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that REM sleep deprivation diminished CF, increased the number of Hcrt neurons, GABA content and GABAARα1 expression. Furthermore, all alterations were positively correlated with

  17. Synaptic Remodeling in the Dentate Gyrus, CA3, CA1, Subiculum, and Entorhinal Cortex of Mice: Effects of Deprived Rearing and Voluntary Running

    PubMed Central

    Schaefers, Andrea T. U.; Grafen, Keren; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Winter, York

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus). We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils. PMID:20508828

  18. Synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex of mice: effects of deprived rearing and voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Andrea T U; Grafen, Keren; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Winter, York

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus). We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils.

  19. Effects of Alcohol-Induced Working Memory Decline on Alcohol Consumption and Adverse Consequences of Use

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, William V.; Day, Anne M.; Metrik, Jane; Leventhal, Adam M.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Alcohol use appears to decrease executive function acutely in a dose dependent manner, and lower baseline executive function appears to contribute to problematic alcohol use. However, no studies, to our knowledge, have examined the relationship between individual differences in working memory (a subcomponent of executive function) after alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors and consequences. Objectives The current study assessed the relationship between drinking behavior, alcohol-related consequences, and alcohol-induced changes in working memory (as assessed by Trails Making Test-B). Method Participants recruited from the community (n = 41), 57.3% male, mean age 39.2, took part in a three-session, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Participants were administered a placebo, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.8 g/kg dose of alcohol. Working memory, past 30 day alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use were measured at baseline; working memory was measured again after each beverage administration. Results Poorer working memory after alcohol administration (controlling for baseline working memory) was significantly associated with a greater number of drinks consumed per drinking day. Additionally, we observed a significant indirect relationship between the degree of alcohol-induced working memory decline and adverse consequences of alcohol use, which was mediated through greater average drinks per drinking day. Conclusions It is possible that greater individual susceptibility to alcohol-induced working memory decline may limit one’s ability to moderate alcohol consumption as evidenced by greater drinks per drinking day, and that this results in more adverse consequences of alcohol use. PMID:26407604

  20. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption on neuronal function in the non-human primate BNST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis function contribute to many of the adverse behavioral effects of chronic voluntary alcohol drinking, including alcohol dependence and mood disorders; limbic brain structures such as the bed nucleus of the stria termin...

  1. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... to alcohol use Get into trouble with the law, family members, friends, school, or dates because of alcohol THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL Alcoholic drinks have different amounts of alcohol in them. Beer is about 5% alcohol, although some beers can ...

  2. The effects and interactions of GABAergic and dopaminergic agents in the prevention of form deprivation myopia by brief periods of normal vision.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Katrina L; Strasberg, Gal; Rayner, Cassie L; Hartfield, Perry J

    2013-05-01

    Intravitreal injections of GABA antagonists, dopamine agonists and brief periods of normal vision have been shown separately to inhibit form-deprivation myopia (FDM). Our study had three aims: (i) establish whether GABAergic agents modify the myopia protective effect of normal vision, (ii) investigate the receptor sub-type specificity of any observed effect, and (iii) consider an interaction with the dopamine (DA) system. Prior to the period of normal vision GABAergic agents were applied either (i) individually, (ii) in combination with other GABAergic agents (an agonist with an antagonist), or (iii) in combination with DA agonists and antagonists. Water injections were given to groups not receiving drug treatments so that all experimental eyes received intravitreal injections. As shown previously, constant form-deprivation resulted in high myopia and when diffusers were removed for 2 h per day the period of normal vision greatly reduced the FDM that developed. GABA agonists inhibited the protective effect of normal vision whereas antagonists had the opposite effect. GABAA/C agonists and D2 DA antagonists when used in combination were additive in suppressing the protective effect of normal vision. A D2 DA agonist restored some of the protective effect of normal vision that was inhibited by a GABA agonist (muscimol). The protective effect of normal vision against form-deprivation is modifiable by both the GABAergic and DAergic pathways.

  3. Effects of stress on alcohol drinking: a review of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Marcelo F.; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale While stress is often proposed to play a significant role in influencing alcohol consumption, the relationship between stress and alcohol is complex and poorly understood. Over several decades, stress effects on alcohol drinking have been studied using a variety of animal models and experimental procedures, yet this large body of literature has generally produced equivocal results. Objectives This paper reviews results from animal studies in which alcohol consumption is evaluated under conditions of acute/sub-chronic stress exposure or models of chronic stress exposure. Evidence also is presented indicating that chronic intermittent alcohol exposure serves as a stressor that consequently influences drinking. Results The effects of various acute/sub-chronic stress procedures on alcohol consumption have generally been mixed, but most study outcomes suggest either no effect or decreased alcohol consumption. In contrast, most studies indicate that chronic stress, especially when administered early in development, results in elevated drinking later in adulthood. Chronic alcohol exposure constitutes a potent stressor itself, and models of chronic intermittent alcohol exposure reliably produce escalation of voluntary alcohol consumption. Conclusions A complex and dynamic interplay among a wide array of genetic, biological, and environmental factors govern stress responses, regulation of alcohol drinking, and the circumstances in which stress modulates alcohol consumption. Suggestions for future directions and new approaches are presented that may aid in developing more sensitive and valid animal models that not only better mimic the clinical situation, but also provide greater understanding of mechanisms that underlie the complexity of stress effects on alcohol drinking. PMID:21850445

