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Sample records for alcohol tba biodegradation

  1. IS YOUR TBA COMING FROM BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) is present at high concentrations in ground water at many sites where gasoline has been spilled from underground storage tanks. In addition, TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) is also present at high concentrations in many of the same ground waters. ...

  2. TBA biodegradation in surface-water sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    The potential for [U-14C] TBA biodegradation was examined in laboratory microcosms under a range of terminal electron accepting conditions. TBA mineralization to CO2 was substantial in surface-water sediments under oxic, denitrifying, or Mn(IV)-reducing conditions and statistically significant but low under SO4-reducing conditions. Thus, anaerobic TBA biodegradation may be a significant natural attenuation mechanism for TBA in the environment, and stimulation of in situ TBA bioremediation by addition of suitable terminal electron acceptors may be feasible. No degradation of [U-14C] TBA was observed under methanogenic or Fe(III)-reducing conditions.

  3. MICROCOSM STUDY OF ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE AND TBA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water samples collected in at a gasoline spill sites in Orange County, California, suggested that MTBE was being transformed to TBA. In some of the most heavily contaminated wells, the concentration of TBA was higher than the concentration of MTBE (MTBE 2 µg/L and TBA 40,...

  4. TBA IN GROUND WATER FROM THE NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At many UST spills, the concentrations of TBA in ground water are much higher than would be expected from the presence of TBA in the gasoline originally spilled. The ratio of concentrations of TBA to concentrations of MTBE in monitoring wells at gasoline spill sites was compared ...

  5. Forensic analysis of tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA) detections in a hydrocarbon-rich groundwater basin.

    PubMed

    Quast, Konrad W; Levine, Audrey D; Kester, Janet E; Fordham, Carolyn L

    2016-04-01

    Tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA), a high-production volume (HPV) chemical, was sporadically detected in groundwater and coalbed methane (CBM) wells in southeastern Colorado's hydrocarbon-rich Raton Basin. TBA concentrations in shallow water wells averaged 75.1 μg/L, while detections in deeper CBM wells averaged 14.4 μg/L. The detection of TBA prompted a forensic investigation to try to identify potential sources. Historic and recent data were reviewed to determine if there was a discernable pattern of TBA occurrence. Supplemental samples from domestic water wells, monitor wells, CBM wells, surface waters, and hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluids were analyzed for TBA in conjunction with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), proxies for evidence of contamination from reformulated gasoline or associated oxygenates. Exploratory microbiological sampling was conducted to determine if methanotrophic organisms co-occurred with TBA in individual wells. Meaningful comparisons of historic TBA data were limited due to widely varying reporting limits. Mapping of TBA occurrence did not reveal any spatial patterns or physical associations with CBM operations or contamination plumes. Additionally, TBA was not detected in HF fluids or surface water samples. Given the widespread use of TBA in industrial and consumer products, including water well completion materials, it is likely that multiple diffuse sources exist. Exploratory data on stable isotopes, dissolved gases, and microbial profiling provide preliminary evidence that methanotrophic activity may be producing TBA from naturally occurring isobutane. Reported TBA concentrations were significantly below a conservative risk-based drinking water screening level of 8000 μg/L derived from animal toxicity data. PMID:26946495

  6. Forensic analysis of tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA) detections in a hydrocarbon-rich groundwater basin.

    PubMed

    Quast, Konrad W; Levine, Audrey D; Kester, Janet E; Fordham, Carolyn L

    2016-04-01

    Tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA), a high-production volume (HPV) chemical, was sporadically detected in groundwater and coalbed methane (CBM) wells in southeastern Colorado's hydrocarbon-rich Raton Basin. TBA concentrations in shallow water wells averaged 75.1 μg/L, while detections in deeper CBM wells averaged 14.4 μg/L. The detection of TBA prompted a forensic investigation to try to identify potential sources. Historic and recent data were reviewed to determine if there was a discernable pattern of TBA occurrence. Supplemental samples from domestic water wells, monitor wells, CBM wells, surface waters, and hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluids were analyzed for TBA in conjunction with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), proxies for evidence of contamination from reformulated gasoline or associated oxygenates. Exploratory microbiological sampling was conducted to determine if methanotrophic organisms co-occurred with TBA in individual wells. Meaningful comparisons of historic TBA data were limited due to widely varying reporting limits. Mapping of TBA occurrence did not reveal any spatial patterns or physical associations with CBM operations or contamination plumes. Additionally, TBA was not detected in HF fluids or surface water samples. Given the widespread use of TBA in industrial and consumer products, including water well completion materials, it is likely that multiple diffuse sources exist. Exploratory data on stable isotopes, dissolved gases, and microbial profiling provide preliminary evidence that methanotrophic activity may be producing TBA from naturally occurring isobutane. Reported TBA concentrations were significantly below a conservative risk-based drinking water screening level of 8000 μg/L derived from animal toxicity data.

  7. Roles of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining MTBE/TBA plumes in alluvial media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. M.; Rasa, E.

    2011-12-01

    A plume of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted above regulatory concentration goals for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE and TBA along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. As previously reported by Rasa et al. (2011), these analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. After 2004, TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly reduced the time for MTBE and TBA concentrations to reach regulatory goals by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer. We have extended that prior work; using the same reaction and diffusion parameters, we explored the sensitivity of the results to thicknesses of the alluvial layers in order to determine under what sets of conditions a reaction zone accessed only by vertical diffusion through a silt from an underlying contaminated aquifer can significantly affect time to achievement of compliance goals within the aquifer.

  8. Identification of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA)-utilizing organisms in BioGAC reactors using 13C-DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Aslett, Denise; Haas, Joseph; Hyman, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Biodegradation of the gasoline oxygenates methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) can cause tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) to accumulate in gasoline-impacted environments. One remediation option for TBA-contaminated groundwater involves oxygenated granulated activated carbon (GAC) reactors that have been self-inoculated by indigenous TBA-degrading microorganisms in ground water extracted from contaminated aquifers. Identification of these organisms is important for understanding the range of TBA-metabolizing organisms in nature and for determining whether self-inoculation of similar reactors is likely to occur at other sites. In this study (13)C-DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify TBA-utilizing organisms in samples of self-inoculated BioGAC reactors operated at sites in New York and California. Based on 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences, all TBA-utilizing organisms identified were members of the Burkholderiales order of the β-proteobacteria. Organisms similar to Cupriavidus and Methylibium were observed in both reactor samples while organisms similar to Polaromonas and Rhodoferax were unique to the reactor sample from New York. Organisms similar to Hydrogenophaga and Paucibacter strains were only detected in the reactor sample from California. We also analyzed our samples for the presence of several genes previously implicated in TBA oxidation by pure cultures of bacteria. Genes Mpe_B0532, B0541, B0555, and B0561 were all detected in (13)C-metagenomic DNA from both reactors and deduced amino acid sequences suggested these genes all encode highly conserved enzymes. One gene (Mpe_B0555) encodes a putative phthalate dioxygenase-like enzyme that may be particularly appropriate for determining the potential for TBA oxidation in contaminated environmental samples.

  9. Natural Anaerobic Biodegradation of TBA in Aquifer Sediments at Gasoline Spill Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    TBA is an important contaminant at spills sites of gasoline that contains MTBE. The impact of TBA is particularly important in Southern California, where the State Action Level for TBA is 12 μg/L and many communities produce ground water for drinking water from an urban landscape...

  10. Anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA).

    PubMed

    Finneran, K T; Lovley, D R

    2001-05-01

    The potential for anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) was investigated in laboratory incubations of sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer and in aquatic sediments. The addition of humic substances (HS) stimulated the anaerobic degradation of MTBE in aquifer sediments in which Fe(III) was available as an electron acceptor. This is attributed to the fact that HS and other extracellular quinones can stimulate the activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms by acting as an electron shuttle between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and insoluble Fe(III) oxides. MTBE was not degraded in aquifer sediments without Fe(III) and HS. [14C]-MTBE added to aquatic sediments adapted for anaerobic MTBE degradation was converted to 14CO2 in the presence or absence of HS or the HS analog, anthraquione-2,6-disulfonate. Unamended aquatic sediments produced 14CH4 as well as 14CO2 from [14C]-MTBE. The aquatic sediments also rapidly consumed TBA under anaerobic conditions and converted [14C]-TBA to 14CH4 and 14CO2. An adaptation period of ca. 250-300 days was required prior to the most rapid anaerobic MTBE degradation in both sediment types, whereas TBA was metabolized in the aquatic sediments without a lag. These results demonstrate that, under the appropriate conditions, MTBE and TBA can be degraded in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that it may be possible to design strategies for the anaerobic remediation of MTBE in petroleum-contaminated subsurface environments.

  11. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2011-11-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer.

  12. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer.

  13. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer. PMID:22115089

  14. Sorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) to synthetic resins.

    PubMed

    Bi, Erping; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2005-10-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used gasoline oxygenate. Contamination of MTBE and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in groundwater and surface water has received great attention. However, sorption affinity and sorption mechanisms of MTBE and TBA to synthetic resins, which can be potentially used in removal of these contaminants from water, in passive sampling, or in enrichment of bacteria, have not been studied systemically. In this study, kinetic and equilibrium sorption experiments (single solute and binary mixtures) on four synthetic resins were conducted. The sorption affinity of the investigated sorbents for MTBE and TBA decreases in the order Ambersorb 563>Optipore L493>Amberlite XAD4>Amberlite XAD7, and all show higher sorption affinity for MTBE than for TBA. Binary experiments with o-xylene, a major compound of gasoline as co-contaminant, imply that all resins preferentially sorb o-xylene over MTBE or TBA, i.e., there is sorption competition. In the equilibrium aqueous concentration (Ceq) range (0.1-139.0 mg/L for MTBE, and 0.01-48.4 mg/L for TBA), experimental and modeling results as well as sorbent characteristics indicate that micropore filling and/or some other type of adsorption process (e.g., adsorption to specific sites of high sorption potential at low concentrations) rather than partitioning were the dominant sorption mechanisms. Optipore L493 has favourable sorption and desorption characteristics, and is a suitable sorbent, e.g., in bacteria enrichment or passive sampling for moderately polar compounds. However, for highly polar compounds such as TBA, Ambersorb 563 might be a better choice, especially in water treatment.

  15. In Situ Biotreatment of TBA with Recirculation/Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    North, Katharine P.; Mackay, Douglas M.; Kayne, Julian S.; Petersen, Daniel; Rasa, Ehsan; Rastegarzadeh, Laleh; Holland, Reef B.; Scow, Kate M.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for in situ biodegradation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) by creation of aerobic conditions in the subsurface with recirculating well pairs was investigated in two field studies conducted at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). In the first experiment, a single recirculating well pair with bromide tracer and oxygen amendment successfully delivered oxygen to the subsurface for 42 days. TBA concentrations were reduced from approximately 500 μg/L to below the detection limit within the treatment zone and the treated water was detected in a monitoring transect several meters downgradient. In the second experiment, a site-calibrated model was used to design a double recirculating well pair with oxygen amendment, which successfully delivered oxygen to the subsurface for 291 days and also decreased TBA concentrations to below the detection limit. Methylibium petroleiphilum strain PM1, a known TBA-degrading bacterium, was detectable at the study site but addition of oxygen had little impact on the already low baseline population densities, suggesting that there was not enough carbon within the groundwater plume to support significant new growth in the PM1 population. Given favorable hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions, the use of recirculating well pairs to introduce dissolved oxygen into the subsurface is a viable method to stimulate in situ biodegradation of TBA or other aerobically-degradable aquifer contaminants. PMID:23358537

  16. Role of volatilization in changing TBA and MTBE concentrations at MTBE-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Eweis, Juana B; Labolle, Eric M; Benson, David A; Fogg, Graham E

    2007-10-01

    Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is commonly found as an impurity in methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) added to gasoline. Frequent observations of high TBA, and especially rising TBA/MTBE concentration ratios, in groundwater at gasoline spill sites are generally attributed to microbial conversion of MTBE to TBA. Typically overlooked is the role of volatilization in the attenuation of these chemicals especially in the vadose zone, which is a source of contamination to groundwater. Here we show that volatilization, particularly through remediation by vapor extraction, can substantially affect the trends in TBA and MTBE concentrations and the respective mass available to impact groundwater aquifers, through the preferential removal of more volatile compounds, including MTBE, and the apparent enrichment of less volatile compounds like TBA. We demonstrate this phenomenon through numerical simulations of remedial-enhanced volatilization. Results show increases in TBA/MTBE concentration ratios consistent with ratios observed in groundwater at gasoline spill sites. Volatilization is an important, and potentially dominant, process that can result in concentration trends similar to those typically attributed to biodegradation.

  17. Misconceptions concerning the behavior, fate and transport of the fuel oxygenates TBA and MTBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, R.; Sloan, R.

    2003-04-01

    The release of gasoline from underground storage tanks and the subsequent appearance of dissolved constituents in drinking water has focused attention on the use of MTBE in reformulated fuels. Natural biodegradation of MTBE in soil, photo-oxidation in the atmosphere or chemical oxidation during remediation of gasoline releases can produce the intermediate tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). TBA is also a fuel oxygenate and can be found as a co-product in MTBE synthesized from methanol and TBA. Because the physical properties of ethers and alcohols differ somewhat from the predominant hydrocarbon compounds in gasoline, misconceptions have developed about the behavior of fuel oxygenates in storage and in the subsurface. Critical review of several misconceptions about MTBE and TBA in gasoline reveals the concepts were conceived to rationalize early field observations and/or incomplete data sets. Closer scrutiny, in light of recent laboratory investigations, field data, case studies and world literature, clarifies these misconceptions and assumptions about the behavior of ether oxygenates and their degradation products in the environment. Commonly held misconceptions focus on four general areas of fuel and fuel oxygenate management: storage/dispensing, hydrology, remediation, and health effects. Storage/dispensing misconceptions address materials stability to ethers and alcohols in fuel and the environmental forensics of fuel systems failure. Groundwater and hydrology misconceptions deal with plume dynamics and the impact of fuel on drinking water resources. Remediation misconceptions focus on the performance of traditional hydrocarbon remediation technologies, recent developments in biodegradation and natural attenuation, drivers of remedial design and remediation costs. Health effects misconceptions address both acute and chronic exposure risk evaluations by national and international health agencies. Generally MTBE and TBA are manageable by the same processes and

  18. MTBE, TBA, and TAME attenuation in diverse hyporheic zones.

    PubMed

    Landmeyer, James E; Bradley, Paul M; Trego, Donald A; Hale, Kevin G; Haas, Joseph E

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by fuel-related compounds such as the fuel oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) presents a significant issue to managers and consumers of groundwater and surface water that receives groundwater discharge. Four sites were investigated on Long Island, New York, characterized by groundwater contaminated with gasoline and fuel oxygenates that ultimately discharge to fresh, brackish, or saline surface water. For each site, contaminated groundwater discharge zones were delineated using pore water geochemistry data from 15 feet (4.5 m) beneath the bottom of the surface water body in the hyporheic zone and seepage-meter tests were conducted to measure discharge rates. These data when combined indicate that MTBE, TBA, and TAME concentrations in groundwater discharge in a 5-foot (1.5-m) thick section of the hyporheic zone were attenuated between 34% and 95%, in contrast to immeasurable attenuation in the shallow aquifer during contaminant transport between 0.1 and 1.5 miles (0.1 to 2.4 km). The attenuation observed in the hyporheic zone occurred primarily by physical processes such as mixing of groundwater and surface water. Biodegradation also occurred as confirmed in laboratory microcosms by the mineralization of U- (14)C-MTBE and U-(14)C-TBA to (14)CO(2) and the novel biodegradation of U- (14)C-TAME to (14)CO(2) under oxic and anoxic conditions. The implication of fuel oxygenate attenuation observed in diverse hyporheic zones suggests an assessment of the hyporheic zone attenuation potential (HZAP) merits inclusion as part of site assessment strategies associated with monitored or engineered attenuation.

  19. MTBE, TBA, and TAME attenuation in diverse hyporheic zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.; Trego, D.A.; Hale, K.G.; Haas, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by fuel-related compounds such as the fuel oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) presents a significant issue to managers and consumers of groundwater and surface water that receives groundwater discharge. Four sites were investigated on Long Island, New York, characterized by groundwater contaminated with gasoline and fuel oxygenates that ultimately discharge to fresh, brackish, or saline surface water. For each site, contaminated groundwater discharge zones were delineated using pore water geochemistry data from 15 feet (4.5 m) beneath the bottom of the surface water body in the hyporheic zone and seepage-meter tests were conducted to measure discharge rates. These data when combined indicate that MTBE, TBA, and TAME concentrations in groundwater discharge in a 5-foot (1.5-m) thick section of the hyporheic zone were attenuated between 34% and 95%, in contrast to immeasurable attenuation in the shallow aquifer during contaminant transport between 0.1 and 1.5 miles (0.1 to 2.4 km). The attenuation observed in the hyporheic zone occurred primarily by physical processes such as mixing of groundwater and surface water. Biodegradation also occurred as confirmed in laboratory microcosms by the mineralization of U- 14C-MTBE and U- 14C-TBA to 14CO2 and the novel biodegradation of U- 14C-TAME to 14CO2 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The implication of fuel oxygenate attenuation observed in diverse hyporheic zones suggests an assessment of the hyporheic zone attenuation potential (HZAP) merits inclusion as part of site assessment strategies associated with monitored or engineered attenuation. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  20. Starch-polyvinyl alcohol cast film-performance and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liang; Imam, S.H.; Stein, T.M.

    1996-10-01

    Starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) cast films were prepared in the absence of plasticizer. Their physical and biodegradable properties were examined. Moisture absorption by the films was similar to that of PVOH at low humidity and increased linearly as the relative humidity increased. The tensile strength of the films decreased with increased humidity and did not display significant improvement with increased PVOH content. Higher PVOH content improved elongation when the relative humidity was 80% or higher. Biodegradation studies revealed that the presence of PVOH in the films slowed the rate of degradation.

  1. Using DNA-Stable Isotope Probing to Identify MTBE- and TBA-Degrading Microorganisms in Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Key, Katherine C.; Sublette, Kerry L.; Duncan, Kathleen; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.; Ogles, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Although the anaerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been documented in the laboratory and the field, knowledge of the microorganisms and mechanisms involved is still lacking. In this study, DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microorganisms involved in anaerobic fuel oxygenate biodegradation in a sulfate-reducing MTBE and TBA plume. Microorganisms were collected in the field using Bio-Sep® beads amended with 13C5-MTBE, 13C1-MTBE (only methoxy carbon labeled), or13C4-TBA. 13C-DNA and 12C-DNA extracted from the Bio-Sep beads were cloned and 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to identify the indigenous microorganisms involved in degrading the methoxy group of MTBE and the tert-butyl group of MTBE and TBA. Results indicated that microorganisms were actively degrading 13C-labeled MTBE and TBA in situ and the 13C was incorporated into their DNA. Several sequences related to known MTBE- and TBA-degraders in the Burkholderiales and the Sphingomonadales orders were detected in all three13C clone libraries and were likely to be primary degraders at the site. Sequences related to sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron-reducers, such as Geobacter and Geothrix, were only detected in the clone libraries where MTBE and TBA were fully labeled with 13C, suggesting that they were involved in processing carbon from the tert-butyl group. Sequences similar to the Pseudomonas genus predominated in the clone library where only the methoxy carbon of MTBE was labeled with 13C. It is likely that members of this genus were secondary degraders cross-feeding on 13C-labeled metabolites such as acetate. PMID:25525320

  2. Parallel pathways of ethoxylated alcohol biodegradation under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Non-ionic surfactants (NS) are a major component of the surfactant flux discharged into surface water, and alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are the major component of this flux. Therefore, biodegradation pathways of AE deserve more thorough investigation. The aim of this work was to investigate the stages of biodegradation of homogeneous oxyethylated dodecanol C12E9 having 9 oxyethylene subunits, under aerobic conditions. Enterobacter strain Z3 bacteria were chosen as biodegrading organisms under conditions with C12E9 as the sole source of organic carbon. Bacterial consortia of river water were used in a parallel test as an inoculum for comparison. The LC-MS technique was used to identify the products of biodegradation. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was selected for the isolation of C12E9 and metabolites from the biodegradation broth. The LC-MS/MS technique operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantitative determination of C12E9, C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6. Apart from the substrate, the homologues C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6, being metabolites of C12E9 biodegradation by shortening of the oxyethylene chain, as well as intermediate metabolites having a carboxyl end group in the oxyethylene chain (C12E8COOH, C12E7COOH, C12E6COOH and C12E5COOH), were identified. Poly(ethylene glycols) (E) having 9, 8 and 7 oxyethylene subunits were also identified, indicating parallel central fission of C12E9 and its metabolites. Similar results were obtained with river water as inoculum. It is concluded that AE, under aerobic conditions, are biodegraded via two parallel pathways: by central fission with the formation of PEG, and by Ω-oxidation of the oxyethylene chain with the formation of carboxylated AE and subsequent shortening of the oxyethylene chain by a single unit. PMID:27037882

  3. Biodegradable poly(ethylene-g-vinyl alcohol) copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Huang, S.J.

    1993-12-31

    A graft reaction of poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA, and polyethylene grafted width maleic anhydride has been carried out in order to add hydrophobicity to PVA. Biodegradabilities of PVA and the polyethylene derivative are well-known. The graft reaction product that was prepared by a simple procedure was characterized with FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The FTIR spectra indicated that ester bonds were formed in the product. It was also found from the thermal analysis that the graft compound was less crystalline that raw PVA and the thermal properties of the graft copolymer remarkably depended on molar ratio of succinic anhydride group in the polyethylene derivative that was used in the graft reaction. The degradation of the material will be discussed.

  4. Field Confirmation and Monitoring Tools for Aerobic Bioremediation of TBA and MTBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, K.; Rasa, E.; Mackay, D. M.; Scow, K. M.; Hristova, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    We have been investigating in situ biotreatment of an existing tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume at Vandenberg AFB by recirculation/oxygenation and evaluating monitoring tools for microbial community composition and activity inside and outside of the treatment zone. Results indicate that recirculation/oxygenation by two pairs of recirculation wells is effective at adding oxygen and decreasing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and TBA concentrations to detection limits along the flowpaths predicted. Compound-specific isotope analyses (CSIA) of groundwater and microbial community analyses (extraction and analysis of DNA) of groundwater and sediments are underway for sampling locations along flowpaths inside and outside of the treatment zone to seek confirmation of in situ biodegradation. We are also evaluating a novel approach to compare the performance of microbial “traps” in characterizing microbial communities: groundwater from the aerobic treatment zone is extracted, separated and directed to multiple chambers located in an air-conditioned ex situ experimental setup. The “traps” under evaluation are in separate chambers; influent and effluent are monitored. The traps being evaluated include Bio-Trap® housings containing Bio-Sep® beads baited with MTBE or TBA labeled with 13C and various unbaited materials. Insights from the various monitoring approaches will be discussed and compared.

  5. In Situ Biodegradation of MTBE and TBA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water at most UST spills sites in Kansas contains both MTBE and benzene, and both contaminants must be effectively treated to close the sites. Soil vacuum extraction, and air sparging are common treatment technologies in Kansas. The technologies supply oxygen to support ...

  6. STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF MTBE TO EVALUATE THE SOURCE OF TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has not been used as a fuel oxygenate in Orange County, California, the concentrations of TBA in ground water at gasoline spill sites are high compared those of the conventional fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). In the year 2002, th...

  7. HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER SAMPLES WITH HYDROCHLORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional sampling and analytical protocols have poor sensitivity for fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Because alcohols are miscible or highly soluble in water, alcohols are not efficiently transferred to the gas chromatograph for analysis....

  8. The Chemistry and Flow Dynamics of Molecular Biological Tools Used to Confirm In Situ Bioremediation of Benzene, TBA, and MTBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, K. P.; Mackay, D. M.; Scow, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    In situ bioremediation has typically been confirmed by collecting sediment and groundwater samples to directly demonstrate a degradation process in a laboratory microcosm. However, recent advances in molecular biological tools present options for demonstrating degradation processes with field-based tools that are less time-consuming. We have been investigating the capability of some of these molecular biological tools to evaluate in situ biodegradation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene at two field sites in California. At both sites, we have deployed Bio-Traps® (“traps”), made of Bio-Sep® beads in slotted PVC pipe, which provide ideal environments for microbial colonization. Stable Isotope Probing can be accomplished by sorbing the13C-labeled organic contaminant of concern onto Bio-Sep® beads (“baiting”); incorporation of 13C into the biomass collected by the trap would indicate that the microbial community was capable of degrading the labeled compound. In addition, we examined the chemistry and flow dynamics of these traps and present those results here. We performed a field experiment and a lab experiment to, in part, define the rate that different baits leached off various traps. At a TBA- and MTBE-contaminated site at Vandenberg AFB, Lompoc, CA, the TBA-dominant plume was effectively treated by recirculation/oxygenation of groundwater, decreasing TBA and MTBE concentrations to detection limits along predicted flowpaths created by two pairs of recirculation wells. We used the generated aerobic treatment zone to deploy traps baited with 13C-labeled MTBE or TBA in a novel, ex situ experimental setup. The groundwater flow extracted from the aerobic treatment zone was split through several chambers, each containing a trap and monitoring of influent and effluent. The chamber effluent was measured throughout a six-week deployment and analyzed for both TBA and MTBE; the majority of mass leached from the baited traps did

  9. IDENTIFYING THE CAUSE OF HIGH CONCENTRATIONS OF TBA IN GROUNDWATER AT GASOLINE SPIILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring at gasoline spills in Orange County, California has revealed that TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) is often present at high concentrations in ground water. To manage the hazard associated with the presence of TBA, staff of the UST Local Oversight Program (LOP) of the Oran...

  10. ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) has not been used as a fuel oxygenate in Orange County, California, the concentrations of TBA in ground water at gasoline spill sites are high compared to the concentrations of the conventional fuel oxygenate Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE). In t...

  11. Biodegradable starch/poly (vinyl alcohol) film reinforced with titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejri, Zahra; Seifkordi, Ali Akbar; Ahmadpour, Ali; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba; Maskooki, Abdolmajid

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable starch/poly (vinyl alcohol)/nano-titanium dioxide (ST/PVA/nano-TiO2) nanocomposite films were prepared via a solution casting method. Their biodegradability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties were also studied in this paper. A general full factorial experimental approach was used to determine effective parameters on the mechanical properties of the prepared films. ST/PVA/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results of mechanical analysis show that ST/PVA films with higher contents of PVA have much better mechanical properties. In thermal analysis, it is found that the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles improves the thermal stability of the films. SEM micrographs, taken from the fracture surface of samples, illustrate that the addition of PVA makes the film softer and more flexible. The results of soil burial biodegradation indicate that the biodegradability of ST/PVA/TiO2 films strongly depends on the starch proportion in the film matrix. The degradation rate is increased by the addition of starch in the films.

  12. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF MTBE AND TBA FOR BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of stable isotope ratios to detect biodegradation for a number of chemical compounds including MTBE and TBA has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory or field studies. Chemical reactions tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), ...

  13. Lignin biodegradation and the production of ethyl alcohol from cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, S.L.; Wilke, C.R.

    1981-02-01

    During the last few years our group has been engaged in developing a biochemical process for the conversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethyl alcohol. Lignin is a barrier to complete cellulose saccharification in this process, but chemical and physical delignification steps are too expensive to be used at the present time. An enzymatic delignification process might be attractive for several reasons: little energy would be expected to be needed, enzymes could be recovered and reused, and useful chemicals might be produced from dissolved lignin. A number of thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi were examined for the ability to rapidly degrade lignocellulose in order to find an organism whcih produced an active lignin-degrading enzyme system. Chryosporium pruinosum and Sporotrichum pulverulentum were found to be active lignocellulose degraders, and C. pruinosum was chosen for further study. Lignin and carbohydrate were degraded when the substrate remained moistened by, but not submerged in, the liquid medium. Attempts were made to demonstrate a cell-free lignin degrading system by both extraction and pressing of cultures grown on moist lignocellulose. Carbohydrate-degrading activity was found but not lignin-degrading activity. This led us to ask whether diffusible lignin-degrading activity could be demonstrated in this organism. The data indicate that the lignin degradation system, or one or more of its components, produced by this organism is either unstable, non-diffusible, or inactive at small distances (about 1 mm) from growing hyphae. At present, studies are being conducted using diffusion cultures to select mutants of C. pruinosum that do produce a diffusible lignin degradation system. We are also examining a number of mesophilic lignin-degrading molds for this ability.

