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Sample records for alcohol myopia theory

  1. Alcohol Use and High-Risk Sexual Behavior among Collegiate Women: A Review of Research on Alcohol Myopia Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Jessica A.; Umstattd, M. Renee; Usdan, Stuart L.

    2010-01-01

    A review of current English literature in the areas of high-risk alcohol use and sexual behavior was conducted from September 2007 to December 2008. Objective: The purpose was to specifically review studies that used alcohol myopia theory (AMT) as the theoretical perspective from which they were evaluated and analyzed. Participants: Collegiate…

  2. Development and validation of the Alcohol Myopia Scale.

    PubMed

    Lac, Andrew; Berger, Dale E

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol myopia theory conceptualizes the ability of alcohol to narrow attention and how this demand on mental resources produces the impairments of self-inflation, relief, and excess. The current research was designed to develop and validate a scale based on this framework. People who were alcohol users rated items representing myopic experiences arising from drinking episodes in the past month. In Study 1 (N = 260), the preliminary 3-factor structure was supported by exploratory factor analysis. In Study 2 (N = 289), the 3-factor structure was substantiated with confirmatory factor analysis, and it was superior in fit to an empirically indefensible 1-factor structure. The final 14-item scale was evaluated with internal consistency reliability, discriminant validity, convergent validity, criterion validity, and incremental validity. The alcohol myopia scale (AMS) illuminates conceptual underpinnings of this theory and yields insights for understanding the tunnel vision that arises from intoxication.

  3. "Alcohol Myopia," Expectations, Social Interests, and Sorority Pledge Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Jeffrey W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines "alcohol myopia" (an increased use of alcohol in the face of increased negative consequences of use) in freshman college women with or without sorority pledge status. Increased alcohol use and alcohol myopia were present in the sorority pledge group. Both groups showed anomalous myopic behavior as alcohol use increased. (RJM)

  4. Eye growth and myopia development: Unifying theory and Matlab model.

    PubMed

    Hung, George K; Mahadas, Kausalendra; Mohammad, Faisal

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article is to present an updated unifying theory of the mechanisms underlying eye growth and myopia development. A series of model simulation programs were developed to illustrate the mechanism of eye growth regulation and myopia development. Two fundamental processes are presumed to govern the relationship between physiological optics and eye growth: genetically pre-programmed signaling and blur feedback. Cornea/lens is considered to have only a genetically pre-programmed component, whereas eye growth is considered to have both a genetically pre-programmed and a blur feedback component. Moreover, based on the Incremental Retinal-Defocus Theory (IRDT), the rate of change of blur size provides the direction for blur-driven regulation. The various factors affecting eye growth are shown in 5 simulations: (1 - unregulated eye growth): blur feedback is rendered ineffective, as in the case of form deprivation, so there is only genetically pre-programmed eye growth, generally resulting in myopia; (2 - regulated eye growth): blur feedback regulation demonstrates the emmetropization process, with abnormally excessive or reduced eye growth leading to myopia and hyperopia, respectively; (3 - repeated near-far viewing): simulation of large-to-small change in blur size as seen in the accommodative stimulus/response function, and via IRDT as well as nearwork-induced transient myopia (NITM), leading to the development of myopia; (4 - neurochemical bulk flow and diffusion): release of dopamine from the inner plexiform layer of the retina, and the subsequent diffusion and relay of neurochemical cascade show that a decrease in dopamine results in a reduction of proteoglycan synthesis rate, which leads to myopia; (5 - Simulink model): model of genetically pre-programmed signaling and blur feedback components that allows for different input functions to simulate experimental manipulations that result in hyperopia, emmetropia, and myopia. These model simulation programs

  5. Long term results of no-alcohol laser epithelial keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Verboschi, Francesca; De Rosa, Vittoria; Salomone, Mariella; Vingolo, Enzo Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the long term clinical results of mechanical no-alcohol-assisted laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) versus standard photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for low-moderate myopia. METHODS Twenty-five eyes treated with LASEK and twenty-five eyes treated with PRK were evaluated with a mean follow-up duration of 60mo. Mechanical separation of the epithelium was performed with blunt spatula and without application of alcohol. Laser ablation was performed with the MEL-70 excimer laser. All patients were examined daily until epithelial closure; at 1, 3, 6, and 12mo, and every year subsequently. Main outcome measures were uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), manifest refraction, haze, efficacy and safety indexes. RESULTS Twenty-one eyes and 22 eyes completed follow-up of 60mo in LASEK and PRK group respectively. Manifest refraction at 60mo follow-up was -0.01 and 0.26 in LASEK and PRK group respectively. In the LASEK group mean UDVA and mean CDVA after 60mo were 20/22 and 20/20 respectively (P>0.01). In the PRK group mean UDVA and mean CDVA at 60mo follow-up were 20/20 and 20/20 after 60mo (P>0.01). The efficacy indexes were 0.87 and 0.95, and the safety indexes were 1.25 and 1.4 respectively for LASEK group and PRK group. CONCLUSION Both standard PRK and no-alcohol LASEK offer safe and effective correction of low-moderate myopia in the long term without any statistically significant difference between the two groups. PMID:26086011

  6. Theories of the Alcoholic Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, W. Miles

    Several theories of the alcoholic personality have been devised to determine the relationship between the clusters of personality characteristics of alcoholics and their abuse of alcohol. The oldest and probably best known theory is the dependency theory, formulated in the tradition of classical psychoanalysis, which associates the alcoholic's…

  7. Are Alcohol Expectancies Associations? Comment on Moss and Albery (2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiers, Reinout W.; Stacy, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    Moss and Albery (2009) presented a dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link, integrating alcohol expectancy and alcohol myopia theory. Their integrative theory rests on a number of assumptions including, first, that alcohol expectancies are associations that can be activated automatically by an alcohol-relevant context, and second, that…

  8. Single-Step Transepithelial PRK vs Alcohol-Assisted PRK in Myopia and Compound Myopic Astigmatism Correction.

    PubMed

    Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J; Cieslinska, Iwona; Mosquera, Samuel A; Verma, Shwetabh

    2016-02-01

    Transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (tPRK), where both the epithelium and stroma are removed in a single-step, is a relatively new procedure of laser refractive error correction. This study compares the 3-month results of myopia and compound myopic astigmatism correction by tPRK or conventional alcohol-assisted PRK (aaPRK).This prospective, nonrandomized, case-control study recruited 148 consecutive patients; 93 underwent tPRK (173 eyes) and 55 aaPRK (103 eyes). Refractive results, predictability, safety, and efficacy were evaluated during the 3-month follow-up. The main outcome measures were uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and mean refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE).Mean preoperative MRSE was -4.30 ± 1.72 D and -4.33 ± 1.96 D, respectively (P = 0.87). The 3-month follow-up rate was 82.1% in the tPRK group (n = 145) and 86.4% in aaPRK group (n = 90), P = 0.81. Postoperative UDVA was 20/20 or better in 97% and 94% of eyes, respectively (P = 0.45). In the tPRK and aaPRK groups, respectively, 13% and 21% of eyes lost 1 line of CDVA, and 30% and 31% gained 1 or 2 lines (P = 0.48). Mean postoperative MRSE was -0.14 ± 0.26 D in the tPRK group and -0.12 ± 0.20 D in the aaPRK group (P = 0.9). The correlation between attempted versus achieved MRSE was equally high in both groups.Single-step transepithelial PRK and conventional PRK provide very similar results 3 months postoperatively. These procedures are predictable, effective, and safe for correction of myopia and compound myopic astigmatism.

  9. Senile cataracts and myopia

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Jacobs, D.R.; Jackson, S.M.; Zwick, H.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 32 persons with myopia and 38 persons with emmetropia who had been operated on at two US Army hospitals on the California coast showed that the persons with myopia who had worn eyeglasses for at least 20 years underwent cataract extraction at a significantly (P less than .00005) older age than the persons with emmetropia (median age at the time of the operation was 70 years, compared with 64 years). These results support the theory that some protection against solar ultraviolet radiation is offered the eyes by eye wear worn continuously and that solar ultraviolet radiation may be a contributing factor in the formation of human senile cataracts.

  10. Collegiate Alcohol Use and High-Risk Sexual Behavior: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaly, Perry W.; Heesacker, Martin; Frost, Hanna M.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses two theories of alcohol use and risky behavior: disinhibition theory and alcohol myopia theory. Reviews the empirical research on collegiate alcohol use and high-risk sexual behavior. Suggestions for future research and for student personnel professionals are provided. (Contains 58 references.) (GCP)

  11. Myopia prevention, near work, and visual acuity of college students: integrating the theory of planned behavior and self-determination theory.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derwin King-Chung; Fung, Ying-Ki; Xing, Suxuan; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-06-01

    There has been little research examining the psychological antecedents of safety-oriented behavior aimed at reducing myopia risk. This study utilizes self-determination theory (SDT) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to understand the role of motivational and social-cognitive factors on individuals' near-work behavior. Adopting a prospective design, undergraduate students (n = 107) completed an initial questionnaire based on SDT in week 1, a second questionnaire containing measures of TPB variables in week 2, and objective measures of reading distance and visual acuity in week 6. The data were analyzed by variance-based structural equation modeling. The results showed that perceived autonomy support and autonomous motivation from SDT significantly predicted attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control from the TPB. These social-cognitive factors were significantly associated with intention and intention significantly predicted reading distance. The relationships in the model held when controlling for visual acuity. In conclusion, the integrated model of SDT and the TPB may help explain myopia-preventive behaviors. PMID:23404136

  12. Myopia prevention, near work, and visual acuity of college students: integrating the theory of planned behavior and self-determination theory.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derwin King-Chung; Fung, Ying-Ki; Xing, Suxuan; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-06-01

    There has been little research examining the psychological antecedents of safety-oriented behavior aimed at reducing myopia risk. This study utilizes self-determination theory (SDT) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to understand the role of motivational and social-cognitive factors on individuals' near-work behavior. Adopting a prospective design, undergraduate students (n = 107) completed an initial questionnaire based on SDT in week 1, a second questionnaire containing measures of TPB variables in week 2, and objective measures of reading distance and visual acuity in week 6. The data were analyzed by variance-based structural equation modeling. The results showed that perceived autonomy support and autonomous motivation from SDT significantly predicted attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control from the TPB. These social-cognitive factors were significantly associated with intention and intention significantly predicted reading distance. The relationships in the model held when controlling for visual acuity. In conclusion, the integrated model of SDT and the TPB may help explain myopia-preventive behaviors.

  13. A Dual-Process Model of the Alcohol-Behavior Link for Social Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Antony C.; Albery, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    A dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link is presented, synthesizing 2 of the major social-cognitive approaches: expectancy and myopia theories. Substantial evidence has accrued to support both of these models, and recent neurocognitive models of the effects of alcohol on thought and behavior have provided evidence to support both as well.…

  14. The Possible Role of Peripheral Refraction in Development of Myopia.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Rosén, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Recent longitudinal studies do not support the current theory of relative peripheral hyperopia causing myopia. The theory is based on misunderstanding of the Hoogerheide et al. article of 1971, which actually found relative peripheral hyperopia to be present after, rather than before, myopia development. The authors present two alternative theories of the role of peripheral refraction in the development and progression of myopia. The one for which most detail is given is based on cessation of ocular growth when the periphery is at an emmetropic stage as determined by equivalent blur of the two line foci caused by oblique astigmatism. This paper is based on an invited commentary on the role of lens treatments in myopia from the 15th International Myopia Conference in Wenzhou, China in September 2015. PMID:27560691

  15. The Possible Role of Peripheral Refraction in Development of Myopia.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Rosén, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Recent longitudinal studies do not support the current theory of relative peripheral hyperopia causing myopia. The theory is based on misunderstanding of the Hoogerheide et al. article of 1971, which actually found relative peripheral hyperopia to be present after, rather than before, myopia development. The authors present two alternative theories of the role of peripheral refraction in the development and progression of myopia. The one for which most detail is given is based on cessation of ocular growth when the periphery is at an emmetropic stage as determined by equivalent blur of the two line foci caused by oblique astigmatism. This paper is based on an invited commentary on the role of lens treatments in myopia from the 15th International Myopia Conference in Wenzhou, China in September 2015.

  16. Myopia Control: A Review.

    PubMed

    Walline, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Slowing the progression of myopia has become a considerable concern for parents of myopic children. At the same time, clinical science is rapidly advancing the knowledge about methods to slow myopia progression. This article reviews the peer-reviewed literature regarding several modalities attempting to control myopia progression. Several strategies have been shown to be ineffective for myopia control, including undercorrection of myopic refractive error, alignment fit gas-permeable contact lenses, outdoor time, and bifocal of multifocal spectacles. However, a recent randomized clinical trial fitted progressing myopic children with executive bifocals for 3 years and found a 39% slowing of myopia progression for bifocal-only spectacles and 50% treatment effect for bifocal spectacles with base-in prism, although there was not a significant difference in progression between the bifocal-only and bifocal plus prism groups. Interestingly, outdoor time has shown to be effective for reducing the onset of myopia but not for slowing the progression of myopic refractive error. More effective methods of myopia control include orthokeratology, soft bifocal contact lenses, and antimuscarinic agents. Orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses are both thought to provide myopic blur to the retina, which acts as a putative cue to slow myopic eye growth. Each of these myopia control methods provides, on average, slightly less than 50% slowing of myopia progression. All studies have shown clinically meaningful slowing of myopia progression, including several randomized clinical trials. The most investigated antimuscarinic agents include pirenzepine and atropine. Pirenzepine slows myopia progression by approximately 40%, but it is not commercially available in the United States. Atropine provides the best myopia control, but the cycloplegic and mydriatic side effects render it a rarely prescribed myopia control agent in the United States. However, low-concentration atropine has

  17. Myopia Control: A Review.

    PubMed

    Walline, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Slowing the progression of myopia has become a considerable concern for parents of myopic children. At the same time, clinical science is rapidly advancing the knowledge about methods to slow myopia progression. This article reviews the peer-reviewed literature regarding several modalities attempting to control myopia progression. Several strategies have been shown to be ineffective for myopia control, including undercorrection of myopic refractive error, alignment fit gas-permeable contact lenses, outdoor time, and bifocal of multifocal spectacles. However, a recent randomized clinical trial fitted progressing myopic children with executive bifocals for 3 years and found a 39% slowing of myopia progression for bifocal-only spectacles and 50% treatment effect for bifocal spectacles with base-in prism, although there was not a significant difference in progression between the bifocal-only and bifocal plus prism groups. Interestingly, outdoor time has shown to be effective for reducing the onset of myopia but not for slowing the progression of myopic refractive error. More effective methods of myopia control include orthokeratology, soft bifocal contact lenses, and antimuscarinic agents. Orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses are both thought to provide myopic blur to the retina, which acts as a putative cue to slow myopic eye growth. Each of these myopia control methods provides, on average, slightly less than 50% slowing of myopia progression. All studies have shown clinically meaningful slowing of myopia progression, including several randomized clinical trials. The most investigated antimuscarinic agents include pirenzepine and atropine. Pirenzepine slows myopia progression by approximately 40%, but it is not commercially available in the United States. Atropine provides the best myopia control, but the cycloplegic and mydriatic side effects render it a rarely prescribed myopia control agent in the United States. However, low-concentration atropine has

  18. Applying the nursing theory of human relatedness to alcoholism and recovery in alcoholics anonymous.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Stephen; Hagerty, Bonnie; Boyd, Carol

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol misuse is a global health risk, and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the largest and most popular mutual-help program for individuals with alcohol-related problems. In recent years, researchers and clinicians have become increasingly interested in specific mechanisms of action that may contribute to positive outcomes through involvement with this 12-step program for recovery, yet few have applied a theoretical framework to these efforts. We examined the phenomena of alcoholism and recovery in AA, using the nursing Theory of Human Relatedness (THR). THR addresses a pervasive human concern: "establishing and maintaining relatedness to others, objects, environments, society and self." The theory describes four states of relatedness (connectedness, disconnectedness, parallelism, and enmeshment) and four relatedness competencies (sense of belonging, reciprocity, mutuality, and synchrony). Both alcoholism and recovery in AA can be viewed primarily in terms of relatedness. In active alcoholism, an individual's involvement with alcohol (enmeshment) can limit, impair, or preclude healthy or adaptive relatedness toward virtually all other referents, including self. As a program of recovery, each of the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous addresses an individual's relatedness to one or more identified referents while simultaneously enhancing and expanding each of the four relatedness competencies. THR provides a theoretical framework to help direct patient care, research, and education and has the potential to serve as a unifying theory in the study of alcoholism and recovery in AA.

  19. Progression of myopia.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, R H

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myopia is an important public health problem because it is common and is associated with increased risk for chorioretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, and other vision-threatening abnormalities. In animals, ocular elongation and myopia progression can be lessened with atropine treatment. This study provides information about progression of myopia and atropine therapy for myopia in humans. METHODS: A total of 214 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (118 girls and 96 boys; median age, 11 years; range, 6 to 15 years) received atropine for myopia from 1967 through 1974. Control subjects were matched by age, sex, refractive error, and date of baseline examination to 194 of those receiving atropine. Duration of treatment with atropine ranged from 18 weeks to 11.5 years (median 3.5 years). RESULTS: Median follow-up from initial to last refraction in the atropine group (11.7 years) was similar to that in the control group (12.4 years). Photophobia and blurred vision were frequently reported, but no serious adverse effects were associated with atropine therapy. Mean myopia progression during atropine treatment adjusted for age and refractive error (0.05 diopters per year) was significantly less than that among control subjects (0.36 diopters per year) (P < .001). Final refractions standardized to the age of 20 years showed a greater mean level of myopia in the control group (3.78 diopters) than in the atropine group (2.79 diopters) (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The data support the view that atropine therapy is associated with decreased progression of myopia and that beneficial effects remain after treatment has been discontinued. PMID:8719698

  20. Conceptualizing the Suicide-Alcohol Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James R.

    Despite the strong empirical evidence linking alcohol use across varying levels to suicidal behavior, the field is lacking a unifying theoretical framework in this area. The concept of alcohol induced myopia to explain the varied effects of alcohol on the behaviors of individuals who drink has been proposed. The term "alcohol myopia" refers to its…

  1. Birth order and myopia

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; McMahon, George; Northstone, Kate; Mandel, Yossi; Kaiserman, Igor; Stone, Richard A.; Lin, Xiaoyu; Saw, Seang Mei; Forward, Hannah; Mackey, David A.; Yazar, Seyhan; Young, Terri L.; Williams, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An association between birth order and reduced unaided vision (a surrogate for myopia) has been observed previously. We examined the association between birth order and myopia directly in 4 subject groups. Methods Subject groups were participants in 1) the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; UK; age 15 years; N=4,401), 2) the Singapore Cohort Study of Risk Factors for Myopia (SCORM; Singapore; age 13 years; N=1,959), 3) the Raine Eye Health Study (REHS; Australia; age 20 years; N=1,344), and 4) Israeli Defense Force recruitment candidates (IDFC; Israel; age 16-22 years; N=888,277). Main outcome: Odds ratio (OR) for myopia in first born versus non-first born individuals after adjusting for potential risk factors. Results The prevalence of myopia was numerically higher in first-born versus non-first-born individuals in all study groups, but the strength of evidence varied widely. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) were: ALSPAC, 1.31 (1.05-1.64); SCORM, 1.25 (0.89-1.77); REHS, 1.18 (0.90-1.55); IDFC, 1.04 (1.03-1.06). In the large IDFC sample, the effect size was greater (a) for the first born versus fourth or higher born comparison than for the first born versus second/third born comparison (P<0.001) and (b) with increasing myopia severity (P<0.001). Conclusions Across all studies, the increased risk of myopia in first born individuals was low (OR <1.3). Indeed, only the studies with >4000 participants provided strong statistical support for the association. The available evidence suggested the relationship was independent of established risk factors such as time outdoors/reading, and thus may arise through a different causal mechanism. PMID:24168726

  2. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  3. Social determinants of alcohol and marijuana effects: a systematic theory.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, J D

    1975-01-01

    Based on the sociological perspective on recreational drug effects, three social determinants are propositionally related to the normal effects of alcohol and marijuana. Effects vary across drugs, users, and situations along an experimental-behavioral dimension termed "effect-orientation." The content of normative expectations toward effects and the interactional characteristics of drug-using situations are conceptualized as direct determinants of effect-orientations. The relative clarity of normative expectations indirectly influences effect-orientations through its relationship to the other two social determinants. The theory stresses the importance of comparative research on the normal uses of alcohol and marijuana.

  4. Rational decision perspectives on alcohol consumption by youth. Revising the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Kuther, Tara L

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive and developmental approaches have made great strides in describing and predicting alcohol consumption by youth. The present review examines several theories of decision making with regard to alcohol consumption, including subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior, and alcohol-related outcome expectancy theory. In addition, the developmental literature on the contribution of parents and peers to adolescent alcohol consumption is reviewed. A model is proposed, which integrates the theory of planned behavior and alcohol-related outcome expectancy theory with modifications based on findings from the developmental literature. Implications for further research are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of high myopia complications prevention program in university freshmen

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Gow-Lieng; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High myopia is a global eye health problem because of its high incidence of sight-threatening complications. Due to the role of awareness, self-examination, and preventive behavior in prevention of morbidity of high myopia complications, promoting knowledge, capabilities, and attitude of high myopic personnel are required in this regard. In this quasi-experiment study, 31 freshmen with high myopia in a national university were enrolled in 2014. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire based on health belief model (HBM) and self-efficacy theory. The intervention program consisted of 1 educational session lasting 150 minutes by lecturing of high myopia complications, virtual reality experiencing, similarity modeling, and quibbling a film made on high myopia complications preventive concepts. Implementing the educational program showed immediate effect in knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, self-efficacy, and preventive behavior intention. While 6 weeks after the educational program, significant increases were observed in cues to action, self-efficacy, and preventive behavior intention. This article provided that, after a single session, there was positive improvement in high myopia complication prevention behavior intention among participants. These positive effects confirmed the efficacy of the education program and will probably induce behavior change. PMID:27749586

  6. Reactance theory and alcohol consumption laws: further confirmation among collegiate alcohol consumers.

    PubMed

    Allen, D N; Sprenkel, D G; Vitale, P A

    1994-01-01

    By the late 1980s, the United States legal drinking age had increased to 21 years. Based on psychological reactance theory, one would predict that these law changes would cause underage collegiate consumers to drink more alcohol because of the belief that their behavioral freedom was being reduced. It was hypothesized that underage collegiate alcohol consumers (UC) would drink more than their legal-age peers (LC) if psychological reactance was a contributing factor to consumption, whereas no differences would be present between the UC and LC groups' usage of illicit drugs, as these had not been affected by recent law changes. To test this hypothesis, a sample of 2,142 college students from 10 midwestern postsecondary educational facilities responded to the Alcohol and Other Drug Use Needs Assessment Survey in the spring of 1990. Mann-Whitney U analyses revealed significant differences between groups on alcohol use measures, but no differences were present on illicit substance use measures. These results are interpreted as supporting reactance theory. PMID:8189723

  7. Alcohol-related and alcohol-free activity participation and enjoyment among college students: a behavioral theories of choice analysis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James G; Barnett, Nancy P; Colby, Suzanne M

    2006-08-01

    College student alcohol abuse remains a significant public health problem, and there is a need for theory-driven and empirically based models to guide prevention efforts. Behavioral theories of choice assume that the decision to consume alcohol is influenced by the relative value of alcohol versus other available activities. In the present study, a sample of college student drinkers (N=108; 56% female, 44% male) who had previously completed a mandatory alcohol intervention completed a measure of alcohol-related and alcohol-free activity participation and enjoyment. The goals of the study were to examine the influence of drinking quantity and contextual variables on activity enjoyment and to identify enjoyable alcohol-free activities that take place on evenings when students might otherwise be drinking. Overall, students found alcohol-related activities more enjoyable than alcohol-free activities, and drinking quantity was positively related to enjoyment. However, alcohol-free activities such as watching movies, going to the theater or museums, going to bars or parties, hanging out with friends, eating at restaurants, and engaging in creative activity were generally as enjoyable as drinking. Alcohol-free activities that included peers or dates were more enjoyable than solitary activities. Men were less likely to engage in alcohol-free activities that included peers and reported less enjoyment related to alcohol-free activities than did women. Further research is required to identify procedures for increasing participation in alcohol-free activities and to determine whether increased alcohol-free activity participation results in decreased alcohol consumption. PMID:16893277

  8. Prevalence of Myopia in France

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Emilie; Ingrand, Pierre; Pelen, François; Bentaleb, Yacine; Weber, Michel; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Souied, Eric; Leveziel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Refractive error (RE), particularly myopia, is the first cause of visual impairment throughout the world. This study aimed to depict the prevalence of myopia in a multicentric series of French individuals. This cross-sectional analysis was carried out between January 2012 and November 2013 in eye clinics dedicated to REs. Data collection included age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity, RE, and any relevant medical history involving laser refractive surgery and cataract surgery. Exclusion criteria consisted of monophthalm patients or those with incomplete demographic data. Prevalences in the overall population, by gender and by age groups were reported for mild myopia (−0.50 to −2.75 diopter [D]), moderate myopia (−3 to −5.75 D), high myopia (less than −6 D), and very high myopia (less than −10 D). The analysis included 100,429 individuals, mean age 38.5 years (± 16.9). Overall prevalence of myopia was 39.1% (95% CI 38.8-39.4). Prevalences of mild, moderate, high and very high myopia were respectively 25.1% (95% CI 25.4-24.9), 10.6% (95% CI 10.4-10.8), 3.4% (95% CI 3.3-3.5) and 0.5% (95% CI 0.48-0.57). Even if possible bias occurred in recruitment, our results are similar to RE data collected in nationally representative samples of Caucasians in other studies. This is to our knowledge, one of the largest European series of individuals dedicated to myopia prevalences in different age groups. These results confirm the importance of myopia as a major health issue in Western countries. PMID:26559276

  9. Shared ideology in Alcoholics Anonymous: a grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, K B

    1997-01-01

    This article uses grounded theory to explore the shared ideology espoused in Alcoholics Anonymous, specifically the nature and role of shared ideology in increasing the efficacy of the recovery process, and the features of the group's tenets and meetings that help facilitate members' indoctrination. Findings support Kassel and Wagner's (1993) contention of shared ideology's major role in the change process of the group, and Antze's (1976) categorizations of the AA ideology and alcoholics' characteristics. Antze's (1979) finding that AA ideology removes the concept of drinking from the voluntary sphere was also supported. The group was found to be a context in which members could change their assumptive worlds through reinterpreting life events, as Frank and Frank (1991) contended. Little support was found for Alexander and Rollins's (1984) comparison of AA to religious cults. The findings underscore the importance of human interaction as persuasion and reinforcement for AA ideology.

  10. Shared ideology in Alcoholics Anonymous: a grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, K B

    1997-01-01

    This article uses grounded theory to explore the shared ideology espoused in Alcoholics Anonymous, specifically the nature and role of shared ideology in increasing the efficacy of the recovery process, and the features of the group's tenets and meetings that help facilitate members' indoctrination. Findings support Kassel and Wagner's (1993) contention of shared ideology's major role in the change process of the group, and Antze's (1976) categorizations of the AA ideology and alcoholics' characteristics. Antze's (1979) finding that AA ideology removes the concept of drinking from the voluntary sphere was also supported. The group was found to be a context in which members could change their assumptive worlds through reinterpreting life events, as Frank and Frank (1991) contended. Little support was found for Alexander and Rollins's (1984) comparison of AA to religious cults. The findings underscore the importance of human interaction as persuasion and reinforcement for AA ideology. PMID:10977242

  11. Quality of life in myopia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K.; Harper, R.; Tromans, C.; Waterman, C.; Goldberg, D.; Haggerty, C.; Tullo, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The safety and predictability of refractive surgery for all degrees of myopia is now becoming established. It is therefore appropriate to evaluate whether there is a patient driven demand for such treatments and, if so, to establish guidelines for its provision within the National Health Service (NHS).
METHODS—A comparative study was designed to assess the effect of degree of myopia on quality of life ("high" (n = 30) -10.00D, worse eye; "moderate" (n = 40) -4.00 to -9.75D, worse eye; "low" (n = 42) <-4.00D, worse eye) compared with a group of patients with keratoconus (n = 30) treated by optical correction. Data collection included binocular logMAR visual acuity, Pelli-Robson low contrast letter sensitivity, questionnaires to assess subjective visual function (VF-14) and effect on quality of life (VQOL), and semi-structured interviews.
RESULTS—There were no significant differences in any of the measures between patients with a high degree of myopia and those with keratoconus, or between those with a low and those with a moderate degree of myopia. However, those with a high degree of myopia had highly significantly poorer logMAR, VF-14, and VQOL scores than those with low and moderate myopia (p<0.001). Interview data supported these findings with patients with a high degree of myopia and those with keratoconus reporting that psychological, cosmetic, practical, and financial factors affected their quality of life.
CONCLUSION—Compared with low and moderate myopia, patients with a high degree of myopia experience impaired quality of life similar to that of patients with keratoconus. Criteria should therefore be identified to enable those in sufficient need to obtain refractive surgical treatment under the NHS.

 PMID:10966960

  12. Alcohol and Masculinity: A Review and Reformulaton of the Sex Role, Dependency, and Power Theories of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemle, Russell

    This review examines three theories of alcohol abuse by American males: (1) the sex role theory which states that men drink heavily because American culture accepts and encourages that activity in males; (2) the dependency theory, which interprets drinking as a means by which men secretly gratify their dependency needs while manifesting an…

  13. A Novel Review of the Evidence Linking Myopia and High Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ajai; Verma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    The association between myopia and high intelligence has been the subject of much vexed debate in academic circles, particularly over the last two decades. This debate has risen from the observation that, over recent centuries, the prevalence of myopia amongst most populations has coincided with a marked increase in the average level of intelligence in these populations. The relationship between myopia and intelligence and theories surrounding this association is examined by the authors. Additionally, the various factors that confound the myopia and high intelligence debate, such as genetics, educational levels, ethnicity, and environmental factors were also explored by the authors. Whilst most studies found a positive correlation reaching statistical significance between myopia and high intelligence compared to emmetropes and hyperopes, further research is required to determine whether this association is causal. PMID:25653868

  14. Clinical management of progressive myopia.

    PubMed

    Aller, T A

    2014-02-01

    Myopia has been increasing in prevalence throughout the world, reaching over 90% in some East Asian populations. There is increasing evidence that whereas genetics clearly have an important role, the type of visual environment to which one is exposed to likely influences the onset, progression, and cessation of myopia. Consequently, attempts to either modify the environment or to reduce the exposure of the eye to various environmental stimuli to eye growth through the use of various optical devices are well under way at research centers around the globe. The most promising of current treatments include low-percentage atropine, bifocal soft contact lenses, orthokeratology, and multifocal spectacles. These methods are discussed briefly and are then categorized in terms of their expected degree of myopia progression control. A clinical strategy is presented for selecting the most effective treatment for the appropriate type of patient at the optimal stage of refractive development to achieve the maximum control of myopia progression. PMID:24357844

  15. Current concepts in myopia control.

    PubMed

    Mihelcic, Matjaz

    2013-04-01

    Current animal and human models of myopia progression show that beside genetics, there are several environmental factors that contribute to the axial elongation process, the underlying cause for progressive myopia. During last years, extensive research in this field revealed some apparently independent mechanisms, which play an important role in myopisation. Understanding of these processes led to the introduction of novel techniques in optical corrective approach, pharmacological interventions as well as suggestions in environmental control. Many of these methods were proven effective for specific cases; however follow up sometimes shows efficacy drop and the catching up of myopia on longer term. In the present paper an overview of pharmacological and optical corrective options as well as environmental manipulation for the purpose of myopia control is presented and their efficacy is discussed. PMID:23837253

  16. Clinical management of progressive myopia

    PubMed Central

    Aller, T A

    2014-01-01

    Myopia has been increasing in prevalence throughout the world, reaching over 90% in some East Asian populations. There is increasing evidence that whereas genetics clearly have an important role, the type of visual environment to which one is exposed to likely influences the onset, progression, and cessation of myopia. Consequently, attempts to either modify the environment or to reduce the exposure of the eye to various environmental stimuli to eye growth through the use of various optical devices are well under way at research centers around the globe. The most promising of current treatments include low-percentage atropine, bifocal soft contact lenses, orthokeratology, and multifocal spectacles. These methods are discussed briefly and are then categorized in terms of their expected degree of myopia progression control. A clinical strategy is presented for selecting the most effective treatment for the appropriate type of patient at the optimal stage of refractive development to achieve the maximum control of myopia progression. PMID:24357844

  17. Examining alcohol consumption with the theory of planned behaviour: Do health and alcohol knowledge play a role?

    PubMed

    Hasking, Penelope; Schofield, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    We used the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to investigate factors associated with alcohol consumption among university students, and to examine whether general or alcohol-specific health knowledge acts as a moderator in the relationship between elements of the theory and drinking behaviour. Participants were 258 Australian undergraduate university students (79% female) who completed an online questionnaire, assessing the constructs of interest. The hypothesis that intentions and behaviour would be successfully predicted using the theory was generally supported. Little evidence for the moderating effect of knowledge on the TPB variables was observed, although both general and alcohol-specific health knowledge moderated the relationship between intentions and behaviours. Contrary to expectation, more accurate knowledge strengthened this relationship. Further work is necessary to investigate the role of knowledge in limiting alcohol-related harms.

  18. Examining alcohol consumption with the theory of planned behaviour: Do health and alcohol knowledge play a role?

    PubMed

    Hasking, Penelope; Schofield, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    We used the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to investigate factors associated with alcohol consumption among university students, and to examine whether general or alcohol-specific health knowledge acts as a moderator in the relationship between elements of the theory and drinking behaviour. Participants were 258 Australian undergraduate university students (79% female) who completed an online questionnaire, assessing the constructs of interest. The hypothesis that intentions and behaviour would be successfully predicted using the theory was generally supported. Little evidence for the moderating effect of knowledge on the TPB variables was observed, although both general and alcohol-specific health knowledge moderated the relationship between intentions and behaviours. Contrary to expectation, more accurate knowledge strengthened this relationship. Further work is necessary to investigate the role of knowledge in limiting alcohol-related harms. PMID:25318009

  19. Alcohol Expectancies and Inhibition Conflict as Moderators of the Alcohol-Unprotected Sex Relationship: Event-Level Findings from a Daily Diary Study Among Individuals Living with HIV in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Susan M; Simbayi, Leickness C; Abrams, Amber; Cloete, Allanise

    2016-01-01

    Literature from sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere supports a global association between alcohol and HIV risk. However, more rigorous studies using multiple event-level methods find mixed support for this association, suggesting the importance of examining potential moderators of this relationship. The present study explores the assumptions of alcohol expectancy theory and alcohol myopia theory as possible moderators that help elucidate the circumstances under which alcohol may affect individuals' ability to use a condom. Participants were 82 individuals (58 women, 24 men) living with HIV who completed daily phone interviews for 42 days which assessed daily sexual behavior and alcohol consumption. Logistic generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the potential moderating effects of inhibition conflict and sex-related alcohol outcome expectancies. The data provided some support for both theories and in some cases the moderation effects were stronger when both partners consumed alcohol. PMID:26280530

  20. Alcohol Expectancies and Inhibition Conflict as Moderators of the Alcohol-Unprotected Sex Relationship: Event-Level Findings from a Daily Diary Study Among Individuals Living with HIV in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Susan M; Simbayi, Leickness C; Abrams, Amber; Cloete, Allanise

    2016-01-01

    Literature from sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere supports a global association between alcohol and HIV risk. However, more rigorous studies using multiple event-level methods find mixed support for this association, suggesting the importance of examining potential moderators of this relationship. The present study explores the assumptions of alcohol expectancy theory and alcohol myopia theory as possible moderators that help elucidate the circumstances under which alcohol may affect individuals' ability to use a condom. Participants were 82 individuals (58 women, 24 men) living with HIV who completed daily phone interviews for 42 days which assessed daily sexual behavior and alcohol consumption. Logistic generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the potential moderating effects of inhibition conflict and sex-related alcohol outcome expectancies. The data provided some support for both theories and in some cases the moderation effects were stronger when both partners consumed alcohol.

  1. Compatibility of Adlerian Theory and Practice with the Philosophy and Practices of Alcoholics Anonymous.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jane J.

    1999-01-01

    Tenets of Adlerian theory and practice are compatible with the philosophy and practices of Alcoholics Anonymous. Counselors can expect treatment approaches based on Adlerian counseling theory to be congruent with 12-step practices of individuals who are in recovery from alcohol dependence. (Author)

  2. Alcohol expectancy and drinking refusal self-efficacy: a test of specificity theory.

    PubMed

    Oei, T P; Burrow, T

    2000-01-01

    Although alcohol expectancy (expectations about the effects of drinking alcohol on one's behavior and mood) and drinking refusal self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to resist drinking in high-risk situations) have consistently been demonstrated to be useful to our understanding of alcohol use and abuse, the specificity of these constructs to alcohol consumption has not been previously demonstrated. Using 161 first-year psychology students and multiple regression analyses this study indicated that alcohol expectancies and drinking refusal self-efficacy were specifically related to quantity of alcohol consumption, but not to caffeine or nicotine intake. These results provide empirical evidence to confirm the theoretical and practical utility of these two cognitive constructs to alcohol research and serve to strengthen the theoretical foundations of alcohol expectancy theory.

  3. Use of the theory of reasoned action to predict drug and alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Laflin, M T; Moore-Hirschl, S; Weis, D L; Hayes, B E

    1994-05-01

    The present study examines the role of self-esteem (SE) in the prediction of drug and alcohol use. Consistent with research on the theory of reasoned action, we suggest that alcohol and drug attitudes and subjective norms are more useful in the prediction of self-reported drug and alcohol consumption than SE. In the present study, measures of SE, drug attitudes, subjective norms, and drug use behaviors were collected from 2,074 high school and college students. Results indicate that drug attitudes and subjective norms do predict drug and alcohol use, but that SE does not add significantly to the prediction of the drug and alcohol behaviors.

  4. Animal models in myopia research.

    PubMed

    Schaeffel, Frank; Feldkaemper, Marita

    2015-11-01

    Our current understanding of the development of refractive errors, in particular myopia, would be substantially limited had Wiesel and Raviola not discovered by accident that monkeys develop axial myopia as a result of deprivation of form vision. Similarly, if Josh Wallman and colleagues had not found that simple plastic goggles attached to the chicken eye generate large amounts of myopia, the chicken model would perhaps not have become such an important animal model. Contrary to previous assumptions about the mechanisms of myopia, these animal models suggested that eye growth is visually controlled locally by the retina, that an afferent connection to the brain is not essential and that emmetropisation uses more sophisticated cues than just the magnitude of retinal blur. While animal models have shown that the retina can determine the sign of defocus, the underlying mechanism is still not entirely clear. Animal models have also provided knowledge about the biochemical nature of the signal cascade converting the output of retinal image processing to changes in choroidal thickness and scleral growth; however, a critical question was, and still is, can the results from animal models be applied to myopia in children? While the basic findings from chickens appear applicable to monkeys, some fundamental questions remain. If eye growth is guided by visual feedback, why is myopic development not self-limiting? Why does undercorrection not arrest myopic progression even though positive lenses induce myopic defocus, which leads to the development of hyperopia in emmetropic animals? Why do some spectacle or contact lens designs reduce myopic progression and others not? It appears that some major differences exist between animals reared with imposed defocus and children treated with various optical corrections, although without the basic knowledge obtained from animal models, we would be lost in an abundance of untestable hypotheses concerning human myopia. PMID:26769177

  5. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Alcohol KidsHealth > For Teens > Alcohol Print A A A ... you can make an educated choice. What Is Alcohol? Alcohol is created when grains, fruits, or vegetables ...

  6. Advances of optical coherence tomography in myopia and pathologic myopia.

    PubMed

    Ng, D S C; Cheung, C Y L; Luk, F O; Mohamed, S; Brelen, M E; Yam, J C S; Tsang, C W; Lai, T Y Y

    2016-07-01

    The natural course of high-axial myopia is variable and the development of pathologic myopia is not fully understood. Advancements in optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology have revealed peculiar intraocular structures in highly myopic eyes and unprecedented pathologies that cause visual impairment. New OCT findings include posterior precortical vitreous pocket and precursor stages of posterior vitreous detachment; peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation; morphological patterns of scleral inner curvature and dome-shaped macula. Swept source OCT is capable of imaging deeper layers in the posterior pole for investigation of optic nerve pits, stretched and thinned lamina cribrosa, elongated dural attachment at posterior scleral canal, and enlargement of retrobulbar subarachnoid spaces. This has therefore enabled further evaluation of various visual field defects in high myopia and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. OCT has many potential clinical uses in managing visual impairing conditions in pathologic myopia. Understanding how retinal nerve fibers are redistributed in axial elongation will allow the development of auto-segmentation software for diagnosis and monitoring progression of glaucoma. OCT is indispensable in the diagnosis of various conditions associated with myopic traction maculopathy and monitoring of post-surgical outcomes. In addition, OCT is commonly used in the multimodal imaging assessment of myopic choroidal neovascularization. Biometry and topography of the retinal layers and choroid will soon be validated for the classification of myopic maculopathy for utilization in epidemiological studies as well as clinical trials. PMID:27055674

  7. Theory of Mind Among Young Adult Children From Alcoholic Families

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Maciej; Glass, Jennifer M; Heitzeg, Mary M; Wojnar, Marcin; Puttler, Leon I; Zucker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Given the evidence that several cognitive and emotional functions are impaired in adult alcohol-dependent patients and the possibility that some of these deficits are transmitted to their children, the objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the perception of complex mental states would be reduced in young adults from families with a positive family history of alcohol dependence. It was also anticipated that social-perceptual deficits would confer unique predictive ability beyond that shared with other cognitive risk factors for alcohol dependence and/or substance use risk. Method: Data from 301 youth ages 18–21 years, recruited from an ongoing community longitudinal study of alcoholic and matched control families, were analyzed. Family history of alcohol dependence as well as alcohol-dependence diagnosis in the youth was based on diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. A substance use risk factor measured early problem alcohol/other drug use. The perception of mental states was measured with the computerized version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). Results: Children of alcohol-dependent parents did not show impairment in the mental states perception task, nor did social perception skills predict alcohol dependence in the youth. Correlational analysis performed between RMET and the substance use risk factor showed no significant association between the variables. Conclusions: The study results do not confirm the hypothesis that behaviorally measured social perception impairment is more prevalent in the children of alcohol-dependent parents. In addition, social-perceptual deficits were not a unique marker of either alcohol dependence or high risk for alcohol dependence in this young adult sample. PMID:25208207

  8. Pharmaceutical intervention for myopia control

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Prema; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2010-01-01

    Myopia is the result of a mismatch between the optical power and the length of the eye, with the latter being too long. Driving the research in this field is the need to develop myopia treatments that can limit axial elongation. When axial elongation is excessive, as in high myopia, there is an increased risk of visual impairment and blindness due to ensuing pathologies such as retinal detachments. This article covers both clinical studies involving myopic children, and studies involving animal models for myopia. Atropine, a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, has been studied most extensively in both contexts. Because it remains the only drug used in a clinical setting, it is a major focus of the first part of this article, which also covers the many shortcomings of topical ophthalmic atropine. The second part of this article focuses on in vitro and animal-based drug studies, which encompass a range of drug targets including the retina, retinal pigment epithelium and sclera. While the latter studies have contributed to a better understanding of how eye growth is regulated, no new antimyopia drug treatments have reached the clinical setting. Less conservative approaches in research, and in particular, the exploration of new bioengineering approaches for drug delivery, are needed to advance this field. PMID:21258611

  9. Adult Children of Alcoholics: Theory and Research. Pamphlet Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Bennett, Linda A.

    The concept of adult children of alcoholics (ACoA) has received wide public recognition and acceptance. An ACoA is defined as any adult who, as a child, was reared by one or two alcoholic parents. To date research has not sufficiently addressed the many questions generated by the grass roots movement, such as whether or not adult children of…

  10. Are alcohol expectancies associations? Comment on Moss and Albery (2009).

    PubMed

    Wiers, Reinout W; Stacy, Alan W

    2010-01-01

    Moss and Albery presented a dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link, integrating alcohol expectancy and alcohol myopia theory. Their integrative theory rests on a number of assumptions including, first, that alcohol expectancies are associations that can be activated automatically by an alcohol-relevant context, and second, that alcohol selectively reduces propositional reasoning. As a result, behavior comes under the control of associative processes after alcohol consumption. We agree with the second but not with the first assumption, based on theoretical and empirical arguments. Although in some cases expectancies may involve a simple association, they are propositional in nature. We demonstrate that this assertion is supported by existing literature cited in Moss and Albery. Moreover, 6 recent studies consistently demonstrated that under circumstances in which executive control is impaired (either as a stable individual difference or under the acute influence of alcohol), associative processes, over and above expectancies, predict alcohol-related behavior. Taken together, the evidence strongly suggests a fundamental distinction between expectancies and associations in memory: Effects of propositional expectancies and executive functions are impaired under the acute influence of alcohol, but memory associations are not. This difference in perspective not only has theoretical implications but also leads to different predictions regarding acute alcohol effects in society.

  11. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Alcohol Wondering if alcohol is off limits with diabetes? Most people with diabetes can have a moderate amount of alcohol. Research has shown that there can be some ...

  12. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  13. A historical survey of books on myopia.

    PubMed

    Goss, David A

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes books with content solely on myopia or with titles that imply that they were entirely on myopia. Thirty such books were found, published from 1912 to 2010. For the purpose of organization, they are classified as textbooks, treatises on treatment, treatises on etiology, and conference proceedings. Changing contents of the books through the years reflect increasing sophistication of myopia research and clinical care.

  14. An applied test of the social learning theory of deviance to college alcohol use.

    PubMed

    DeMartino, Cynthia H; Rice, Ronald E; Saltz, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses about influences on college drinking derived from the social learning theory of deviance were tested and confirmed. The effect of ethnicity on alcohol use was completely mediated by differential association and differential reinforcement, whereas the effect of biological sex on alcohol use was partially mediated. Higher net positive reinforcements to costs for alcohol use predicted increased general use, more underage use, and more frequent binge drinking. Two unexpected finding were the negative relationship between negative expectations and negative experiences, and the substantive difference between nondrinkers and general drinkers compared with illegal or binge drinkers. The discussion considers implications for future campaigns based on Akers's deterrence theory.

  15. An applied test of the social learning theory of deviance to college alcohol use.

    PubMed

    DeMartino, Cynthia H; Rice, Ronald E; Saltz, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses about influences on college drinking derived from the social learning theory of deviance were tested and confirmed. The effect of ethnicity on alcohol use was completely mediated by differential association and differential reinforcement, whereas the effect of biological sex on alcohol use was partially mediated. Higher net positive reinforcements to costs for alcohol use predicted increased general use, more underage use, and more frequent binge drinking. Two unexpected finding were the negative relationship between negative expectations and negative experiences, and the substantive difference between nondrinkers and general drinkers compared with illegal or binge drinkers. The discussion considers implications for future campaigns based on Akers's deterrence theory. PMID:25630048

  16. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A Text Size What's in ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  17. Epidemiology, genetics and treatments for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Li, Zhi-Kui; Gao, Jin-Rong; Liu, Jian-Rong; Xu, Chang-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Myopia is a significant public health problem and its prevalence is increasing over time and genetic factors in disease development are important. The prevalence and incidence of myopia within sampled population often varies with age, country, sex, race, ethnicity, occupation, environment, and other factors. Myopia growth is under a combination of genes and their products in time and space to complete the coordination role of the guidance. Myopia-related genes include about 70 genetic loci to which primary myopias have been mapped, although the number is constantly increasing and depends to some extent on definition. Of these, several are associated with additional abnormalities, mostly as part of developmental syndromes. These tend to result from mutations in genes encoding transcriptional activators, and most of these have been identified by sequencing candidate genes in patients with developmental anomalies. Currently, COL1A1 (collagen alpha-1 chain of type I), COL2A1 (collagen alpha-1 chain of type II), ACTC1 (actin, alpha, cardiac muscle 1), PAX6 (paired box gene 6) and NIPBL (nipped-B homolog), and so on have been mapped. Myopia is most commonly treated with spectacles or glasses. The most common surgical procedure performed to correct myopia is laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). This review of the recent advances on epidemiology, genetic locations and treatments of myopia are summarized. PMID:22553740

  18. Controlling myopia progression in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Smith, Molly J; Walline, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common disorder, affecting approximately one-third of the US population and over 90% of the population in some East Asian countries. High amounts of myopia are associated with an increased risk of sight-threatening problems, such as retinal detachment, choroidal degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Slowing the progression of myopia could potentially benefit millions of children in the USA. To date, few strategies used for myopia control have proven to be effective. Treatment options such as undercorrection of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, although one recent randomized clinical trial using executive top bifocal spectacles on children with progressive myopia has shown to decrease the progression to nearly half of the control subjects. The most effective methods are the use of orthokeratology contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, and topical pharmaceutical agents such as atropine or pirenzepine. Although none of these modalities are US Food and Drug Administration-approved to slow myopia progression, they have been shown to slow the progression by approximately 50% with few risks. Both orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses have shown to slow myopia progression by slightly less than 50% in most studies. Parents and eye care practitioners should work together to determine which modality may be best suited for a particular child. Topical pharmaceutical agents such as anti-muscarinic eye drops typically lead to light sensitivity and poor near vision. The most effective myopia control is provided by atropine, but is rarely prescribed due to the side effects. Pirenzepine provides myopia control with little light sensitivity and few near-vision problems, but it is not yet commercially available as an eye drop or ointment. Several studies have shown that lower concentrations of atropine slow the progression of myopia control with fewer side

  19. Controlling myopia progression in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Molly J; Walline, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common disorder, affecting approximately one-third of the US population and over 90% of the population in some East Asian countries. High amounts of myopia are associated with an increased risk of sight-threatening problems, such as retinal detachment, choroidal degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Slowing the progression of myopia could potentially benefit millions of children in the USA. To date, few strategies used for myopia control have proven to be effective. Treatment options such as undercorrection of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, although one recent randomized clinical trial using executive top bifocal spectacles on children with progressive myopia has shown to decrease the progression to nearly half of the control subjects. The most effective methods are the use of orthokeratology contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, and topical pharmaceutical agents such as atropine or pirenzepine. Although none of these modalities are US Food and Drug Administration-approved to slow myopia progression, they have been shown to slow the progression by approximately 50% with few risks. Both orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses have shown to slow myopia progression by slightly less than 50% in most studies. Parents and eye care practitioners should work together to determine which modality may be best suited for a particular child. Topical pharmaceutical agents such as anti-muscarinic eye drops typically lead to light sensitivity and poor near vision. The most effective myopia control is provided by atropine, but is rarely prescribed due to the side effects. Pirenzepine provides myopia control with little light sensitivity and few near-vision problems, but it is not yet commercially available as an eye drop or ointment. Several studies have shown that lower concentrations of atropine slow the progression of myopia control with fewer side

  20. Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Donald E.; Carlton, Bruce E.

    1978-01-01

    There are important measurements of alcoholism that are poorly understood by physicians. Professional attitudes toward alcoholic patients are often counterproductive. Americans spend about $30 billion on alcohol a year and most adults drink alcohol. Even though traditional criteria allow for recognition of the disease, diagnosis is often made late in the natural course, when intervention fails. Alcoholism is a major health problem and accounts for 10 percent of total health care costs. Still, this country's 10 million adult alcoholics come from a pool of heavy drinkers with well defined demographic characteristics. These social, cultural and familial traits, along with subtle signs of addiction, allow for earlier diagnosis. Although these factors alone do not establish a diagnosis of alcoholism, they should alert a physician that significant disease may be imminent. Focus must be directed to these aspects of alcoholism if containment of the problem is expected. PMID:685264

  1. The Future of Myopia Control Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Paul; Gifford, Kate Louise

    2016-04-01

    The growing incidence of pediatric myopia worldwide has generated strong scientific interest in understanding factors leading to myopia development and progression. Although contact lenses (CLs) are prescribed primarily for refractive correction, there is burgeoning use of particular modalities for slowing progression of myopia following reported success in the literature. Standard soft and rigid CLs have been shown to have minimal or no effect for myopia control. Overall, orthokeratology and soft multifocal CLs have shown the most consistent performance for myopia control with the least side effects. However, their acceptance in both clinical and academic spheres is influenced by data limitations, required off-label usage, and a lack of clear understanding of their mechanisms for myopia control. Myopia development and progression seem to be multifactorial, with a complex interaction between genetics and environment influencing myopigenesis. The optical characteristics of the individual also play a role through variations in relative peripheral refraction, binocular vision function, and inherent higher-order aberrations that have been linked to different refractive states. Contact lenses provide the most viable opportunity to beneficially modify these factors through their close alignment with the eye and consistent wearing time. Contact lenses also have potential to provide a pharmacological delivery device and a possible feedback mechanism for modification of a visual environmental risk. An examination of current patents on myopia control provides a window to the future development of an ideal myopia-controlling CL, which would incorporate the broadest treatment of all currently understood myopigenic factors. This ideal lens must also satisfy safety and comfort aspects, along with overcoming practical issues around U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, product supply, and availability to target populations. Translating the broad field of myopia research

  2. Juvenile myopia progression, risk factors and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Myrowitz, Elliott H.