  4. Gender Specific Effects of Mood on Alcohol Seeking Behaviors: Preliminary Findings Using Intravenous Alcohol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cyders, Melissa A.; VanderVeen, J. Davis; Plawecki, Martin; Millward, James B.; Hays, James; Kareken, David A.; O’Connor, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Background Although negative mood has long been implicated in differences in alcohol seeking by men and women, little research has used precise, well-controlled laboratory experiments to examine how negative mood affects alcohol seeking behaviors. Methods A total of 34 (19 Women) community-dwelling, alcohol using adults aged 21–32 (mean age=24.86, SD=3.40, 74.3% Caucasian; Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test [AUDIT]= 10.1, SD= 3.4) completed two counter-balanced intravenous alcohol self-administration sessions: one under negative mood and one under neutral mood. Fourteen individuals (9 women; mean age=25.00, SD=2.77) participated in an alcohol “liking” experiment (i.e., free access drinking) and 20 individuals (10 women; mean age=24.77, SD=3.73) participated in an alcohol “wanting” experiment, in which gaining access to alcohol required progressively effortful work. There was no significant difference between men and women on the AUDIT (t(34)=−0.38, p=.71). Results Priming with negative mood induction caused a significant decrease in self-reported mood (mean change=−1.90, t(39)=−6.81, p<.001), as intended. In free access, negative mood was associated with a significantly increased peak breath alcohol concentration (BrAC; F=9.41, p=.01), with a trend toward a greater effect in men than in women (F=2.67, p=.13). Negative mood also had a significant effect on peak BrAC achieved in the progressive work paradigm (F=5.28, p=.04), with a significantly stronger effect in men (F=5.35, p=.03) than women; men also trended toward more consistent work for alcohol across both neutral and negative sessions. Conclusions These preliminary findings demonstrate a gender-specific response on how mood affects alcohol seeking and suggest gender-specific interventions to prevent mood-based alcohol consumption. PMID:26842258

  5. Community off-sales provision and the presence of alcohol-related detritus in residential neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Alasdair J M; Davidson, Neil

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between community off-sales premises and alcohol-related detritus (litter/remains) in residential neighbourhoods. This was accomplished by photographing all brand-identifiable alcohol product detritus (glass, packaging, etc.) where they lay and mapping these against the presence of off-sales outlets (licensed convenience stores) in the community. It was hypothesised that alcohol-related detritus would be greatest near to such alcohol outlets. However, although there was some evidence of a "broken bottles effect", accumulations of alcohol-related detritus near some off-sales premises, it is concluded that local area deprivation is a better predictor of such alcohol-related incivility than is outlet provision. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to current social responsibility policy developments which are designed to make the alcohol industry liable for alcohol-related incivilities.

  6. Discriminating the Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure From Other Behavioral and Learning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Claire D.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are underdiagnosed in general treatment settings. Among the factors involved in identifying the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure are (1) the evidence for prenatal alcohol exposure; (2) the effects of the postnatal, caregiving environment; (3) comorbidities; and (4) differential diagnosis, which includes identifying the neurodevelopmental effects of alcohol and discriminating these effects from those characterizing other conditions. This article reviews findings on the neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure, including learning and memory, motor and sensory/motor effects, visual/spatial skills, and executive functioning and effortful control. Encouraging clinicians to discriminate the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure from other conditions may require more education and training but ultimately will improve outcomes for affected children. PMID:23580040

  7. Exploring the Effect of Ginsenoside Rh1 in a Sleep Deprivation-Induced Mouse Memory Impairment Model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Shi, Zhe; Dong, Liming; Lv, Jingwei; Xu, Pan; Li, Yinghui; Qu, Lina; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-02-28

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae) has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for enhancing cognition for thousands of years. Ginsenoside Rh1, a constituent of ginseng root, as with other constituents, has memory-improving effects in normal mice and scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Sleep deprivation (SD) is associated with memory impairment through induction of oxidative stress. The present study investigated the effect of Rh1 against SD-induced cognitive impairment and attempted to define the possible mechanisms involved. Ginsenoside Rh1 (20 μmol/kg; 40 μmol/kg) and modafinil (0.42 g/kg) were administered to the mice intraperitoneally for 23 days. After 14-day SD, locomotor activity was examined using the open field test, and the object location recognition and Morris water maze tests were used to evaluate cognitive ability. The cortex and hippocampus were then dissected and homogenized, and levels and activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers were evaluated to determine the level of oxidative stress. The results revealed that Rh1 prevented cognitive impairment induced by SD, and its ability to reduce oxidative stress in cortex and hippocampus may contribute to the mechanism of action. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Beneficial effect of astragalosides on stroke condition using PC12 cells under oxygen glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Bi-Ying; Chang, Ching-Ping; Lin, Jia-Wei; Yu, Jung-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Pin; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2014-08-01