  14. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  15. Microbial degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Torsten C; Schirmer, Mario; Weiss, Holger; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2004-06-01

    The fate of fuel oxygenates such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the subsurface is governed by their degradability under various redox conditions. The key intermediate in degradation of MTBE and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) which was often found as accumulating intermediate or dead-end product in lab studies using microcosms or isolated cell suspensions. This review discusses in detail the thermodynamics of the degradation processes utilizing various terminal electron acceptors, and the aerobic degradation pathways of MTBE and TBA. It summarizes the present knowledge on MTBE and TBA degradation gained from either microcosm or pure culture studies and emphasizes the potential of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for identification and quantification of degradation processes of slowly biodegradable pollutants such as MTBE and TBA. Microcosm studies demonstrated that MTBE and TBA may be biodegradable under oxic and nearly all anoxic conditions, although results of various studies are often contradictory, which suggests that site-specific conditions are important parameters. So far, TBA degradation has not been shown under methanogenic conditions and it is currently widely accepted that TBA is a recalcitrant dead-end product of MTBE under these conditions. Reliable in situ degradation rates for MTBE and TBA under various geochemical conditions are not yet available. Furthermore, degradation pathways under anoxic conditions have not yet been elucidated. All pure cultures capable of MTBE or TBA degradation isolated so far use oxygen as terminal electron acceptor. In general, compared with hydrocarbons present in gasoline, fuel oxygenates biodegrade much slower, if at all. The presence of MTBE and related compounds in groundwater therefore frequently limits the use of in situ biodegradation as remediation option at gasoline-contaminated sites. Though degradation of MTBE and TBA in field studies has been reported under oxic

  16. Biodegradation of ethylene vinyl alcohol by aerobic organisms in an aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, J.J. Jr.; Young, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    Ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) is a thermoplastic used extensively in laminates for food containers. This study investigates the biodegradability of EVOH utilizing ASTM Test Method D5271. This method indicates the extent and rate of biodegradation of plastic materials by aerobic microorganisms in an aqueous environment and is performed in a respirometer. The ethylene derived segments of the EVOH contain {sup 14}C which acts as tracer to measure biodegradation as indicated by the {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} given off by microbial metabolism. Liquid scintillation counting measured the activity of the respired {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} converted from the ethylene segments of the EVOH. Three physical forms of EVOH were tested: a pure EVOH, a high surface area EVOH, and a blended form of EVOH with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH). The reactors with these EVOH forms were set up to receive a weekly influx of microorganisms (inoculum), or various amounts of POH as a co-substrate. Results to date have indicated that an increased surface area for the EVOH increases conversion of {sup 14}C relative to the pure EVOH. Some cases with blended EVOH/PVOH reactors have also showed increased conversion of {sup 14}C relative to the pure EVOH cases. The addition of inoculum to the reactors did not seem to significantly increase the conversion of {sup 14}C as compared to the effect of PVOH addition. PVOH co-substrate addition increased {sup 14}C conversion. Also, increasing the amount of PVOH co-substrate addition further increases the conversion of {sup 14}C.

  17. TBA PRODUCTION BY ACID HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE DURING HEATED HEADSPACE ANALYSIS & EVALUATION OF A BASE AS A PRESERVATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At room temperature (20°±3°C), purge and trap samplers provide poor sensitivity for analysis of the fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). Because alcohols are miscible or highly soluble in water, they are not efficiently transferred to a gas chr...

  18. Anaerobic digestion of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymer packaging: biodegradability and environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Trzcinski, A P; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2011-12-01

    The digestibility of a starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymer insulated cardboard coolbox was investigated under a defined anaerobic digestion (AD) system with key parameters characterized. Laboratory results were combined with industrial operational data to develop a site-specific life cycle assessment (LCA) model. Inoculated with active bacterial trophic groups, the anaerobic biodegradability of three starch-PVOH biopolymers achieved 58-62%. The LCA modeling showed that the environmental burdens of the starch-PVOH biopolymer packaging under AD conditions on acidification, eutrophication, global warming and photochemical oxidation potential were dominated by atmospheric emissions released from substrate degradation and fuel combustion, whereas energy consumption and infrastructure requirements were the causes of abiotic depletion, ozone depletion and toxic impacts. Nevertheless, for this bio-packaging, AD of the starch-PVOH biopolymer combined with recycling of the cardboard emerged as the environmentally superior option and optimization of the energy utilization system could bring further environmental benefits to the AD process.

  19. Physicochemical properties of biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol-agar films from the red algae Hydropuntia cornea.

    PubMed

    Madera-Santana, Tomás J; Robledo, Daniel; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Agar obtained from the red alga Hydropuntia cornea was blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) in order to produce biodegradable films. In this study, we compare the properties of biopolymeric films formulated with agars extracted from H. cornea collected at different seasons (rainy and dry) in the Gulf of Mexico coast and PVOH as synthetic matrix. The films were prepared at different agar contents (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and their optical, mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties analyzed. The tensile strength of PVOH-agar films increased when agar content was augmented. The formulation with 50% agar from rainy season (RS) had a significant higher tensile strength when compared to those from dry season (DS; p < 0.05). Tensile modulus also displayed an increasing trend and likewise, for 50% and 75% agar blends from RS showed higher values than those from DS (p < 0.05). In contrast, elongation at break decreased as the agar content increased, independently of the season. Environmental scanning electron microscopy images of PVOH-agar 75% biofilms from RS showed a homogeneous structure with good interfacial adhesion between the two components. The changes evidenced in the FTIR spectrum of this blend suggest that hydrogen bonding is taking place between the agar ether linkages (C-O-C) and the hydroxyl groups (OH) of the PVOH. Based on the above mentioned results, blends of PVOH and 75% agar from H. cornea collected in rainy season showed good properties for applications in the biodegradable packaging industry.

  20. EFFECT OF BTEX ON THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE AND TBA BY MIXED BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination in groundwater often coexists with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) near the source of the plume. Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is a prevalent intermediate of MTBE degradation. Therefore, there is a significant p...

  1. Structural analysis, and antioxidant and antibacterial properties of chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) biodegradable films.

    PubMed

    Hajji, Sawssen; Chaker, Achraf; Jridi, Mourad; Maalej, Hana; Jellouli, Kemel; Boufi, Sami; Nasri, Moncef

    2016-08-01

    The development and characterization of biodegradable blend films based on chitosan and poly (vinyl alcohol) for possible use in a variety of biological activities are reported. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) (Ch/PVA) films showed characteristics peaks shifting to a lower frequency range due to hydrogen bonding between -OH of PVA and -NH2 of chitosan. The chitosan and PVA polymers presented good compatibility. The morphology study of chitosan and composite films showed a compact and homogenous structure. The tensile strength and elongation at break increased with PVA content. In fact, the highest tensile strength and elongation at break (53.58 MPa and 454 %) occurs with pure PVA film. The results showed that PVA incorporation in the blends contributes to increase the intermolecular interactions, thus improving the mechanical properties. In addition, the prepared films demonstrated high antioxidant activities monitored by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging, reducing power, and β-carotene bleaching activity. Nevertheless, PVA addition reduced antioxidant and antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. PMID:27106077

  2. AEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF GASOLINE OXYGENATES MTBE AND TBA

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE degradation was investigated using a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with biomass retention (porous pot reactor) operated under aerobic conditions. MTBE was fed to the reactor at an influent concentration of 150 mg/l (1.70 mmol/l). A second identifical rector was op...

  3. Laboratory evidence of MTBE biodegradation in Borden aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Mario; Butler, Barbara J.; Church, Clinton D.; Barker, James F.; Nadarajah, Nalina

    2003-02-01

    Mainly due to intrinsic biodegradation, monitored natural attenuation can be an effective and inexpensive remediation strategy at petroleum release sites. However, gasoline additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) can jeopardize this strategy because these compounds often degrade, if at all, at a slower rate than the collectively benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene (BTEX) compounds. Investigation of whether a compound degrades under certain conditions, and at what rate, is therefore important to the assessment of the intrinsic remediation potential of aquifers. A natural gradient experiment with dissolved MTBE-containing gasoline in the shallow, aerobic sand aquifer at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden (Ontario, Canada) from 1988 to 1996 suggested that biodegradation was the main cause of attenuation for MTBE within the aquifer. This laboratory study demonstrates biologically catalyzed MTBE degradation in Borden aquifer-like environments, and so supports the idea that attenuation due to biodegradation may have occurred in the natural gradient experiment. In an experiment with batch microcosms of aquifer material, three of the microcosms ultimately degraded MTBE to below detection, although this required more than 189 days (or >300 days in one case). Failure to detect the daughter product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in the field and the batch experiments could be because TBA was more readily degradable than MTBE under Borden conditions.

  4. Laboratory evidence of MTBE biodegradation in Borden aquifer material.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Mario; Butler, Barbara J; Church, Clinton D; Barker, James F; Nadarajah, Nalina

    2003-02-01

    Mainly due to intrinsic biodegradation, monitored natural attenuation can be an effective and inexpensive remediation strategy at petroleum release sites. However, gasoline additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) can jeopardize this strategy because these compounds often degrade, if at all, at a slower rate than the collectively benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene (BTEX) compounds. Investigation of whether a compound degrades under certain conditions, and at what rate, is therefore important to the assessment of the intrinsic remediation potential of aquifers. A natural gradient experiment with dissolved MTBE-containing gasoline in the shallow, aerobic sand aquifer at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden (Ontario, Canada) from 1988 to 1996 suggested that biodegradation was the main cause of attenuation for MTBE within the aquifer. This laboratory study demonstrates biologically catalyzed MTBE degradation in Borden aquifer-like environments, and so supports the idea that attenuation due to biodegradation may have occurred in the natural gradient experiment. In an experiment with batch microcosms of aquifer material, three of the microcosms ultimately degraded MTBE to below detection, although this required more than 189 days (or >300 days in one case). Failure to detect the daughter product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in the field and the batch experiments could be because TBA was more readily degradable than MTBE under Borden conditions.

  5. Combined toxicities of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolite tert-butyl alcohol on earthworms via different exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Yoon, Youngdae; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) are among the major soil contaminants that threaten the health of soil ecosystems. Many MTBE-contaminated sites accumulate TBA, because TBA is the intermediate of MTBE biodegradation. To access the risk of MTBE and TBA in soil, we investigated the combined toxicities of MTBE and TBA using two earthworm species, Perionyx excavatus and Eisenia andrei, as well as the toxic effects via different exposure routes. The combined toxicity showed weak antagonistic effects (LC50mix values were slightly greater than 1.0), and sensitivity toward same pollutants differed in the two earthworm species. Moreover, the toxicity of MTBE and TBA was also affected by the exposure route; both filter paper and artificial soil tests showed that dermal-only exposure to MTBE had an even greater toxic effect than combined dermal and oral exposure. Thus, we suggest that diverse environmental factors including organic materials, the physicochemical properties of the contact media, and the exposure routes of the organism, should be taken into consideration when assessing the effects of pollutants on organisms in diverse environmental systems.

  6. Biodegradation of high concentration of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas corrugata embedded in peat-phosphate esterified polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Li, Hai-Jun; Shi, Yue-E; Zhu, Bo-Lin; Gao, Song

    2013-10-01

    Efficiency on biodegradation of high concentration of nitrobenzene (NB) by peat-phosphate esterified polyvinyl alcohol-embedded NB-degrading bacteria Pseudomonas corrugata was conducted compared to free bacteria cells. Its biodegradation kinetics, reuse ability, degradation effect in the absence of the essential element needed for the growth of bacteria and degradation efficiency of the raw water from the contaminated site were also invested. Results show that the degradation rate when the concentration of NB was at 600, 750, and 900 mg/L reached 91.02, 83.23, and 55.9 %, which was higher than that observed in free bacteria at the same concentration levels. Biodegradation kinetics of the material could be well described by first- and zero-order kinetics when the concentration of NB was at 300, 450 mg/L and 600, 750, 900 mg/L, respectively. Stable degradation activity (stayed at a level of approximately 70 %) was displayed during the 11th repeat-batch experiment. The affect of absence of phosphorus in the medium can be abated ascribed to the addition of peat, which contributes with organic matter and other elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus necessary to maintain metabolically active the microorganisms. Effective biodegradation of the raw water from the experimental site revealed that the material can be a potential candidate for treating NB-contaminated wastewater in the practical setting. PMID:23576015

  7. RK-TBA prototype RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.; Anderson, D.; Giordano, G.

    1996-04-11

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Specific details of the induction core tests and pulsed power system are presented. The 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction is also described in detail.

  8. Membrane instantons from a semiclassical TBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Flavio; Mariño, Marcos

    2013-05-01

    The partition function on the three-sphere of ABJM theory contains non-perturbative corrections which correspond to membrane instantons in M-theory. These corrections can be studied in the Fermi gas approach to the partition function, and they are encoded in a system of integral equations of the TBA type. We study a semiclassical or WKB expansion of this TBA system in the ABJM coupling k, which corresponds to the strong coupling expansion of the type IIA string. This allows us to study membrane instanton corrections in M-theory at high order in the WKB expansion. Using these WKB results, we verify the conjectures for the form of the one-instanton correction at finite k proposed recently by Hatsuda, Moriyama and Okuyama (HMO), which are in turn based on a conjectural cancellation of divergences between worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons. The HMO cancellation mechanism is important since it shows in a precise, quantitative way, that the perturbative genus expansion is radically insufficient at strong coupling, and that non-perturbative membrane effects are essential to make sense of the theory. We propose analytic expressions in k for the full two-membrane instanton correction and for higher-order non-perturbative terms, which pass many consistency checks and provide further evidence for the HMO mechanism.

  9. Quasi-local formulation of the mirror TBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, János; Hegedűs, Árpád

    2012-05-01

    We present a method of removing all infinite sums from the various forms of the mirror TBA equations and the energy formula of the AdS/CFT spectral problem. This new formulation of the TBA system is quasi-local because Y-functions that are connected by the TBA equations are at most next to nearest neighbors with respect to the Y-system diagram of AdS/CFT. The quasi-local version of the mirror TBA is also useful as starting point for the hybrid-NLIE formulation of the spectral problem.

  10. A sustainable slashing industry using biodegradable sizes from modified soy protein to replace petro-based poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Zhao, Yuzhu; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-02-17

    Biodegradable sizing agents from triethanolamine (TEA) modified soy protein could substitute poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) sizes for high-speed weaving of polyester and polyester/cotton yarns to substantially decrease environmental pollution and impel sustainability of textile industry. Nonbiodegradable PVA sizes are widely used and mainly contribute to high chemical oxygen demand (COD) in textile effluents. It has not been possible to effectively degrade, reuse or replace PVA sizes so far. Soy protein with good biodegradability showed potential as warp sizes in our previous studies. However, soy protein sizes lacked film flexibility and adhesion for required high-speed weaving. Additives with multiple hydroxyl groups, nonlinear molecule, and electric charge could physically modify secondary structure of soy protein and lead to about 23.6% and 43.3% improvement in size adhesion and ability of hair coverage comparing to unmodified soy protein. Industrial weaving results showed TEA-soy protein had relative weaving efficiency 3% and 10% higher than PVA and chemically modified starch sizes on polyester/cotton fabrics, and had relative weaving efficiency similar to PVA on polyester fabrics, although with 3- 6% lower add-on. In addition, TEA-soy sizes had a BOD5/COD ratio of 0.44, much higher than 0.03 for PVA, indicating that TEA-soy sizes were easily biodegradable in activated sludge.

  11. Determination of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and tert-Butyl Alcohol in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction/Head Space Analysis in Comparison to EPA Method 5030/8260B

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Keun-Chan; Stringfellow, William T.

    2003-10-02

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is now one of the most common groundwater contaminants in the United States. Groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also likely to be contaminated with tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), because TBA is a component of commercial grade MTBE, TBA can also be used as a fuel oxygenate, and TBA is a biodegradation product of MTBE. In California, MTBE is subject to reporting at concentrations greater than 3 {micro}g/L. TBA is classified as a ''contaminant of current interest'' and has a drinking water action level of 12 {micro}g/L. In this paper, we describe the development and optimization of a simple, automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) method for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water and demonstrate the applicability of this method for monitoring MTBE and TBA contamination in groundwater, drinking water, and surface water. In this method, the headspace (HS) of a water sample is extracted with a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, the MTBE and TBA are desorbed into a gas chromatograph (GC), and detected using mass spectrometry (MS). The method is optimized for the routine analysis of MTBE and TBA with a level of quantitation of 0.3 {micro}g/L and 4 {micro}g/L, respectively, in water. MTBE quantitation was linear for over two orders of concentration (0.3 {micro}g/L -80 {micro}g/L). TBA was found to be linear within the range of 4 {micro}g/L-7,900 {micro}g/L. The lower level of detection for MTBE is 0.03 {micro}g/L using this method. This SPME method using headspace extraction was found to be advantageous over SPME methods requiring immersion of the fiber into the water samples, because it prolonged the life of the fiber by up to 400 sample analyses. This is the first time headspace extraction SPME has been shown to be applicable to the measurement of both MTBE and TBA at concentrations below regulatory action levels. This method was compared with the certified EPA Method 5030/8260B (purge-and-trap/GC/MS) using split samples from

  12. An ex situ evaluation of TBA- and MTBE-baited bio-traps

    PubMed Central

    North, Katharine P.; Mackay, Douglas M.; Annable, Michael D.; Sublette, Kerry L.; Davis, Greg; Holland, Reef B.; Petersen, Daniel; Scow, Kate M.

    2013-01-01

    Aquifer microbial communities can be investigated using Bio-traps® (“bio-traps”), passive samplers containing Bio-Sep® beads (“bio-beads”) that are deployed in monitoring wells to be colonized by bacteria delivered via groundwater flow through the well. When bio-beads are “baited” with organic contaminants enriched in 13C, stable isotope probing allows assessment of the composition and activity of the microbial community. This study used an ex situ system fed by groundwater continuously extracted from an adjacent monitoring well within an experimentally-created aerobic zone treating a tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume. The goal was to evaluate aspects of bio-trap performance that cannot be studied quantitatively in situ. The measured groundwater flow through a bio-trap housing suggests that such traps might typically “sample” about 1.8 L per month. The desorption of TBA or methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) bait from bio-traps during a typical deployment duration of 6 weeks was approximately 90% and 45%, respectively, of the total initial bait load, with initially high rate of mass loss that decreased markedly after a few days. The concentration of TBA in groundwater flowing by the TBA-baited bio-beads was estimated to be as high as 3400 mg/L during the first few days, which would be expected to inhibit growth of TBA-degrading microbes. Initial inhibition was also implied for the MTBE-baited bio-trap, but at lower concentrations and for a shorter time. After a few days, concentrations in groundwater flowing through the bio-traps dropped below inhibitory concentrations but remained 4–5 orders of magnitude higher than TBA or MTBE concentrations within the aquifer at the experimental site. Desorption from the bio-beads during ex situ deployment occurred at first as predicted by prior sorption analyses of bio-beads but with apparent hysteresis thereafter, possibly due to mass transfer limitations caused by colonizing microbes. These results suggest that

  13. An ex situ evaluation of TBA- and MTBE-baited bio-traps.

    PubMed

    North, Katharine P; Mackay, Douglas M; Annable, Michael D; Sublette, Kerry L; Davis, Greg; Holland, Reef B; Petersen, Daniel; Scow, Kate M

    2012-08-01

    Aquifer microbial communities can be investigated using Bio-traps(®) ("bio-traps"), passive samplers containing Bio-Sep(®) beads ("bio-beads") that are deployed in monitoring wells to be colonized by bacteria delivered via groundwater flow through the well. When bio-beads are "baited" with organic contaminants enriched in (13)C, stable isotope probing allows assessment of the composition and activity of the microbial community. This study used an ex situ system fed by groundwater continuously extracted from an adjacent monitoring well within an experimentally-created aerobic zone treating a tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume. The goal was to evaluate aspects of bio-trap performance that cannot be studied quantitatively in situ. The measured groundwater flow through a bio-trap housing suggests that such traps might typically "sample" about 1.8 L per month. The desorption of TBA or methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) bait from bio-traps during a typical deployment duration of 6 weeks was approximately 90% and 45%, respectively, of the total initial bait load, with initially high rate of mass loss that decreased markedly after a few days. The concentration of TBA in groundwater flowing by the TBA-baited bio-beads was estimated to be as high as 3400 mg/L during the first few days, which would be expected to inhibit growth of TBA-degrading microbes. Initial inhibition was also implied for the MTBE-baited bio-trap, but at lower concentrations and for a shorter time. After a few days, concentrations in groundwater flowing through the bio-traps dropped below inhibitory concentrations but remained 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than TBA or MTBE concentrations within the aquifer at the experimental site. Desorption from the bio-beads during ex situ deployment occurred at first as predicted by prior sorption analyses of bio-beads but with apparent hysteresis thereafter, possibly due to mass transfer limitations caused by colonizing microbes. These results suggest that TBA- or MTBE

  14. Fully Biodegradable Airway Stents Using Amino Alcohol-Based Poly(ester amide) Elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jane; Boutin, Kyle G.; Abdulhadi, Omar; Personnat, Lyndia D.; Shazly, Tarek; Langer, Robert; Channick, Colleen L.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Airway stents are often used to maintain patency of the tracheal and bronchial passages in patients suffering from central airway obstruction caused by malignant tumors, scarring, and injury. Like most conventional medical implants, they are designed to perform their functions for a limited period of time, after which surgical removal is often required. Two primary types of airway stents are in general use, metal mesh devices and elastomeric tubes; both are constructed using permanent materials, and must be removed when no longer needed, leading to potential complications. This paper describes the development of process technologies for bioresorbable prototype elastomeric airway stents that would dissolve completely after a predetermined period of time or by an enzymatic triggering mechanism. These airway stents are constructed from biodegradable elastomers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency. This work combines microfabrication technology with bioresorbable polymers, with the ultimate goal of a fully biodegradable airway stent ultimately capable of improving patient safety and treatment outcomes. PMID:23526787

  15. WILL FLUOROTELOMER ALCOHOL BASED POLYMER FORMULATIONS BIODEGRADE DURING AEROBIC BIOLOGICAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) based polymer formulations (PFs) to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may be an important source of the perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) observed in many environmental matrices. Working with the Office of Pollution, Prevention,...

  16. USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES TO ESTIMATE THE RATE OF NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE AT FIELD SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural biodegradation of fuel contaminants in ground water reduces the risk of contamination of drinking water wells. It is very difficult to estimate the natural rate of biodegradation of MTBE in ground water because its primary biodegradation product, TBA, is also a component...

  17. Effect of redox conditions on MTBE biodegradation in surface water Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was observed in surface water-sediment microcosms under anaerobic conditions. The efficiency and products of anaerobic MTBE biodegradation were dependent on the predominant terminal electron-accepting conditions. In the presence of substantial methanogenic activity, MTBE biodegradation was nominal and involved reduction of MTBE to the toxic product, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). In the absence of significant methanogenic activity, accumulation of [14C]TBA generally decreased, and mineralization of [U-14C]MTBE to 14CO2 generally increased as the oxidative potential of the predominant terminal electron acceptor increased in the order of SO4, Fe(III), Mn(IV) < NO3 < O2. Microbial mineralization of MTBE to CO2 under Mn(IV)or SO4-reducing conditions has not been reported previously. The results of this study indicate that microorganisms inhabiting the sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE effectively under a range of anaerobic terminal electron-accepting conditions. Thus, anaerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States.

  18. 6:2 Fluorotelomer alcohol (6:2 FTOH) biodegradation by multiple microbial species under different physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hee; Wang, Ning; Chu, Kung Hui

    2014-02-01

    Factors affecting microbial aerobic biodegradation of 6:2 fluorotelomer alcohol [6:2 FTOH, F(CF₂)₆CH₂CH₂OH] were investigated using three alkane-degrading bacteria (Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5, Pseudomonas oleovorans, and Pseudomonas butanovora) and one fluoroacetate-degrading bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 8341). In the presence of formate (an external reducing energy source), P. fluorescens DSM 8341 produced perfluorobutanoic acid by removing three -CF₂- groups from 6:2 FTOH. Only P. fluorescens DSM 8341 transformed 5:3 acid to 4:3 acid and perfluoropentanoic acid. However, formate showed no effects on the degradation rates, patterns, or transformation products of 6:2 FTOH by M. vaccae JOB5. When dicyclopropylketone (an alkane hydroxylase inducer) or formate was added, P. oleovorans rapidly degraded 6:2 FTOH and produced PFPeA. In the presence of lactate, P. butanovora degraded 6:2 FTOH slowly but produced diverse metabolites. Our results demonstrate that the extent and mechanisms of 6:2 FTOH biotransformation are affected by strain types, enzyme inducers, and levels of reducing energy. PMID:23907259

  19. RK-TBA studies at the RTA test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.; Anderson, D.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1997-03-01

    Construction of a prototype RF power source based on the RK-TBA concept, called the RTA, has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The status of the prototype is presented, specifically the 1-MV, 1.2-kA induction electron gun and the pulsed power system that are in assembly. The RTA program theoretical effort, in addition to supporting the development of the prototype, has been studying optimization parameters for the application of the RK-TBA concept to higher-energy linear colliders. An overview of this work is presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. RK-TBA Studies at the RTA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.; Anderson, D.; Eylon, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1997-01-01

    Construction of a prototype RF power source based on the RK-TBA concept, called the RTA, has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The status of the prototype is presented, specifically the 1-MV, 1.2-kA induction electron gun and the pulsed power system that are in assembly. The RTA program theoretical effort, in addition to supporting the development of the prototype, has been studying optimization parameters for the application of the RK-TBA concept to higher-energy linear colliders. An overview of this work is presented. 1 fig.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and application of biodegradable crosslinked carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sabaa, Magdy W; Abdallah, Heba M; Mohamed, Nadia A; Mohamed, Riham R

    2015-11-01

    Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCh) nanocomposites were synthesized using terephthaloyl diisothiocyanate crosslinker, in the presence of montmorillonite (MMT), in different ratios of the two matrices. Characterization of nanocomposites was performed using different analyses. Swelling behavior was studied in different buffered solutions. It was found that formation of crosslinked CMCh/PVA hydrogels increased the swellability. Metal ion adsorption has also been investigated. The results indicated that crosslinked CMCh adsorbs various metal ions much more than non crosslinked CMCh. Antimicrobial activity was examined against Gram positive bacteria, against Gram negative bacteria, and also against fungi. Results indicated that most of these nanocomposites exhibited good antimicrobial potency. Degradation study was carried out in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for different time periods in order to find out degradation index (Di). Results showed that weight loss of most of the nanocomposites increased as a function of incubation time. PMID:26249602

  2. Biodegradable poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyoxalate electrospun nanofibers for hydrogen peroxide-triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Phromviyo, Nutthakritta; Lert-Itthiporn, Aurachat; Swatsitang, Ekaphan; Chompoosor, Apiwat

    2015-01-01

    Release of drugs in a controlled and sustainable manner is of great interest for treating some inflammatory diseases, drug delivery, and cosmetics. In this work, we demonstrated the control release of a drug from composite nanofibers mediated by hydrogen peroxide. Composite nanofibers of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyoxalate (PVA/POX NFs) blended at various weight ratios were successfully prepared by electrospinning. Rhodamine B (RB) was used as a model of drug and was initially loaded into the POX portion. The morphology of NFs was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The functional groups presented in the NFs were characterized using IR spectroscopy. In vitro release behavior and cell toxicity of nanofibers were also investigated using the MTT assay. The results indicated that POX content had a significant effect on the size and release profiles of nanofibers. Microstructure analysis revealed that sizes of PVA/POX NFs increased with increasing POX content, ranging from 214 to 422 nm. Release profiles of RB at 37 °C were non-linear and showed different release mechanisms. The mechanism of drug release depended on the chemical composition of the NFs. RB release from the NFs with highest POX content was caused by the degradation of the nanofiber matrix, whereas the RB release in lower POX content NFs was caused by diffusion. The NFs with POX showed a loss of structural integrity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as seen using SEM. The MTT assay showed that composite nanofibers had minimal cytotoxicity. We anticipate that nanofibrous PVA/POX can potentially be used to target numerous inflammatory diseases that overproduce hydrogen peroxide and may become a potential candidate for use as a local drug delivery vehicle. PMID:26147088

  3. New evaluation scheme for two-dimensional isotope analysis to decipher biodegradation processes: application to groundwater contamination by MTBE.