    2011-01-01

    The development and progression of early onset myopia is actively being investigated. While myopia is often considered a benign condition it should be considered a public health problem for its visual, quality of life, and economic consequences. Nearly half of the visually impaired population in the world has uncorrected refractive errors, with myopia a high percent of that group. Uncorrected visual acuity should be screened for and treated in order to improve academic performance, career opportunities and socio-economic status. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the onset and progression of myopia. Twin studies have supported genetic factors and research continues to identify myopia genetic loci. While multiple myopia genetic loci have been identified establishing myopia as a common complex disorder, there is not yet a genetic model explaining myopia progression in populations. Environmental factors include near work, education levels, urban compared to rural location, and time spent outdoors. In this field of study where there continues to be etiology controversies, there is recent agreement that children who spend more time outdoors are less likely to become myopic. Worldwide population studies, some completed and some in progress, with a common protocol are gathering both genetic and environmental cohort data of great value. There have been rapid population changes in prevalence rates supporting an environmental influence. Interventions to prevent juvenile myopia progression include pharmacologic agents, glasses and contact lenses. Pharmacological interventions over 1–2 year trials have shown benefits. Peripheral vision defocus has been found to affect the emmetropization process and may be affected by wearing glasses or contacts. Accommodation accuracy also has been implicated in myopia progression. Further research will aim to assess both the role and interaction of environmental influences and genetic factors. PMID:23961008

  3. The Future of Myopia Control Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Paul; Gifford, Kate Louise

    2016-04-01

    The growing incidence of pediatric myopia worldwide has generated strong scientific interest in understanding factors leading to myopia development and progression. Although contact lenses (CLs) are prescribed primarily for refractive correction, there is burgeoning use of particular modalities for slowing progression of myopia following reported success in the literature. Standard soft and rigid CLs have been shown to have minimal or no effect for myopia control. Overall, orthokeratology and soft multifocal CLs have shown the most consistent performance for myopia control with the least side effects. However, their acceptance in both clinical and academic spheres is influenced by data limitations, required off-label usage, and a lack of clear understanding of their mechanisms for myopia control. Myopia development and progression seem to be multifactorial, with a complex interaction between genetics and environment influencing myopigenesis. The optical characteristics of the individual also play a role through variations in relative peripheral refraction, binocular vision function, and inherent higher-order aberrations that have been linked to different refractive states. Contact lenses provide the most viable opportunity to beneficially modify these factors through their close alignment with the eye and consistent wearing time. Contact lenses also have potential to provide a pharmacological delivery device and a possible feedback mechanism for modification of a visual environmental risk. An examination of current patents on myopia control provides a window to the future development of an ideal myopia-controlling CL, which would incorporate the broadest treatment of all currently understood myopigenic factors. This ideal lens must also satisfy safety and comfort aspects, along with overcoming practical issues around U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, product supply, and availability to target populations. Translating the broad field of myopia research

  4. Predicting Alcohol-Impaired Driving among Spanish Youth with the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    PubMed

    Espada, José P; Griffin, Kenneth W; Gonzálvez, María T; Orgilés, Mireia

    2015-06-19

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for motor vehicle accidents in young drivers. Crashes associated with alcohol consumption typically have greater severity. This study examines the prevalence of driving under the influence among Spanish youth and tests the theory of reasoned action as a model for predicting driving under the influence. Participants included 478 Spanish university students aged 17-26 years. Findings indicated that alcohol was the substance most associated with impaired driving, and was involved in more traffic crashes. Men engage in higher levels of alcohol and other drug use, and perceived less risk in drunk driving (p < .01). The study confirms that alcohol use and driving under the influence of alcohol are highly prevalent in Spanish young people, and some gender differences exist in these behaviors (p < .01). Furthermore, the study confirms the validity of theory of reasoned action as a predictive model of driving under the influence of alcohol among youth in Spain (p < .001) and can help in the design of prevention programs.

  5. Predicting Alcohol-Impaired Driving among Spanish Youth with the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    PubMed

    Espada, José P; Griffin, Kenneth W; Gonzálvez, María T; Orgilés, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for motor vehicle accidents in young drivers. Crashes associated with alcohol consumption typically have greater severity. This study examines the prevalence of driving under the influence among Spanish youth and tests the theory of reasoned action as a model for predicting driving under the influence. Participants included 478 Spanish university students aged 17-26 years. Findings indicated that alcohol was the substance most associated with impaired driving, and was involved in more traffic crashes. Men engage in higher levels of alcohol and other drug use, and perceived less risk in drunk driving (p < .01). The study confirms that alcohol use and driving under the influence of alcohol are highly prevalent in Spanish young people, and some gender differences exist in these behaviors (p < .01). Furthermore, the study confirms the validity of theory of reasoned action as a predictive model of driving under the influence of alcohol among youth in Spain (p < .001) and can help in the design of prevention programs. PMID:26087814

  6. A mathematical theory for temporal changes in tolerance to the behavioral effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Radlow, Robert

    2006-10-01

    Temporal changes in the tolerance to alcohol are rarely discussed. In the behavioral theory proposed here, the rate of increase in tolerance during alcohol exposure is described by linear equations with zero intercept. These equations describe the rate of tolerance growth for acute tolerance, the rate of tolerance growth after alcohol dosing (chronic tolerance), and, for cases in which tolerance has been conditioned, the equations also describe changes in the rate of growth of tolerance when the stimulus set changes. This theory does not explain tolerance acquisition, but may be useful in investigating the physiological basis for tolerance acquisition because it provides numerical values for momentary tolerance that can be compared with concurrent physiological changes. The theory is testable and most of the published behavioral data on non-conditioned tolerance are consistent with the proposed theory. New empirical data on conditioned tolerance are needed to evaluate the proposed theory, and the design for an evaluation is suggested here. Despite its limitations, the theory serves as one example of what a mathematical theory for tolerance might be and may stimulate the development of competing theories with which it could be compared empirically.

  7. Prediction of Juvenile-Onset Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zadnik, Karla; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Mutti, Donald O.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myopia (nearsightedness) has its onset in childhood and affects about one-third of adults in the United States. Along with its high prevalence, myopia is expensive to correct and is associated with ocular diseases that include glaucoma and retinal detachment. OBJECTIVE To determine the best set of predictors for myopia onset in school-aged children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study was an observational cohort study of ocular development and myopia onset conducted at 5 clinical sites from September 1, 1989, through May 22, 2010. Data were collected from 4512 ethnically diverse, nonmyopic school-aged children from grades 1 through 8 (baseline grades 1 through 6) (ages 6 through 13 years [baseline, 6 through 11 years]). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We evaluated 13 candidate risk factors for their ability to predict the onset of myopia. Myopia onset was defined as −0.75 diopters or more of myopia in each principal meridian in the right eye as measured by cycloplegic autorefraction at any visit after baseline until grade 8 (age 13 years). We evaluated risk factors using odds ratios from discrete time survival analysis, the area under the curve, and cross validation. RESULTS A total of 414 children became myopic from grades 2 through 8 (ages 7 through 13 years). Of the 13 factors evaluated, 10 were associated with the risk for myopia onset (P < .05). Of these 10 factors, 8 retained their association in multivariate models: spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline, parental myopia, axial length, corneal power, crystalline lens power, ratio of accommodative convergence to accommodation (AC/A ratio), horizontal/vertical astigmatism magnitude, and visual activity. A less hyperopic/more myopic baseline refractive error was consistently associated with risk of myopia onset in multivariate models (odds ratios from 0.02 to 0.13, P < .001), while near work, time

  8. Myopia, an underrated global challenge to vision: where the current data takes us on myopia control

    PubMed Central

    Holden, B; Sankaridurg, P; Smith, E; Aller, T; Jong, M; He, M

    2014-01-01

    Myopia is the most frequent cause of distance impairment in the world and is creating an alarming global epidemic with deleterious ramifications for the quality of life and economic health of individuals and nations as a whole. In addition to being immediately disadvantageous, myopia increases the risk of serious disorders such as myopic macular degeneration, retinal detachment, glaucoma, and cataract and is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness across many countries. The reduction in age of onset of myopia is of great concern since the earlier the onset, the more myopic the individual will become, with all the attendant increased risks of accompanying debilitating eye conditions. The economic burden is great; both in consequences of uncorrected refractive error and also in the provision of devices for correcting visual acuity. Earlier onset of myopia increases the lifetime economic burden related to loss of productivity and independence, leading to a reduced quality of life. Recent data suggest addressing accommodation per se has little direct amelioration of myopia progression. Pharmacological interventions that effect changes in the sclera show promising efficacy, whereas optical interventions based on a myopic shift in the retinal image are proving to effect up to 55% reduction in the rate of progression of myopia. Early contact lens and spectacle interventions that reduce the rate of progression of myopia are able to significantly reduce the burden of myopia. These non-pharmacological interventions show profound promise in reducing the overall associated morbidity of myopia. PMID:24357836

  9. Optics, evolution, and myopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Norman D.; Slade, Ivan

    2005-06-01

    Darwin's seminal work 'Origin of Species' immediately attracted the 19th Century scholar John Tyndall. Darwin's book was, and is, a hypothetical and metaphysical treatise but it has great explanatory power. The cryptically named 'X Club'-9 members, including Tyndall-was formed to defend Darwin's outrageous ideas. Tyndall's responsibilities within this X-Club were to support Darwin's theory through experimental studies in solar physics and chemistry. Research was, of course, directed at understanding the physical basis of life on earth. The studies founded modern meteorological sciences, nephelometry and bacteriology (pace, Pasteur). This current essay details some of the historical background of Tyndall's work in natural philosophy; allowing the value of Tyndall's work to be assessed more objectively. Also it evaluates their respective contributions to the founding of this different way of looking at the world. The work of Tyndall at the 1868 Norwich 'British Association for the Advancement of Science' (BAAS) Meeting and the later internationally explosive 1874 Belfast BAAS meeting are examined in the light of his research. Some amplification of Tyndall's works both philosophically and historically is attempted.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: deafness and myopia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorder KidsHealth: Your Child's Vision Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center MalaCards: deafness and myopia My Baby's ... 5 links) Alexander Graham Bell Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing March of Dimes: Hearing ...

  11. Early Childhood Refractive Error and Parental History of Myopia as Predictors of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Manny, Ruth E.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the utility of a child's first grade refractive error and parental history of myopia as predictors of myopia onset between the second and eighth grades. Methods. Subjects were nonmyopic children in the first grade who were enrolled in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Myopia was defined as −0.75 D or more myopia in both meridians (by cycloplegic autorefraction). The children were classified as having a high (versus low) risk of myopia with a cycloplegic sphere cutoff of +0.75 D or less (versus more) of hyperopia. Parental myopia was determined by a parent-completed survey. Discrete-time survival models predicted the risk of myopia. Results. Of the 1854 nonmyopic first graders, 21.3% were at high risk of myopia. More high-risk subjects had two myopic parents, 25.4% compared with 16.5% in the low-risk group (P < 0.0001). The low-risk survival function was similar regardless of the number of myopic parents. Among high-risk eighth graders, the survival probability was lower than in the low-risk group, decreasing with an increase in the number of myopic parents. The sensitivity and specificity of first grade refractive error with the number of myopic parents as predictors for myopia onset were 62.5% and 81.9%, respectively. Conclusions. First grade refractive error and the number of myopic parents can predict a child's risk of myopia; however, because the sensitivity of these factors is low, these two predictors may not be sufficient at this young age when a more accurate prediction of myopia onset is needed. PMID:19737876

  12. Childhood myopia: epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Recko, Matthew; Stahl, Erin Durrie

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamic interaction between the eye's growth and its ability to adapt to maintain vision has shown that childhood myopia is a significant prediction of progressive myopia and the potentially severe ocular comorbidities associated with it. It is important for us to better understand this process and its risk factors in order to better develop a prevention and treatment strategy. This article will discuss the epidemiology, risk factors and current therapeutic regimens for reducing myopic progression. PMID:25958656

  13. Accommodation and induced myopia in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Troilo, David; Quinn, Nicole; Baker, Kayla

    2007-04-01

    Accommodation may indirectly influence visually guided eye growth by affecting the retinal defocus signal used to guide growth. Specifically, increased lags of accommodation associated with low stimulus-response (S-R) function slopes will impose increased hyperopic blur on the retina and may induce axial elongation and myopia. The purpose of this study was (1) to measure accommodation in awake, free viewing marmosets and (2) compare accommodation behavior in marmosets before and after inducing different amounts of myopia with binocular spectacle lenses. In untreated marmosets, the average accommodation S-R slope approached one, but showed considerable inter-individual variability (mean+/-SD: 0.964+/-0.249 for monocular viewing; 0.895+/-0.235 for binocular viewing; monocular and binocular measures not significantly different). The monocular S-R slopes were significantly reduced following a period of lens rearing that produced axial myopia (change in slope=-0.30+/-0.30, p<.01) and the reduction in slope was proportional to the amount of myopia induced (p<.01). The S-R slopes measured either under monocular or binocular conditions before induction of myopia were not well correlated with the degree of myopia induced (monocular: r=-.240, p=.453; binocular: r=-.060, p=.824). These results support the hypothesis that the reduction in S-R slope in myopes is a consequence of the myopia induced. The alternative hypothesis-that low S-R slope increases susceptibility to the development of myopia--is not supported by the weak correlation between the pre-manipulation S-R slopes and the magnitude of the myopic shift.

  14. Monovision slows juvenile myopia progression unilaterally

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J R

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the acceptability, effectivity, and side effects of a monovision spectacle correction designed to reduce accommodation and myopia progression in schoolchildren. Methods: Dominant eyes of 11 year old children with myopia (−1.00 to −3.00 D mean spherical equivalent) were corrected for distance; fellow eyes were uncorrected or corrected to keep the refractive imbalance ⩽2.00 D. Myopia progression was followed with cycloplegic autorefraction and A-scan ultrasonography measures of vitreous chamber depth (VCD) for up to 30 months. Dynamic retinoscopy was used to assess accommodation while reading. Results: All children accommodated to read with the distance corrected (dominant) eye. Thus, the near corrected eye experienced myopic defocus at all levels of accommodation. Myopia progression in the near corrected eyes was significantly slower than in the distance corrected eyes (inter-eye difference = 0.36 D/year (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.19, p = 0.0015, n = 13); difference in VCD elongation = 0.13 mm/year (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.08, p = 0.0003, n = 13)). After refitting with conventional spectacles, the resultant anisometropia returned to baseline levels after 9–18 months. Conclusions: Monovision is not effective in reducing accommodation in juvenile myopia. However, myopia progression was significantly reduced in the near corrected eye, suggesting that sustained myopic defocus slows axial elongation of the human eye. PMID:16113381

  15. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  16. Myopia Stabilization and Associated Factors Among Participants in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To use the Gompertz function to estimate the age and the amount of myopia at stabilization and to evaluate associated factors in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) cohort, a large ethnically diverse group of myopic children. Methods. The COMET enrolled 469 ethnically diverse children aged 6 to younger than 12 years with spherical equivalent refraction between −1.25 and −4.50 diopters (D). Noncycloplegic refraction was measured semiannually for 4 years and annually thereafter. Right eye data were fit to individual Gompertz functions in participants with at least 6 years of follow-up and at least seven refraction measurements over 11 years. Function parameters were estimated using a nonlinear least squares procedure. Associated factors were evaluated using linear regression. Results. In total, 426 participants (91%) had valid Gompertz curve fits. The mean (SD) age at myopia stabilization was 15.61 (4.17) years, and the mean (SD) amount of myopia at stabilization was −4.87 (2.01) D. Ethnicity (P < 0.0001) but not sex or the number of myopic parents was associated with the age at stabilization. Ethnicity (P = 0.02) and the number of myopic parents (P = 0.01) but not sex were associated with myopia magnitude at stabilization. At stabilization, African Americans were youngest (mean age, 13.82 years) and had the least myopia (mean, −4.36 D). Participants with two versus no myopic parents had approximately 1.00 D more myopia at stabilization. The age and the amount of myopia at stabilization were correlated (r = −0.60, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. The Gompertz function provides estimates of the age and the amount of myopia at stabilization in an ethnically diverse cohort. These findings should provide guidance on the time course of myopia and on decisions regarding the type and timing of interventions. PMID:24159085

  17. Vulnerability to alcohol consumption, spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being: test of a theory 1

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Luz Patricia Díaz; Sanchez, Alba Idaly Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to demonstrate the relations among vulnerability, self-transcendence and well-being in the young adult population and the effect of each of these variables on the adoption of low-risk consumption conducts. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional correlation study using structural equations analysis to test the relation among the variables. Results: an inverse relation was evidenced between vulnerability to alcohol consumption and spiritual transcendence (β-0.123, p 0.025) and a direct positive relation between spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being (β 0.482, p 0.000). Conclusions: the relations among the variables spiritual transcendence, vulnerability to alcohol consumption and psychosocial well-being, based on Reed's Theory, are confirmed in the population group of young college students, concluding that psychosocial well-being can be achieved when spiritual transcendence is enhanced, as the vulnerability to alcohol consumption drops. PMID:27276017

  18. Men’s Condom Use Resistance: Alcohol Effects on Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Danube, Cinnamon L.; Morrison, Diane M.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is a novel investigation of 1) the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict men’s condom use resistance (CUR; i.e., attempts to avoid condom use with a partner who wants to use one) and 2) the effects of alcohol on endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs. Methods Using an alcohol administration protocol, a between- and within-subjects experiment was conducted with a community sample of 312 young male non-problem drinkers who have sex with women. After assessing endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs (e.g., attitudes, norms, self-efficacy, control, and intentions) in a sober state, beverage condition was experimentally manipulated between subjects and endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs was reassessed. Results Analyses included repeated measures MANOVAs with beverage condition (no alcohol vs. alcohol) as the between-subjects factor and time (pre-beverage vs. post-beverage) as the within-subjects factor. Between-subjects, intoxicated participants reported significantly stronger CUR intentions, more favorable CUR attitudes and normative perceptions, and greater CUR self-efficacy than sober participants. There were significant within-subject changes for CUR intentions, attitudes, normative perceptions, and self-efficacy. Neither between- nor within-subjects effects were found for CUR control. An exploratory multi-group path analysis indicated that the relationships among the TPB-CUR constructs were similar for alcohol and no alcohol groups. Conclusions Findings indicated that alcohol intoxication increased men’s CUR intentions and self-efficacy and led to more positive CUR attitudes and norms, yet had no effect on CUR control. Future research should examine whether there are similar effects of intoxication on TPB constructs related to other sexual risk behaviors. PMID:26348499

  19. Determinants of disulfiram acceptance among alcohol patients: a test of the theory of reasoned action.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, R G; Prue, D M; Rychtarik, R G

    1987-01-01

    The utility of disulfiram in the treatment of alcohol abuse has been limited by the high frequency with which clients refuse the regimen. The present study identified variables influencing disulfiram acceptance/rejection within the framework of the theory of reasoned action. Eighty male inpatients on an alcohol treatment unit completed a questionnaire operationalizing the components of the model. The theoretical components were then used to predict requests for the drug. Multiple regression analyses revealed significant correlations among components of the model consistent with the assumptions of the theory. In addition, significant differences were found between disulfiram requestors and rejectors in terms of behavioral and normative beliefs about the consequences of being placed on the drug. Implications of these results for the design of effective interventions are discussed.

  20. Night myopia is reduced in binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Chirre, Emmanuel; Prieto, Pedro M; Schwarz, Christina; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Night myopia, which is a shift in refraction with light level, has been widely studied but still lacks a complete understanding. We used a new infrared open-view binocular Hartmann-Shack wave front sensor to quantify night myopia under monocular and natural binocular viewing conditions. Both eyes' accommodative response, aberrations, pupil diameter, and convergence were simultaneously measured at light levels ranging from photopic to scotopic conditions to total darkness. For monocular vision, reducing the stimulus luminance resulted in a progression of the accommodative state that tends toward the subject's dark focus or tonic accommodation and a change in convergence following the induced accommodative error. Most subjects presented a myopic shift of accommodation that was mitigated in binocular vision. The impact of spherical aberration on the focus shift was relatively small. Our results in monocular conditions support the hypothesis that night myopia has an accommodative origin as the eye progressively changes its accommodation state with decreasing luminance toward its resting state in total darkness. On the other hand, binocularity restrains night myopia, possibly by using fusional convergence as an additional accommodative cue, thus reducing the potential impact of night myopia on vision at low light levels. PMID:27333457

  1. Can the Theory of Planned Behavior Mediate the Effects of Low Self-Control on Alcohol Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, George E.; Marcum, Catherine Davis

    2005-01-01

    Some studies show that Gottfredson and Hirschi's low self-control plays an important role in alcohol use, but low self-control remains stable over time. Because self-control is not easily changed, the present study examines the ability of theory of planned behavior to mediate the effect of low self-control on intentions to use alcohol and alcohol…

  2. Theories and models supporting prevention approaches to alcohol problems among youth.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E M; Amatetti, S; Funkhouser, J E; Johnson, S

    1988-01-01

    The Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration's Office for Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP) was established to initiate programs to provide prevention and early intervention services for young people, especially high-risk youth. OSAP's starting point was the theories and models that provide the background body of knowledge. The models summarized here guide new prevention efforts and provide a framework for analyzing diverse experiences in the field. The goal has been to develop strategies based on theories and models of prevention that can reverse or prevent adolescent alcohol use. Among the psychosocial models, research in social learning theory is the theoretical basis for prevention efforts using the team approach among individuals, small groups, families, and communities. A prevention technique based on cognitive dissonance theory proposes verbal inoculations to establish or strengthen beliefs and attitudes, helping a young person to resist drinking, which may be in conflict with another, more desirable goal. In the developmental concept adolescence is a period of role confusion out of which the person's identity should emerge. Prevention efforts built on this view seek to help adolescents to form positive identities by achievement as students, athletes, and in community roles. Behavioral intention theory provides a framework for understanding the role of perceived social norms in directing behaviors. In the social development model, prevention programs should create positive peer groups and ensure that the social environment does not give mixed messages. Health behavior theory is the basis for prevention strategies directed toward a person's entire behavior instead of one aspect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3141950

  3. Why Common Sense Goes Out the Window: Effects of Alcohol on Intentions to Use Condoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Tara K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Four studies tested the hypothesis that alcohol decreases the likelihood of condom use during casual sex. Results are consistent with "alcohol myopia," the notion that alcohol decreases cognitive capacity, such that intoxicated people are more likely to attend to the most salient cues in a situation. Provides strong evidence that alcohol use…

  4. Online Learning as Information Delivery: Digital Myopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Jan; Reeves, Thomas C.; Oliver, Ron

    2005-01-01

    In business and commerce, the concept of marketing myopia has been a useful tool to predict, analyze and explain the rise and fall of businesses. In this article, we question whether the concept can also be used to predict the ultimate downfall of online learning in higher education, if universities continue to confuse their key mission-education-…

  5. Gender and family differences in adolescent's heavy alcohol use: the power-control theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, K

    2010-10-01

    According to the power-control theory, growing independence of adolescent girls, manifest in more prevalent problem behaviors, may be explained by changes in family structure (increasing level of authority gained in the workplace by mothers). To verify this hypothesis, self-report data from Warsaw adolescents (N = 3087, age 14-15 years, 50% boys) were used. Results indicate that parenting practices differ across child gender and structure of parents' work authority. Girls, especially in patriarchal households, spend more time with mothers and perceive stronger maternal control. In egalitarian families, fathers tend to be more involved with sons than with daughters. When parental control, support and adolescents' risk preferences are controlled, the gender-by-household type interaction effect is observed--girls in patriarchal families have the lowest risk of getting drunk. Study results provide support for power-control theory showing the relationship between parental work authority and adolescent's heavy alcohol use.

  6. Gender and family differences in adolescent's heavy alcohol use: the power-control theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, K

    2010-10-01

    According to the power-control theory, growing independence of adolescent girls, manifest in more prevalent problem behaviors, may be explained by changes in family structure (increasing level of authority gained in the workplace by mothers). To verify this hypothesis, self-report data from Warsaw adolescents (N = 3087, age 14-15 years, 50% boys) were used. Results indicate that parenting practices differ across child gender and structure of parents' work authority. Girls, especially in patriarchal households, spend more time with mothers and perceive stronger maternal control. In egalitarian families, fathers tend to be more involved with sons than with daughters. When parental control, support and adolescents' risk preferences are controlled, the gender-by-household type interaction effect is observed--girls in patriarchal families have the lowest risk of getting drunk. Study results provide support for power-control theory showing the relationship between parental work authority and adolescent's heavy alcohol use. PMID:20513655

  7. Effect of alcohol on vagal regulation of cardiovascular function: contributions of the polyvagal theory to the psychophysiology of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Reed, S F; Porges, S W; Newlin, D B

    1999-11-01

    Research was conducted to evaluate the influence of acute alcohol consumption on vagal regulation of heart rate. Nine men with histories of polydrug use participated in this residential study. On 5 separate days, they drank liquids consisting of cold water (on 2 days), a moderate dose of alcohol (0.64 g/kg), a high dose of alcohol (1.12 g/kg), and a placebo. Continuous recordings of heart period were quantified to produce 3 measures of heart rate variability, reflecting the amplitude of 3 neurophysiologically mediated rhythms. Heart period, respiratory rhythm (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]), and the 0.064-0.10-Hz vasomotor rhythm were significantly lower during the high alcohol dose condition, relative to the placebo and water conditions. Because the neural regulation of the heart by the vagus contributes to these variables, these findings suggest that alcohol reduces cardiac vagal tone. In support of this explanation, alcohol also decreased the coupling between changes in heart period and changes in RSA. This study demonstrated that alcohol produces a dysregulated state in which heart rate is relatively uncoupled from vagal activity.

  8. Identification of myopia-associated WNT7B polymorphisms provides insights into the mechanism underlying the development of myopia.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masahiro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Tabara, Yasuharu; Suda, Kenji; Morooka, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Hideo; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Chen, Peng; Qiao, Fan; Nakata, Isao; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Gotoh, Norimoto; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Meguro, Akira; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Polasek, Ozen; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Richardson, Andrea J; Schache, Maria; Takeuchi, Masaki; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Cuellar, Gabriel; Shi, Yi; Huang, Luling; Yang, Zhenglin; Leung, Kim Hung; Kao, Patrick Y P; Yap, Maurice K H; Yip, Shea Ping; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; MacGregor, Stuart; Vitart, Veronique; Aung, Tin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Baird, Paul N; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-03-31

    Myopia can cause severe visual impairment. Here, we report a two-stage genome-wide association study for three myopia-related traits in 9,804 Japanese individuals, which was extended with trans-ethnic replication in 2,674 Chinese and 2,690 Caucasian individuals. We identify WNT7B as a novel susceptibility gene for axial length (rs10453441, Pmeta=3.9 × 10(-13)) and corneal curvature (Pmeta=2.9 × 10(-40)) and confirm the previously reported association between GJD2 and myopia. WNT7B significantly associates with extreme myopia in a case-control study with 1,478 Asian patients and 4,689 controls (odds ratio (OR)meta=1.13, Pmeta=0.011). We also find in a mouse model of myopia downregulation of WNT7B expression in the cornea and upregulation in the retina, suggesting its possible role in the development of myopia.

  9. Prescribing Eyeglasses for Myopia and Hyperopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-02-01

    Most eyeglass prescriptions are given for patients with one of two common visual problems: myopia and hyperopia. Myopia is the condition where the eye cannot clearly focus on far objects; e.g., one can't easily see the blackboard from the back of the room. Hyperopia refers to problems seeing close up, e.g., difficulty reading the newspaper. Physics enables us to estimate the prescription of eyeglasses quickly from data anyone can gather. The beauty of the method derives from the fact that you do not need to know anything about the detailed structure of the eye's compound lens system and biological media. This is due to the fact that eyeglasses are corrective.

  10. [Pathophysiology of myopia: nature versus nurture].

    PubMed

    Cassagne, M; Malecaze, F; Soler, V

    2014-05-01

    Myopia is the most frequent refractive disorder in the world. It has become a real Public Health problem, due to its frequency and to high myopia-related blinding complications. Myopic progression depends on genetic and environmental factors. Genetic studies have identified more than forty candidate genes that take part in pathophysiological pathways, from retinal phototransduction to axial lengthening via scleral remodelling. Environmental factors also influence scleral remodelling by way of visual perception. In the case of predominant attention to near tasks, a physiological feedback loop leads to axial growth. This phenomenon, called active emmetropization, is particularly obvious in animal models and in some human populations. To date, research has failed to identify a molecule common to all the implicated metabolic pathways which could be a target for an effective preventive treatment against myopic progression. PMID:24698640

  11. [Pathophysiology of myopia: nature versus nurture].

    PubMed

    Cassagne, M; Malecaze, F; Soler, V

    2014-05-01

    Myopia is the most frequent refractive disorder in the world. It has become a real Public Health problem, due to its frequency and to high myopia-related blinding complications. Myopic progression depends on genetic and environmental factors. Genetic studies have identified more than forty candidate genes that take part in pathophysiological pathways, from retinal phototransduction to axial lengthening via scleral remodelling. Environmental factors also influence scleral remodelling by way of visual perception. In the case of predominant attention to near tasks, a physiological feedback loop leads to axial growth. This phenomenon, called active emmetropization, is particularly obvious in animal models and in some human populations. To date, research has failed to identify a molecule common to all the implicated metabolic pathways which could be a target for an effective preventive treatment against myopic progression.

  12. New perspectives on the prevention of myopia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Fan; Morgan, Ian G; He, Mingguang

    2011-03-01

    The high prevalence of myopia and its public health and clinical consequences make prevention of myopia a top priority. Traditional approaches to prevention have been based on reducing accommodative load, and have generally been unsuccessful. Only treatment with atropine eye-drops has produced clinically significant effects, which are however of limited duration and suffer from potential side-effects. In addition, based on animal experimentation, it is now clear that atropine blocks eye growth by mechanisms which do not involve accommodation. More generally, experimentation on animal models of myopia has shown that accommodation is not important for the control of eye growth, whereas exposure to hyperopic (growth-promoting) and myopic (growth-inhibiting) defocus is more important. Recent epidemiological evidence has also questioned the importance of near work, although education is clearly important. This suggests a preventive approach based on deliberately increasing the amount of myopic defocus a child is exposed to may be successful. There is also convincing evidence that children who spend more time outside are less likely to become myopic, which also suggests a quite non-invasive approach to prevention. These new directions need to be pursued.

  13. Decreased sleep quality in high myopia children.

    PubMed

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Torii, Hidemasa; Tsubota, Kazuo; Negishi, Kazuno

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality in myopic children and adults. This cross sectional study surveyed 486 participants aged from 10 to 59 years with refractive errors using a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Children (< 20 years) in the high myopia group exhibited the poorest PSQI scores (P < 0.01), while the adults showed no such correlations. Subscales of PSQI and HADS in children disclosed that the high myopia groups had the shortest sleep duration (P < 0.01), worst subjective sleep scores (P < 0.001), and latest bedtime (P < 0.05). Regression analyses in children significantly correlated myopic errors with PSQI (P < 0.05), sleep duration (P < 0.01), and bedtime (P < 0.01). Sleep efficacy (P < 0.05) and daytime dysfunction (P < 0.05) were significantly better in contact-lens users compared to the respective non-user groups across all participants. In conclusion, sleep quality in children was significantly correlated with myopic error, with the high myopia group worst affected. PMID:27650408

  14. Decreased sleep quality in high myopia children

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Torii, Hidemasa; Tsubota, Kazuo; Negishi, Kazuno

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality in myopic children and adults. This cross sectional study surveyed 486 participants aged from 10 to 59 years with refractive errors using a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Children (< 20 years) in the high myopia group exhibited the poorest PSQI scores (P < 0.01), while the adults showed no such correlations. Subscales of PSQI and HADS in children disclosed that the high myopia groups had the shortest sleep duration (P < 0.01), worst subjective sleep scores (P < 0.001), and latest bedtime (P < 0.05). Regression analyses in children significantly correlated myopic errors with PSQI (P < 0.05), sleep duration (P < 0.01), and bedtime (P < 0.01). Sleep efficacy (P < 0.05) and daytime dysfunction (P < 0.05) were significantly better in contact-lens users compared to the respective non-user groups across all participants. In conclusion, sleep quality in children was significantly correlated with myopic error, with the high myopia group worst affected. PMID:27650408

  15. Myopia in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Swati; Chia, Audrey; Htoon, Hla Myint; Lam, Pin Min; Yap, Fabian; Ling, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to evaluate the proportion of young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who have myopia, as well as the risk factors associated with myopia in this group. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, patients aged < 21 years with T1DM for ≥ 1 year underwent a comprehensive eye examination. Presence of parental myopia, and average hours of near-work and outdoor activity were estimated using a questionnaire. Annualised glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), defined as the mean of the last three HbA1c readings taken over the last year, was calculated. Multivariate analysis using genetic, environmental and diabetes-related factors was done to evaluate risk factors associated with myopia. RESULTS Of the 146 patients (mean age 12.5 ± 3.6 years) recruited, 66.4% were Chinese and 57.5% were female. Myopia (i.e. spherical equivalent [SE] of –0.50 D or worse) was present in 96 (65.8%) patients. The proportion of patients with myopia increased from 25.0% and 53.6% in those aged < 7.0 years and 7.0–9.9 years, respectively, to 59.2% and 78.4% in those aged 10.0–11.9 years and ≥ 12.0 years, respectively. Higher levels of SE were associated with lower parental myopia (p = 0.024) and higher annualised HbA1c (p = 0.011). CONCLUSION Compared to the background population, the proportion of myopia in young patients with T1DM was higher in those aged < 10 years but similar in the older age group. Myopia was associated with a history of parental myopia. Environmental risk factors and poor glycaemic control were not related to higher myopia risk. PMID:26310273

  16. Suicide and Alcohol: Conceptualizing the Relationship from a Cognitive-Social Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents formulation of association between alcohol consumption and suicidal behavior derived from recent advances in area of social cognition. Suggests that social cognitive mechanism of alcohol-induced myopia may serve important role in developing comprehensive conceptualization of alcohol-suicide relationship. Discusses implications for…

  17. RPE and Choroid Mechanisms Underlying Ocular Growth and Myopia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is the most common type of refractive errors and one of the world's leading causes of blindness. Visual manipulations in animal models have provided convincing evidence for the role of environmental factors in myopia development. These models along with in vitro studies have provided important insights into underlying mechanisms. The key locations of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid make them plausible conduits for relaying growth regulatory signals originating in the retina to the sclera, which ultimately determines eye size and shape. Identifying the key signal molecules and their targets may lead to the development of new myopia control treatments. This section summarizes findings implicating the RPE and choroid in myopia development. For RPE and/or choroid, changes in morphology, activity of ion channels/transporters, as well as in gene and protein expression, have been linked to altered eye growth. Both tissues thus represent potential targets for novel therapies for myopia.

  18. RPE and Choroid Mechanisms Underlying Ocular Growth and Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common type of refractive errors and one of the world’s leading causes of blindness. Visual manipulations in animal models have provided convincing evidence for the role of environmental factors in myopia development. These models along with in vitro studies have provided important insights into underlying mechanisms. The key locations of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid make them plausible conduits for relaying growth regulatory signals originating in the retina to the sclera, which ultimately determines eye size and shape. Identifying the key signal molecules and their targets may lead to the development of new myopia control treatments. This section summarizes findings implicating the RPE and choroid in myopia development. For RPE and/or choroid, changes in morphology, activity of ion channels/transporters, as well as in gene and protein expression, have been linked to altered eye growth. Both tissues thus represent potential targets for novel therapies for myopia. PMID:26310157

  19. Understanding Alcohol Consumption and Its Correlates among African American Youths in Public Housing: A Test of Problem Behavior Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombe, Margaret; Yu, Mansoo; Nebbitt, Von; Earl, Tara

    2011-01-01

    African American youths are overrepresented in urban public housing developments characterized by violence, poverty, and alternative market activities. Using Jessor and Jessor's problem behavior theory (PBT), the authors examined alcohol use and its correlates in a sample of African American youths from three public housing developments (N = 403).…

  20. Deterrence Theory and the Role of Shame in Projected Offending of College Students against a Ban on Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Margaret S.; Fukushima, Miyuki; Spivak, Andrew L.; Payne, David

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we advance previous research in deterrence theory by examining the perceived deterrent effects of a newly instituted dry policy on a college campus. A survey of 500 full-time undergraduate students between the ages of 18 and 26 was conducted 3 months following the ban on alcohol. Hypotheses are derived from deterrence theory…

  1. Prevalence of Myopia in France: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Emilie; Ingrand, Pierre; Pelen, François; Bentaleb, Yacine; Weber, Michel; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Souied, Eric; Leveziel, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Refractive error (RE), particularly myopia, is the first cause of visual impairment throughout the world. This study aimed to depict the prevalence of myopia in a multicentric series of French individuals.This cross-sectional analysis was carried out between January 2012 and November 2013 in eye clinics dedicated to REs. Data collection included age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity, RE, and any relevant medical history involving laser refractive surgery and cataract surgery. Exclusion criteria consisted of monophthalm patients or those with incomplete demographic data.Prevalences in the overall population, by gender and by age groups were reported for mild myopia (-0.50 to -2.75 diopter [D]), moderate myopia (-3 to -5.75 D), high myopia (less than -6 D), and very high myopia (less than -10 D).The analysis included 100,429 individuals, mean age 38.5 years (± 16.9). Overall prevalence of myopia was 39.1% (95% CI 38.8-39.4). Prevalences of mild, moderate, high and very high myopia were respectively 25.1% (95% CI 25.4-24.9), 10.6% (95% CI 10.4-10.8), 3.4% (95% CI 3.3-3.5) and 0.5% (95% CI 0.48-0.57).Even if possible bias occurred in recruitment, our results are similar to RE data collected in nationally representative samples of Caucasians in other studies. This is to our knowledge, one of the largest European series of individuals dedicated to myopia prevalences in different age groups. These results confirm the importance of myopia as a major health issue in Western countries.

  2. Prevalence of Myopia in France: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Emilie; Ingrand, Pierre; Pelen, François; Bentaleb, Yacine; Weber, Michel; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Souied, Eric; Leveziel, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Refractive error (RE), particularly myopia, is the first cause of visual impairment throughout the world. This study aimed to depict the prevalence of myopia in a multicentric series of French individuals.This cross-sectional analysis was carried out between January 2012 and November 2013 in eye clinics dedicated to REs. Data collection included age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity, RE, and any relevant medical history involving laser refractive surgery and cataract surgery. Exclusion criteria consisted of monophthalm patients or those with incomplete demographic data.Prevalences in the overall population, by gender and by age groups were reported for mild myopia (-0.50 to -2.75 diopter [D]), moderate myopia (-3 to -5.75 D), high myopia (less than -6 D), and very high myopia (less than -10 D).The analysis included 100,429 individuals, mean age 38.5 years (± 16.9). Overall prevalence of myopia was 39.1% (95% CI 38.8-39.4). Prevalences of mild, moderate, high and very high myopia were respectively 25.1% (95% CI 25.4-24.9), 10.6% (95% CI 10.4-10.8), 3.4% (95% CI 3.3-3.5) and 0.5% (95% CI 0.48-0.57).Even if possible bias occurred in recruitment, our results are similar to RE data collected in nationally representative samples of Caucasians in other studies. This is to our knowledge, one of the largest European series of individuals dedicated to myopia prevalences in different age groups. These results confirm the importance of myopia as a major health issue in Western countries. PMID:26559276

  3. How well does the theory of planned behaviour predict alcohol consumption? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard; Dahdah, Mary; Norman, Paul; French, David P

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify correlations between theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and (i) intentions to consume alcohol and (ii) alcohol consumption. Systematic literature searches identified 40 eligible studies that were meta-analysed. Three moderator analyses were conducted: pattern of consumption, gender of participants and age of participants. Across studies, intentions had the strongest relationship with attitudes (r+ = .62), followed by subjective norms (r+ = .47) and perceived behavioural control (PBC; r+ = .31). Self-efficacy (SE) had a stronger relationship with intentions (r+ = .48) compared with perceived control (PC; r+ = -.10). Intention had the strongest relationship with alcohol consumption (r+ = .54), followed by SE (r+ = .41). In contrast, PBC and PC had negative relationships with alcohol consumption (r+ = -.05 and -.13, respectively). All moderators affected TPB relationships. Patterns of consumption with clear definitions had stronger TPB relations, females reported stronger attitude-intention relations than males, and adults reported stronger attitude-intention and SE-intention relations than adolescents. Recommendations for future research include targeting attitudes and intentions in interventions to reduce alcohol consumption, using clear definitions of alcohol consumption in TPB items to improve prediction and assessing SE when investigating risk behaviours.

  4. How well does the theory of planned behaviour predict alcohol consumption? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Richard; Dahdah, Mary; Norman, Paul; French, David P.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify correlations between theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and (i) intentions to consume alcohol and (ii) alcohol consumption. Systematic literature searches identified 40 eligible studies that were meta-analysed. Three moderator analyses were conducted: pattern of consumption, gender of participants and age of participants. Across studies, intentions had the strongest relationship with attitudes (r + = .62), followed by subjective norms (r + = .47) and perceived behavioural control (PBC; r + = .31). Self-efficacy (SE) had a stronger relationship with intentions (r + = .48) compared with perceived control (PC; r + = −.10). Intention had the strongest relationship with alcohol consumption (r + = .54), followed by SE (r + = .41). In contrast, PBC and PC had negative relationships with alcohol consumption (r + = −.05 and −.13, respectively). All moderators affected TPB relationships. Patterns of consumption with clear definitions had stronger TPB relations, females reported stronger attitude–intention relations than males, and adults reported stronger attitude–intention and SE–intention relations than adolescents. Recommendations for future research include targeting attitudes and intentions in interventions to reduce alcohol consumption, using clear definitions of alcohol consumption in TPB items to improve prediction and assessing SE when investigating risk behaviours. PMID:25089611

  5. How well does the theory of planned behaviour predict alcohol consumption? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard; Dahdah, Mary; Norman, Paul; French, David P

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify correlations between theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and (i) intentions to consume alcohol and (ii) alcohol consumption. Systematic literature searches identified 40 eligible studies that were meta-analysed. Three moderator analyses were conducted: pattern of consumption, gender of participants and age of participants. Across studies, intentions had the strongest relationship with attitudes (r+ = .62), followed by subjective norms (r+ = .47) and perceived behavioural control (PBC; r+ = .31). Self-efficacy (SE) had a stronger relationship with intentions (r+ = .48) compared with perceived control (PC; r+ = -.10). Intention had the strongest relationship with alcohol consumption (r+ = .54), followed by SE (r+ = .41). In contrast, PBC and PC had negative relationships with alcohol consumption (r+ = -.05 and -.13, respectively). All moderators affected TPB relationships. Patterns of consumption with clear definitions had stronger TPB relations, females reported stronger attitude-intention relations than males, and adults reported stronger attitude-intention and SE-intention relations than adolescents. Recommendations for future research include targeting attitudes and intentions in interventions to reduce alcohol consumption, using clear definitions of alcohol consumption in TPB items to improve prediction and assessing SE when investigating risk behaviours. PMID:25089611

  6. Personal Construct Theory and the Transformation of Identity in Alcoholics Anonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lance Brendan

    2011-01-01

    The dominant theoretical approach to alcoholism research presumes linear, causal relationships between individual cognitions and behavioral outcomes. This approach has largely failed to account for the recovery some alcoholics achieve in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) because AA emphasizes the transformation of identity, framed in terms of…

  7. School-Aged Children of Alcoholics: Theory and Research. Pamphlet Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Bennett, Linda A.

    Despite the research documenting the occurrence of alcoholism in families, little is known about how alcoholism is transmitted from one generation to the next or what causes several members of the same family to abuse alcohol. To date, the most consistent findings among school-aged children are reports of cognitive differences. Health problems,…

  8. Current status on the development and treatment of myopia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey; Schulman, Erica; Jamal, Nadine

    2012-05-01

    This is a review of the current literature describing the effect of atropine, bifocals, and/or contact lenses on slowing the progression of myopia. Cumulative data from a number of studies have demonstrated atropine instilled once a day in myopic eyes resulted in a 90% average reduction of myopia progression, as compared to untreated eyes, i.e., from 0.50 D/year to 0.05 D/year. Pirenzepine, a muscarinic pharmacological agent, has a minimal effect on pupil size and accommodation, and it has been shown to slow myopia by 44%. Bifocals and progressive lenses, which have been used for years to slow the progression of myopia, have recently been shown to produce, on average, only small, clinically insignificant treatment effects. However, their effectiveness is increased in children who are esophoric and have a large lag of accommodation, reducing myopia progression to between 0.25 and 0.40 D/year. Traditional correcting soft and gas permeable contact lenses, as well as novel spectacle lens designs, have not been shown to be effective in reducing myopic progression. Under-correction of the refractive error has been shown not only to be ineffective in slowing myopia, but has also been associated with an increased rate of myopia progression. Orthokeratology, using reverse geometry designed lenses, has been shown to be moderately effective in decreasing the progression of myopia by between 30 to 50% in a number of short-term, well-controlled studies, reducing myopia progression to between -0.25 and -0.35 D/year. Recently, there have been pilot studies using novel peripherally correcting soft contact lenses to slow the progression of myopia. Two of those lens designs have been shown to be moderately effective in slowing the progression of myopia, both of which had a 30% efficacy, reducing myopia progression to 0.35 D/year. In summary, myopia control is entering a new era with the use of contact lenses and pharmaceutical agents to effectively slow its progression with minimal

  9. Treatment of choroidal neovascularization in high myopia.

    PubMed

    Montero, Javier A; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose M

    2010-05-01

    High myopia affects approximately 2% of general population, and is a major cause of legal blindness in many developed countries. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the most common vision-threatening complication of high myopia. Different therapeutic approaches have been attempted such as thermal laser photocoagulation, surgery and photodynamic therapy with verteporfin (PDT). The visual outcome of these therapies has been reported to be better than the natural history of the condition. However, the limited visual acuity improvement after PDT monotherapy and the appearance of subretinal fibrosis and chorioretinal atrophy prompted the association of other therapies. In the past few years a tremendous advance in the knowledge of the mechanisms underling CNV secondary to high myopia and age related macular degeneration has been achieved, leading to new therapeutic targets and novel drugs and combined therapies. These new therapeutic weapons have been designed to achieve a selective shut down of choroidal new vessels. Recent reviews have been published on the natural history and therapies for myopic CNV. Ohno-Matsui reported on the natural history of the condition as well as the outcome of laser photocoagulation, surgical extraction of CNV, foveal translocation and photodynamic therapy on myopic CNV in the short-term. Soubrane et al reviewed the new advances on surgery, laser photocoagulation and PDT, considering some of the potential effects of triamcinolone, pegaptanib and ranibizumab in CNV secondary to age related macular degeneration (AMD). Novack et al reported on the pharmacological therapy of CNV in AMD. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent advances in myopic CNV pathophysiology and the new therapeutic targets and drugs that are changing the clinical management of myopic CNV. PMID:20196722

  10. Treatment of choroidal neovascularization in high myopia.

    PubMed

    Montero, Javier A; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose M

    2010-05-01

    High myopia affects approximately 2% of general population, and is a major cause of legal blindness in many developed countries. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the most common vision-threatening complication of high myopia. Different therapeutic approaches have been attempted such as thermal laser photocoagulation, surgery and photodynamic therapy with verteporfin (PDT). The visual outcome of these therapies has been reported to be better than the natural history of the condition. However, the limited visual acuity improvement after PDT monotherapy and the appearance of subretinal fibrosis and chorioretinal atrophy prompted the association of other therapies. In the past few years a tremendous advance in the knowledge of the mechanisms underling CNV secondary to high myopia and age related macular degeneration has been achieved, leading to new therapeutic targets and novel drugs and combined therapies. These new therapeutic weapons have been designed to achieve a selective shut down of choroidal new vessels. Recent reviews have been published on the natural history and therapies for myopic CNV. Ohno-Matsui reported on the natural history of the condition as well as the outcome of laser photocoagulation, surgical extraction of CNV, foveal translocation and photodynamic therapy on myopic CNV in the short-term. Soubrane et al reviewed the new advances on surgery, laser photocoagulation and PDT, considering some of the potential effects of triamcinolone, pegaptanib and ranibizumab in CNV secondary to age related macular degeneration (AMD). Novack et al reported on the pharmacological therapy of CNV in AMD. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent advances in myopic CNV pathophysiology and the new therapeutic targets and drugs that are changing the clinical management of myopic CNV.

  11. Smartphone-Based, Self-Administered Intervention System for Alcohol Use Disorders: Theory and Empirical Evidence Basis

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Patrick L.; Gonzalez, Vivian M.; King, Diane K.; Giroux, Danielle; Bacon, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology provide an opportunity to deliver in-the-moment interventions to individuals with alcohol use disorders, yet availability of effective “apps” that deliver evidence-based interventions is scarce. We developed an immediately available, portable, smartphone-based intervention system whose purpose is to provide stand-alone, self-administered assessment and intervention. In this paper, we describe how theory and empirical evidence, combined with smartphone functionality contributed to the construction of a user-friendly, engaging alcohol intervention. With translation in mind, we discuss how we selected appropriate intervention components including assessments, feedback and tools, that work together to produce the hypothesized outcomes. PMID:24347811

  12. Smartphone-Based, Self-Administered Intervention System for Alcohol Use Disorders: Theory and Empirical Evidence Basis.

    PubMed

    Dulin, Patrick L; Gonzalez, Vivian M; King, Diane K; Giroux, Danielle; Bacon, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology provide an opportunity to deliver in-the-moment interventions to individuals with alcohol use disorders, yet availability of effective "apps" that deliver evidence-based interventions is scarce. We developed an immediately available, portable, smartphone-based intervention system whose purpose is to provide stand-alone, self-administered assessment and intervention. In this paper, we describe how theory and empirical evidence, combined with smartphone functionality contributed to the construction of a user-friendly, engaging alcohol intervention. With translation in mind, we discuss how we selected appropriate intervention components including assessments, feedback and tools, that work together to produce the hypothesized outcomes. PMID:24347811

  13. Myopia management: multihospital portfolio planning.

    PubMed

    Irish, G G

    1987-10-01

    The acquisition and divestiture of organizational business units demonstrate management's strategy in response to an evolving marketplace. From a strategic perspective, the most significant danger to a corporation is not having the "right" portfolio of businesses or products to respond to the marketplace. This article describes a conceptual model that a multihospital system executive might use to determine the growth and diversification of the organization's portfolio of businesses. The model involves the application of market, financial, and microeconomic theories in a logical sequence to assist management in making business acquisition and divestiture decisions.

  14. Visual Activity before and after the Onset of Juvenile Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Sims, Janene R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate visual activities before and after the onset of juvenile myopia. Methods. The subjects were 731 incident myopes (−0.75 D or more myopia on cycloplegic autorefraction in both meridians) and 587 emmetropes (between −0.25 and +1.00 D) in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Parents supplied visual activity data annually. Data from myopic children 5 years before through 5 years after myopia onset were compared to data from age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched models of children who remained emmetropic. Results. Hours per week spent reading or using a computer/playing video games did not differ between the groups before myopia onset; however, hours per week for both activities were significantly greater in myopes than in emmetropes at onset and in 4 of the 5 years after onset by 0.7 to 1.6 hours per week. Hours per week spent in outdoor/sports activities were significantly fewer for children who became myopic 3 years before onset through 4 years after onset by 1.1 to 1.8 hours per week. Studying and TV watching were not significantly different before myopia onset. Conclusions. Before myopia onset, near work activities of future myopic children did not differ from those of emmetropes. Those who became myopic had fewer outdoor/sports activity hours than the emmetropes before, at, and after myopia onset. Myopia onset may influence children's near work behavior, but the lack of difference before onset argues against a major causative role for near work. Less outdoor/sports activity before myopia onset may exert a stronger influence on development than near work. PMID:20926821

  15. Astigmatism and the development of myopia in children.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, J; Grice, K; Held, R; McLellan, J; Thorn, F

    2000-01-01

    While it is now established that astigmatism is more prevalent in infants and young children than in the adult population, little is known about the functional significance of this astigmatism, especially its role, if any, in emmetropization and the development of myopia. Manifest refractions (mean of 16 per subject) were obtained from 245 subjects starting in the first year, with 6-23 years of regular follow-up. Results showed that infantile astigmatism is associated with increased astigmatism and myopia during the school years. Two possible mechanisms underlying this association are discussed: (1) infantile astigmatism disrupts focusing mechanisms; and (2) ocular growth induces astigmatism and myopia.

  16. Multicomponent adsorption of alcohols onto silicalite-1 from aqueous solution: isotherms, structural analysis, and assessment of ideal adsorbed solution theory.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2012-11-01

    Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations in the isobaric-isothermal version of the Gibbs ensemble (GE) were carried out to probe the adsorption from aqueous solutions of methanol and/or ethanol onto silicalite-1. This methodology does require neither specification of the chemical potential nor any reference to activity models based on experimental data. The CBMC-GE methodology can be applied to the complete range of mixture compositions from pure water to pure alcohols and can also be used when multiple solute types are present at high concentration. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities for the alcohols (α(ethanol) > α(methanol)) almost over the entire composition range. The ideal adsorbed solution theory is found to substantially underpredict the amount of sorbed water and leads to very large errors for low alcohol solution concentrations. The simulations indicate that, at lower loadings, the adsorbed alcohol molecules can serve as seeds for water adsorption but, at higher loadings, alcohols displace water molecules from their preferred region.