    Astragalosides (AST) are reported to be neuroprotective in focal cerebral ischemic models in vivo. In this study, the direct effect of AST against oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) including neuronal injury and the underlying mechanisms in vitro were investigated. 5 h OGD followed by 24 h of reperfusion [adding back oxygen and glucose (OGD-R)] was used to induce in vitro ischemia reperfusion injury in differentiated rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. AST (1, 100, and 200 µg/mL) were added to the culture after 5 h of the OGD ischemic insult and was present during the reoxygenation phases. A key finding was that OGD-R decreased cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase, increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, autophagy, functional impairment of mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in PC12 cells, all of which AST treatment significantly reduced. In addition, AST attenuated OGD-R-induced cell loss through P38 MAPK activation a neuroprotective effect blunted by SB203580, a specific inhibitor of P38 MAPK. Our data suggest that both apoptosis and autophagy are important characteristics of OGD-R-induced PC12 death and that treating PC12 cells with AST blocked OGD-R-induced apoptosis and autophagy by suppressing intracellular oxidative stress, functional impairment of mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our data provide identification of AST that can concomitantly inhibit multiple cells death pathways following OGD injuries in neural cells.

  9. Protective effects of aloperine on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning-Tian; Zhou, Ru; Chang, Ren-Yuan; Hao, Yin-Ju; Ma, Lin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Du, Juan; Zheng, Jie; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yu-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Aloperine (ALO), one of the alkaloids isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., is traditionally used for various diseases including neuronal disorders. This study investigated the protective effects of ALO on neonatal rat primary-cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/RP). Treatment with ALO (25, 50, and 100 mg/l) attenuated neuronal damage (p < 0.01), with evidence of increased cell viability (p < 0.01) and decreased cell morphologic impairment. Furthermore, ALO increased mitochondrial membrane potential (p < 0.01), but inhibited intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)] i (p  < 0.01) elevation in a dose-dependent manner at OGD/RP. ALO also reduced the intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde production and enhanced the antioxidant enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the total antioxidant capacity. The results suggested that ALO has significant neuroprotective effects that can be attributed to anti-oxidative stress.

  10. Effect of alcohol consumption in prenatal life, childhood, and adolescence on child development.

    PubMed

    Foltran, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Franchin, Laura; Verduci, Elvira; Giovannini, Marcello

    2011-11-01

    The effects of alcohol consumption in adults are well described in the literature, while knowledge about the effects of alcohol consumption in children is more limited and less systematic. The present review shows how alcohol consumption may negatively influence the neurobiological and neurobehavioral development of humans. Three different periods of life have been considered: the prenatal term, childhood, and adolescence. For each period, evidence of the short-term and long-term effects of alcohol consumption, including neurodevelopmental effects and associations with subsequent alcohol abuse or dependence, is presented.

  11. Alcohol and pregnancy: Effects on maternal care, HPA axis function, and hippocampal neurogenesis in adult females.

    PubMed

    Workman, Joanna L; Raineki, Charlis; Weinberg, Joanne; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-07-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption negatively affects health, and has additional consequences if consumption occurs during pregnancy as prenatal alcohol exposure adversely affects offspring development. While much is known on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure in offspring less is known about effects of alcohol in dams. Here, we examine whether chronic alcohol consumption during gestation alters maternal behavior, hippocampal neurogenesis and HPA axis activity in late postpartum female rats compared with nulliparous rats. Rats were assigned to alcohol, pair-fed or ad libitum control treatment groups for 21 days (for pregnant rats, this occurred gestation days 1-21). Maternal behavior was assessed throughout the postpartum period. Twenty-one days after alcohol exposure, we assessed doublecortin (DCX) (an endogenous protein expressed in immature neurons) expression in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and HPA axis activity. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy reduced nursing and increased self-directed and negative behaviors, but spared licking and grooming behavior. Alcohol consumption increased corticosterone and adrenal mass only in nulliparous females. Surprisingly, alcohol consumption did not alter DCX-expressing cell density. However, postpartum females had fewer DCX-expressing cells (and of these cells more immature proliferating cells but fewer postmitotic cells) than nulliparous females. Collectively, these data suggest that alcohol consumption during pregnancy disrupts maternal care without affecting HPA function or neurogenesis in dams. Conversely, alcohol altered HPA function in nulliparous females only, suggesting that reproductive experience buffers the long-term effects of alcohol on the HPA axis.

  12. Alcohol and pregnancy: effects on maternal care, HPA axis function, and hippocampal neurogenesis in adult females

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption negatively affects health, and has additional consequences if consumption occurs during pregnancy as prenatal alcohol exposure adversely affects offspring development. While much is known on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure in offspring less is known about effects of alcohol in dams. Here, we examine whether chronic alcohol consumption during gestation alters maternal behavior, hippocampal neurogenesis and HPA axis activity in late postpartum female rats compared with nulliparous females. Rats were assigned to alcohol, pair-fed or ad libitum control treatment groups for 21 days (for pregnant rats, this occurred gestation days 1 – 21). Maternal behavior was assessed throughout the postpartum period. Twenty-one days after alcohol exposure, we assessed doublecortin (DCX) (an endogenous protein expressed in immature neurons) expression in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and HPA axis activity. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy reduced nursing and increased self-directed and negative behaviors, but spared licking and grooming behavior. Alcohol consumption increased corticosterone and adrenal mass only in nulliparous females. Surprisingly, alcohol consumption did not alter DCX-expressing cell density. However, postpartum females had fewer DCX-expressing cells (and of these cells more immature proliferating cells but fewer postmitotic cells) than nulliparous females. Collectively, these data suggest that alcohol consumption during pregnancy disrupts maternal care without affecting HPA function or neurogenesis in dams. Conversely, alcohol altered HPA function in nulliparous females only, suggesting that reproductive experience buffers the long-term effects of alcohol on the HPA axis. PMID:25900594