    PubMed

    Zwank, Luc; Berg, Michael; Elsner, Martin; Schmidt, Torsten C; Schwarzenbach, René P; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2005-02-15

    Compound-specific analysis of stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes was used to assess the fate of the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in a groundwater plume at an industrial disposal site. We present a novel approach to evaluate two-dimensional compound-specific isotope data with the potential to identify reaction mechanisms and to quantify the extent of biodegradation at complex field sites. Due to the widespread contaminant plume, multiple MTBE sources, the presence of numerous other organic pollutants, and the complex biogeochemical and hydrological regime atthe site, a traditional mass balance approach was not applicable. The isotopic composition of MTBE steadily changed from the source regions along the major contaminant plume (-26.4% to +40.0% (carbon); -73.1% to +60.3% (hydrogen)) indicating substantial biodegradation. Constant carbon isotopic signatures of TBA suggest the absence of TBA degradation at the site. Published carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation data for biodegradation of MTBE under oxic and anoxic conditions, respectively, were examined and used to determine both the nature and the extent of in-situ biodegradation along the plume(s). The coupled evaluation of two-dimensional compound-specific isotope data explained both carbon and hydrogen fractionation data in a consistent way and indicate anaerobic biodegradation of MTBE along the entire plume. A novel scheme to reevaluate empiric isotopic enrichment factors (epsilon) in terms of theoretically based intrinsic carbon (12k/13k) and hydrogen (1k/2k) kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is presented. Carbon and hydrogen KIE values, calculated for different potential reaction mechanisms, imply that anaerobic biodegradation of MTBE follows a SN2-type reaction mechanism. Furthermore, our data suggest that additional removal process(es) such as evaporation contributed to the overall MTBE removal along the plume, a phenomenon

  4. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Alcohol KidsHealth > For Teens > Alcohol Print A A A ... you can make an educated choice. What Is Alcohol? Alcohol is created when grains, fruits, or vegetables ...

  5. IS HCI THAT IS USED AS A PRESERVATIVE CREATING FALSE POSITIVES FOR TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will hydrochloric acid produce false positives for TBA? Yes, if you heat the sample to get a lower detection limit for TBA. Conventional purge and trap methods at ambient temperature have a reporting limit for TBA between 50 and 100 g/liter. This is higher than the provisiona...

  6. USING δ13C TO PREDICT THE RATE OF BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is difficult to estimate the rate of natural biodegradation of MTBE at field scale. Dispersion in the aquifer or dilution in the well can give a false impression of attenuation along a flow path. The first product of MTBE biodegradation is TBA. Many gasoline spills contain TB...

  7. Review of quantitative surveys of the length and stability of MTBE, TBA, and benzene plumes in groundwater at UST sites.

    PubMed

    Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10 µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185 feet for benzene and 110 to 178 feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400 feet vs. 345 feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530 feet vs. 425 feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends.

  8. Formation of alkenes via degradation of tert-alkyl ethers and alcohols by Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 and Methylibium spp.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Franziska; Muzica, Liudmila; Schuster, Judith; Treuter, Naemi; Rosell, Mònica; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H; Rohwerder, Thore

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial degradation pathways of fuel oxygenates such as methyl tert-butyl and tert-amyl methyl ether (MTBE and TAME, respectively) have already been studied in some detail. However, many of the involved enzymes are still unknown, and possible side reactions have not yet been considered. In Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108, Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1, and Methylibium sp. strain R8, we have now detected volatile hydrocarbons as by-products of the degradation of the tert-alkyl ether metabolites tert-butyl and tert-amyl alcohol (TBA and TAA, respectively). The alkene isobutene was formed only during TBA catabolism, while the beta and gamma isomers of isoamylene were produced only during TAA conversion. Both tert-alkyl alcohol degradation and alkene production were strictly oxygen dependent. However, the relative contribution of the dehydration reaction to total alcohol conversion increased with decreasing oxygen concentrations. In resting-cell experiments where the headspace oxygen content was adjusted to less than 2%, more than 50% of the TAA was converted to isoamylene. Isobutene formation from TBA was about 20-fold lower, reaching up to 4% alcohol turnover at low oxygen concentrations. It is likely that the putative tert-alkyl alcohol monooxygenase MdpJ, belonging to the Rieske nonheme mononuclear iron enzymes and found in all three strains tested, or an associated enzymatic step catalyzed the unusual elimination reaction. This was also supported by the detection of mdpJK genes in MTBE-degrading and isobutene-emitting enrichment cultures obtained from two treatment ponds operating at Leuna, Germany. The possible use of alkene formation as an easy-to-measure indicator of aerobic fuel oxygenate biodegradation in contaminated aquifers is discussed. PMID:21742915

  9. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Alcohol Wondering if alcohol is off limits with diabetes? Most people with diabetes can have a moderate amount of alcohol. Research has shown that there can be some ...

  10. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  11. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A Text Size What's in ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  12. Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Donald E.; Carlton, Bruce E.

    1978-01-01

    There are important measurements of alcoholism that are poorly understood by physicians. Professional attitudes toward alcoholic patients are often counterproductive. Americans spend about $30 billion on alcohol a year and most adults drink alcohol. Even though traditional criteria allow for recognition of the disease, diagnosis is often made late in the natural course, when intervention fails. Alcoholism is a major health problem and accounts for 10 percent of total health care costs. Still, this country's 10 million adult alcoholics come from a pool of heavy drinkers with well defined demographic characteristics. These social, cultural and familial traits, along with subtle signs of addiction, allow for earlier diagnosis. Although these factors alone do not establish a diagnosis of alcoholism, they should alert a physician that significant disease may be imminent. Focus must be directed to these aspects of alcoholism if containment of the problem is expected. PMID:685264

  13. Aerobic MTBE biodegradation: an examination of past studies, current challenges and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Deeb, R A; Scow, K M; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    2000-01-01

    With the current practice of amending gasoline with up to 15% by volume MTBE, the contamination of groundwater by MTBE has become widespread. As a result, the bioremediation of MTBE-impacted aquifers has become an active area of research. A review of the current literature on the aerobic biodegradation of MTBE reveals that a number of cultures from diverse environments can either partially degrade or completely mineralize MTBE. MTBE is either utilized as a sole carbon and energy source or is degraded cometabolically by cultures grown on alkanes. Reported degradation rates range from 0.3 to 50 mg MTBE/g cells/h while growth rates (0.01-0.05 g MTBE/g cells/d) and cellular yields (0.1-0.2 g cells/g MTBE) are generally low. Studies on the mechanisms of MTBE degradation indicate that a monooxygenase enzyme cleaves the ether bond yielding tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and formaldehyde as the dominant detectable intermediates. TBA is further degraded to 2-methyl-2-hydroxy-1-propanol, 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid, 2-propanol, acetone, hydroxyacteone and eventually, carbon dioxide. The majority of these intermediates are also common to mammalian MTBE metabolism. Laboratory studies on the degradation of MTBE in the presence of gasoline aromatics reveal that while degradation rates of other gasoline components are generally not inhibited by MTBE, MTBE degradation could be inhibited in the presence of more easily biodegradable compounds. Controlled field studies are clearly needed to elucidate MTBE degradation potential in co-contaminant plumes. Based on the reviewed studies, it is likely that a bioremediation strategy involving direct metabolism, cometabolism, bioaugmentation, or some combination thereof, could be applied as a feasible and cost-effective treatment method for MTBE contamination.

  14. Microbial biosafety of pilot-scale bioreactor treating MTBE and TBA-contaminated drinking water supply

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Radomir; Klemme, David A.; Scow, Kate; Hristova, Krassimira

    2012-01-01

    A pilot-scale sand-based fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) was utilized to treat both methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) from a contaminated aquifer. To evaluate the potential for re-use of the treated water, we tested for a panel of water quality indicator microorganisms and potential waterborne pathogens including total coliforms, E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Aeromonas hydrophila, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolytica and Mycobacterium avium in both influent and treated waters from the bioreactor. Total bacteria decreased during FBBR treatment. E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella spp., C. jejuni, V. cholerae, Y. enterocolytica and M. avium were not detected in aquifer water or bioreactor treated water samples. For those pathogens detected, including total coliforms, L. pneumophila and A. hydrophila, numbers were usually lower in treated water than influent samples, suggesting removal during treatment. The detection of particular bacterial species reflected their presence or absence in the influent waters. PMID:22321859

  15. Aerobic biodegradation of [14C] 6:2 fluorotelomer alcohol in a flow-through soil incubation system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Wang, Ning; Buck, Robert C; Wolstenholme, Barry W; Folsom, Patrick W; Sulecki, Lisa M; Bellin, Cheryl A

    2010-08-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of [1,2-(14)C] 6:2 FTOH [F(CF(2))(6)(14)CH(2)(14)CH(2)OH] in a flow-through soil incubation system is described. Soil samples dosed with [1,2-(14)C] 6:2 FTOH were analyzed by liquid scintillation counting, LC/ARC (liquid chromatography/accurate radioisotope counting), LC/MS/MS, and thermal combustion to account for 6:2 FTOH and its transformation products over 84 d. Half of the [1,2-(14)C] 6:2 FTOH disappeared from soil in 1.3 d, undergoing simultaneous microbial degradation and partitioning of volatile transformation product(s) and the 6:2 FTOH precursor into the air phase. The overall (14)C (radioactivity) mass balance in live and sterile treatments was 77-87% over 84-d incubation. In the live test system, 36% of total (14)C dosed was captured in the airflow (headspace), 25% as soil-bound residues recovered via thermal combustion, and 16% as soil extractable. After 84 d, [(14)C] 5:2 sFTOH [F(CF(2))(5)CH(OH)(14)CH(3)] was the dominant transformation product with 16% molar yield and primarily detected in the airflow. The airflow also contained [1,2-(14)C] 6:2 FTOH and (14)CO(2) at 14% and 6% of total (14)C dosed, respectively. The other significant stable transformation products, all detected in soil, were 5:3 acid [F(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)COOH, 12%], PFHxA [F(CF(2))(5)COOH, 4.5%] and PFPeA [F(CF(2))(4)COOH, 4.2%]. Soil-bound residues as well as conjugates between fluorinated transformation products and dissolved soil components were only observed in the live test system and absent in the sterile soil, suggesting that such binding and complexation are microbially or enzymatically driven processes. At day 84, 5:3 acid is postulated to be the major transformation product in soil-bound residues, which may not be available for further biodegradation in soil environment.

  16. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  17. Surface-coated fly ash reinforced biodegradable poly(vinyl alcohol) composite films: part 2-analysis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, D. C. D.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Campbell, J.; Yu, A.; Blackburn, D.; White, C.

    2010-12-01

    Composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) reinforced with 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt.% surface-coated fly ash by surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS-FA) along with 1 wt.% cross-linking agent, glutaraldehyde (GLA) were prepared by aqueous casting method. The tensile strengths of the composite films were increased proportionally with the addition of SLS-FA. The maximum 75% higher strength of the composite with 20 wt.% was achieved compared to that of neat PVA. The modulus of the composites was also increased proportionally with SLS-FA and the maximum 218% reached in composite with 20 wt.%, but the strain at break was decreased with addition of SLS-FA. Changes in FTIR spectra reflect the chemical and/or physical bonding in the ternary PVA, SLS-FA and GLA component systems. In the study of surface morphology, the connectivity was visualized in SEM images along with interstitial voids. The films with SLS-FA show 53% smoother surface calculated with AFM compared to unmodified FA composite films.

  18. Biodegradation behaviors and water adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol)/starch/carboxymethyl cellulose/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Sabouri, Narges

    2013-09-01

    The focus of this work is to study the effect of sodium montmorillonite (MMT-Na) clay content on the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/starch (S)/carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) blends using enzyme cellulase. The rate of glucose production from each nanocomposite substrates was most rapid for the substrate without MMT-Na and decreased with the addition of MMT-Na for PVA/S/CMC blend (51.5 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/1% MMT (45.4 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/3% MMT (42.8 μg/ml h), and PVA/S/CMC/5% MMT (39.2 μg/ml h). The results of this study have revealed that films with MMT-Na content at 5 wt.% exhibited a significantly reduced rate and extent of hydrolysis. Enzymatic degradation behavior of MMT-Na containing nanocomposites of PVA/S/CMC was based on the determinations of weight loss and the reducing sugars. The degraded residues have been characterized by various analytical techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  19. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-21

    Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  20. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water-tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-01

    Water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with xTBA ≈ 0.03-0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at xTBA ≈ 0.05. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, xTBA ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  1. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water-tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-21

    Water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x(TBA) ≈ 0.03-0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x(TBA) ≈ 0.05. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x(TBA) ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of the Nitroimidazole TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, S.; Yang, T. J.; Kim, Y.; Wang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Wang, B.; Xu, J.; Mdluli, K.; Ma, Z.; Franzblau, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitroimidazoles are a promising new class of antitubercular agents. The nitroimidazo-oxazole delamanid (OPC-67683, Deltyba) is in phase III trials for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, while the nitroimidazo-oxazine PA-824 is entering phase III for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis. TBA-354 (SN31354[(S)-2-nitro-6-((6-(4-trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)pyridine-3-yl)methoxy)-6,7-dihydro-5H-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazine]) is a pyridine-containing biaryl compound with exceptional efficacy against chronic murine tuberculosis and favorable bioavailability in preliminary rodent studies. It was selected as a potential next-generation antituberculosis nitroimidazole following an extensive medicinal chemistry effort. Here, we further evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and activity of TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TBA-354 is narrow spectrum and bactericidal in vitro against replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with potency similar to that of delamanid and greater than that of PA-824. The addition of serum protein or albumin does not significantly alter this activity. TBA-354 maintains activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv isogenic monoresistant strains and clinical drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. Spontaneous resistant mutants appear at a frequency of 3 × 10−7. In vitro studies and in vivo studies in mice confirm that TBA-354 has high bioavailability and a long elimination half-life. In vitro studies suggest a low risk of drug-drug interactions. Low-dose aerosol infection models of acute and chronic murine tuberculosis reveal time- and dose-dependent in vivo bactericidal activity that is at least as potent as that of delamanid and more potent than that of PA-824. Its superior potency and pharmacokinetic profile that predicts suitability for once-daily oral dosing suggest that TBA-354 be studied further for its potential as a next-generation nitroimidazole. PMID:25331696

  3. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The state agencies that implement the Underground Storage Tank program rely heavily on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) to clean up contaminants such as benzene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) at gasoline spill sites. This is possible because the contaminants are biolo...

  4. Determination of naturally occurring MTBE biodegradation by analysing metabolites and biodegradation by-products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martienssen, Marion; Fabritius, Holger; Kukla, Stefan; Balcke, Gerd U.; Hasselwander, Eyk; Schirmer, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is one of the main additives in gasoline. Its degradation is known to be difficult in natural environments. In this study, significant MTBE degradation is demonstrated at a contaminated site in Leuna (eastern Germany). Since the extent of the plume appeared to be constant over the last 5 years, an extended study was performed to elucidate the degradation processes. Special attention was paid to the production, accumulation and degradation of metabolites and by-products. Groundwater samples from 105 monitoring wells were used to measure 20 different substances. During the degradation process, several intermediates such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), tert-butyl formate, formate and lactate were produced. However, the potentially carcinogenic by-product methacrylate was not detected in several hundred samples. At the Leuna site, MTBE degradation occurred under microaerobic conditions. In contrast to hydrocarbons and BTEX, there was no evidence for anaerobic MTBE degradation. Among the degradation products, TBA was found to be a useful intermediate to identify MTBE degradation, at least under microaerobic conditions. TBA accumulation was strongly correlated to MTBE degradation according to the kinetic properties of both degradation processes. Since maximum degradation rates ( vmax) and km values were higher for MTBE ( vmax = 2.3 mg/l/d and km = 3.2 mg/l) than for TBA ( vmax = 1.35 mg/l/d and km = 0.05 mg/l), TBA significantly accumulated as an intermediate by-product. The field results were supported by bench scale model aquifer experiments.

  5. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT OF MTBE AND TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (as U.S. EPA defines the term) is a remedy, where natural processes bring the concentration of MTBE or TBA to an acceptable level in a reasonable period of time. The longevity of the plume is its critical property. The rate of attenuation is typica...

  6. Biodegradation of gasoline ether oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Ether oxygenates such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) are added to gasoline to improve fuel combustion and decrease exhaust emissions. Ether oxygenates and their tertiary alcohol metabolites are now an important group of groundwater pollutants. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the microorganisms, enzymes and pathways involved in both the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of these compounds. This review also aims to illustrate how these microbiological and biochemical studies have guided, and have helped refine, molecular and stable isotope-based analytical approaches that are increasingly being used to detect and quantify biodegradation of these compounds in contaminated environments.

  7. Effect of Redox Conditions on MTBE Biodegradation in Surface-Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. M.; Chapelle, F. H.; Landmeyer, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial degradation of methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) was observed in surface-water-sediment microcosms under anaerobic conditions. However, the efficiency and products of anaerobic MTBE biodegradation were strongly dependent on the predominant redox conditions. In the presence of substantial methanogenic activity, MTBE biodegradation was nominal and involved reduction of MTBE to the toxic product, t-butanol (TBA). In the absence of significant methanogenic activity, accumulation of 14C-TBA generally decreased and mineralization of [U-14C] MTBE to 14CO2 generally increased as the oxidative potential of the predominant terminal electron acceptor increased. The results of this study indicate that microorganisms inhabiting the bed sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE effectively under a range of anaerobic terminal electron accepting conditions. Thus, anaerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States.

  8. Methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol degradation by Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Reyes, Miguel; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2005-11-01

    Fusarium solani degraded methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other oxygenated compounds from gasoline including tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). The maximum degradation rate of MTBE was 16 mg protein h and 46 mg/g protein h for TBA. The culture transformed 77% of the total carbon to 14CO2. The estimated yield for MTBE was 0.18 g dry wt/g MTBE. PMID:16314973

  9. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cometabolism with hexane in biofilters inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Margarita; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) vapors by cometabolism with gaseous hexane (n-hexane > 95%) was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizing short chain aliphatic hydrocarbon (C(5)-C(8)). Kinetic batch experiments showed that MTBE was degraded even when hexane was completely exhausted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1.06 ± 0.16 mg MTBE mg hexane(-1). Intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) accumulation was observed followed by its gradual consumption. A maximum MTBE elimination capacity (EC(MAX)) of 35 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiency (RE) of 70% were attained in mineral medium amended biofilters having an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 1 min. For these experimental conditions, a maximum hexane EC of approximately 60 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained at a load of 75 g m(-3) h(-1). Experiments under transient conditions revealed a competitive substrate interaction between MTBE and hexane. Biomass densities between 5.8 and 12.6 g L(biofilter) (-1) were obtained. Nevertheless, production of biopolymers caused non-uniform distribution flow rates that reduced the performance. Residence time distribution profiles showed an intermediate dispersion flow rate with a dispersion coefficient of 0.8 cm(2) s(-1). PMID:22486671

  10. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cometabolism with hexane in biofilters inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Margarita; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) vapors by cometabolism with gaseous hexane (n-hexane > 95%) was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizing short chain aliphatic hydrocarbon (C(5)-C(8)). Kinetic batch experiments showed that MTBE was degraded even when hexane was completely exhausted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1.06 ± 0.16 mg MTBE mg hexane(-1). Intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) accumulation was observed followed by its gradual consumption. A maximum MTBE elimination capacity (EC(MAX)) of 35 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiency (RE) of 70% were attained in mineral medium amended biofilters having an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 1 min. For these experimental conditions, a maximum hexane EC of approximately 60 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained at a load of 75 g m(-3) h(-1). Experiments under transient conditions revealed a competitive substrate interaction between MTBE and hexane. Biomass densities between 5.8 and 12.6 g L(biofilter) (-1) were obtained. Nevertheless, production of biopolymers caused non-uniform distribution flow rates that reduced the performance. Residence time distribution profiles showed an intermediate dispersion flow rate with a dispersion coefficient of 0.8 cm(2) s(-1).

  11. Extruded/injection-molded composites containing unripe plantain flour, ethylene vinyl-alcohol and glycerol: Evaluation of color, mechanical property and biodegradability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extruded/injection-molded composites were produced from plantain flour blended with ethylene vinyl-alcohol (EVA) and glycerol. Scanning electron microscopy showed composites had a smooth surface and excellent compatibility between plantain flour, EVA and glycerol. The impact of increased plantain fl...

  12. Site specific replacements of a single loop nucleoside with a dibenzyl linker may switch the activity of TBA from anticoagulant to antiproliferative.

    PubMed

    Scuotto, Maria; Rivieccio, Elisa; Varone, Alessia; Corda, Daniela; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Vellecco, Valentina; Cirino, Giuseppe; Virgilio, Antonella; Esposito, Veronica; Galeone, Aldo; Borbone, Nicola; Varra, Michela; Mayol, Luciano

    2015-09-18

    Many antiproliferative G-quadruplexes (G4s) arise from the folding of GT-rich strands. Among these, the Thrombin Binding Aptamer (TBA), as a rare example, adopts a monomolecular well-defined G4 structure. Nevertheless, the potential anticancer properties of TBA are severely hampered by its anticoagulant action and, consequently, no related studies have appeared so far in the literature. We wish to report here that suitable chemical modifications in the TBA sequence can preserve its antiproliferative over anticoagulant activity. Particularly, we replaced one residue of the TT or TGT loops with a dibenzyl linker to develop seven new quadruplex-forming TBA based sequences (TBA-bs), which were studied for their structural (CD, CD melting, 1D NMR) and biological (fibrinogen, PT and MTT assays) properties. The three-dimensional structures of the TBA-bs modified at T13 (TBA-bs13) or T12 (TBA-bs12), the former endowed with selective antiproliferative activity, and the latter acting as potently as TBA in both coagulation and MTT assays, were further studied by 2D NMR restrained molecular mechanics. The comparative structural analyses indicated that neither the stability, nor the topology of the G4s, but the different localization of the two benzene rings of the linker was responsible for the loss of the antithrombin activity for TBA-bs13. PMID:26250112

  13. Development of biodegradable materials; balancing degradability and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.M.; Allen, A.L.; Dell, P.A.; McCassie, J.E.; Shupe, A.E.; Stenhouse, P.J. Stenhouse, Welch, E.A.; Kaplan, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    The development of biodegradable materials suitable for packaging must take into consideration various performance criteria such as mechanical and barrier properties, as well as rate of biodegradability in given environments. Individual or blended biopolymer films were obtained commercially or blown into film in the laboratory and tested for tensile strength, ultimate elongation and oxygen barrier. These films were then subjected to accelerated marine biodegradation tests as well as simulated marine respirometry. Starch/ethylene vinyl alcohol films exhibited good mechanical and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were very slow to biodegrade in the simulated and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were very slow to biodegrade in the simulated marine environment. Polyhydroxyalkanoates had good mechanical properties, average oxygen barrier and good biodegradability. Data indicate that performance and biodegradability of packaging can be tailored to needs by combining individual biopolymers in different proportions in blends and laminates.

  14. Aerobic mineralization of MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol by stream-bed sediment microorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the stream-bed sediments at two gasoline- contaminated groundwater sites demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenates, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Up to 73% of [U-14C]-MTBE and 84% of [U-14C]-TBA were degraded to 14CO2 under mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions. No significant mineralization was observed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that, under the mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions characteristic of stream-bed sediments, microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE and TBA delivered to surface water bodies by contaminated groundwater or by other sources.Microorganisms indigenous to the stream-bed sediments at two gasoline-contaminated groundwater sites demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenates, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Up to 73% of [U-14C]-MTBE and 84% of [U-14C]-TBA were degraded to 14CO2 under mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions. No significant mineralization was observed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that, under the mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions characteristic of stream-bed sediments, microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE and TBA delivered to surface water bodies by contaminated groundwater or by other sources.

  15. Design and control of glycerol-tert-butyl alcohol etherification process.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Elena; Bildea, Costin Sorin; Bozga, Grigore

    2012-01-01

    Design, economics, and plantwide control of a glycerol-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) etherification plant are presented. The reaction takes place in liquid phase, in a plug flow reactor, using Amberlyst 15 as a catalyst. The products' separation is achieved by two distillation columns where high-purity ethers are obtained and a section involving extractive distillation with 1,4-butanediol as solvent, which separates TBA from the TBA/water azeotrope. Details of design performed in AspenPlus and an economic evaluation of the process are given. Three plantwide control structures are examined using a mass balance model of the plant. The preferred control structure fixes the fresh glycerol flow rate and the ratio glycerol + monoether : TBA at reactor-inlet. The stability and robustness in the operation are checked by rigorous dynamic simulation in AspenDynamics.

  16. Effect of gamma ray on poly(lactic acid)/poly(vinyl acetate-co-vinyl alcohol) blends as biodegradable food packaging films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Dadbin, Susan; Frounchi, Masoud

    2014-03-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly(vinyl acetate-co-vinyl alcohol) [P(VAc-co-VA)] blends as new transparent film packaging materials were prepared at various blend compositions and different vinyl alcohol contents. The blends and pure PLA were irradiated by gamma rays to investigate the extent of changes in the packaging material during gamma ray sterilization process. The miscibility of the blends was dependent on the blend composition and vinyl alcohol content; gamma irradiation had little effect on the extent of miscibility. The glass transition temperature of pure PLA and PLA/P(VAc-co-VA) miscible blends reduced after irradiation. On the other hand in PLA/P(VAc-co-VA) immiscible blends, while the glass transition temperature of the PLA phase decreased; that of the copolymer phase slightly increased. The reduction in the glass transition was about 10 percent for samples irradiated with 50 kGy indicating dominance of chain scission of PLA molecules at high irradiation dose. The latter was verified by drop in mechanical properties of pure PLA after exposing to gamma irradiation at 50 kGy. Blending of PLA with the copolymer P(VAc-co-VA) compensated greatly the adverse effects of irradiation on PLA. The oxygen-barrier property of the blend was superior to the neat PLA and remained almost intact with irradiation. The un-irradiated and irradiated blends had excellent transparency. Gamma ray doses used for sterilization purposes are usually less than 20 kGy. It was shown that gamma irradiation at 20 kGy had no or little adverse effects on PLA/P(VAc-co-VA) blends mechanical and gas barrier properties.