  17. Some effects of alcohol and eye movements on cross-race face learning.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alistair J

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of acute alcohol intoxication on visual scanning in cross-race face learning. The eye movements of a group of white British participants were recorded as they encoded a series of own-and different-race faces, under alcohol and placebo conditions. Intoxication reduced the rate and extent of visual scanning during face encoding, reorienting the focus of foveal attention away from the eyes and towards the nose. Differences in encoding eye movements also varied between own-and different-race face conditions as a function of alcohol. Fixations to both face types were less frequent and more lingering following intoxication, but in the placebo condition this was only the case for different-race faces. While reducing visual scanning, however, alcohol had no adverse effect on memory, only encoding restrictions associated with sober different-race face processing led to poorer recognition. These results support perceptual expertise accounts of own-race face processing, but suggest the adverse effects of alcohol on face learning published previously are not caused by foveal encoding restrictions. The implications of these findings for alcohol myopia theory are discussed.

  18. Attributional style and life events: a diathesis-stress theory of alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, B I; Abela, J R; Buchanan, G M; Seligman, M E

    2000-12-01

    The role of a cognitive diathesis-stress model in predicting changes in alcohol consumption was examined. This study evaluated the interaction of attributional style with negative life events in predicting changes in beer, wine, spirits, and overall alcohol consumption. 93 undergraduate participants completed the Khavari Alcohol Test, Negative Life Events Questionnaire, and Attributional Style Questionnaire. The interaction of attributional style with negative life events predicted increases in spirits consumption between Time 1 and Time 2.

  19. Overnight orthokeratology is comparable with atropine in controlling myopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many efforts have been invested in slowing progression of myopia. Among the methods, atropine administration and orthokeratology (OK) are most widely used. This study analyzed the efficacy of atropine and OK lens in controlling myopia progression and elongation of axial length. Methods This retrospective study included 105 patients (210 eyes) who wore OK lenses and 105 patients (210 eyes) who applied 0.125% atropine every night during the 3 following period. Student t-test, linear regression analysis, repeated measure ANOVA, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results The change in axial length per year was 0.28 ± 0.08 mm, 0.30 ± 0.09 mm, and 0.27 ± 0.10 mm in the OK lens group, and 0.38 ± 0.09 mm, 0.37 ± 0.12 mm, and 0.36 ± 0.08 mm in the atropine group for years 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed an increase in myopia of 0.28 D and 0.34 D per year, and an increase in axial length of 0.28 mm and 0.37 mm per year in the OK lens and atropine groups, respectively. Repeated measure ANOVA showed significant differences in myopia (p = 0.001) and axial length (p < 0.001) between the atropine and OK lens groups; in astigmatism, there was no significant difference in these parameters (p = 0.320). Comparison of increases in axial length in relation to baseline myopia showed significant correlations both in the OK lens group (Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r = 0.259; p < 0.001) and atropine group (r = 0.169; p = 0.014). High myopia patients benefited more from both OK lenses and atropine than did low myopia patients. The correlation of baseline myopia and myopia progression was stronger in the OK lens group then in the atropine group. Conclusions OK lens is a useful method for controlling myopia progression even in high myopia patients. PMID:24685184

  20. BMP-2 Is Involved in Scleral Remodeling in Myopia Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Honghui; Cui, Dongmei; Zhao, Feng; Huo, Lijun; Hu, Jianmin; Zeng, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    The development of myopia is associated with scleral remodeling, but it is unclear which factors regulate this process. This study investigated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) expression in the sclera of guinea pigs with lens-induced myopia (LIM) and after recovery from myopia and evaluated the effect of BMP-2 on extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) cultured in vitro. Lens-induced myopia was brought about in two groups of guinea pigs (the lens-induced myopia and myopia recovery groups) by placing -4.00 D lenses on the right eye for three weeks. The left eye served as a contralateral control. In the recovery group, the lenses were removed after one week. The refractive power and axial length of the eyes were measured, and the BMP-2 expression levels in the sclera were measured. After three weeks, the lens-induced eyes acquired relative myopia in both groups of guinea pigs. Immunostaining of the eyeballs revealed significantly decreased BMP-2 expression in the posterior sclera of the myopic eyes compared to the contralateral eyes. One week after lens removal, BMP-2 expression recovered, and no differences were observed between the experimental and contralateral eyes in the recovery group. HSFs were cultured with BMP-2 or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Type I and type III collagen synthesis was significantly up-regulated following BMP-2 treatment in culture after one and two weeks, but the ratio of type III to type I collagen mRNA was not increased. Biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and aggrecan was increased in HSFs treated with BMP-2. Some chondrogenesis-associated genes expression increased in HSFs treated with BMP-2. From this study, we concluded that BMP-2 is involved in scleral remodeling in the development and recovery of lens-induced myopia.

  1. Development of Experimental Myopia in Chicks in a Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Richard A.; Cohen, Yuval; McGlinn, Alice M.; Davison, Sherrill; Casavant, Susan; Shaffer, James; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Iuvone, P. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The hypothesis that outdoor exposure might protect against myopia has generated much interest, although available data find only modest clinical efficacy. We tested the effect of outdoor rearing on form-deprivation myopia in chicks, a myopia model markedly inhibited by high-intensity indoor laboratory lighting. Methods Unilaterally goggled cohorts of White Leghorn chicks were maintained in a species-appropriate, outdoor rural setting during daylight hours to the extent permitted by weather. Control chicks were reared indoors with incandescent lighting. Besides ocular refraction and ultrasound, we determined dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content in retina and vitreous and measured mRNA expression levels of selected clock and circadian rhythm-related genes in the retina/RPE. Results Myopia developed in the goggled eyes of all cohorts. Whereas outdoor rearing lessened myopia by 44% at 4 days, a protective effect was no longer evident at 11 days. Outdoor rearing had no consistent effect on retinal or vitreous content of dopamine or DOPAC. Conforming to prior data on form-deprivation myopia, retina and vitreous levels of DOPAC were reduced in goggled eyes. Compared with contralateral eyes, the retinal expression of clock and circadian rhythm-related genes was modestly altered in myopic eyes of chicks reared indoors or outdoors. Conclusions Outdoor rearing of chicks induces only a partial decrease of goggle-induced myopia that is not maintained, without evidence that retinal dopamine metabolism accounts for the partial myopia inhibition under these outdoor conditions. Although modest, alterations in retinal gene expression suggest that studying circadian signals might be informative for understanding refractive mechanisms. PMID:27618415

  2. Myopia and digit ratio in medical college students.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Mathangi; Atheeshwar, Shweta; Chandrasekar, Mathangi D

    2014-01-01

    Myopia is amongst the most common refractive errors in the world. Both environmental and genetic factors are attributed to its causation, however all factors contributing to the development of myopia is yet to be found. Recent studies show presence of sex hormone receptor in the eyes. This has been shown to have a role in the development of various ocular pathologies. The second to fourth finger length ratio (2D:4D) has been hypothesised to be determined by exposure to sex steroids prenatally and thus considered a crude measure for prenatal androgen exposure. Hence this study was initiated to assess the association between myopia and 2D:4D ratio (a proxy marker to prenatal sex steroid exposure) among 100 medical college students of either sex and explore the possibility of role of prenatal sex steroids in causation of myopia. This study showed significant negative associations between myopia and digit ratio favouring a probable causal role of sex steroids on eye growth and development of myopia. PMID:24587043

  3. Investigating mechanisms of myopia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardue, Machelle T.; Stone, Richard A.; Iuvone, P. Michael

    2013-01-01

    While genetic and environmental factors have been shown to control visually-guided eye growth and influence myopia development, investigations into the intersection of these two factors in controlling refractive development have been limited by the lack of a genetically modifiable animal model. Technological advances have now made it possible to assess refractive state and ocular biometry in the small mouse eye and therefore to exploit the many genetic mouse mutants to investigate mechanisms of visually-guided eye growth. This review considers the benefits and challenges of studying refractive development in mice, compares the results of refractive error and ocular biometry from wild-type strains and genetic models in normal laboratory visual environments or with disrupted visual input, and discusses some of the remaining challenges in interpreting data from the mouse to validate and standardize methods between labs. PMID:23305908

  4. Peripheral contrast sensitivity and attention in myopia.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Kristen L; Thorn, Frank; Bex, Peter J; Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of normal visual experience or changes in the normal interaction between central and peripheral retinal input may lead to the development of myopia. In order to examine the relationship between peripheral contrast sensitivity and myopia, we manipulated attentional load for foveal vision in emmetropes and myopes while observers detected targets with peripheral vision. Peripheral contrast detection thresholds were measured binocularly using vertical Gabor stimuli presented at three eccentricities (±8°, 17°, 30°) in a spatial 2 alternative forced choice task. Contrast thresholds were measured in young adult (mean age 24.5±2.6years) emmetropes (n=17; group SE: +0.19±0.32D) and myopes (n=25; group SE: -3.74±1.99D). Attention at central fixation was manipulated with: (1) a low attention task, requiring simple fixation; or (2) a high attention task, which required subjects to perform a mathematical task. We found that at 30° all subjects exhibited lower contrast sensitivity (higher thresholds). In addition, myopes (Wilcoxon, p<0.01), but not emmetropes (Wilcoxon, p=0.1), had a significant decrease in sensitivity at 30° during the high attention task. However, the attention dependent threshold increase for myopes was not significantly greater than for emmetropes (Wilcoxon, p=0.27). Attentional load did not increase thresholds at 8° or 17° for either refractive group. These data indicate that myopes experience a greater decrease in contrast sensitivity in the far periphery than emmetropes when attention is deployed in central vision. PMID:27264028

  5. Peripheral contrast sensitivity and attention in myopia.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Kristen L; Thorn, Frank; Bex, Peter J; Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of normal visual experience or changes in the normal interaction between central and peripheral retinal input may lead to the development of myopia. In order to examine the relationship between peripheral contrast sensitivity and myopia, we manipulated attentional load for foveal vision in emmetropes and myopes while observers detected targets with peripheral vision. Peripheral contrast detection thresholds were measured binocularly using vertical Gabor stimuli presented at three eccentricities (±8°, 17°, 30°) in a spatial 2 alternative forced choice task. Contrast thresholds were measured in young adult (mean age 24.5±2.6years) emmetropes (n=17; group SE: +0.19±0.32D) and myopes (n=25; group SE: -3.74±1.99D). Attention at central fixation was manipulated with: (1) a low attention task, requiring simple fixation; or (2) a high attention task, which required subjects to perform a mathematical task. We found that at 30° all subjects exhibited lower contrast sensitivity (higher thresholds). In addition, myopes (Wilcoxon, p<0.01), but not emmetropes (Wilcoxon, p=0.1), had a significant decrease in sensitivity at 30° during the high attention task. However, the attention dependent threshold increase for myopes was not significantly greater than for emmetropes (Wilcoxon, p=0.27). Attentional load did not increase thresholds at 8° or 17° for either refractive group. These data indicate that myopes experience a greater decrease in contrast sensitivity in the far periphery than emmetropes when attention is deployed in central vision.

  6. Preventing alcohol abuse in the gay community: toward a theory and model.

    PubMed

    Mongeon, J E; Ziebold, T O

    1982-01-01

    Urban gay communities present unique populations for a comprehensive prevention program. They are well defined, bounded communities with rapid internal communication, can be considered "at risk" for alcoholism, and are traditionally "underserved" for prevention and treatment. Models of alcoholism epidemiology elucidate critical factors relevant to the urban gay population, and indigenous gay organizations afford effective means of implementing a program. The model presented in this paper is based upon current research about successful prevention programs and uses accepted strategies tailored to the specific characteristics of the urban gay community. The basic premise of the model is that community self help is the most effective approach to alcohol and drug abuse prevention. PMID:7130692

  7. The Role of Atropine Eye Drops in Myopia Control.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Armesto, Alejandro; Szwajkowska, Maria; Iribarren, Guillermo; Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    High myopia is a major cause of uncorrectable visual impairment. It imposes major challenges and costs for refractive correction, and for the treatment of associated pathological complications. In the last 60 years, there has been a marked increase in the prevalence of high myopia in younger generations in developed countries in East and Southeast Asia, and there are signs of similar, but less pronounced increases in North America and Europe. In some parts of the world, 70-90% of children completing high schools are now myopic, and as many as 20% may be highly myopic. It is now clear that myopia results from excessive axial elongation of the eye, and this greater rate of axial elongation appears to be environmentally driven. Experimental studies have examined the biochemical mechanisms involved in regulation of axial elongation; and, from these studies, some options have emerged for preventing the development of myopia or slowing myopia progression. Atropine eye drops have been quite extensively used in clinical practice in Asian countries. This long-lasting treatment could be beneficial, but has clear limitations and complications. Recent reports suggest that a low concentration of atropine, which has less severe side-effects, is also effective. But, a decision to use an invasive treatment such as atropine drops, even at low doses, requires careful consideration of the risk of myopia progression. A decision to use atropine in pre-myopic patients would require even more careful consideration of the risks. Here, we review the current literature relevant to the prevention of myopia progression with atropine drops.

  8. New ZNF644 mutations identified in patients with high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xinying; Wang, Tianyun; Tong, Ping; Li, Yunping; Guo, Hui; Wan, Anran; Xia, Lu; Liu, Yanling; Li, Ying; Tian, Qi; Shen, Lu; Cai, Xinzhang; Tian, Lei; Jin, Xuemin; Hu, Zhengmao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Myopia, or near-sightedness, is one of the most common human visual impairments worldwide, and high myopia is one of the leading causes of blindness. In this study, we investigated the mutation spectrum of ZNF644, a causative gene for autosomal dominant high myopia, in a high-myopia cohort from a Chinese population. Methods DNA was isolated with the standard proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform method from a case cohort of 186 subjects diagnosed with high myopia (spherical refractive error equal or less than −6.00 diopters). Sanger sequencing was performed to find potential mutations in all coding exons, flanking splicing sites, and untranslated regions (UTRs) of ZNF644 (NM_201269). Identified novel variants were further screened in 526 ethnically matched normal controls. Functional prediction and conservation analysis were performed using ANNOVAR. Results Five novel variants were identified. Three are missense (c.1201A>G:p.T401A, c.2867C>G:p.T956S, c.3833A>G:p.E1278G), one is synonymous (c.2565A>G:p.T855T), and one (c.-219C>A) is located in the 5′ UTR. Functional prediction indicates that c.3833A>G:p.E1278G was predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen2. Conservation analysis using PhyloP and GERP++ indicate all of the missense variants are highly conserved. None of these novel mutations was identified in 526 normal controls. Conclusions ZNF644 is associated with high myopia in a cohort from a Chinese population. ZNF644 mutations have a minor contribution to the genetic etiology of high myopia. PMID:24991186

  9. Is myopia another clinical manifestation of insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Galvis, Virgilio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Tello, Alejandro; Castellanos-Castellanos, Yuly Andrea; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Cohen, Daniel Dylan; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    Myopia is a multifactorial visual refraction disease, in which the light rays from distant objects are focused in front of retina, causing blurry vision. Myopic eyes are characterized by an increased corneal curvature and/or ocular axial length. The prevalence of myopia has increased in recent decades, a trend that cannot be attributed exclusively to genetic factors. Low and middle income countries have a higher burden of refractive error, which we propose could be a consequence of a shorter exposure time to a westernized lifestyle, a phenomenon that may also explain the rapid increase in cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes, among those populations. We suggest that interactions between genetic, epigenetic and a rapidly changing environment are also involved in myopia onset and progression. Furthermore, we discuss several possible mechanisms by which insulin resistance may promote abnormal ocular growth and myopia to support the hypothesis that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are involved in its pathogenesis, providing a link between trends in myopia and those of cardiometabolic diseases. There is evidence that insulin have direct ocular growth promoting effects as well an indirect effect via the induction of insulin-like growth factors leading to decreases insulin-like growth factor-binding protein, also implicated in ocular growth. PMID:27063082

  10. Relation Between Near Work and Myopia Progression in Student Population

    PubMed Central

    Muhamedagic, Lejla; Muhamedagic, Belma; Halilovic, Emina Alimanovic; Halimic, Jasmina Alajbegovic; Stankovic, Aleksa; Muracevic, Bedrana

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine relation between near work and myopia progression in student population. Causes of myopia occurrence are not sufficiently explained. Methods This retrospective-prospective, descriptive research included 100 students with verified myopia up to -3 Dsph. Ophthalmological examination and measurement diopter-hours variable (Dh) were done twice, in the period from January 2011 until January 2012. Results A multivariate regression analysis of impact on the difference of distance visual acuity without correction to the right and left eye and difference of automatic computer refractometry in cycloplegia of both eyes indicates that, diopter-hours variable (Dh) had statistically significant impact on increase of distance visual acuity difference (right eye OR: I measurement–Dh 1.489, II measurement–Dh 1.544, p<0.05; left eye OR: I measurement–Dh 1.602, II measurement–Dh 1.538, p<0.05) and automatic computer refractometry in cycloplegia (right eye OR: I measurement 1.361, II measurement 1.493, p<0.05; left eye OR: I measurement 0.931, II measurement 1.019, p<0.05) during both measurements. Conclusion Near work cause the increase of myopia. This research opened a perspective for other researches on the impact of near work on myopia. PMID:24944532

  11. Structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    The first principles calculations have been carried out to investigate the structural, electronic band structure density of states along with the projected density of states for poly(vinyl alcohol). Our structural calculation suggests that the poly(vinyl alcohol) exhibits monoclinic structure. The calculated structural lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental values. The band structure calculations reveal that the direct and indirect band gaps are 5.55 eV and 5.363 eV respectively in accordance with experimental values.

  12. What Public Policies Should Be Developed to Cope with the Myopia Epidemic?

    PubMed

    Verkicharla, Pavan Kumar; Chia, Nadine En Hui; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2016-09-01

    The epidemic of myopia in urban Asian cities has increased over recent generations and has become a significant public health concern. Considering the potential role of time outdoors in myopia prevention, and the differences in behavioral attitudes of individuals living in Urban East Asian (more indoor-centric) and Western countries, public policies should be developed in different countries accordingly to encourage children to go outdoors to counteract myopia. This is a short manuscript (presented at the International Myopia Conference-2015 by Prof. Seang Mei Saw) about public policies that should be developed to cope with the "myopia epidemic." PMID:27525536

  13. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 < r < 0.20, indicating that the refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  14. A review of environmental risk factors for myopia during early life, childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Dharani; Lin Chua, Sharon Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Myopia is a significant public health problem worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. The increasing prevalence of myopia poses a huge socio-economic burden and progressive high myopia can lead to sight-threatening ocular complications. Hence, the prevention of early-onset myopia progressing to pathological high myopia is important. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that increased outdoor time is an important modifiable environmental factor that protects young children from myopia. This protective effect may be due to high light intensity outdoors, the chromaticity of daylight or increased vitamin D levels. This review summarises the possible underlying biological mechanisms for the protective association between time outdoors and myopia, including the potential role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in refractive error development. Recent evidence for the role of other environmental risk factors such as near work, birth seasons, parental smoking and birth order are also summarised. PMID:26497977

  15. [To the treatment of progressive myopia in children].

    PubMed

    Obrubov, S A; Tumasian, A R

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with a new treatment technology for childhood progressive myopia concurrent with chronic diseases. The technology of vision preservation in children of a general educational establishment includes complex phytotherapeutic exposure and infrasound pneumomassage of eyeball tissues. Infrasound ocular pneumomassage at a pressure of 0.1 atm, with a frequency of 4 Hz, and an infrasound power of 170 dB improves muscle accommodation function, blood circulation and lowers intraocular pressure. The developed complex technology contributes to a reduction in the incidence of exacerbations of chronic diseases and exerts a beneficial effect on the course of myopia in children.

  16. Linking Places to Problems: Geospatial Theories of Neighborhoods, Alcohol and Crime.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Dennis M; Gruenewald, Paul J; Waller, Lance A

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a critical review of two broad categories of social ecological theories of crime, social integration and place-based theories, and their relationships to spatial assessments of crime patterns. Social integration theories emphasize the role of neighborhood disorganization on crime, while place theories stress the social interactions within and between places as a source of crime. We provide an analysis of the extent to which these two types of theorizing describe processes and mechanisms that are truly ecologic (identify specific interactions between individuals and their environments) and truly spatial (identify specific movement and interaction patterns of individuals and groups) as they endeavor to explain crime outcomes. We suggest that social integration theories do not provide spatial signatures of sufficient specificity to justify the application of spatial statistical techniques as quantitative arbiters of the theory. On the other hand, place based theories go some way toward addressing these issues because the emphasis is placed on understanding the exact physical and social characteristics of place and the activities that occur around locations as sources of crime. Routine activities and crime potential theories attempt to explain clustering or "hot spots" of crime in ways that give clear spatial dimension by looking at micro-spatial interactions between offenders and targets of crime. These theories have strong ecological implications as well, since they contain specific statements about how people use the space around them and how these patterns of use are related to patterns of criminal activity. We conclude by identifying a set of requirements for successful empirical tests of geospatial theories, including the development of valid measures of key theoretical constructs and the formulation of critical empirical assessments of geospatial hypotheses derived from motivating theory.

  17. Myopia Glasses and Optical Power Estimation: An Easy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-02-01

    Human eye optics is a common high school physics topic and students usually show a great interest during our presentation of this theme. In this article, we present an easy way to estimate a diverging lens' optical power from a simple experiment involving myopia eyeglasses and a smartphone flashlight.

  18. Behavioral Vision Training for Myopia: Stimulus Specificity of Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Jin-Pang

    1988-01-01

    The study assessed transfer of visual training for myopia using two different training stimuli and a single subject A-B-C-A design with a male student volunteer. A procedure including stimulus fading and reinforcement (positive verbal feedback) was used to effectively improve performance on both behavioral acuity tests during the training phases…

  19. Myopia Glasses and Optical Power Estimation: An Easy Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-01-01

    Human eye optics is a common high school physics topic and students usually show a great interest during our presentation of this theme. In this article, we present an easy way to estimate a diverging lens' optical power from a simple experiment involving myopia eyeglasses and a smartphone flashlight.

  20. Myopia onset and progression: can it be prevented?

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea; Semeraro, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-06-01

    Myopia is the commonest ocular abnormality and the high and growing prevalence of myopia, especially but not only in Asian populations, as well as its progressive nature in children, has contributed to a recent surge in interest. Such worldwide growing prevalence seems to be associated with increasing educational pressures, combined with life-style changes, which have reduced the time that children spend outdoors. Highly nearsighted people are at greater risk for several vision-threatening problems such as retinal detachments, choroidal neovascularization, cataracts and glaucoma, thus the potential benefits of interventions that can limit or prevent myopia progression would be of remarkable social impact. Our understanding of the regulatory processes that lead an eye to refractive errors is undoubtedly incomplete but has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the animal studies, observational clinical studies, and randomized clinical trials recently published. In this review we assess the effects of several types of life-style and interventions, including outdoor activities, eye drops, undercorrection of myopia, multifocal spectacles, contact lenses, and refractive surgery on the onset and progression of nearsightedness. PMID:24043334

  1. Excimer laser surgery for myopia and myopic astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Hadden, O B; Morris, A T; Ring, C P

    1995-08-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy using the Summit Excimer Laser has been carried out on 1333 eyes with myopia or myopic astigmatism which have been followed up for six months or longer. Of those, 607 have been followed up for one year. Of the eyes with myopia or myopic astigmatism of up to 3 dioptres spherical equivalent, at one year 85.6% had unaided vision of 6/6, 97.2% 6/9 or better, and 99.4% 6/12 or better. Of the eyes between -3.25 and -6.00 dioptres spherical equivalent at one year 72.1% achieved 6/6 vision unaided, 88.8% 6/9 or better, and 94.2% 6/12 or better. Of the eyes between -6.25 and -10.00 dioptres, at one year 49.6% achieved 6/6 vision unaided, 76.1% 6/9 or better and 88.0% 6/12 or better. To achieve these figures, 28% of the patients had astigmatic keratotomy, either two or three weeks before photorefractive keratectomy, or at the same time as photorefractive keratectomy. Photorefractive keratectomy is as predictable as radial keratotomy in eyes of under 6 dioptres myopia, but is more predictable than radial keratotomy in higher myopia. Photorefractive keratectomy has the advantages of leaving an eye which is structurally sound, and without diurnal variation of focusing. PMID:8534441

  2. [Progressing myopia in children: does it need treatment or not?].

    PubMed

    Tarutta, E P; Iomdina, E N; Akhmedzhanova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the case study was to evaluate the remote consequences of a complex of laser and repeated surgical sclerorestorative procedures made in progressing myopia and its complications. Three hundred and forty-six children, aged 8-10, with rapidly progressing uncomplicated myopia of 4.25 to 9.5 D were shared between 2 groups. Two hundred and forty patients of the experimental group were made sclerorestorative procedures and transscleral low-energy laser stimulation of the ciliary muscle by means of infrared laser MACDEL-09. No such treatment was applied to patients of the control group. When indicated, preventive laser coagulation of the retina was made in both groups. The dynamic 10-year follow-up over the status of refraction and eye bottom showed that the complex scheme of repeated sclerorestorative procedures and low-energy laser treatment combined with preventive peripheral laser coagulation of the retina cut the rate of progressing myopia and prevented peripheral vitreoretinal dystrophy and retinal detachment in children and teenagers with progressing myopia.

  3. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or ... brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of ...

  4. Concise Review: Using Stem Cells to Prevent the Progression of Myopia-A Concept.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff W M; Handa, James T; Rini, David; Walczak, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of myopia has increased in modern society due to the educational load of children. This condition is growing rapidly, especially in Asian countries where it has already reached a pandemic level. Typically, the younger the child's age at the onset of myopia, the more rapidly the condition will progress and the greater the likelihood that it will develop the known sight-threatening complications of high myopia. This rise in incidence of severe myopia has contributed to an increased frequency of eye diseases in adulthood, which often complicate therapeutic procedures. Currently, no treatment is available to prevent myopia progression. Stem cell therapy can potentially address two components of myopia. Regardless of the exact etiology, myopia is always associated with scleral weakness. In this context, a strategy aimed at scleral reinforcement by transplanting connective tissue-supportive mesenchymal stem cells is an attractive approach that could yield effective and universal therapy. Sunlight exposure appears to have a protective effect against myopia. It is postulated that this effect is mediated via local ocular production of dopamine. With a variety of dopamine-producing cells already available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, stem cells engineered for dopamine production could be used for the treatment of myopia. In this review, we further explore these concepts and present evidence from the literature to support the use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of myopia.

  5. Concise Review: Using Stem Cells to Prevent the Progression of Myopia – A Concept

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Handa, James T.; Rini, David; Walczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of myopia has increased in modern society due to the educational load of children. This condition is growing rapidly, especially in Asian countries where it has already reached a pandemic level. Typically, the younger the child’s age at the onset of myopia, the more rapidly the condition will progress and the greater the likelihood that it will develop the known sight-threatening complications of high myopia. This rise in incidence of severe myopia has contributed to an increased frequency of eye diseases in adulthood, which often complicate therapeutic procedures. Currently, no treatment is available to prevent myopia progression. Stem cell therapy can potentially address two components of myopia. Regardless of the exact etiology, myopia is always associated with scleral weakness. In this context, a strategy aimed at scleral reinforcement by transplanting connective tissue-supportive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an attractive approach that could yield effective and universal therapy. Sunlight exposure appears to have a protective effect against myopia. It is postulated that this effect is mediated via local ocular production of dopamine. With a variety of dopamine-producing cells already available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, stem cells engineered for dopamine production could be utilized for the treatment of myopia. In this review, we further explore these concepts and present evidence from the literature to support the use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of myopia. PMID:25752937

  6. Interactions between biomaterials and the sclera: Implications on myopia progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, James

    Myopia prevalence has steadily climbed worldwide in recent decades with the most dramatic impact in East Asian countries. Treatments such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser surgery for the refractive error are widely available, but none cures the underlying cause. In progressive high myopia, invasive surgical procedures using a scleral buckle for mechanical support are performed since the patient is at risk of becoming blind. The treatment outcome is highly dependent on the surgeon's skills and the patient's myopia progression rate, with limited choices in buckling materials. This dissertation, in four main studies, represents efforts made to control high myopia progression through the exploration and development of biomaterials that influence scleral growth. First, mRNA expression levels of the chick scleral matrix metalloproteinases, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, and transforming growth factor-beta 2 were assessed for temporal and defocus power effects. The first study elucidated the roles that these factors play in scleral growth regulation and suggested potential motifs that can be incorporated in future biomaterials design. Second, poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) as injectable gels and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as solid strips were implanted in chicks to demonstrate the concept of posterior pole scleral reinforcements. This second study found that placing appropriate biomaterials at the posterior pole of the eye could directly influence scleral remodeling by interacting with the host cells. Both studies advanced the idea that scleral tissue remodeling could be potentially controlled by well-designed biomaterials. These findings led to the exploration of biomimetic hydrogels comprising enzymatically-degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) to determine their biocompatibility and effects on the chick posterior eye wall. This third study demonstrated the feasibility of stimulating scleral growth by applying biomimetic

  7. Posterior Corneal Characteristics of Cataract Patients with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Qinghe; Tang, Yating; Qian, Dongjin; Lu, Yi; Jiang, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the characteristics of the posterior corneal surface in patients with high myopia before cataract surgery. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study at the Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Corneal astigmatism and axial length were measured with a rotating Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and partial coherence interferometry (IOLMaster) in a high-myopia study group of 167 eyes (axial length ≥ 26 mm) and a control group of 150 eyes (axial length > 20 mm and < 25 mm). Results Total corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism values were higher in the high-myopia group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in posterior corneal astigmatism between the high-myopia study group and the control group. In the study group, the mean posterior corneal astigmatism (range 0 – −0.9 diopters) was –0.29 diopters (D) ± 0.17 standard deviations (SD). The steep corneal meridian was aligned vertically (60°–120°) in 87.43% of eyes for the posterior corneal surface, and did not change with increasing age. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.235, p = 0.002) between posterior corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism, especially when the anterior corneal surface showed with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism (r = 0.452, p = 0.000). There was a weak negative correlation between posterior corneal astigmatism and age (r = –0.15, p = 0.053) in the high-myopia group. Compared with total corneal astigmatism values, the anterior corneal measurements alone overestimated WTR astigmatism by a mean of 0.27 ± 0.18 D in 68.75% of eyes, underestimated against-the-rule (ATR) astigmatism by a mean of 0.41 ± 0.28 D in 88.89% of eyes, and underestimated oblique astigmatism by a mean of 0.24 ± 0.13 D in 63.64% of eyes. Conclusions Posterior corneal astigmatism decreased with age and remained as ATR astigmatism in most cases of high myopia. There was a significant correlation between posterior corneal

  8. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation Leads to Myopia Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Qiu, Fangfang; Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhou, Xiangtian; An, Jianhong; Huang, Furong; Wang, Qiongsi; Reinach, Peter S; Li, Wei; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Myopia incidence in China is rapidly becoming a very serious sight compromising problem in a large segment of the general population. Therefore, delineating the underlying mechanisms leading to myopia will markedly lessen the likelihood of other sight compromising complications. In this regard, there is some evidence that patients afflicted with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), havean adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation and a higher incidence of myopia. To clarify this possible association, we determined whether the changes in pertinent biometric and biochemical parameters underlying postnatal refractive error development in APCMin mice are relevant for gaining insight into the pathogenesis of this disease in humans. The refraction and biometrics in APCMin mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days P28 and P84 were examined with eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR) and customized optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with WT littermates, the APCMin mutated mice developed myopia (average -4.64 D) on P84 which was associated with increased vitreous chamber depth (VCD). Furthermore, retinal and scleral changes appear in these mice along with: 1) axial length shortening; 2) increased retinal cell proliferation; 3) and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Scleral collagen fibril diameters became heterogeneous and irregularly organized in the APCMin mice. Western blot analysis showed that scleral alpha-1 type I collagen (col1α1) expression also decreased whereas MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was invariant. These results indicate that defective APC gene function promotes refractive error development. By characterizing in APCMin mice ocular developmental changes, this approach provides novel insight into underlying pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to human myopia development.

  9. Posterior scleral reinforcement for the treatment of pathological myopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Peng; Li, Qiu-Ming; Wang, Yu-Ying; Wang, Yuan; Lyu, Xiao-Bei; Jia, Heng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of posterior scleral reinforcement (PSR) in the treatment of pathological myopia. METHODS The study included 52 eyes in 43 patients with pathological myopia who underwent PSR (PSR group), and 52 eyes in 36 age- and myopia-matched patients who did not undergo such treatment as control group. Axial length, refraction error, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and macular scans by optical coherence tomography (OCT) were recorded at baseline, 6mo, 1, 3 and 5y after the surgery, and the complications were noted. RESULTS There were no statistical differences in axial length, refractive error, or BCVA between the PSR group and the control group at baseline. At the end of the follow-up, the mean axial length was 29.79±1.26 mm in the PSR group, which was significantly shorter than that in the control group (30.78±1.30 mm) (P<0.01), and the mean refractive error was -16.86±2.53 D in the PSR group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group (-19.18±2.12 D) (P<0.01). A statistically significant difference in BCVA was found between the PSR group (0.51±0.25 logMAR) and the control group (0.62±0.26 logMAR) at the postoperative 5-year follow-up (P<0.01). There were no serious complications during the 5-year follow-up period. CONCLUSION PSR can prevent axial elongation and myopia progression in eyes with pathological myopia. PMID:27162733

  10. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation Leads to Myopia Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhou, Xiangtian; An, Jianhong; Huang, Furong; Wang, Qiongsi; Reinach, Peter S.; Li, Wei; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Myopia incidence in China is rapidly becoming a very serious sight compromising problem in a large segment of the general population. Therefore, delineating the underlying mechanisms leading to myopia will markedly lessen the likelihood of other sight compromising complications. In this regard, there is some evidence that patients afflicted with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), havean adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation and a higher incidence of myopia. To clarify this possible association, we determined whether the changes in pertinent biometric and biochemical parameters underlying postnatal refractive error development in APCMin mice are relevant for gaining insight into the pathogenesis of this disease in humans. The refraction and biometrics in APCMin mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days P28 and P84 were examined with eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR) and customized optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with WT littermates, the APCMin mutated mice developed myopia (average -4.64 D) on P84 which was associated with increased vitreous chamber depth (VCD). Furthermore, retinal and scleral changes appear in these mice along with: 1) axial length shortening; 2) increased retinal cell proliferation; 3) and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Scleral collagen fibril diameters became heterogeneous and irregularly organized in the APCMin mice. Western blot analysis showed that scleral alpha-1 type I collagen (col1α1) expression also decreased whereas MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was invariant. These results indicate that defective APC gene function promotes refractive error development. By characterizing in APCMin mice ocular developmental changes, this approach provides novel insight into underlying pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to human myopia development. PMID:26495845

  11. Night Myopia Studied with an Adaptive Optics Visual Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Artal, Pablo; Schwarz, Christina; Cánovas, Carmen; Mira-Agudelo, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Eyes with distant objects in focus in daylight are thought to become myopic in dim light. This phenomenon, often called “night myopia” has been studied extensively for several decades. However, despite its general acceptance, its magnitude and causes are still controversial. A series of experiments were performed to understand night myopia in greater detail. Methods We used an adaptive optics instrument operating in invisible infrared light to elucidate the actual magnitude of night myopia and its main causes. The experimental setup allowed the manipulation of the eye's aberrations (and particularly spherical aberration) as well as the use of monochromatic and polychromatic stimuli. Eight subjects with normal vision monocularly determined their best focus position subjectively for a Maltese cross stimulus at different levels of luminance, from the baseline condition of 20 cd/m2 to the lowest luminance of 22×10−6 cd/m2. While subjects performed the focusing tasks, their eye's defocus and aberrations were continuously measured with the 1050-nm Hartmann-Shack sensor incorporated in the adaptive optics instrument. The experiment was repeated for a variety of controlled conditions incorporating specific aberrations of the eye and chromatic content of the stimuli. Results We found large inter-subject variability and an average of −0.8 D myopic shift for low light conditions. The main cause responsible for night myopia was the accommodation shift occurring at low light levels. Other factors, traditionally suggested to explain night myopia, such as chromatic and spherical aberrations, have a much smaller effect in this mechanism. Conclusions An adaptive optics visual analyzer was applied to study the phenomenon of night myopia. We found that the defocus shift occurring in dim light is mainly due to accommodation errors. PMID:22768343

  12. Flicker parameters are different for suppression of myopia and hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, H N; Schaeffel, F

    1997-10-01

    Axial eye growth rates in the chicken are controlled by local retinal image-processing circuits. These circuits quantify the loss of contrast for different spatial frequencies and promote axial eye growth rates in correlation with the amount of retinal image degradation ("deprivation myopia"). They also distinguish whether the plane of focus lies in front of or behind the retina. How the sign of defocus is detected still remains unclear. Cues from chromatic aberration are not important. In an attempt to isolate retinal circuits controlling the development of myopia or hyperopia, young chickens were raised in flickering light of different frequencies (12 and 6 Hz) and duty cycles (4-75%) produced by rotating chopper disks. The effects of flickering light on refractive errors and change in axial growth rates induced by translucent occluders or defocusing lenses were measured by infrared retinoscopy and A-scan ultrasound, respectively. Retinal electrical activity was evaluated by flicker ERG after matching flicker parameters and stimulation brightness at retinal surface. Changes in retinal and vitreal dopamine content caused by flicker in occluded and normal eyes were determined by HPLC-ECD. Strikingly, suppression of myopia occurred for similar flicker parameters, whether induced by translucent occluders ("deprivation") or negative lenses ("defocus"). The degree to which myopia was suppressed was correlated with the duration of flicker dark phase and with the ERG amplitude. In contrast, suppression of hyperopia did not correlate with these parameters. We conclude that two different retinal circuits with different temporal characteristics are involved in the processing of hyperopic defocus/deprivation and of myopic defocus, the first one dependent on flicker ERG amplitude. However, we did not find any correlation between the rate of dopamine release and the degree of inhibition of deprivation myopia in flickering light. PMID:9373666

  13. When alcohol narrows the field of focal attention.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which alcohol intoxication restricts the scope of attention in the visual field. A group of intoxicated (n = 31; mean BAC ≈ .08%) and placebo control (n = 31; mean BAC ≈ .00%) participants were required to correctly identify visual probes while performing two verbal categorization tasks: one designed to widen the scope of visual attention on to each stimulus word, the other to narrow attention on to the central letter of each word. Response times to surprise probes interpolated between categorization trials were measured and these catch trials could appear in any of the stimulus word letter positions. As predicted by alcohol myopia theory (AMT), which assumes that the drug narrows focal attention, intoxicated participants made slower responses than the sober controls to probes displayed in non-central letter positions, although right-field probe reaction times (RTs) were slower than those for left-field targets. This response asymmetry and the wider theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Reflections on a proposed theory of reservation-dwelling American Indian alcohol use: comment on Spillane and Smith (2007).

    PubMed

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-03-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the lack of contingencies between drinking and "standard life reinforcers" (SLRs), such as employment, housing, education, and health care. This comment presents evidence that these arguments were based on a partial review of the literature. Weaknesses in the application of SLR constructs to American Indian reservation communities are identified as is the need for culturally contextualized empirical evidence supporting this theory and its application. Cautionary notes are offered about the development of literature reviews, theoretical frameworks, and policy recommendations for American Indian communities.

  15. Reflections on a Proposed Theory of Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Alcohol Use: Comment on Spillane and Smith (2007)

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O’Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2015-01-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith (2007) suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non–American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the lack of contingencies between drinking and “standard life reinforcers” (SLRs), such as employment, housing, education, and health care. This comment presents evidence that these arguments were based on a partial review of the literature. Weaknesses in the application of SLR constructs to American Indian reservation communities are identified as is the need for culturally contextualized empirical evidence supporting this theory and its application. Cautionary notes are offered about the development of literature reviews, theoretical frameworks, and policy recommendations for American Indian communities. PMID:19254084

  16. Seasonal Variations in the Progression of Myopia in Children Enrolled in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gwiazda, Jane; Deng, Li; Manny, Ruth; Norton, Thomas T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate monthly and seasonal variations in the progression of myopia in children enrolled in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET). Methods. An ethnically diverse cohort of 469 myopic 6- to <12 year-old children was randomized to single vision or progressive addition lenses and followed for 3 years with 98.5% retention. Progression of myopia was measured semiannually by noncycloplegic autorefraction (Nidek ARK 700A) and annually by cycloplegic autorefraction, with the former measurements used in these analyses. The semiannual progression rate was calculated as (change in spherical equivalent refraction between two consecutive semiannual visits/number of days between the two visits) times 182.5. Months were categorized as the midpoint between two visit dates. Seasons were classified as winter (October through March) or summer (April through September). The seasonal difference was tested using a linear mixed model adjusting for demographic variables (age, sex, ethnicity), baseline refraction, and treatment group. Results. Data from 358 children (mean [±SD] age = 9.84 ± 1.27 years; mean myopia = −2.54 ± 0.84 diopters [D]) met the criteria for these analyses. Myopia progression varied systematically by month; it was slower in April through September than in the other months. Mean progression in winter was −0.35 ± 0.34 D and in summer was −0.14 ± 0.32 D, a statistically significant difference (0.21 D, P < 0.0001). The same seasonal pattern was found by age, sex, ethnicity (except in the small sample of Asians), lens type, and clinical center. Conclusions. The slower progression of myopia found in summer is likely related to children's spending more time outdoors and fewer hours in school. The data have clinical implications regarding the time of year and the frequency with which myopic children have eye examinations and the need for precise timing of visits in clinical trials testing new myopia treatments. (Clinical

  17. An evidence-based update on myopia and interventions to retard its progression.

    PubMed

    Leo, Seo-Wei; Young, Terri L

    2011-04-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder. With its increasing prevalence and earlier age-of-onset in recent birth cohorts, myopia now affects almost 33% of adults in the United States, and epidemic proportions of 85% to 90% adults in Asian cities. Unlike children in Western populations, where the prevalence of myopia is very low (less than 5%), Asian children have prevalences as high as 29% in 7-year-olds. In addition to the direct economic and social burdens of myopia, associated ocular complications may lead to substantial vision loss. This workshop summarizes the current literature regarding myopia epidemiology, genetics, animal model studies, risk factors, and clinical treatments. Published treatment strategies to retard the progression of myopia in children, such as pharmacologic agents, progressive addition lenses, and neural adaptation programs, are outlined. PMID:21596297

  18. Prevalence and risk indicators of myopia among schoolchildren in Amman, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khader, Y S; Batayha, W Q; Abdul-Aziz, S M I; Al-Shiekh-Khalil, M I

    2006-01-01

    We aimed to identify the prevalence and risk factors of myopia among secondary-school students in Amman. Thus 1777 (1081 males and 696 females) students aged 12-17 years old were recruited from 8 schools randomly selected from 8 different geographic locations in Amman. Data were collected by questionnaire, and self-reported myopia was checked against school medical records. The prevalence of myopia was 17.6%, with no significant difference between males and females after adjusting for other possible variables. Myopia was significantly associated with age, family history of myopia, computer use, and reading and writing outside school. Playing sports was inversely associated with myopia but there was no association with watching television. PMID:17037714

  19. Factors Shaping the Decision of College Students to Walk or Drive under the Influence of Alcohol: A Test of Rational Choice Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Ashley; Monk-Turner, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Rational Choice theory was tested to better understand the differences in behaviour regarding walking and driving under the influence of alcohol. Methods: Students at a residential college campus in Virginia were surveyed. Findings: Results show that students were less likely to walk or drive while intoxicated if they believed such behaviour…

  20. Computer-delivered interventions for reducing alcohol consumption: meta-analysis and meta-regression using behaviour change techniques and theory.

    PubMed

    Black, Nicola; Mullan, Barbara; Sharpe, Louise

    2016-09-01

    The current aim was to examine the effectiveness of behaviour change techniques (BCTs), theory and other characteristics in increasing the effectiveness of computer-delivered interventions (CDIs) to reduce alcohol consumption. Included were randomised studies with a primary aim of reducing alcohol consumption, which compared self-directed CDIs to assessment-only control groups. CDIs were coded for the use of 42 BCTs from an alcohol-specific taxonomy, the use of theory according to a theory coding scheme and general characteristics such as length of the CDI. Effectiveness of CDIs was assessed using random-effects meta-analysis and the association between the moderators and effect size was assessed using univariate and multivariate meta-regression. Ninety-three CDIs were included in at least one analysis and produced small, significant effects on five outcomes (d+ = 0.07-0.15). Larger effects occurred with some personal contact, provision of normative information or feedback on performance, prompting commitment or goal review, the social norms approach and in samples with more women. Smaller effects occurred when information on the consequences of alcohol consumption was provided. These findings can be used to inform both intervention- and theory-development. Intervention developers should focus on, including specific, effective techniques, rather than many techniques or more-elaborate approaches.

  1. Extending the theory of planned behavior to predict alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among youth of Mexican heritage.

    PubMed

    Kam, Jennifer A; Matsunaga, Masaki; Hecht, Michael L; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou

    2009-03-01

    This study examined the applicability of extending the theory of planned behavior to explain the normative processes in substance use among Mexican-heritage youth. The theory identifies norms, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control as predictors of intentions, which in turn, predict behaviors. To date, the theory had a limited conceptualization of norms and had not been extended to youth of Mexican descent, one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. population and one at particular risk for alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Based on norm focus theory, it was hypothesized that norms are multidimensional, consisting of parental injunctive, peer injunctive, descriptive, and personal substance use norms. Second, it was hypothesized that parental injunctive, peer injunctive, and descriptive norms indirectly affect substance use intentions through attitudes, personal norms, and perceived behavioral control. The third hypothesis postulated that the model would operate differently based on Mexican-heritage youths' country of origin. Mexican-heritage youth (N = 1,499) from 30 elementary schools in Phoenix, AZ completed questionnaires in three waves over 18 months as part of a larger study. The findings supported the first hypothesis, showing the multidimensionality of norms. The second hypothesis was partially supported by findings from a multi-group multilevel path analysis using Mplus. Descriptive norms' association with intentions was partially mediated by attitudes, personal norms, and perceived behavioral control, while parental and peer injunctive norms were fully mediated, partially supporting the second hypothesis. Contrary to the third hypothesis, the mediation model did not differ based on Mexican-heritage youths' country of origin.

  2. Modifying Heathcare System Alcohol Interventions for the High-Risk Drinking Environment: Theory in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croff, Julie M.; Clapp, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a model program in the medical context, but it may be missing a large portion of the population with low access to healthcare services. Young adults have the lowest rates of insurance, low healthcare service utilization, and high rates of substance use. Theory driven Screening and…

  3. A Test of Cognitive Dissonance Theory to Explain Parents' Reactions to Youths' Alcohol Intoxication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatz, Terese; Stattin, Hakan; Kerr, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that parents reduce control and support in response to youths' drinking. Why they react this way, however, is still unknown. From cognitive dissonance theory, we derived hypotheses about parents' reactions. We used a longitudinal, school-based sample of 494 youths (13 and 14 years, 56% boys) and their parents. General Linear…

  4. Sclera-related gene polymorphisms in high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Tsai, Yuhsin; Liu, Su-Ching; Chen, Wen-Chi; Tsai, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and fibromodulin (FMOD) are important extracellular matrix components of the sclera and have been shown to be associated with the development of high myopia. Our aim was to examine the association between myopia and the polymorphisms within TGF-β2, bFGF, and FMOD. Methods The study group comprised of patients (n=195; age range: 17−24 years) with a spherical equivalent of −6.5 diopters (D) or a more negative refractive error. The control group comprised of individuals (n=94; age range: 17−25 years) with a spherical equivalent ranging from −0.5 D to +1.0 D. The subjects with astigmatism over –0.75 D were excluded from the study. High resolution melting (HRM) genotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping were used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The polymorphisms detected were TGF-β2 (rs7550232 and rs991967), bFGF (rs308395 and rs41348645), and FMOD (rs7543418). Moreover, a stepwise logistic regression procedure was used to detect which of the significant SNPs contributed to the main effects of myopia development. Results There were significant differences in the frequency of the A allele and A/A genotype in TGF-β2 (rs7550232; p=0.0178 and 0.03, respectively). Moreover, the haplotype distribution of haplotype 2 (Ht2; A/A) of TGF-β2 differed significantly between the two groups (p=0.014). The results of the stepwise logistic regression procedure revealed that TGF-β2 (rs7550232) contributed significantly to the development of high myopia. Conclusions TGF-β2 is an important structure of sclera and might contribute to the formation of myopia. TGF-β2 (rs7550232) polymorphisms, A allele and A/A genotype, had a protective role against the development of high myopia. PMID:19710942

  5. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children’s myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ −0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24–2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41–1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies. PMID:27329615

  6. X-ray reflectivity measurements and Landau theory of smectic wetting in liquid crystal--benzyl alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, G.J.; Pershan, P.S.; Kawamoto, E.H.; Foster, W.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B.M.

    1995-05-01

    Smectic layering has been observed at the free surface of decylcyanobiphenyl (10CB) and dodecylcyanobiphenyl (12CB) and mixtures of 10CB and 12CB with benzyl alcohol (BA). The effect of BA is to suppress the bulk isotropic-smectic transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital I}{ital A}} and surface layer ``transition`` temperatures {ital T}{sub {ital j}}, as well as sharpening these surface transitions by reducing the temperature range {Delta}{ital T} over which layers grow. The observed sharpening appears to saturate for concentrations {ital x}{ge}0.118. A Landau theory for the growth of a single layer {ital j} has been developed, in which the free energy contains a term coupling the concentration {ital x} to the local smectic order parameter {psi}{sub {ital j}} such that {ital F}{sub {ital j}}{similar_to}{ital x}{psi}{sub {ital j}}{sup 2}. Applying this theory to pure 12CB and eight mixtures of 12CB-BA, we find that the {ital j}=1{minus}{gt}{ital j}=2 transition is continuous in pure 12CB, but that the addition of small amounts of impurity drives the transition first order.

  7. [Accomodation tonus in myopia and its potential prognostic value].

    PubMed

    Tarutta, E P; Tarasova, N A

    2012-01-01

    60 patients with different degree of myopia were examined to study habitual accomodation tonus (HAT) and accomodation rest tonus (ART). HAT was calculated as a difference between standard autorefratometer measurements before and after cycloplegia; HAT in open field (HAT-OF) was estimated using open-field autorefractometer before and after cycloplegia with a patient looking at the distant object; ART was considered as a difference between refraction in dark conditions (dark focus) and cycloplegic refraction using open-field autorefractometer Grand Seiko WR-5100K (Japan). In examined patients ART was maximal (-0,87 +/- 0,08 dpt) and HAT-OF-minimal (-0,15 +/- 0,04 dpt). The high values of accomodation tonus (both HAT and ART) were associated with higher rates of myopia progressing. For the first time dynamic refraction measured using open-field autorefractometer confirmed the phenomenon of "negative" accomodation.