  13. Effects of Chronic Stress on Alcohol Reward- and Anxiety-Related Behavior in High- and Low-Alcohol Preferring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Breit, Kristen R.; Chester, Julia A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Stress exposure (SE) during adolescence is associated with an increased risk for the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Past research has shown that SE during adolescence increases voluntary alcohol consumption in mice during adulthood; however, little is known about the positive or negative motivational aspects of this relationship. Methods High-alcohol preferring (HAP2) and low-alcohol preferring (LAP2) male mice were exposed to stress during adolescence, stress during adulthood, or no stress. After a 30-day interim, subjects were exposed to alcohol-induced place and footshock-induced fear conditioning procedures to measure stress-induced behavioral alterations during adulthood. Results SE during adolescence did not increase the magnitude of alcohol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), as hypothesized, but increased the magnitude of conditioned fear, as measured by fear-potentiated startle (FPS), in HAP2 subjects only. Regardless of stress treatment group, LAP2 subjects showed greater alcohol-induced CPP expression than HAP2 mice. HAP2 mice also showed greater FPS than LAP2 mice, as previously shown. Conclusions These results in mice, taken together with past research, suggest that mice exposed to stress during adolescence do not increase alcohol consumption during adulthood because of a greater sensitivity to the rewarding effects of alcohol, as measured via place conditioning. These results in mice also suggest that humans exposed to stress during adolescence may be more susceptible to developing anxiety during adulthood. The findings may be particularly relevant for humans with a familial history of AUDs. PMID:26876975

  14. [Effects of alcohol consumption on traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Katada, Ryuichi

    2011-10-01

    It has been well known that alcohol consumption affects traumatic brain injury. The mechanism of detrimental effect of ethanol on traumatic brain injury has not been clarified. This review focused on the relationship among traumatic brain injury, ethanol and aquaporin-4. We have reported that ethanol increased brain edema after brain contusion and decreased survival rates in rats. It was suggested that increasing brain edema by ethanol after brain contusion may be caused by oxidative stress. Brain edema consists of cytotoxic brain edema, vasogenic brain edema, interstitial brain edema and osmotic edema. Ethanol mainly increases cytotoxic brain edema. Both alcohol consumption and brain contusion cause oxidative stress. Antioxidant treatment decreases cytotoxic brain edema. Aquaporin-4, an water channel, was increased by ethanol 24 hr after traumatic brain injury in rat. The aquaporin-4 inhibitor decreased brain edema after brain contusion and increased survival rates under ethanol consumption. Aquaporin-4 may have strict relation between ethanol and brain edema increasing after brain contusion.

  15. Changes of functional and effective connectivity in smoking replenishment on deprived heavy smokers: a resting-state FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2013-01-01

    Previous researches have explored the changes of functional connectivity caused by smoking with the aid of fMRI. This study considers not only functional connectivity but also effective connectivity regarding both brain networks and brain regions by using a novel analysis framework that combines independent component analysis (ICA) and Granger causality analysis (GCA). We conducted a resting-state fMRI experiment in which twenty-one heavy smokers were scanned in two sessions of different conditions: smoking abstinence followed by smoking satiety. In our framework, group ICA was firstly adopted to obtain the spatial patterns of the default-mode network (DMN), executive-control network (ECN), and salience network (SN). Their associated time courses were analyzed using GCA, showing that the effective connectivity from SN to DMN was reduced and that from ECN/DMN to SN was enhanced after smoking replenishment. A paired t-test on ICA spatial patterns revealed functional connectivity variation in regions such as the insula, parahippocampus, precuneus, anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, and ventromedial/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These regions were later selected as the regions of interest (ROIs), and their effective connectivity was investigated subsequently using GCA. In smoking abstinence, the insula showed the increased effective connectivity with the other ROIs; while in smoking satiety, the parahippocampus had the enhanced inter-area effective connectivity. These results demonstrate our hypothesis that for deprived heavy smokers, smoking replenishment takes effect on both functional and effective connectivity. Moreover, our analysis framework could be applied in a range of neuroscience studies.