  17. MtBE biodegradation in a gravity flow, high-biomass retaining bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zein, Maher M; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2004-06-15

    The aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE), a widely used fuel oxygenate, was investigated using a pilot-scale biomass-retaining bioreactor called a Biomass Concentrator Reactor (BCR). The reactor was operated for a year at a flow rate of 2500 L/d on Cincinnati dechlorinated tap water and an influent MtBE concentration of 5 mg/L. Treatment efficiency of MtBE in the reactor during stable operations exceeded 99.9%. The upper 95% confidence levels of effluent MtBE concentrations and its degradation byproduct tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) were 2.9 and 0.9 microg/L, respectively, during these stable conditions. In addition, the effluent was found to be of better quality than the influent tap water as reflected by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Microbial community DNA profiling was carried out using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction amplified 16s rDNA. The BCR was found to be inhabited by a wide spectrum of bacterial species, most notably microorganisms related to the genera Hydrogenophaga, Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Pseudomonas. These organisms were previously reported to be associated with MtBE degradation. With the contamination of groundwater by MtBE being a wide-ranging problem throughout the United States, it is essential to develop a technology capable of effectively remediating such aquifers in order to protect public health and the environment. The BCR's simple operation and low maintenance requirements may render it an economically attractive approach to remediating groundwater contaminated with MtBE.

  18. Longitudinal impedance measurement of an RK-TBA induction accelerating gap

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Induction accelerating gap designs are being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) applications. The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance to limit beam breakup, low longitudinal impedance at the beam-modulation frequency to minimize power loss. Various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques were explored to optimize the gap design. We report on the experimental effort to evaluate the rf properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. Longitudinal impedance measurements above beam-tube cut-off frequency using a single-wire measuring system are presented.

  19. Surface-coated fly ash used as filler in biodegradable poly(vinyl alcohol) composite films: Part 1—The modification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, D. C. D.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Gupta, S.; Yu, A.; Blackburn, D.; White, C.

    2010-02-01

    The surfaces of fly ash (FA) particles were modified by surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and used in fabrication of composite films with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Both unmodified fly ash (FA) and modified fly ash (SLS-FA) samples were examined using a range of analytical tools including X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The distribution patterns of SLS-FA particles were shifted to the higher regions compared to FA by adding 1.2-4.2 μm in the ranges between 2 and 25 μm, whereas the modification process reduced the size of the particles over 25 μm due to grinding during the activation process. The increased 1.2-4.2 μm in average can be considered the thickness of the surfactant on the SLS-FA surface. On the oxides based chemical analysis by XRF, the compositions were almost unchanged. SEM and TEM were visualised the irregular sizes morphology mostly spherical of the particles, although it is impossible to capture the images of exactly same particles in modified and unmodified forms. The composite films reinforced with SLS-FA showed 33% higher strength than those of FA filled films. The enhancement of tensile strength attributed from the level of physical bonding between SLS-FA and PVA surfaces.

  20. Decreased toxicity to terrestrial plants associated with a mixture of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolite tert-butyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    An, Youn-Joo; Lee, Woo-Mi

    2007-08-01

    The influence of the main fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its key metabolite, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), on the growth of a plant seedling was studied separately and in combination. The test plants were mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), wheat (Triticum aestivum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), kale (Brassica alboglabra), Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris), and sweet corn (Zea mays). The growth of all the plants was adversely affected by TBA and MTBE. The 5-d median effective concentration (EC50) for the plants exposed to MTBE and TBA were in the range of 680 to 1,000 mg MTBE/kg soil (dry wt) and 1,200 to 3,500 mg TBA/kg soil (dry wt), respectively. The relative order of the sensitivity rankings is almost the same for MTBE and TBA. Methyl tert-butyl ether is more toxic than TBA to most of the test species. Based on the EC50 values, MTBE is approximately 1.5 to 3 times more potent than TBA. The sum of the toxic unit (TU) at 50% inhibition of the mixture (EC50mix) was calculated from the dose (TU-based)-response relationships using the trimmed Spearman-Karber method. The combined effect of MTBE + TBA on the plant growth was less than additive because the EC50mix values were greater than I TU. This phenomenon may be due to the competition of MTBE and TBA in terms of their intake by plants. The combined effects of MTBE and TBA should be taken into account to assess their risk in gasoline-contaminated sites.

  1. Contribution of the nitroimidazoles PA-824 and TBA-354 to the activity of novel regimens in murine models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tasneen, Rokeya; Williams, Kathy; Amoabeng, Opokua; Minkowski, Austin; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E; Upton, Anna M; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2015-01-01

    New regimens based on two or more novel agents are sought in order to shorten or simplify the treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. PA-824 is a nitroimidazo-oxazine now in phase II trials and has shown significant early bactericidal activity alone and in combination with the newly approved agent bedaquiline or with pyrazinamide with or without moxifloxacin. While the development of PA-824 continues, a potential next-generation derivative, TBA-354, has been discovered to have in vitro potency superior to that of PA-824 and greater metabolic stability than that of the other nitroimidazole derivative in clinical development, delamanid. In the present study, we compared the activities of PA-824 and TBA-354 as monotherapies in murine models of the initial intensive and continuation phases of treatment, as well as in combination with bedaquiline plus pyrazinamide, sutezolid, and/or clofazimine. The monotherapy studies demonstrated that TBA-354 is 5 to 10 times more potent than PA-824, but selected mutants are cross-resistant to PA-824 and delamanid. The combination studies revealed that TBA-354 is 2 to 4 times more potent than PA-824 when combined with bedaquiline, and when administered at a dose equivalent to that of PA-824, TBA-354 demonstrated superior sterilizing efficacy. Perhaps most importantly, the addition of either nitroimidazole significantly improved the sterilizing activities of bedaquiline and sutezolid, with or without pyrazinamide, confirming the value of each agent in this potentially universally active short-course regimen.

  2. Contribution of the Nitroimidazoles PA-824 and TBA-354 to the Activity of Novel Regimens in Murine Models of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tasneen, Rokeya; Williams, Kathy; Amoabeng, Opokua; Minkowski, Austin; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Upton, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    New regimens based on two or more novel agents are sought in order to shorten or simplify the treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. PA-824 is a nitroimidazo-oxazine now in phase II trials and has shown significant early bactericidal activity alone and in combination with the newly approved agent bedaquiline or with pyrazinamide with or without moxifloxacin. While the development of PA-824 continues, a potential next-generation derivative, TBA-354, has been discovered to have in vitro potency superior to that of PA-824 and greater metabolic stability than that of the other nitroimidazole derivative in clinical development, delamanid. In the present study, we compared the activities of PA-824 and TBA-354 as monotherapies in murine models of the initial intensive and continuation phases of treatment, as well as in combination with bedaquiline plus pyrazinamide, sutezolid, and/or clofazimine. The monotherapy studies demonstrated that TBA-354 is 5 to 10 times more potent than PA-824, but selected mutants are cross-resistant to PA-824 and delamanid. The combination studies revealed that TBA-354 is 2 to 4 times more potent than PA-824 when combined with bedaquiline, and when administered at a dose equivalent to that of PA-824, TBA-354 demonstrated superior sterilizing efficacy. Perhaps most importantly, the addition of either nitroimidazole significantly improved the sterilizing activities of bedaquiline and sutezolid, with or without pyrazinamide, confirming the value of each agent in this potentially universally active short-course regimen. PMID:25331697

  3. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or ... brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of ...

  4. Aggregation in dilute aqueous tert-butyl alcohol solutions: Insights from large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rini; Patey, G. N.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations employing up to 64 000 particles are used to investigate aggregation and microheterogeneity in aqueous tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) solutions for TBA mole fractions Xt ⩽ 0.1. Four different force fields are considered. It is shown that the results obtained can be strongly dependent on the particular force field employed, and can be significantly influenced by system size. Two of the force fields considered show TBA aggregation in the concentration range Xt ≈ 0.03 - 0.06. For these models, systems of 64 000 particles are minimally sufficient to accommodate the TBA aggregates. The structures resulting from TBA aggregation do not have a well-defined size and shape, as one might find in micellar systems, but are better described as TBA-rich and water-rich regions. All pair correlation functions exhibit long-range oscillatory behavior with wavelengths that are much larger than molecular length scales. The oscillations are not strongly damped and the correlations can easily exceed the size of the simulation cell, even for the low TBA concentrations considered here. We note that these long-range correlations pose a serious problem if one wishes to obtain certain physical properties such as Kirkwood-Buff integrals from simulation results. In contrast, two other force fields that we consider show little sign of aggregation for Xt ≲ 0.08. In our 64 000 particle simulations all four models considered show demixing-like behavior for Xt ≳ 0.1, although such behavior is not evident in smaller systems of 2000 particles. The meaning of the demixing-like behavior is unclear. Since real TBA-water solutions do not demix, it might be an indication that all four models we consider poorly represent the real system. Alternatively, it might be an artifact of finite system size. Possibly, the apparent demixing indicates that for Xt ≳ 0.1, the stable TBA aggregates are simply too large to fit into the simulation cell. Our results provide a view of the

  5. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  6. Biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaiyan

    In this dissertation, various noncrosslinked and crosslinked biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and characterized. The properties of these polymer nanocomposites, and their relating mechanisms and corresponding applications were studied and discussed in depth. Chapter 1 introduces the research background and objectives of the current research. Chapter 2 presents the development of a novel low cost carbon source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production and fabrication and characterization of biobased polymer nanocomposites using produced BC and soy protein based resins. The carbon source, soy flour extract (SFE), was obtained from defatted soy flour (SF) and BC yield achieved using SFE medium was high. The results of this study showed that SFE consists of five sugars and Acetobacter xylinum metabolized sugars in a specific order. Chapter 3 discusses the fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites using BC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). These polymer nanocomposites had excellent tensile and thermal properties. Crosslinking of PVA using glutaraldehyde (GA) not only increased the mechanical and thermal properties but the water-resistance. Chapter 4 describes the development and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) based biodegradable polymer nanocomposites by blending MFC suspension with PVA. Chemical crosslinking of the polymer nanocomposites was carried out using glyoxal to increase the mechanical and thermal properties as well as to make the PVA partially water-insoluble. Chapter 5 reports the development and characterization of halloysite nanotube (HNT) reinforced biodegradable polymer nanocomposites utilizing HNT dispersion and PVA. Several separation techniques were used to obtain individualized HNT dispersion. The results indicated uniform dispersion of HNTs in both PVA and malonic acid (MA) crosslinked PVA resulted in excellent mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, especially

  7. Mechanisms of biodegradation of dibenzoate plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Kermanshahi pour, Azadeh; Cooper, David G; Mamer, Orval A; Maric, Milan; Nicell, Jim A

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradation mechanisms were elucidated for three dibenzoate plasticizers: diethylene glycol dibenzoate (D(EG)DB), dipropylene glycol dibenzoate (D(PG)DB), both of which are commercially available, and 1,6-hexanediol dibenzoate, a potential green plasticizer. Degradation studies were done using Rhodococcus rhodochrous in the presence of pure alkanes as a co-substrate. As expected, the first degradation step for all of these systems was the hydrolysis of one ester bond with the release of benzoic acid and a monoester. Subsequent biodegradation of the monobenzoates of diethylene glycol (D(EG)MB) and dipropylene glycol (D(PG)MB) was very slow, leading to significant accumulation of these monoesters. In contrast, 1,6-hexanediol monobenzoate was quickly degraded and characterization of the metabolites indicated that the biodegradation proceeded by way of the oxidation of the alcohol group to generate 6-(benzoyloxy) hexanoic acid followed by beta-oxidation steps. This pathway was blocked for D(EG)MB and D(PG)MB by the presence of an ether function. The use of a pure hydrocarbon as a co-substrate resulted in the formation of another class of metabolites; namely the esters of the alcohols formed by the oxidation of the alkanes and the benzoic acid released by hydrolysis of the original diesters. These metabolites were biodegraded without the accumulation of any intermediates. PMID:19665165

  8. Fate of free and linear alcohol-ethoxylate-derived fatty alcohols in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Federle, Thomas W; Itrich, Nina R

    2006-05-01

    Pure homologues of [1-14C] C12, C14, and C16 alcohols and the linear alcohol ethoxylates, AE [1-14C alkyl] C13E9 and C16E9 were tested in a batch-activated sludge die-away system to assess their biodegradation kinetics and to predict levels of free alcohol derived from AE biodegradation in treated effluent. First-order rates for primary biodegradation were similar for all alcohols (86-113 h(-1)) and were used to predict removal under typical treatment conditions. Predicted removals of fatty alcohols ranged from 99.76% to 99.85%, consistent with published field data. During the biodegradation of the AE homologues, lower than expected levels of fatty alcohol based upon the assumption that biodegradation occurs through central fission were observed. Rather than fatty alcohols, the major metabolites were polar materials resulting from omega oxidation of the alkyl chain prior to or concurrent with central cleavage. The amounts of free fatty alcohols that were formed from AEs in influent and escape into effluent were negligible due both to their rapid degradation and to the finding that formation of free alcohol through central cleavage is only a minor degradation pathway in activated sludge. PMID:16026837

  9. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  10. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  11. Hydrophobic Hydration in Water-tert-Butyl Alcohol Solutions by Extended Depolarized Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Comez, L; Paolantoni, M; Lupi, L; Sassi, P; Corezzi, S; Morresi, A; Fioretto, D

    2015-07-23

    Molecular dynamics and structural properties of water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) mixtures are studied as a function of concentration by extended depolarized light scattering (EDLS) experiments. The wide frequency range, going from fraction to several thousand GHz, explored by EDLS allows distinguishing TBA rotational dynamics from structural relaxation of water and intermolecular vibrational and librational modes of the solution. Contributions to the water relaxation originating from two distinct populations, i.e. hydration and bulk water, are clearly identified. The dynamic retardation factor of hydration water with respect to the bulk, ξ ≈ 4, almost concentration independent, is one of the smallest found by EDLS among a variety of systems of different nature and complexity. This result, together with the small number of water molecules perturbed by the presence of TBA, supports the idea that hydrophobic simple molecules are less effective than hydrophilic and more complex molecules in perturbing the H-bond network of liquid water. At increasing TBA concentrations the average number of perturbed water molecules shows a pronounced decrease and the characteristic frequency of librational motions reduces significantly, both of which are results consistent with the occurrence of self-aggregation of TBA molecules.

  12. Evaluation of the intrinsic mtbe biodegradation potential in MTBE-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Moreels, D; Bastiaens, L; Merckx, R; Ollevier, F; Diels, L; Springael, D

    2001-01-01

    MTBE has only recently being used as an octane enhancer in gasoline in Europe and is considered as a more recent groundwater contaminant on this continent. In this study we examined if during the recent contamination history, European MTBE contaminated aquifers had developed MTBE degrading microbial communities. Different MTBE contaminated and non-contaminated aquifers and soils were tested for their intrinsic biodegradation potential. The role of the oxygen concentration, the availability of nutrients and the influence of the presence of a co-contaminant like benzene on the MTBE biodegradation capabilities of the indigenous microorganisms were examined. All studied soil samples showed degradation of benzene under all tested conditions. On the other hand only one aquifer showed the capacity to degrade MTBE as demonstrated by the disappearance of MTBE and the production of TBA, the main degradation product of MTBE.

  13. Grey water biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the biodegradability characteristics of grey water constituents is imperative for a proper design and operation of a biological treatment system of grey water. This study characterizes the different COD fractions of dormitory grey water and investigates the effect of applying different conditions in the biodegradation test. The maximum aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and conversion rate for the different COD fractions is determined. The results show that, on average, dormitory grey water COD fractions are 28% suspended, 32% colloidal and 40% dissolved. The studied factors incubation time, inoculum addition and temperature are influencing the determined biodegradability. The maximum biodegradability and biodegradation rate differ between different COD fractions, viz. COD(ss), COD(col) and COD(diss). The dissolved COD fraction is characterised by the lowest degradation rate, both for anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The maximum biodegradability for aerobic and anaerobic conditions is 86 and 70% respectively, whereas the first order conversion rate constant, k₂₀, is 0.119 and 0.005 day⁻¹, respectively. The anaerobic and aerobic conversion rates in relation to temperature can be described by the Arrhenius relation, with temperature coefficients of 1.069 and 1.099, respectively.

  14. An unprecedented up-field shift in the 13C NMR spectrum of the carboxyl carbons of the lantern-type dinuclear complex TBA[Ru2(O2CCH3)4Cl2] (TBA+ = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation).

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuya; Ikeue, Takahisa; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Guégan, Frédéric; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Hiromitsu, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Mikuriya, Masahiro; Kataoka, Yusuke; Handa, Makoto

    2015-08-14

    A large up-field shift (-763 ppm) has been observed for the carboxyl carbons of the dichlorido complex TBA[Ru(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)Cl(2)] (TBA(+) = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation) in the (13)C NMR spectrum (CD(2)Cl(2) at 25 °C). The DFT calculations showed spin delocalization from the paramagnetic Ru(2)(5+) core to the ligands, in agreement with the large up-field shift.

  15. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  16. HIGH LEVELS OF MONOAROMATIC COMPOUNDS LIMIT THE USE OF SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER AND TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, two papers reported the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with polydimethylsiloxane(PDMS)/Carboxen fibers to determine trace levels of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary butyl alcohol (tBA) in water. Attempts were made to apply this technique to th...

  17. Biodegradable electroactive materials for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimard, Nathalie Kathryn

    This dissertation focuses on the development of biomaterials that could be used to enhance the regeneration of severed peripheral nerves. These materials were designed to be electroactive, biodegradable, and biocompatible. To render the materials electroactive the author chose to incorporate conducting polymer (CP) units into the materials. Because CPs are inherently non-degradable, the key challenge was to create a CP-based material that was also biodegradable. Two strategies were explored to generate a biodegradable CP-based material. The first strategy centered around the incorporation of both electroactive and biodegradable subunits into a copolymer system. In the context of this approach, two bis(methoxyquaterthiophene)-co-adipic acid polyester (QAPE) analogues were successfully synthesized, one through polycondensation (giving undoped QAPE) and the second through oxidative polymerization (giving doped QAPE-2). QAPE was found to be electroactive by cyclic voltammetry, bioerodible, and cytocompatible with Schwann cells. QAPE was doped with ferric perchlorate, although only a low doping percentage was realized (˜8%). Oxidative polymerization of a bis(bithiophene) adipate permitted the direct synthesis of doped QAPE-2, which was found to have a higher doping level (˜24%). The second strategy pursued with the goal of generating an electroactive biodegradable material involved covalently immobilizing low molecular weight polythiophene chains onto the surface of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) films. HA films are not only biodegradable and biocompatible, but they also provide mechanical integrity to bilayer systems. Dicyclocarbodiimide coupling of carboxylic acids to HA alcohol groups was used to functionalize HA films. The HA-polythiophene composite is still in the early stages of development. However, to date, thiophene has been successfully immobilized at the surface of HA films with a high degree of substitution. The author has also shown that thiophene

  18. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  19. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- www.al-anon.org/home National Institute on Alcohol ...

  20. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  1. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... raquo Alcohol Facts Alcohol Facts Listen Drinks like beer, malt liquor, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol. Alcohol is the ingredient that gets you drunk. Hard liquor—such as whiskey, rum, or gin—has more ...

  2. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  3. Editorial: biodegradable materials.

    PubMed

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-11-21

    This Special Issue "Biodegradable Materials" features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment.

  4. Editorial: Biodegradable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue “Biodegradable Materials” features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment. PMID:25421242

  5. Directions for environmentally biodegradable polymer research

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G. )

    1993-03-01

    A major factor promoting interest in biodegradable polymers is the growing concern raised by the recalcitrance and unknown environmental fate of many of the currently used synthetic polymers. These polymers include both water-soluble and water-insoluble types. The former are generally specialty polymers with functional groups that effect water solubility such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, amido, etc.; the latter are usually nonfunctional polymers commonly referred to as commodity plastics. Both types of polymers are widely used in many applications. Water-soluble polymers are used, for example, in cosmetics, water treatment, dispersants, thickeners, detergents, and superabsorbents, and they include poly(acrylic acid), polyacrylamide, poly(vinyl alcohol), and poly(ethylene glycol). Plastics are used in packaging, disposable diaper backing, fishing nets, and agricultural film; they include polymers such as polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(ethylene terephthalate), and Nylon 6.6. In this Account, the author presents a personal perspective on definitions and test protocols for biodegradable polymers as well as how they will influence the future direction and developments in the field. However, before doing so he digresses briefly to present a commentary on the role of biodegradable polymers in environmental waste management. This should be useful for those readers unfamiliar with the subject, and it will set the stage for the rest of the discussion. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  7. [Study on biodegradation of polyacrylamide].

    PubMed

    Han, Chang-Fu; Zheng, Ai-Fang; Li, Da-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium was introduced into biodegradation of polyacrylamide(PAM), and effects of glucose amount, pH, N concentration, Mn2+ concentration and biodegradation time on biodegradation of PAM were studied. Results show that Phanerochaete chrysosporium has special abilities of enzyme catalysis biodegradation of PAM. And the removal rate of PAM is 50%. Nitrogen limitation (NH4+ = 0.2 g/L) and Mn2+ concentration (Mn2+ = 0.017 5 g/L) are optima of producing PAM biodegradation enzyme.

  8. Systemic approaches to biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Almudena; Valencia, Alfonso; Cases, Ildefonso

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation, the ability of microorganisms to remove complex chemicals from the environment, is a multifaceted process in which many biotic and abiotic factors are implicated. The recent accumulation of knowledge about the biochemistry and genetics of the biodegradation process, and its categorization and formalization in structured databases, has recently opened the door to systems biology approaches, where the interactions of the involved parts are the main subject of study, and the system is analysed as a whole. The global analysis of the biodegradation metabolic network is beginning to produce knowledge about its structure, behaviour and evolution, such as its free-scale structure or its intrinsic robustness. Moreover, these approaches are also developing into useful tools such as predictors for compounds' degradability or the assisted design of artificial pathways. However, it is the environmental application of high-throughput technologies from the genomics, metagenomics, proteomics and metabolomics that harbours the most promising opportunities to understand the biodegradation process, and at the same time poses tremendous challenges from the data management and data mining point of view.

  9. Biodegradable Materials for Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for nonwovens is increasing globally, particularly in the disposable products area. As the consumption of nonwoven products with short life increases, the burden on waste disposal also rises. In this context, biodegradable nonwovens become more important today and for the future. Several new ...

  10. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-01-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones.

  11. Biodegradability of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) film grafted with vinyl acetate: Effect of grafting and saponification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuki; Seko, Noriaki; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Tamada, Masao; Kasuya, Ken-ichi; Mitomo, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) film was carried out. At a degree of grafting higher than 5%, the grafted films (PHB-g-VAc) completely lost the enzymatic degradability that is characteristic of PHB due to the grafted VAc covering the surface of the PHB film. However, the biodegradability of the PHB-g-VAc films was recovered when the films were saponified in alkali solution under optimum conditions. Graft chains of the PHB-g-VAc film reacted selectively to become biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The biodegradability of the saponified PHB-g-VAc film increased rapidly with time.

  12. Biodegradable analogues of DDT*

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Robert L.; Kapoor, Inder P.; Hirwe, Asha S.

    1971-01-01

    Despite the immense utility of DDT for vector control its usefulness is prejudiced by its stability in the environment and by the low rate at which it can be degraded biologically. Metabolic studies in insects, in mice, and in a model ecosystem with several food chains have shown that DDT analogues with substituent groups readily attacked by multifunction oxidases undergo a substantial degree of biological degradation and do not appear to be stored readily in animal tissues or concentrated in food chains. Detailed metabolic pathways have been worked out and it is clear that comparative biochemistry can be used to develop DDT analogues that are adequately persistent yet biodegradable. A number of new DDT analogues have been evaluated for insecticidal activity against flies and mosquitos and for their potential usefulness as safe, persistent, and biodegradable insecticides. PMID:5315354

  13. Biodegradation of cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Saldick, J

    1974-12-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO(2) and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand.

  14. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  15. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  16. Integration of bioinformatics to biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics and biodegradation are two primary scientific fields in applied microbiology and biotechnology. The present review describes development of various bioinformatics tools that may be applied in the field of biodegradation. Several databases, including the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation database (UM-BBD), a database of biodegradative oxygenases (OxDBase), Biodegradation Network-Molecular Biology Database (Bionemo) MetaCyc, and BioCyc have been developed to enable access to information related to biochemistry and genetics of microbial degradation. In addition, several bioinformatics tools for predicting toxicity and biodegradation of chemicals have been developed. Furthermore, the whole genomes of several potential degrading bacteria have been sequenced and annotated using bioinformatics tools. PMID:24808763

  17. Myths about drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... to. I spend a lot of time getting alcohol, drinking alcohol, or recovering from the effects of alcohol. ... Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Overview of Alcohol Consumption. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol- ...

  18. Biodegradable Polymers for the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Richard A.; Kalra, Bhanu

    2002-08-01

    Biodegradable polymers are designed to degrade upon disposal by the action of living organisms. Extraordinary progress has been made in the development of practical processes and products from polymers such as starch, cellulose, and lactic acid. The need to create alternative biodegradable water-soluble polymers for down-the-drain products such as detergents and cosmetics has taken on increasing importance. Consumers have, however, thus far attached little or no added value to the property of biodegradability, forcing industry to compete head-to-head on a cost-performance basis with existing familiar products. In addition, no suitable infrastructure for the disposal of biodegradable materials exists as yet.

  19. Biodegradable polymers for the environment.

    PubMed

    Gross, Richard A; Kalra, Bhanu

    2002-08-01

    Biodegradable polymers are designed to degrade upon disposal by the action of living organisms. Extraordinary progress has been made in the development of practical processes and products from polymers such as starch, cellulose, and lactic acid. The need to create alternative biodegradable water-soluble polymers for down-the-drain products such as detergents and cosmetics has taken on increasing importance. Consumers have, however, thus far attached little or no added value to the property of biodegradability, forcing industry to compete head-to-head on a cost-performance basis with existing familiar products. In addition, no suitable infrastructure for the disposal of biodegradable materials exists as yet.

  20. Tertiary butyl alcohol in drinking water induces phase I and II liver enzymes with consequent effects on thyroid hormone homeostasis in the B6C3F1 female mouse.

    PubMed

    Blanck, O; Fowles, J; Schorsch, F; Pallen, C; Espinasse-Lormeau, H; Schulte-Koerne, E; Totis, M; Banton, M

    2010-03-01

    Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) was administered to groups of 15 female B6C3F1 mice in drinking water at concentrations of 0, 2.0 or 20 mg TBA ml(-1), for 14 days, for assessment of gross and histological changes in the liver and thyroid, thyroid hormones (T3, T4, and TSH), total hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyp) content, specific Cyp activities and quantitative PCR analysis of specific Cyp enzymes (Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11), sulfuryltransferases (ST1a1, ST2a2, and STn) and glucuronyltransferases (UGT1a1, UGT2b1, and UGT2b5). Phenobarbital (PB) was administered to a positive control group by oral gavage at a daily dose of 80 mg kg(-1). TBA caused, on day 14, a reduction in circulating T3 (12-15% decrease) and a dose-dependent reduction in T4 (13-22% decrease), with no evidence of thyroid pathology. Two of five livers examined in the 20 mg TBA ml(-1) dose group showed mild, diffuse centrilobular hypertrophy. On day 14, Cyp 7-benzoxyresorufin-O-debenzylase activity was significantly induced 12-fold by TBA at 20 mg ml(-1), and 1.8-fold at the 2.0 mg TBA ml(-1) concentration. Cyp 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity was slightly induced (2.1-fold) by 20 mg TBA ml(-1) on day 14. Quantitative PCR analysis of gene transcripts showed a significant induction of Cyp2b10 and ST1a1 with both TBA concentrations, and a slight induction of Cyp2b9 at 20 mg TBA ml(-1) only. PB induced all phase I and phase II gene transcripts except for Cyp1a1 and Cyp2b9. These findings suggest that TBA, at and below doses used in chronic studies, is an inducer of phase I and phase II liver enzymes, with resulting decreases in circulating thyroid hormones in B6C3F1 mice. PMID:19760798

  1. Neutralization/biodegradation of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Harvey, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    The reaction of sulfur mustard (2,2{prime}-dichlorodiethyl sulfide, HD) with NaOH was investigated with respect to the potential utilization of this reaction for the demilitarization of HD stockpiles. Initial studies with Chemical Agent Standard Analytical Reference Material (CASARM) and [{sup 13}C]HD defined the essential parameters of the HD/NaOH reaction with respect to the effects of temperature and NaOH concentration. A temperature increase from 30{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C resulted in a greater than 28-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate, corresponding to an enthalpy of activation value of 17.9 Kcal/mol. NaOH requirements were essentially stoichiometric (0.528 g NaOH per g HD). The effects of varied HD concentrations on the product yield were investigated. At lower HD concentrations, thiodiglycol (TDG) was the major product. As HD concentrations increased, the relative yield of ether and thioether products increased with a concomitant decrease of TDG. Material balance was performed by {sup 13}C NMR to determine the overall product distribution. Approximately 35% of the carbon from HD formed TDG, 60% formed ether-alcohol compounds and 5% formed thioxane and elimination products. Under typical conditions, hydrolysis was complete (no HD or chlorinated organics remained) as determined by both {sup 13}C NMR and GOMS. In order to determine if the process would have application to partially degraded samples which are frequently encountered in demilitarization operations, 64% HD recovered from a buried munition was tested. No chlorinated compounds were detectable in the hydrolysate and the basic distribution of products was similar to that seen with CASARM and munitions-grade material. Biodegradation experiments with hydrolyzed [{sup 14}C] HD as the sole source of carbon for growth demonstrated mineralization by the evolution of CO{sub 2}.