  8. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Polling, J R; Kok, R G W; Tideman, J W L; Meskat, B; Klaver, C C W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Randomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a non-Asian country. Methods An effectiveness study was performed in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Overall 77 children (mean age 10.3 years±2.3), of European (n=53), Asian (n=18), and African (n=6) descent with progressive myopia were prescribed atropine 0.5% eye drops daily. Both parents and children filled in a questionnaire regarding adverse events and adherence to therapy. A standardized eye examination including cycloplegic refraction and axial length was performed at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 months after initiation of therapy. Results Mean spherical equivalent at baseline was −6.6D (±3.3). The majority (60/77, 78%) of children adhered to atropine treatment for 12 months; 11 of the 17 children who discontinued therapy did so within 1 month after the start of therapy. The most prominent reported adverse events were photophobia (72%), followed by reading problems (38%), and headaches (22%). The progression rate of spherical equivalent before treatment (−1.0D/year±0.7) diminished substantially during treatment (−0.1D/year±0.7) compared to those who ceased therapy (−0.5D/year±0.6; P=0.03). Conclusions Despite the relatively high occurrence of adverse events, our study shows that atropine can be an effective and sustainable treatment for progressive high myopia in Europeans. PMID:27101751

  9. Aripiprazole Induced Acute Transient Bilateral Myopia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karadağ, Hasan; Acar, Mutlu; Özdel, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic drug. Acute transient myopia is a rare response to systemic medication. Unspecified ocular side effects of aripiprazole have rarely been reported. To the best of our knowledge, only 3 cases of aripiprazole induced myopia and diplopia have been reported in the literature. The aim of this article is to present a case of aripiprazole-induced acute transient myopia. Case Report: A 30 year-old woman underwent treatment for 5 days with aripiprazole and presented with bilateral painless blurred vision. The patient’s uncorrected visual acuity was 2/10 in both eyes and her best corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in both eyes with a refractive error of −3.00 diopters using a standard Snellen chart. Adding 2 mgs of biperiden a day to her treatment regimen decreased her blurred vision symptoms. After discontinuation of aripiprazole treatment and cross-switching to Paliperidon palmitate (75 mg/month) her blurred vision completely resolved. The same side effect did not re-occur when checked on her 6-month follow up. Conclusion: Ophthalmologists as well as psychiatrists must be aware of this myopic shift and should also ask these patients about medicine usage, especially aripiprazole. Ophthalmologists should consult the prescribing psychiatrist and stop the drug immediately to reverse this temporary condition. PMID:26167352

  10. An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior to Sorority Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Huchting, Karen; Lac, Andrew; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Greek-affiliated college students have been found to drink more heavily and frequently than other students. With female student drinking on the rise over the past decade, sorority women may be at particular risk for heavy consumption patterns. The current study is the first to apply the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine drinking patterns among a sorority-only sample. Two-hundred and forty-seven sorority members completed questionnaires measuring TPB variables of attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions, with drinking behaviors measured one month later. Latent structural equation modeling examined the pathways of the TPB model. Intentions to drink mediated the relationship between attitudes and norms on drinking behavior. Subjective norms predicted intentions to drink more than attitudes or perceived behavioral control. Perceived behavioral control did not predict intentions but did predict drinking behaviors. Interpretation and suggestions from these findings are discussed. PMID:18055130

  11. Diminished ciliary muscle movement on accommodation in myopia.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Won Ki; Lee, Kook; Moon, Nam Ju

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of ciliary muscle to the development and progression of myopia has been addressed. A thickened ciliary muscle in myopia has been speculated as an internal equatorial growth restriction, possibly a matter of hypertrophy with potentially poor contractility, which may result in the development and progression of myopia. In this preliminary study, we evaluated the interrelationship of ciliary muscle characteristics and myopia in 31 volunteers (aged 19-35), via ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM), with eyes focused on far and near targets. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis (using stepwise variable selection) were employed to analyze the relationship between axial length/refractive error and various parameters of ciliary muscle (CM)-cross-sectional area (CMA); length from scleral (CMLs) and vitreous (CMLv) aspects; thickness at 1.0 mm (CMT1), 2.0 mm (CMT2), and 3.0 mm (CMT3) posterior to scleral spur; maximum thickness (CMTm); and apical angle. The impact on accommodation of changes (Δ) in above parameters and of centroid variations was subsequently assessed. In a univariate analysis, axial length showed positive relationship with CMLs (r = 0.454, p = 0.017) and CMT3 (r = 0.460, p = 0.018), and negative relationship with ΔCMTm (r = -0.501, p = 0.008) and Δapical angle (r = -0.400, p = 0.039). Multivariate regression analysis showed that ΔCMTm (β = -0.506, p = 0.008) was independently related with axial length. A negative correlation between CMTm and ΔCMTm was also observed (r = -0.432, p = 0.024). These results suggest that accentuated ciliary muscle thickness, suggesting muscular hypertrophy, may account for the inherent dysfunction in myopia. Further studies are necessary to confirm these preliminary observations and hypotheses.

  12. Interventions to slow progression of myopia in children

    PubMed Central

    Walline, Jeffrey J; Lindsley, Kristina; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Cotter, Susan A; Mutti, Donald O; Twelker, J. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearsightedness (myopia) causes blurry vision when looking at distant objects. Highly nearsighted people are at greater risk of several vision-threatening problems such as retinal detachments, choroidal atrophy, cataracts and glaucoma. Interventions that have been explored to slow the progression of myopia include bifocal spectacles, cycloplegic drops, intraocular pressure-lowering drugs, muscarinic receptor antagonists and contact lenses. The purpose of this review was to systematically assess the effectiveness of strategies to control progression of myopia in children. Objectives To assess the effects of several types of interventions, including eye drops, undercorrection of nearsightedness, multifocal spectacles and contact lenses, on the progression of nearsightedness in myopic children younger than 18 years. We compared the interventions of interest with each other, to single vision lenses (SVLs) (spectacles), placebo or no treatment. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1950 to October 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 11 October 2011. We also searched the reference lists and Science Citation Index for additional, potentially relevant studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which participants were treated with spectacles, contact lenses or pharmaceutical agents for the purpose of controlling progression of myopia. We excluded trials where participants were older than 18 years at baseline or participants had less than −0

  13. Human parallels to experimental myopia? A literature review on visual deprivation.

    PubMed

    Fledelius, Hans C; Goldschmidt, Ernst; Haargaard, Birgitte; Jensen, Hanne

    2014-12-01

    Raviola and Wiesel's monkey eyelid suture studies of the 1970s laid the cornerstone for the experimental myopia science undertaken since then. The aim has been to clarify the basic humoral and neuronal mechanisms behind induced myopization, its eye tissue transmitters in particular. Besides acquiring new and basic knowledge, the practical object of the research is to reduce the burden of human myopia around the world. Acquisition and cost of optical correction is one issue, but associated morbidity counts more, with its global load of myopia-associated visual loss and blindness. The object of the present PubMed literature-based review is to evaluate apparent similarities between experience from disturbed imaging in experimental laboratory science and varieties within the spectrum of childhood human myopia. So far, the main impression is that macroscopical optical deprivation appears absent in the prevalent types of human myopia, nor is myopia a regular sequel where early eye pathology has led to poor imaging and optical deprivation. Optical aberrations of a higher order are a relatively new issue in myopia research, and microstructural deprivation is only marginally dealt within the survey. Links between experimental and human myopia appear mainly occasional, and with only few examples in humans where factual parallels appear credible. Clinical and epidemiological data on refraction remain important, in particular with a view to life style and environmental factors. Such knowledge may further serve as inspiration to the laboratory research, which aims at solving the basic enigmas on a tissue level.

  14. [Laser correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism in children--literature review].

    PubMed

    Mrukwa-Kominek, Ewa; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanisława

    2003-01-01

    Anisometropic myopia and myopic astigmatism are very often refractive error in children. Suitable correction of different vision defects in children might prevent the consequences of amblyopia and lack of development of binocular vision. This article presents the effectiveness of correction in myopia and myopic anisometropia using laser method such as PRK, LASEK and LASIK. It is the literature review. PMID:15049271

  15. A single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the LAMA1 gene in Japanese patients with high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sayaka; Ota, Masao; Meguro, Akira; Nishizaki, Ritsuko; Okada, Eiichi; Mok, Jeewon; Kimura, Tetusya; Oka, Akira; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Ohno, Shigeaki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2007-01-01

    Although a myopia susceptibility gene has not yet been elucidated, ten candidate regions (MYP1–MYP10) have been associated with myopia by linkage analysis employing large pedigrees. We report herein on the results of our analysis pertaining to polymorphisms of LAMA1 (alpha subunit of laminin), a promising candidate gene for high myopia present in the MYP2 region of Japanese subjects with high myopia. Three hundred and thirty Japanese subjects with high myopia at a level of greater than −9.25 D and ethnically and sex matched 330 normal controls without high myopia was enrolled in this study. The thirteen SNPs located on the LAMA1 gene were analyzed using PCR and SNP-specific fluorogenic probes. Two of the SNPs were monomorphic and none of the 11 SNPs showed statistically significant association with high myopia in the Japanese population. There is no convincing evidence to prove a connection between nucleotide sequence variations in LAMA1 and high myopia. The pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping disclosed a strong value (D' > 0.8) and narrow ranged block within these SNPs. PMID:19668483

  16. Bayesian analysis of the structural equation models with application to a longitudinal myopia trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fu; Fan, Tsai-Hung

    2012-01-30

    Myopia is becoming a significant public health problem, affecting more and more people. Studies indicate that there are two main factors, hereditary and environmental, suspected to have strong impact on myopia. Motivated by the increase in the number of people affected by this problem, this paper focuses primarily on the utilization of mathematical methods to gain further insight into their relationship with myopia. Accordingly, utilizing multidimensional longitudinal myopia data with correlation between both eyes, we develop a Bayesian structural equation model including random effects. With the aid of the MCMC method, it is capable of expressing the correlation between repeated measurements as well as the two-eye correlation and can be used to explore the relational structure among the variables in the model. We consider four observed factors, including intraocular pressure, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length. The results indicate that the genetic effect has much greater influence on myopia than the environmental effects.

  17. The dynamic sclera: extracellular matrix remodeling in normal ocular growth and myopia development.

    PubMed

    Harper, Angelica R; Summers, Jody A

    2015-04-01

    Myopia is a common ocular condition, characterized by excessive elongation of the ocular globe. The prevalence of myopia continues to increase, particularly among highly educated groups, now exceeding 80% in some groups. In parallel with the increased prevalence of myopia, are increases in associated blinding ocular conditions including glaucoma, retinal detachment and macular degeneration, making myopia a significant global health concern. The elongation of the eye is closely related to the biomechanical properties of the sclera, which in turn are largely dependent on the composition of the scleral extracellular matrix. Therefore an understanding of the cellular and extracellular events involved in the regulation of scleral growth and remodeling during childhood and young adulthood will provide future avenues for the treatment of myopia and its associated ocular complications.

  18. What Public Policies Should Be Developed to Deal with the Epidemic of Myopia?

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian G

    2016-09-01

    Developed countries in East and Southeast Asia are now faced with a high prevalence of high myopia in young adults, and this trend is emerging in other parts of the world. This is likely to lead to increased levels of pathological myopia. Fortunately, several school-based clinical trials have demonstrated that interventions based on increasing the amount of time that children spend outdoors can significantly slow the onset of myopia. I argue that it is time to implement mandatory programs of this kind in school systems, within a framework of regular monitoring of visual acuity, so that those children who become myopic are referred for clinical treatment as soon as possible to slow progression of their myopia towards high and potentially pathological myopia.

  19. [Orthokeratology for the high myopia and high astigmatism is worth watching].

    PubMed

    Xie, Peiying

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of high myopia in teenagers is rising. Due to both genetic factors and environmental factors, most of myopia occurs in early age with rapid progress, and the prevention and control are very difficult. Orthokeratology is considered as one of the most effective ways of controlling myopia for children. It is proved effective through many years of clinical studies not only for low to moderate myopia, but also for high myopia with astigmatism. However, professional knowledge is lacking domestically. This paper introduces the local and overseas research results in recent years, and discusses the necessity and feasibility of high diopter orthokeratology correction, implementation methods and requirements, and safety and effectiveness evaluation standards for reference.

  20. [Orthokeratology for the high myopia and high astigmatism is worth watching].

    PubMed

    Xie, Peiying

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of high myopia in teenagers is rising. Due to both genetic factors and environmental factors, most of myopia occurs in early age with rapid progress, and the prevention and control are very difficult. Orthokeratology is considered as one of the most effective ways of controlling myopia for children. It is proved effective through many years of clinical studies not only for low to moderate myopia, but also for high myopia with astigmatism. However, professional knowledge is lacking domestically. This paper introduces the local and overseas research results in recent years, and discusses the necessity and feasibility of high diopter orthokeratology correction, implementation methods and requirements, and safety and effectiveness evaluation standards for reference. PMID:25877704

  1. Women's sexual arousal: effects of high alcohol dosages and self-control instructions.

    PubMed

    George, William H; Davis, Kelly Cue; Heiman, Julia R; Norris, Jeanette; Stoner, Susan A; Schacht, Rebecca L; Hendershot, Christian S; Kajumulo, Kelly F

    2011-05-01

    The basic relationship between alcohol and women's sexual arousal - especially genital arousal - received little research attention for nearly 30 years (e.g. Wilson and Lawson, 1978) until very recently (e.g. George et al., 2009). To investigate hypotheses based on earlier findings and Alcohol Myopia Theory (AMT), two experiments evaluated the effects of high blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) and arousal instructional demands on indices of vaginal responding and self-reported sexual arousal. In Experiment 1, self-control instructions to maximize (versus suppress) arousal increased peak and average Vaginal Pulse Amplitude (VPA) change. Self-control also interacted with a target BAC of .08% (versus .00%) to influence latency to peak arousal onset: Intoxicated women instructed to maximize showed a shorter latency to peak arousal than did intoxicated women instructed to suppress; however, sober women showed an undifferentiated pattern. Also, in Experiment 1, the target BAC of .08% had no effect on VPA or subjective arousal measures. In Experiment 2, a target BAC of .10% (versus .00%) attenuated peak change and average change in VPA, but this dosage had no effects on latency to peak achieved arousal, or on subjective arousal. Instructions to maximize arousal (versus no instruction) had no effect on any arousal measures. Overall, among young moderate drinking women, alcohol had attenuating effects but only at the higher dosage. Maximize versus suppress instructions about arousal had predicted effects on arousal and interactive effects on latency, but only at the lower dosage. The findings highlight the importance of dosage and contextual factors in alcohol's impact on the variability of women's sexual responding. PMID:21439287

  2. Education-Related Parameters in High Myopia: Adults versus School Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Ya Xing; Bi, Hong Sheng; Wu, Jian Feng; Jiang, Wen Jun; Nangia, Vinay; Sinha, Ajit; Zhu, Dan; Tao, Yong; Guo, Yin; You, Qi Sheng; Wu, Li Juan; Tao, Li Xin; Guo, Xiu Hua; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Since high myopia in the younger generation may differ etiologically from high myopia in older generations, we examined whether education-related parameters differ between high myopia in today´s school children and high pathological myopia in today´s elderly generation. Methods The investigation included the adult populations of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (BES) (3468 adults;mean age:64.6±9.8years;range:50–93years) and Central India Eye and Medical Study (CIEMS) (4711 adults;age:49.±13.2years;range:30–100years), and the children and teenager populations of the Shandong Children Eye Study (SCES) (6026 children;age:9.7±3.3years;range:4–18years;cycloplegic refractometry), Gobi Desert Children Eye Study (1565;age:11.9±3.5years;range:6–21 years;cycloplegic refractometry), Beijing Pediatric Eye Study (681 children;age:7.7±1.6years;range:5–13 years;non-cycloplegic refractometry,calculation of axial length to corneal curvature radius ratio), Beijing Children Eye Study (15066 children;age:13.2±3.4years;range:7–18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry), Beijing High School Teenager Eye Study (4677 children;age:16.9±0.7years;range:16–18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry). Results In the BES and CIEMS, educational level did not differ significantly between, or was significantly lower in the highly myopic group (myopic refractive error ≥6 diopters) than in the non-highly myopic group. In all non-adult study populations, higher prevalence of high myopia was significantly associated with higher degree of education related parameters such as attendance of high-level schools, and more time spent for indoors near work versus time spent outdoors. Conclusions Comparing associations of old or genetic high myopia in adults with new or acquired high myopia in school children revealed that education-related parameters did not show a clear association with old or genetic high myopia, while in contrast, new high myopia showed strong associations

  3. [Current status on the pathogenesis of progressive myopia].

    PubMed

    Tserediani, I O

    2015-02-01

    In the article shown is the modern diagnostic method of progressive myopia pathogenesis. Establishment of possible myopia progress using the ultrasonographic biometry while looking into and into and down contact equator at one and the same point. The research goal is to study the residual deformative changes developed as a result of sclera distraction during reading. We have researched 150 patients. The patients were split in three groups according to the age and myopia type: I group included patients of the age of 5-12 years; the II group had patients of the age of 13-19 years; III group - patients above the 19 years. The used age differentiation is based on the eye anatomic growth criteria. The research was held by the following scheme: all the researches patients underwent the preliminary anesthesia drops instillation; the ultrasonographic biometry catheter was put using one and the same equator point. In the first position they established the front and back axis size, in the second one - the eye size was established in the medial look regime; in the third position - the eye size was established in the reading regime. The data obtained are as follows: among the first group patients, aged from 5 to 12 years, in reading regime the eye size was increased in 93% cases; among the second group patients, aged from 13 to 19 years, in reading regime the eye size was increased in 90% cases; among the third group patients, aged above 19 years - 91% cases. The reason why the sclera capsule distraction during reading regime is that of the extraocular muscles and growth of the intraocular pressure influence the process. Because the sclera is fibrotic membrane, it is characterized with well-marked elasticity, stronger accommodation and the sigh load in the near distance causes sclera capsule distraction. After the contraction the residual deformation stays there. Accumulation of such residual deformations causes the sclera weakness and formation of myopia as a disease

  4. Mutations in LRPAP1 are associated with severe myopia in humans.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Khan, Arif O; Alkuraya, Hisham; Adly, Nouran; Anazi, Shamsa; Al-Saleh, Ahmed A; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Hijazi, Hadia; Prabakaran, Sarita; Tacke, Marlene; Al-Khrashi, Abdullah; Hashem, Mais; Reinheckel, Thomas; Assiri, Abdullah; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-08-01

    Myopia is an extremely common eye disorder but the pathogenesis of its isolated form, which accounts for the overwhelming majority of cases, remains poorly understood. There is strong evidence for genetic predisposition to myopia, but determining myopia genetic risk factors has been difficult to achieve. We have identified Mendelian forms of myopia in four consanguineous families and implemented exome/autozygome analysis to identify homozygous truncating variants in LRPAP1 and CTSH as the likely causal mutations. LRPAP1 encodes a chaperone of LRP1, which is known to influence TGF-β activity. Interestingly, we observed marked deficiency of LRP1 and upregulation of TGF-β in cells from affected individuals, the latter being consistent with available data on the role of TGF-β in the remodeling of the sclera in myopia and the high frequency of myopia in individuals with Marfan syndrome who characteristically have upregulation of TGF-β signaling. CTSH, on the other hand, encodes a protease and we show that deficiency of the murine ortholog results in markedly abnormal globes consistent with the observed human phenotype. Our data highlight a role for LRPAP1 and CTSH in myopia genetics and demonstrate the power of Mendelian forms in illuminating new molecular mechanisms that may be relevant to common phenotypes.

  5. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Wan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%), uveitis (3.7%), or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5%) compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p<0.001) using data from children (<18years old) in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD), an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA) or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia. PMID:27470424

  6. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  7. A theory-based dual-focus alcohol intervention for preadolescents: the Strong African American Families Program.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X; Brody, Gene H; Murry, Velma McBride; Cleveland, Michael J; Wills, Thomas A

    2006-06-01

    This study examined mediators of the Strong African American Families Program, a randomized, dual-focus prevention trial intended to delay the onset of alcohol use and reduce alcohol consumption among rural African American youths. More specifically, it demonstrated that changes in consumption 2 yrs after the intervention were mediated through 2 different paths, a social reaction path and a reasoned/intention path. The social reaction path provided evidence that relative to the control condition, the intervention decreased children's willingness to drink by making their images of drinkers less favorable. The reasoned/intention path provided evidence that the intervention influenced the children's intentions to drink by increasing targeted parenting behaviors related to alcohol. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that these changes in willingness and intentions were independently associated with alcohol consumption at the follow-up, and they suggest that a dual-process model approach that targets both intentions and willingness can be more successful than either approach alone.

  8. The Development of Myopia Among Children With Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    EKDAWI, NOHA S.; NUSZ, KEVIN J.; DIEHL, NANCY N.; MOHNEY, BRIAN G.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe the long-term refractive error changes in children diagnosed with intermittent exotropia (IXT) in a defined population. DESIGN Retrospective, population-based observational study. METHODS Using the resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, the medical records of all children (<19 years) diagnosed with IXT as residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, from January 1, 1975 through December 31, 1994 were retrospectively reviewed for any change in refractive error over time. RESULTS One hundred eighty-four children were diagnosed with IXT during the 20-year study period; 135 (73.4%) had 2 or more refractions separated by a mean of 10 years (range, 1–27 years). The Kaplan-Meier rate of developing myopia in this population was 7.4% by 5 years of age, 46.5% by 10 years, and 91.1% by 20 years. There were 106 patients with 2 or more refractions separated by at least 1 year through 21 years of age, of which 43 underwent surgery and 63 were observed. The annual overall progression was −0.26 diopters (SD ± 0.24) without a statistically significant difference between the observed and surgical groups (P = .59). CONCLUSION In this population-based study of children with intermittent exotropia, myopia was calculated to occur in more than 90% of patients by 20 years of age. Observation versus surgical correction did not alter the refractive outcome. PMID:20172074

  9. Small Incision Lenticule Extraction for Postkeratoplasty Myopia and Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Osama; Shehata, Kitty; Abdalla, Moones F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) for treating myopia and myopic astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Design. Case-series. Methods. Ten eyes of 10 patients with previous PKP and residual myopic astigmatism for whom pentacam imaging and thickness measurements were acceptable for laser vision correction. Manifest refraction (MR), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) were obtained preoperatively and one day, one week, and one, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Cases were operated on the VisuMax® femtosecond laser platform with 500 kHz repetition rate. Results. The mean correction ratio for spherical errors was 0.84 ± 0.19 D and for the mean refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE) was 0.79 ± 0.13 D. Vector analysis showed a mean astigmatism reduction at the intended axis of 67 ± 25.25%, a correction index of 0.81 ± 0.21, and an overall mean percentage of success of astigmatism surgery of 53 ± 37.9%. The postoperative MRSE was stable throughout the 6-month follow-up period. The efficacy index was 0.93 and the safety index was 1.12. Conclusion. SMILE for correction of post-PKP myopia and astigmatism is effective, safe, and stable with moderate accuracy and predictability. Centration of the treatment within the grafts was easily performed. PMID:27446606

  10. Orthokeratology to Control Myopia Progression: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Manli; Wang, Danyang; Chen, Yile; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical treatment effects of orthokeratology to slow the progression of myopia. Methods Several well-designed controlled studies have investigated the effects of orthokeratology in school-aged children. We conducted this meta-analysis to better evaluate the existing evidence. Relevant studies were identified in the Medline and Embase database without language limitations. The main outcomes included axial length and vitreous chamber depth reported as the mean ± standard deviation. The results were pooled and assessed with a fixed-effects model analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed according to geographical location and study design. Results Of the seven eligible studies, all reported axial length changes after 2 years, while two studies reported vitreous chamber depth changes. The pooled estimates indicated that change in axial length in the ortho-k group was 0.27 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22, 0.32) less than the control group. Myopic progression was reduced by approximately 45%. The combined results revealed that the difference in vitreous chamber depth between the two groups was 0.22 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.14, 0.31). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. Conclusion The overall findings suggest that ortho-k can slow myopia progression in school-aged children. PMID:25855979

  11. Evaluation of potential reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of coniferyl alcohol a-linkages in lignin: a density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Heath D.; Mohamed, Mohamed Naseer Ali; Kubicki, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Five potential reaction mechanisms, each leading to the formation of an α-O-4-linked coniferyl alcohol dimer, and one scheme leading to the formation of a recently proposed free-radical coniferyl alcohol trimer were assessed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These potential reaction mechanisms were evaluated using both the calculated Gibbs free energies, to predict the spontaneity of the constituent reactions, and the electron-density mapped Fukui function, to determine the most reactive sites of each intermediate species. The results indicate that each reaction in one of the six mechanisms is thermodynamically favorable to those in the other mechanisms; what is more, the Fukui function for each free radical intermediate corroborates with the thermochemical results for this mechanism. This mechanism proceeds via the formation of two distinct free-radical intermediates, which then react to produce the four α-O-4 stereoisomers.

  12. Structure and stability of acrolein and allyl alcohol networks on Ag(111) from density functional theory based calculations with dispersion corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Branda, Maria Marta; Illas, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of acrolein and allyl alcohol with the Ag(111) surface has been studied by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations including explicitly dispersion terms. Different coverage values have been explored going from isolated adsorbed molecules to isolated dimers, interacting dimers or ordered overlayers. The inclusion of the dispersion terms largely affects the calculated values of the adsorption energy and also the distance between adsorbed molecule and the metallic surface but much less the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Owing to the large dipole moment of acrolein, the present calculations predict that at high coverage this molecule forms a stable extensive two-dimensional network on the surface, caused by the alignment of the adsorbate dipoles. For the case of allyl alcohol, dimers and complex networks exhibit similar stability.

  13. What Do Animal Studies Tell Us about the Mechanism of Myopia-Protection by Light?

    PubMed

    Norton, Thomas T

    2016-09-01

    : Human studies have provided strong evidence that exposure to time outdoors is protective against the onset of myopia. A causal factor may be that the light levels outdoors (30,000-130,000 lux) are much higher than light levels indoors (typically less than 500 lux). Studies using animal models have found that normal animals exposed to low illuminance levels (50 lux) can develop myopia. The myopia and axial elongation, produced in animals by monocular form deprivation, is reduced by light levels in the 15,000 to 25,000 range. Myopia induced with a negative-power lens seems less affected, perhaps because the lens provides a powerful target for the emmetropization mechanism. Animal studies suggest that raising the light levels may have their effect by increasing retinal dopamine activity, probably via the D2 receptor pathway, altering gene expression in the retina and reducing the signals that produce axial elongation. PMID:27362614

  14. Accommodative Lag and Juvenile-Onset Myopia Progression in Children Wearing Refractive Correction

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, David A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Mutti, Donald O.; Zadnik, Karla

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between accommodative lag and annual myopia progression was investigated using linear models in 592 myopic children wearing a full refractive correction in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. The mean (± SD) age and spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline were 10.4 ± 1.8 years and −2.13 ± 1.24 D, respectively. The mean annual progression of myopia was −0.45 ± 0.32 D, and the mean accommodative lag (for a 4-D Badal stimulus) was 1.59 ± 0.63 D. Neither lag at the beginning nor at the end of a yearly progression interval was associated with annual myopia progression (all p ≥ 0.12). These data suggest that foveal hyperopic retinal blur during near viewing may not drive juvenile-onset myopia progression. PMID:21342658

  15. Influence of indoor and outdoor activities on progression of myopia during puberty.

    PubMed

    Öner, Veysi; Bulut, Asker; Oruç, Yavuz; Özgür, Gökhan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether time spent on indoor and outdoor activities or the other possible risk factors including age, gender, parental history, and initial refraction was associated with progression of myopia, during puberty. Fifty eyes of 50 myopic children aged 9-14 years were enrolled in the study. The parents were interviewed to determine the amounts of time in hours per day spent on reading and writing, using computer, watching TV, and outdoor activities (i.e., sports, games, or being outdoor with no activities) on an average day. The annual myopia progression rate (diopters per year) was calculated for each subject and was used in the statistical analyses. The mean initial age of the subjects was 10.9 ± 1.5 (ranging from 9 to 14) years. The mean follow-up period was 33.3 ± 10.3 (ranging from 17 to 55) months. There was a significant increase in the mean myopia value of the subjects after follow-up period (p < 0.001). The mean daily time spent on reading and writing and initial refraction value were independently associated with annual myopic progression rate. On the other hand, age, gender, parental myopia, and the mean daily times spent on computer use, watching TV, and outdoor activities had no correlations with annual myopia progression rate. The present study showed that myopia progression was associated with time spent on reading and writing and initial refraction value, during puberty. However, myopia progression was not associated with parental myopia, age, gender, and daily times spent on using computer, watching TV, and outdoor activities.

  16. Study of association of PAX6 polymorphisms with susceptibility to high myopia in a Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; Meguro, Akira; Yamane, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Masaki; Okada, Eiichi; Iijima, Yasuhito; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have investigated the relationship of paired box 6 (PAX6) gene polymorphisms with the risk of high myopia, but the results across studies remain inconsistent and ambiguous. In the present work, we investigated whether PAX6 polymorphisms are associated with high myopia in a Japanese population. Methods A total of 1,585 Japanese patients with high myopia (spherical equivalent [SE] <−9.00 diopters [D]) and 1,011 Japanese healthy controls (SE≥−1.00 D) were recruited. To compare genotype frequencies between cases and controls, we genotyped five single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAX6 gene that are reportedly associated with high/extreme myopia: rs662702, rs3026393, rs644242, rs3026390, and rs667773. Results For rs662702, rs644242, and rs667773, odds ratios (ORs) for their risk alleles tended to increase with the progression of SE and axial length in the additive and recessive models. Of these, rs644242 had the highest OR (2.56) in patients with SE<−15 D in both eyes in the recessive model. On the other hand, for rs3026393 and rs3026390, the ORs for their risk alleles tended to increase according to the progression of SE and axial length in the dominant model. Of the two, rs3026393 had the highest OR (2.32) in patients with SE<−15 D in both eyes in the dominant model. However, no significant associations were identified in this study. Conclusion We found that these PAX6 single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of extreme myopia. Although the results, which are in agreement with some previous studies, did not reach statistical significance, PAX6 single nucleotide polymorphisms may be important risk factors for the development of extreme myopia. Further genetic studies with larger sample sizes and taking into account the degree of myopia are needed to clarify the contribution of PAX6 variants in myopia development. PMID:26604670

  17. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  18. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- www.al-anon.org/home National Institute on Alcohol ...

  19. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  20. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... raquo Alcohol Facts Alcohol Facts Listen Drinks like beer, malt liquor, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol. Alcohol is the ingredient that gets you drunk. Hard liquor—such as whiskey, rum, or gin—has more ...

  1. A clinical study on the role of Akshi Tarpana with Jeevantyadi Ghrita in Timira (Myopia).

    PubMed

    Poonam; Manjusha, R; Vaghela, D B; Shukla, V J

    2011-10-01

    Myopia is a major public health problem pertaining to eye that entails substantial societal, personal, educational, and economical impact. Various surveys in India have found the prevalence of myopia ranging from 6.9% to 19.7%. Myopia progression is irreversible and methods for the correction of myopia are not without complications. Myopia closely resembles Timira involving first and second Patala in terms of symptoms, anatomical structures involved, and the pathogenesis of the disease. The study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of the Akshi-Tarpana procedure with Jeevantyadi Ghrita in fresh and old myopes. A total of 54 patients (108 eyes) having myopia ≥-6 D were registered for the study and divided into two groups (Group A, Akshi-Tarpana with Jeevantyadi Ghrita, and Group B, Akshi-Tarpana with plain Go Ghrita), by stratified sampling. The procedure was done in 5 sittings of 5 days each with an equal interval of 5 days between each sitting. A total of 22 patients in Group A and 18 in Group B completed the treatment. Obtained data were statistically analyzed using a t-test and the study reveals that objectively, 09.30% and 05.55% eyes were cured, 16.28% and 02.78% markedly improved, and 34.88% and 11.11% moderately improved in Group A and B, respectively. PMID:22661851

  2. NYX mutations in four families with high myopia with or without CSNB1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Song, Xiusheng; Li, Yin; Li, Hongyan; Dan, Handong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the NYX gene are known to cause complete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1), which is always accompanied by high myopia. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between NYX mutations and high myopia with or without CSNB1. Methods Four Chinese families having high myopia with or without CSNB1 and 96 normal controls were recruited. We searched for mutations in the NYX gene using Sanger sequencing. Further analyses of the detected variations in the available family members were performed, and the frequencies of the detected variations in 96 normal controls were determined to verify our deduction. The effect of each variation on the nyctalopin protein was predicted using online tools. Results Four potential pathogenic variations in the NYX gene were found in four families with high myopia with or without CSNB1. Three of the four variants were novel (c.626G>C; c.121delG; c.335T>C). The previously identified variant, c.529_530delGCinsAT, was found in an isolated highly myopic patient and an affected brother, but the other affected brother did not carry the same variation. Further linkage analyses of this family showed a coinheritance of markers at MYP1. These four mutations were not identified in the 96 normal controls. Conclusions Our study expands the mutation spectrum of NYX for cases of high myopia with CSNB1; however, more evidence is needed to elucidate the pathogenic effects of NYX on isolated high myopia. PMID:25802485

  3. Correlation between polymorphisms in the MFN1 gene and myopia in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yun-Chun; Lei, Jia-Hong; Wang, Ying; Xu, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To explore whether genetic variations in the MFN1 gene are associated with low to moderate myopia in Chinese population. METHODS The case-control association analysis was used. The study included 100 independent myopia patients (-0.75 D ≤ spherical refraction ≤-8.00 D) and 100 sex-matched healthy controls (with binocular spherical equivalent ranges between -0.50 D and +0.50 D). Four single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) tags (rs3976523, rs13098637, rs6762399 and rs7618348) were selected for genotyping by direct sequencing. The frequencies of genotypes and their alleles were calculated based on the number of SNP genotypes in each sample. The Chi-square test was used to examine the difference in the frequency between the myopia cases and controls. RESULTS Genotype distributions in the four SNPs were all in accordance with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; analysis showed that rs13098637 was significantly associated with low to moderate myopia (P=0.003 and empirical P=0.010). There were no statistically significant differences observed for the genotype or allele frequencies of the other three SNPs between the myopia cases and controls in the Chinese population in this study. CONCLUSION The current study has revealed that the C allele of rs13098637 in MFN1 had a significant association with low to moderate myopia. PMID:26682159

  4. Study of Pattern of Change in Handwriting Class Characters with Different Grades of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Hedge, Shruti Prabhat; Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Handwriting is a visuo-motor skill highly dependent on visual skills. Any defect in the visual inputs could affect a change in the handwriting. Understanding the variation in handwriting characters caused by visual acuity change can help in identifying learning disabilities in children and also assess the disability in elderly. In our study we try to analyse and catalogue these changes in the handwriting of a person. Materials and Methods The study was conducted among 100 subjects having normal visual acuity. They were asked to perform a set of writing tasks, after which the same tasks were repeated after inducing different grades of myopia. Changes in the handwriting class characters were analysed and compared in all grades of myopia. Results In the study it was found that the letter size, pastiosity, word omissions, inability to stay on line all increase with changes in visual acuity. However these finding are not proportional to the grade of myopia. Conclusion From the findings of the study it can be concluded that myopia significantly influences the handwriting and any change in visual acuity would induce corresponding changes in handwriting. There is increase in letter size, pastiosity where as the ability to stay on line and space between the lines decrease in different grades of myopia. The changes are not linear and cannot be used to predict the grade of myopia but can be used as parameters suggestive of refractive error. PMID:26816917

  5. Light, literacy and the absence of ultraviolet radiation in the development of myopia.

    PubMed

    Prepas, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    As the prevalence of myopia steadily increases, reaching as high as 90% in some populations, investigators continue to look for causative factors other than family history. Most current research suggests an association of axial myopia with reading or either the presence or absence of light. Even though these studies are frequently inconsistent, non-reproducible or contradictory, many clinicians utilize them in recommending treatments for children, such as bifocals or atropine. By reviewing the biologic effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields, we may gain insight into these discrepancies as well as unify the combined role of literacy and light in the pathogenesis of myopia. These biologic effects are wavelength specific. The wavelength of artificial (either incandescent or fluorescent) light is primarily 700-400 nm, while the wavelength of natural light is 700-200 nm, inclusive of the ultraviolet spectrum. So the opposite findings of myopia resulting from either accommodation under continuous light or under darkness (form deprivation) can be reconciled by restating it: Close focusing in the absence of UV light may provoke axial myopia. Experimental evidence exhibiting both scleral remodeling under accommodation as well as the inhibition of scleral remodeling by the hardening of collagen under ultraviolet exposure may support this concept. Perhaps new research can look into the role of the presence or absence of UV light in animal models of myopia.

  6. A clinical study on the role of Akshi Tarpana with Jeevantyadi Ghrita in Timira (Myopia)

    PubMed Central

    Poonam; Manjusha, R.; Vaghela, D. B.; Shukla, V. J.

    2011-01-01

    Myopia is a major public health problem pertaining to eye that entails substantial societal, personal, educational, and economical impact. Various surveys in India have found the prevalence of myopia ranging from 6.9% to 19.7%. Myopia progression is irreversible and methods for the correction of myopia are not without complications. Myopia closely resembles Timira involving first and second Patala in terms of symptoms, anatomical structures involved, and the pathogenesis of the disease. The study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of the Akshi-Tarpana procedure with Jeevantyadi Ghrita in fresh and old myopes. A total of 54 patients (108 eyes) having myopia ≥-6 D were registered for the study and divided into two groups (Group A, Akshi-Tarpana with Jeevantyadi Ghrita, and Group B, Akshi-Tarpana with plain Go Ghrita), by stratified sampling. The procedure was done in 5 sittings of 5 days each with an equal interval of 5 days between each sitting. A total of 22 patients in Group A and 18 in Group B completed the treatment. Obtained data were statistically analyzed using a t-test and the study reveals that objectively, 09.30% and 05.55% eyes were cured, 16.28% and 02.78% markedly improved, and 34.88% and 11.11% moderately improved in Group A and B, respectively. PMID:22661851

  7. Association of COL1A1 polymorphism with high myopia: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guang-Ming; Zhao, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Ai-Ming; Chen, Yong-Xing; Li, Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene and high myopia. METHODS In this Meta-analysis, we examined 5 published case-control studies that involved 1942 high myopia cases and 2929 healthy controls to assess the association between the COL1A1 rs2075555 polymorphism and high myopia risk. We calculated the pooled odds ratios (ORs) of COL1A1 rs2075555 polymorphism in high myopia cases vs healthy controls to evaluate the strength of the association. RESULTS Overall, there was no significant difference both in the genotype and allele distributions of COL1A1 rs2075555 polymorphism between high myopia cases and healthy controls: CC vs AA OR=1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76-1.58; AC vs AA OR=0.98, 95%CI 0.80-1.20; CC/AC vs AA/OR=1.01, 95%CI 0.84-1.22; CC vs AC/AA OR=1.06, 95%CI=0.93-1.20; C vs A OR=1.06, 95%CI 0.91-1.23). In addition, in the stratified analyses by ethnicity, no significant associations were found in any genetic model both in European and Asia cohorts. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that the COL1A1 rs2075555 polymorphism may not affect susceptibility to high myopia. PMID:27162737

  8. A review of current approaches to identifying human genes involved in myopia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wing Chun; Yap, Maurice K H; Yip, Shea Ping

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of myopia is high in many parts of the world, particularly among the Orientals such as Chinese and Japanese. Like other complex diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, myopia is likely to be caused by both genetic and environmental factors, and possibly their interactions. Owing to multiple genes with small effects, genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic complexity, the study of the genetics of myopia poses a complex challenge. This paper reviews the current approaches to the genetic analysis of complex diseases and how these can be applied to the identification of genes that predispose humans to myopia. These approaches include parametric linkage analysis, non-parametric linkage analysis like allele-sharing methods and genetic association studies. Basic concepts, advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed and explained using examples from the literature on myopia. Microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms are common genetic markers in the human genome and are indispensable tools for gene mapping. High throughput genotyping of millions of such markers has become feasible and efficient with recent technological advances. In turn, this makes the identification of myopia susceptibility genes a reality.

  9. Reflections on a Proposed Theory of Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Alcohol Use: Comment on Spillane and Smith (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the…

  10. US productivity slowdown: a case of statistical myopia

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, M.R.

    1984-06-01

    The author argues that the productivity panic is based upon statistical myopia, and that a careful analysis within the perspective of the entire 20th century discloses no substantial variation in what is described as growth in total factor productivity or technical progress. He finds no substantial variations in trend growth rates of private labor productivity since 1900 if reasonable adjustments are made for the effects of demographic trends on the average quality of labor. Even if one were to ignore the effects of demographic shifts, the measured growth rates of productivity, total private hours, and private employment have essentially the same values in 1956-79 as for 1900-29. Some of the primary data base for the paper appears in the appendix. 39 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Aniso-accommodation as a possible factor in myopia development.

    PubMed

    Charman, W N

    2004-09-01

    It is shown that the asymmetric convergence caused by the changes in fixation required to read a line of text results in unequal accommodation demands to the two eyes. Since experimental evidence suggests that the required aniso-accommodation response cannot be achieved, and that accommodation in both eyes tends to match the response to the lower of the two demands, in general the retinal image in at least one eye must be out-of-focus. The resultant blur increases as the eccentricity of gaze is increased and the reading distance is reduced, and also depends on the posture and position of the head, together with the balance between eye and head movements. By analogy with the results of animal experiments, it is argued that the defocused retinal imagery involved in reading and similar tasks could be a factor in myopia development, particularly in children who adopt unfavourable reading postures.

  12. ON pathway mutations increase susceptibility to form-deprivation myopia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Ranjay; Park, Han Na; Hanif, Adam M; Sidhu, Curran S; Iuvone, P Michael; Pardue, Machelle T

    2015-08-01

    The ON pathway mutation in nob mice is associated with altered refractive development, and an increased susceptibility to form-deprivation (FD) myopia. In this study, we used mGluR6-/- mice, another ON pathway mutant, to determine whether the nob phenotype was due to the Nyx mutation or abnormal ON pathway transmission. Refractive development under a normal visual environment for mGluR6-/- and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice was measured every 2 weeks from 4 to 16 weeks of age. The response to monocular FD from 4 weeks of age was measured weekly in a separate cohort of mice. Refraction and ocular biometry were obtained using a photorefractor and optical coherence tomography. Retinas were harvested at 16 weeks, and analyzed for dopamine (DA) and DOPAC using high-performance liquid chromatography. Under normal conditions, mGluR6-/- mice were significantly more myopic than their WT controls (refraction at 12 weeks; WT: 9.40 ± 0.16 D, mGluR6-/-: 6.91 ± 0.38 D). Similar to nob mice, two weeks of FD resulted in a significant myopic shift of -5.57 ± 0.72 D in mGluR6-/- mice compared to -1.66 ± 0.19 D in WT animals. No significant axial length changes were observed with either normal or FD visual conditions. At 16 weeks, mGluR6-/- retinas showed significantly lower DOPAC levels (111.2 ± 33.0 pg/mg) compared to their WT counterparts (197.5 ± 11.2 pg/mg). Retinal DA levels were similar between the different genotypes. Our results indicate that reduced retinal DA metabolism/turnover may be associated with increased susceptibility to myopia in mice with ON pathway defect mutations.

  13. Intraocular lens exchange for high myopia in pseudophakic children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, C L; Trivedi, R H; Wilson, M E

    2016-09-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine the preoperative factors and postoperative outcomes following intraocular lens (IOL) exchange for high myopia in pseudophakic children.MethodsThe medical records of all patients undergoing IOL exchange for high myopia were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsA total of 15 eyes were identified that had undergone an IOL exchange for myopic shift. Average age of cataract extraction (CE) was 5.4 months. In all, 10/15 had a unilateral cataract. IOL exchange usually occurred at an average of 6 years following cataract surgery. The average spherical equivalent (SE) of the refractive error at that time was -9.6 D. Following IOL exchange, SE was -1.3 D. A two-line reduction in best-corrected visual acuity was observed in 1/13 of our patients for whom pre- and post-exchange data were available. The average axial length (AL) of the eye undergoing the IOL exchange was 24.0 mm, average AL in the non-operative eye was 22.1 mm. On average, the operative eyes grew 4.4 mm and the non-operative eyes 3.02 mm. No adverse events were seen in the operative eyes.ConclusionYounger age at the time of CE creates a greater likelihood of AL elongation and predisposes a child to myopic shift. IOL exchange should be considered an option to reduce anisometropia and associated aniseikonia to improve visual outcomes. Successful visual rehabilitation and predictable post-exchange refractions were seen with our patients.

  14. Intraocular lens exchange for high myopia in pseudophakic children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, C L; Trivedi, R H; Wilson, M E

    2016-09-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine the preoperative factors and postoperative outcomes following intraocular lens (IOL) exchange for high myopia in pseudophakic children.MethodsThe medical records of all patients undergoing IOL exchange for high myopia were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsA total of 15 eyes were identified that had undergone an IOL exchange for myopic shift. Average age of cataract extraction (CE) was 5.4 months. In all, 10/15 had a unilateral cataract. IOL exchange usually occurred at an average of 6 years following cataract surgery. The average spherical equivalent (SE) of the refractive error at that time was -9.6 D. Following IOL exchange, SE was -1.3 D. A two-line reduction in best-corrected visual acuity was observed in 1/13 of our patients for whom pre- and post-exchange data were available. The average axial length (AL) of the eye undergoing the IOL exchange was 24.0 mm, average AL in the non-operative eye was 22.1 mm. On average, the operative eyes grew 4.4 mm and the non-operative eyes 3.02 mm. No adverse events were seen in the operative eyes.ConclusionYounger age at the time of CE creates a greater likelihood of AL elongation and predisposes a child to myopic shift. IOL exchange should be considered an option to reduce anisometropia and associated aniseikonia to improve visual outcomes. Successful visual rehabilitation and predictable post-exchange refractions were seen with our patients. PMID:27419831

  15. Visual analysis of orthokeratology on myopia reduction for aviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane

    2005-04-01

    Ortho-K was indicated for sixty eyes of thirty aviators, twenty-one pilots and nine flight attendants, with age of 34.5 on the average. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was originally 20/30 or worse in all cases. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -3.69 Diopters (D). The same ophthalmologist designed full costumed reverse geometry Advanced Orthokeratology lenses for each patient. All the patients were followed at least two years wearing of Advanced Ortho-K lenses. The follow up examinations on auto-refraction, auto-keratometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, corneal endothelial cells, corneal thickness and curve, and corneal shape were performed in the morning, 10am to 12am. 94% of the patients improved in UCVA up to 20/20 or better, 87% of them improved up to 20/15 or better, and 67% of them improved up to 20/10. The mean SEs improved to -1.90+/-1.00D during six months, -1.49+/-1.03D during one year, and -0.73+/-0.94D during two years. Astigmatism slightly increased by 0.38D on the average, however, it did not cause any serious problems for aviation tasks even during night. Intraocular pressure did not increase and corneal endothelial cells did not decrease. Other ophthalmologic examinations showed normal conditions and any complications were not observed throughout the period. Advanced Ortho-K was evaluated to be safe and effective enough for also aviators with myopia. It can be recommended one of the options of reduction of myopia for aviators. Evaluations on night vision and night glare are planned for further studies.

  16. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  17. Reactivity to alcohol cues and induced moods in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Litt, M D; Cooney, N L; Kadden, R M; Gaupp, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been theorized that respondent conditioning processes in part underlie desire for alcohol and thus contribute to relapse after alcoholism treatment. One implication of this theory is that the relevant conditioned responses could be eliminated by respondent extinction, in which the alcoholic patient is exposed to alcohol-related stimuli while being prevented from consuming alcohol. However, exteroceptive cues such as the sight and smell of alcoholic beverages are not always sufficient to elicit desire for alcohol. In view of this, it has been suggested that interoceptive cues, such as mood states, may also play a role in eliciting desire for alcohol. To test this, eight alcoholic subjects were induced to experience negative or neutral moods on four separate days, and then exposed to the sight and smell of their favorite alcoholic drink, and to a neutral stimulus (seltzer water), in a within-subjects design. Results from this work indicate that: (a) negative moods can be reliably induced in the laboratory as confirmed by subjects' reports; (b) exposure to alcohol cues had no effect on desire for alcohol while subjects were in a relaxed, neutral mood state; (c) the presence of negative mood states alone appeared to be sufficient to elicit desire for alcohol in some subjects, regardless of whether alcohol or water was presented. These data argue that negative mood states may cue desire for alcohol independent of other cues. The data also suggest that reactivity to alcohol cues may be substantially reduced by relaxation.

  18. Trends in bond dissociation energies of alcohols and aldehydes computed with multireference averaged coupled-pair functional theory.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Victor B; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2014-05-01

    As part of our ongoing investigation of the combustion chemistry of oxygenated molecules using multireference correlated wave function methods, we report bond dissociation energies (BDEs) in C1-C4 alcohols (from methanol to the four isomers of butanol) and C1-C4 aldehydes (from methanal to butanal). The BDEs are calculated with a multireference averaged coupled-pair functional-based scheme. We compare these multireference BDEs with those derived from experiment and single-reference methods. Trends in BDEs for the alcohols and aldehydes are rationalized by considering geometry relaxations of dissociated radical fragments, resonance stabilization, and hyperconjugation. Lastly, we discuss the conjectured association between bond strengths and rates of hydrogen abstraction by hydroxyl radicals. In general, abstraction reaction rates are higher at sites where the C-H bond energies are lower (and vice versa). However, comparison with available rate data shows this inverse relationship between bond strengths and abstraction rates does not hold at all temperatures.

  19. Negative Lens–Induced Myopia in Infant Monkeys: Effects of High Ambient Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Earl L.; Hung, Li-Fang; Arumugam, Baskar; Huang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether high light levels, which have a protective effect against form-deprivation myopia, also retard the development of lens-induced myopia in primates. Methods. Hyperopic defocus was imposed on 27 monkeys by securing −3 diopter (D) lenses in front of one eye. The lens-rearing procedures were initiated at 24 days of age and continued for periods ranging from 50 to 123 days. Fifteen of the treated monkeys were exposed to normal laboratory light levels (∼350 lux). For the other 12 lens-reared monkeys, auxiliary lighting increased the illuminance to 25,000 lux for 6 hours during the middle of the daily 12 hour light cycle. Refractive development, corneal power, and axial dimensions were assessed by retinoscopy, keratometry, and ultrasonography, respectively. Data were also obtained from 37 control monkeys, four of which were exposed to high ambient lighting. Results. In normal- and high-light-reared monkeys, hyperopic defocus accelerated vitreous chamber elongation and produced myopic shifts in refractive error. The high light regimen did not alter the degree of myopia (high light: −1.69 ± 0.84 D versus normal light: −2.08 ± 1.12 D; P = 0.40) or the rate at which the treated eyes compensated for the imposed defocus. Following lens removal, the high light monkeys recovered from the induced myopia. The recovery process was not affected by the high lighting regimen. Conclusions. In contrast to the protective effects that high ambient lighting has against form-deprivation myopia, high artificial lighting did not alter the course of compensation to imposed defocus. These results indicate that the mechanisms responsible for form-deprivation myopia and lens-induced myopia are not identical. PMID:23557736

  20. Alcohol Use Predicts Sexual Decision-Making: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Literature.

    PubMed

    Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Carey, Kate B; Cunningham, Karlene; Johnson, Blair T; Carey, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is associated with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections through increased sexual risk-taking behavior. Establishing a causal link between alcohol and sexual behavior has been challenging due to methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs). Experimental methods can be used to establish causality. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on unprotected sex intentions. We searched electronic bibliographic databases for records with relevant keywords; 26 manuscripts (k = 30 studies) met inclusion criteria. Results indicate that alcohol consumption is associated with greater intentions to engage in unprotected sex (d +s = 0.24, 0.35). The effect of alcohol on unprotected sex intentions was greater when sexual arousal was heightened. Alcohol consumption is causally linked to theoretical antecedents of sexual risk behavior, consistent with the alcohol myopia model. Addressing alcohol consumption as a determinant of unprotected sex intentions may lead to more effective HIV interventions. PMID:26080689

  1. Alcohol Use Predicts Sexual Decision-Making: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Literature.

    PubMed

    Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Carey, Kate B; Cunningham, Karlene; Johnson, Blair T; Carey, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is associated with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections through increased sexual risk-taking behavior. Establishing a causal link between alcohol and sexual behavior has been challenging due to methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs). Experimental methods can be used to establish causality. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on unprotected sex intentions. We searched electronic bibliographic databases for records with relevant keywords; 26 manuscripts (k = 30 studies) met inclusion criteria. Results indicate that alcohol consumption is associated with greater intentions to engage in unprotected sex (d +s = 0.24, 0.35). The effect of alcohol on unprotected sex intentions was greater when sexual arousal was heightened. Alcohol consumption is causally linked to theoretical antecedents of sexual risk behavior, consistent with the alcohol myopia model. Addressing alcohol consumption as a determinant of unprotected sex intentions may lead to more effective HIV interventions.

  2. Increasing Prevalence of Myopia in Europe and the Impact of Education

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katie M.; Bertelsen, Geir; Cumberland, Phillippa; Wolfram, Christian; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H.S.; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Erke, Maja Gran; Hogg, Ruth; Höhn, René; Hysi, Pirro; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Ried, Janina; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Bron, Alain; Dartigues, Jean-François; Fletcher, Astrid; Hofman, Albert; Kuijpers, Robert W.A.M.; Luben, Robert N.; Oxele, Konrad; Topouzis, Fotis; von Hanno, Therese; Mirshahi, Alireza; Foster, Paul J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Rahi, Jugnoo; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether myopia is becoming more common across Europe and explore whether increasing education levels, an important environmental risk factor for myopia, might explain any temporal trend. Design Meta-analysis of population-based, cross-sectional studies from the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) Consortium. Participants The E3 Consortium is a collaborative network of epidemiological studies of common eye diseases in adults across Europe. Refractive data were available for 61 946 participants from 15 population-based studies performed between 1990 and 2013; participants had a range of median ages from 44 to 78 years. Methods Noncycloplegic refraction, year of birth, and highest educational level achieved were obtained for all participants. Myopia was defined as a mean spherical equivalent ≤−0.75 diopters. A random-effects meta-analysis of age-specific myopia prevalence was performed, with sequential analyses stratified by year of birth and highest level of educational attainment. Main Outcome Measures Variation in age-specific myopia prevalence for differing years of birth and educational level. Results There was a significant cohort effect for increasing myopia prevalence across more recent birth decades; age-standardized myopia prevalence increased from 17.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.6–18.1) to 23.5% (95% CI, 23.2–23.7) in those born between 1910 and 1939 compared with 1940 and 1979 (P = 0.03). Education was significantly associated with myopia; for those completing primary, secondary, and higher education, the age-standardized prevalences were 25.4% (CI, 25.0–25.8), 29.1% (CI, 28.8–29.5), and 36.6% (CI, 36.1–37.2), respectively. Although more recent birth cohorts were more educated, this did not fully explain the cohort effect. Compared with the reference risk of participants born in the 1920s with only primary education, higher education or being born in the 1960s doubled the myopia prevalence ratio–2.43 (CI, 1.26–4

  3. Assessing the Genetic Predisposition of Education on Myopia: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Kho, Pik Fang; Hewitt, Alex W; Wichmann, H-Erich; Yazar, Seyhan; Stambolian, Dwight; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Wojciechowski, Robert; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Mackey, David A; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the largest cause of uncorrected visual impairments globally and its recent dramatic increase in the population has made it a major public health problem. In observational studies, educational attainment has been consistently reported to be correlated to myopia. Nonetheless, correlation does not imply causation. Observational studies do not tell us if education causes myopia or if instead there are confounding factors underlying the association. In this work, we use a two-step least squares instrumental-variable (IV) approach to estimate the causal effect of education on refractive error, specifically myopia. We used the results from the educational attainment GWAS from the Social Science Genetic Association Consortium to define a polygenic risk score (PGRS) in three cohorts of late middle age and elderly Caucasian individuals (N = 5,649). In a meta-analysis of the three cohorts, using the PGRS as an IV, we estimated that each z-score increase in education (approximately 2 years of education) results in a reduction of 0.92 ± 0.29 diopters (P = 1.04 × 10(-3) ). Our estimate of the effect of education on myopia was higher (P = 0.01) than the observed estimate (0.25 ± 0.03 diopters reduction per education z-score [∼2 years] increase). This suggests that observational studies may actually underestimate the true effect. Our Mendelian Randomization (MR) analysis provides new evidence for a causal role of educational attainment on refractive error.