  16. Effects of water deprivation for 72 hours on the pharmacokinetics of a new carbapenem, DA-1131, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Hee; Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Won Bae; Lee, Inchul; Lee, Myung Gull

    2002-09-27

    Hormonal, physiological, and biochemical changes occurring in dehydrated patients could alter the pharmacokinetics of the drugs; therefore, the pharmacokinetics of DA-1131, a new carbapenem antibiotic, were investigated after 1-min intravenous administration of the drug at 50 mg/kg to control and 72-hr water-deprived rats. The impaired kidney and liver functions were observed in water-deprived rats on the basis of tissue microscopic examination. After intravenous infusion of the drug to water-deprived rats, the plasma concentrations of DA-1131 were higher and this resulted in a significantly greater total area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity than those in control rats (4520 versus 3760 microg min/ml). This could be due to significantly slower total body clearance (CL) of DA-1131 in water-deprived rats (9.81 versus 14.1 ml/min/kg). The significantly slower CL of DA-1131 in water-deprived rats was due to significant decrease in both renal clearance (2.87 versus 5.13 ml/min/kg because of a significant decrease in 8-hr urinary excretion of unchanged DA-1131 [28.4 versus 39.9% of the intravenous dose] due to impaired kidney function) and nonrenal clearance (6.82 versus 8.66 ml/min/kg because of a significant decrease in the metabolism of DA-1131 in the kidney, as proved by the significant decrease in total renal DHP-I enzyme activity [1900 versus 2130 mU/each kidney]) in water-deprived rats. Water-deprivation did not alter the affinity of rat tissues to DA-1131.

  17. A Review of Existing Studies Reporting the Negative Effects of Alcohol Access and Positive Effects of Alcohol Control Policies on Interpersonal Violence

    PubMed Central

    Fitterer, Jessica L.; Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Stockwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption often leads to elevated rates of violence yet alcohol access policies continue to relax across the globe. Our review establishes the extent alcohol policy can moderate violent crime through alcohol availability restrictions. Results were informed from comprehensive selection of peer-reviewed journals from 1950 to October 2015. Our search identified 87 relevant studies on alcohol access and violence conducted across 12 countries. Seventeen studies included quasi-control design, and 23 conducted intervention analysis. Seventy-one (82%) reported a significant relationship between alcohol access and violent offenses. Alcohol outlet studies reported the greatest percentage of significant results (93%), with trading hours (63%), and alcohol price following (58%). Results from baseline studies indicated the effectiveness of increasing the price of commonly consumed alcohol, restricting the hours of alcohol trading, and limiting the number of alcohol outlets per region to prevent violent offenses. Unclear are the effects of tax reductions, restriction of on-premises re-entry, and different outlet types on violent crime. Further, the generalization of statistics over broad areas and the low number of control/intervention studies poses some concern for confounding or correlated effects on study results, and amount of information for local-level prevention of interpersonal violence. Future studies should focus on gathering longitudinal data, validating models, limiting crime data to peak drinking days and times, and wherever possible collecting the joint distribution between violent crime, intoxication, and place. A greater uptake of local-level analysis will benefit studies comparing the influence of multiple alcohol establishment types by relating the location of a crime to establishment proximity. Despite, some uncertainties particular studies showed that even modest policy changes, such as 1% increases in alcohol price, 1 h changes to closing times

  18. Effects of Alcoholism on Grandchildren: A Bowenian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Barbara J.; Coll, Kenneth M.

    In comparing the personality characteristics of late adolescent and young adult children of alcoholics with those of their peers, it was found that individuals with grandparents who were alcoholics in the absence of parental alcoholism were very similar to children of alcoholics. Grandparents may exert a social influence by passing on…

  19. [Effect of painting work on alcoholic liver dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Goji, Junko; Tsuchiya, Goro; Fujita, Daisuke; Koizumi, Naoko

    2003-11-01

    The effect of painting on alcoholic liver dysfunction was investigated. The subjects were male workers engaged in small-scale enterprises under contract to with heavy industries. Painting involved metal cleaning and painting, and the air concentrations of organic solvents were frequently high. The study population consisted of 1,157 male workers over 40 yr of age. Of them, 85 were painters engaged for a mean duration of 20.9 +/- 9.8 yr. There was no significant difference in GOT and GPT between painters who did not drink and non-painters who did not drink, but GOT and GPT were significantly higher in painters drinking several days a week than in non-painters. A past history of hepatitis affected GOT, GPT and gamma-GTP. Painting, daily alcohol consumption, drinking frequency and body mass index affected gamma-GTP. A questionnaire survey of hepatitis was also conducted in 206 male workers (age range 18-67 yr). Of them, 134 were painters (mean duration of painting, 16.8 +/- 10.4 yr). This questionnaire survey showed that 13 painters (9.6% of the painters) and two non-painters (2.6% of the non-painters) had a history of hepatitis. Of the 13 painters, five painters had a history of hepatitis C and four had a history of alcoholic hepatitis. All of these 13 painters had the habit of drinking. This study indicated that painting had little effect on the liver function in painters not drinking, but increased alcoholic liver dysfunction in painters with the drinking habit.

  20. Effect of boric acid on oxidative stress in rats with fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sogut, Ibrahim; Oglakci, Aysegul; Kartkaya, Kazim; Ol, Kevser Kusat; Sogut, Melis Savasan; Kanbak, Gungor; Inal, Mine Erden

    2015-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study concerning the effect of boric acid (BA) administration on fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). In this study, the aim was to investigate prenatal alcohol-induced oxidative stress on the cerebral cortex of newborn rat pups and assess the protective and beneficial effects of BA supplementation on rats with FAS. Pregnant rats were divided into three groups, namely the control, alcohol and alcohol + boric acid groups. As markers of alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of the newborn pups, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were measured. Although the MDA levels in the alcohol group were significantly increased compared with those in the control group (P<0.05), the MDA level in the alcohol + boric acid group was shown to be significantly decreased compared with that in the alcohol group (P<0.01). The CAT activity of the alcohol + boric acid group was significantly higher than that in the alcohol group (P<0.05). The GPx activity in the alcohol group was decreased compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that alcohol is capable of triggering damage to membranes of the cerebral cortex of rat pups and BA could be influential in antioxidant mechanisms against oxidative stress resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure.