  2. Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Chevy Chase, MD. National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information.

    This concise survey presents some of the highlights of modern research on drinking and alcoholism, as based on technical articles published in the scientific literature and the views expressed by leading authorities in the field. Contents include discussions about: (1) the nature and scope of the problem; (2) the chemical composition of alcoholic…

  3. Production of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols as a factor obstacle to the successful ozonation-assisted biodegradation of ethoxylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Satoshi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2015-10-01

    Ozonation is believed to improve the biodegradability of organic compounds. In the present study, degradation of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) was monitored in hybrid treatment systems consisting of ozonation and microbial degradation processes. We found that ozonation of NPEOs decreased, rather than increased, the biodegradability under certain conditions. The timing of ozonation was a definitive factor in determining whether ozonation increased or decreased the biodegradation rates of NPEOs. Initial ozonation of NPEOs prior to biodegradation reduced the rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal during the subsequent 14 d of biodegradation, whereas intermediate ozonation at the 9th day of biodegradation improved subsequent DOC removal during 14 d of NPEO biodegradation. Furthermore, reduction of DOC removal was also observed, when initial ozonation prior to biodegradation was subjected to cetyl alcohol ethoxylates. The production of less biodegradable intermediates, such as mono- and dicarboxylated polyethylene glycols (MCPEGs and DCPEGs), was responsible for the negative effect of ozonation on biodegradability of NPEOs. DCPEGs and MCPEGs were produced by biodegradation of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) that were ozonolysis products of the NPEOs, and the biodegradability of DCPEGs and MCPEGs was less than that of the precursor PEGs. The results indicate that, if the target chemicals contain ethoxy chains, production of PEGs may be one of the important factors when ozonation is considered.

  4. Computational Framework for Predictive Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Stacey D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    As increasing amounts of anthropogenic chemicals are released into the environment, it is vital to human health and the preservation of ecosystems to evaluate the fate of these chemicals in the environment. It is useful to predict whether a particular compound is biodegradable and if alternate routes can be engineered for compounds already known to be biodegradable. In this work, we describe a computational framework (called BNICE) that can be used for the prediction of novel biodegradation pathways of xenobiotics. The framework was applied to 4-chlorobiphenyl, phenanthrene, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, compounds representing various classes of xenobiotics with known biodegradation routes. BNICE reproduced the proposed biodegradation routes found experimentally, and in addition, it expanded the biodegradation reaction networks through the generation of novel compounds and reactions. The novel reactions involved in the biodegradation of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were studied in depth, where pathway and thermodynamic analyses were performed. This work demonstrates that BNICE can be applied to generate novel pathways to degrade xenobiotic compounds that are thermodynamically feasible alternatives to known biodegradation routes and attractive targets for metabolic engineering. PMID:19650084

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodegradation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Stacey D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms provide a wealth of biodegradative potential in the reduction and elimination of xenobiotic compounds in the environment. One useful metric to evaluate potential biodegradation pathways is thermodynamic feasibility. However, experimental data for the thermodynamic properties of xenobiotics is scarce. The present work uses a group contribution method to study the thermodynamic properties of the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database. The Gibbs free energies of formation and reaction are estimated for 914 compounds (81%) and 902 reactions (75%), respectively, in the database. The reactions are classified based on the minimum and maximum Gibbs free energy values, which accounts for uncertainty in the free energy estimates and a feasible concentration range relevant to biodegradation. Using the free energy estimates, the cumulative free energy change of 89 biodegradation pathways (51%) in the database could be estimated. A comparison of the likelihood of the biotransformation rules in the Pathway Prediction System and their thermodynamic feasibility was then carried out. This analysis revealed that when evaluating the feasibility of biodegradation pathways, it is important to consider the thermodynamic topology of the reactions in the context of the complete pathway. Group contribution is shown to be a viable tool for estimating, a priori, the thermodynamic feasibility and the relative likelihood of alternative biodegradation reactions. This work offers a useful tool to a broad range of researchers interested in estimating the feasibility of the reactions in existing or novel biodegradation pathways. PMID:19288443

  6. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  7. Marine Oil Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Terry C; Prince, Roger C; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2016-03-01

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments, and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to "bloom" in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine waters with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments. PMID:26698270

  8. Alcohol use disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse; Problem drinking; Drinking problem; Alcohol addiction; Alcoholism - alcohol use; Substance use - alcohol ... The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ... 1 drink per day Men should not drink more than 2 drinks per day

  9. Biodegradation of Polypropylene Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, Brandi Nechelle

    The primary aim of the current research is to document the biodegradation of polypropylene nonwovens and filament under composting environments. To accelerate the biodegradat ion, pre-treatments and additives were incorporated into polypropylene filaments and nonwovens. The initial phase (Chapter 2) of the project studied the biodegradation of untreated polypropylene with/without pro-oxidants in two types of composting systems. Normal composting, which involved incubation of samples in food waste, had little effect on the mechanical properties of additive-free spunbond nonwovens in to comparison prooxidant containing spunbond nonwovens which were affected significantly. Modified composting which includes the burial of samples with food and compressed air, the polypropylene spunbond nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants displayed an extreme loss in mechanical properties and cracking on the surface cracking. Because the untreated spunbond nonwovens did not completely decompose, the next phase of the project examined the pre-treatment of gamma-irradiation or thermal aging prior to composting. After exposure to gamma-irradiation and thermal aging, polypropylene is subjected to oxidative degradation in the presence of air and during storage after irradiat ion. Similar to photo-oxidation, the mechanism of gamma radiation and thermal oxidative degradation is fundamentally free radical in nature. In Chapter 3, the compostability of thermal aged spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidant additives. The FTIR spectrum confirmed oxidat ion of the polypropylene nonwovens with/without additives. Cracking on both the pro-oxidant and control spunbond nonwovens was showed by SEM imaging. Spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were also preirradiated by gamma rays followed by composting. Nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were severely degraded by gamma-irradiation after up to 20 kGy exposure as explained in Chapter 4. Furthermore (Chapter 5), gamma

  10. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C₅-C₈), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  11. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  12. Ring-Opening Polymerization of Lactide to Form a Biodegradable Polymer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Jennifer L.; Aubrecht, Katherine B.

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity for introductory organic chemistry, students carry out the tin(II) bis(2-ethylhexanoate)/benzyl alcohol mediated ring-opening polymerization of lactide to form the biodegradable polymer polylactide (PLA). As the mechanism of the polymerization is analogous to that of a transesterification reaction, the experiment can be…

  13. Biodegradation of propellant ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Sundaram, S.T.; Sharma, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes efforts to degrade nitrocellulose (NC) and nitroglycerin (NG) with fungi. Screening experiments were performed to determine the ability of mycelial fungi to biodegrade NC. The greatest amount of NC degradation was obtained with Sclerotium rolfsii ATCC 24459 and Fusarium solani IFO 31093. These fungi were then tested for NG degradation. It was found that the combined culture aerobically degraded 100% of the NG to form a mixture of 55% dinitroglycerin (DNG) and 5% of mononitroglycerin (MNG) in two days, with no further change observed afterward. In the presence of 1.2% glucose and 0.05% ammonium nitrate, NG was completely degraded in two days and a mixture of 20% DNG and 16% MNG was formed after 11 days. Based on these results, it appears that the combination of the fungi in a one to one ratio can be used to degrade both of these energetic compounds.

  14. Lung toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Elias; Grabowski, Nadége; Mura, Simona; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hillaireau, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles exhibit high potentialities for local or systemic drug delivery through lung administration making them attractive as nanomedicine carriers. However, since particulate matter or some inorganic manufactured nanoparticles exposed to lung cells have provoked cytotoxic effects, inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, it becomes important to investigate nanomedicine toxicity towards the lungs. This is the reason why, in the present review, the behavior of biodegradable nanoparticles towards the different parts of the respiratory tract as well as the toxicological consequences, measured on several models in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo, are described. Taken all together, the different studies carried out so far conclude on no or slight toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

  15. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Haws, R.; Wright, B.; Reese, D.; Moeller, G.; Peterson, C.

    1995-12-31

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO{sub 2} evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO{sub 2} evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO{sub 2} evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO{sub 2}. The test substances were examined for BOD{sub 5} and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD{sub 5} and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD{sub 5} and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p << 0.01. RME was also significantly lower than REE (p < 0.05) and MS (p < 0.01) for BOD{sub 5} value.

  16. Biodegradation of PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, R.I.

    1992-01-01

    PCBs were examined for biodegradability by a strain of Pseudomonas sp. designated E1, by a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa designated E2, and by a strain of Pseudomonas putida designated E3. The PCBs included Aroclor mixes from Aroclor 1221 to Aroclor 1268, and pure congeners ranging from monochlorobiphenyl to decachlorobiphenyl. These congeners represented all structural classes. Pure culture studies revealed that cells of E1 grew well on all structural classes of PCB congeners up to heptachlorobiphenyl, and all Aroclor mixes up to Aroclor 1260. Gas chromotographic analysis revealed that biphenyl/acetate grown resting cells of E1 degraded congeners up to octachlorobiphenyl. The degradative patterns for E2 and E3 were assessed using gas chromatographic techniques. E2 was found to be markedly inferior to E1, degrading only the mono-, di-, and tri-chlorobiphenyl tested. Pseudomonas putida strain E3 could not degrade any PCB congener. Mutations in both E2 and E3 that enabled them to utilize more highly chlorinated congeners of PCBs were obtained in nutritionally depleted environments. Such mutants could not be obtained by direct selection using minimal media and appear to be [open quotes]Cairnsian[close quotes] mutations. The Pseudomonas sp. strain E1 was tested in 15 prior or current National Priority List soil microcosms to assess its biodegradative ability in situ. E1 was able to completely degrade the 2,3,4,2[prime],3[prime],4[prime]-2,4,5,2[prime],4[prime],5[prime]-hexachlorobiphenyl congener in seven of the microcosms within two months as well.

  17. Aerobic biotransformation of 14C-labeled 8-2 telomer B alcohol by activated sludge from a domestic sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Szostek, Bogdan; Folsom, Patrick W; Sulecki, Lisa M; Capka, Vladimir; Buck, Robert C; Berti, William R; Gannon, John T

    2005-01-15

    This study investigated the biodegradation potential of 3-(14)C,1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanol [CF3(CF2)6(14)CF2CH2CH2OH, 14C-labeled 8-2 telomer B alcohol or 14C-labeled 8-2 TBA] by diluted activated sludge from a domestic wastewater treatment plant under aerobic conditions. After sample extraction with acetonitrile, biotransformation products were separated and quantified by LC/ARC (on-line liquid chromatography/accurate radioisotope counting) with a limit of quantification about 0.5% of the 14C counts applied to the test systems. Identification of biotransformation products was performed by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Three transformation products have been identified: CF3(CF2)6(14)CF2CH2COOH (8-2 saturated acid); CF3(CF2)6(14)CF=CHCOOH (8-2 unsaturated acid); and CF3(CF2)6(14)COOH (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA), representing 27, 6.0, and 2.1% of the initial 14C mass (14C counts applied) after 28 days, respectively. A transformation product, not yet reported in the literature, has also been observed and tentatively identified as CF3(CF2)6(14)CH2CH2COOH (2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluorodecanoic acid); it accounted for 2.3% of the mass balance after 28 days. The 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluorodecanoic acid is likely a substrate for beta-oxidation, which represents one of the possible pathways for 8-2 telomer B alcohol degradation. The 8-2 saturated acid and 8-2 unsaturated acid cannot be directly used as substrates for beta-oxidation due to the proton deficiency in their beta-carbon (C3 carbon) and their further catabolism may be catalyzed by some other still unknown mechanisms. The 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluorodecanoic acid may originate either from the major transformation product CF3(CF2)6(14)CF2CH2COOH or from other unidentified transformation products via multiple steps. Approximately 57% of the starting material remained unchanged after 28 days, likely due to its strong adsorption to the PTFE (poly(tetrafluoroethylene)) septa of the test vessels. No CF3(CF2)6(14)CF2COOH

  18. Evaluation of biodegradable plastics for rubber seedling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansor, Mohd Khairulniza; Dayang Habibah A. I., H.; Kamal, Mazlina Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    The main negative consequence of conventional plastics in agriculture is related to handling the wastes plasticand the associated environmental impact. Hence, a study of different types of potentially biodegradable plastics used for nursery applications have been evaluated on its mechanical,water absorption propertiesand Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Supplied samples from different companies were designated as SF, CF and CO. Most of the polybags exhibited mechanical properties quite similar to the conventional plastics (polybag LDPE). CO polybag which is based on PVA however had extensively higher tensile strength and water absorption properties. FTIR study revealed a characteristics absorbance of conventional plastic, SF, CF and CO biodegradable polybag are associated with polyethylene, poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT), polyethylene and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) structures respectively.

  19. Combined use of [TBA][L-ASP] and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin as selectors for separation of Cinchona alkaloids by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Haixia; Wu, Yujiao; Zhao, Wenyan; Yang, Min; Jing, Huanwang; Chen, Anjia

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a new capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation and detection method was developed for the chiral separation of the four major Cinchona alkaloids (quinine/quinidine and cinchonine/cinchonidine) using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and chiral ionic liquid ([TBA][L-ASP]) as selectors. Separation parameters such as buffer concentrations, pH, HP-β-CD and chiral ionic liquid concentrations, capillary temperature, and separation voltage were investigated. After optimization of separation conditions, baseline separation of the three analytes (cinchonidine, quinine, cinchonine) was achieved in fewer than 7 min in ammonium acetate background electrolyte (pH 5.0) with the addition of HP-β-CD in a concentration of 40 mM and [TBA][L-ASP] of 14 mM, while the baseline separation of cinchonine and quinidine was not obtained. Therefore, the first-order derivative electropherogram was applied for resolving overlapping peaks. Regression equations revealed a good linear relationship between peak areas in first-order derivative electropherograms and concentrations of the two diastereomer pairs. The results not only indicated that the first-order derivative electropherogram was effective in determination of a low content component and of those not fully separated from adjacent ones, but also showed that the ionic liquid appeared to be a very promising chiral selector in CE.

  20. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  1. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated. PMID:26880470

  2. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol ... other questions about alcohol. Here’s what we know: Alcohol’s effects vary from person to person, depending on a ...

  3. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the alcohol travels through her blood and into the baby's blood, tissues, and organs. Alcohol breaks down much more slowly in ...

  4. Stability of fluctuating and transient aggregates of amphiphilic solutes in aqueous binary mixtures: Studies of dimethylsulfoxide, ethanol, and tert-butyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-10-01

    In aqueous binary mixtures, amphiphilic solutes such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), etc., are known to form aggregates (or large clusters) at small to intermediate solute concentrations. These aggregates are transient in nature. Although the system remains homogeneous on macroscopic length and time scales, the microheterogeneous aggregation may profoundly affect the properties of the mixture in several distinct ways, particularly if the survival times of the aggregates are longer than density relaxation times of the binary liquid. Here we propose a theoretical scheme to quantify the lifetime and thus the stability of these microheterogeneous clusters, and apply the scheme to calculate the same for water-ethanol, water-DMSO, and water-TBA mixtures. We show that the lifetime of these clusters can range from less than a picosecond (ps) for ethanol clusters to few tens of ps for DMSO and TBA clusters. This helps explaining the absence of a strong composition dependent anomaly in water-ethanol mixtures but the presence of the same in water-DMSO and water-TBA mixtures.

  5. Biodegradation of Polyethoxylated Nonylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Yassellis; Medina, Luis; Borusiak, Margarita; Ramos, Nairalith; Pinto, Gilberto; Valbuena, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Polyethoxylated nonylphenols, with different ethoxylation degrees (NPEOx), are incorporated into many commercial and industrial products such as detergents, domestic disinfectants, emulsifiers, cosmetics, and pesticides. However, the toxic effects exerted by their degradation products, which are persistent in natural environments, have been demonstrated in several animal and invertebrate aquatic species. Therefore, it seems appropriate to look for indigenous bacteria capable of degrading native NPEOx and its derivatives. In this paper, the isolation of five bacterial strains, capable of using NPEO15, as unique carbon source, is described. The most efficient NPEO15 degrader bacterial strains were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain Yas2) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain Yas1). Maximal growth rates were reached at pH 8, 27°C in a 5% NPEO15 medium. The NPEO15 degradation extension, followed by viscometry assays, reached 65% after 54.5 h and 134 h incubation times, while the COD values decreased by 95% and 85% after 24 h for the Yas1 and Yas2 systems, respectively. The BOD was reduced by 99% and 99.9% levels in 24 h and 48 h incubations. The viscosity data indicated that the NPEO15 biodegradation by Yas2 follows first-order kinetics. Kinetic rate constant (k) and half life time (τ) for this biotransformation were estimated to be 0.0072 h−1 and 96.3 h, respectively. PMID:23936727

  6. Injectable and biodegradable hydrogels: gelation, biodegradation and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Rodrigues, João; Tomás, Helena

    2012-03-21

    Injectable hydrogels with biodegradability have in situ formability which in vitro/in vivo allows an effective and homogeneous encapsulation of drugs/cells, and convenient in vivo surgical operation in a minimally invasive way, causing smaller scar size and less pain for patients. Therefore, they have found a variety of biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, cell encapsulation, and tissue engineering. This critical review systematically summarizes the recent progresses on biodegradable and injectable hydrogels fabricated from natural polymers (chitosan, hyaluronic acid, alginates, gelatin, heparin, chondroitin sulfate, etc.) and biodegradable synthetic polymers (polypeptides, polyesters, polyphosphazenes, etc.). The review includes the novel naturally based hydrogels with high potential for biomedical applications developed in the past five years which integrate the excellent biocompatibility of natural polymers/synthetic polypeptides with structural controllability via chemical modification. The gelation and biodegradation which are two key factors to affect the cell fate or drug delivery are highlighted. A brief outlook on the future of injectable and biodegradable hydrogels is also presented (326 references). PMID:22116474

  7. Biodegradation of news inks

    SciTech Connect

    Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

  8. Testing biodegradability with standardized methods.

    PubMed

    Pagga, U

    1997-12-01

    Laboratory test methods are used by industry laboratories to determine biodegradability, an important parameter for the evaluation of the ecological behaviour of substances. Biodegradability has a key role due to the simple fact that a degradable substance will cause no long term risk in the environment. The great variety of biodegradation processes in the natural environment and in technical plants for treating waste water and solid wastes gave rise to a rather large number of test methods based on different test principles. To guarantee the acceptance of the test results by authorities and customers internationally standardized methods (ISO, OECD) and established quality criteria (GLP, EN 45,000, ISO 9000) are used. PMID:9415981

  9. Petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Harayama, S; Kishira, H; Kasai, Y; Shutsubo, K

    1999-08-01

    Petroleum-based products are the major source of energy for industry and daily life. Petroleum is also the raw material for many chemical products such as plastics, paints, and cosmetics. The transport of petroleum across the world is frequent, and the amounts of petroleum stocks in developed countries are enormous. Consequently, the potential for oil spills is significant, and research on the fate of petroleum in a marine environment is important to evaluate the environmental threat of oil spills, and to develop biotechnology to cope with them. Crude oil is constituted from thousands of components which are separated into saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes. Upon discharge into the sea, crude oil is subjected to weathering, the process caused by the combined effects of physical, chemical and biological modification. Saturates, especially those of smaller molecular weight, are readily biodegraded in marine environments. Aromatics with one, two or three aromatic rings are also efficiently biodegraded; however, those with four or more aromatic ring are quite resistant to biodegradation. The asphaltene and resin fractions contain higher molecular weight compounds whose chemical structures have not yet been resolved. The biodegradability of these compounds is not yet known. It is known that the concentrations of available nitrogen and phosphorus in seawater limit the growth and activities of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in a marine environment. In other words, the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers to an oil-contaminated marine environment can stimulate the biodegradation of spilled oil. This notion was confirmed in the large-scale operation for bioremediation after the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez in Alaska. Many microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum components have been isolated. However, few of them seem to be important for petroleum biodegradation in natural environments. One group of bacteria belonging to the genus

  10. Petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Harayama, S; Kishira, H; Kasai, Y; Shutsubo, K

    1999-08-01

    Petroleum-based products are the major source of energy for industry and daily life. Petroleum is also the raw material for many chemical products such as plastics, paints, and cosmetics. The transport of petroleum across the world is frequent, and the amounts of petroleum stocks in developed countries are enormous. Consequently, the potential for oil spills is significant, and research on the fate of petroleum in a marine environment is important to evaluate the environmental threat of oil spills, and to develop biotechnology to cope with them. Crude oil is constituted from thousands of components which are separated into saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes. Upon discharge into the sea, crude oil is subjected to weathering, the process caused by the combined effects of physical, chemical and biological modification. Saturates, especially those of smaller molecular weight, are readily biodegraded in marine environments. Aromatics with one, two or three aromatic rings are also efficiently biodegraded; however, those with four or more aromatic ring are quite resistant to biodegradation. The asphaltene and resin fractions contain higher molecular weight compounds whose chemical structures have not yet been resolved. The biodegradability of these compounds is not yet known. It is known that the concentrations of available nitrogen and phosphorus in seawater limit the growth and activities of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in a marine environment. In other words, the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers to an oil-contaminated marine environment can stimulate the biodegradation of spilled oil. This notion was confirmed in the large-scale operation for bioremediation after the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez in Alaska. Many microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum components have been isolated. However, few of them seem to be important for petroleum biodegradation in natural environments. One group of bacteria belonging to the genus

  11. Biodegradation and bioaccumulation of phthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, N.; Diefenbach, R.

    1995-12-31

    Phthalate esters very often are considered as persistent in the environment. This view is supported by an assumed lack of biodegradability, the high log K{sub ow} values and the assumed high bioaccumulation potential. Results are presented which show phthalates esters to be readily biodegradable even with a non-adapted inoculum. Combined with a lack of relevant bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms, a reconsideration of the environmental impact of these substances is necessary. Special prerequisites for testing poorly water soluble substances are also discussed.

  12. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  13. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 17728 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  14. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  15. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  16. A kinetic model for predicting biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, S; Pavlov, T; Nedelcheva, D; Reuschenbach, P; Silvani, M; Bias, R; Comber, M; Low, L; Lee, C; Parkerton, T; Mekenyan, O

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradation plays a key role in the environmental risk assessment of organic chemicals. The need to assess biodegradability of a chemical for regulatory purposes supports the development of a model for predicting the extent of biodegradation at different time frames, in particular the extent of ultimate biodegradation within a '10 day window' criterion as well as estimating biodegradation half-lives. Conceptually this implies expressing the rate of catabolic transformations as a function of time. An attempt to correlate the kinetics of biodegradation with molecular structure of chemicals is presented. A simplified biodegradation kinetic model was formulated by combining the probabilistic approach of the original formulation of the CATABOL model with the assumption of first order kinetics of catabolic transformations. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to fit the model parameters to OECD 301F biodegradation kinetic data for a set of 208 chemicals. The new model allows the prediction of biodegradation multi-pathways, primary and ultimate half-lives and simulation of related kinetic biodegradation parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD), carbon dioxide production, and the nature and amount of metabolites as a function of time. The model may also be used for evaluating the OECD ready biodegradability potential of a chemical within the '10-day window' criterion.

  17. Preferential biodegradation of structurally dissimilar dyes from a mixture by Brevibacillus laterosporus.

    PubMed

    Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-09-15

    Biodegradation of a mixture containing seven commercial textile dyes with different structures and color properties has been investigated by an ecofriendly strain--Brevibacillus laterosporus MTCC 2298. It showed 87% decolorization in terms of ADMI removal (American Dye Manufacturing Institute) within 24h. The effective decolorization of dye mixture was attained in the presence of metal salt--CaCl(2) and nitrogen sources. The induction of oxido-reductive enzymes such as veratryl alcohol oxidase, tyrosinase, NADH-DCIP reductase and azo reductase was found to be responsible for biotransformation of dyes. High performance thin layer chromatography exposed the mechanism of preferential biodegradation of dyes at different time periods. Significant change in the high pressure liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of sample before and after treatment confirmed the biodegradation of dye mixture. Phytotoxicity study revealed the much less toxic nature of the metabolites produced after the degradation of dyes mixture.

  18. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161. Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  19. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  20. Identification of Biomarker Genes To Predict Biodegradation of 1,4-Dioxane

    PubMed Central

    Gedalanga, Phillip B.; Pornwongthong, Peerapong; Mora, Rebecca; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Baldwin, Brett; Ogles, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase gene targets in Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 were evaluated for their use as biomarkers to identify the potential for 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in pure cultures and environmental samples. Our studies using laboratory pure cultures and industrial activated sludge samples suggest that the presence of genes associated with dioxane monooxygenase, propane monooxygenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase are promising indicators of 1,4-dioxane biotransformation; however, gene abundance was insufficient to predict actual biodegradation. A time course gene expression analysis of dioxane and propane monooxygenases in Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 and mixed communities in wastewater samples revealed important associations with the rates of 1,4-dioxane removal. In addition, transcripts of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were upregulated during biodegradation, although only the aldehyde dehydrogenase was significantly correlated with 1,4-dioxane concentrations. Expression of the propane monooxygenase demonstrated a time-dependent relationship with 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in P. dioxanivorans CB1190, with increased expression occurring after over 50% of the 1,4-dioxane had been removed. While the fraction of P. dioxanivorans CB1190-like bacteria among the total bacterial population significantly increased with decrease in 1,4-dioxane concentrations in wastewater treatment samples undergoing active biodegradation, the abundance and expression of monooxygenase-based biomarkers were better predictors of 1,4-dioxane degradation than taxonomic 16S rRNA genes. This study illustrates that specific bacterial monooxygenase and dehydrogenase gene targets together can serve as effective biomarkers for 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in the environment. PMID:24632253

  1. Identification of biomarker genes to predict biodegradation of 1,4-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Gedalanga, Phillip B; Pornwongthong, Peerapong; Mora, Rebecca; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Baldwin, Brett; Ogles, Dora; Mahendra, Shaily

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase gene targets in Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 were evaluated for their use as biomarkers to identify the potential for 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in pure cultures and environmental samples. Our studies using laboratory pure cultures and industrial activated sludge samples suggest that the presence of genes associated with dioxane monooxygenase, propane monooxygenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase are promising indicators of 1,4-dioxane biotransformation; however, gene abundance was insufficient to predict actual biodegradation. A time course gene expression analysis of dioxane and propane monooxygenases in Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 and mixed communities in wastewater samples revealed important associations with the rates of 1,4-dioxane removal. In addition, transcripts of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were upregulated during biodegradation, although only the aldehyde dehydrogenase was significantly correlated with 1,4-dioxane concentrations. Expression of the propane monooxygenase demonstrated a time-dependent relationship with 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in P. dioxanivorans CB1190, with increased expression occurring after over 50% of the 1,4-dioxane had been removed. While the fraction of P. dioxanivorans CB1190-like bacteria among the total bacterial population significantly increased with decrease in 1,4-dioxane concentrations in wastewater treatment samples undergoing active biodegradation, the abundance and expression of monooxygenase-based biomarkers were better predictors of 1,4-dioxane degradation than taxonomic 16S rRNA genes. This study illustrates that specific bacterial monooxygenase and dehydrogenase gene targets together can serve as effective biomarkers for 1,4-dioxane biodegradation in the environment.