  4. Development of myopia as a hazard for workers in pneumatic caissons

    PubMed Central

    Onoo, A; Kiyosawa, M; Takase, H; Mano, Y

    2002-01-01

    Background/aim: Pneumatic caisson engineering has been developed for large civil engineering constructions. Because of complaints of blurred vision by personnel working in pneumatic caissons, the development of myopia was suspected. The aim of this study was to determine the cause of the blurred vision and the mechanism underlying the changes. Methods: 12 caisson workers underwent a complete ophthalmological examination after completing up to 11 weeks of work (4 days/week) in a pneumatic caisson. Six months later, nine of the workers were examined again. Results: Nine subjects were myopic at the initial examination, and seven of these were considered to have developed the myopia after starting to work in the pneumatic caisson. Six months after completion of the work, the mean refractive change was significantly towards hyperopia. Conclusions: The blurred vision in pneumatic caisson workers was in all likelihood due to the development of myopia. The refractive shift towards hyperopia after completion of work in the pneumatic caisson supports this and demonstrates that the changes were temporary. The myopia is similar to the myopia seen in patients treated by hyperbaric oxygen. Careful monitoring of the refraction of caisson workers should be performed for industrial health control. PMID:12386088

  5. Association between Myopia, Biometry and Occludable Angle: The Jiangning Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Cai, Xuan; Yu, Wenjing; Yu, Siyi; Wang, Tianyu; Lu, Wuyi; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Myopia subjects usually have long axial lengths and are predisposed to deep anterior chamber depths and open angles. Jiangning eye study is a randomized, population based study in Shanghai to determine whether myopia has an effect on the prevalence of occludable angles. Methods A total of 2478 residents aged 50 years and over were randomly selected, and 2044 (82.5%) individuals of them participated in ophthalmic examinations between November 2012 and February 2013. Eye examinations included autorefraction, noncontact tonometry, measurement of axial length, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Results The crude prevalences of iris trabecular meshwork contact in Jiangning Chinese individuals with myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia are 1.25%, 6.44%, and 7.43%, respectively. There is also iris trabecular meshwork contact and shallow anterior chamber depth in myopia subjects even with long axial lengths. Conclusions The prevalence of iris trabecular meshwork contact in myopia subjects is lower than their emmetropia or hyperopia counterparts. Axial length is an important factor associate with occludable angle. PMID:27764227

  6. Foveal and Macular Thickness Evaluation by Spectral OCT SLO and Its Relation with Axial Length in Various Degree of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Nancy Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the foveal and macular thickness in various degrees of myopia and its association with axial length in low, moderate and high degrees of myopia. Design: A cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Ophthalmology, MGMCRI, Pondicherry, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty five eyes eyes of 64 myopic subjects between the age group of 20-40 who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected and complete ophthalmic examination was done. Cycloplegic refraction was done and the subjects were categorized into low (n=43 eyes), moderate (n=43 eyes) and high (n=36) degrees of myopia. The foveal and macular thickness was assessed using spectral OCT- SLO and axial length was measured by A-scan biometry. Results: The foveae minimum of high myopia (178 ± 26.4 microns) was significantly thicker compared to moderate myopia (p= 0.028). There was no significant intergroup difference in the thickness significance of the outer and inner macular between mild, moderate and high degree of myopia. The mean axial length of high myopia (26.7±0.97mm) was significantly higher compared to moderate (24.6±0.81mm) and low myopia (23.5±0.81mm) with a p-value of p = 0.001. There was a positive correlation of axial length with foveae minimum, fovea and superior inner macula in respect to myopia (p<0.05). Conclusion: The foveal and macular thickness in myopia is influenced by the axial length. Early detection of such changes in macular thickness by using OCT is helpful in understanding the mechanism and factors affecting the structural changes of myopic eyes. Also it implicates the importance of refractive error induced retinal macular changes while interpreting OCT. PMID:25954643

  7. PAX6 mutations may be associated with high myopia.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Alex W; Kearns, Lisa S; Jamieson, Robyn V; Williamson, Kathy A; van Heyningen, Veronica; Mackey, David A

    2007-09-01

    PAX6 is a key regulator of eye development and there are many well recognized ophthalmic sequelae of mutations at this locus. The 14 exon PAX6 gene is well conserved across species and phyla. Coding region mutations manifest in a variety of phenotypes. Predicted premature protein truncations are generally associated with classical aniridia. Missense mutations are often found in cases with variant phenotypes such as ectopia pupillae; isolated foveal hypoplasia; nystagmus and hyaloid vessel proliferation. The locus has also been implicated, through a genome-wide sib-pair scan, to be important in the normal variation of myopia. We investigated the association between identified PAX6 mutations and refractive error in Australian patients from four pedigrees. Two of eight subjects with a 1410delC PAX6 mutation had a mean spherical equivalence < -9D, whilst a mean spherical equivalence < or = -5D was recorded in two from four subjects with an Arg240Stop PAX6 mutation and one of two subjects with a Glu93Stop mutation. One individual identified with a Pro346Ala PAX6 mutation had a mean spherical equivalence of +2.8 D. Thus, our observations generally support other incidental findings, that PAX6 mutation, particularly predicted haploinsufficiency, may be associated with extreme refractive error, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not clear. PMID:17896318

  8. Myths about drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... to. I spend a lot of time getting alcohol, drinking alcohol, or recovering from the effects of alcohol. ... Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Overview of Alcohol Consumption. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol- ...

  9. Changes in dopamine and ZENK during suppression of myopia in chicks by intense illuminance.

    PubMed

    Lan, Weizhong; Yang, Zhikuan; Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2016-04-01

    High ambient illuminances have been found to slow the development of deprivation myopia in several animal models. Almost complete inhibition of myopia was observed in chickens when intermittent episodes of high illuminance were alternated with standard office illuminance (50% duty cycle, alternate periods of 1 min 15,000 lux and 1 min 500 lux, continued for 10 h per day), or when illuminances were increased to 40,000 lux. Since the mechanisms by which bright light suppresses myopia are poorly understood, we have studied the roles of two well-established signaling molecules in myopia, dopamine and ZENK, in the chicken. In line with previous studies, we found that retinal dopamine release (as reflected by vitreal DOPAC content) was severely reduced during development of deprivation myopia. We found that illuminance of 15,000 lux, provided by quartz-halogen lamps, partially rescued the drop in retinal dopamine release. The finding is in line with the assumption that dopamine is involved in the light-induced inhibition of myopia. No differences in vitreal DOPAC were found when bright light was provided continuously or with 1:1 min alternating exposure with 500 lux. As previously described by others, wearing diffusers suppressed the expression of ZENK protein in glucagonergic amacrine cells (GACs) but neither continuous nor 1:1 min alternating bright to normal light could rescue the suppression of ZENK in GACs. While it is well known that light increases global retinal ZENK mRNA and protein levels, the changes of ZENK protein induced specifically in GACs by diffuser wear appear independent of light levels. PMID:26657138

  10. Time Outdoors, Visual Activity, and Myopia Progression in Juvenile-Onset Myopes

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik,, Karla

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association between myopia progression and time spent outdoors and in various visual activities. Methods. Subjects were 835 myopes (both principal meridians −0.75 diopters [D] or more myopia by cycloplegic autorefraction) in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study with both progression data and at least one measure of activity associated with a progression interval. Activity data were collected by parental survey. Average activity level (mean of the activity at the beginning and the end of a 1-year progression interval) was the primary predictor in a repeated-measures mixed model. The model controlled for age, sex, ethnicity, refractive error at the beginning of the progression interval, clinic site, and type of autorefractor used. Effects were scaled based on performing an additional 10 hours per week of an activity. Results. In the multivariate model, the number of hours of reading for pleasure per week was not significantly associated with annual myopia progression at an a priori level of P ≤ 0.01, nor were the other near activities, the near-work composite variable diopter-hours, or outdoor/sports activity. The magnitude of effects was clinically small. For example, the largest multivariate effect was that each additional 10 hours of reading for pleasure per week at the end of a progression interval was associated with an increase in average annual progression by −0.08 D. Conclusions. Despite protective associations previously reported for time outdoors reducing the risk of myopia onset, outdoor/sports activity was not associated with less myopia progression following onset. Near work also had little meaningful effect on the rate of myopia progression. PMID:22977132

  11. Near Work Related Parameters and Myopia in Chinese Children: the Anyang Childhood Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Ming; Li, Si-Yuan; Kang, Meng-Tian; Zhou, Yuehua; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Wang, Yi-Peng; Zhan, Si-Yan; Gopinath, Bamini; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Ningli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the associations of near work related parameters with spherical equivalent refraction and axial length in Chinese children. Methods A total of 1770 grade 7 students with mean age of 12.7 years were examined with cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length. Questions were asked regarding time spent in near work and outdoors per day, and near work related parameters. Results Multivariate models revealed the following associations with greater odds of myopia: continuous reading (> 45min), odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.8; close television viewing distance (≤ 3m), OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3; head tilt when writing, OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7, and desk lighting using fluorescent vs. incandescent lamp, OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0. These factors, together with close reading distance and close nib-to-fingertip distance were significantly associated with greater myopia (P<0.01). Among near work activities, only reading more books for pleasure was significantly associated with greater myopia (P=0.03). Television viewing distance (≤ 3 m), fluorescent desk light, close reading distance (≤20 cm) and close nib-to-fingertip distance (≤ 2 cm) were significantly associated with longer axial length (P<0.01). Reading distance, desk light, and reading books for pleasure had significant interaction effects with parental myopia. Conclusions Continuous reading, close distances of reading, television viewing and nib-to-fingertip, head tilt when writing, reading more books for pleasure and use of fluorescent desk light were significantly associated with myopia in 12-year-old Chinese children, which indicates that visual behaviors and environments may be important factors mediating the effects of near work on myopia. PMID:26244865

  12. Changes in dopamine and ZENK during suppression of myopia in chicks by intense illuminance.

    PubMed

    Lan, Weizhong; Yang, Zhikuan; Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2016-04-01

    High ambient illuminances have been found to slow the development of deprivation myopia in several animal models. Almost complete inhibition of myopia was observed in chickens when intermittent episodes of high illuminance were alternated with standard office illuminance (50% duty cycle, alternate periods of 1 min 15,000 lux and 1 min 500 lux, continued for 10 h per day), or when illuminances were increased to 40,000 lux. Since the mechanisms by which bright light suppresses myopia are poorly understood, we have studied the roles of two well-established signaling molecules in myopia, dopamine and ZENK, in the chicken. In line with previous studies, we found that retinal dopamine release (as reflected by vitreal DOPAC content) was severely reduced during development of deprivation myopia. We found that illuminance of 15,000 lux, provided by quartz-halogen lamps, partially rescued the drop in retinal dopamine release. The finding is in line with the assumption that dopamine is involved in the light-induced inhibition of myopia. No differences in vitreal DOPAC were found when bright light was provided continuously or with 1:1 min alternating exposure with 500 lux. As previously described by others, wearing diffusers suppressed the expression of ZENK protein in glucagonergic amacrine cells (GACs) but neither continuous nor 1:1 min alternating bright to normal light could rescue the suppression of ZENK in GACs. While it is well known that light increases global retinal ZENK mRNA and protein levels, the changes of ZENK protein induced specifically in GACs by diffuser wear appear independent of light levels.

  13. Animal Studies and the Mechanism of Myopia-Protection by Light?

    PubMed

    Ashby, Regan

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that spending time outdoors during your childhood is protective against the development of myopia. It has been hypothesized that this protective effect is associated with light-induced increases in retinal dopamine levels, a critical neuromodulator that has long been postulated to be involved in the regulation of ocular growth. This paper, along with the paper entitled "What do animal studies tell us about the mechanism of myopia-protection by light?" discusses the evidence provided by animal models for this hypothesis. PMID:27560692

  14. Duke-Elder's Views on Prognosis, Prophylaxis, and Treatment of Myopia: Way Ahead of His Time.

    PubMed

    Polling, Jan Roelof; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Tideman, J Willem L; Klaver, Caroline C W

    2016-01-01

    Sir Stewart Duke-Elder was probably the most influential ophthalmologist of the 20th century. One of his visionary pieces of work was his writing on myopia in the second edition of The Practice of Refraction, published in 1935. Many of his insights are now, 80 years later, supported by scientific proof. In terms of prognosis of myopia, he stated that this largely depended on the age of the patient. We now have epidemiologic evidence that age of onset is strongly related to final refractive error, and that high myopia carries a high risk of blindness. With respect to prophylaxis, he claimed that accessory risk factors were excessive near work, bad ocular hygiene, and physical debility in the early years of growth: "The régime of modern schools imposes far too much application to books upon young children at an age when they require all their available vitality for physical growth and development." He recommended open-air pursuits and avoidance of indoor activities, in particular for children with a hereditary tendency toward myopia. Current investigations indeed point to a crucial role for near work, although not all findings are consistent. The most established factor that is protective from myopia is outdoor exposure, more likely due to intense exposure to light rather than to "open-air." Ocular hygiene and physical activity have not been confirmed as protective factors, but Duke-Elder's views on gene-environment interactions are truly insightful. Concerning treatment, he suggested that adequate correction by glasses, intake of vitamin D, and restriction of education in "myope classes" could halt progression of myopia. Optical correction is considered helpful nowadays, but sound statistical evidence has only been provided for orthokeratology. High vitamin D serum levels are indeed related to low refractive error, but it is not yet clear whether high dietary intake is beneficial. Restriction of education does not meet current moral standards, but in China, "myopia

  15. Alcohol and masculinity.

    PubMed

    Lemle, R; Mishkind, M E

    1989-01-01

    Alcohol use--and abuse--has always been more prevalent among males than among females. The sex role prescription for men to affirm their masculinity by drinking is a major determinant of this sex difference. This paper reviews the intricate interrelationship between masculinity and both social and alcoholic drinking. A large body of evidence indicates that social drinking is a primary cultural symbol of manliness; portrayals in the media strengthen this association. Less evidence exists to connect masculinity issues with alcoholic dependence, but there has been much speculation: Three psychodynamic theories of alcoholism--the repressed homosexuality, dependency, and power theories--hypothesized that men who drink addictively have the most fragile masculine identities. The 1980s have witnessed a widespread recognition of the dangers of equating drinking and manliness, and societal changes suggest that drinking may be gradually losing its masculine aura.

  16. Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Chevy Chase, MD. National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information.

    This concise survey presents some of the highlights of modern research on drinking and alcoholism, as based on technical articles published in the scientific literature and the views expressed by leading authorities in the field. Contents include discussions about: (1) the nature and scope of the problem; (2) the chemical composition of alcoholic…

  17. The Association between Near Work Activities and Myopia in Children-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Chang, Dolly Shuo-Teh; Wu, Pei-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Myopia has a multifactorial etiology, although environmental factors are predominant in determining its current patterns. Currently, associations between near work activities and myopia have not been consistently observed. Therefore, we performed a systematic review to quantify the effect of near work activities on myopia in children. Relevant articles published between 1989 and 2014 were identified in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, and the citation lists were reviewed. Twelve cohort studies and 15 cross-sectional studies were included (25,025 children aged between 6 and 18 years). The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. Study-level data were pooled using a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model (when less than 5 studies were included). We found that more time spent on near work activities was associated with higher odds of myopia (odds ratio [OR] = 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-1.20) and that the odds of myopia increased by 2% (OR:1.02; 95% CI = 1.01-1.03) for every one diopter-hour (hr) more of near work per week. Therefore, the development of a strategy to reduce the impact of near work on myopia would be important for preventing myopia in children.

  18. Genetic association of COL1A1 polymorphisms with high myopia in Asian population: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bo; Qu, Chao; Huang, Xiao-Fang; Ye, Zi-Meng; Zhang, Ding-Ding; Shi, Yi; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yu-Ping; Shuai, Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To comprehensively evaluate the potential association of COL1A1 polymorphisms with high myopia by a systematic review and Meta-analysis. METHODS All association studies on COL1A1 and high myopia reported up to June 10, 2014 in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Chinese Biomedical Database were retrieved. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were analyzed for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using fixed- and random- effects models according to between-study heterogeneity. Publication bias analyses were conducted by Egger's test. RESULTS A total of four studies from reported papers were included in this analysis. The Meta-analyses for COL1A1 rs2075555, composed of 2304 high myopia patients and 2272 controls, failed to detect any significant association with high myopia. A total of 971 cases and 649 controls were tested for COL1A1 rs2269336. The association of COL1A1 rs2269336 with high myopia was observed in recessive model (CC vs CG+GG, P=0.03) and in heterozygous model (CG vs GG, P=0.04), but not in other models. CONCLUSION This Meta-analysis shows that COL1A1 rs2269336 (CC vs CG+GG) affects individual susceptibility to high myopia, whereas there is no association detected between SNPs rs2075555 and high myopia. Given the limited sample size, further investigations including more ethnic groups are required to validate the association. PMID:27588274

  19. The Association between Near Work Activities and Myopia in Children—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Myopia has a multifactorial etiology, although environmental factors are predominant in determining its current patterns. Currently, associations between near work activities and myopia have not been consistently observed. Therefore, we performed a systematic review to quantify the effect of near work activities on myopia in children. Relevant articles published between 1989 and 2014 were identified in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, and the citation lists were reviewed. Twelve cohort studies and 15 cross-sectional studies were included (25,025 children aged between 6 and 18 years). The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. Study-level data were pooled using a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model (when less than 5 studies were included). We found that more time spent on near work activities was associated with higher odds of myopia (odds ratio [OR] = 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08–1.20) and that the odds of myopia increased by 2% (OR:1.02; 95% CI = 1.01–1.03) for every one diopter-hour (hr) more of near work per week. Therefore, the development of a strategy to reduce the impact of near work on myopia would be important for preventing myopia in children. PMID:26485393

  20. Etiopathogenesis and management of high-degree myopia. Part I.

    PubMed

    Zejmo, Maria; Formińska-Kapuścik, Maria; Pieczara, Ewa; Filipek, Erita; Mrukwa-Kominek, Ewa; Samochowiec-Donocik, Elzbieta; Leszczyński, Rafał; Smuzyńska, Magdalena

    2009-09-01

    High-degree myopia (HM) is defined as a refractive error above -6 D (-8 diopters). An axial eyeball length above 26 mm and is also connected with excessive myopisation. Mechanical stretching and thinning of the choroids may lead to the development of irreversible degenerative changes in the eyeball and visual impairment. HM prevalence varies significantly by geographical area, ranging from 1.7-3.3%, while in highly urban regions of South-East Asia it affects up to 24% of university students. HM is not a homogenous disease. It is considered to be inherited in different patterns: dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked. Many genetic mutations linked to HM development have been described and the different patterns of inheritance may reflect different types of HM. Moreover, the clinical state of the HM eyeball may result from both genetic and environmental risk factors influencing the progression of the refractive error. The development and progression of HM is connected with sustained prolonged near work involving accommodation-convergence imbalance leading to retinal blur, the years spent at school, the amount of near work, especially writing and reading, which is related to slight chronic under-accommodation, and improper light stimuli in early childhood. Contemporary definitions of HM, views on etiopathogenesis, excessive axial elongation, and pathological changes within the eyeball in the course of HM leading to visual impairment are presented here. Genetic and environmental risk factors influencing the progression of HM, its significantly different prevalence in various geographical areas, and therapeutic options for the refractive error are also presented.
    PMID:19721411

  1. Preventing suicide in adolescents with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Nita J; Sher, Leo

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent suicide is an escalating crisis that needs to be addressed by clinicians and researchers. Alcohol use has consistently been implicated in adolescent suicide and it is generally assumed that alcohol use leads to an increased risk in suicidality, suicide attempts and completed suicides. It can lead to adolescent suicidality through alcohol myopia, disinhibition, and impaired judgment. Multiple genetically related intermediate phenotypes might contribute to the risk of alcohol misuse and suicidal behavior in adolescents. Genetic variations that enhance the risk for mood and anxiety symptoms or susceptibility to stress might increase risk through different mechanisms. Comorbid disorders such as depression are frequently exhibited in adolescents who misuse alcohol, therefore any adolescent who appears to be at risk for alcoholism or depression should always be screened for all other psychiatric disorders and for suicidality; some signs suicidal adolescents may exhibit include withdrawal, personality change, and a loss of interest in pleasurable activities. While assessment is important, prevention is crucial in any attempt to decrease the incidence of adolescent suicide. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established a set of seven guidelines that can be implemented from kindergarten through high school in order to establish alcohol prevention efforts in schools. Through beginning prevention efforts at a young age, it is hopeful that both alcohol misuse and adolescent suicide can be reduced. PMID:17458324

  2. Genome-wide analysis points to roles for extracellular matrix remodeling, the visual cycle, and neuronal development in myopia.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Amy K; Tung, Joyce Y; Do, Chuong B; Hinds, David A; Mountain, Joanna L; Francke, Uta; Eriksson, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Myopia, or nearsightedness, is the most common eye disorder, resulting primarily from excess elongation of the eye. The etiology of myopia, although known to be complex, is poorly understood. Here we report the largest ever genome-wide association study (45,771 participants) on myopia in Europeans. We performed a survival analysis on age of myopia onset and identified 22 significant associations ([Formula: see text]), two of which are replications of earlier associations with refractive error. Ten of the 20 novel associations identified replicate in a separate cohort of 8,323 participants who reported if they had developed myopia before age 10. These 22 associations in total explain 2.9% of the variance in myopia age of onset and point toward a number of different mechanisms behind the development of myopia. One association is in the gene PRSS56, which has previously been linked to abnormally small eyes; one is in a gene that forms part of the extracellular matrix (LAMA2); two are in or near genes involved in the regeneration of 11-cis-retinal (RGR and RDH5); two are near genes known to be involved in the growth and guidance of retinal ganglion cells (ZIC2, SFRP1); and five are in or near genes involved in neuronal signaling or development. These novel findings point toward multiple genetic factors involved in the development of myopia and suggest that complex interactions between extracellular matrix remodeling, neuronal development, and visual signals from the retina may underlie the development of myopia in humans. PMID:23468642

  3. Genetic analysis of axial length genes in high grade myopia from Indian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Sharmila, Ferdinamarie; Abinayapriya; Ramprabhu, Karthikeyan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; R.R.Sudhir; Sripriya, Sarangapani

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the putative association of Membrane frizzled related protein (MFRP) and Visual system homeobox protein (VSX2) gene variants with axial length (AL) in myopia. Method A total of 189 samples with (N = 98) and without (N = 91) myopia were genotyped for the MRFP and VSX2 variations in ABI Prism 3100 AVANT genetic analyzer. Genotype/haplotype analysis was performed using PLINK, Haploview and THESIAS softwares. Results Fifteen variations were observed in the MFRP gene of which, rs36015759 (c.492C > T, T164T) in exon 5 was distributed at a high frequency in the controls and significantly associated with a low risk for myopia (P = 4.10 ∗ e− 07 OR < 1.0). An increased frequency for the coding haplotype block [CGTCGG] harboring rs36015759 was observed in controls (31%) than cases (8%) that also correlated with a decreased mean AL (− 1.35085; P = 0.000444) by THESIAS analysis. The ‘T’ allele of rs36015759 was predicted to abolish the binding site for splicing enhancer (SRp40) by FASTSNP analysis. Conclusion Myopia is a complex disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Our work shows evidence of association of a specific MFRP haplotype which was more prevalent in controls with decreased AL. However, replication and functional studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:25606400

  4. SLITRK6 mutations cause myopia and deafness in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Mustafa; Chioza, Barry A.; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Cross, Harold E.; Duman, Duygu; Kokotas, Haris; Moore-Barton, Heather L.; Sakoori, Kazuto; Ota, Maya; Odaka, Yuri S.; Foster, Joseph; Cengiz, F. Basak; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Tekeli, Oya; Grigoriadou, Maria; Petersen, Michael B.; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Gurtz, Kay; Xia, Xia-Juan; Pandya, Arti; Patton, Michael A.; Young, Juan I.; Aruga, Jun; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Myopia is by far the most common human eye disorder that is known to have a clear, albeit poorly defined, heritable component. In this study, we describe an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by high myopia and sensorineural deafness. Our molecular investigation in 3 families led to the identification of 3 homozygous nonsense mutations (p.R181X, p.S297X, and p.Q414X) in SLIT and NTRK-like family, member 6 (SLITRK6), a leucine-rich repeat domain transmembrane protein. All 3 mutant SLITRK6 proteins displayed defective cell surface localization. High-resolution MRI of WT and Slitrk6-deficient mouse eyes revealed axial length increase in the mutant (the endophenotype of myopia). Additionally, mutant mice exhibited auditory function deficits that mirrored the human phenotype. Histological investigation of WT and Slitrk6-deficient mouse retinas in postnatal development indicated a delay in synaptogenesis in Slitrk6-deficient animals. Taken together, our results showed that SLITRK6 plays a crucial role in the development of normal hearing as well as vision in humans and in mice and that its disruption leads to a syndrome characterized by severe myopia and deafness. PMID:23543054

  5. [Accommodative hyperemia of the ciliary body as one of the pathogenetic factors in myopia].

    PubMed

    Sergienko, N M; Kondratenko, Iu N

    1989-01-01

    Thermometry of 40 eyes before and after visual work at near with different correction of ametropia and tonography of 20 eyes with progressive myopia and 20 eyes with stationary myopia conducted before and after 15-minute reading load under full correction have revealed that visual work at near is accompanied by working hyperemia of ciliary body (rise of temperature in the anterior segment of the eye ball) and hyperproduction of intraocular fluid. In eyes with stationary myopia, hyperproduction is fully compensated by improvement of aqueous outflow from the eye. In eyes with progressive myopia, ophthalmic hypertension takes place because of insufficient improvement of the outflow facility coefficient. It is likely that working hyperemia of the ciliary body and hyperproduction of intraocular fluid under conditions of visual work at near can be realized as a factor of myopization of the human eye in case of a certain predisposition: in eyes with a not fully formed angle of the anterior chamber or in eyes with anomalous development of the angle.

  6. Alcohol use disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse; Problem drinking; Drinking problem; Alcohol addiction; Alcoholism - alcohol use; Substance use - alcohol ... The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ... 1 drink per day Men should not drink more than 2 drinks per day

  7. Prevalence and associated factors of myopia among primary and middle school-aged students: a school-based study in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Yang, J; Mai, J; Du, X; Guo, Y; Li, P; Yue, Y; Tang, D; Lu, C; Zhang, W-H

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo estimate the prevalence of myopia among primary and middle school-aged students in Guangzhou and to explore the potentially contributing factors to myopia.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was based on a sample of students in grades 1-6 and grades 7-9. Data were collected from refractive error measurements and a structured questionnaire.ResultsA total of 3055 participants were involved in this analysis, and the overall prevalence of myopia was 47.4% (95% confidence interval (CI)= 45.6-49.2%). The prevalence of myopia in students increased along with the growth of grade level; the prevalence of myopia in students in grade 1 was only 0.2%, as it increased to 38.8% in students in grade 3, and the rate was the highest (68.4%) in students in grade 9. Girls were at a higher risk of myopia than boys (adjusted odds ratio=1.22, 95% CI=1.04-1.44). Both male and female students whose distance of reading was longer than 25 cm were less likely to have myopia and who have one or two myopic parents were at a higher risk of myopia. In addition, reading for pleasure more than 2 h per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.84, 95% CI=1.09-3.12) was only positively associated with myopia in boys and spending time watching television per week was only positively associated with myopia in girls.ConclusionMyopia in students is a significant public health problem in Guangzhou. Female gender, higher grade, longer time spent for near work, shorter distance of near work, and parental myopia were shown to be associated with the increasing risk of myopia in children.

  8. Prevalence and associated factors of myopia among primary and middle school-aged students: a school-based study in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Yang, J; Mai, J; Du, X; Guo, Y; Li, P; Yue, Y; Tang, D; Lu, C; Zhang, W-H

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo estimate the prevalence of myopia among primary and middle school-aged students in Guangzhou and to explore the potentially contributing factors to myopia.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was based on a sample of students in grades 1-6 and grades 7-9. Data were collected from refractive error measurements and a structured questionnaire.ResultsA total of 3055 participants were involved in this analysis, and the overall prevalence of myopia was 47.4% (95% confidence interval (CI)= 45.6-49.2%). The prevalence of myopia in students increased along with the growth of grade level; the prevalence of myopia in students in grade 1 was only 0.2%, as it increased to 38.8% in students in grade 3, and the rate was the highest (68.4%) in students in grade 9. Girls were at a higher risk of myopia than boys (adjusted odds ratio=1.22, 95% CI=1.04-1.44). Both male and female students whose distance of reading was longer than 25 cm were less likely to have myopia and who have one or two myopic parents were at a higher risk of myopia. In addition, reading for pleasure more than 2 h per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.84, 95% CI=1.09-3.12) was only positively associated with myopia in boys and spending time watching television per week was only positively associated with myopia in girls.ConclusionMyopia in students is a significant public health problem in Guangzhou. Female gender, higher grade, longer time spent for near work, shorter distance of near work, and parental myopia were shown to be associated with the increasing risk of myopia in children. PMID:26965016

  9. Genetic variants on chromosome 1q41 influence ocular axial length and high myopia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Meguro, Akira; Nakata, Isao; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Goh, Liang-Kee; Li, Yi-Ju; Lim, Wan'e; Ho, Candice E H; Hawthorne, Felicia; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chua, Daniel; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Vithana, Eranga; Seielstad, Mark; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Beuerman, Roger W; Tai, E-Shyong; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2012-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL). Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = -0.16 mm per minor allele, P(meta) =2.69 × 10(-10)). The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR) =0.75, 95% CI: 0.68-0.84, P(meta) =4.38 × 10(-7)) in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia.

  10. Automatic classification of pathological myopia in retinal fundus images using PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon W. K.; Tan, Ngan Meng; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Shijian; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi; Saw, Seang Mei; Tong, Louis; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Pathological myopia is the seventh leading cause of blindness. We introduce a framework based on PAMELA (PAthological Myopia dEtection through peripapilLary Atrophy) for the detection of pathological myopia from fundus images. The framework consists of a pre-processing stage which extracts a region of interest centered on the optic disc. Subsequently, three analysis modules focus on detecting specific visual indicators. The optic disc tilt ratio module gives a measure of the axial elongation of the eye through inference from the deformation of the optic disc. In the texturebased ROI assessment module, contextual knowledge is used to demarcate the ROI into four distinct, clinically-relevant zones in which information from an entropy transform of the ROI is analyzed and metrics generated. In particular, the preferential appearance of peripapillary atrophy (PPA) in the temporal zone compared to the nasal zone is utilized by calculating ratios of the metrics. The PPA detection module obtains an outer boundary through a level-set method, and subtracts this region against the optic disc boundary. Temporal and nasal zones are obtained from the remnants to generate associated hue and color values. The outputs of the three modules are used as in a SVM model to determine the presence of pathological myopia in a retinal fundus image. Using images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute, the proposed framework reported an optimized accuracy of 90% and a sensitivity and specificity of 0.85 and 0.95 respectively, indicating promise for the use of the proposed system as a screening tool for pathological myopia.

  11. Residual stromal bed thickness correlates with regression of myopia after LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Kosuke; Onodera, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between residual stromal bed thickness (hereinafter bed thickness) and regression of myopia after LASIK, taking into consideration the long-term outcomes. Subjects and methods A total of 177 patients (309 eyes) and 41 patients (70 eyes) were retrospectively reviewed at 5 and 10 years after surgery, respectively. These patients were also continuously examined throughout the study. All patients underwent laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia in our clinic and scored at least 1.0 (0 logMAR) uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCVA) 1 month after surgery. Bonferroni–Dunn method and Student’s t-test were used for statistical analyses. Results Cases with a refractive value (spherical equivalent) of less than −6.0 D (Group A) were compared to those with −6.1 D or higher (Group B). There was a statistically significant decrease in Group B UCVA of 0.04 logMAR and 0.12 logMAR at 5 and 10 years after surgery, respectively. With regard to the relationship between regression of myopia and bed thickness in the long-term, there was a significantly higher frequency of regression of myopia in cases with less than 350 μm bed thickness compared to those with 350 μm and more, in a surgical volume of more than −6.1 D (Group B). Conclusion The present study indicates that bed thickness correlates with regression of myopia after LASIK and enough bed thickness is important to maintain good UCVA in the long-term. PMID:27784987

  12. Is the peripapillary retinal perfusion related to myopia in healthy eyes? A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Kong, Xiangmei; Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Mengwei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripapillary and parafoveal perfusion of young, healthy myopic subjects with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Design A prospective comparative study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. Setting Participants recruited from a population-based study performed by the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai. Participants A total of 78 Chinese normal subjects (78 eyes) with different refraction were included. Myopia was divided into 4 groups on the basis of the refractive status: 20 eyes with emmetropia (mean spherical equivalent (MSE) 0.50D to −0.50D), 20 eyes with mild myopia (MSE −0.75D to −2.75D), 20 eyes with moderate myopia (MSE −3.00D to −5.75D), and 18 eyes with high myopia (MSE≤−6.00D). Main outcome measures Peripapillary and parafoveal retinal and choroidal perfusion parameters and their relationships with axial length (AL) and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness were analysed. Results Significant differences were found for the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area among the 4 groups, but not in the parafoveal area. The high myopia group had the lowest peripapillary retinal flow index and vessel density. In addition, there was a negative correlation (β=−0.002, p=0.047) between the AL and peripapillary retinal flow index and a positive correlation between RNFL thickness and the peripapillary retinal perfusion parameters (flow index: β=0.001, p=0.006; vessel density: β=0.350, p=0.002) even after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions Highly myopic eyes have a decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with emmetropic eyes. Such vascular features might increase the susceptibility to vascular-related eye diseases. PMID:26969645

  13. Controversial opinion: evaluation of EGR1 and LAMA2 loci for high myopia in Chinese populations*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang-yu; Huang, Zhu; Lu, Ning; Chen, Wei; Fang, Hui; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Functional studies have suggested the important role of early growth response 1 (EGR1) and Laminin α2-chain (LAMA2) in human eye development. Genetic studies have reported a significant association of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the LAMA2 gene with myopia. This study aimed to evaluate the association of the tagging SNPs (tSNPs) in the EGR1 and LAMA2 genes with high myopia in two independent Han Chinese populations. Four tSNPs (rs11743810 in the EGR1 gene; rs2571575, rs9321170, and rs1889891 in the LAMA2 gene) were selected, according to the HapMap database (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), and were genotyped using the ligase detection reaction (LDR) approach for 167 Han Chinese nuclear families with extremely highly myopic offspring (<−10.0 diopters) and an independent group with 485 extremely highly myopic cases (<−10.0 diopters) and 499 controls. Direct sequencing was used to confirm the LDR results in twenty randomly selected subjects. Family-based association analysis was performed using the family-based association test (FBAT) software package (Version 1.5.5). Population-based association analysis was performed using the Chi-square test. The association analysis power was estimated using online software (http://design.cs.ucla.edu). The FBAT demonstrated that all four tSNPs tested did not show association with high myopia (P>0.05). Haplotype analysis of tSNPs in the LAMA2 genes also did not show a significant association (P>0.05). Meanwhile, population-based association analysis also showed no significant association results with high myopia (P>0.05). On the basis of our family- and population-based analyses for the Han Chinese population, we did not find positive association signals of the four SNPs in the LAMA2 and EGR1 genes with high myopia. PMID:26984843

  14. A clinical study on Akshitarpana and combination of Akshitarpana with Nasya therapy in Timira with special reference to myopia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Durgesh Prasad; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Dhiman, Kartar Singh

    2010-10-01

    Myopia, commonly referred to as shortsightedness, is the most common eye disease in the world with substantial social, educational, and economic impact. Some of the clinical features of Timira can be correlated with myopia. An open randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the role of Tarpana with and without Nasya in patients suffering from myopia. In total, 41 patients were registered in two groups, out of which 30 patients completed the treatment. In Group A, Tarpana with Mahatriphaladya Ghrita and in Group B, Nasya with Abhijita taila followed by Tarpana with Mahatriphaladya Ghrita was administered. After enrollment of the patients in the study, the cardinal signs and symptoms of Timira - myopia, that is, visual acuity, clinical refraction, were evaluated before and after the treatment. Comparatively, more relief in the signs and symptoms were found in the Nasya group followed by the Tarpana group. PMID:22048542

  15. A clinical study on Akshitarpana and combination of Akshitarpana with Nasya therapy in Timira with special reference to myopia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Durgesh Prasad; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Dhiman, Kartar Singh

    2010-01-01

    Myopia, commonly referred to as shortsightedness, is the most common eye disease in the world with substantial social, educational, and economic impact. Some of the clinical features of Timira can be correlated with myopia. An open randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the role of Tarpana with and without Nasya in patients suffering from myopia. In total, 41 patients were registered in two groups, out of which 30 patients completed the treatment. In Group A, Tarpana with Mahatriphaladya Ghrita and in Group B, Nasya with Abhijita taila followed by Tarpana with Mahatriphaladya Ghrita was administered. After enrollment of the patients in the study, the cardinal signs and symptoms of Timira — myopia, that is, visual acuity, clinical refraction, were evaluated before and after the treatment. Comparatively, more relief in the signs and symptoms were found in the Nasya group followed by the Tarpana group. PMID:22048542

  16. Homogeneous catalysis on the gas-phase dehydration reaction of tertiary alcohols by hydrogen bromide. Density functional theory calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Alexis; Rosas, Felix; Mora, Jose R.; Brusco, Yannely; Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Chuchani, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The gas-phase thermal dehydration mechanism of tert-butanol, 2-methyl-2-butanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol by homogeneous catalysis of hydrogen bromide was examined by density functional theory calculations with the hybrid functionals: M062X, CAMB3LYP and WB97XD. Reasonable agreements were found between theoretical and experimental enthalpy values at the WB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level. The dehydration mechanism of tert-butanol with and without catalysis was evaluated in order to examine the catalyst effect on the mechanism. The elimination reaction without catalysis involves a four-membered transition state (TS), while the reaction with catalysis involves a six-membered TS. The mechanism without catalysis has enthalpy activation over 150 kJ mol-1 greater than the catalysed reaction. In all these reactions, the elongation of the C-O bond is significant in the TS. The un-catalysed reaction is controlled by breaking of C-O bond, and it was found to be more synchronous (Sy ≈ 0.91) than the hydrogen bromide catalysed reactions (Sy ≈ 0.75-0.78); the latter reactions are dominated by the three reaction coordinates associated with water formation. No significant effect on the enthalpies of activation was observed when the size of the alkyl chain was increased.

  17. Deletion 17p11.2 (Smith-Magenis syndrome) is relatively common among patients having mental retardation and myopia

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, B.; Jaeger, E.R.; Freitag, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    We recently reported the finding of moderate to severe myopia in 6 of 10 patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). To investigate the prevalence of SMS among mentally retarded people having myopia, we surveyed a cohort of patients residing at a facility for individuals with mental retardation (MR). Of 547 institutionalized individuals with MR, 72 (13.2%) had moderate to high myopia defined as a visual acuity of minus 3 diopters or more. It should be noted that our institution does not specifically select for people with visual impairment; rather, the facility serves people with a primary diagnosis of MR. Sixty-five of 72 (90.3%) myopic individuals identified were available for cytogenetic analysis. Seventeen (26.2%) of these patients had trisomy 21. Down syndrome (DS) is well known to be associated with eye abnormalities, including myopia. Of 48 individuals with moderate to high myopia not having DS, 5 (10.4%) were shown to have deletions of 17p11.2. This is a high prevalence considering the relative rarity of SMS. By contrast, in a randomized sample of 48 patients without significant myopia at the same facility, we found no individuals with deletion 17p11.2. We conclude that the diagnosis of SMS should be considered in any non-Down syndrome individual having MR and myopia, and that ophthalmologists serving people with MR should be made aware of this deletion syndrome. Furthermore, our results suggest that significant numbers of people having SMS could be identified through selective institutional screening of patients having a combination of MR and moderate to severe myopia.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Refractive Error and Myopia, Lessons Learned, and Implications for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Hysi, Pirro G.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hammond, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of the genetic basis of refractive error and myopia entered a new stage with the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Multiple GWAS on many ethnic groups have been published over the years, providing new insight into the genetic architecture and pathophysiology of refractive error. This is a review of the GWAS published to date, the main lessons learned, and future possible directions of genetic studies of myopia and refractive error. PMID:24876304

  19. Five-Year Progression of Refractive Errors and Incidence of Myopia in School-Aged Children in Western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ye; Li, Hua; Wu, Yu-Fei; Xu, Ji; Lv, Sha; Li, Ge; Liu, Shi-Chun; Song, Sheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine the change in refractive error and the incidence of myopia among school-aged children in the Yongchuan District of Chongqing City, Western China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional survey was initially conducted in 2006 among 3070 children aged 6 to 15 years. A longitudinal follow-up study was then conducted 5 years later between November 2011 and March 2012. Refractive error was measured under cycloplegia with autorefraction. Age, sex, and baseline refractive error were evaluated as risk factors for progression of refractive error and incidence of myopia. Results Longitudinal data were available for 1858 children (60.5%). The cumulative mean change in refractive error was −2.21 (standard deviation [SD], 1.87) diopters (D) for the entire study population, with an annual progression of refraction in a myopic direction of −0.43 D. Myopic progression of refractive error was associated with younger age, female sex, and higher myopic or hyperopic refractive error at baseline. The cumulative incidence of myopia, defined as a spherical equivalent refractive error of −0.50 D or more, among initial emmetropes and hyperopes was 54.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 45.2%–63.5%), with an annual incidence of 10.6% (95% CI, 8.7%–13.1%). Myopia was found more likely to happen in female and older children. Conclusions In Western China, both myopic progression and incidence of myopia were higher than those of children from most other locations in China and from the European Caucasian population. Compared with a previous study in China, there was a relative increase in annual myopia progression and annual myopia incidence, a finding which is consistent with the increasing trend on prevalence of myopia in China. PMID:26875599

  20. Prevalence of myopia and refractive changes in students from 3 to 17 years of age.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Hirai, H

    1999-10-01

    We investigated changes in the prevalence of myopia and mean changes in refractive errors in Japanese students from 3 to 17 years old from 1984 to 1996. Mass ophthalmologic surveys were performed annually during the course of the study. The age-specific frequency distribution of refractive errors remained similar for 6-year-old students (defined in this study as students in the first grade of primary school) during the 13-year period, but the distribution became gradually skewed toward myopia for 12-year-old students (defined in this study as students in the first grade of junior high school). Comparisons between 1984 and 1996 examinations showed a considerable increase in the incidence of myopia among those 7 years of age or older, and changes in mean refractive errors also demonstrated a greater shift toward myopia, especially in students older than 10 years, for whom the changes were statistically significant. In this 13-year period, the prevalence of myopia increased from 49.3% to 65.6% in 17-year-old students. In addition to the annual mass ophthalmologic examinations, we also performed a longitudinal 6-year study of 346 students who entered junior high school in 1989, 1990, or 1991. Among these students, the prevalence of myopia increased from 43.5% at 12 years of age to 66.0% at 17 years of age. These 346 students were divided into the following eight groups according to their refractive error (spherical power [D]) at 12 years of age: +1 D, 0 D, -1 D, -2 D, -3 D, -4 D, -5 D, and -6 D. Mean progressions of myopia in these students were as follows: for the +1 D group, -0.14 D/year; for the 0 D group, -0.25 D/year; for the -1 D group, -0.37 D/year; for the -2 D group, -0.40 D/year; for the -3 D group, -0.29 D/year; for the -4 D group, -0.25 D/year; for the -5 D group, -0.14 D/year; and for the -6 D group, -0.22 D/year. Boys and girls demonstrated a statistically significant difference in mean changes in refractive errors at the 6-year follow-up examination: the

  1. Constructing a Theory- and Evidence-Based Treatment Rationale for Complex eHealth Interventions: Development of an Online Alcohol Intervention Using an Intervention Mapping Approach

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Ayna; Nesvåg, Sverre; Kok, Gerjo; Duckert, Fanny

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to limited reporting of intervention rationale, little is known about what distinguishes a good intervention from a poor one. To support improved design, there is a need for comprehensive reports on novel and complex theory-based interventions. Specifically, the emerging trend of just-in-time tailoring of content in response to change in target behavior or emotional state is promising. Objective The objective of this study was to give a systematic and comprehensive description of the treatment rationale of an online alcohol intervention called Balance. Methods We used the intervention mapping protocol to describe the treatment rationale of Balance. The intervention targets at-risk drinking, and it is delivered by email, mobile phone text messaging, and tailored interactive webpages combining text, pictures, and prerecorded audio. Results The rationale of the current treatment was derived from a self-regulation perspective, and the overarching idea was to support continued self-regulation throughout the behavior change process. Maintaining the change efforts over time and coping adaptively during critical moments (eg, immediately before and after a lapse) are key factors to successful behavior change. Important elements of the treatment rationale to achieving these elements were: (1) emotion regulation as an inoculation strategy against self-regulation failure, (2) avoiding lapses by adaptive coping, and (3) avoiding relapse by resuming the change efforts after a lapse. Two distinct and complementary delivery strategies were used, including a day-to-day tunnel approach in combination with just-in-time therapy. The tunnel strategy was in accordance with the need for continuous self-regulation and it functions as a platform from which just-in-time therapy was launched. Just-in-time therapy was used to support coping during critical moments, and started when the client reports either low self-efficacy or that they were drinking above target levels

  2. Locus of Control in Alcoholics Undergoing Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Shirley C.

    Alcoholism is a complex behavior pattern. Social learning theory, which is concerned with the analysis of why individuals behave in certain ways and the effects of reinforcement patterns in their behaviors, offers an alternative to traditional treatments of alcoholics. Among alcoholics, drinking is a control issue. Locus of control is viewed as a…

  3. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tkatchenko, Andrei V; Luo, Xiaoyan; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  4. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  5. The Role of Academic Motivation in High School Students’ Current and Lifetime Alcohol Consumption: Adopting a Self-Determination Theory Perspective*

    PubMed Central

    Wormington, Stephanie V.; Anderson, Kristen G.; Corpus, Jennifer Henderlong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The current study investigated the relationship between different types of academic motives—specifically, intrinsic motivation, introjected regulation, and external regulation—and high school students' current and lifetime alcohol consumption. Method: One thousand sixty-seven high school students completed measures of academic motivation, other school-related factors, and lifetime and current alcohol consumption. Results: Using structural equation modeling, different types of motivation and school-related factors were differentially related to student drinking. Specifically, intrinsic motivation was negatively related to lifetime and current alcohol consumption. External regulation, on the other hand, was positively associated with current drinking. Grade point average was the only school-related factor related to student alcohol use. Conclusions: These findings suggest that motivation is an important construct to consider in predicting students’ alcohol use, even when other more commonly studied educational variables are considered. In addition, it supports the adoption of a motivation framework that considers different types of motivation in understanding the relationship between academic motivation and alcohol use. Suggestions for incorporating the self-determination model of motivation into studies of alcohol and substance use, as well as potential impacts on intervention efforts, are discussed. In particular, it may be important to foster only certain types of motivation, rather than all types of academically-focused motives, in efforts to deter alcohol use. PMID:22051210

  6. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... other questions about alcohol. Here’s what we know: Alcohol’s effects vary from person to person, depending on a ...

  7. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the alcohol travels through her blood and into the baby's blood, tissues, and organs. Alcohol breaks down much more slowly in ...

  8. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Myopia and Hyperopia Provides Evidence for Replication of 11 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Li, Xiaohui; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Vitart, Veronique; Schache, Maria; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Hysi, Pirro G.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Yin; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Wang, Jie Jin; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Bencic, Goran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Venturini, Cristina; Fleck, Brian; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hammond, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Baird, Paul N.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Pirastu, Mario; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Stambolian, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex, multifactorial disorder characterized by a mismatch between the optical power of the eye and its axial length that causes object images to be focused off the retina. The two major subtypes of RE are myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness), which represent opposite ends of the distribution of the quantitative measure of spherical refraction. We performed a fixed effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association results of myopia and hyperopia from 9 studies of European-derived populations: AREDS, KORA, FES, OGP-Talana, MESA, RSI, RSII, RSIII and ERF. One genome-wide significant region was observed for myopia, corresponding to a previously identified myopia locus on 8q12 (p = 1.25×10−8), which has been reported by Kiefer et al. as significantly associated with myopia age at onset and Verhoeven et al. as significantly associated to mean spherical-equivalent (MSE) refractive error. We observed two genome-wide significant associations with hyperopia. These regions overlapped with loci on 15q14 (minimum p value = 9.11×10−11) and 8q12 (minimum p value 1.82×10−11) previously reported for MSE and myopia age at onset. We also used an intermarker linkage- disequilibrium-based method for calculating the effective number of tests in targeted regional replication analyses. We analyzed myopia (which represents the closest phenotype in our data to the one used by Kiefer et al.) and showed replication of 10 additional loci associated with myopia previously reported by Kiefer et al. This is the first replication of these loci using myopia as the trait under analysis. “Replication-level” association was also seen between hyperopia and 12 of Kiefer et al.'s published loci. For the loci that show evidence of association to both myopia and hyperopia, the estimated effect of the risk alleles were in opposite directions for the two traits. This suggests that these loci are important contributors to variation of

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis of myopia and hyperopia provides evidence for replication of 11 loci.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Li, Xiaohui; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Vitart, Veronique; Schache, Maria; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Hysi, Pirro G; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Yin; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Wang, Jie Jin; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Vingerling, Johannes R; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Bencic, Goran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Venturini, Cristina; Fleck, Brian; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Hammond, Chris J; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Paterson, Andrew D; Baird, Paul N; Klaver, Caroline C W; Rotter, Jerome I; Pirastu, Mario; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex, multifactorial disorder characterized by a mismatch between the optical power of the eye and its axial length that causes object images to be focused off the retina. The two major subtypes of RE are myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness), which represent opposite ends of the distribution of the quantitative measure of spherical refraction. We performed a fixed effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association results of myopia and hyperopia from 9 studies of European-derived populations: AREDS, KORA, FES, OGP-Talana, MESA, RSI, RSII, RSIII and ERF. One genome-wide significant region was observed for myopia, corresponding to a previously identified myopia locus on 8q12 (p = 1.25×10(-8)), which has been reported by Kiefer et al. as significantly associated with myopia age at onset and Verhoeven et al. as significantly associated to mean spherical-equivalent (MSE) refractive error. We observed two genome-wide significant associations with hyperopia. These regions overlapped with loci on 15q14 (minimum p value = 9.11×10(-11)) and 8q12 (minimum p value 1.82×10(-11)) previously reported for MSE and myopia age at onset. We also used an intermarker linkage- disequilibrium-based method for calculating the effective number of tests in targeted regional replication analyses. We analyzed myopia (which represents the closest phenotype in our data to the one used by Kiefer et al.) and showed replication of 10 additional loci associated with myopia previously reported by Kiefer et al. This is the first replication of these loci using myopia as the trait under analysis. "Replication-level" association was also seen between hyperopia and 12 of Kiefer et al.'s published loci. For the loci that show evidence of association to both myopia and hyperopia, the estimated effect of the risk alleles were in opposite directions for the two traits. This suggests that these loci are important contributors to variation of refractive

  10. An item response theory analysis of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for personality disorders: findings from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Harford, Thomas C; Chen, Chiung M; Saha, Tulshi D; Smith, Sharon M; Hasin, Deborah S; Grant, Bridget F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of DSM-IV symptom criteria for assessing personality disorders (PDs) in a national population and to compare variations in proposed symptom coding for social and/or occupational dysfunction. Data were obtained from a total sample of 34,653 respondents from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). For each personality disorder, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) established a 1-factor latent factor structure for the respective symptom criteria. A 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model was applied to the symptom criteria for each PD to assess the probabilities of symptom item endorsements across different values of the underlying trait (latent factor). Findings were compared with a separate IRT model using an alternative coding of symptom criteria that requires distress/impairment to be related to each criterion. The CFAs yielded a good fit for a single underlying latent dimension for each PD. Findings from the IRT indicated that DSM-IV PD symptom criteria are clustered in the moderate to severe range of the underlying latent dimension for each PD and are peaked, indicating high measurement precision only within a narrow range of the underlying trait and lower measurement precision at lower and higher levels of severity. Compared with the NESARC symptom coding, the IRT results for the alternative symptom coding are shifted toward the more severe range of the latent trait but generally have lower measurement precision for each PD. The IRT findings provide support for a reliable assessment of each PD for both NESARC and alternative coding for distress/impairment. The use of symptom dysfunction for each criterion, however, raises a number of issues and implications for the DSM-5 revision currently proposed for Axis II disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2010).