  1. Effect of boric acid on oxidative stress in rats with fetal alcohol syndrome

    PubMed Central

    SOGUT, IBRAHIM; OGLAKCI, AYSEGUL; KARTKAYA, KAZIM; OL, KEVSER KUSAT; SOGUT, MELIS SAVASAN; KANBAK, GUNGOR; INAL, MINE ERDEN

    2015-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study concerning the effect of boric acid (BA) administration on fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). In this study, the aim was to investigate prenatal alcohol-induced oxidative stress on the cerebral cortex of newborn rat pups and assess the protective and beneficial effects of BA supplementation on rats with FAS. Pregnant rats were divided into three groups, namely the control, alcohol and alcohol + boric acid groups. As markers of alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of the newborn pups, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were measured. Although the MDA levels in the alcohol group were significantly increased compared with those in the control group (P<0.05), the MDA level in the alcohol + boric acid group was shown to be significantly decreased compared with that in the alcohol group (P<0.01). The CAT activity of the alcohol + boric acid group was significantly higher than that in the alcohol group (P<0.05). The GPx activity in the alcohol group was decreased compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that alcohol is capable of triggering damage to membranes of the cerebral cortex of rat pups and BA could be influential in antioxidant mechanisms against oxidative stress resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. PMID:25667671

  2. Sensitivity of the stanford sleepiness scale to the effects of cumulative partial sleep deprivation and recovery oversleeping.

    PubMed

    Herscovitch, J; Broughton, R

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) to short-term cumulative partial sleep deprivation (PSD) and subsequent recovery oversleeping was examined. A repeated-measures design included 7 paid healthy undergraduate volunteers, who were normal sleepers (mean sleep time 7.6 hr), and consisted of the following schedule: (a) pre-baseline; (b)sleep reduction of 40% of 1 night (mean, 4.6 hr) for 5 nights; (c) recovery oversleeping for night 1 (mean, 10.6 Hr) and night 2 (mean, 9.1 hr); (d) post-baseline. Daytime performance testing utilized a 1 hr auditory vigilance task and four short-duration (10 min) tests, two of which have been shown sensitive to total and partial sleep loss effects. Subjects completed SSS forms every min while awake and 1-9 scales of mood and energy upon awakening. Subjective measures were analyzed across conditions for mean all-day and task-related SSS values and mood and energy ratings. A correlational analysis investigated individual correspondences between ratings and performance. Results indicate that SSS is sensitive to deficits in alertness following PSD. However, it generally does not predict individual performance efficiency and therefore cannot act as a substitute for performance measures in studies involving chronic sleep loss.

  3. The effects of chewing versus caffeine on alertness, cognitive performance and cardiac autonomic activity during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Mark; Pavy, Alan; van den Heuvel, Cameron

    2006-12-01

    Chewing has been shown to alleviate feelings of sleepiness and improve cognitive performance during the day. This study investigated the effect of chewing on alertness and cognitive performance across one night without sleep as well as the possible mediating role of cardiac autonomic activity. Fourteen adults participated in a randomized, counterbalanced protocol employing a chewing, placebo and caffeine condition. Participants completed tasks assessing psychomotor vigilance, tracking, grammatical reasoning, alertness and sleepiness each hour across the night. All participants received either placebo or caffeine (200 mg), while the chewing condition also chewed on a tasteless and odorless substance for 15 min each hour. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of the successive differences in R-R intervals on the ECG (RMSSD), and preejection period (PEP) were simultaneously recorded. Alertness and cognitive performance amongst the chewing condition did not differ or were in fact worse when compared with placebo. Similarly, measures of HR and RMSSD remained the same between these two conditions; however, PEP was reduced in the later part of the night in the chewing condition compared with a relative increase for placebo. Caffeine led to improved speed and accuracy on cognitive tasks and increased alertness when compared with chewing. Relative increases in RMSSD and reductions in HR were demonstrated following caffeine; however, no change in PEP was seen. Strong associations between cardiac parasympathetic activity and complex cognitive tasks, as well as between subjective alertness and simpler cognitive tasks, suggest a differential process mediating complex versus simple cognitive performance during sleep deprivation.