  2. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse - quitting drinking; Quitting drinking; Quitting alcohol; Alcoholism - deciding to quit ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol- ...

  3. Recent advances in biodegradable nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra K; Kumar, A Pratheep; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K; Drzal, Lawrence T; Singh, Raj Pal

    2005-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing bio-based products and innovative process technologies that can reduce the dependence on fossil fuel and move to a sustainable materials basis. Biodegradable bio-based nanocomposites are the next generation of materials for the future. Renewable resource-based biodegradable polymers including cellulosic plastic (plastic made from wood), corn-derived plastics, and polyhydroxyalkanoates (plastics made from bacterial sources) are some of the potential biopolymers which, in combination with nanoclay reinforcement, can produce nanocomposites for a variety of applications. Nanocomposites of this category are expected to possess improved strength and stiffness with little sacrifice of toughness, reduced gas/water vapor permeability, a lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and an increased heat deflection temperature, opening an opportunity for the use of new, high performance, lightweight green nanocomposite materials to replace conventional petroleum-based composites. The present review addresses this green material, including its technical difficulties and their solutions.

  4. Membrane stabilization of biodegradable polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joshua S; Levine, Dalia H; Davis, Kevin P; Bates, Frank S; Hammer, Daniel A; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-04-21

    Biodegradable polymersomes are promising vehicles for a range of applications. Their stabilization would improve many properties, including the retention and controlled release of polymersome contents, yet this has not been previously accomplished. Here, we present the first example of stabilizing fully biodegradable polymersomes through acrylation of the hydrophobic terminal end of polymersome-forming poly(caprolactone-b-ethylene glycol). Exposure of the resulting polymersomes loaded with a hydrophobic photoinitiator to ultraviolet light polymerized the acrylates, without affecting polymersome morphology or cell cytotoxicity. These stabilized polymersomes were more resistant to surfactant disruption and degradation. As an example of stabilized polymersome utility, the unintended release of doxorubicin (DOX) due to leakage from polymersomes decreased with membrane stabilization and slower sustained release was observed. Finally, DOX-loaded polymersomes retained their cytotoxicity following stabilization.

  5. Biodegradable stents with elastic memory.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu S; Tan, Lay Poh; Joso, Joe Ferry D; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Wang, Xintong

    2006-03-01

    This work reports, for the first time, the development of a fully biodegradable polymeric stent that can self-expand at body temperatures (approximately 37 degrees C), using the concept of elastic memory. This self-expansion is necessary in fully polymeric stents, to overcome the problem of elastic recoil following balloon expansion in a body vessel. Bi-layered biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and poly glycolic acid (PLGA) polymers. Elastic memory was imparted to the stents by temperature conditioning. The thickness and composition of each layer in the stents are critical parameters that affect the rate of self-expansion at 37 degrees C, as well as the collapse strengths of the stents. The rate of self-expansion of the stents, as measured at 37 degrees C, exhibits a maximum with layer thickness. The Tg of the outer layer is another significant parameter that affects the overall rate of expansion.

  6. BSD: the Biodegradative Strain Database.

    PubMed

    Urbance, John W; Cole, James; Saxman, Paul; Tiedje, James M

    2003-01-01

    The Biodegradative Strain Database (BSD) is a freely-accessible, web-based database providing detailed information on degradative bacteria and the hazardous substances that they degrade, including corresponding literature citations, relevant patents and links to additional web-based biological and chemical data. The BSD (http://bsd.cme.msu.edu) is being developed within the phylogenetic framework of the Ribosomal Database Project II (RDPII: http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/html) to provide a biological complement to the chemical and degradative pathway data of the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database (UM-BBD: http://umbbd.ahc.umn.edu). Data is accessible through a series of strain, chemical and reference lists or by keyword search. The web site also includes on-line data submission and user survey forms to solicit user contributions and suggestions. The current release contains information on over 250 degradative bacterial strains and 150 hazardous substances. The transformation of xenobiotics and other environmentally toxic compounds by microorganisms is central to strategies for biocatalysis and the bioremediation of contaminated environments. However, practical, comprehensive, strain-level information on biocatalytic/biodegradative microbes is not readily available and is often difficult to compile. Similarly, for any given environmental contaminant, there is no single resource that can provide comparative information on the array of identified microbes capable of degrading the chemical. A web site that consolidates and cross-references strain, chemical and reference data related to biocatalysis, biotransformation, biodegradation and bioremediation would be an invaluable tool for academic and industrial researchers and environmental engineers.

  7. Biochemistry of microbial polyvinyl alcohol degradation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusako; Hu, Xiaoping

    2009-08-01

    Effect of minor chemical structures such as 1,2-diol content, ethylene content, tacticity, a degree of polymerization, and a degree of saponification of the main chain on biodegradability of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is summarized. Most PVA-degraders are Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the Pseudomonads and Sphingomonads, but Gram-positive bacteria also have PVA-degrading abilities. Several examples show symbiotic degradation of PVA by different mechanisms. Penicillium sp. is the only reported eukaryotic degrader. A vinyl alcohol oligomer-utilizing fungus, Geotrichum fermentans WF9101, has also been reported. Lignolytic fungi have displayed non-specific degradation of PVA. Extensive published studies have established a two-step process for the biodegradation of PVA. Some bacteria excrete extracellular PVA oxidase to yield oxidized PVA, which is partly under spontaneous depolymerization and is further metabolized by the second step enzyme (hydrolase). On the other hand, PVA (whole and depolymerized to some extent) must be taken up into the periplasmic space of some Gram-negative bacteria, where PVA is oxidized by PVA dehydrogenase, coupled to a respiratory chain. The complete pva operon was identified in Sphingopyxis sp. 113P3. Anaerobic biodegradability of PVA has also been suggested.

  8. In vitro biodegradation of steranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chosson, P. ); Connan, J.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report reproducible results on the in vitro biodegradation of steranes in various crude oils. 73 pure strains including Pseudomonadacea (33) and Actinomycetaceae (40) have been screened in order to test their capability to degrade steranes contained in total alkanes isolated from various crudes. Biodegradation of steranes has been observed with 7 strains belonging to Nocardia and Arthrobacter genera. 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) and 5{alpha}(H), 14{beta}(H), 17{beta}(H) Steranes with the 20R configuration were degraded under reproducible laboratory conditions. Biodegradation of the sterane mixtures isolated from crude oils followed W. Seiferts rules established on the basis of geological observations. 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) C{sub 27}-Steranes with the 20R configuration are degraded first and ends with the 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) C{sub 29}steranes. Then 5{alpha}9h0, 14{beta}(H), and 17{beta}(H) steranes are attacked starting with the 20R configuration. Limited alteration of Tm and Ts terpane has also been observed.

  9. Biodegradation of dimethylsilanediol in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, C L; Carpenter, J C; Leib, T K; Spivack, J L

    1996-01-01

    The biodegradation potential of [14C]dimethylsilanediol, the monomer unit of polydimethylsiloxane, in soils was investigated. Dimethylsilanediol was found to be biodegraded in all of the tested soils, as monitored by the production of 14CO2. When 2-propanol was added to the soil as a carbon source in addition to [14C]dimethylsilanediol, the production of 14CO2 increased. A method for the selection of primary substrates that support cometabolic degradation of a target compound was developed. By this method, the activity observed in the soils was successfully transferred to liquid culture. A fungus, Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtendahl, and a bacterium, an Arthrobacter species, were isolated from two different soils, and both microorganisms were able to cometabolize [14C]dimethylsilanediol to 14CO2 in liquid culture. In addition, the Arthrobacter sp. that was isolated grew on dimethylsulfone, and we believe that this is the first reported instance of a microorganism using dimethylsulfone as its primary carbon source. Previous evidence has shown that polydimethylsiloxane is hydrolyzed in soil to the monomer, dimethylsilanediol. Now, biodegradation of dimethylsilanediol in soil has been demonstrated. PMID:8953708

  10. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  11. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... varies. Almost none of these babies have normal brain development. Infants and children with fetal alcohol syndrome have many different problems, which can be ...

  12. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such ... alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, ...

  13. Biodegradation of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stloukal, Petr; Koutny, Marek; Sedlarik, Vladimir; Kucharczyk, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Polylactid acid seems to be an appropriate replacement of conventional non-biodegradable synthetic polymer primarily due to comparable mechanical, thermal and processing properties in its high molecular weight form. Biodegradation of high molecular PLA was studied in compost for various forms differing in their specific surface area. The material proved its good biodegradability under composting conditions and all investigated forms showed to be acceptable for industrial composting. Despite expectations, no significant differences in resulting mineralizations were observed for fiber, film and powder sample forms with different specific surface areas. The clearly faster biodegradation was detected only for the thin coating on porous material with high specific surface area.

  14. A review of plastic waste biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Yanful, Ernest K; Bassi, Amarjeet S

    2005-01-01

    With more and more plastics being employed in human lives and increasing pressure being placed on capacities available for plastic waste disposal, the need for biodegradable plastics and biodegradation of plastic wastes has assumed increasing importance in the last few years. This review looks at the technological advancement made in the development of more easily biodegradable plastics and the biodegradation of conventional plastics by microorganisms. Additives, such as pro-oxidants and starch, are applied in synthetic materials to modify and make plastics biodegradable. Recent research has shown that thermoplastics derived from polyolefins, traditionally considered resistant to biodegradation in ambient environment, are biodegraded following photo-degradation and chemical degradation. Thermoset plastics, such as aliphatic polyester and polyester polyurethane, are easily attacked by microorganisms directly because of the potential hydrolytic cleavage of ester or urethane bonds in their structures. Some microorganisms have been isolated to utilize polyurethane as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen source. Aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters have active commercial applications because of their good mechanical properties and biodegradability. Reviewing published and ongoing studies on plastic biodegradation, this paper attempts to make conclusions on potentially viable methods to reduce impacts of plastic waste on the environment.

  15. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  16. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  17. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  18. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The Great Western Sugar Company has announced plans for the construction of a $300 million plant for the production of fuel grade alcohol from corn. The plant at Reserve, Lousiana, will also produce high fructose corn syrup and animal feed by-products and will employ an additional 200 people.

  19. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  20. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  1. Here today, gone tomorrow: biodegradable soft robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges to modern technologies is what to do with them when they go irreparably wrong or come to the end of their productive lives. The convention, since the development of modern civilisation, is to discard a broken item and then procure a new one. In the 20th century enlightened environmentalists campaigned for recycling and reuse (R and R). R and R has continued to be an important part of new technology development, but there is still a huge problem of non-recyclable materials being dumped into landfill and being discarded in the environment. The challenge is even greater for robotics, a field which will impact on all aspects of our lives, where discards include motors, rigid elements and toxic power supplies and batteries. One novel solution is the biodegradable robot, an active physical machine that is composed of biodegradable materials and which degrades to nothing when released into the environment. In this paper we examine the potential and realities of biodegradable robotics, consider novel solutions to core components such as sensors, actuators and energy scavenging, and give examples of biodegradable robotics fabricated from everyday, and not so common, biodegradable electroactive materials. The realisation of truly biodegradable robots also brings entirely new deployment, exploration and bio-remediation capabilities: why track and recover a few large non-biodegradable robots when you could speculatively release millions of biodegradable robots instead? We will consider some of these exciting developments and explore the future of this new field.

  2. Biodegradable Materials: Anchors and Interference Screws.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    Biodegradable implants allow clarity in postoperative imaging, easier revision, and fewer concerns about associated tissue damage. It is important to appreciate that different biodegradable materials have different properties and different degradation rates. Faster degradation can be associated with a greater inflammatory response. However, inflammation is a normal part of the degradation process. The concern arises when the inflammation is clinically significant.

  3. Biodegradation of aliphatic and aromatic polycarbonates.

    PubMed

    Artham, Trishul; Doble, Mukesh

    2008-01-01

    Polycarbonate is one of the most widely used engineering plastics because of its superior physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Understanding the biodegradation of this polymer is of great importance to answer the increasing problems in waste management of this polymer. Aliphatic polycarbonates are known to biodegrade either through the action of pure enzymes or by bacterial whole cells. Very little information is available that deals with the biodegradation of aromatic polycarbonates. Biodegradation is governed by different factors that include polymer characteristics, type of organism, and nature of pretreatment. The polymer characteristics such as its mobility, tacticity, crystallinity, molecular weight, the type of functional groups and substituents present in its structure, and plasticizers or additives added to the polymer all play an important role in its degradation. The carbonate bond in aliphatic polycarbonates is facile and hence this polymer is easily biodegradable. On the other hand, bisphenol A polycarbonate contains benzene rings and quaternary carbon atoms which form bulky and stiff chains that enhance rigidity. Even though this polycarbonate is amorphous in nature because of considerable free volume, it is non-biodegradable since the carbonate bond is inaccessible to enzymes because of the presence of bulky phenyl groups on either side. In order to facilitate the biodegradation of polymers few pretreatment techniques which include photo-oxidation, gamma-irradiation, or use of chemicals have been tested. Addition of biosurfactants to improve the interaction between the polymer and the microorganisms, and blending with natural or synthetic polymers that degrade easily, can also enhance the biodegradation.

  4. Biodegradation of a synthetic lubricant by Micrococcus roseus

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.A.; Taylor, F.; Brown, D.E.; Higgins, I.J. ); Randles, S.J. )

    1993-04-01

    The loss of large quantities of lubricants, both synthetic and mineral oil based, is causing increasing concern because they are not only an unquantified hazard to the environment, but also a potential hazard to the long-term health of people. This study examines the metabolic pathways and eventual fate of synthetic lubricants in micoorganisms involved in biodegradation. The synthetic ester Emkarate 1550 (E1550), which includes a tertiary alcohol (TMP), and the bacterium, Micrococcus roseus were used in the experiments. The results indicate that M. roseus cleaves the E1550 ester by the action of esterases bound to the surface of the cell, with the products released into the surrounding medium. The organic acids, octaoate and decanoate, are taken up and metabolized, whereas the TMP (1,1,1-tri(hydroxymethyl)propane) component is not metabolized and accumulates in the medium. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Electrical properties of starch-PVA biodegradable polymer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Kulshrestha, N.; Gupta, P. N.

    2015-02-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte films were prepared by adding different contents of potassium chloride (KCl) in a polymer matrix composed of two versatile biodegradable polymers: starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), using the solution cast method. The complexation of the added salt (KCl) with the polymer matrix was confirmed from an x-ray diffraction study (XRD). The evolution of a smooth and uniform morphology with the increasing content of KCl was confirmed from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The transference number measurement established ions as the dominant charge carriers in the system. The maximum ionic conductivity ˜5.44 × 10-5 S cm-1 at ambient conditions was obtained for the film with 1.5 wt% of KCl using complex impedance spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity and dielectric constant increased with the salt content, thus affirming the amplification in the number of charge carriers. The noteworthy aspect of the investigation is the observation of appreciable ionic conductivity at a relatively low salt content. Low values of activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent ionic conductivity could be favorable from the point of view of the application. Electric modulus studies confirmed the absence of electrode polarization effects in the polymer electrolyte films. The scaling of the electric modulus shows a distribution of relaxation times in the polymer electrolyte films. The study unveils the efficiency of the starch-PVA blend, with glycerol and citric acid as additives, as a hopeful material for preparing biodegradable solid polymer electrolyte films.

  6. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  7. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... RISKS OF ALCOHOL Alcohol increases the risk of: Alcoholism Falls, drownings, and other accidents Head, neck, stomach, ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and your health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/ ...

  8. [Chlorinate solvents natural biodegradation in shallow groundwater].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang-tao; Li, Ye; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hong-han

    2005-03-01

    Chlorinated solvents contaminations are most popular in shallow groundwater. A serious local groundwater contamination of chlorinated solvents is founded in a north city of China during the organic pollution investigation. On the basis of the available data and the determining methods of chlorinated solvents biodegradation in groundwater under natural conditions, research on chlorinated solvents biodegrading potential is carried out. The results show that the ground water environment parameters, Eh and pH of the groundwater, indirect sign of biodegradation, i.e. NO3- changing, and concentration variation of biodegradation intermediate products of PCE and TCE all proved that chlorinated solvents can be degraded by microorganism in groundwater. The results of simulating experiment also reveal that, co-metabolism biodegradation of chlorinated solvent was possible under the groundwater circumstances in this sample. Therefore, admitting there is biotransformation from PCE to TCE can explain the present situation more reasonably.

  9. Biodegradable polymers for electrospinning: towards biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Liow, Sing Shy; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-12-01

    Electrospinning has received much attention recently due to the growing interest in nano-technologies and the unique material properties. This review focuses on recent progress in applying electrospinning technique in production of biodegradable nanofibers to the emerging field of biomedical. It first introduces the basic theory and parameters of nanofibers fabrication, with focus on factors affecting the morphology and fiber diameter of biodegradable nanofibers. Next, commonly electrospun biodegradable nanofibers are discussed, and the comparison of the degradation rate of nanoscale materials with macroscale materials are highlighted. The article also assesses the recent advancement of biodegradable nanofibers in different biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensor and immunoassay. Future perspectives of biodegradable nanofibers are discussed in the last section, which emphasizes on the innovation and development in electrospinning of hydrogels nanofibers, pore size control and scale-up productions.

  10. Chemical dispersants: Oil biodegradation friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Rahsepar, Shokouh; Smit, Martijn P J; Murk, Albertinka J; Rijnaarts, Huub H M; Langenhoff, Alette A M

    2016-07-15

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodegradation by alkane and/or aromatic degrading bacterial culture in artificial seawater at different dispersant to oil ratios (DORs). Our results show that dispersant addition did not enhance oil biodegradation. At DOR 1:20, biodegradation was inhibited, especially when only the alkane degrading culture was present. With a combination of cultures, this inhibition was overcome after 10days. This indicates that initial inhibition of oil biodegradation can be overcome when different bacteria are present in the environment. We conclude that the observed inhibition is related to the enhanced dissolution of aromatic compounds into the water, inhibiting the alkane degrading bacteria. PMID:27156037

  11. Chemical dispersants: Oil biodegradation friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Rahsepar, Shokouh; Smit, Martijn P J; Murk, Albertinka J; Rijnaarts, Huub H M; Langenhoff, Alette A M

    2016-07-15

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodegradation by alkane and/or aromatic degrading bacterial culture in artificial seawater at different dispersant to oil ratios (DORs). Our results show that dispersant addition did not enhance oil biodegradation. At DOR 1:20, biodegradation was inhibited, especially when only the alkane degrading culture was present. With a combination of cultures, this inhibition was overcome after 10days. This indicates that initial inhibition of oil biodegradation can be overcome when different bacteria are present in the environment. We conclude that the observed inhibition is related to the enhanced dissolution of aromatic compounds into the water, inhibiting the alkane degrading bacteria.

  12. Biodegradable products by lipase biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Linko, Y Y; Lämsä, M; Wu, X; Uosukainen, E; Seppälä, J; Linko, P

    1998-11-18

    The interest in the applications of biocatalysis in organic syntheses has rapidly increased. In this context, lipases have recently become one of the most studied groups of enzymes. We have demonstrated that lipases can be used as biocatalyst in the production of useful biodegradable compounds. A number of examples are given. 1-Butyl oleate was produced by direct esterification of butanol and oleic acid to decrease the viscosity of biodiesel in winter use. Enzymic alcoholysis of vegetable oils without additional organic solvent has been little investigated. We have shown that a mixture of 2-ethyl-1-hexyl esters can be obtained in a good yield by enzymic transesterification from rapeseed oil fatty acids for use as a solvent. Trimethylolpropane esters were also similarly synthesized as lubricants. Finally, the discovery that lipases can also catalyze ester syntheses and transesterification reactions in organic solvent systems has opened up the possibility of enzyme catalyzed production of biodegradable polyesters. In direct polyesterification of 1,4-butanediol and sebacic acid, polyesters with a mass average molar mass of the order of 56,000 g mol-1 or higher, and a maximum molar mass of about 130,000 g mol-1 were also obtained by using lipase as biocatalyst. Finally, we have demonstrated that also aromatic polyesters can be synthesized by lipase biocatalysis, a higher than 50,000 g mol-1 mass average molar mass of poly(1,6-hexanediyl isophthalate) as an example. PMID:9866859

  13. Investigation of the proinflammatory potential of biodegradable nanoparticle drug delivery systems in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, L.A. . E-mail: lea_ann.dailey@kcl.ac.uk; Jekel, N.; Fink, L.; Gessler, T.; Schmehl, T.; Wittmar, M.; Kissel, T.; Seeger, W.

    2006-08-15

    Particulate nanocarriers have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties in the lung, such as avoidance of macrophage clearance mechanisms and long residence times. However, instilled non-biodegradable polystyrene nanospheres with small diameters and thus large surface areas have been shown to induce pulmonary inflammation. This study examines the potential of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and the novel PLGA derivative, diethylaminopropylamine polyvinyl alcohol-grafted-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (DEAPA-PVAL-g-PLGA), to provoke inflammatory responses in the murine lung after intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, protein concentration, MIP-2 mRNA induction, and polymorphonucleocyte (PMN) recruitment in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were used to evaluate an inflammatory response in Balb-C mice. Two sizes of polystyrene (PS) nanospheres (diameters: 75 nm and 220 nm) were included in the study for comparison. All nanoparticle suspensions were instilled at concentrations of 1 {mu}g/{mu}l and 2.5 {mu}g/{mu}l, representative of an estimated 'therapeutic dose' and a concentrated 'dose' of particles. In all experiments, the 75 nm PS particles exhibited elevated responses for the inflammatory markers investigated. In contrast, biodegradable particles of comparable hydrodynamic diameter showed a significantly lower inflammatory response. The most marked differences were observed in the extent of PMN recruitment. While the 75 nm and 220 nm PS nanospheres exhibited 41 and 74% PMN within the total BALF cell population after 24 h, respectively, PMN recruiting in lungs instilled with both types of biodegradable particles did not exceed values of the negative isotonic glucose control. In conclusion, evidence suggests that biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles designed for pulmonary drug delivery may not induce the same inflammatory response as non-biodegradable

  14. [Alcohol and alcoholism: attitudes of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Divane; Bittencourt, Marina Nolli

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive exploratory study that aimed to verify nursing students' attitudes facing to the alcoholic drinks, alcoholism and alcoholics, according to their position in face of an attitudes scale items. For data collection, it was used the Scale of Attitudes to alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholic, applied to 144 nursing students. The results showed a tendency to negative attitudes of these students in face of alcoholism, alcoholic person and alcoholic drinks, since most participants were placed in category indifferent or disagree with the positive items, agreeing with negative scale items. We conclude that this trend of negative attitudes is connected to insufficient attention given to the subject during the nurses' education, being verified the need for greater importance to be given to this problem.

  15. Aged refinery hydrocarbon biodegradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon biodegradation was investigated as a potential cleanup technology for refinery soil. Well-mixed field soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for one year in laboratory mesocosms to stimulate biodegradation. Freon infrared analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. Significant reductions in TPH (up to 68%) and methylene chloride extractable material (up to 55%) were observed. The combined trimethylated phenanthrene/anthracenes (C3P/A) were even more highly depleted than TPH. Nutrient amendment increased TPH, methylene chloride, and C3P/A removal, but not biomarker concentrations. Significant reduction of two to five ring PAHs occurred. Expected depletion patterns for PAHs were observed except in the case of naphthalene and derivatives, phenanthrene/anthracene and derivatives, and chrysene. A possible explanation is that the more readily degradable PAHs were already highly biodegraded before the study and the remaining portions were less available for biodegradation. These results are consistent with reports on the effects of aging on PAH biodegradation in soil. Biodegradation was influenced by PAH structure and molecular weight.

  16. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology. PMID:23710326

  17. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-14

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology.

  18. Formulation of microbial cocktails for BTEX biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Karthiga; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2015-02-01

    BTEX biodegradation by a mixed community of micro-organisms offers a promising approach in terms of cost-effectiveness and elimination of secondary pollution. Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 were chosen to formulate synthetic consortia based on their ability to biodegrade the mono-aromatic compounds. Benzene and toluene supported the growth of both the strains; while ethyl benzene and o-xylene were only utilized as growth substrates by P. putida F1 and P. stutzeri OX1, respectively. In a mixed substrate system, P. putida F1 exhibited incomplete removal of o-xylene while P. stutzeri OX1 displayed cometabolic removal of ethyl benzene with dark coloration of the growth medium. The biodegradation potential of the two Pseudomonas species complemented each other and offered opportunities to explore their performance as a co-culture for enhanced BTEX biodegradation. Several microbial formulations were concocted and their BTEX biodegradation characteristics were evaluated. Mixed culture biodegradation ascertained the advantages of the co-culture over the individual Pseudomonas species. This study also emphasized the significance of inoculum density and species proportion while concocting preselected micro-organisms for enhanced BTEX biodegradation.

  19. Promoting Diabetic Wound Therapy Using Biodegradable rhPDGF-Loaded Nanofibrous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chang, Shang-Hung; Chen, Wei-Jan; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Chang, Po-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ting; Wang, Fu-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nanofibrous biodegradable drug-loaded membranes that sustainably released recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB) to repair diabetic wounds were developed in this work. rhPDGF-BB and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were mixed in hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol, followed by the electrospinning of the solutions into biodegradable membranes to equip the nanofibrous membranes. An elution technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit were used to determine the rhPDGF-BB release rates in vitro and in vivo from this membrane. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomized into 3 groups: rhPDGF-BB-loaded nanofibrous membrane group, PLGA only membrane group, and conventional gauze sponge group for the wound associated with diabetes of rat in each group. The nanofibrous biodegradable membranes released effective concentrations of rhPDGF-BB for over 21 days. The nanofibrous rhPDGF-BB-loaded PLGA membranes contained more water and were further hydrophilic than PLGA only fibers. The rhPDGF-BB-loaded PLGA membranes considerably helped the diabetic wounds repairing. Furthermore, the proliferative cells and angiogenesis of rats associated with diabetes by rhPDGF-BB-loaded nanofibrous membranes were greater than those of other groups, owing to the increased matrix metalloproteinase 9. These biodegradable rhPDGF-BB-loaded membranes were effective in treating diabetic wounds as very advanced accelerators during the initial phases of wound-healing process. PMID:26632682

  20. Bacterial degradation of tert-amyl alcohol proceeds via hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol by employing the tertiary alcohol desaturase function of the Rieske nonheme mononuclear iron oxygenase MdpJ.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Judith; Schäfer, Franziska; Hübler, Nora; Brandt, Anne; Rosell, Mònica; Härtig, Claus; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H; Rohwerder, Thore

    2012-03-01

    Tertiary alcohols, such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-amyl alcohol (TAA) and higher homologues, are only slowly degraded microbially. The conversion of TBA seems to proceed via hydroxylation to 2-methylpropan-1,2-diol, which is further oxidized to 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid. By analogy, a branched pathway is expected for the degradation of TAA, as this molecule possesses several potential hydroxylation sites. In Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 and Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1, a likely candidate catalyst for hydroxylations is the putative tertiary alcohol monooxygenase MdpJ. However, by comparing metabolite accumulations in wild-type strains of L108 and PM1 and in two mdpJ knockout mutants of strain L108, we could clearly show that MdpJ is not hydroxylating TAA to diols but functions as a desaturase, resulting in the formation of the hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol. The latter is further processed via the hemiterpenes prenol, prenal, and 3-methylcrotonic acid. Likewise, 3-methyl-3-pentanol is degraded via 3-methyl-1-penten-3-ol. Wild-type strain L108 and mdpJ knockout mutants formed isoamylene and isoprene from TAA and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, respectively. It is likely that this dehydratase activity is catalyzed by a not-yet-characterized enzyme postulated for the isomerization of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and prenol. The vitamin requirements of strain L108 growing on TAA and the occurrence of 3-methylcrotonic acid as a metabolite indicate that TAA and hemiterpene degradation are linked with the catabolic route of the amino acid leucine, including an involvement of the biotin-dependent 3-methylcrotonyl coenzyme A (3-methylcrotonyl-CoA) carboxylase LiuBD. Evolutionary aspects of favored desaturase versus hydroxylation pathways for TAA conversion and the possible role of MdpJ in the degradation of higher tertiary alcohols are discussed.