  11. [The new findings of high myopia by swept-source optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Y; Han, Q H

    2016-07-01

    The fundus disease of high myopia, one of the main reasons leading to visual impairment, includes different types of the retinal, choroidal and scleral changes, and in particular the macular and optic disc lesions. Due to technical limitations, it is relatively difficult to study the characteristics of the sclera and the choroid in humans in vivo. The swept-source optical coherence tomography, with the long wave swept laser as a light source, has less sensitivity roll-off with the tissue depth, which makes it possible to check the choroid and the sclera. The recent studies of the characteristics of the choroid and the sclera in high myopia, and new findings of spinal and vascular systems posterior to the sclera in humans are mainly reviewed in this article. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 547-550). PMID:27531116

  12. The cause(s) of myopia and the efforts that have been made to prevent it.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    In spite of a long history of study, as well as a significant, recent increase in research attention, the cause(s) and the means of preventing or mitigating the progression of myopia in children are still elusive. The high and growing prevalence of myopia, especially in Asian populations, as well as its progressive nature in children and its effect on visual acuity, have contributed to the recent surge in interest. Animal research carried out in the 1970s also helped spark this interest by legitimising the study of environmental influences on the refractive development of the eye. Efforts that include the use of visual training or biofeedback, bifocal and progressive lenses, contact lenses and pharmaceuticals are reviewed. Current research trends that focus on the relationship between genetics and environment, as well as studies, both animal and human, that explore the effect of peripheral refractive error on the refractive development of the central retina are also reviewed. PMID:22845416

  13. [Ophthalmophysiological features of applying soft contact lenses to correct myopia in pilots].

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, I G; Rosliakov, V A; Aleksandrova, L A

    1997-01-01

    The development of effective methods for preventing and correcting myopia in pilots is one of the most important problems of aeronautic ophthalmology. The majority of Russian and foreign aeronautic ophthalmologists agree that contact correction is the principal method for repair of occupational vision of myopic pilots. Experiments with soft contact lenses with 38 and 70% humor content were carried out. The methodology was based on comprehensive examinations of the vision status and status of the organ of vision under common conditions on the Earth and during simulation of unfavorable flight factors. The results indicate that contact lenses are a safe means for correcting myopia in pilots. This is confirmed by the absence of unfavorable changes in the main visual functions and in the status of the anterior segment of the eye, by a constant level of visual working capacity, and by the absence of negative subjective sensations.

  14. [Further enhance the long-term myopia control efficacy and safety of orthokeratology].

    PubMed

    Xie, Peiying

    2014-01-01

    Strategies and methods of myopia prevention and control has been more and more. In recent years optical correction method is focusing on promoting the retinal mid-peripheral myopic defocus, improving the visual quality and promoting the accommodative function. Among the all, orthokeratology is the most notable optometry technology. This article will combine research progress both local and international achievements, the present situation of the domestic popularized the technique, and the existing problems. From the realistic approach, keep improving, the pursuit of stability, the pursuit of harmony and eliminate the false five aspects, to discuss how to promote orthokeratology for the myopia control with long-term stably efficacy and safety. How to promote the harmony and cooperation between doctors, patients and manufactures. And how to correctly guide the orthokeratology Having both specification and continued development. PMID:24709125

  15. Long-term vision-threatening complications of phakic intraocular lens implantation for high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Sayman Muslubas, Isil Bahar; Kandemir, Baran; Aydin Oral, Ayse Yesim; Kugu, Suleyman; Dastan, Metin

    2014-01-01

    AIM To report the long-term vision-threatening complications in patients who underwent phakic intraocular lens (pIOLs) implantation for high myopia. METHODS This study was designed from a consecutive series of phakic intraocular lens complication and corrective surgeries. Sixteen eyes of 13 patients had implantation of phakic intraocular lens for correction high myopia and developed serious complications have been included in this study. The mean age of patients was 38.6±6.35y (range 32-50y) and the mean time of history of pIOL implantation for high myopia was 6±2y (range 2-10y). Before corrective surgery, best spectacle-corrective visual acuity (BSCVA) ranged from perception to 20/200 in the eyes in which severe complications occurred. RESULTS Corneal decompensation occurred in 12 eyes of 9 high myopic patients after anterior chamber pIOL implantation. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) occurred in 4 eyes of 4 high myopic patients following anterior chamber and posterior chamber pIOL implantation. Patients with corneal decompensation, had combined procedures consisting of pIOL removal and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Removals of pIOL, phacoemulsification and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil tamponade were performed in patients with RRD. After corrective surgeries, all patients but one (P+, patient 2, right eye) achieved moderate BSCVA ranged from 20/200 to 20/50 at the last visit. CONCLUSION Phakic IOLs may be effective for the correction of high myopia. Although these IOLs may have severe complications and it affects safety and efficacy of this surgery. As seen here, corneal decompensation and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment are possible postoperative vision-threatening complications of phakic IOLs. Patients must be carefully examined before and after surgery for possible endothelial cell loss and vitreoretinal problems. PMID:24790887

  16. A case of extreme myopia enrolled at a school for the blind.

    PubMed

    Masanganise, R

    1998-05-01

    A case of extreme myopia causing remedial blindness in a child enrolled at a school for the blind is presented. The need for training optometrists and creating posts for them at Central and Provincial Eye Units in the country has been highlighted. Selection guidelines for enrolling students at schools for the blind are essential if inappropriate admissions to these schools are to be curtailed. PMID:9810413

  17. Comparative study on the effect of Saptamrita Lauha and Yoga therapy in myopia

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Charu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Myopia is very common ophthalmic disease especially in children and adolescence. In Ayurvedic texts, only by the main feature impairment of distant vision myopia can be correlated with Drishtigata Rogas (2nd Patalgata Timira). Aim: To compare the effect of Saptamruta Lauha and Yoga therapy in myopia. Materials and Methods: In present study, a total 60 patients with age group between 8 to 30 years were selected randomly from the out-patient Department of Swasthavritta and Shalakyatantra Department of Government Ayurveda College, Trivandrum, and were divided in two groups. In Group A, Saptamrita Lauha 250 mg twice daily with unequal quantity of honey and Ghrita was administered while in Group B, patients subjected to Yoga therapy (Jala Neti, Nadi Shodhana, Shitali Pranayama and point Tratak) for 3 months duration with 1 month follow-up. Results and Conclusion: The result obtained from the study reveals that there is no significant reduction in the visual acuity and clinical refraction, but associated changes were observed as reduced in group B when compared to group A. However, relief from headache was found to be equally effective in both the groups. PMID:25364195

  18. Myopia Control with a Novel Peripheral Gradient Soft Lens and Orthokeratology: A 2-Year Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pauné, Jaime; Morales, Hari; Armengol, Jesús; Quevedo, Lluisa; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; González-Méijome, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the degree of axial elongation with soft radial refractive gradient (SRRG) contact lenses, orthokeratology (OK), and single vision (SV) spectacle lenses (control) during a period of 1 year before treatment and 2 years after treatment. Methods. This was a prospective, longitudinal, nonrandomized study. The study groups consisted of 30, 29, and 41 children, respectively. The axial length (AL) was measured during 2 years after recruitment and lens fitting. Results. The baseline refractive sphere was correlated significantly (Spearman's Rho (ρ) correlation = 0.542; P < 0.0001) with the amount of myopia progression before baseline. After 2 years, the mean myopia progression values for the SRRG, OK, and SV groups were −0.56 ± 0.51, −0.32 ± 0.53, and −0.98 ± 0.58 diopter, respectively. The results represent reductions in myopic progression of 43% and 67% for the SRRG and OK groups, respectively, compared to the SV group. The AL increased 27% and 38% less in the SRRG and OK groups, respectively compared with the SV group at the 2-year visit (P < 0.05). Axial elongation was not significantly different between SRRG and OK (P = 0.430). Conclusion. The SRRG lens significantly decreased AL elongation compared to the SV control group. The SRRG lens was similarly effective to OK in preventing myopia progression in myopic children and adolescent. PMID:26605331

  19. Experimental myopia in a diurnal mammal (Sciurus carolinensis) with no accommodative ability.

    PubMed Central

    McBrien, N A; Moghaddam, H O; New, R; Williams, L R

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the functional morphology of the intra-ocular muscles of the grey squirrel using pharmacological and histological methods. Using sympathomimetic (phenylephrine) and parasympathomimetic (carbachol) agents, administered by transcorneal iontophoresis, the response of the iris sphincter and dilator muscles and the ciliary muscle were recorded. Measurement techniques included both streak retinoscopy and coincidence optometry for measurement of ocular refraction and high resolution ultrasonography to monitor changes in the intra-ocular component dimensions. 2. The grey squirrel was found not to possess a functional accommodative system. No change in ocular refraction or intra-ocular dimensions could be induced with 40% carbachol. Marked changes in pupil diameter occurred with topical application of both phenylephrine (dilation) and carbachol (constriction). Histological findings were in agreement with pharmacological findings in showing well developed iris sphincter and dilator muscles but only a poorly developed ciliary muscle. 3. Calculation of the depth of focus of the grey squirrel eye reveals that this could be sufficient to account for the behavioural observations of near viewing habits. 4. We then determined whether we could induce axial elongation of the vitreous chamber and a consequent myopia by monocular deprivation (MD) of pattern vision. 5. Monocular deprivation of pattern vision produced a significant experimental myopia due to axial elongation of the vitreous chamber in the deprived eye. 6. The results demonstrate that a functional accommodative system is not necessary to induce experimental myopia in the grey squirrel eye. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8271206

  20. Global variations and time trends in the prevalence of childhood myopia, a systematic review and quantitative meta-analysis: implications for aetiology and early prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Alicja R; Kapetanakis, Venediktos V; Wathern, Andrea K; Gilmartin, Bernard; Whincup, Peter H; Cook, Derek G; Owen, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to quantify the global variation in childhood myopia prevalence over time taking account of demographic and study design factors. A systematic review identified population-based surveys with estimates of childhood myopia prevalence published by February 2015. Multilevel binomial logistic regression of log odds of myopia was used to examine the association with age, gender, urban versus rural setting and survey year, among populations of different ethnic origins, adjusting for study design factors. 143 published articles (42 countries, 374 349 subjects aged 1–18 years, 74 847 myopia cases) were included. Increase in myopia prevalence with age varied by ethnicity. East Asians showed the highest prevalence, reaching 69% (95% credible intervals (CrI) 61% to 77%) at 15 years of age (86% among Singaporean-Chinese). Blacks in Africa had the lowest prevalence; 5.5% at 15 years (95% CrI 3% to 9%). Time trends in myopia prevalence over the last decade were small in whites, increased by 23% in East Asians, with a weaker increase among South Asians. Children from urban environments have 2.6 times the odds of myopia compared with those from rural environments. In whites and East Asians sex differences emerge at about 9 years of age; by late adolescence girls are twice as likely as boys to be myopic. Marked ethnic differences in age-specific prevalence of myopia exist. Rapid increases in myopia prevalence over time, particularly in East Asians, combined with a universally higher risk of myopia in urban settings, suggest that environmental factors play an important role in myopia development, which may offer scope for prevention. PMID:26802174

  1. [Pathology of alcoholism. Experiences and treatment possibilities].

    PubMed

    Gallimberti, L; Benussi, G; Gasparini, V; Sottile, F

    1981-12-22

    In the present study, the state of art of alcohol-related pathology is described, and the most credited etiological theories reviewed. An effort has been made to apply theory to the daily practice of the health practitioner and the social worker, who operate in the field. Particular emphasis has been given to the experience in the County of Dolo, Italy, where alcohol-related problems have been successfully dealt with by the Alcoholism Unit of the local General Hospital.

  2. Femininity Issues in Women's Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomberg, Edith S. Lisansky

    Alcohol studies, like most psychological studies, have traditionally focused on males. Several psychosocial theories have been used to explain male alcoholism, including dependency, the power drive, and sex role theory. This latter stance may provide a theoretical framework for the etiology of drinking which will apply to both sexes; however,…

  3. The Social Ecology of Adolescent Alcohol Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennett, Susan T.; Foshee, Vangie A.; Bauman, Karl E.; Hussong, Andrea; Cai, Li; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Faris, Robert; Hipp, John; DuRant, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A conceptual framework based on social ecology, social learning, and social control theories guided identification of social contexts, contextual attributes, and joint effects that contribute to development of adolescent alcohol misuse. Modeling of alcohol use, suggested by social learning theory, and indicators of the social bond, suggested by…

  4. Function of all-trans retinoic acid observation on similar myopia changes in cultivated rabbit retinal pigment epithelium and relation with myopia relevant factors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) during the similar myopia changes of cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, as well as the variation changes and relationships with myopic correlation factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and matrix metalloprateinase-2 (MMP-2). Rabbit RPE cells of primary generation were selected and cultured to fifth generation by subculture. Then the morphology of RPE cells were observed and cell vitality was analyzed by using the Trypan blue reject test. The expressions of HGF and MMP-2 in RPE cells were tested by using an immunobistochemistry method. The HGF concentration in RPE cell culture fluid was detected by applying enzyme-linked immunosorbnent assay (ELISA). As the ATRA concentration enhanced and action time prolonged, the survival rate of RPE cells was reduced, but the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased, so did the secretion of HGF. ATRA concentration with no less than 5 nM/ml was able to induce the growth inhibition of RPE cells and the decrease in survival rate, which was similar to the changes in RPE cells in myopia. With the actin of ATRA, the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased in RPE cells, with more distinct in HGF increase.

  5. Function of all-trans retinoic acid observation on similar myopia changes in cultivated rabbit retinal pigment epithelium and relation with myopia relevant factors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) during the similar myopia changes of cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, as well as the variation changes and relationships with myopic correlation factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and matrix metalloprateinase-2 (MMP-2). Rabbit RPE cells of primary generation were selected and cultured to fifth generation by subculture. Then the morphology of RPE cells were observed and cell vitality was analyzed by using the Trypan blue reject test. The expressions of HGF and MMP-2 in RPE cells were tested by using an immunobistochemistry method. The HGF concentration in RPE cell culture fluid was detected by applying enzyme-linked immunosorbnent assay (ELISA). As the ATRA concentration enhanced and action time prolonged, the survival rate of RPE cells was reduced, but the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased, so did the secretion of HGF. ATRA concentration with no less than 5 nM/ml was able to induce the growth inhibition of RPE cells and the decrease in survival rate, which was similar to the changes in RPE cells in myopia. With the actin of ATRA, the expressions of HGF and MMP-2 increased in RPE cells, with more distinct in HGF increase. PMID:27113312

  6. Factor Analysis of the Aftereffects of Drinking in Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Performed factor analyses of 100 alcoholics' reports of the effects that they experience after alcohol consumption. Five factors emerged: Hangover, Euphoria, Flushing, Seizures, and Sleepiness. These factors may be helpful in assessing theories on the etiology of alcoholism and in studies of ethanol's effects on subsets of alcohol abusers. (BH)

  7. APLP2 Regulates Refractive Error and Myopia Development in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Tkatchenko, Andrei V; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hysi, Pirro G; Wojciechowski, Robert; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Thinakaran, Gopal; Williams, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Myopia is the most common vision disorder and the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. However, gene variants identified to date explain less than 10% of the variance in refractive error, leaving the majority of heritability unexplained ("missing heritability"). Previously, we reported that expression of APLP2 was strongly associated with myopia in a primate model. Here, we found that low-frequency variants near the 5'-end of APLP2 were associated with refractive error in a prospective UK birth cohort (n = 3,819 children; top SNP rs188663068, p = 5.0 × 10-4) and a CREAM consortium panel (n = 45,756 adults; top SNP rs7127037, p = 6.6 × 10-3). These variants showed evidence of differential effect on childhood longitudinal refractive error trajectories depending on time spent reading (gene x time spent reading x age interaction, p = 4.0 × 10-3). Furthermore, Aplp2 knockout mice developed high degrees of hyperopia (+11.5 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10-4) compared to both heterozygous (-0.8 ± 2.0 D, p < 1.0 × 10-4) and wild-type (+0.3 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10-4) littermates and exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in susceptibility to environmentally induced myopia (F(2, 33) = 191.0, p < 1.0 × 10-4). This phenotype was associated with reduced contrast sensitivity (F(12, 120) = 3.6, p = 1.5 × 10-4) and changes in the electrophysiological properties of retinal amacrine cells, which expressed Aplp2. This work identifies APLP2 as one of the "missing" myopia genes, demonstrating the importance of a low-frequency gene variant in the development of human myopia. It also demonstrates an important role for APLP2 in refractive development in mice and humans, suggesting a high level of evolutionary conservation of the signaling pathways underlying refractive eye development.

  8. Impact of Age and Myopia on the Rate of Visual Field Progression in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Hong, Kyung Euy; Park, Chan Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myopia is rapidly increasing in young populations and patients with glaucoma associated with myopia are reported to be young aged in East Asia. These young patients have a longer life expectancy, which increases their risk of end-of-life visual disabilities. There is a need to understand the clinical course of myopic glaucoma patients, which may be important for the care of these myopic populations. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the age at presentation and the rate of glaucoma progression in the visual field (VF) according to the presence of myopia. The study was conducted as a prospective observational study including 179 patients with open-angle glaucoma who had undergone at least 5 VF examinations with a follow-up of at least 5 years. The progression rate of the mean deviation (MD) and the pattern standard deviation (PSD) are expressed as change in decibels (dB) per year. The slopes of the MD and PSD were calculated by linear regression analyses. Factors related to the slope of VF MD changes were analyzed with correlation and regression analyses. The slope of the linear fit line plotted against age at presentation and the rate of change in the VF MD was −0.026 (P < 0.001) in the myopic group and −0.008 (P = 0.167) in the nonmyopic group; the relationship was more prominent in the myopic group than the nonmyopic group. In the myopic group, age (β = −0.417; 95% confidence intervals (CI), −0.651 to −0.200; P = 0.050) and baseline untreated intraocular pressure (β = −0.179; 95% CI, −0.331 to −0.028; P = 0.022) were significantly related to the rate of change in the MD, which was only the presence of disc hemorrhage (β = −0.335; 95% CI, −0.568 to −0.018; P = 0.022) in the nonmyopic group. Age at presentation was significantly related to the rate of change in the VF in glaucomatous eyes with myopia compared to eyes without myopia. Older age was significantly related to the rate of

  9. APLP2 Regulates Refractive Error and Myopia Development in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Thinakaran, Gopal; Williams, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is the most common vision disorder and the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. However, gene variants identified to date explain less than 10% of the variance in refractive error, leaving the majority of heritability unexplained (“missing heritability”). Previously, we reported that expression of APLP2 was strongly associated with myopia in a primate model. Here, we found that low-frequency variants near the 5’-end of APLP2 were associated with refractive error in a prospective UK birth cohort (n = 3,819 children; top SNP rs188663068, p = 5.0 × 10−4) and a CREAM consortium panel (n = 45,756 adults; top SNP rs7127037, p = 6.6 × 10−3). These variants showed evidence of differential effect on childhood longitudinal refractive error trajectories depending on time spent reading (gene x time spent reading x age interaction, p = 4.0 × 10−3). Furthermore, Aplp2 knockout mice developed high degrees of hyperopia (+11.5 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) compared to both heterozygous (-0.8 ± 2.0 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) and wild-type (+0.3 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) littermates and exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in susceptibility to environmentally induced myopia (F(2, 33) = 191.0, p < 1.0 × 10−4). This phenotype was associated with reduced contrast sensitivity (F(12, 120) = 3.6, p = 1.5 × 10−4) and changes in the electrophysiological properties of retinal amacrine cells, which expressed Aplp2. This work identifies APLP2 as one of the “missing” myopia genes, demonstrating the importance of a low-frequency gene variant in the development of human myopia. It also demonstrates an important role for APLP2 in refractive development in mice and humans, suggesting a high level of evolutionary conservation of the signaling pathways underlying refractive eye development. PMID:26313004

  10. Refractive Error, Axial Length, and Relative Peripheral Refractive Error before and after the Onset of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Hayes, John R.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones, Lisa A.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error before, during the year of, and after the onset of myopia in children who became myopic compared with emmetropes. Methods Subjects were 605 children 6 to 14 years of age who became myopic (at least −0.75 D in each meridian) and 374 emmetropic (between −0.25 D and + 1.00 D in each meridian at all visits) children participating between 1995 and 2003 in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Axial length was measured annually by A-scan ultrasonography. Relative peripheral refractive error (the difference between the spherical equivalent cycloplegic autorefraction 30° in the nasal visual field and in primary gaze) was measured using either of two autorefractors (R-1; Canon, Lake Success, NY [no longer manufactured] or WR 5100-K; Grand Seiko, Hiroshima, Japan). Refractive error was measured with the same autorefractor with the subjects under cycloplegia. Each variable in children who became myopic was compared to age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates of emmetrope values for each annual visit from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. Results In the sample as a whole, children who became myopic had less hyperopia and longer axial lengths than did emmetropes before and after the onset of myopia (4 years before through 5 years after for refractive error and 3 years before through 5 years after for axial length; P < 0.0001 for each year). Children who became myopic had more hyperopic relative peripheral refractive errors than did emmetropes from 2 years before onset through 5 years after onset of myopia (P < 0.002 for each year). The fastest rate of change in refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error occurred during the year before onset rather than in any year after onset. Relative peripheral refractive error remained at a consistent level of hyperopia each

  11. The effect of intravitreal injection of vehicle solutions on form deprivation myopia in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alexander H; Siegwart, John T; Frost, Michael R; Norton, Thomas T

    2016-04-01

    lntravitreal injection of substances dissolved in a vehicle solution is a common tool used to assess retinal function. We examined the effect of injection procedures (three groups) and vehicle solutions (four groups) on the development of form deprivation myopia (FDM) in juvenile tree shrews, mammals closely related to primates, starting at 24 days of visual experience (about 45 days of age). In seven groups (n = 7 per group), the myopia produced by monocular form deprivation (FD) was measured daily for 12 days during an 11-day treatment period. The FD eye was randomly selected; the contralateral eye served as an untreated control. The refractive state of both eyes was measured daily, starting just before FD began (day 1); axial component dimensions were measured on day 1 and after eleven days of treatment (day 12). Procedure groups: the myopia (treated eye - control eye refraction) in the FD group was the reference. The sham group only underwent brief daily anesthesia and opening of the conjunctiva to expose the sclera. The puncture group, in addition, had a pipette inserted daily into the vitreous. In four vehicle groups, 5 μL of vehicle was injected daily. The NaCl group received 0.85% NaCl. In the NaCl + ascorbic acid group, 1 mg/mL of ascorbic acid was added. The water group received sterile water. The water + ascorbic acid group received water with ascorbic acid (1 mg/mL). We found that the procedures associated with intravitreal injections (anesthesia, opening of the conjunctiva, and puncture of the sclera) did not significantly affect the development of FDM. However, injecting 5 μL of any of the four vehicle solutions slowed the development of FDM. NaCl had a small effect; myopia development in the last 6 days (-0.15 ± 0.08 D/day) was significantly less than in the FD group (-0.55 ± 0.06 D/day). NaCl + Ascorbic acid further slowed the development of FDM on several treatment days. H2O (-0.09 ± 0.05 D/day) and H2O + ascorbic acid

  12. Optical treatment strategies to slow myopia progression: effects of the visual extent of the optical treatment zone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Earl L

    2013-09-01

    In order to develop effective optical treatment strategies for myopia, it is important to understand how visual experience influences refractive development. Beginning with the discovery of the phenomenon of form deprivation myopia, research involving many animal species has demonstrated that refractive development is regulated by visual feedback. In particular, animal studies have shown that optically imposed myopic defocus slows axial elongation, that the effects of vision are dominated by local retinal mechanisms, and that peripheral vision can dominate central refractive development. In this review, the results obtained from clinical trials of traditional optical treatment strategies employed in efforts to slow myopia progression in children are interpreted in light of the results from animal studies and are compared to the emerging results from preliminary clinical studies of optical treatment strategies that manipulate the effective focus of the peripheral retina. Overall, the results suggest that imposed myopic defocus can slow myopia progression in children and that the effectiveness of an optical treatment strategy in reducing myopia progression is influenced by the extent of the visual field that is manipulated. PMID:23290590

  13. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  14. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 17728 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  15. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REASONS FOR DRINKING ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION: AN INTERACTIONAL APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    ABBEY, ANTONIA; SMITH, MARY JO; SCOTT, RICHARD O.

    2015-01-01

    Two motives for alcohol consumption have been emphasized in the etiological and the reasons-for-drinking literature: (a) people drink alcohol to cope with stress, and (b) people drink alcohol because of social influences. There is support for both of these hypotheses, but the results are usually modest and most authors agree that more complex theories of alcohol consumption are needed. This study examined the interactional effects of reasons for drinking alcohol and situational factors on alcohol consumption. Standardized telephone interviews were conducted with 781 randomly selected Michigan drinkers. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that gender, friends’ alcohol consumption, coping, and social motives for drinking were significant predictors of study participants’ alcohol consumption. As predicted, there was a significant interaction between drinking to cope with stress and perceived stress, and there was also a significant interaction between drinking for social reasons and friends’ alcohol consumption. Similarities and differences in the results for women, men, Blacks, and Whites are described. PMID:8178704

  17. Peripheral Defocus and Myopia Progression in Myopic Children Randomly Assigned to Wear Single Vision and Progressive Addition Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, David A.; Barr, Christopher D.; Mutti, Donald O.; Zadnik, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the effect of progressive addition lenses (PALs) and single vision lenses (SVLs) on peripheral defocus in myopic children, and to compare the effect of myopic versus hyperopic peripheral defocus on foveal myopia progression. Methods. Eighty-four myopic children aged 6 to 11 years with spherical equivalent (SE) cycloplegic autorefraction between −0.75 diopters (D) and −4.50 D were randomly assigned to wear SVLs or PALs. Aberrometry measurements of the eye and spectacles were made centrally, 30° nasally, temporally, and superiorly, and 20° inferiorly on the retina using a Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System for Vision Research (COAS-VR). The association between peripheral defocus and the 1-year change in central myopia was investigated. Results. SVLs caused a hyperopic shift in peripheral defocus at all locations (all P ≤ 0.0003). PALs caused a myopic shift in peripheral defocus in three of four locations measured (all P ≤ 0.01) with the greatest shift superiorly due to the PAL addition (−1.04 ± 0.30 D). Superior retinal defocus when wearing either SVLs or PALs was associated with the 1-year change in central myopia. The adjusted 1-year change in central SE myopia was −0.38 D for children with absolute superior myopic defocus (n = 67) and −0.65 D for children with absolute superior hyperopic defocus (n = 17; difference = 0.27 D; P = 0.002). Conclusions. PALs caused a myopic shift in peripheral defocus. Superior myopic defocus was associated with less central myopia progression. These data support the continued investigation of optical designs that result in peripheral myopic defocus as a potential way to slow myopia progression. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00335049.) PMID:23838771

  18. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161. Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  19. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  20. Alcohol and error processing.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Yeung, Nick

    2003-08-01

    A recent study indicates that alcohol consumption reduces the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the electroencephalogram associated with error commission. Here, we explore possible mechanisms underlying this result in the context of two recent theories about the neural system that produces the ERN - one based on principles of reinforcement learning and the other based on response conflict monitoring.

  1. Refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) through a small incision (SMILE) for correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ağca, Alper; Demirok, Ahmet; Yıldırım, Yusuf; Demircan, Ali; Yaşa, Dilek; Yeşilkaya, Ceren; Perente, İrfan; Taşkapılı, Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) is an alternative to laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for the correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism. SMILE can be performed for the treatment of myopia ≤−12 D and astigmatism ≤5 D. The technology is currently only available in the VisuMax femtosecond laser platform. It offers several advantages over LASIK and PRK; however, hyperopia treatment, topography-guided treatment, and cyclotorsion control are not available in the current platform. The working principles, potential advantages, and disadvantages are discussed in this review. PMID:27757010

  2. [A preliminary study on the relation of myopia to the development and nutrition of primary and middle school].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J

    1994-06-01

    Myopia is the major cause for hypopsia of primary and middle school students. The height, weight and vision of 3,884 students were measured. It is concluded from their statistical analysis that vision and weight are positively interrelated whereas there is no interrelation found between vision and height. It is also pointed out that one of the key factors affecting vision is weight, which will be affected by irrational food structure, food preference and hypotrophy. The heavy study load of primary and middle school students is also one of the numerous causes for the increasing incidence of myopia. PMID:7843393

  3. Do Alcohol Expectancy Outcomes and Valuations Mediate Peer Influences and Lifetime Alcohol Use among Early Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Ham, Lindsay S.; Jarvis, Lorna Hernandez; Olthuis, Janine V.

    2009-01-01

    Building on the theory of reasoned action (I. Ajzen & M. Fishbein, 1973, 1980; M. Fishbein & I. Ajzen, 1975) and expectancy theory, the authors examined the mediating role of alcohol expectancies in adolescent drinking behaviors by testing whether alcohol expectancy outcomes and valuations (the extent to which these outcomes are perceived as good…

  4. Toward DSM-V: An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Diagnostic Process for DSM-IV Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelhorn, Heather; Hartman, Christie; Sakai, Joseph; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Rhee, So Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John; Hopger, Christian; Crowley, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical interviews of approximately 5,587 adolescents revealed that DSM-IV diagnostic categories were found to be different in terms of the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). However, a substantial inconsistency and overlap was found in severity of AUDs across categories. The need for an alternative diagnostic algorithm which considers all…

  5. An International Collaborative Family-Based Whole-Genome Linkage Scan for High-Grade Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ju; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Bulusu, Anuradha; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Abbott, Diana; Malecaze, Francois; Calvas, Patrick; Rosenberg, Thomas; Paget, Sandrine; Creer, Rosalind C.; Kirov, George; Owen, Michael J.; Zhao, Bei; White, Tristan; Mackey, David A.; Young, Terri L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Several nonsyndromic high-grade myopia loci have been mapped primarily by microsatellite markers and a limited number of pedigrees. In this study, whole-genome linkage scans were performed for high-grade myopia, using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 254 families from five independent sites. Methods Genomic DNA samples from 1411 subjects were genotyped (Linkage Panel IVb; Illumina, San Diego, CA). Linkage analyses were performed on 1201 samples from 10 Asian, 12 African-American, and 221 Caucasian families, screening for 5744 SNPs after quality-control exclusions. Two disease states defined by sphere (SPH) and spherical equivalence (SE; sphere+cylinder/2) were analyzed. Parametric and nonparametric two-point and multipoint linkage analyses were performed using the FASTLINK, HOMOG, and MERLIN programs. Multiple stratified datasets were examined, including overall, center-specific, and race-specific. Linkage regions were declared suggestive if they had a peak LOD score ≥ 1.5. Results The MYP1, MYP3, MYP6, MYP11, MYP12, and MYP14 loci were replicated. The novel region q34.11 on chromosome 9 (max NPL= 2.07 at rs913275) was identified. Chromosome 12, region q21.2-24.12 (36.59 cM, MYP3 locus) showed significant linkage (peak HLOD = 3.48) at rs337663 in the overall dataset by SPH and was detected by the Duke, Asian, and Caucasian subsets as well. Potential shared interval was race dependent—a 9.4-cM region (rs163016–rs1520724) driven by the Asian subset and a 1343-cM region (rs163016–rs1520724) driven by the Caucasian subset. Conclusions The present study is the largest linkage scan to date for familial high-grade myopia. The outcomes will facilitate the identification of genes implicated in myopic refractive error development and ocular growth. PMID:19324860

  6. [Efficiency of interlamellar refractive tunnel keratoplasty in myopia and astigmatism correction].

    PubMed

    Shusterov, Y

    2014-10-01

    Correction of high degree myopia, anisometropia and astigmatism continues to remain one of actual problems of ophthalmology. The purpose of the present work - the analysis of results of application of refractive interlamellar tunnel keratoplasty variants. We develop 6 updatings tunnel keratoplasty. In total in clinic 310 operations from which in 158 cases as a transfer material used a donor cornea, in 63 cases - brephocornea (a fruit cornea) and in 89 cases - hydrogel synthetic implant, modified in low-temperature to gas-discharge plasma are spent. From the specified number of operative interventions, on 86 eyes of operation tunnel keratoplasty have been spent at those patients by whom earlier it has been given up in carrying out eximerlaser corrections, in connection with presence of a "thin", "flat" and "convex" cornea. Maximum refractive effect fell first two weeks after operation. Definitive stabilisation of a refraction occurred on 2-3 month, thus regress of the reached effect made an order of 10-12 %. It is reached refractive effect from 5,5 to 20,0 D. Undercorrection in some cases made to 3,5 D, that spoke very high myopia (more than 20,0 D) degrees. It has been noticed, that refractive effect of operations with ecsplants was above (on the average on 10 %), than at use of a donor cornea, at identical cross-section section of used transfer materials. It spoke that the synthetic material, unlike a donor cornea, kept the form. At all patients substantial increase of visual acuities has been received, and in 75 % it was equal or exceeded visual acuity before operation with the greatest possible correction. Thus, clinical approbation has proved, that the variants of tunnel keratoplasty, are effective ways of high myopia, anisometropia and astigmatism correction. Updating in gaseous plasma is represented in the perspective way of improvement of biocompatibility of synthetic materials.

  7. Integration of Defocus by Dual Power Fresnel Lenses Inhibits Myopia in the Mammalian Eye

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Sally A.; Tse, Dennis Y.; Bowrey, Hannah E.; Leotta, Amelia J.; Lam, Carly S.; Wildsoet, Christine F.; To, Chi-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Eye growth compensates in opposite directions to single vision (SV) negative and positive lenses. We evaluated the response of the guinea pig eye to Fresnel-type lenses incorporating two different powers. Methods. A total of 114 guinea pigs (10 groups with 9–14 in each) wore a lens over one eye and interocular differences in refractive error and ocular dimensions were measured in each of three experiments. First, the effects of three Fresnel designs with various diopter (D) combinations (−5D/0D; +5D/0D or −5D/+5D dual power) were compared to three SV lenses (−5D, +5D, or 0D). Second, the ratio of −5D and +5D power in a Fresnel lens was varied (50:50 compared with 60:40). Third, myopia was induced by 4 days of exposure to a SV −5D lens, which was then exchanged for a Fresnel lens (−5D/+5D) or one of two SV lenses (+5D or −5D) and ocular parameters tracked for a further 3 weeks. Results. Dual power lenses induced an intermediate response between that to the two constituent powers (lenses +5D, +5D/0D, 0D, −5D/+5D, −5D/0D and −5D induced +2.1 D, +0.7 D, +0.1 D, −0.3 D, −1.6 D and −5.1 D in mean intraocular differences in refractive error, respectively), and changing the ratio of powers induced responses equal to their weighted average. In already myopic animals, continued treatment with SV negative lenses increased their myopia (from −3.3 D to −4.2 D), while switching to SV positive lenses or −5D/+5D Fresnel lenses reduced their myopia (by 2.9 D and 2.3 D, respectively). Conclusions. The mammalian eye integrates competing defocus to guide its refractive development and eye growth. Fresnel lenses, incorporating positive or plano power with negative power, can slow ocular growth, suggesting that such designs may control myopia progression in humans. PMID:24398103

  8. Exposure to sunlight reduces the risk of myopia in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ding, Hui; Stell, William K; Liu, Liangping; Li, Saiqun; Liu, Hongshan; Zhong, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has recently been postulated as responsible for the effect that more time spent outdoors protects children from myopia, while early life exposure to natural light was reported to be possibly related to onset of myopia during childhood. In this study, we had two aims: to determine whether increasing natural light exposure has a protective effect on hyperopic defocus-induced myopia, and to observe whether early postnatal exposure to natural light causes increased risk of refractive error in adolescence. Eight rhesus monkeys (aged 20-30 days) were treated monocularly with hyperopic-defocus (-3.0D lens) and divided randomly into two groups: AL group (n=4), reared under Artificial (indoor) Lighting (08:00-20:00); and NL group (n=4), exposed to Natural (outdoor) Light for 3 hours per day (11:00-14:00), and to indoor lighting for the rest of the light phase. After being reared with lenses for ca. 190 days, all monkeys were returned to unrestricted vision until the age of 3 years. Another eight age-matched monkeys, reared with unrestricted vision under artificial lighting since birth, were employed as controls. The ocular refraction, corneal curvature and axial dimensions were measured before lens-wearing (at 23±3 days of age), monthly during the light phase, and at the age of puberty (at 1185+3 days of age). During the lens-wearing treatment, infant monkeys in the NL group were more hyperopic than those in the AL group (F=5.726, P=0.032). Furthermore, the two eyes of most NL monkeys remained isometropic, whereas 3 of 4 AL monkeys developed myopic anisometropia more than -2.0D. At adolescence, eyes of AL monkeys showed significant myopic anisometropia compared with eyes of NL monkeys (AL vs NL: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.22±0.44D; P=0.002) and controls (AL vs Control: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.05±0.85D; P<0.0001). All differences in refraction were associated with parallel changes in axial dimensions. Our results suggest that exposure to natural outdoor light

  9. Exposure to Sunlight Reduces the Risk of Myopia in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Ding, Hui; Stell, William K.; Liu, Liangping; Li, Saiqun; Liu, Hongshan; Zhong, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has recently been postulated as responsible for the effect that more time spent outdoors protects children from myopia, while early life exposure to natural light was reported to be possibly related to onset of myopia during childhood. In this study, we had two aims: to determine whether increasing natural light exposure has a protective effect on hyperopic defocus-induced myopia, and to observe whether early postnatal exposure to natural light causes increased risk of refractive error in adolescence. Eight rhesus monkeys (aged 20-30 days) were treated monocularly with hyperopic-defocus (-3.0D lens) and divided randomly into two groups: AL group (n=4), reared under Artificial (indoor) Lighting (08:00-20:00); and NL group (n=4), exposed to Natural (outdoor) Light for 3 hours per day (11:00-14:00), and to indoor lighting for the rest of the light phase. After being reared with lenses for ca. 190 days, all monkeys were returned to unrestricted vision until the age of 3 years. Another eight age-matched monkeys, reared with unrestricted vision under artificial lighting since birth, were employed as controls. The ocular refraction, corneal curvature and axial dimensions were measured before lens-wearing (at 23±3 days of age), monthly during the light phase, and at the age of puberty (at 1185+3 days of age). During the lens-wearing treatment, infant monkeys in the NL group were more hyperopic than those in the AL group (F=5.726, P=0.032). Furthermore, the two eyes of most NL monkeys remained isometropic, whereas 3 of 4 AL monkeys developed myopic anisometropia more than -2.0D. At adolescence, eyes of AL monkeys showed significant myopic anisometropia compared with eyes of NL monkeys (AL vs NL: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.22±0.44D; P=0.002) and controls (AL vs Control: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.05±0.85D; P<0.0001). All differences in refraction were associated with parallel changes in axial dimensions. Our results suggest that exposure to natural outdoor light

  10. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse - quitting drinking; Quitting drinking; Quitting alcohol; Alcoholism - deciding to quit ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol- ...

  11. Alcoholism and homosexuality: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Nardi, P M

    1982-01-01

    Although causal relationships between homosexuality and alcoholism have not been established, the myths and assumptions surrounding this issue are numerous. Much of the available literature on the subject is from a psychoanalytic perspective, emphasizing latent homosexuality as a cause of alcoholism. Very little is from the perspective of gay and lesbian populations. This paper analyzes the assumptions underlying the biological and genetic approaches, learning theory, psychoanalytic perspectives, and sociological models as they relate to alcoholism and homosexuality.

  12. Retina imaging system with adaptive optics for the eye with or without myopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Jiang, Baoguang; Mu, Quanquan; Chen, Shaoyuan; Xuan, Li

    2009-04-01

    An adaptive optics system for the retina imaging is introduced in the paper. It can be applied to the eye with myopia from 0 to 6 diopters without any adjustment of the system. A high-resolution liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) device is used as the wave-front corrector. The aberration is detected by a Shack-Harmann wave-front sensor (HASO) that has a Root Mean Square (RMS) measurement accuracy of λ/100 ( λ = 0.633 μm). And an equivalent scale model eye is constructed with a short focal length lens (˜18 mm) and a diffuse reflection object (paper screen) as the retina. By changing the distance between the paper screen and the lens, we simulate the eye with larger diopters than 5 and the depth of field. The RMS value both before and after correction is obtained by the wave-front sensor. After correction, the system reaches the diffraction-limited resolution approximately 230 cycles/mm at the object space. It is proved that if the myopia is smaller than 6 diopters and the depth of field is between -40 and +50 mm, the system can correct the aberration very well.

  13. The investigation on the role of mitochondrial fusion protein 1 in the development of myopia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yun-Lin; Zou, Yun-Chun; Lei, Jia-Hong; Zeng, Guan-Peng; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to preliminarily investigate the expression of mitochondrial fusion protein 1 (MFN1) in a lens-induced animal myopia (LIM) model and to explore the relationship between MFN1 and the visual development. Materials and Methods: MFN1 gene expression in guinea pigs was examined during the development of minus LIM, 15 tri-colored guinea pigs were obtained, and one eye of each pig was randomly selected and treated with −7.00D lenses. Ocular refraction and axial length were collected before intervention and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after intervention. After the refraction and axial length measurements at 1, 2, and 3 weeks of lens intervention, five guinea pigs were randomly selected. MFN1 expression in the retina of both eyes was tested by immunohistochemistry technique. Results: MFN1-positive cells could be observed in the retina of both eyes. The positive cells in the LIM eyes were staining deeper, and much more positive cells could be observed. Furthermore, MFN1-positive expression could be seen mainly in ganglion cells after 1 week of minus lens intervention, and with time extension, more and more positive cells appeared in the rod-cone cell and bipolar cell layer, and this phenomenon could not be found in the normal control eyes. Conclusion: This study suggested that MFN1 might be correlated to the development of myopia. PMID:27609161

  14. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E; Crewther, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies. PMID:27625591

  15. Large angle esotropia with high myopia and a lost medial rectus muscle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Alhashemi, Leila Hosseini; Jafari, Alireza Keshtcar; Eshraghi, Bahram; Fakhraie, Ghasem

    2013-01-01

    A 67 year old woman presented with her left eye fixed in adduction and infraduction. She had previous complicated strabismus surgery 18 years ago with a report of intraoperative loss of left medial rectus (MR) muscle (not retrieved at the time of surgery). An Orbital MRI of the left eye showed reattachment of the MR muscle to the globe and an axially enlarged globe associated with inferior displacement of the lateral rectus and nasal displacement of the superior rectus muscles. In ultrasonography the axial lengths were 24.1 mm in the right and 29.9 mm in the left eye. She underwent staged surgery: The first stage was a recession of the left MR muscle and union procedure on the SR and LR muscles followed by a second adjustable suture procedure under topical anesthesia, of right MR recession, right LR resection and left IR recession. After 12 months her eyes were still binocularly aligned. Unilateral high myopia must be considered in progressive esotropia. Imaging and ultrasonography can demonstrate anatomical abnormality and muscle paths to confirm the definite diagnosis. Union procedure described by Yokoyama is an effective procedure in correcting this strabismus associated with high myopia. PMID:23822915

  16. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies. PMID:27625591

  17. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies.

  18. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E; Crewther, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies.

  19. "They Can't Even Play Right!" Cultural Myopia in the Analysis of Play--Cultural Perspectives on Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terry; Murrell, Peter C., Jr.

    Using the framework of cultural context analysis, this paper examines how cultural myopia can lead to inaccurate generalizations regarding play and development among children in diverse sociocultural groups in the United States. The paper argues that analyses drawing causal connections between playing with particular toys or in certain ways and…

  20. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... varies. Almost none of these babies have normal brain development. Infants and children with fetal alcohol syndrome have many different problems, which can be ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such ... alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, ...

  2. Elderly Alcoholism: Implications for Human Service Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beechem, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Incumbent upon those faculty who teach substance abuse courses is the need to integrate elderly alcoholism-related course content to encourage and adequately prepare university students to serve this "hidden" population. Course content would ideally include theories specific to loss-grief, aging, and alcoholism. In addition, field placement…

  3. Choroidal thickness profiles in myopic eyes of young adults in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Elise; Hyman, Leslie; Gwiazda, Jane; Marsh-Tootle, Wendy; Zhang, Qinghua; Hou, Wei; Norton, Thomas T; Weise, Katherine; Dirkes, Keri; Zangwill, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship of choroidal thickness with axial length (AL) and myopia in young adult eyes in the ethnically diverse Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) cohort. Design Cross-sectional, multi-center, study Methods In addition to measures of myopia by cycloplegic autorefraction and AL by A-scan ultrasonography, participants underwent optical coherence tomography imaging of the choroid (RTVue) in both eyes at their last visit (14 years after baseline). Using digital calipers, two independent readers measured choroidal thickness in the right eye (left eye if poor quality; n=37) at seven locations: fovea and 750, 1500, 2250μm nasal (N) and temporal (T) to the fovea. Results Choroidal thickness measurements were available from 294/346 (85%) of imaged participants (mean age: 24.3±1.4 years; 44.9% male) with mean myopia of -5.3±2.0D and mean AL of 25.5±1.0mm. Overall, choroidal thickness varied by location (p<0.0001) and was thickest at the fovea (273.8±70.9 μm) and thinnest nasally (N2250,191.5±69.3 μm). Multivariable analyses showed significantly thinner choroids in eyes with more myopia and longer AL at all locations except T2250 (p≤0.001) and presence of peri-papillary crescent at all locations except T1500 and T2250 (p≤0.0001). Choroidal thickness varied by ethnicity at N2250 (p<0.0001), with Asians having the thinnest and African Americans the thickest choroids. Conclusion Choroids are thinner in longer, more myopic young adult eyes. The thinning was most prominent nasally and in eyes with a crescent. In the furthest nasal location, ethnicity was associated with choroidal thickness. The findings suggest that choroidal thickness should be evaluated, especially in the nasal regions where myopic degenerations are most commonly seen clinically. PMID:25896460

  4. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  5. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  6. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  7. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The Great Western Sugar Company has announced plans for the construction of a $300 million plant for the production of fuel grade alcohol from corn. The plant at Reserve, Lousiana, will also produce high fructose corn syrup and animal feed by-products and will employ an additional 200 people.

  8. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  9. Social anxiety and alcohol consumption: the role of alcohol expectancies and reward sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Hasking, Penelope

    2009-09-01

    Although the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption has been the subject of extensive exploration, previous studies have failed to draw consistent conclusions about the nature of this relationship. Gray [Gray, J.A. (1970). The psychophysiological basis of introversion-extraversion. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 8, 249-266] suggested that individuals who are sensitive to reward are likely to place themselves in potentially rewarding environments (e.g. pubs and clubs). As such these individuals will have a greater chance to experience and vicariously observe the effects of alcohol in these environments, leading to the formation and modification of alcohol expectancies. Consequently, reinforcement sensitivity theory and alcohol expectancies are inherently related, yet have remained disparate areas of research. In this study, a total of 454 young adults responded to a questionnaire assessing social anxiety, alcohol consumption, reward sensitivity and alcohol expectancies. Regression analyses revealed a positive relationship between reward sensitivity, expectations of tension reduction and increased confidence, and alcohol consumption. Expectations of tension reduction were observed to moderate the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption. In addition, three-way relationships between reward sensitivity, alcohol expectancies and social anxiety were observed to predict alcohol consumption. Overall, these results suggest that both reward sensitivity and alcohol expectancies play a role in the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption, and that inclusion of these constructs in further research may aid in further clarifying the mechanisms underlying comorbid social anxiety and alcohol abuse.

  10. Alcoholism in Fiction: Learning from the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Nada J.; Madden, Louise P.

    1975-01-01

    Nursing students in a theory course on alcoholism, with no accompanying practicum, developed empathy and understanding through studying relevant concepts exemplified in works of popular literature which they read, analyzed, and discussed. (AJ)

  11. Many-objective reservoir policy identification and refinement to reduce institutional myopia in water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Herman, Jonathan D.; Castelletti, Andrea; Reed, Patrick M.

    2014-05-01

    Current water reservoir operating policies are facing growing water demands as well as increasing uncertainties associated with a changing climate. However, policy inertia and myopia strongly limit the possibility of adapting current water reservoir operations to the undergoing change. Historical agreements and regulatory constraints limit the rate that reservoir operations are innovated and creates policy inertia, where water institutions are unlikely to change their current practices in absence of dramatic failures. Yet, no guarantee exists that historical management policies will not fail in coming years. In reference to policy myopia, although it has long been recognized that water reservoir systems are generally framed in heterogeneous socio-economic contexts involving a myriad of conflicting, non-commensurable operating objectives, the broader understanding of the multi-objective consequences of current operating rules as well as their vulnerability to hydroclimatic uncertainties is severely limited. This study proposes a decision analytic framework to overcome both policy inertia and myopia in complex river basin management contexts. The framework combines reservoir policy identification, many-objective optimization under uncertainty, and visual analytics to characterize current operations and discover key tradeoffs between alternative policies for balancing evolving demands and system uncertainties. The approach is demonstrated on the Conowingo Dam, located within the Lower Susquehanna River, USA. The Lower Susquehanna River is an interstate water body that has been subject to intensive water management efforts due to the system's competing demands from urban water supply, atomic power plant cooling, hydropower production, and federally regulated environmental flows. The proposed framework initially uses available streamflow observations to implicitly identify the current but unknown operating policy of Conowingo Dam. The quality of the identified baseline

  12. Pharmacology of Myopia and Potential Role for Intrinsic Retinal Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Richard A.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and public health impact of refractive errors, the mechanisms responsible for ametropias are poorly understood. Much evidence now supports the concept that the retina is central to the mechanism(s) regulating emmetropization and underlying refractive errors. Using a variety of pharmacologic methods and well-defined experimental eye growth models in laboratory animals, many retinal neurotransmitters and neuromodulators have been implicated in this process. Nonetheless, an accepted framework for understanding the molecular and/or cellular pathways that govern postnatal eye development is lacking. Here, we review two extensively studied signaling pathways whose general roles in refractive development are supported by both experimental and clinical data: acetylcholine signaling through muscarinic and/or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and retinal dopamine pharmacology. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine was first studied as an anti-myopia drug some two centuries ago, and much subsequent work has continued to connect muscarinic receptors to eye growth regulation. Recent research implicates a potential role of nicotinic acetycholine receptors; and the refractive effects in population surveys of passive exposure to cigarette smoke, of which nicotine is a constituent, support clinical relevance. Reviewed here, many puzzling results inhibit formulating a mechanistic framework that explains acetylcholine’s role in refractive development. How cholinergic receptor mechanisms might be used to develop acceptable approaches to normalize refractive development remains a challenge. Retinal dopamine signaling not only has a putative role in refractive development, its upregulation by light comprises an important component of the retinal clock network and contributes to the regulation of retinal circadian physiology. During postnatal development, the ocular dimensions undergo circadian and/or diurnal fluctuations in magnitude

  13. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  14. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... RISKS OF ALCOHOL Alcohol increases the risk of: Alcoholism Falls, drownings, and other accidents Head, neck, stomach, ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and your health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/ ...

  15. [Quantum-wave physiotherapy in the treatment of myopia in children].

    PubMed

    Volkova, L P

    2008-01-01

    It is established that cyclicity of excitation and inhibition processes in healthy persons is symmetric, 11.9+0.2 cycles in 1 minute, and reflects structural (retina nerve fibers layer thickness) and functional (visual acuity) symmetry of pair eyes, autonomous regulatory system dynamic balance as the etalon of health. Myopia is accompanied by autonomous visual cycles acceleration up to 14.3+2.4 cycles in 1 minute at low degree and up to 17.7+2.2 cycles in 1 minute at mid degree with their rhythmicity disturbance. Simultaneously asymmetrical thinning of retina nerve fibers layer was noted. Bilateral electroconductivity on meridians on the right side was lower than on the left side, which characterized vegetative balance asymmetry as pathology index. Quantum-wave physiotherapy imitates autonomous cyclicity of visual system and recovers vegetative balance bilateral symmetry and structural-functional symmetry of visual organ with the increase of visual acuity in 1.5 times.