  4. Acute sleep deprivation: the effects of the AMPAKINE compound CX717 on human cognitive performance, alertness and recovery sleep.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Julia; Stanley, Neil; James, Lynette M; Wright, Nicola; Johnsen, Sigurd; Arbon, Emma L; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2012-08-01

    AMPA receptor modulation is a potential novel approach to enhance cognitive performance. CX717 is a positive allosteric modulator of the AMPA receptor that has shown efficacy in rodent and primate cognition models. CX717 (100 mg, 300 mg and 1000 mg) and placebo were studied in 16 healthy male volunteers (18-45 years) in a randomized, crossover study. Cognitive function, arousal and recovery sleep (by polysomnography) were assessed during the extended wakefulness protocol. Placebo condition was associated with significant decrements in cognition, particularly at the circadian nadir (between 03:00 and 05:00). Pre-specified primary and secondary analyses (general linear mixed modelling, GLMM) at each separate time point did not reveal consistent improvements in performance or objective alertness with any dose of CX717. Exploratory repeated measures analysis, a method used to take into account the influence of individual differences, demonstrated an improvement in attention-based task performance following the 1000 mg dose. Analysis of the recovery sleep showed that CX717 1000 mg significantly reduced stage 4 and slow-wave sleep (p ≤ 0.05) with evidence of reduced electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave and spindle activity. The study suggests that CX717 only at the 1000 mg dose may counteract effects of sleep deprivation on attention-based tasks and that it may interfere with subsequent recovery sleep.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and aging: Effects on spatial learning and memory after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus.

    PubMed

    Estrada, C; Fernández-Gómez, F J; López, D; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Tunez, I; Toledo, F; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    The benefits of neuromodulatory procedures as a possible therapeutic application for cognitive rehabilitation have increased with the progress made in non-invasive modes of brain stimulation in aged-related disorders. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method used to examine multiple facets of the human brain and to ameliorate the impairment in cognition caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to evaluate how a chronic TMS treatment could improve learning and memory functions after sleep deprivation (SD) in old Octodon degus. SD was executed by gently handling to keep the animals awake throughout the night. Thirty young and twenty-four old O. degus females were divided in six groups (control, acute and chronic TMS treatment). Behavioral tests included; Radial Arm Maze (RAM), Barnes Maze (BM) and Novel Object Recognition (NOR). Although learning and memory functions improved in young animals with only one session of TMS treatment, a significant improvement in cognitive performance was seen in old animals after 4 and 7days of TMS, depending on the task that was performed. No side effects were observed following, which showed therapeutic potential for improving age-related cognitive performance.

  6. The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Cardiac Function and Tolerance to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Sajad; Asl, Amir Nezami; Asgari, Alireza; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation (SD) is strongly associated with elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective To determine the effect of SD on basal hemodynamic functions and tolerance to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in male rats. Method SD was induced by using the flowerpot method for 4 days. Isolated hearts were perfused with Langendorff setup, and the following parameters were measured at baseline and after IR: left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP); heart rate (HR); and the maximum rate of increase and decrease of left ventricular pressure (±dp/dt). Heart NOx level, infarct size and coronary flow CK-MB and LDH were measured after IR. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured at start and end of study. Results In the SD group, the baseline levels of LVDP (19%), +dp/dt (18%), and -dp/dt (21%) were significantly (p < 0.05) lower, and HR (32%) was significantly higher compared to the controls. After ischemia, hearts from SD group displayed a significant increase in HR together with a low hemodynamic function recovery compared to the controls. In the SD group, NOx level in heart, coronary flow CK-MB and LDH and infarct size significantly increased after IR; also SD rats had higher SBP after 4 days. Conclusion Hearts from SD rats had lower basal cardiac function and less tolerance to IR injury, which may be linked to an increase in NO production following IR. PMID:26559853

  7. The effect of exercise, alcohol or both combined on health and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Suter, P M; Schutz, Y

    2008-12-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is consumed on a daily basis by a large fraction of the population, and in many countries, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is considered as an integral part of the diet. Although the relationship between alcohol intake and obesity is controversial, regular consumption of alcohol, through its effects in suppressing fat oxidation, is regarded as a risk factor for weight gain, increased abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. Indeed, alcohol taken with a meal leads to an increase in postprandial lipemia-an effect on postprandial metabolism that is opposite to that observed with exercise. Furthermore, although regular exercise training and/or a preprandial exercise session reduce postprandial lipemia independently of alcohol ingestion, the exercise-induced reduction in postprandial lipemia is nonetheless less pronounced when alcohol is also consumed with the meal. Whether or not alcohol influences exercise and sport performance remains contradictory. It is believed that alcohol has deleterious effects on the performance, although it may contribute to reduce pain and anxiety. The alcohol effects on sports performance depend on the type and dosage of alcohol, acute vs chronic administration, the alcohol elimination rate as well as the type of exercise.

  8. Effects of Beverages on Alcohol Metabolism: Potential Health Benefits and Harmful Impacts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Sha; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-09

    Nonalcoholic beverages are usually consumed accompanying alcoholic drinks, and their effects on alcohol metabolism are unclear in vivo. In this study, the effects of 20 nonalcoholic beverages on alcohol metabolism and liver injury caused by alcohol were evaluated in mice. Kunming mice were orally fed with alcohol (52%, v/v) and beverages. The concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde in blood as well as the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in liver were assessed to indicate alcohol metabolism. The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in serum as well as the levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver were measured to reflect the alcohol-induced liver injury. The results showed that the treatment of soda water, green tea and honey chrysanthemum tea could accelerate ethanol metabolism and prevent liver injuries caused by alcohol when companied with excessive alcohol drinking. They might be potential dietary supplements for the alleviation of harmful effects from excessive alcohol consumption. On the contrary, some beverages such as fresh orange juice and red bull are not advised to drink when companied with alcohol consumption due to their adverse effects on ethanol induced liver injury.