  1. Bacterial Degradation of tert-Amyl Alcohol Proceeds via Hemiterpene 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol by Employing the Tertiary Alcohol Desaturase Function of the Rieske Nonheme Mononuclear Iron Oxygenase MdpJ

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Judith; Schäfer, Franziska; Hübler, Nora; Brandt, Anne; Rosell, Mònica; Härtig, Claus; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H.

    2012-01-01

    Tertiary alcohols, such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-amyl alcohol (TAA) and higher homologues, are only slowly degraded microbially. The conversion of TBA seems to proceed via hydroxylation to 2-methylpropan-1,2-diol, which is further oxidized to 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid. By analogy, a branched pathway is expected for the degradation of TAA, as this molecule possesses several potential hydroxylation sites. In Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 and Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1, a likely candidate catalyst for hydroxylations is the putative tertiary alcohol monooxygenase MdpJ. However, by comparing metabolite accumulations in wild-type strains of L108 and PM1 and in two mdpJ knockout mutants of strain L108, we could clearly show that MdpJ is not hydroxylating TAA to diols but functions as a desaturase, resulting in the formation of the hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol. The latter is further processed via the hemiterpenes prenol, prenal, and 3-methylcrotonic acid. Likewise, 3-methyl-3-pentanol is degraded via 3-methyl-1-penten-3-ol. Wild-type strain L108 and mdpJ knockout mutants formed isoamylene and isoprene from TAA and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, respectively. It is likely that this dehydratase activity is catalyzed by a not-yet-characterized enzyme postulated for the isomerization of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and prenol. The vitamin requirements of strain L108 growing on TAA and the occurrence of 3-methylcrotonic acid as a metabolite indicate that TAA and hemiterpene degradation are linked with the catabolic route of the amino acid leucine, including an involvement of the biotin-dependent 3-methylcrotonyl coenzyme A (3-methylcrotonyl-CoA) carboxylase LiuBD. Evolutionary aspects of favored desaturase versus hydroxylation pathways for TAA conversion and the possible role of MdpJ in the degradation of higher tertiary alcohols are discussed. PMID:22194447

  2. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Narayan, R.; Davies, G. B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all ‘good’ or petrochemical-based products are all ‘bad’. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated ‘home’ composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  3. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Murphy, R J; Narayan, R; Davies, G B H

    2009-07-27

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  4. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Murphy, R J; Narayan, R; Davies, G B H

    2009-07-27

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted.

  5. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution.

  6. Biomedical Applications of Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ulery, Bret D.; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as biomaterials has greatly impacted the advancement of modern medicine. Specifically, polymeric biomaterials that are biodegradable provide the significant advantage of being able to be broken down and removed after they have served their function. Applications are wide ranging with degradable polymers being used clinically as surgical sutures and implants. In order to fit functional demand, materials with desired physical, chemical, biological, biomechanical and degradation properties must be selected. Fortunately, a wide range of natural and synthetic degradable polymers has been investigated for biomedical applications with novel materials constantly being developed to meet new challenges. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the field over the past 4 years, specifically highlighting new and interesting discoveries in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. PMID:21769165

  7. Engineered biosynthesis of biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Jambunathan, Pooja; Zhang, Kechun

    2016-08-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in the rapid development of biobased plastics and the major drivers for this expansion are rising environmental concerns of plastic pollution and the depletion of fossil-fuels. This paper presents a broad view on the recent developments of three promising biobased plastics, polylactic acid (PLA), polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and polybutylene succinate (PBS), well known for their biodegradability. The article discusses the natural and recombinant host organisms used for fermentative production of monomers, alternative carbon feedstocks that have been used to lower production cost, different metabolic engineering strategies used to improve product titers, various fermentation technologies employed to increase productivities and finally, the different downstream processes used for recovery and purification of the monomers and polymers.

  8. Biodegradable polyesters from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Amy; Wright, Zachary C; Frank, Curtis W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental concerns have led to the development of biorenewable polymers with the ambition to utilize them at an industrial scale. Poly(lactic acid) and poly(hydroxyalkanoates) are semicrystalline, biorenewable polymers that have been identified as the most promising alternatives to conventional plastics. However, both are inherently susceptible to brittleness and degradation during thermal processing; we discuss several approaches to overcome these problems to create a balance between durability and biodegradability. For example, copolymers and blends can increase ductility and the thermal-processing window. Furthermore, chain modifications (e.g., branching/crosslinking), processing techniques (fiber drawing/annealing), or additives (plasticizers/nucleating agents) can improve mechanical properties and prevent thermal degradation during processing. Finally, we examine the impacts of morphology on end-of-life degradation to complete the picture for the most common renewable polymers.

  9. Engineered biosynthesis of biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Jambunathan, Pooja; Zhang, Kechun

    2016-08-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in the rapid development of biobased plastics and the major drivers for this expansion are rising environmental concerns of plastic pollution and the depletion of fossil-fuels. This paper presents a broad view on the recent developments of three promising biobased plastics, polylactic acid (PLA), polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and polybutylene succinate (PBS), well known for their biodegradability. The article discusses the natural and recombinant host organisms used for fermentative production of monomers, alternative carbon feedstocks that have been used to lower production cost, different metabolic engineering strategies used to improve product titers, various fermentation technologies employed to increase productivities and finally, the different downstream processes used for recovery and purification of the monomers and polymers. PMID:27260524

  10. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-01-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  11. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-03-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  12. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  13. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  14. Preparation and degradation mechanisms of biodegradable polymer: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S. H.; Duan, P. P.; Shen, M. X.; Xue, Y. J.; Wang, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Polymers are difficult to degrade completely in Nature, and their catabolites may pollute the environment. In recent years, biodegradable polymers have become the hot topic in people's daily life with increasing interest, and a controllable polymer biodegradation is one of the most important directions for future polymer science. This article presents the main preparation methods for biodegradable polymers and discusses their degradation mechanisms, the biodegradable factors, recent researches and their applications. The future researches of biodegradable polymers are also put forward.

  15. Role of microbial adhesion in phenanthrene biodegradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens LP6a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasnezhad, Hassan

    Biodegradation of poorly water soluble hydrocarbons, such as n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often limited by the low availability of the pollutant to microbes. Adhesion of microorganisms to the oil-water interface can influence this availability. Our approach was to study a range of compounds and mechanisms to promote the adhesion of a hydrophilic PAH degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens LP6a, to an oil-water interface and examine the effect on biodegradation of phenanthrene by the bacteria. The cationic surfactants cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), poly-L-lysine and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and the long chain alcohols 1-dodecanol, 2-dodecanol and farnesol increased the adhesion of P. fluorescens LP6a to n-hexadecane from ca. 30% to ca. 90% of suspended cells adhering. The alcohols also caused a dramatic change in the oil-water contact angle of the cell surface, increasing it from 24° to 104°, whereas the cationic compounds had little effect. In contrast, cationic compounds changed the electrophoretic mobility of the bacteria, reducing the mean zeta potential from --23 to --7 mV in 0.01M potassium phosphate buffer, but the alcohols had no effect on zeta potential. This results illustrate that alcohols acted through altering the cell surface hydrophobicity, whereas cationic surfactants changed the surface charge density. Phenanthrene was dissolved in heptamethylnonane and introduced to the aqueous growth medium, hence forming a two phase system. Introducing 1-dodecanol at concentrations of 217, 820 or 4100 mg/L resulted in comparable increases in phenanthrene biodegradation of about 30% after 120 h incubation with non-induced cultures. After 100 h of incubation with LP6a cultures induced with 2-aminobenzoate, 4.5% of the phenanthrene was mineralized by cultures versus more than 10% by the cultures containing initial 1-dodecanol or 2-dodecanol concentrations of 120 or 160 mg/L. The production and accumulation of metabolites in

  16. Intimately coupling of photolysis accelerates nitrobenzene biodegradation, but sequential coupling slows biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihui; Zhang, Yongming; Bai, Qi; Yan, Ning; Xu, Hua; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-04-28

    Photo(cata)lysis coupled with biodegradation is superior to photo(cata)lysis or biodegradation alone for removal of recalcitrant organic compounds. The two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously via intimate coupling. We studied nitrobenzene (NB) removal and mineralization to evaluate why intimate coupling of photolysis with biodegradation was superior to sequential coupling. Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor, we compared direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis (P+B), simultaneous photolysis and biodegradation (P&B), and biodegradation with nitrophenol (NP) and oxalic acid (OA) added individually and simultaneously (B+NP, B+OA, and B+NP+OA); NP and OA were NB's main UV-photolysis products. Compared with B, the biodegradation rate P+B was lower by 13-29%, but intimately coupling (P&B) had a removal rate that was 10-13% higher; mineralization showed similar trends. B+OA gave results similar to P&B, B+NP gave results similar to P+B, and B+OA+NP gave results between P+B and P&B, depending on the amount of OA and NP added. The photolysis product OA accelerated NB biodegradation through a co-substrate effect, but NP was inhibitory. Although decreasing the UV photolysis time could minimize the inhibition impact of NP in P+B, P&B gave the fastest removal of NB by accentuating the co-substrate effect of OA. PMID:25661172

  17. Biodegradation of the anionic surfactant dialkyl sulphosuccinate

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, S.G. . Port Sunlight Lab.)

    1993-10-01

    A range of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guideline test systems was used to determine the extent and possible mechanisms of biodegradation of dialkyl sulphosuccinate (DASS, C[sub 6]/C[sub 8]). Primary biodegradation of DASS was virtually complete in OECD guideline tests and in simulations of activated sludge sewage treatment systems under both optimal and adverse conditions, and of an anaerobic digester. Ultimate biodegradation increased form about 50% in ready tests to 94% in more powerful inherent tests. [[sup 14]C]DASS was used to determine the fate of the surfactant in activated sludge and in surface waters. Mechanistic studies were performed to ascertain the biodegradative pathway of [[sup 14]C]DASS. A putative degradation pathway for DASS is proposed.

  18. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  19. OPTIMIZING BTEX BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine optimum conditions for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (collectively known as BTEX) biodegradation by aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions. Microcosms, constructed with aquifer samples from Traverse City, Mic...

  20. Polyaspartate scale inhibitors -- Biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Low, K.C.; Shannon, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Polyaspartates are highly biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylate-based scale inhibitors. This article presents laboratory testing data on polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium and barium mineral scales. The optimum molecular weight (Mw) for polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, and barium sulfate mineral scales was determined to be between 1,000 Mw and 4,000 Mw. For inhibition of calcium carbonate and barium sulfate, polyaspartates in the range of 3,000 Mw to 4,000 Mw were most effective. For calcium sulfate inhibition, the optimum Mw lies in the 1,000 Mw to 2,000 Mw range. Biodegradability data (OECD 301B Ready Biodegradability) on polyaspartates of a variety of Mw is also presented, which demonstrates the high biodegradability of this class of mineral scale inhibitors.

  1. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION THROUGH IN-SITU AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provided an overview of enhanced aerobic bioremediation using in-situ aeration or venting. The following topics were covered: (1) Basic discussion on biodegradation and respiration testing; (2) Basic discussion on volatilization, rate-limited mass transport, an...

  2. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Tago, Kanako; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Tsushima, Seiya

    2011-11-29

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily isolated from plant surfaces, displayed strong degradation activity on films made from poly-butylene succinate or poly-butylene succinate-co-adipate. Strains of P. antarctica isolated from leaves and husks of paddy rice displayed strong degradation activity on these films at 30°C. The type strain, P. antarctica JCM 10317, and Pseudozyma spp. strains from phyllosphere secreted a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme with a molecular mass of about 22 kDa. Reliable source of biodegradable plastic-degrading microorganisms are now in our hands.

  3. Radical-based dephosphorylation and organophosphonate biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.; Loo, S.; Cordeiro, M.L.; Li, D.

    1987-04-01

    Products resulting from the degradation of organophosphonates by Escherichia coli are identified and used as a basis for evaluating mechanisms which may be the chemical basis of the biodegradation. One mechanistic hypothesis which is consistent with the biodegradation products involves radical-based dephosphorylation. Chemical modeling of this process is achieved by the reaction of alkylphosphonic acids with lead(IV) tetraacetate and electrochemical oxidation at a platinum anode.

  4. Influence of Concentration and Salinity on the Biodegradability of Organic Additives in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouser, P. J.; Kekacs, D.

    2014-12-01

    One of the risks associated with the use of hydraulic fracturing technologies for energy development is the potential release of hydraulic fracturing-related fluids into surface waters or shallow aquifers. Many of the organic additives used in hydraulic fracturing fluids are individually biodegradable, but little is know on how they will attenuate within a complex organic fluid in the natural environment. We developed a synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid based on disclosed recipes used by Marcellus shale operators to evaluate the biodegradation potential of organic additives across a concentration (25 to 200 mg/L DOC) and salinity gradient (0 to 60 g/L) similar to Marcellus shale injected fluids. In aerobic aqueous solutions, microorganisms removed 91% of bulk DOC from low SFF solutions and 57% DOC in solutions having field-used SFF concentrations within 7 days. Under high SFF concentrations, salinity in excess of 20 g/L inhibited organic compound biodegradation for several weeks, after which time the majority (57% to 75%) of DOC remained in solution. After SFF amendment, the initially biodiverse lake or sludge microbial communities were quickly dominated (>79%) by Pseudomonas spp. Approximately 20% of added carbon was converted to biomass while the remainder was respired to CO2 or other metabolites. Two alcohols, isopropanol and octanol, together accounted for 2-4% of the initial DOC, with both compounds decreasing to below detection limits within 7 days. Alcohol degradation was associated with an increase in acetone at mg/L concentrations. These data help to constrain the biodegradation potential of organic additives in hydraulic fracturing fluids and guide our understanding of the microbial communities that may contribute to attenuation in surface waters.

  5. Biodegradability of commercial and weathered diesel oils

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; de Franceschi de Angelis, Dejanira; Pirôllo, Maria Paula Santos; Contiero, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the capability of different microorganisms to degrade commercial diesel oil in comparison to a weathered diesel oil collected from the groundwater at a petrol station. Two microbiological methods were used for the biodegradability assessment: the technique based on the redox indicator 2,6 -dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) and soil respirometric experiments using biometer flasks. In the former we tested the bacterial cultures Staphylococcus hominis, Kocuria palustris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBI, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Bacillus cereus, a commercial inoculum, consortia obtained from soil and groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons and a consortium from an uncontaminated area. In the respirometric experiments it was evaluated the capability of the native microorganisms present in the soil from a petrol station to biodegrade the diesel oils. The redox indicator experiments showed that only the consortia, even that from an uncontaminated area, were able to biodegrade the weathered diesel. In 48 days, the removal of the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the respirometric experiments was approximately 2.5 times greater when the commercial diesel oil was used. This difference was caused by the consumption of labile hydrocarbons, present in greater quantities in the commercial diesel oil, as demonstrated by gas chromatographic analyses. Thus, results indicate that biodegradability studies that do not consider the weathering effect of the pollutants may over estimate biodegradation rates and when the bioaugmentation is necessary, the best strategy would be that one based on injection of consortia, because even cultures with recognised capability of biodegrading hydrocarbons may fail when applied isolated. PMID:24031193

  6. Health risks of alcohol use

    MedlinePlus

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking ... Beer, wine, and liquor all contain alcohol. If you are drinking any of these, you are using alcohol. Your drinking patterns may vary, depending on who you are with ...

  7. Evaluation of biodegradation-promoting additives for plastics.

    PubMed

    Selke, Susan; Auras, Rafael; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Castro Aguirre, Edgar; Cheruvathur, Rijosh; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-17

    Biodegradation-promoting additives for polymers are increasingly being used around the world with the claim that they effectively render commercial polymers biodegradable. However, there is a lot of uncertainty about their effectiveness in degrading polymers in different environments. In this study, we evaluated the effect of biodegradation-promoting additives on the biodegradation of polyethylene (PE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Biodegradation was evaluated in compost, anaerobic digestion, and soil burial environments. None of the five different additives tested significantly increased biodegradation in any of these environments. Thus, no evidence was found that these additives promote and/or enhance biodegradation of PE or PET polymers. So, anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation are not recommended as feasible disposal routes for nonbiodegradable plastics containing any of the five tested biodegradation-promoting additives.

  8. Biodegradation of the Pyrethroid Pesticide Esfenvalerate by Marine-Derived Fungi.

    PubMed

    Birolli, Willian G; Alvarenga, Natália; Seleghim, Mirna H R; Porto, André L M

    2016-08-01

    Esfenvalerate biodegradation by marine-derived fungi is reported here. Esfenvalerate (S,S-fenvalerate) and its main metabolites [3-phenoxybenzaldehyde (PBAld), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBAc), 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (PBAlc), and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyric acid (CLAc)] were quantitatively analyzed by a validated method in triplicate experiments. All the strains (Penicillium raistrickii CBMAI 931, Aspergillus sydowii CBMAI 935, Cladosporium sp. CBMAI 1237, Microsphaeropsis sp. CBMAI 1675, Acremonium sp. CBMAI 1676, Westerdykella sp. CBMAI 1679, and Cladosporium sp. CBMAI 1678) were able to degrade esfenvalerate, however, with different efficiencies. Initially, 100 mg L(-1) esfenvalerate (Sumidan 150SC) was added to each culture in 3 % malt liquid medium. Residual esfenvalerate (64.8-95.2 mg L(-1)) and the concentrations of PBAc (0.5-7.4 mg L(-1)), ClAc (0.1-7.5 mg L(-1)), and PBAlc (0.2 mg L(-1)) were determined after 14 days. In experiments after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of biodegradation with the three most efficient strains, increasing concentrations of the toxic compounds PBAc (2.7-16.6 mg L(-1), after 28 days) and CLAc (6.6-13.4 mg L(-1), after 28 days) were observed. A biodegradation pathway was proposed, based on HPLC-ToF results. The biodegradation pathway includes PBAld, PBAc, PBAlc, ClAc, 2-hydroxy-2-(3-phenoxyphenyl)acetonitrile, 3-(hydroxyphenoxy)benzoic acid, and methyl 3-phenoxy benzoate. Marine-derived fungi were able to biodegrade esfenvalerate in a commercial formulation and showed their potential for future bioremediation studies in contaminated soils and water bodies. PMID:27381569

  9. Biodegradation of the Pyrethroid Pesticide Esfenvalerate by Marine-Derived Fungi.

    PubMed

    Birolli, Willian G; Alvarenga, Natália; Seleghim, Mirna H R; Porto, André L M

    2016-08-01

    Esfenvalerate biodegradation by marine-derived fungi is reported here. Esfenvalerate (S,S-fenvalerate) and its main metabolites [3-phenoxybenzaldehyde (PBAld), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBAc), 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (PBAlc), and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyric acid (CLAc)] were quantitatively analyzed by a validated method in triplicate experiments. All the strains (Penicillium raistrickii CBMAI 931, Aspergillus sydowii CBMAI 935, Cladosporium sp. CBMAI 1237, Microsphaeropsis sp. CBMAI 1675, Acremonium sp. CBMAI 1676, Westerdykella sp. CBMAI 1679, and Cladosporium sp. CBMAI 1678) were able to degrade esfenvalerate, however, with different efficiencies. Initially, 100 mg L(-1) esfenvalerate (Sumidan 150SC) was added to each culture in 3 % malt liquid medium. Residual esfenvalerate (64.8-95.2 mg L(-1)) and the concentrations of PBAc (0.5-7.4 mg L(-1)), ClAc (0.1-7.5 mg L(-1)), and PBAlc (0.2 mg L(-1)) were determined after 14 days. In experiments after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of biodegradation with the three most efficient strains, increasing concentrations of the toxic compounds PBAc (2.7-16.6 mg L(-1), after 28 days) and CLAc (6.6-13.4 mg L(-1), after 28 days) were observed. A biodegradation pathway was proposed, based on HPLC-ToF results. The biodegradation pathway includes PBAld, PBAc, PBAlc, ClAc, 2-hydroxy-2-(3-phenoxyphenyl)acetonitrile, 3-(hydroxyphenoxy)benzoic acid, and methyl 3-phenoxy benzoate. Marine-derived fungi were able to biodegrade esfenvalerate in a commercial formulation and showed their potential for future bioremediation studies in contaminated soils and water bodies.

  10. Biodegradability and biodegradation rate of poly(caprolactone)-starch blend and poly(butylene succinate) biodegradable polymer under aerobic and anaerobic environment.

    PubMed

    Cho, H S; Moon, H S; Kim, M; Nam, K; Kim, J Y

    2011-03-01

    The biodegradability and the biodegradation rate of two kinds biodegradable polymers; poly(caprolactone) (PCL)-starch blend and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), were investigated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PCL-starch blend was easily degraded, with 88% biodegradability in 44 days under aerobic conditions, and showed a biodegradation rate of 0.07 day(-1), whereas the biodegradability of PBS was only 31% in 80 days under the same conditions, with a biodegradation rate of 0.01 day(-1). Anaerobic bacteria degraded well PCL-starch blend (i.e., 83% biodegradability for 139 days); however, its biodegradation rate was relatively slow (6.1 mL CH(4)/g-VS day) compared to that of cellulose (13.5 mL CH(4)/g-VS day), which was used as a reference material. The PBS was barely degraded under anaerobic conditions, with only 2% biodegradability in 100 days. These results were consistent with the visual changes and FE-SEM images of the two biodegradable polymers after the landfill burial test, showing that only PCL-starch blend had various sized pinholes on the surface due to attack by microorganisms. This result may be use in deciding suitable final disposal approaches of different types of biodegradable polymers in the future.

  11. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  12. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  13. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse. PMID:24477631

  14. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  15. Biomechanical Challenges to Polymeric Biodegradable Stents.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joao S; Moore, James E

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable implants have demonstrated clinical success in simple applications (e.g., absorbable sutures) and have shown great potential in many other areas of interventional medicine, such as localized drug delivery, engineered tissue scaffolding, and structural implants. For endovascular stenting and musculoskeletal applications, they can serve as temporary mechanical support that provides a smooth stress-transfer from the degradable implant to the healing tissue. However, for more complex device geometries, in vivo environments, and evolving load-bearing functions, such as required for vascular stents, there are considerable challenges associated with the use of biodegradable materials. A biodegradable stent must restore blood flow and provide support for a predictable appropriate period to facilitate artery healing, and subsequently, fail safely and be absorbed in a controllable manner. Biodegradable polymers are typically weaker than metals currently employed to construct stents, so it is difficult to ensure sufficient strength to keep the artery open and alleviate symptoms acutely while keeping other design parameters within clinically acceptable ranges. These design challenges are serious, given the general lack of understanding of biodegradable polymer behavior and evolution in intimal operating conditions. The modus operandi is mainly empirical and relies heavily on trial-and-error methodologies burdened by difficult, resource-expensive, and time-consuming experiments. We are striving for theoretical advancements systematizing the empirical knowledge into rational frameworks that could be cast into in silico tools for simulation and product development optimization. These challenges are evident when one considers that there are no biodegradable stents on the US market despite more than 30 years of development efforts (and currently only a couple with CE mark). This review summarizes previous efforts at implementing biodegradable stents, discusses the

  16. Prediction of biodegradability from chemical structure: Modeling or ready biodegradation test data

    SciTech Connect

    Loonen, H.; Lindgren, F.; Hansen, B.

    1999-08-01

    Biodegradation data were collected and evaluated for 894 substances with widely varying chemical structures. All data were determined according to the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) I test protocol. The MITI I test is a screening test for ready biodegradability and has been described by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline 301 C and European Union (EU) test guideline C4F. The chemicals were characterized by a set of 127 predefined structural fragments. This data set was used to develop a model for the prediction of the biodegradability of chemicals under standardized OECD and EU ready biodegradation test conditions. Partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis was used for the model development. The model was evaluated by means of internal cross-validation and repeated external validation. The importance of various structural fragments and fragment interactions was investigated. The most important fragments include the presence of a long alkyl chain; hydroxy, ester, and acid groups (enhancing biodegradation); and the presence of one or more aromatic rings and halogen substituents (regarding biodegradation). More than 85% of the model predictions were correct for using the complete data set. The not readily biodegradable predictions were slightly better than the readily biodegradable predictions (86 vs 84%). The average percentage of correct predictions from four external validation studies was 83%. Model optimization by including fragment interactions improve the model predicting capabilities to 89%. It can be concluded that the PLS model provides predictions of high reliability for a diverse range of chemical structures. The predictions conform to the concept of readily biodegradable (or not readily biodegradable) as defined by OECD and EU test guidelines.

  17. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  18. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils.

  19. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  20. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  1. Ultimate biodegradation of dialkyl phthalate ester plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.L.; Sinko, C.J.; Winkelmann, D.A.; Peterson, D.R.; Parkerton, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    Phthalate Esters (PEs) are primarily used as plasticizers in the polymer industry to impart the desired degree of flexibility to plastic products. The single isomer, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is the most common plasticizer. However, other commercially important PE plasticizers possess branched alkyl chains of a mixed isomeric nature. The purpose of this study was to compare the ultimate biodegradability of mixed isomer PEs dihexyl (DHP), diisoheptyl (DIHP), diisononyl (DINP), diisodecyl (DIDP), and diisoundecyl (DIUP) phthalate to DEHP using the standardized OECD test (301 F) which is based on mannometric respirometry. Ultimate biodegradation results after 28 days under unacclimated conditions at 25 C were as follows: DHP (80 {+-} 10%), DIHP (82 {+-} 13%), DEHP (63 {+-} 18%), DINP (70 {+-} 11%), DIDP (67 {+-} 13%), DUP (57 {+-} 14%). These data confirm the readily biodegradable nature of DEHP and mixed isomer PEs reported in previous studies and provide additional data to contradict the misperception that PEs are environmentally persistent. The influence of alkyl chain structure on the rate and extent of biodegradation observed in this and other biodegradation studies are discussed.

  2. Biodegradable lignin/polyolefin composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kosikova, B.; Demjanova, V.; Mikulasova, M.; Lora, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    From the view point of environmental protection, the plastic wastes, especially from packing materials, represent a potential waste problem. Various approaches were examined to develop partially or completely biodegradable plastics. New type of partially biodegradable polyolefins was prepared by blending of polypropylene with lignin, which was recovered in the ALCELL process, an organosolv pulping process that uses ethanol-water as the delignifying agent. Films of blends with up to 10% wt ALCELL lignin, prepared in absence of commercial stabilizers, had acceptable mechanical strengths. The effect of lignin on biodegradability of the composite films was examined by comparison of behaviour of both pure and lignin containing films during treatment with fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. It was found that this fungus is able to grow and to produce lignolytic enzymes in the presence of the films containing lignin. Biodegradation of lignin in the composite film was confirmed by the releasing of lignin fragments into the extracellular fluid. Because of measurement of mechanical properties offers a mean of direct estimation of polymer degradation, the degree of biodegradation of the films tested was followed by monitoring of elongation at break. The changes of break at elongation in the course of enzymatic treatment revealed that the lignin/PP composite films are potentially environmentally nonpersisting. The micrographs of the lignin containing films obtained by scanning electron microscopy show the significant changes of the film surface upon degradation with Phanerochaete chrysosporium in contrast to unchanged lignin free film.