  16. Verteporfin: new indication. New indication in complications of high myopia: no sustained benefit.

    PubMed

    2003-02-01

    (1) High myopia can lead to subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation with a marked loss of central vision. There is no satisfactory treatment. (2) Marketing authorisation has been granted for verteporfin in this indication. Intravenous verteporfin injection is followed by cold red laser therapy, in one or several sessions. (3) In a multicentre comparative randomised double-blind trial involving 120 patients, verteporfin + cold red laser therapy stabilised visual acuity in 72% of patients after one year of follow-up, compared to 44% of patients who received a placebo + cold red laser therapy. This advantage was lost at two years of follow-up. (4) This trial revealed no new side effects of verteporfin. (5) In practice, for want of anything better, verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy may be helpful, but patients should be told of its limitations.

  17. Hyperoxic myopia in a closed-circuit mixed-gas scuba diver.

    PubMed

    Butler, F K; White, E; Twa, M

    1999-01-01

    A myopic shift occurred in a closed-circuit mixed-gas scuba diver using a 1.3 atm abs constant partial pressure of oxygen in a nitrogen-oxygen mix. This change was noticed after approximately 18 days of diving with a mean dive time of 4.04 h each day. The observed myopic shift was due to hyperoxic myopia, one sign of lenticular oxygen toxicity, and resolved over a 1 mo. period after diving was completed. On a subsequent drive trip, a myopic shift was found in both the index diver as well as two other divers breathing the same gasmix on similar profiles. Diving communities should be aware of the risk of both lenticular and pulmonary oxygen toxicity when conducting intensive diving at oxygen partial pressures in the 1.3-1.6 atm abs range.

  18. Under-correction of human myopia – Is it myopigenic?: A retrospective analysis of clinical refraction data

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Esposito, Christina; Peterson, Cody; Coronado, Cory; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate retrospectively, based on routine clinical records in an optometric office, the effect of refractive under-correction of the myopic spectacle prescription on myopic progression in children and young adults. Methods Patient records of children and young-adult myopes in a private optometric practice in Glendale, Arizona, USA, were initially reviewed to identify those that met the criteria. Information collected from the patient records included: age, gender, the dates and number of their visits (more than one visit was required for use of the data), final prescription, and non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. For each patient visit, the difference in spherical equivalent (SE) between the subjective refraction for maximum visual acuity and the final prescription was calculated for both the left and right eyes. Myopia progression was defined as the difference in SE between the final subjective refraction of the previous visit and that of the subsequent visit. Based on the study criteria, a total of 275 patient visits were obtained from the data collected in 76 patients. Results A significant positive correlation was found between the magnitude of under-correction of the refractive error and myopic progression (r = 0.301, p < 0.01); that is, the greater the under-correction, the greater the myopic progression. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between myopia progression and subjective refraction (r = 0.166, p = 0.006); that is, the greater the degree of myopia, the greater the effect of under-correction. However, there was no significant correlation between myopia progression and either age (r = −0.11, p = 0.86) or gender (r = −0.82, p = 0.17). Conclusion Under-correction of myopia produced a small but progressively greater degree of myopic progression than did full correction. The present finding is consistent with earlier clinical trials and modeling of human myopia. PMID:25000870

  19. Defocus Incorporated Soft Contact (DISC) lens slows myopia progression in Hong Kong Chinese schoolchildren: a 2-year randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carly Siu Yin; Tang, Wing Chun; Tse, Dennis Yan-Yin; Tang, Ying Yung; To, Chi Ho

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine if ‘Defocus Incorporated Soft Contact’ (DISC) lens wear slows childhood myopia progression. Methods A 2-year double-blind randomised controlled trial was carried out in 221 children aged 8–13 years, with myopia between −1.00 and −5.00 Dioptres (D) and astigmatism ≤1.00 D. Subjects were randomly assigned to the DISC (n=111) or single vision (SV; n=110) contact lens group. DISC lenses incorporated concentric rings, which provided an addition of +2.50 D, alternating with the normal distance correction. Refractive error (cycloplegic autorefraction) and axial length were measured at 6-month intervals. Differences between groups were analysed using unpaired t test. Results In total, 128 children completed the study, n=65 in the DISC group and n=63 in the SV group. Myopia progressed 25% more slowly for children in the DISC group compared with those in the control group (0.30 D/year; 95% CI −0.71 to −0.47 vs 0.4 D/year; 95% CI −0.93 to −0.65, p=0.031). Likewise, there was less axial elongation for children in the DISC versus SV groups (0.13 mm/year; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.31 vs 0.18 mm/year; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.43, p=0.009). Treatment effect correlated positively with DISC lens wearing time (r=0.342; p=0.005). Indeed, myopia in children who wore the DISC lenses for five or more hours/day progressed 46% (mean difference=−0.382 D, p=0.001; 95% CI −0.59 to −0.17) less than those in the SV group. Conclusions The daily wearing of DISC lens significantly slowed myopia progression and axial elongation in Hong Kong schoolchildren. The findings demonstrated that simultaneous clear vision with constant myopic defocus can retard myopia progression. PMID:24169657

  20. TOPOGRAPHICALLY GUIDED LASIK FOR MYOPIA USING THE NIDEK CXII CUSTOMIZED ASPHERIC TREATMENT ZONE (CATZ)

    PubMed Central

    Waring, George; Dougherty, Paul J.; Chayet, Arturo; Fischer, Jeffery; Fant, Barbara; Stevens, Gary; Bains, Harkaran S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy, predictability, and safety of topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the surgical correction of low to moderate myopia with astigmatism using the Nidek CXIII excimer laser equipped with the customized aspheric treatment zone (CATz) algorithm. Methods In a multicenter US Food and Drug Administration study of topography-guided LASIK, 4 centers enrolled 135 eyes with manifest refraction sphere that ranged from −0.50 to −7.00 D (mean, −3.57 ± 1.45) with up to −4.00 D of astigmatism (mean, −1.02 ± 0.64 D). The intended outcome was plano in all eyes. Refractive outcomes and higher-order aberrations were analyzed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patient satisfaction was assessed using both the validated Refractive Status and Vision Profile (RSVP) questionnaire and a questionnaire designed for this study. Six-month postoperative outcomes are reported here. Results By 6 months postoperatively, the manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) for all eyes was −0.09 ± 0.31 D. Six months postoperatively, 116 of 131 eyes (88.55%) had an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, and 122 of 131 eyes (93.13%) had a MRSE within ±0.50 D. Distance best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) increased by 2 or more lines in 21 of 131 eyes (19.01%), and no eyes lost 2 lines or more of BSCVA. The total ocular higher-order aberrations root-mean-square increased by 0.04 μm postoperatively. Patients reported significantly fewer night driving and glare and halo symptoms postoperatively than preoperatively. Conclusions Nidek CXIII CATz treatment of myopia with astigmatism is safe, efficacious, and predictable, and it reduces patient symptoms associated with night driving and glare and halo symptoms. PMID:18427614

  1. Corneal Epithelial Remodeling and Its Effect on Corneal Asphericity after Transepithelial Photorefractive Keratectomy for Myopia.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Wang, Yan; Lei, Yulin; Zheng, Xiuyun; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the changes in epithelial thickness profile following transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (T-PRK) for myopia and to investigate the effect of epithelial remodeling on corneal asphericity. Methods. Forty-four patients (44 right eyes) who underwent T-PRK were retrospectively evaluated. Epithelial thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography at different corneal zones (central, 2 mm; paracentral, 2-5 mm; and mid-peripheral, 5-6 mm) preoperatively and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The correlation between the changes in corneal epithelial thickness (ΔCET) and postoperative Q-value changes (ΔQ) was analyzed 6 months postoperatively. Results. Epithelial thickness at 6 months showed a negative meniscus-like lenticular pattern with less central thickening, which increased progressively toward the mid-periphery (3.69 ± 4.2, 5.19 ± 3.8, and 6.23 ± 3.9 μm at the center, paracenter, and mid-periphery, resp., P < 0.01). A significant positive relationship was observed between epithelial thickening and ΔQ 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.438, 0.580, and 0.504, resp., P < 0.01). Conclusions. Significant epithelial thickening was observed after T-PRK and showed a lenticular change with more thickening mid-peripherally, resulting in increased oblateness postoperatively. Epithelial remodeling may modify the epithelial thickness profile after surface ablation refractive surgery for myopia. PMID:27672447

  2. One Year Follow-Up After Veriflex Phakic Intraocular Lenses Implantation for Correction of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Pjano, Melisa Ahmedbegovic; Biscevic, Alma; Grisevic, Senad; Pidro, Ajla; Ratkovic, Mirko; Bohac, Maja; Husovic, Amila Alikadic; Gojak, Refet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate visual and refractive outcomes after Veriflex phakic intraocular lenses (pIOL) implantation in moderately myopic eyes as well as postoperative complications. Methods: This prospective clinical study included 40 eyes of 26 patients which underwent implantation of Veriflex for correction of myopia from -6.00 to -14.50 diopters (D) in the Eye Clinic Svjetlost Sarajevo, from January 2011 to January 2014. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), manifest residual spherical equivalent (MRSE), intraocular pressure (IOP), endothelial cell (EC) density were evaluated at one, three, six and 12 months. Other complications in postoperative period were evaluated. For statistical analysis SPSS for Windows and Microsoft Excel were used. Results: Out of 26 patients 14 had binocular and 12 monocular procedure, with mean age of 29.8±6.5 years. After 12 months mean UDVA was 0.73±0.20. Mean MRSE was -0.39±0.31D and 90% of eyes had MRSE within ±1D. EC loss was 7.18±4.33%. There was no significant change of IOP by the end of 12 months follow up period. The only intraoperative complication was hyphema and occurred in one eye. Few postoperative complications were: subclinical inflammation in three eyes (7,5%), pigment dispersion in four eyes (10%), ovalisation of papilla in 2 eyes (5%) and decentration of pIOL in 2 eyes (5%). Conclusion: Implantation of iris-claw phakic lenses Veriflex for treating moderately high myopia is a procedure with good visual and refractive results and few postoperative complications. PMID:27482131

  3. Corneal Epithelial Remodeling and Its Effect on Corneal Asphericity after Transepithelial Photorefractive Keratectomy for Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the changes in epithelial thickness profile following transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (T-PRK) for myopia and to investigate the effect of epithelial remodeling on corneal asphericity. Methods. Forty-four patients (44 right eyes) who underwent T-PRK were retrospectively evaluated. Epithelial thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography at different corneal zones (central, 2 mm; paracentral, 2–5 mm; and mid-peripheral, 5-6 mm) preoperatively and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The correlation between the changes in corneal epithelial thickness (ΔCET) and postoperative Q-value changes (ΔQ) was analyzed 6 months postoperatively. Results. Epithelial thickness at 6 months showed a negative meniscus-like lenticular pattern with less central thickening, which increased progressively toward the mid-periphery (3.69 ± 4.2, 5.19 ± 3.8, and 6.23 ± 3.9 μm at the center, paracenter, and mid-periphery, resp., P < 0.01). A significant positive relationship was observed between epithelial thickening and ΔQ 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.438, 0.580, and 0.504, resp., P < 0.01). Conclusions. Significant epithelial thickening was observed after T-PRK and showed a lenticular change with more thickening mid-peripherally, resulting in increased oblateness postoperatively. Epithelial remodeling may modify the epithelial thickness profile after surface ablation refractive surgery for myopia.

  4. Corneal Epithelial Remodeling and Its Effect on Corneal Asphericity after Transepithelial Photorefractive Keratectomy for Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the changes in epithelial thickness profile following transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (T-PRK) for myopia and to investigate the effect of epithelial remodeling on corneal asphericity. Methods. Forty-four patients (44 right eyes) who underwent T-PRK were retrospectively evaluated. Epithelial thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography at different corneal zones (central, 2 mm; paracentral, 2–5 mm; and mid-peripheral, 5-6 mm) preoperatively and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The correlation between the changes in corneal epithelial thickness (ΔCET) and postoperative Q-value changes (ΔQ) was analyzed 6 months postoperatively. Results. Epithelial thickness at 6 months showed a negative meniscus-like lenticular pattern with less central thickening, which increased progressively toward the mid-periphery (3.69 ± 4.2, 5.19 ± 3.8, and 6.23 ± 3.9 μm at the center, paracenter, and mid-periphery, resp., P < 0.01). A significant positive relationship was observed between epithelial thickening and ΔQ 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.438, 0.580, and 0.504, resp., P < 0.01). Conclusions. Significant epithelial thickening was observed after T-PRK and showed a lenticular change with more thickening mid-peripherally, resulting in increased oblateness postoperatively. Epithelial remodeling may modify the epithelial thickness profile after surface ablation refractive surgery for myopia. PMID:27672447

  5. Use of paradox in the treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Shore, J J

    1981-02-01

    Using a paradoxical approach in dealing with an alcoholic's denial of alcoholism and resistance to treatment allows the therapist to maintain an empathic stance while placing the responsibility for change on the alcoholic. The author discusses the theory of paradox, its use by Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon, the power dynamics of the therapeutic process, and the specific strategies and ethics of this approach to therapy. PMID:7215985

  6. [Alcohol and alcoholism: attitudes of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Divane; Bittencourt, Marina Nolli

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive exploratory study that aimed to verify nursing students' attitudes facing to the alcoholic drinks, alcoholism and alcoholics, according to their position in face of an attitudes scale items. For data collection, it was used the Scale of Attitudes to alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholic, applied to 144 nursing students. The results showed a tendency to negative attitudes of these students in face of alcoholism, alcoholic person and alcoholic drinks, since most participants were placed in category indifferent or disagree with the positive items, agreeing with negative scale items. We conclude that this trend of negative attitudes is connected to insufficient attention given to the subject during the nurses' education, being verified the need for greater importance to be given to this problem.

  7. The Effect of Religiosity and Campus Alcohol Culture on Collegiate Alcohol Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Gayle M.

    2010-01-01

    Religiosity and campus culture were examined in relationship to alcohol consumption among college students using reference group theory. Participants and Methods: College students (N = 530) at a religious college and at a state university complete questionnaires on alcohol use and religiosity. Statistical tests and logistic regression were…

  8. Photorefractive keratectomy with mitomycin-C for the treatment of compound moderate myopia with astigmatism in buccal pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Kheiltash, Azita

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of controlled buccal pemphigus vulgaris with compound moderate myopia with astigmatism that was treated with photorefractive keratectomy with mitomycin-C (PRK+MMC) in both eyes. The preoperative manifest refraction was -6.50 sphere and -5.5 -0.75 x 20 in the right eye and left eye, respectively, with a best corrected visual acuity of 10/10 in both eyes. Seven months after surgery, the uncorrected visual acuity was 10/10 in both eyes. The manifest refraction was 0.75 sphere and 0.50 -0.75 x 120 in the right eye and left eye, respectively. Haze was not detected in the follow-up examinations. Reepithelialization was complete 5 days after surgery in both eyes. The results show that PRK+MMC for compound moderate myopia with astigmatism in a patient with controlled pemphigus vulgaris may be an effective and safe treatment.

  9. Pernicious Myopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minden, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The author states that neglect of the special educational needs of secondary school students in Canada has contributed to a high dropout rate and has resulted in increased delinquency, lack of employment, and a high incidence of poor mental health and social adjustment among the dropout population. (GW)

  10. Hypnosis in the Treatment of Alcoholism: A Theoretical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffenhagen, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the history and theory of alcoholism and hypnosis and proposes a theoretical model of alcholism based on self-esteem. Suggets that hypnosis may be an effective tool in the treatment of alcoholism with cure as the goal, and calls for more consistency in theory and practice. (JAC)

  11. Longitudinal changes in corneal curvature and its relationship to axial length in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Zhang, Qinghua; Deng, Li; Fern, Karen; Manny, Ruth E.; Weissberg, Erik; Hyman, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe longitudinal changes in corneal curvature (CC) and axial length (AL) over 14 years, and to explore the relationship between AL and CC, and the axial length/corneal radius (AL/CR) ratio. Methods In total 469, 6 to <12-year-old, children were enrolled in COMET. Measurements of refractive error, CC (D), CR (mm), and ocular component dimensions including AL were gathered annually. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate longitudinal changes adjusting for covariates (gender, ethnicity, lens type, baseline age and baseline refraction). The Pearson correlation coefficient between AL and CC was computed at each visit. Results There was a slight but significant (p < 0.0001) flattening in CC over 14 years. At all visits females had significantly steeper CC than males (overall difference = 0.53 D, p < 0.0001). Caucasians had the steepest CC, and Hispanics the flattest (p = 0.001). The correlation between AL and CC was −0.70 (p < 0.0001) at baseline (mean age = 9.3 years) and decreased to −0.53 (p < 0.0001) at the 14-year visit (mean age = 24.1 years). The average AL/CR ratio was 3.15 at baseline and increased to 3.31 at the 14-year visit. The correlation between the magnitude of myopia and AL/CR ratio was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) at each visit than the correlation between myopia and AL alone. Conclusions Differences in average corneal curvature by age, gender, and ethnicity observed in early childhood remain consistent as myopia progresses and stabilizes. This study also demonstrates increases in the AL/CR ratio as myopia progresses and then stabilizes, supporting observations from previous cross-sectional data. PMID:26564446

  12. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  13. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  14. Efficacy and Safety of LASIK Combined with Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Myopia: Six-Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Wang, Li-qiang

    2016-01-01

    This was a prospective controlled clinical trial. 48 myopia patients (96 eyes) were included in this study. After LASIK, accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking (ACXL) was used for myopia treatment. During 6-month follow-up, the results of LASIK-ACXL treatment were studied and compared to the LASIK-only procedure. The results showed that no statistically significant differences in UDVA, CDVA, MRSE, K mean, pachymetry, or ECD were found between the two groups at the visit after 6 months of follow-up (all P > 0.05). At 6 months postoperatively, 2 eyes lost one or more lines of visual acuity in the LASIK-ACXL group, whereas all LASIK-only treated eyes had a stable CDVA. In vivo confocal microscopy showed a decrease of keratocyte density and appearance of honeycomb-like structures in the anterior residual stroma bed; the changes were similar but more pronounced following LASIK-only. None of the cases in both groups developed signs of significant keratitis, regression, or ectasia during the 6-month follow-up. LASIK-ACXL can effectively correct refractive error in patients with myopia, with no significant complications during 6-month follow-up, indicating stability and morphologic change similar to those with LASIK-only treatment. PMID:27689082

  15. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hysi, Pirro G; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; MacGregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Pourcain, Beate St; Simpson, Claire L; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W H; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ong, Rick T; Döring, Angela; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Verkerk, Annemieke J M H; Meitinger, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli; Hawthorne, Felicia; Spector, Tim D; Karssen, Lennart C; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Ang, Wei; Mishra, Aniket; Montgomery, Grant W; Pennell, Craig E; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Schache, Maria; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily; Iyengar, Sudha K; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Polasek, Ozren; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Zeller, Tanja; Mirshahi, Alireza; Müller, Christian; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Amin, Najaf; Bergen, Arthur A B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Vitart, Veronique; Williams, Cathy; Baird, Paul N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Young, Terri L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight; Klaver, Caroline C; Hammond, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide and is a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses, including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry and 8,376 from 5 Asian cohorts. We identified 16 new loci for refractive error in individuals of European ancestry, of which 8 were shared with Asians. Combined analysis identified 8 additional associated loci. The new loci include candidate genes with functions in neurotransmission (GRIA4), ion transport (KCNQ5), retinoic acid metabolism (RDH5), extracellular matrix remodeling (LAMA2 and BMP2) and eye development (SIX6 and PRSS56). We also confirmed previously reported associations with GJD2 and RASGRF1. Risk score analysis using associated SNPs showed a tenfold increased risk of myopia for individuals carrying the highest genetic load. Our results, based on a large meta-analysis across independent multiancestry studies, considerably advance understanding of the mechanisms involved in refractive error and myopia.

  16. Association of ZNF644, GRM6, and CTNND2 genes with high myopia in the Han Chinese population: Jiangsu Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Su, S; Yang, M; Hu, N; Yao, Y; Zhu, R; Zhou, J; Liang, C; Guan, H

    2016-07-01

    AimsHigh myopia is a common visual disorder in the world. The ZNF644, GRM6, and CTNND2 genes are expressed in the retina. This study aims to investigate the associations of these genes with high myopia in Han Chinese population.MethodsThe case-control association included high myopia cases (n=430) and controls (n=430) recruited from a population-based study, 'Jiangsu Eye Study'. Fourteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three genes were genotyped by the TaqMan method using the real-time PCR system.ResultsThree SNPs GRM6-rs11746675, GRM6-rs2067011, and GRM6-rs2645339 were associated with high myopia (odds ratio (OR)=0.74, P=0.003; OR=0.78, P=0.018; and OR=0.78, P=0.023; respectively). The significances of rs2067011 and rs2645339 disappeared after multiple testing corrections. Rs11746675 remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The genetic model analysis found that GRM6-rs11746675 and GRM6-rs2067011 were suggestively associated with high myopia in the recessive model (OR=0.54, P=0.004; OR=0.52, P=0.003; respectively). Haplotype GAT for GRM6 markers rs2067011-rs2645339-rs762724 showed significance (P=0.0239), but such association did not remain significant after multiple testing corrections.ConclusionsOur data suggested that genetic variants in GRM6 are associated with high myopia. The mechanism of GRM6 in the development of high myopia need to be further investigated. PMID:27034204

  17. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping. I. Basic Theory and an Analysis of Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    Because some genes have been cloned that have a known biochemical or physiological function, genetic variation can be measured in a population at loci that may directly influence a phenotype of interest. With this measured genotype approach, specific alleles or haplotypes in the probed DNA region can be assigned phenotypic effects. In this paper we address several problems encountered in implementing the measured genotype approach with restriction site data. A number of analytical problems arise in part as a consequence of the linkage disequilibrium that is commonly encountered when dealing with small DNA regions: 1) different restriction site polymorphisms are not statistically independent, 2) the sites being measured are not likely to be the direct cause of the associated phenotypic effects, 3) haplotype classes may be phenotypically heterogeneous, and 4) the sites that are most strongly associated with phenotypic effects are not necessarily the most closely linked to the actual genetic cause of the effects. When recombination and gene conversion are rare, the primary cause of linkage disequilibrium is history (mutational origin, genetic drift, hitchhiking, etc.). We deal with historical association directly by producing a cladogram that partially reconstructs the evolutionary history of the present-day haplotype variability. The cladogram defines a nested analysis of variance that simultaneously detects phenotypic effects, localizes the effects within the cladogram, and identifies haplotypes that are potentially heterogeneous in their phenotypic associations. The power of this approach is illustrated by an analysis of the associations between alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and restriction site variability in a 13-kb fragment surrounding the ADH locus in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:2822535

  18. Attitudinal and Normative Predictors of Alcohol Use by Older Adolescents and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuther, Tara L.; Higgins-D'Alessandro, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Examines a model of alcohol use based on the theory of planned behavior, and expectancy theory on the influence of parents and peers with older adolescents and young adults. Results suggest that, during adolescence, decisions to consume alcohol are rational, based on the consideration of the positive consequences of alcohol use; however, the…

  19. Health risks of alcohol use

    MedlinePlus

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking ... Beer, wine, and liquor all contain alcohol. If you are drinking any of these, you are using alcohol. Your drinking patterns may vary, depending on who you are with ...

  20. The Effects of Scleral Collagen Cross-Linking Using Glyceraldehyde on the Progression of Form-Deprived Myopia in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yanhua; Cheng, Zhaohui; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Guo, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of collagen cross-linking using glyceraldehyde on the biomechanical properties of the sclera and the axial elongation of form-deprived myopia in the guinea pig. Thirty-six guinea pigs were randomly assigned to four groups: FDM (form-deprived myopia); FDMG (form-deprived myopia treated with glyceraldehyde); FDMS (form-deprived myopia treated with 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride); and normal control (free of form-deprivation). FDM was achieved in the right eye using a latex facemask. The right eye in FDMG was treated with a posterior subtenon injection of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde; 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride was administered to the right eye in FDMS group using the same method. Axial length, refraction, and stress-strain of the sclera were measured at scheduled time points. The treated eyes were also examined histologically by light microscopy. It was found that glyceraldehyde treatment significantly increased the stiffness of the sclera in the FDM eyes and abnormalities have not been observed in the retina and optic nerve of the treated eyes. But the development of myopia was not affected. PMID:27504195

  1. The Effects of Scleral Collagen Cross-Linking Using Glyceraldehyde on the Progression of Form-Deprived Myopia in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanhua; Cheng, Zhaohui; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Guo, Haixia; Han, Quanhong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of collagen cross-linking using glyceraldehyde on the biomechanical properties of the sclera and the axial elongation of form-deprived myopia in the guinea pig. Thirty-six guinea pigs were randomly assigned to four groups: FDM (form-deprived myopia); FDMG (form-deprived myopia treated with glyceraldehyde); FDMS (form-deprived myopia treated with 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride); and normal control (free of form-deprivation). FDM was achieved in the right eye using a latex facemask. The right eye in FDMG was treated with a posterior subtenon injection of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde; 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride was administered to the right eye in FDMS group using the same method. Axial length, refraction, and stress-strain of the sclera were measured at scheduled time points. The treated eyes were also examined histologically by light microscopy. It was found that glyceraldehyde treatment significantly increased the stiffness of the sclera in the FDM eyes and abnormalities have not been observed in the retina and optic nerve of the treated eyes. But the development of myopia was not affected. PMID:27504195

  2. Visual and optical performance of silicone hydrogel contact lenses for moderate myopia

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Nancy; Simpson, Trefford; Fonn, Desmond

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the short-term visual and optical performance of silicone hydrogel contact lenses for myopia ≥ −3.00D. Methods This was a short-term, non-dispense, double-masked, randomized study investigating Night&Day (ND), PureVision (PV), O2 Optix (O2), Biofinity (BF), Acuvue Advance (AA) and Acuvue OASYS for myopia ≥ −3.00D. Testing was conducted under scotopic conditions. Measures (one eye only) included: high- and low-contrast visual acuity (HCVA/LCVA), contrast sensitivity, subjective clarity of vision ratings (0-100 scale using reference images, with test image representing grade 50) and ocular aberrations (up to the 4th order, analyzed across individual scotopic pupil sizes). Results Three males and 27 females participated, with a mean (± SD) age of 24.9 ± 7.7 yrs (range 19 to 53 yrs), sphere of −5.30 ± 1.73D (range −3.00 to −10.75D) and cylinder −0.36 ± 0.23D (range 0 to −0.75D). Mean (± SEM) logMAR HCVA ranged from 0.06 (PV) to 0.10 (AA) (± 0.02), LCVA from 0.33 (BF) to 0.40 (AA) (± 0.02) and contrast sensitivity from 2.33 (BF) to 2.53 (ND) (± 0.15) (differences not statistically significant; all p > 0.05). Subjective ratings for the test image ranged from 59 (PV) to 64 (ND) (± 4) and 56 (AA) to 65 (ND) (± 4), for monochromatic and polychromatic reference images, respectively (all p > 0.05). There was a statistically significant impact on ocular aberrations with all study lenses compared to no lens. Between-lens differences were statistically significant for defocus (Z02), horizontal coma (Z 13) and spherical aberration (Z04). Conclusions Despite some differences in ocular aberrations, there were no significant differences in HCVA, LCVA, contrast sensitivity or subjective ratings across lenses.

  3. Alcohol and cocaine. Clinical and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1992-01-01

    Both clinical experience and epidemiological studies in community and specialized (e.g., treatment) populations indicate that the prevalence of co-use of alcohol and cocaine, and the comorbidity of alcoholism and cocaine addiction, are greater than would be expected from the chance occurrence of two independent conditions. Alcohol and cocaine have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may account for some of this co-use. While their reinforcing properties have neuropharmacological and behavioral differences, a unified theory of reinforcement by alcohol and cocaine has been proposed, involving dopamine activity in the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens circuit. Regardless of their pharmacology, the prevalent co-use of alcohol and cocaine has important implications for drug abuse treatment and indicates the need for future research on this topic.

  4. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  5. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  6. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse. PMID:24477631

  7. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  8. Density Functional Theory-Derived Group Additivity and Linear Scaling Methods for Prediction of Oxygenate Stability on Metal Catalysts. Adsorption of Open-Ring Alcohol and Polyol Dehydrogenation Intermediates on Pt-Based Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Salciccioli, Michael; Chen, Ying; Vlachos, Dion G.

    2010-11-09

    Semiempirical methods for prediction of thermochemical properties of adsorbed oxygenates are developed. Periodic density functional theory calculations are used to study the relative stability of ethanol, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol dehydrogenation intermediates on Pt(111). For ethylene glycol dehydrogenation intermediates, it is found that the thermodynamically favored intermediates at each level of dehydrogenation are as follows: HOCH2CHOH, HOCHCHOH, HOCHCOH, HOCCOH ≈ HOCHCO, HOCCO, OCCO. Structural and energetic patterns emerge from these C2HxO2 adsorption calculations that lead to the formation of group additive properties for thermochemical property prediction of oxygenates on Pt(111). Finally, linear scaling relationships of atomic binding energy are used to predict the binding energy of the C2HxO2 species on the Ni(111) surface and Ni-Pt-Pt(111) bimetallic surface. It is shown that the linear scaling relationships can accurately predict the binding energy of larger oxygenates as well as of oxygenates on bimetallic catalysts. Corrections for ring strain and weak oxygen-metal and hydrogen-bonding interactions are added to increase the accuracy of group additivity and linear scaling relationships.

  9. High Myopia Caused by a Mutation in LEPREL1, Encoding Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Mordechai, Shikma; Gradstein, Libe; Pasanen, Annika; Ofir, Rivka; El Amour, Khalil; Levy, Jaime; Belfair, Nadav; Lifshitz, Tova; Joshua, Sara; Narkis, Ginat; Elbedour, Khalil; Myllyharju, Johanna; Birk, Ohad S.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive high-grade axial myopia was diagnosed in Bedouin Israeli consanguineous kindred. Some affected individuals also had variable expressivity of early-onset cataracts, peripheral vitreo-retinal degeneration, and secondary sight loss due to severe retinal detachments. Through genome-wide linkage analysis, the disease-associated gene was mapped to ∼1.7 Mb on chromosome 3q28 (the maximum LOD score was 11.5 at θ = 0 for marker D3S1314). Sequencing of the entire coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of the six genes within the defined locus identified a single mutation (c.1523G>T) in exon 10 of LEPREL1, encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase 2 (P3H2), a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that hydroxylates collagens. The mutation affects a glycine that is conserved within P3H isozymes. Analysis of wild-type and p.Gly508Val (c.1523G>T) mutant recombinant P3H2 polypeptides expressed in insect cells showed that the mutation led to complete inactivation of P3H2. PMID:21885030

  10. Peripapillary Intrachoroidal Cavitation in Myopia Evaluated with Multimodal Imaging Comprising “En-Face” Technique

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Georges; Leze, Romain; Affortit-Demoge, Aude; Faure, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To demonstrate the usefulness of “en-face” Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) combined with Fluorescein Angiography (FA) in the investigation of peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation. Materials and Methods. A 72-year-old man followed for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) for 4 years was referred for an asymptomatic “peripapillary lesion.” A full ophthalmological examination and conventional imaging of the retina were done. FA, Indocyanine Green Angiography (ICG-A), and SD-OCT using the “en-face” technique were also performed. Results. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/25 both eyes. Slit-lamp examination revealed no abnormalities of anterior segment. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was normal. Fundus examination showed a triangular yellow-orange thickening at the inferior border of both optic nerves. FA showed early hypofluorescence of the lesion and progressive staining without any dye pooling. SD-OCT with “en-face” technique showed an intrachoroidal hyporeflective space resembling a cavitation below the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Conclusions. “En-face” SD-OCT and FA are valuable techniques for the diagnosis of peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation associated with myopia. Pathophysiological insights regarding SD-OCT findings and angiography behavior are offered. PMID:26543655

  11. Computer simulation of photorefractive keratectomy for the correction of myopia and hyperopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinault, Pascal; 'Huillier, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) performed by means of the 193 nm excimer laser has stimulated considerable interest in the ophthalmic community because this new procedure has the potential to correct myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The use of a laser beam to remove a controlled amount of tissue from the cornea implies that both the energy density of the laser beam and the target removed rate are accurately known. In addition, the required tissue ablation profile to achieve refractive correction must be predicted by optical calculations. This paper investigates: (1) Optical computations based on raytracing model to determine what anterior profile of cornea is needed postoperatively for ametropia. (2) Maximal depth of the removed corneal tissue against the ablation zone treated. And (3) the thickness of ablated corneal lenticule at any distance from the optical axis. Relationships between these data are well fitted by polynomial regressive curves in order to be useful as an algorithm in the computer-controlled delivery of the ArF laser beam.

  12. Evaluation of the toric implantable collamer lens for simultaneous treatment of myopia and astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Price, Marianne O; Price, Francis W

    2015-01-01

    Myopic astigmatism is a prevalent condition that can be treated with spectacles, contact lenses, or laser refractive surgery. However, these treatment options have functional limitations at higher levels of refractive error. The toric implantable collamer lens is designed to treat a broad range of refractive error, generally up to -18 diopters with +1 to +6 diopters of astigmatism. Approval for a more limited treatment range of up to 15 diopters of myopia with +1 to +4 diopters of astigmatism is being sought in the US, where this device has not yet received marketing approval. Surgical correction of high-myopic astigmatism can be life-altering and allow people to participate in activities that were not previously feasible because of visual limitations. The toric implantable collamer lens is implanted behind the iris and in front of the natural crystalline lens. With earlier lens designs, it was necessary to create an iridectomy or iridotomy to prevent pupillary block. The newest toric implantable collamer lens model has a small central hole that is not visually noticeable. This eliminates the need to create a hole in the iris, thereby enhancing the safety of the procedure.

  13. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  14. Association between Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Gene rs12423791 or rs6214 Polymorphisms and High Myopia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Du, Xueying; Lu, Ciyong; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of insulin-like growth factor 1 gene rs12423791 and rs6214 polymorphisms with high myopia. Methods An electronic search was conducted on PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biological Abstract Database for articles published prior to May 6, 2014. A meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.1 and Stata 12.0, and the odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in fixed or random effects models based on the results of the Q test. The subgroup analysis was conducted on the basis of the various regions, the sensitivity analysis was also performed to evaluate the stability of the results, and the publication bias was evaluated by a funnel plot and Egger’s linear regression analysis. Results This comprehensive meta-analysis included 2808 high myopia patients and 2778 controls from five unrelated studies. The results demonstrated that the significant association was not present in any genetic models between IGF-1 rs12423791 or rs6214 and high myopia. However, subgroup analysis indicated that rs12423791 polymorphism was associated with high myopia in the Chinese populations in the allelic contrast model (C vs. G: OR=1.24, 95% CI=1.04-1.48 in the fixed-effects model), the dominant model (CC+CG vs. GG: OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.16-1.69 in the fixed-effects model), and the codominant model (CG vs. GG: OR=1.37, 95% CI= 1.12-1.68 in the fixed-effects model). Additionally, none of the individual studies significantly affected the association between IGF-1 rs12423791 and high myopia, according to sensitivity analysis. Conclusion This meta-analysis shows that IGF-1 rs12423791 or rs6214 gene polymorphism is not associated with high myopia. PMID:26076017

  15. Applying General Strain Theory to Examine Perceived Discrimination’s Indirect Relation to Mexican-Heritage Youth’s Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Michael J.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling was used to test four hypotheses. First, this study hypothesized that acculturation-related variables (e.g., Mexican-heritage youth’s country of origin, time spent in the U.S., and language preference with family and friends) would be associated with initial levels of perceived discrimination. Guided by general strain theory (GST), this study then posed a second hypothesis: Initial levels of perceived discrimination would be indirectly related to initial levels of substance use through initial levels of acculturation stress. Third, this study hypothesized that changes in perceived discrimination would be indirectly related to changes in substance use through changes in acculturation stress. As a fourth hypothesis, it was postulated that initial levels of perceived discrimination would be indirectly related to changes in substance use through changes in acculturation stress. Mexican-heritage youth (N=1,106) from 29 schools in Phoenix, AZ completed surveys at six waves from 5th through 8th grades. In partial support of the first hypothesis, more time spent in the U.S. and speaking English with friends were associated with lower levels of perceived discrimination. The second hypothesis was not supported. Initial levels of perceived discrimination were positively associated with initial levels of acculturation stress; however, this association was not found between initial levels of acculturation stress and substance use. The third and fourth hypotheses were supported, which buttressed predictions derived from GST. Both initial levels and increases in perceived discrimination were indirectly related to increases in substance use through increases in acculturation stress. PMID:20490921

  16. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and

  17. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  18. Perillyl Alcohol (Monoterpene Alcohol), Limonene.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Shahla; Kiumarsi, Amir; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Alizadeh, Javad; Marzban, Hassan; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have a long history of use in traditional medicines and their activities against different diseases have been the focus of many basic and clinical researches in past few decades. The essential oils, volatile liquid containing aroma compound from plants, are known as active ingredients in the herbal medicine. Perillyl alcohol (POH) is usually available through dietary sources and is being explored for its cancer chemoprevention, tumor growth suppression, and regression. Citrus peels are the waste product of juice manufacturing industries and have been considered as a critical problem for environmental green ecology policies for years. One of the most well-known approaches to overcome this problem is transformation of these monoterpene by the use of specific strains of bacteria or yeasts. Limonene (1-methyl-4-isopropyl-cyclohexene) is a monoterpene, as other monoterpenes consists of two isoprene units, that comprises more than 90% of citrus essential oil and it exists in many fruits and vegetables. Although, the anticancer activity of d-limonene has identified nearly two decades ago, it has recently attracted much more attention in translational medicine. In this chapter, we will overview the anticancer effects of POH and d-limonene. Later, we will address the pharmacokinetics of these compounds, highlight the signaling pathways which are targeted by these proteins, review the clinical trials which have been done for these compounds in different cancer models, and finally discuss the future directions of the research in this field that might be more applicable in future cancer therapy strategies.

  19. Perillyl Alcohol (Monoterpene Alcohol), Limonene.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Shahla; Kiumarsi, Amir; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Alizadeh, Javad; Marzban, Hassan; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have a long history of use in traditional medicines and their activities against different diseases have been the focus of many basic and clinical researches in past few decades. The essential oils, volatile liquid containing aroma compound from plants, are known as active ingredients in the herbal medicine. Perillyl alcohol (POH) is usually available through dietary sources and is being explored for its cancer chemoprevention, tumor growth suppression, and regression. Citrus peels are the waste product of juice manufacturing industries and have been considered as a critical problem for environmental green ecology policies for years. One of the most well-known approaches to overcome this problem is transformation of these monoterpene by the use of specific strains of bacteria or yeasts. Limonene (1-methyl-4-isopropyl-cyclohexene) is a monoterpene, as other monoterpenes consists of two isoprene units, that comprises more than 90% of citrus essential oil and it exists in many fruits and vegetables. Although, the anticancer activity of d-limonene has identified nearly two decades ago, it has recently attracted much more attention in translational medicine. In this chapter, we will overview the anticancer effects of POH and d-limonene. Later, we will address the pharmacokinetics of these compounds, highlight the signaling pathways which are targeted by these proteins, review the clinical trials which have been done for these compounds in different cancer models, and finally discuss the future directions of the research in this field that might be more applicable in future cancer therapy strategies. PMID:27102697

  20. Assessment of contrast sensitivity and aberrations after photorefractive keratectomy in patients with myopia greater than 5 diopters.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Alireza; Rezvan, Bijan; Hashemi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in contrast sensitivity and aberrations in cases of myopia greater than 5.0 diopter (D) who had photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). In this semi-experimental study, 20 eyes of ten patients were studied. Inclusion criteria were at least 5.0 D of myopia, stable refraction in the past year, no history of refractive surgery, a minimum corneal thickness of 480 μm, and having surgery in both eyes. Exclusion criteria were the presence of any corneal condition. In addition to the routine tests, aberrometry and assessment of contrast sensitivity was done using the WaveLight Allegro Analyzer and the VectorVision CSV-1000. After PRK using the Concerto Excimer Laser (WaveLight, Alcon), patients were scheduled to have follow-up visits at 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year after surgery. Contrast sensitivity with glare showed an increasing trend only at the spatial frequency of 3 cycles per degree (cpd) (P=0.013). Contrast sensitivity without glared increased postoperatively at special frequencies of 3, 6, and 18 cpd (P<0.05). The preoperative level of higher order aberrations root mean square (HOA RMS) of 0.24±0.08 reached 0.71±0.25 at 12 months after surgery. Assessment of comma and trefoil showed no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative values, but the amount of spherical aberration changed from a mean preoperative value of 0.0±0.09 to 0.27±0.15 at 12 months after surgery. In the treatment of myopia greater than 5.0 D, PRK with the Concerto Excimer Laser can improve contrast sensitivity in certain spatial frequencies. This is while HOA RMS and spherical aberration increase.

  1. The Neurobiology of Alcohol Consumption and Alcoholism: An Integrative History1

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, Boris; Hoffman, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the neurobiological predisposition to consume alcohol (ethanol) and to transition to uncontrolled drinking behavior (alcoholism), as well as studies of the effects of alcohol on brain function, started a logarithmic growth phase after the repeal of the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution. Although the early studies were primitive by current technological standards, they clearly demonstrated the effects of alcohol on brain structure and function, and by the end of the 20th century left little doubt that alcoholism is a “disease” of the brain. This review traces the history of developments in the understanding of ethanol’s effects on the most prominent inhibitory and excitatory systems of brain (GABA and glutamate neurotransmission). This neurobiological information is integrated with knowledge of ethanol’s actions on other neurotransmitter systems to produce an anatomical and functional map of ethanol’s properties. Our intent is limited in scope, but is meant to provide context and integration of the actions of ethanol on the major neurobiologic systems which produce reinforcement for alcohol consumption and changes in brain chemistry that lead to addiction. The developmental history of neurobehavioral theories of the transition from alcohol drinking to alcohol addiction is presented and juxtaposed to the neurobiological findings. Depending on one’s point of view, we may, at this point in history, know more, or less, than we think we know about the neurobiology of alcoholism. PMID:24141171

  2. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  3. Cataract surgery in the setting of severe pathologic myopia with high axial length: use of pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gologorsky, Daniel; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery in patients with pathologic myopia and high axial length can be challenging for a variety of reasons, including imprecise intraocular lens calculations in eyes with posterior staphylomas and intraoperative complications such as suprachoroidal hemorrhage, posterior capsular rupture, and retinal tears. Although most surgeons recommend standard phacoemulsification and preservation of the posterior capsule in these cases, an alternative approach presented in this series entails the removal of the lens through the pars plana and removal of formed vitreous during the concurrent procedure. PMID:27313443

  4. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  5. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-01-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful. PMID:26487881

  6. When Is Sport Participation Risky or Protective for Alcohol Use? The Role of Teammates, Friendships, and Popularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Andrea E.; Simpkins, Sandra D.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how adolescents' peer relations might alter whether sport participation is associated with alcohol use. Consistent with social learning theory, we found that sport participation was protective against alcohol use if these peers had low alcohol use, but athletes were likely to use alcohol if their sport friends and…

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus.

  8. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. PMID:26482673

  9. Pre-drinking and alcohol-related harm in undergraduates: the influence of explicit motives and implicit alcohol identity.

    PubMed

    Caudwell, Kim M; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated how pre-drinking could be explained using a model based on dual-systems theory, incorporating measures of explicit and implicit constructs. Undergraduate students (N = 144; 44 male; 100 female; M age = 20.1 years), completed an online survey comprising measures of pre-drinking motives, a measure of pre-drinking cost motives, and an alcohol identity implicit association test. Variance-based structural equation modelling revealed that the predictors explained 34.8% of the variance in typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption and 25% of the variance in alcohol-related harm. Cost, interpersonal enhancement, and barriers to consumption motives predicted higher typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption and greater alcohol-related harm. Higher situational control scores predicted lower typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption, and lower alcohol-related harm. Positive implicit alcohol identity predicted alcohol-related harm, but not typical alcohol consumption. Results indicate that a dual-systems approach to pre-drinking has utility in predicting alcohol-related harm and may inform interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption and associated harm. PMID:24863376

  10. Pre-drinking and alcohol-related harm in undergraduates: the influence of explicit motives and implicit alcohol identity.

    PubMed

    Caudwell, Kim M; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated how pre-drinking could be explained using a model based on dual-systems theory, incorporating measures of explicit and implicit constructs. Undergraduate students (N = 144; 44 male; 100 female; M age = 20.1 years), completed an online survey comprising measures of pre-drinking motives, a measure of pre-drinking cost motives, and an alcohol identity implicit association test. Variance-based structural equation modelling revealed that the predictors explained 34.8% of the variance in typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption and 25% of the variance in alcohol-related harm. Cost, interpersonal enhancement, and barriers to consumption motives predicted higher typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption and greater alcohol-related harm. Higher situational control scores predicted lower typical pre-drinking alcohol consumption, and lower alcohol-related harm. Positive implicit alcohol identity predicted alcohol-related harm, but not typical alcohol consumption. Results indicate that a dual-systems approach to pre-drinking has utility in predicting alcohol-related harm and may inform interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption and associated harm.

  11. Central Macular Thickness in Children with Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Gordon S. K.; Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Woo, Tiffany T. Y.; Wong, Raymond L. M.; Wong, Ian Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the central macular thickness (CMT) in myopic, emmetropic, and hyperopic Chinese children using Optical Coherence Tomography. Methods. 168 right eyes of Chinese subjects aged 4–18 were divided into 3 groups based on their postcycloplegic spherical equivalent: myopes (<−1.0 D); emmetropes (≥−1.0 to ≤+1.0 D); and hyperopes (>+1.0 D) and the CMT was compared before/after age adjustment. The CMT was correlated with age, axial length, and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL). Results. The mean CMT was 274.9 ± 50.3 μm and the mean population age was 7.6 ± 3.3 years. The CMT was thickest in the myopes (283.3 ± 57.3 μm, n = 56), followed by the hyperopes (266.2 ± 55.31 μm, n = 60) and then emmetropes (259.8 ± 28.7 μm, n = 52) (all P < 0.0001). When adjusted for age, myopes had a thicker CMT than the other 2 groups (all P < 0.0001) but there was no CMT difference between the emmetropes and hyperopes (P > 0.05). There was no significant correlation between CMT with age, axial length, or peripapillary RNFL (all P ≥ 0.2). Conclusion. Chinese children with myopia had a thicker CMT than those with emmetropia or hyperopia. There was no correlation of the CMT with age, axial length, or peripapillary RNFL thickness. PMID:26167504

  12. Postnatal Chick Choroids Exhibit Increased Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity During Recovery From Form Deprivation Induced Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Angelica R.; Wang, Xiang; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Ma, Jian-Xing; Summers, Jody A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increases in retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) transcript in the chick choroid suggest that RALDH2 may be responsible for increases observed in all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) synthesis during recovery from myopic defocus. The purpose of the present study was to examine RALDH2 protein expression, RALDH activity, and distribution of RALDH2 cells in control and recovering chick ocular tissues. Methods Myopia was induced in White Leghorn chicks for 10 days, followed by up to 15 days of unrestricted vision (recovery). Expression of RALDH isoforms in chick ocular tissues was evaluated by Western blot. Catalytic activity of RALDH was measured in choroidal cytosol fractions using an in vitro atRA synthesis assay together with HPLC quantification of synthesized atRA. Distribution of RALDH2 cells throughout the choroid was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results RALDH2 was expressed predominately in the chick choroid (P < 0.001) and increased after 24 hours and 4 days of recovery (76%, 74%, and 165%, respectively; P < 0.05). Activity of RALDH was detected solely in the choroid and was elevated at 3 and 7 days of recovery compared to controls (70% and 48%, respectively; P < 0.05). The number of RALDH2 immunopositive cells in recovering choroids was increased at 24 hours and 4 to 15 days of recovery (P < 0.05) and were concentrated toward the RPE side compared to controls. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that RALDH2 is the major RALDH isoform in the chick choroid and is responsible for the increased RALDH activity seen during recovery. PMID:27654415

  13. Decision-making and addiction (part II): myopia for the future or hypersensitivity to reward?

    PubMed

    Bechara, Antoine; Dolan, Sara; Hindes, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    On a decision-making instrument known as the "gambling task" (GT), a subgroup of substance dependent individuals (SDI) opted for choices that yield high immediate gains in spite of higher future losses. This resembles the behavior of patients with ventromedial (VM) prefrontal cortex lesions. In this study, we addressed the possibility that hypersensitivity to reward may account for the "myopia" for the future in this subgroup of SDI. We used a variant version of the GT, in which the good decks yielded high immediate punishment but higher delayed reward. The bad decks yielded low immediate punishment and lower delayed reward. We measured the skin conductance response (SCR) of subjects after receiving reward (reward SCR) and during their pondering from which deck to choose (anticipatory SCR). A subgroup of SDI who was not impaired on the original GT performed normally on the variant GT. The subgroup of SDI who was impaired on the original GT showed two levels of performance on the variant GT. One subgroup (36% of the sample) performed poorly on the variant GT, and showed similar behavioral and physiological impairments to VM patients. The other subgroup of SDI (64% of the sample) performed normally on the variant task, but had abnormally large physiological responses to reward, i.e. large SCR after receiving reward (reward SCR) and large SCR in anticipation of outcomes that yield large reward. Thus, the combined cognitive and physiological approach of assessing decision-making characterizes three sub-populations of SDI. One sub-population is without impairments that can be detected by any measure of the GT paradigm. Another sub-population is similar to VM patients in that they are insensitive to the future, both positive and negative. A third sub-population is hypersensitive to reward, so that the presence or the prospect of receiving, reward dominates their behavior.

  14. Early outcomes after small incision lenticule extraction and photorefractive keratectomy for correction of high myopia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy C Y; Yu, Marco C Y; Ng, Alex; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, George P M; Jhanji, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively compared visual and refractive outcomes in patients with high myopia and myopic astigmatism after small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and photorefractive keratetctomy (PRK) with mitomycin C. Sixty-six eyes of 33 patients (mean age, 29.7 ± 5.6 years) were included (SMILE: 34 eyes, PRK 32 eyes). Preoperatively, no significant difference was noted in manifest spherical equivalent (p = 0.326), manifest sphere (p = 0.277), and manifest cylinder (p = 0.625) between both groups. At 1 month, there were significant differences in logMAR uncorrected distance visual acuity, efficacy index and manifest refraction spherical equivalent between SMILE and PRK (p ≤ 0.029). At 6 months, the logMAR corrected distance visual acuity (p = 0.594), logMAR uncorrected visual acuity (p = 0.452), efficacy index (p = 0.215) and safety index was (p = 0.537) was comparable between SMILE and PRK. Significant differences were observed in postoperative manifest spherical equivalent (p = 0.044) and manifest cylinder (p = 0.014) between both groups. At the end of 6 months, 100% of the eyes in SMILE group and 69% of the eyes in PRK group were within ±0.50 D of the attempted cylindrical correction. The postoperative difference vector, magnitude of error and absolute angle of error were significantly smaller after SMILE compared to PRK (p ≤ 0.040) implying a trend towards overcorrection of cylindrical correction following PRK. PMID:27601090

  15. Myopia induced by flickering light in guinea pigs: a detailed assessment on susceptibility of different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Di, Yue; Liu, Rui; Chu, Ren-Yuan; Zhou, Xing-Tao; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effectiveness and feasibility of inducing myopia in guinea pigs by flickering light (FL) stimulation with different frequencies. METHODS Seventy 2-week-old guinea pigs were randomly assigned to six groups: five FL groups and a control group (n=12 for each). Animals in the five FL groups were raised under 500lx illumination with a duty diurnal cycle of 50% at a flash rate of 5, 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1Hz respectively. Those in the control group were reared under steady 250lx illumination. Refraction, axial length, and radius of curvature were measured before and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks after treatment. At week 12, the eyeballs were taken out and three ocular dimensions and dry weight of sclera were measured. RESULTS A myopic shift and axial eye length increase developed in the five FL groups. Stimulation at 0.5Hz caused greater changes in myopic shift, axial elongation, eyeball dimension, and dry weight of sclera than stimulation at other frequencies. Compared with controls, eyes in 0.5Hz group were approximately -5.5±1.5D more myopic with increase in horizontal, vertical, axial dimensions by 0.89±0.3mm, 0.69±0.2mm, 1.12±0.2mm respectively and with increase in dry weight of sclera by 0.44mg. CONCLUSION Chronic exposure to periodic illumination at temporal frequency is attended by development of excessive ocular enlargement and myopic refractive error. Emmetropization could be disrupted differently by frequency alteration. PMID:23638407

  16. Early outcomes after small incision lenticule extraction and photorefractive keratectomy for correction of high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tommy C. Y.; Yu, Marco C. Y.; Ng, Alex; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, George P. M.; Jhanji, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively compared visual and refractive outcomes in patients with high myopia and myopic astigmatism after small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and photorefractive keratetctomy (PRK) with mitomycin C. Sixty-six eyes of 33 patients (mean age, 29.7 ± 5.6 years) were included (SMILE: 34 eyes, PRK 32 eyes). Preoperatively, no significant difference was noted in manifest spherical equivalent (p = 0.326), manifest sphere (p = 0.277), and manifest cylinder (p = 0.625) between both groups. At 1 month, there were significant differences in logMAR uncorrected distance visual acuity, efficacy index and manifest refraction spherical equivalent between SMILE and PRK (p ≤ 0.029). At 6 months, the logMAR corrected distance visual acuity (p = 0.594), logMAR uncorrected visual acuity (p = 0.452), efficacy index (p = 0.215) and safety index was (p = 0.537) was comparable between SMILE and PRK. Significant differences were observed in postoperative manifest spherical equivalent (p = 0.044) and manifest cylinder (p = 0.014) between both groups. At the end of 6 months, 100% of the eyes in SMILE group and 69% of the eyes in PRK group were within ±0.50 D of the attempted cylindrical correction. The postoperative difference vector, magnitude of error and absolute angle of error were significantly smaller after SMILE compared to PRK (p ≤ 0.040) implying a trend towards overcorrection of cylindrical correction following PRK. PMID:27601090

  17. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  18. Alcohol and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Alcohol and Cancer Risk On This Page What is ... in the risk of colorectal cancer. Research on alcohol consumption and other cancers: Numerous studies have examined ...