  9. Effects of Beverage-Specific Alcohol Consumption on Drinking Behaviors among Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Reingle, Jennifer M.; Tobler, Amy L.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic beverage consumption among high school students has shifted from beer to liquor. The current longitudinal study examined the effects of beverage-specific alcohol use on drinking behaviors among urban youth. Data included 731 adolescents who participated in Project Northland Chicago and reported consuming alcohol in 7th grade. Logistic…

  10. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Anger Experience and Expression among Partner Assaultive Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    The author investigated the acute effects of alcohol intoxication on anger experience and expression among 46 maritally violent (MV) and 56 maritally nonviolent (NV) men randomly assigned to receive alcohol, placebo, or no alcohol. Participants completed an anger-arousing articulated thoughts in simulated situations (ATSS) paradigm and imagined…

  11. The Effects of Education on the Attitudes of Counselors in Training toward Alcoholism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kampen, Pamela Sue

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of education on the attitudes of counselors in training toward alcoholism. Alcoholism is a treatable disease if recognized, properly diagnosed and the appropriate interventions are made available to the alcoholic and their families. There is estimated to be more than two billion people…

  12. Effects of Beverages on Alcohol Metabolism: Potential Health Benefits and Harmful Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Sha; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic beverages are usually consumed accompanying alcoholic drinks, and their effects on alcohol metabolism are unclear in vivo. In this study, the effects of 20 nonalcoholic beverages on alcohol metabolism and liver injury caused by alcohol were evaluated in mice. Kunming mice were orally fed with alcohol (52%, v/v) and beverages. The concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde in blood as well as the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in liver were assessed to indicate alcohol metabolism. The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in serum as well as the levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver were measured to reflect the alcohol-induced liver injury. The results showed that the treatment of soda water, green tea and honey chrysanthemum tea could accelerate ethanol metabolism and prevent liver injuries caused by alcohol when companied with excessive alcohol drinking. They might be potential dietary supplements for the alleviation of harmful effects from excessive alcohol consumption. On the contrary, some beverages such as fresh orange juice and red bull are not advised to drink when companied with alcohol consumption due to their adverse effects on ethanol induced liver injury. PMID:27005619

  13. Effects of Antrodia camphorata on alcohol clearance and antifibrosis in livers of rats continuously fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Tze; Tzang, Bor-Show; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Kang, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2011-04-27

    Alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) is the result of an excessive or chronic consumption of alcohol. Nine male Wistar rats per group were randomly assigned to one of the following drinking treatments: a 20% (w/w) alcohol solution (ALC); a 20% (w/w) alcohol solution cotreated with 0.25 g silymarin/kg BW/day; or a 20% (w/w) alcohol solution cotreated with 0.025 g Niuchangchih ( Antrodia camphorata )/kg BW/day for 4 weeks. Rats with cotreatments of silymarin or Niuchangchih had smaller (p < 0.05) relative liver size, less (p < 0.05) liver lipid accumulation, and lower (p < 0.05) liver damage indices [aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) values]. In the regulation of alcohol metabolism, the lower serum alcohol level was observed only in alcohol-fed rats supplemented with Niuchangchih. Meanwhile, cotreatment of silymarin or Niuchangchih increased (p < 0.05) CAT and ALDH activities but did not (p > 0.05) affect ADH and CYP2E1 expressions, which accelerate alcohol metabolism in the body. Additionally, neither silymarin nor Niuchangchih (p > 0.05) influenced serum/hepatic MMP-2 activities and NF-κB, AP1, and α-SMA gene expressions, but serum/hepatic MMP-9 activities and TNF-α, KLF-6, and TGF-β1 gene expressions of alcohol-fed rats were down-regulated (p < 0.05) by silymarin or Niuchangchih, which also could explain the lower liver damage observed in rats chronically fed alcohol.

  14. The Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Alcohol Expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol expectancy (AEs) research has enhanced our understanding of how anticipated alcohol effects confer risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, extant AE measures have limitations within one or more of the following areas: assessing a comprehensive range of effects, specifying the hypothetical number of drinks consumed, assessing AEs by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC), and/or psychometric evaluation. Building upon the strengths of existing measures, we employed conceptual and statistical advances in measurement development to create the novel, psychometrically-sound Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale (AEAS). Unique to this study, pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive sampling of effects that varied in valence (positive/negative) and arousal (low/high) and were identified as plausible outcomes of drinking. The AEAS specified the number of drinks individuals imagined consuming (adjusted for sex) and the hypothetical drinking episode length (2 hours). AEs were also assessed separately by BAC limb. For validation purposes, the AEAS was included in several survey studies of young adults (ages 18-30). The validity argument for the proposed interpretation of AEAS test scores was based upon the following: 1) exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (N=546) identified a 22-item, 4-factor internal structure, categorizing alcohol effects into quadrants (high/low arousal crossed with positive/negative valence); 2) scalar measurement invariance was established for BAC limb, sex, and binge drinking status; 3) convergence/divergence was observed with alternative AEs measures and mood; and 4) test-criterion relationships were observed with several alcohol-related outcomes. The reliability argument was based on test-retest and internal consistency coefficients. PMID:22708572

  15. Relative Deprivation, Poor Health Habits and Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibner, Christine E