  19. Alcohol and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Alcohol and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their ... to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and Depression Caffeine and Migraine ...

  20. Benzyl Alcohol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Benzyl alcohol lotion is used to treat head lice (small insects that attach themselves to the skin) in adults ... children less than 6 months of age. Benzyl alcohol is in a class of medications called pediculicides. ...

  1. Translational Studies of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2008-01-01

    Human studies are necessary to identify and classify the brain systems predisposing individuals to develop alcohol use disorders and those modified by alcohol, while animal models of alcoholism are essential for a mechanistic understanding of how chronic voluntary alcohol consumption becomes compulsive, how brain systems become damaged, and how damage resolves. Our current knowledge of the neuroscience of alcohol dependence has evolved from the interchange of information gathered from both human alcoholics and animal models of alcoholism. Together, studies in humans and animal models have provided support for the involvement of specific brain structures over the course of alcohol addiction, including the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20041042

  2. [Neurologic sequelae of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Ladurner, G; Griebnitz, E

    1986-10-10

    The consequences of alcoholism on the peripheral and central nervous system are discussed. Polyneuropathy is present in 30% of the alcoholics, whilst cranial nerve involvement is found in 5-25%. Alcoholic myopathy is only very rarely seen. Wernicke's encephalopathy is found at post mortem investigation in 1.8% of alcoholics, but is rarely clinically diagnosed. The Marchiafava-Bignamy syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis are rarely seen; alcoholic amblyopia which is seen in 0.5% of the hospitalised alcoholics is more frequent, but still a rare finding. Cerebral seizures are common in chronic alcoholics with an incidence varying from 5 to 37% according to the type of drinking habit and have, thus, to be categorised. Brain atrophy is a common finding and correlates with the duration and extent of the alcoholism. PMID:3788182

  3. Alcohol and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing some kinds of cancer. The way alcohol causes cancer isn’t completely understood. In fact, there might ... For example, it could be that alcohol itself causes cancer by increasing hormone levels, or it may be ...

  4. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and hard alcohol calories you are consuming. Simply ... calories) Average Drinks Per Week Monthly Subtotal Calories Beer Regular 12 149 Regular Beer Light 12 110 ...

  5. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... TODAY: “Neurodevelopment and Alcohol: From Cell Adhesion to Cell Phones" Dr. Michael Charness, 11/3 @3 , Masur t. ... lecture: “Neurodevelopment and Alcohol: From Cell Adhesion to Cell Phones" Dr. Michael Charness, 11/3 @3 pm, Masur ...

  6. Solubilities of stearic acid, stearyl alcohol, and arachidyl alcohol in supercritical carbon dioxide at 35[degree]C

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Yoshio; Koga, Yoshio; Maruyama, Hironori; Arai, Yasuhiko . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    The solubilities of stearic acid (octadecanoic acid), stearyl alcohol (1-octadecanol), and arachidyl alcohol (1-eicosanol) in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by using a flow-type apparatus at 35 C up to 23.7 MPa. The solubilities of those substances and other fatty acids and higher alcohols in supercritical carbon dioxide at 35 C were correlated by a solution model based on the regular solution model coupled with the Flory-Huggins theory.

  7. The influence of alcohol expectancy priming and mood manipulation on subsequent alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Stein, K D; Goldman, M S; Del Boca, F K

    2000-02-01

    Studies showing that verbal priming can implicitly affect alcohol consumption have been used to support cognitive models of expectancies. However, because expectancy words reflect affective states as well as drinking outcomes, mediation through an affective pathway remains theoretically plausible (i.e., such words inadvertently may affect mood, which in turn influences drinking). The primary pathway was identified (and expectancy theory was tested) by comparing memory priming (using alcohol expectancy or neutral words) with mood induction (using positive or neutral music); an unrelated experiment paradigm allowed the priming manipulation to implicitly affect drinking. Men in the alcohol priming group drank significantly more than men in each of the other conditions, and, consistent with theory, men with histories of heavier drinking drank the most when primed with alcohol expectancies, indicating that expectancies can function as automatic memory processes.

  8. Alcohol and motorcycle fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S P; Fisher, R S

    1977-01-01

    A series of 99 fatal motorcycle crashes in Maryland was studied retrospectively, using police and medical examiner records. Blood alcohol concentrations were determined for 62 motorcycle drivers; measurable amounts of alcohol were found in two-thirds (41), and one-half (31) had illegally high concentrations of 100 mg/100 ml or more. The police report mentioned alcohol in only 9 instances. High blood alcohol concentrations were found most commonly among drivers age 20-34. PMID:842762

  9. Alcoholism and the Loss of Willpower

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Xavier; Bechara, Antoine; Brevers, Damien; Verbanck, Paul; Campanella, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Like other addictions, alcoholism reflects the continuation of alcohol use despite negative consequences (e.g., an ulcer or family problems made worse by alcohol consumption). Recent cognitive theories suggest that optimal information processing related to the capacity to make decisions under uncertainty conditions is impaired either prior to the initiation of alcohol use, or it is related to the consequence of its repeated utilization. In this paper, we suggest that alcoholism may be the product of an imbalance between two separate, but interacting, cognitive registers that contribute to decision making: a reactive/automatic attentional and memory system for signaling the presence of alcohol cues in the environment and for attributing to such cues pleasure and/or excitement; and a reflective/nonautomatic system for regulating the dominant reactive/automatic response. Hyperactivity within the reactive system can override the reflective system and brain/cognitive changes induced by ethanol could lead to the disruption of self-regulation. We finally develop the idea that different patterns of imbalance between reactive and reflective systems could lead to distinct patterns of clinical impulsivity involved in the vulnerability to, the development of, and the relapse into alcoholism. PMID:21765575

  10. Alcohol-Involved Rapes: Are They More Violent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; Clinton, A. Monique; McAuslan, Pam; Zawacki, Tina; Buck, Philip O.

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol's psychological, cognitive, and motor effects contribute to rape. Based on theory and past research, we hypothesized that there would be a curvilinear relationship between the quantity of alcohol consumed by perpetrators and how aggressively they behaved. Moderate levels of intoxication encourage aggressiveness; however, extreme levels…

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Developmental Characteristics and Directions for Further Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Betty Fry; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of how fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is identified, a review of theories on how alcohol acts to produce FAS, and a summary of the impact of the early and long-term effects of FAS. Issues that are particularly pertinent to children with FAS and their caregivers are raised. (DB)

  12. The Alcoholism Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The alcoholism questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the drug-abuse questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about alcoholics and alcoholism, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  13. Youths' Perceptions of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Barbara (Day); Hughes, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Only a third of students in this study accepted the medical model of alcoholism. Those who had the least knowledge of, and experience with, alcohol were the most likely to consider alcoholism as an illness. The source of information on drugs most conducive to acceptance of the medical model was parents. (Author/ABB)

  14. Alcohol and Minority Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.; Watts, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that minority youth who use (or abuse) alcohol in American society deal with using alcohol, being minority, and being young, three dimensions viewed by society with mixed, sometimes hostile and/or fearful reactions. Suggests that examining alcoholism among minority youth involves coming to grips with poverty, education, income, and life…

  15. Television: Alcohol's Vast Adland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Concern about how much television alcohol advertising reaches underage youth and how the advertising influences their attitudes and decisions about alcohol use has been widespread for many years. Lacking in the policy debate has been solid, reliable information about the extent of youth exposure to television alcohol advertising. To address this…

  16. Alcohol on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACU-I Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol use on campus and strategies colleges are using to educate students about alcohol are considered in two articles. In "When Alternatives Aren't," Ruth Bradford Burnham and Stephen J. Nelson explore the role alcoholic beverages play in young people's social lives and some of the implications for planning social events. They offer a balanced…

  17. Biological Vulnerability to Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the role of biological factors in the risk for alcoholism. Notes the importance of the definition of primary alcoholism and highlights data indicating that this disorder is genetically influenced. In studies of men at high risk for the future development of alcoholism, vulnerability shows up in reactions to ethanol brain wave amplitude and…

  18. Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Ronald W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents analysis of adult children of alcoholics, their experience and adjustment in relation to the severity and type of alcoholism, age considerations and perceptions as a child, and existence and nature of significant others. Discusses alcoholics' and others' family issues, focusing on roles taken, and personality characteristics. Emphasizes…

  19. Alcoholism and Lesbians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the issues involved in the relationship between lesbianism and alcoholism. It examines the constellation of health and related problems created by alcoholism, and it critically interrogates the societal factors that contribute to the disproportionately high rates of alcoholism among lesbians by exploring the antecedents and…

  20. Alcoholism's Hidden Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses children of alcoholics as victims of fetal alcohol syndrome, family violence, retarded social development, and severe emotional scars. These children bring family roles to school that allow survival in the alcoholic home but are dysfunctional outside it. Educators can take certain steps to address these students' problems. Includes six…

  1. Women and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol, which is found in: »» 12 ounces of beer with 5 percent alcohol content »» 5 ounces of wine with 12 percent alcohol content »» 1.5 ounces ... reflect customary serving sizes. A large cup of beer, an overpoured glass of wine, or a single ...

  2. Alcohol and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Dufour, M C; Archer, L; Gordis, E

    1992-02-01

    Moderate drinking for the elderly of both genders is no more than one drink per day, where a drink is defined as 12 oz of beer, 5 oz of wine, or 1.5 oz of spirits. Age does not affect the rate of absorption or elimination of alcohol. Lean body mass decreases and adipose tissue increases with age, however, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the volume of total body water. With a smaller volume of distribution, an alcohol dose identical to that administered to a younger individual of the same size and gender will produce a higher blood alcohol concentration in the elderly. Low-dose alcohol stimulates appetite and promoters regular bowel function. In the well-nourished nonalcoholic elderly, the negative impact of alcohol consumption on nutrition is minimal. Alcohol consumption improves mood by increasing feelings of happiness and freedom from care while lessening inhibitions, stress, tension, and depression. Although in the laboratory low-dose alcohol improves certain types of cognitive function in young men, in other types of task performance, alcohol induces impairment, which worsens with age. The effects of alcohol on sleep are primarily detrimental, worsening both insomnia and breathing disturbances during sleep. Although the role of alcohol consumption in mortality from heart disease has not been investigated in the elderly, moderate drinking appears safe. Under some circumstances low-dose alcohol may produce analgesia whereas in others it may worsen pain. The elderly use a significant proportion of both prescription and over-the-counter medication, a large variety of which interact with alcohol. Alcoholic beverage consumption may exacerbate cognitive impairment and dementias of other etiology. Although some studies suggest that moderate use of alcohol by institutionalized senior citizens appears to produce benefits including improved socialization, separation of the effects of the social situation from those specifically attributable to alcohol remains to

  3. Homozygous loss-of-function mutation of the LEPREL1 gene causes severe non-syndromic high myopia with early-onset cataract.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Tong, P; Peng, Y; Wang, T; Liu, Y; Chen, J; Li, Y; Tian, Q; Hu, Y; Zheng, Y; Xiao, L; Xiong, W; Pan, Q; Hu, Z; Xia, K

    2014-12-01

    High myopia is a severe visual impairment which can increase the risk of retinal degeneration, subretinal hemorrhage, choroidal neovascularization, cataract and retinal detachment. We recruited an autosomal-recessive high myopia family, with affected subjects who also present early-onset cataract, retinal degeneration and other complications. Using targeted capturing and whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous non-sense mutation in the LEPREL1 gene which causes premature termination of the translation at the fifth amino acid (c.13C>T; p.Q5X), co-segregating with the phenotypes. LEPREL1 encodes a proline hydroxylase called prolyl 3-hydroxylase 2 (P3H2), a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that hydroxylates collagens. The results show that LEPREL1 plays an important role in eye development and homozygous loss-of-function mutation of this gene can cause severely high myopia and early-onset cataract. Our study also strongly suggests that the disruption of collagen modification is one of the pathogenic mechanisms of high myopia and cataract.

  4. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhu, Jianfeng; He, Xiangui; Du, Ergang; Jiang, Kelimu; Zheng, Wenjing; Ke, Bilian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r = 0.26, P < 0.01), and lens position (age adjusted; r = −0.31, P < 0.01) were found. After cycloplegia, ACD and ACV significantly increased, while ACA significantly decreased. Changes in refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.05, all). Changes of refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Myopia presented thinner lenses and smaller changes of anterior segment and refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia. PMID:26457196

  5. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhu, Jianfeng; He, Xiangui; Du, Ergang; Jiang, Kelimu; Zheng, Wenjing; Ke, Bilian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r = 0.26, P < 0.01), and lens position (age adjusted; r = -0.31, P < 0.01) were found. After cycloplegia, ACD and ACV significantly increased, while ACA significantly decreased. Changes in refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.05, all). Changes of refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Myopia presented thinner lenses and smaller changes of anterior segment and refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia.

  6. Elevated Transforming Growth Factor-β2 in the Aqueous Humor: A Possible Explanation for High Rate of Capsular Contraction Syndrome in High Myopia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keke; Zhu, Xiangjia; Chen, Minjie; Sun, Xinghuai; Yang, Jin; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the role of transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-β2) in the development of high myopic capsular contraction syndrome. Methods. Nineteen cases of capsular contraction syndrome, including 14 with high myopia, were collected, and their clinical data were reviewed. Aqueous humor and anterior capsular membranes were obtained during capsulotomy. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining with anti-TGF-β2 antibody were performed on capsular membranes. TGF-β2 levels in aqueous humor were assayed using ELISA and western blot. Results. High myopia was significantly associated with the incidence of capsular contraction syndrome (odds ratio: 14.74, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 5.29-41.05). Histopathological analysis revealed proliferation of fibroblast-like lens epithelial cells on the shrunken anterior capsule, labeled with TGF-β2 antibodies. ELISA and Western blot showed higher levels of TGF-β2 in aqueous humor of patients with capsular contraction syndrome and high myopia. Conclusions. High myopia is a risk factor for capsular contraction syndrome. Elevated TGF-β2 levels in high myopic cataract patients may play an important role in the pathogenesis of capsular contraction syndrome.

  7. Elevated Transforming Growth Factor-β2 in the Aqueous Humor: A Possible Explanation for High Rate of Capsular Contraction Syndrome in High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Zhu, Xiangjia; Chen, Minjie; Sun, Xinghuai; Yang, Jin; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the role of transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-β2) in the development of high myopic capsular contraction syndrome. Methods. Nineteen cases of capsular contraction syndrome, including 14 with high myopia, were collected, and their clinical data were reviewed. Aqueous humor and anterior capsular membranes were obtained during capsulotomy. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining with anti-TGF-β2 antibody were performed on capsular membranes. TGF-β2 levels in aqueous humor were assayed using ELISA and western blot. Results. High myopia was significantly associated with the incidence of capsular contraction syndrome (odds ratio: 14.74, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 5.29–41.05). Histopathological analysis revealed proliferation of fibroblast-like lens epithelial cells on the shrunken anterior capsule, labeled with TGF-β2 antibodies. ELISA and Western blot showed higher levels of TGF-β2 in aqueous humor of patients with capsular contraction syndrome and high myopia. Conclusions. High myopia is a risk factor for capsular contraction syndrome. Elevated TGF-β2 levels in high myopic cataract patients may play an important role in the pathogenesis of capsular contraction syndrome. PMID:26942002

  8. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhu, Jianfeng; He, Xiangui; Du, Ergang; Jiang, Kelimu; Zheng, Wenjing; Ke, Bilian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r = 0.26, P < 0.01), and lens position (age adjusted; r = -0.31, P < 0.01) were found. After cycloplegia, ACD and ACV significantly increased, while ACA significantly decreased. Changes in refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.05, all). Changes of refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Myopia presented thinner lenses and smaller changes of anterior segment and refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia. PMID:26457196

  9. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches.

  10. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  11. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  12. Genetics and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  13. Assessment of exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the adenosine A2A receptor gene to high myopia susceptibility in Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Xue, Anquan; Chen, Wei; Ding, Yang; Yan, Dongsheng; Peng, Jiqing; Zeng, Changqing; Qu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) modulates collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix production in ocular tissues that contribute to eye growth and the development of myopia. We aimed to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in A2AR exons associates with high myopia found in Chinese subjects. Methods DNA samples were prepared from venous lymphocytes of 175 Chinese subjects with high myopia of less than –8.00 diopters (D) correction and 101 ethnically similar controls with between –1.00 D and +1.00 D correction. The coding region sequences of A2AR were amplified by PCR and analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The detected variations were confirmed by reverse sequencing. Allelic frequencies of all detected common SNPs were assessed for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Results Five variations in A2AR exons, 5675 A>G, 5765 C>T, 13325 G>A, 13448 C>T, and 14000 T>A, were detected in controls at a low frequency (<1%). However, one SNP, 13772 T>C (rs5751876), showed its polymorphism in 53.3% of the total study population. The rs5751876 is a synonymous substitution located in a tyrosine codon of exon 2. Despite no significant difference in genotype distribution between cases and controls, the frequency of heterozygotes with the rs5751876 genotype was significantly lower in subjects with high myopia. Conclusions The reduced frequency of the heterozygote rs5751876 genotype in subjects suggests a possible association of A2AR with high myopia in a Chinese population. PMID:22740769

  14. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; French, Barbara A.; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J.; McKillop, Iain H.; Kirpich, Irina A.; McClain, Craig J.; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M.; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomas, Paul G.; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based upon the “Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia” organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its comorbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible

  15. Alcohol-Specific Coping Styles of Adult Children of Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorders and Associations with Psychosocial Functioning.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Michelle L; Eddie, David; Buffington, Angela J; McCrady, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Parental alcohol use disorders (AUDs) have been conceptualized as a chronic stressor that can lead to deleterious long-term outcomes in children of individuals with AUDs. Yet, while many individuals are detrimentally affected by their parents' problematic alcohol use, and go on to manifest psychological problems, others do not. How individuals cope with the stress of having a parent with an AUD is believed to be an important moderator of this differential outcome. This study assessed whether individuals' alcohol-specific coping styles predicted alcohol use, positive or negative life events, and depression, using a sample of 465 college students, of whom 20% were adult children of individuals with alcohol use disorders, colloquially known as adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), and a battery of well-validated, self-report measures. Participant ACOAs reported less 'engaged' and 'total' alcohol-specific coping strategies and more 'withdrawal' alcohol-specific coping strategies than their non adult children of alcoholics (NACOAs) counterparts. Across participants, women reported more 'engaged', 'tolerant/inactive', and 'total' coping than men. Although ACOAs reported significantly more negative life events, which predicted more passive coping styles, they did not differ significantly from NACOAs on measures of problematic alcohol use or depression, supporting theories of resilience in ACOAs regardless of their alcohol-specific coping styles. For NACOAs, 'tolerant' coping predicted greater depression and alcohol-related problems; 'engaged' coping predicted fewer alcohol problems. Results suggest that ACOAs cope differently with problematic alcohol use among relatives and friends compared with NACOAs and are more likely to experience negative life events. Additionally, alcohol-related coping strategies have more predictive utility in NACOAs than ACOAs. PMID:25802055

  16. Residence Hall Room Type and Alcohol Use among College Students Living on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Don; O'Grady, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives were to explore the relation between the built environment of residence halls and the alcohol use of college students living on campus from the perspective of the theory of routine activity. This exploratory study examined data from two samples on one college campus. Online surveys assessed alcohol use, attitudes toward alcohol use,…

  17. The Rise and Development of the Adult Children of Alcoholics Movement: Merging Three Theoretical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, David R.; Reeves, Edward B.

    Drinking behavior, from abstinence to alcoholism, has been explored from a wide range of intellectual positions, academic disciplines, and ideological stances. The Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOAs) movement is probably the most rapidly expanding enterprise in the alcoholism arena. Social movement theory seeks to describe, explain, and…

  18. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  19. Coping Skills Program for Individuals with Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Cynthia P.; Hood, Colleen Deyell

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a theory based coping skills program for people with alcoholism. Based on Shiffman and Wills' (1985) Stress Program Process model, it helped clients effectively respond to conditions that contributed to negative affect and create life- enhancing experiences. Evaluation involved social…

  20. Alcohol, Drugs and Adolescents. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaChance, Laurie L.

    The foreword states that this publication aims to assist the reader to better understand the dimensions of the drug and alcohol abuse problems of adolescents and the responses of choice by professionals and by those caring for adolescents. These topics are discussed: (1) the stepping stone theory; (2) correlates of substance abuse; (3)…

  1. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Myopia in 3-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Valencia Hui Xian; Verkicharla, Pavan Kumar; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Chua, Sharon Yu Lin; Cai, Shirong; Tan, Chuen Seng; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ngo, Cheryl; Saw, Seang-Mei; on behalf of the GUSTO study group

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the association of axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CRC) ratio with spherical equivalent (SE) in a 3-year old Asian cohort. Methods Three-hundred forty-nine 3-year old Asian children from The Growing Up in Singapore towards Healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study underwent AL and CRC measurements with a noncontact ocular biometer and cycloplegic refraction using an autorefractor. The ratio of AL to CRC (AL/CRC) was calculated for all the participants, and subsequently AL, CRC, and AL/CRC were analyzed in relationship to SE. Results The SE showed better correlation with AL/CRC (Spearman's correlation coefficient, ρ = −0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.66; −0.49; P < 0.001) compared to either AL or CRC alone ([ρ = −0.36; 95% CI: −0.51 to 0.51; P = 0.01] and [ρ = 0.05; 95% CI: −0.04 to 0.17; P = 0.34], respectively). Mean AL/CRC was 2.91 ± 0.06 among myopes and decreased to 2.79 ± 0.06 among hyperopes. Axial length to corneal radius of curvature was strongly correlated with SE in myopes (ρ = −0.78; 95% CI: −3.76; −0.79; P = < 0.001), but not in emmetropes and hyperopes ([ρ = −0.39; 95% CI: −10.73; −0.57; P = 0.01] and [ρ = −0.18; 95% CI: −17.28; 12.42; P = 0.38], respectively). Linear regression adjusted for gender and ethnicity showed a 0.74-diopter shift in SE towards myopia with every 0.1 increase in AL/CRC ratio (P < 0.001, r2 = 0.33). Conclusion The correlation between SE and AL/CRC is stronger than that between AL or CRC alone. This suggests that in a research setting, when cycloplegic refraction is difficult to perform on 3-year-old children, AL/CRC may be the next best reference for refractive error. Translational Relevance In the research setting, AL/CRC may be the next best reference for refractive error over AL alone when cycloplegic refraction is unavailable in 3-year old children. PMID:26929885

  2. Many-Objective Reservoir Policy Identification and Refinement to Reduce Institutional Myopia in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, M.; Herman, J. D.; Castelletti, A.; Reed, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Institutional inertia strongly limits our ability to adapt water reservoir operations to better manage growing water demands as well as their associated uncertainties in a changing climate. Although it has long been recognized that these systems are generally framed in heterogeneous socio-economic contexts involving a myriad of conflicting, non-commensurable operating objectives, our broader understanding of the multiobjective consequences of current operating rules as well as their vulnerability to hydroclimatic uncertainties is severely limited. This study proposes a decision analytic framework to overcome policy inertia and myopia in complex river basin management contexts. The framework combines reservoir policy identification and many-objective optimization under uncertainty to characterize current operations and discover key tradeoffs between alternative policies for balancing evolving demands and system uncertainties. The approach is demonstrated on the Conowingo Dam, located within the Lower Susquehanna River, USA. The Lower Susquehanna River is an interstate water body that has been subject to intensive water management efforts due to the system's competing demands from urban water supply, atomic power plant cooling, hydropower production, and federally regulated environmental flows. Initially our proposed framework uses available streamflow observations to implicitly identify the Conowingo Dam's current but unknown operating policy. This baseline policy is identified by fitting radial basis functions to existing system dynamics. Our assumption in the baseline policy is that the dam operator is represented as a rational agent seeking to maximize primary operational objectives (i.e., guaranteeing the public water supply and maximizing the hydropower revenue). The quality of the identified baseline policy is evaluated by its ability to replicate historical release dynamics. Once identified, the historical baseline policy then provides a means of representing

  3. Relationships between central and peripheral corneal thickness in different degrees of myopia

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Sara; Mena, Laura; Rio-San Cristobal, Ana; Martin, Raul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the relationship between the central corneal thickness (CCT) and mid-peripheral corneal thickness (PCT) with the degree of myopia [axial length (AL) and spherical equivalent refractive error (SE)]. Methods 175 right myopic eyes from 175 patients were divided according to the degree of SE: group #1 (n = 76, <6.00 D), group #2 (n = 72, between 6.00 and 12.00 D) and group #3 (n = 27, >12.00 D). The CCT and PCT (3 mm from the apex to the superior, inferior, nasal and temporal locations) were measured with the Orbscan-II. Relative peripheral index (RPI) was calculated by dividing the PCT by the CCT. The AL was measured with the IOL Master, and the SE was obtained with subjective refraction. Results AL was 25.18 ± 1.16 mm, 26.59 ± 1.26 mm and 29.45 ± 2.58 mm and SE was −3.31 ± 1.40 D, −8.32 ± 1.64 D and −16.44 ± 4.48 D for groups #1, #2 and #3, respectively. Non-statistically significant differences in central and peripheral corneal thickness were found between groups (P > 0.05 ANOVA). Non-significant relationship was found between central and peripheral corneal thickness with the AL and SE in the three study groups and in the total sample (r < 0.24; P > 0.05). The RPI values were similar between groups without significant difference between groups (P > 0.05 ANOVA). Linear relationship was found between RPI superior location in group #2 (r = −0.23; P = 0.04) and RPI nasal location in group #3 with the EE (r = 0.41; P = 0.03). Conclusion There are no significant differences among low, moderate and extremely myopic eyes related to the CCT and PCT. Corneal thickness is very similar in myopic eyes with small differences that are not clinically relevant to myopic patient management. PMID:24646900

  4. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions in aqueous mixtures of alcohols at a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-21

    Aqueous solutions of alcohols are interesting because of their anomalous behavior that is believed to be due to the molecular structuring of water and alcohol around each other in solution. The interfacial structuring and properties are significant for application in alcohol purification processes and biomolecular structure. Here we study aqueous mixtures of short alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol) at a hydrophobic surface using interfacial statistical associating fluid theory which is a perturbation density functional theory. The addition of a small amount of alcohol decreases the interfacial tension of water drastically. This trend in interfacial tension can be explained by the structure of water and alcohol next to the surface. The hydrophobic group of an added alcohol preferentially goes to the surface preserving the structure of water in the bulk. For a given bulk alcohol concentration, water mixed with the different alcohols has different interfacial tensions with propanol having a lower interfacial tension than methanol and ethanol. 2-propanol is not as effective in decreasing the interfacial tension as 1-propanol because it partitions poorly to the surface due to its larger excluded volume. But for a given surface alcohol mole fraction, all the alcohol mixtures give similar values for interfacial tension. For separation of alcohol from water, methods that take advantage of the high surface mole fraction of alcohol have advantages compared to separation using the vapor in equilibrium with a water-alcohol liquid.

  5. [Alcohol and crime].

    PubMed

    Lévay, Boglárka

    2006-01-01

    The role alcohol abuse plays in criminality has been a matter of primary concern for scholars for decades, as indicated by numerous studies and research projects. Most of these studies focus on determining the presence of a relationship between criminal behaviour and alcohol use, and whether criminal inclinations increase with the consumption of alcohol. Research shows that alcohol use indeed increases the risk of criminal behaviour, and that there is an especially strong and consistent correlation between alcohol abuse and violent crimes. However, researchers still disagree on the exact extent to which alcohol use effects criminality, and on the mechanisms causing alcohol to induce violent behaviour. A significant proportion of studies have focused in recent years on aggressive behaviour as a result of drinking alcohol. One of the most important means of measurement is the study of violent behaviour in places where alcohol is on sale. Studying the forms and frequency of violence in pubs and near off-licence stores greatly enables experts to understand the general context of the problem. This is the reason for the increasing interest in the topic throughout the past few decades. The present study focuses mainly on the literature published in English and German in leading journals of criminology since 1980, as well as on the most recent and fundamental publications on the topic, with special regard to results concerning drinking habits, and the relationship between drinking alcohol and violent or criminal behaviour, respectively.

  6. Effect of low-addition soft contact lenses with decentered optical design on myopia progression in children: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fujikado, Takashi; Ninomiya, Sayuri; Kobayashi, Takuma; Suzaki, Asaki; Nakada, Mitsuhiko; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of low-addition soft contact lenses (CLs) with decentered optical design on the progression of myopia in children in a pilot study. Subjects and methods Twenty-four Japanese children age 10–16 years with baseline myopia of −0.75 to −3.50 D sphere and ≤1.00 D cylinder were studied. The new CLs were designed to have a nasal decentration with the optical center centered on the line of sight, and with progressive-addition power of +0.5 D peripherally. Monofocal soft CLs were used as controls. A pair of new CLs or control CLs was randomly assigned to the children, and they wore the lenses for 12 months during the first phase. Then, the type of CLs was changed, ie, a crossover design, and the children were observed for another 12 months during the second phase. The end points were changes in axial length and refractive error (spherical equivalent) under cycloplegia. Results The change of axial length in the new-CL and control-CL groups was not different between 12 months and baseline, the change of axial length between 12 months and 1 month in the new-CL group (0.09±0.08 mm) was significantly smaller (47%) than that in the control-CL group (0.17±0.08 mm, P<0.05). During the same period, the change of refractive error in the new-CL group was not significantly different from that in the control group. Neither the change in axial length nor refractive error in the new-CL group was significantly different from those in the control-CL group in the second phase. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that low-addition soft CLs with decentered optical design can reduce the degree of axial elongation in myopic children after an initial transient phase of CL wear. The reduction of the progression of myopia by low-addition soft CLs warrants further investigations. PMID:25284981

  7. Alcohol Expectancies in Young Adult Sons of Alcoholics and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra A.; And Others

    Adolescent offspring of alcoholics have been found to have higher alcohol reinforcement expectancies than do teenagers from nonalcoholic families. In particular, those with a positive family history of alcoholism expect more cognitive and motor enhancement with alcohol consumption. This study examined the alcohol expectancies of 58 matched pairs…

  8. Exposure to Televised Alcohol Ads and Subsequent Adolescent Alcohol Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Alan W.; Zogg, Jennifer B.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Dent, Clyde W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective : To assess the impact of televised alcohol commercials on adolescents' alcohol use. Methods : Adolescents completed questionnaires about alcohol commercials and alcohol use in a prospective study. Results : A one standard deviation increase in viewing television programs containing alcohol commercials in seventh grade was associated…

  9. Understanding the role of alcohol during rape: the perfect storm of attention, emotion, & expectancies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Sex offenders and violent offenders in general that were intoxicated at the time of their offense often claim that they were too intoxicated to know 1) what they were doing at the time of the offense and 2) therefore unable to recall the details of the offense situation the next day. What the literature has to say contradicts the claims of sex offenders or violent offenders who claim they were "out of control" and that they do not recall what they did in the offense situation. Alcohol use (mild to moderate consumption) appears to result in 1) alcohol myopia; 2) increased attentional focus on the more salient emotions (whether negative or positive); 3) improved creative thinking and improved attention to the activity at hand; 4) decreased frontal lobe activity (e.g., lack of concern about consequences or morals); 5) is impacted by alcohol expectancies; and 6) does not prevent an individual from being able to recall activity that occurred while intoxicated when provided cues.

  10. Understanding the role of alcohol during rape: the perfect storm of attention, emotion, & expectancies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Sex offenders and violent offenders in general that were intoxicated at the time of their offense often claim that they were too intoxicated to know 1) what they were doing at the time of the offense and 2) therefore unable to recall the details of the offense situation the next day. What the literature has to say contradicts the claims of sex offenders or violent offenders who claim they were "out of control" and that they do not recall what they did in the offense situation. Alcohol use (mild to moderate consumption) appears to result in 1) alcohol myopia; 2) increased attentional focus on the more salient emotions (whether negative or positive); 3) improved creative thinking and improved attention to the activity at hand; 4) decreased frontal lobe activity (e.g., lack of concern about consequences or morals); 5) is impacted by alcohol expectancies; and 6) does not prevent an individual from being able to recall activity that occurred while intoxicated when provided cues. PMID:25345240

  11. Tianeptine and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Favre, J D; Guelfi-Sozzi, C; Delalleau, B; Lôo, H

    1997-10-01

    Several arguments are in favour of the use of antidepressant drugs in alcohol-dependent patients, especially those acting on the serotoninergic system: (1) neurochemical data indicate the interaction between alcohol and 5-HT metabolism, (2) pharmacological studies show an improvement in the behaviour of alcoholized animals treated with antidepressants, (3) depression is a frequent disease in alcoholic patients. Tianeptine has been shown to be active in the treatment of depression in patients with history of alcohol abuse or dependence. In a first double-blind study performed versus amitryptiline, depression after withdrawal was improved by tianeptine, and biological abnormalities usually related to chronic alcohol intake tended to decrease. Similar results were found in an open study carried out on 277 alcoholic patients treated for 1 year. As these patients were depressed, no definite conclusion could be drawn from these results in respect of a specific action of tianeptine on alcohol dependence. Thus, a multicentre double-blind study has been performed which compared tianeptine (12.5 mg t.i.d) and placebo in 342 non-depressed patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for Psychoactive Substance Dependence (alcohol). Other inclusion criteria were: daily alcohol intake higher than 80 g, minimum score of 3 on the Short-Mast Questionnaire, mean corpuscular volume above 98 fl and/or gamma Gt more than twice the upper limit of normal. The patients were treated for 9 months. The intention-to-treat population and the per protocol population were made up of 327 patients and 111 patients, respectively. The main efficacy criterion was the absence of alcoholic relapse (abstinence) defined by the patient's statements, the investigators clinical judgement and some biological parameters: alcohol blood levels, gamma Gt levels. Secondary criteria were the evolution of the alcohol consumption in the patients who relapsed, cumulative abstinence duration, a visual analogue scale for the

  12. Attachment theory and theory of planned behavior: an integrative model predicting underage drinking.

    PubMed

    Lac, Andrew; Crano, William D; Berger, Dale E; Alvaro, Eusebio M

    2013-08-01

    Research indicates that peer and maternal bonds play important but sometimes contrasting roles in the outcomes of children. Less is known about attachment bonds to these 2 reference groups in young adults. Using a sample of 351 participants (18 to 20 years of age), the research integrated two theoretical traditions: attachment theory and theory of planned behavior (TPB). The predictive contribution of both theories was examined in the context of underage adult alcohol use. Using full structural equation modeling, results substantiated the hypotheses that secure peer attachment positively predicted norms and behavioral control toward alcohol, but secure maternal attachment inversely predicted attitudes and behavioral control toward alcohol. Alcohol attitudes, norms, and behavioral control each uniquely explained alcohol intentions, which anticipated an increase in alcohol behavior 1 month later. The hypothesized processes were statistically corroborated by tests of indirect and total effects. These findings support recommendations for programs designed to curtail risky levels of underage drinking using the tenets of attachment theory and TPB.

  13. [Alcohol and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Maillot, F; Farad, S; Lamisse, F

    2001-11-01

    Alcoholism and alcohol-associated organ injury is one of the major health problems worldwide. Alcohol may lead to an alteration in intermediary metabolism and the relation between alcohol intake and body weight is a paradox. The effect of alcohol intake on resting metabolic rate, assessed by indirect calorimetry, and lipid oxidation, is still controversial. Small quantities of ethanol seem to have no effect on body weight. Ingestion of moderate amounts may lead to an increase in body weight, via a lipid-oxidizing suppressive effect. Chronic intake of excessive amounts in alcoholics leads to a decrease in body weight, probably via increased lipid oxidation and energy expenditure. Chronic ethanol abuse alters lipid-soluble (vitamins A, D and E) and water-soluble (B-complex vitamins, vitamin C) vitamins status, and some trace elements status such as magnesium, selenium or zinc.

  14. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Torok, Natalie J

    2015-11-02

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%-50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies.

  15. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  16. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  17. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  18. Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs, and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are fetal alcohol spectrum disorders? • What is fetal alcohol syndrome? • What amounts of alcohol can cause FAS? • Is ... disabilities that can last a lifetime. What is fetal alcohol syndrome? Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most severe ...

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  20. Affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related mortality in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse has numerous adverse health and social consequences. The consumer response to changes in alcohol affordability is an important issue on alcohol policy debates. Studies from many countries have shown an inverse relationship between alcohol prices and alcohol consumption in the population. There are, however, suggestions that increasing the price of alcohol by rising taxes may have limited effect on alcohol-related problems, associated with long-term heavy drinking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between alcohol affordability and alcohol-related mortality rates in post-Soviet Belarus. For this purpose trends in alcohol-related mortality rates (mortality from liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, alcoholism and alcohol psychoses) and affordability of vodka between 1990 and 2010 were compared. The time series analysis revealed that 1% increase in vodka affordability is associated with an increase in liver cirrhosis mortality of 0,77%, an increase in pancreatitis mortality of 0.53%, an increase in mortality from alcoholism and alcohol psychoses of 0,70%. The major conclusion emerging from this study is that affordability of alcohol is one of the most important predictor of alcohol-related problems in a population. These findings provide additional evidence that decreasing in affordability of alcohol is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

  1. [Alcohol and criminal behavior].

    PubMed

    Arzt, G

    1990-05-01

    The topic 'alcohol and crime' has several aspects. This article shows how drug administration is based on a complex network of legal provisions and is enforced by criminal law sanctions. As to crimes influenced by alcohol, drunken driving is by far the most important and best researched field. Next, the article turns to the role of alcohol with regard to severe common crimes such as murder or child abuse. Finally, the issue of drunkenness as a defence is raised and the treatment of alcoholics as a criminal law sanction discussed.

  2. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used “over the counter” sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to understand how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models, and a combination of multi-disciplinary experimental methodologies to examine and understand anatomical and cellular substrates mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure on sleep-wakefulness. The results of our studies suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol’s action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Lesions of the BF cholinergic neurons or blockade of AD A1 receptors results in attenuation of alcohol-induced sleep promotion, suggesting that AD and BF cholinergic neurons are critical for sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern

  3. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones ...

  4. Microwave alcohol fuel sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, K.; Endo, A.; Morozumi, H.; Shibata, T.

    1984-06-05

    A microwave alcohol fuel sensor comprises a microwave oscillator, a microwave receiver, and a microwave transmission circuit connected to the oscillator and the receiver. The microwave transmission circuit comprises a dielectric substrate and, a strip line mounted on the substrate so that microwaves leak from the substrate to an alcohol gasoline fuel, and the microwaves attenuate by alcohol dielectric loss, whereby output voltage from the receiver corresponds to alcohol content rate. The dielectric substrate is formed tubular so that a constant amount of the fuel is fed the sensor.

  5. Retinoic acid metabolic change in retina and choroid of the guinea pig with lens-induced myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Liu, Shuang-Zhen; Dou, Xiu-Qiong

    2012-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of retinoic acid (RA) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (RALDH2) of retina and choroid in the guinea pig lens-induced myopic eyes. METHODS Totally 45 guinea pigs, at age of three weeks, were randomly assigned into three groups: the normal control, the lens-induced group and the recovering group. Out of focus was induced by the -6.00D concave lens on the left eye, and lasted for 15 days. All animals underwent biometric measurement (corneal radius of curvature, refraction and axial length). Subsequently, RA content in the retina and RPE/choriod complex was detected by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. RALDH2 protein in the retina and RPE/choriod complex was evaluated by the immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. RESULTS After wearing -6.00D lens for 15 days, axial length of the lens-induced eye extends and myopia was formed, with RA contents increasing in both the neural retina and RPE/choroid complex. Comparing with the lens-induced group, myopic degree significantly relieved, and its RA contents in both the neural retina and RPE/choroid complex decreased in the recovering group. In the normal control, RALDH2 protein was expressed positively in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), inner plexiform layer (IPL) and lateral border of outer nuclear layer (ONL). Retinal RALDH2 protein increased in the lens-induced group, and was also positive in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). In the recovering group, retinal RALDH2 protein attenuated the expression in the OPL turns to negative. RALDH2 protein was not expressed in the choroid of any group. CONCLUSION RA of retina and chorid participates in the regulation of the lens-induced myopia in guinea pigs, which may be related with retinal RALDH2 protein. PMID:23275899

  6. Foldable iris-fixated phakic intraocular lens implantation for the correction of myopia: Two years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ozertürk, Yusuf; Kubaloglu, Anil; Sari, Esin Sogutlu; Koytak, Arif; Capkin, Musa; Akçay, Levent; Evcili, Pinar Sorgun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and potential risks of Artiflex foldable iris-fixated phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implantation for the management of myopia. Materials and Methods: Seventy-eight eyes of 40 consecutive patients with a mean spherical refraction of –11.70 ± 3.77 diopters (D; range –5.50 to –17.5 D) were included in this prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. Main parameters assessed were uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), corneal topography (Orbscan II, BauchandLomb, Rochester, NY, USA), manifest and cycloplegic refractive errors, endothelial cell density (ECD) and applanation tonometry. Results: After 2 years, BSCVA was 20/40 or better in 82% of the eyes and UCVA was 20/40 or better in 84% of the eyes. After 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years, 51.3% (37 of 72 eyes), 58.9% (46 of 78 eyes) and 76.0% (38 of 50 eyes) of eyes gained 1 line or more of BSCVA, respectively. Compared to preoperative values, the mean endothelial cell loss was 2.6% at 1 month, 4.9% at 1 year and 7.4% at 2 years. Pigmented or non-pigmented precipitates were observed in17 eyes (21.7%) which were treated with topical corticosteroids. At the second postoperative year, pigmented precipitates persisted in nine eyes. However, this was not associated with a loss of BSCVA. Conclusion: The implantation of Artiflex pIOL is an effective surgical option for the management of high myopia. The most common complication observed within 2 years of follow-up was accumulation of pigmented precipitates with no effect on the final BSCVA. PMID:22218241

  7. Posterior chamber collagen copolymer phakic intraocular lens with a central hole for moderate-to-high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xinfang; Wu, Weiliang; Wang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Tong, Jianping; Shen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Visian Implantable Collamer Lens V4c) for the correction of moderate to high myopia in Chinese eyes. The article is designed as a retrospective case series. This study included the first consecutive eyes that had implantation of a new pIOL design with a central hole, at our department by the same surgeon. The safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, and adverse events of the surgery were evaluated over 6 months. The study enrolled 63 eyes (32 patients). The mean spherical equivalent decreased from −12.81 ± 3.11 diopters (D) preoperatively to −0.05 ± 0.27 D 6 months postoperatively; 96.8% of eyes were within ±0.50 D of the target and 100% of eyes were within ±1.00 D. All eyes had a decimal uncorrected distance visual acuity of 0.5 (20/40) or better at every follow-up visit. The safety and efficacy indices were 1.42 ± 0.34 and 1.11 ± 0.19, respectively. Postoperatively, the intraocular pressure (IOP) remained stable over time. No significant rises in IOP (including pupillary block) and no secondary cataract were found. After 6 months, the mean vault was 505.2 ± 258.9 μm (range 120–990 μm), and the mean endothelial cell loss was 2.0%. Implantation of the pIOL was safe, effective, predictable, and stable in the correction of moderate-to-high myopia in Han Chinese patients, even without peripheral iridectomy. PMID:27603356

  8. The Effect of Alcohol and Private Self-Consciousness on Self-Report of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Ken

    Many studies have supported the finding that alcohol consumption may lead to socially inappropriate behaviors. One theory which appears promising in accounting for the effects of intoxication is Hull's (1981) self-consciousness theory which is based on the idea that alcohol consumption affects behavior indirectly as a result of its effect on…

  9. Prenatal alcohol consumption and knowledge about alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oksoo; Park, Kyungil

    2011-09-01

    The study investigated prenatal alcohol consumption and knowledge of alcohol risks and fetal alcohol syndrome among Korean women. The participants were 221 Korean women who attended the post-partum care centers in Seoul, Korea. The data included the participants' background characteristics, quantity-frequency typology, Student Alcohol Questionnaire, and a scale on the participants' knowledge of fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcohol was consumed during pregnancy by 12.7% of the participants. Of these, 60.7% drank alcohol with their spouse. A few participants reported that nurses identified their drinking habits and gave them information on alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome. Most of the participants did not have the opportunity for prenatal counseling about fetal alcohol syndrome. The knowledge level regarding alcohol risks and fetal alcohol syndrome among the participants was poor. Alcohol consumption before pregnancy was significantly related to prenatal alcohol consumption. Prenatal alcohol consumption was not related to knowledge about alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome. The assessment of alcohol consumption and counseling about alcohol are needed for pregnant women in order to prevent fetal alcohol syndrome.

  10. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  11. Influence of different alcohols on the swelling behaviour of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althans, Daniel; Langenbach, Kai; Enders, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    The swelling equilibrium of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels in alcohol solutions as a function of temperature, alcohol concentration, kind of alcohol (C1OH-C3OH) and gel properties was investigated experimentally. Additionally, the swelling degree as a function of the alcohol concentration was modelled with the UNIQUAC-Free Volume model in combination with the Phantom Network theory. The experiments show that, in pure water, the transition temperature is between 303.15 and 308.15 K depending on the properties of the gel and hence on the polymerization conditions. The transition from a swollen to a shrunken state is caused by the polymeric network and the change of polymer chain localization. In a system with hydrogel + water + alcohol, the swelling degree decreases with increasing alcohol concentration until the shrunken state is reached and increases again by further addition of alcohol at constant temperature. With increasing carbon number of the alcohols, the transition from a swollen to a shrunken state and vice versa shifts to lower concentrations at constant temperature. The use of the UNIQUAC-Free Volume model with Phantom Network theory leads to results in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Alcoholism: A Developmental Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarter, Ralph E.; Vanyukov, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism etiology is discussed from developmental behavior genetic perspective. Temperament features that appear to be associated with heightened risk for alcoholism are examined. Their interactions with the environment during course of development are considered within epigenetic framework and, as discussed, have ramifications for improving…

  13. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy.

  14. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy. PMID:25307570

  15. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  16. Cardiovascular effects of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, D M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of alcohol on the heart include modification of the risk of coronary artery disease, the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, exacerbation of conduction disorders, atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias, and an increased risk of hypertension, hemorrhagic stroke, infectious endocarditis, and fetal heart abnormalities. PMID:2686174

  17. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  18. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  19. Alcohol and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Ruth; And Others

    Prepared in response to a request from members of the United Methodist Church, this guide can be used with high school students generally, if the theological orientation is recognized. The guide provides opportunities, in four lesson outlines, to share experiences concerning alcohol use, to present information regarding the effect of alcohol on…

  20. [Alcohol and working].

    PubMed

    Mangili, A

    2004-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on both health and productivity, alcohol misuse is a serious concern in the workplace. Some occupations (e.g. employees of the catering and hotel trade, seamen, sales representatives, brewers and distillers, journalists, physicians, lawyers) are associated with a high rate of alcohol abuse. Alcohol intake can modify worker's behaviour (impaired judgement and vigilance, dulled reflexes) causing reduced performance, mistakes during operating procedures, accidents and injuries. Moreover it can affect the toxicokinetic and toxicodinamic properties of several substances in the workplace, inducing a more complex evaluation of exposure assessment and diagnostic procedures of occupational diseases. The occupational physician, during health surveillance program, can face several alcohol related issues. These entail diagnostic evaluation of alcoholism, job fitness evaluation, in heavy drinkers, advise of rehabilitation and health promotion program.

  1. Phytotherapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Michał; Zovko-Koncić, Marijana; Chrostek, Lech

    2012-02-01

    Alcoholism is a medical, social, and economic problem where treatment methods mostly include difficult and long-lasting psychotherapy and, in some cases, quite controversial pharmacological approaches. A number of medicinal plants and pure natural compounds are reported to have preventive and therapeutic effects on alcoholism and alcohol dependency, but their constituents, efficacy and mechanism of action are mostly unknown so far. Recently, kudzu [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi], St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.), danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.), ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.), Japanese raisin tree (Hovenia dulcis Thunb.), ibogaine (Tabernanthe iboga H. Bn.), evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.), prickly pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill.), purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), fenugreek seed (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and many others drew the attention of researchers. Can, therefore, drugs of natural origin be helpful in the treatment of alcoholism or in decreasing alcohol consumption? PMID:22474979

  2. Alcohol and sex.

    PubMed

    Vijayasenan, M E

    1981-01-14

    Diminished sexual functioning among individuals dependent upon alcohol has been assessed. Ninety-seven male patients entered the study, all inpatients as the unit for treatment of alcoholism and drug addiction (Villa 6) in Porirua Hospital, Porirua. The sexual ability of these patients before the development of alcoholism was also rated for the same items and this rating was used as a control. Of the 97 patients, 69 (71 percent) suffered from sexual dysfunction for a period more than 12 months prior to admission to hospital. The disturbances noted were diminished sexual desire (58 percent of patients), erectile impotence (16 percent), premature ejaculation (4 percent), ejaculatory in competence (22 percent). A high proportion of the alcoholics showed signs of sexual deviation-19 percent having performed sexual crimes and a further 28 percent having repeated thought of sexual crimes. The possible causes of alcohol induced sexual dysfunction are discussed.

  3. Post-translationally Abnormal Collagens of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase-2 Null Mice Offer a Pathobiological Mechanism for the High Myopia Linked to Human LEPREL1 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Werther, Rachel; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Weis, MaryAnn; Lee, Brendan H.; Eyre, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Myopia, the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide, results from an increase in the axial length of the eyeball. Mutations in LEPREL1, the gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase-2 (P3H2), have recently been identified in individuals with recessively inherited nonsyndromic severe myopia. P3H2 is a member of a family of genes that includes three isoenzymes of prolyl 3-hydroxylase (P3H), P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3. Fundamentally, it is understood that P3H1 is responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline. This limited additional knowledge also suggests that each isoenzyme has evolved different collagen sequence-preferred substrate specificities. In this study, differences in prolyl 3-hydroxylation were screened in eye tissues from P3h2-null (P3h2n/n) and wild-type mice to seek tissue-specific effects due the lack of P3H2 activity on post-translational collagen chemistry that could explain myopia. The mice were viable and had no gross musculoskeletal phenotypes. Tissues from sclera and cornea (type I collagen) and lens capsule (type IV collagen) were dissected from mouse eyes, and multiple sites of prolyl 3-hydroxylation were identified by mass spectrometry. The level of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at multiple substrate sites from type I collagen chains was high in sclera, similar to tendon. Almost every known site of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in types I and IV collagen from P3h2n/n mouse eye tissues was significantly under-hydroxylated compared with their wild-type littermates. We conclude that altered collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is caused by loss of P3H2. We hypothesize that this leads to structural abnormalities in multiple eye tissues, but particularly sclera, causing progressive myopia. PMID:25645914

  4. Work-family conflict and alcohol use: examination of a moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer M; Rospenda, Kathleen M; Richman, Judith A; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little research focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  5. Work-family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Examination of a Moderated Mediation Model

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension-reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the present study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23480251

  6. Relapse Prevention Model of Behavioral Maintenance: Implications for Alcohol Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Colley, Mary; Cinelli, Bethann

    1992-01-01

    Describes Relapse Prevention as therapeutic modality, based on Social Learning Theory, used to prevent relapse for individuals who have completed treatment for substance abuse behaviors. Outlines relapse prevention theory and suggests various components of model be incorporated into alcohol education curricula. Outlines teaching strategies to…

  7. Using Motivational Interviewing to Address College Client Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Mark B.; Schmitt, Dorothy M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI; W. R. Miller & S. Rollnick, 2002) is presented as a potentially effective counseling strategy for assisting traditionally aged college students in reducing their problematic, heavy alcohol use. MI's congruence with two developmental theories--Self-Determination Theory (R. M. Ryan & E. L. Deci, 2000) and…

  8. 76 FR 44599 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review..., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, National Institutes...

  9. 75 FR 63494 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Special Emphasis..., Extramural Project Review Branch, EPRB, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism,...

  10. 76 FR 78014 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

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  11. 76 FR 26308 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

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  12. 75 FR 57473 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

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  13. 75 FR 10291 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

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  14. 77 FR 22794 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

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  15. 76 FR 77841 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

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  16. 75 FR 38533 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

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  17. 77 FR 70171 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

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  18. 75 FR 10808 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Special Emphasis... Officer, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, 5635...

  19. 77 FR 22794 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism...

  20. 78 FR 42529 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review....D., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism,...