  3. Biodegradability of degradable plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Agamuthu, P; Faizura, Putri Nadzrul

    2005-04-01

    Plastic waste constitutes the third largest waste volume in Malaysian municipal solid waste (MSW), next to putrescible waste and paper. The plastic component in MSW from Kuala Lumpur averages 24% (by weight), whereas the national mean is about 15%. The 144 waste dumps in the country receive about 95% of the MSW, including plastic waste. The useful life of the landfills is fast diminishing as the plastic waste stays un-degraded for more than 50 years. In this study the compostability of polyethylene and pro-oxidant additive-based environmentally degradable plastics (EDP) was investigated. Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples exposed hydrolytically or oxidatively at 60 degrees C showed that the abiotic degradation path was oxidative rather than hydrolytic. There was a weight loss of 8% and the plastic has been oxidized as shown by the additional carbonyl group exhibited in the Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) Spectrum. Oxidation rate seemed to be influenced by the amount of pro-oxidant additive, the chemical structure and morphology of the plastic samples, and the surface area. Composting studies during a 45-day experiment showed that the percentage elongation (reduction) was 20% for McD samples [high-density polyethylene, (HDPE) with 3% additive] and LL samples (LLDPE with 7% additive) and 18% reduction for totally degradable plastic (TDP) samples (HDPE with 3% additive). Lastly, microbial experiments using Pseudomonas aeroginosa on carbon-free media with degradable plastic samples as the sole carbon source, showed confirmatory results. A positive bacterial growth and a weight loss of 2.2% for degraded polyethylene samples were evident to show that the degradable plastic is biodegradable.

  4. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and

  5. Renal histopathology in toxicity and carcinogenicity studies with tert-butyl alcohol administered in drinking water to F344 rats: a pathology working group review and re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hard, Gordon C; Bruner, Richard H; Cohen, Samuel M; Pletcher, John M; Regan, Karen S

    2011-04-01

    An independent Pathology Working Group (PWG) re-evaluated the kidney changes in National Toxicology Program (NTP) toxicology/carcinogenicity studies of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in F344/N rats to determine possible mode(s) of action underlying renal tubule tumors in male rats at 2-years. In the 13-week study, the PWG confirmed that the normal pattern of round hyaline droplets in proximal convoluted tubules was replaced by angular droplet accumulation, and identified precursors of granular casts in the outer medulla, changes typical of alpha(2u)-globulin (α(2u)-g) nephropathy. In the 2-year study, the PWG confirmed the NTP observation of increased renal tubule tumors in treated male groups. Linear papillary mineralization, another hallmark of the α(2u)-g pathway was present only in treated male rats. Chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN) was exacerbated in high-dose males and females, with a relationship between advanced grades of CPN and renal tumor occurrence. Hyperplasia of the papilla lining was a component of CPN in both sexes, but there was no pelvic urothelial hyperplasia. High-dose females showed no TBA-related nephrotoxicity. The PWG concluded that both α(2u)-g nephropathy and exacerbated CPN modes of action were operative in TBA renal tumorigenicity in male rats, neither of which has relevance for human cancer risk.

  6. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  7. Perillyl Alcohol (Monoterpene Alcohol), Limonene.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Shahla; Kiumarsi, Amir; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Alizadeh, Javad; Marzban, Hassan; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have a long history of use in traditional medicines and their activities against different diseases have been the focus of many basic and clinical researches in past few decades. The essential oils, volatile liquid containing aroma compound from plants, are known as active ingredients in the herbal medicine. Perillyl alcohol (POH) is usually available through dietary sources and is being explored for its cancer chemoprevention, tumor growth suppression, and regression. Citrus peels are the waste product of juice manufacturing industries and have been considered as a critical problem for environmental green ecology policies for years. One of the most well-known approaches to overcome this problem is transformation of these monoterpene by the use of specific strains of bacteria or yeasts. Limonene (1-methyl-4-isopropyl-cyclohexene) is a monoterpene, as other monoterpenes consists of two isoprene units, that comprises more than 90% of citrus essential oil and it exists in many fruits and vegetables. Although, the anticancer activity of d-limonene has identified nearly two decades ago, it has recently attracted much more attention in translational medicine. In this chapter, we will overview the anticancer effects of POH and d-limonene. Later, we will address the pharmacokinetics of these compounds, highlight the signaling pathways which are targeted by these proteins, review the clinical trials which have been done for these compounds in different cancer models, and finally discuss the future directions of the research in this field that might be more applicable in future cancer therapy strategies.

  8. Perillyl Alcohol (Monoterpene Alcohol), Limonene.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Shahla; Kiumarsi, Amir; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Alizadeh, Javad; Marzban, Hassan; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have a long history of use in traditional medicines and their activities against different diseases have been the focus of many basic and clinical researches in past few decades. The essential oils, volatile liquid containing aroma compound from plants, are known as active ingredients in the herbal medicine. Perillyl alcohol (POH) is usually available through dietary sources and is being explored for its cancer chemoprevention, tumor growth suppression, and regression. Citrus peels are the waste product of juice manufacturing industries and have been considered as a critical problem for environmental green ecology policies for years. One of the most well-known approaches to overcome this problem is transformation of these monoterpene by the use of specific strains of bacteria or yeasts. Limonene (1-methyl-4-isopropyl-cyclohexene) is a monoterpene, as other monoterpenes consists of two isoprene units, that comprises more than 90% of citrus essential oil and it exists in many fruits and vegetables. Although, the anticancer activity of d-limonene has identified nearly two decades ago, it has recently attracted much more attention in translational medicine. In this chapter, we will overview the anticancer effects of POH and d-limonene. Later, we will address the pharmacokinetics of these compounds, highlight the signaling pathways which are targeted by these proteins, review the clinical trials which have been done for these compounds in different cancer models, and finally discuss the future directions of the research in this field that might be more applicable in future cancer therapy strategies. PMID:27102697

  9. Nanosized insulin-complexes based on biodegradable amine-modified graft polyesters poly[vinyl-3-(diethylamino)-propylcarbamate-co-(vinyl acetate)-co-(vinyl alcohol)]-graft-poly(L-lactic acid): protection against enzymatic degradation, interaction with Caco-2 cell monolayers, peptide transport and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Simon, Michael; Behrens, Isabel; Dailey, Lea Anne; Wittmar, Matthias; Kissel, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Non-parenteral insulin delivery by the oral route is limited by epithelial barriers and enzymatic degradation. Nanosized insulin-complexes based on amine modified comb-like polyesters were designed to overcome these barriers. Protection of insulin in nanocomplexes (NC) from enzymatic degradation was investigated. The interaction with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells in terms of cytotoxicity, transport through and uptake in the cell layers was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and insulin transport. The protection capacity of NC and their interaction with Caco-2 cells varied strongly as a function of lactide-grafting (hydrophobicity). With increasing lactide-grafting (P(26) < or = P(26)-1(LL) < or = P(26)-2(LL)) NC protected up to 95% of the insulin against degradation by trypsin. Transport and uptake into cell monolayers increased with higher l-lactid grafting. About 25% of a 1.25mg/ml TRITC-insulin NC dispersion with P(26)-2(LL) was recovered in Caco-2 cells after 90 min. A concentration dependent cytotoxicity profile was observed showing elevated LDH release and decreased TEER values. The cytotoxicity correlates with the surfactant like character of the polymers, decreasing the surface tension to 46 mN/m for the amphiphilic P(26)-2(LL). The observed TEER decrease was reversible after 20 h, suggesting that the biodegradable comb-polyesters offer a promising approach to overcome mucosal barriers.

  10. Introduction of Environmentally Degradable Parameters to Evaluate the Biodegradability of Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Geng, Weitao; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Kong, Meimei; Wang, Shufang

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally Degradable Parameter (EdK) is of importance in the describing of biodegradability of environmentally biodegradable polymers (BDPs). In this study, a concept EdK was introduced. A test procedure of using the ISO 14852 method and detecting the evolved carbon dioxide as an analytical parameter was developed, and the calculated EdK was used as an indicator for the ultimate biodegradability of materials. Starch and polyethylene used as reference materials were defined as the EdK values of 100 and 0, respectively. Natural soil samples were inoculated into bioreactors, followed by determining the rates of biodegradation of the reference materials and 15 commercial BDPs over a 2-week test period. Finally, a formula was deduced to calculate the value of EdK for each material. The EdK values of the tested materials have a positive correlation to their biodegradation rates in the simulated soil environment, and they indicated the relative biodegradation rate of each material among all the tested materials. Therefore, the EdK was shown to be a reliable indicator for quantitatively evaluating the potential biodegradability of BDPs in the natural environment. PMID:22675455

  11. Biodegradable Photonic Melanoidin for Theranostic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Changho; Jung, Ho Sang; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Ki Su; Yun, Seok Hyun; Kim, Chulhong; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-01-26

    Light-absorbing nanoparticles for localized heat generation in tissues have various biomedical applications in diagnostic imaging, surgery, and therapies. Although numerous plasmonic and carbon-based nanoparticles with strong optical absorption have been developed, their clearance, potential cytotoxicity, and long-term safety issues remain unresolved. Here, we show that "generally regarded as safe (GRAS)" melanoidins prepared from glucose and amino acid offer a high light-to-heat conversion efficiency, biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonmutagenicity, and efficient renal clearance, as well as a low cost for synthesis. We exhibit a wide range of biomedical photonic applications of melanoidins, including in vivo photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, photoacoustic tracking of gastrointestinal tracts, photothermal cancer therapy, and photothermal lipolysis. The biodegradation rate and renal clearance of melanoidins are controllable by design. Our results confirm the feasibility of biodegradable melanoidins for various photonic applications to theranostic nanomedicines. PMID:26623481

  12. Biodegradation of malachite green by Ochrobactrum sp.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmidevi, S R; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the biodegradation of malachite green (MG), a triphenylmethane dye, using a novel microorganism isolated from textile effluent contaminated environment. The organism responsible for degradation was identified as Ochrobactrum sp JN214485 by 16S rRNA analysis. The effect of operating parameters such as temperature, pH, immobilized bead loading, and initial dye concentration on % degradation was studied, and their optimal values were found to be 30 °C, 6, 20 g/L and 100 mg/L, respectively. The analysis showed that the extracellular enzymes were responsible for the degradation. The biodegradation of MG was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopic and FTIR analysis. The phytotoxicity test concluded that the degradation products were less toxic compared to MG. The kinetics of biodegradation was studied and the activation energy was found to be 10.65 kcal/mol.

  13. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Lei, Meijuan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  14. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  15. Biodegradable containers from green waste materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Schettini, Evelia; Pandini, Stefano; Bignotti, Fabio; Vox, Giuliano; D'Amore, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Novel biodegradable polymeric materials based on protein hydrolysate (PH), derived from waste products of the leather industry, and poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEG) or epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were obtained and their physico-chemical properties and mechanical behaviour were evaluated. Different processing conditions and the introduction of fillers of natural origin, as saw dust and wood flour, were used to tailor the mechanical properties and the environmental durability of the product. The biodegradable products, which are almost completely manufactured from renewable-based raw materials, look promising for several applications, particularly in agriculture for the additional fertilizing action of PH or in packaging.

  16. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jessica S; Kamperman, Marleen; de Souza, Emerson J; Schick, Bernhard; Arzt, Eduard

    2011-02-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) polymer systems. Micropatterned and non-patterned compliant PDMS did not show significant differences in adhesion on compliant mice ear skin or on gelatin-glycerin model substrates. However, adhesion measurements for micropatterned stiff PLGA on compliant gelatin-glycerin model substrates showed significant enhancement in pull-off strengths compared to non-patterned controls.

  17. Random UV mutagenesis approach for enhanced biodegradation of sulfonated azo dye, Green HE4B.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Swati M; Inamdar, Shrirang A; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study was to execute mutant bacteria for efficient biodegradation of sulfonated azo dye, Green HE4B (GHE4B). UV irradiation was used to introduce random mutations in Pseudomonas sp. LBC1. Genetic alterations induced by UV irradiation in selected mutant bacteria were confirmed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA technique. The mutant bacteria named as Pseudomonas sp. 1 F reduced the time required for complete degradation of recalcitrant dye GHE4B by 25 % when compared with the wild one. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometric analysis. Activities of enzymes like laccase, lignin peroxidase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, and NADH dichlorophenol indophenol reductase were found to be boosted in mutant bacteria as a consequence of UV-induced mutation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of differentially expressed proteins of mutant bacteria suggested active role of antioxidant enzymes in the degradation of the dye. The degradation product was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results revealed few variations in the degradation end products of wild-type and mutant bacteria. Phytotoxicity study underlined the safer biodegradation of GHE4B by mutant Pseudomonas sp. 1 F.

  18. Process and formulation variables in the preparation of injectable and biodegradable magnetic microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Gagnon, Jeffrey; Häfeli, Urs O

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare biodegradable sustained release magnetite microspheres sized between 1 to 2 μm. The microspheres with or without magnetic materials were prepared by a W/O/W double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as the biodegradable matrix forming polymer. Effects of manufacturing and formulation variables on particle size were investigated with non-magnetic microspheres. Microsphere size could be controlled by modification of homogenization speed, PLGA concentration in the oil phase, oil phase volume, solvent composition, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) concentration in the outer water phase. Most influential were the agitation velocity and all parameters that influence the kinematic viscosity of oil and outer water phase, specifically the type and concentration of the oil phase. The magnetic component yielding homogeneous magnetic microspheres consisted of magnetite nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter stabilized with a polyethylene glycole/polyacrylic acid (PEG/PAA) coating and a saturation magnetization of 47.8 emu/g. Non-magnetic and magnetic microspheres had very similar size, morphology, and size distribution, as shown by scanning electron microscopy. The optimized conditions yielded microspheres with 13.7 weight% of magnetite and an average diameter of 1.37 μm. Such biodegradable magnetic microspheres seem appropriate for vascular administration followed by magnetic drug targeting. PMID:17407608

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus.

  20. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. PMID:26482673

  1. Comparative study on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of silicate bioceramic coatings on biodegradable magnesium alloy as biodegradable biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, M.; Fathi, M. H.; Savabi, O.; Razavi, S. M.; Hashemibeni, B.; Yazdimamaghani, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2014-03-01

    Many clinical cases as well as in vivo and in vitro assessments have demonstrated that magnesium alloys possess good biocompatibility. Unfortunately, magnesium and its alloys degrade too quickly in physiological media. In order to improve the biodegradation resistance and biocompatibility of a biodegradable magnesium alloy, we have prepared three types of coating include diopside (CaMgSi2O6), akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O6) and bredigite (Ca7MgSi4O16) coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy through a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. In this research, the biodegradation and biocompatibility behavior of samples were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro analysis was performed by cytocompatibility and MTT-assay and the in vivo test was conducted on the implantation of samples in the greater trochanter of adult rabbits. The results showed that diopside coating has the best bone regeneration and bredigite has the best biodegradation resistance compared to others.

  2. CONTROLLED METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) EXPOSURE TO HUMANS THROUGH DERMAL, INGESTION, AND INHALATION ROUTES AND THE RESULTANT BIOMARKER TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) AS MEASURED IN EXHALED BREATH AND VENOUS BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. In September 1997 during SCOS97 a series of 3-h canister samples of ambient air were collected at the Azusa air monitoring station during morning and afternoon periods. ...

  3. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  4. Alcohol and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Alcohol and Cancer Risk On This Page What is ... in the risk of colorectal cancer. Research on alcohol consumption and other cancers: Numerous studies have examined ...

  5. Alcohol and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Alcohol and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their ... to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and Depression Caffeine and Migraine ...

  6. Benzyl Alcohol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Benzyl alcohol lotion is used to treat head lice (small insects that attach themselves to the skin) in adults ... children less than 6 months of age. Benzyl alcohol is in a class of medications called pediculicides. ...

  7. Translational Studies of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2008-01-01

    Human studies are necessary to identify and classify the brain systems predisposing individuals to develop alcohol use disorders and those modified by alcohol, while animal models of alcoholism are essential for a mechanistic understanding of how chronic voluntary alcohol consumption becomes compulsive, how brain systems become damaged, and how damage resolves. Our current knowledge of the neuroscience of alcohol dependence has evolved from the interchange of information gathered from both human alcoholics and animal models of alcoholism. Together, studies in humans and animal models have provided support for the involvement of specific brain structures over the course of alcohol addiction, including the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20041042

  8. [Neurologic sequelae of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Ladurner, G; Griebnitz, E

    1986-10-10

    The consequences of alcoholism on the peripheral and central nervous system are discussed. Polyneuropathy is present in 30% of the alcoholics, whilst cranial nerve involvement is found in 5-25%. Alcoholic myopathy is only very rarely seen. Wernicke's encephalopathy is found at post mortem investigation in 1.8% of alcoholics, but is rarely clinically diagnosed. The Marchiafava-Bignamy syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis are rarely seen; alcoholic amblyopia which is seen in 0.5% of the hospitalised alcoholics is more frequent, but still a rare finding. Cerebral seizures are common in chronic alcoholics with an incidence varying from 5 to 37% according to the type of drinking habit and have, thus, to be categorised. Brain atrophy is a common finding and correlates with the duration and extent of the alcoholism. PMID:3788182

  9. Alcohol and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing some kinds of cancer. The way alcohol causes cancer isn’t completely understood. In fact, there might ... For example, it could be that alcohol itself causes cancer by increasing hormone levels, or it may be ...

  10. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and hard alcohol calories you are consuming. Simply ... calories) Average Drinks Per Week Monthly Subtotal Calories Beer Regular 12 149 Regular Beer Light 12 110 ...

  11. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... TODAY: “Neurodevelopment and Alcohol: From Cell Adhesion to Cell Phones" Dr. Michael Charness, 11/3 @3 , Masur t. ... lecture: “Neurodevelopment and Alcohol: From Cell Adhesion to Cell Phones" Dr. Michael Charness, 11/3 @3 pm, Masur ...

  12. Alcohol and motorcycle fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S P; Fisher, R S

    1977-01-01

    A series of 99 fatal motorcycle crashes in Maryland was studied retrospectively, using police and medical examiner records. Blood alcohol concentrations were determined for 62 motorcycle drivers; measurable amounts of alcohol were found in two-thirds (41), and one-half (31) had illegally high concentrations of 100 mg/100 ml or more. The police report mentioned alcohol in only 9 instances. High blood alcohol concentrations were found most commonly among drivers age 20-34. PMID:842762

  13. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment. PMID:25432082

  14. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment.

  15. Prospective for biodegradable microstructured optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Alexandre; Guo, Ning; Gao, Yan; Godbout, Nicolas; Lacroix, Suzanne; Dubois, Charles; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2007-01-01

    We report fabrication of a novel microstructured optical fiber made of biodegradable and water soluble materials that features ˜1dB/cm transmission loss. Two cellulose butyrate tubes separated with hydroxypropyl cellulose powder were codrawn into a porous double-core fiber offering integration of optical, microfluidic, and potentially drug release functionalities.

  16. BIODEGRADATION OF ATRAZINE IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pesticide atrazine is frequently detected in ground water, including ground water used as drinking water. Little information is available on the fate of atrazine in the subsurface, including its biodegradability. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the biodegradabil...

  17. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU BIODEGRADATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ biodegradation may be used to treat low-to-intermediate concentrations of organic contaminants in place without disturbing or displacing the contaminated media. Although this technology has been used to degrade a limited number of inorganics, specifically cyanide and nitr...

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SLURRY BIODEGRADATION, International Technology Corporation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology uses a slurry-phase bioreactor in which the soil is mixed with water to form a slurry. Microorganisms and nutrients are added to the slurry to enhance the biodegradation process, which converts organic wastes into relatively harmless byproducts of microbial metabo...

  19. Biodegradation Of thermoplastic polyurethanes from vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic urethanes based on polyricinoleic acid soft segments and MDI/BD hard segments with varied soft segment concentration were prepared. Soft segment concentration was varied fro, 40 to 70 wt %. Biodegradation was studied by respirometry. Segmented polyurethanes with soft segments based ...

  20. Neuronal growth and differentiation on biodegradable membranes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sabrina; Piscioneri, Antonella; Messina, Antonietta; Salerno, Simona; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    Semipermeable polymeric membranes with appropriate morphological, physicochemical and transport properties are relevant to inducing neural regeneration. We developed novel biodegradable membranes to support neuronal differentiation. In particular, we developed chitosan, polycaprolactone and polyurethane flat membranes and a biosynthetic blend between polycaprolactone and polyurethane by phase-inversion techniques. The biodegradable membranes were characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physicochemical, mechanical and degradation properties. We investigated the efficacy of these different membranes to promote the adhesion and differentiation of neuronal cells. We employed as model cell system the human neuroblastoma cell line SHSY5Y, which is a well-established system for studying neuronal differentiation. The investigation of viability and specific neuronal marker expression allowed assessment that the correct neuronal differentiation and the formation of neuronal network had taken place in vitro in the cells seeded on different biodegradable membranes. Overall, this study provides evidence that neural cell responses depend on the nature of the biodegradable polymer used to form the membranes, as well as on the dissolution, hydrophilic and, above all, mechanical membrane properties. PCL-PU membranes exhibit mechanical properties that improve neurite outgrowth and the expression of specific neuronal markers.

  1. Biodegradable implant materials in fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Illi, O E; Weigum, H; Misteli, F

    1992-01-01

    Based on our experiences in paediatric traumatology treated conservatively or with metallic implants, we looked for alternative fixation possibilities in the field of biodegradables. We designed a new driving system for screws consisting of an indwelling screw driver which transduces the torque force over the whole length of the thread. With this technical approach, the head and the neck of the screw as the most friable point for the fracture of the implant could be avoided. In 48 calves aged 6 weeks we performed a comparative study with either conservative treatment (repositioning and casting) or osteosynthesis with biodegradable screws made from polylactate acid or metallic screws (AO type) after an oblique osteotomy at a 45 degrees angle to the axis of the right metacarpal bone. Results from 1 to 6 weeks postoperatively were compared and good to excellent results obtained in equal amounts for PLA and steel screw osteosynthesis, whereas conservative treatment was only successful in one third of the cases. Clinical, radiological and histological follow-up proved the feasibility of biodegradable osteosynthesis in the growing skeleton. For clinical evaluation in children, the resorption time of biodegradable materials has to be lowered to 3 to 6 months. PMID:10149979

  2. The Alcoholism Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The alcoholism questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the drug-abuse questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about alcoholics and alcoholism, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  3. Youths' Perceptions of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Barbara (Day); Hughes, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Only a third of students in this study accepted the medical model of alcoholism. Those who had the least knowledge of, and experience with, alcohol were the most likely to consider alcoholism as an illness. The source of information on drugs most conducive to acceptance of the medical model was parents. (Author/ABB)

  4. Alcohol and Minority Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.; Watts, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that minority youth who use (or abuse) alcohol in American society deal with using alcohol, being minority, and being young, three dimensions viewed by society with mixed, sometimes hostile and/or fearful reactions. Suggests that examining alcoholism among minority youth involves coming to grips with poverty, education, income, and life…

  5. Television: Alcohol's Vast Adland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Concern about how much television alcohol advertising reaches underage youth and how the advertising influences their attitudes and decisions about alcohol use has been widespread for many years. Lacking in the policy debate has been solid, reliable information about the extent of youth exposure to television alcohol advertising. To address this…

  6. Alcohol on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACU-I Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol use on campus and strategies colleges are using to educate students about alcohol are considered in two articles. In "When Alternatives Aren't," Ruth Bradford Burnham and Stephen J. Nelson explore the role alcoholic beverages play in young people's social lives and some of the implications for planning social events. They offer a balanced…

  7. Biological Vulnerability to Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the role of biological factors in the risk for alcoholism. Notes the importance of the definition of primary alcoholism and highlights data indicating that this disorder is genetically influenced. In studies of men at high risk for the future development of alcoholism, vulnerability shows up in reactions to ethanol brain wave amplitude and…

  8. Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Ronald W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents analysis of adult children of alcoholics, their experience and adjustment in relation to the severity and type of alcoholism, age considerations and perceptions as a child, and existence and nature of significant others. Discusses alcoholics' and others' family issues, focusing on roles taken, and personality characteristics. Emphasizes…

  9. Alcoholism and Lesbians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the issues involved in the relationship between lesbianism and alcoholism. It examines the constellation of health and related problems created by alcoholism, and it critically interrogates the societal factors that contribute to the disproportionately high rates of alcoholism among lesbians by exploring the antecedents and…

  10. Alcoholism's Hidden Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses children of alcoholics as victims of fetal alcohol syndrome, family violence, retarded social development, and severe emotional scars. These children bring family roles to school that allow survival in the alcoholic home but are dysfunctional outside it. Educators can take certain steps to address these students' problems. Includes six…

  11. Women and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol, which is found in: »» 12 ounces of beer with 5 percent alcohol content »» 5 ounces of wine with 12 percent alcohol content »» 1.5 ounces ... reflect customary serving sizes. A large cup of beer, an overpoured glass of wine, or a single ...

  12. Alcohol and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Dufour, M C; Archer, L; Gordis, E

    1992-02-01

    Moderate drinking for the elderly of both genders is no more than one drink per day, where a drink is defined as 12 oz of beer, 5 oz of wine, or 1.5 oz of spirits. Age does not affect the rate of absorption or elimination of alcohol. Lean body mass decreases and adipose tissue increases with age, however, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the volume of total body water. With a smaller volume of distribution, an alcohol dose identical to that administered to a younger individual of the same size and gender will produce a higher blood alcohol concentration in the elderly. Low-dose alcohol stimulates appetite and promoters regular bowel function. In the well-nourished nonalcoholic elderly, the negative impact of alcohol consumption on nutrition is minimal. Alcohol consumption improves mood by increasing feelings of happiness and freedom from care while lessening inhibitions, stress, tension, and depression. Although in the laboratory low-dose alcohol improves certain types of cognitive function in young men, in other types of task performance, alcohol induces impairment, which worsens with age. The effects of alcohol on sleep are primarily detrimental, worsening both insomnia and breathing disturbances during sleep. Although the role of alcohol consumption in mortality from heart disease has not been investigated in the elderly, moderate drinking appears safe. Under some circumstances low-dose alcohol may produce analgesia whereas in others it may worsen pain. The elderly use a significant proportion of both prescription and over-the-counter medication, a large variety of which interact with alcohol. Alcoholic beverage consumption may exacerbate cognitive impairment and dementias of other etiology. Although some studies suggest that moderate use of alcohol by institutionalized senior citizens appears to produce benefits including improved socialization, separation of the effects of the social situation from those specifically attributable to alcohol remains to

  13. Assessing the aquatic hazard of some branched and linear nonionic surfactants by biodegradation and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, P.B.; Salanitro, J.P.; Evans, S.H.; Kravetz, L. . Westhollow Research Center)

    1993-10-01

    An aquatic hazard assessment was conducted for branched and linear nonionic surfactants using toxicity and biodegradation measurements. Four nonionic alcohol ethoxylate surfactants with different degrees of branching were evaluated for neat surfactant toxicity, degradation in laboratory sewage treatment units, and aquatic toxicity of treated effluents. Acute testing with neat surfactants showed ranges for EC50s of 1.3 to 11.6 mg/L for Daphnia, 1.6 to 6.1 mg/L for Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), and 1.5 to 11.4 mg/L for Microtox[reg sign]. Chronic testing of algae showed NOECs of 1 to 10 mg/L and maximum acceptable toxicant concentrations (MATCs) of 0.8 to 14.2 mg/L. Seven-day chronic estimation tests showed MATCs of 0.6 to 41.4 mg/L for Pimephales promelas and 1 to 14 mg/L for Daphnia. Effluents collected from treatment units receiving a 50-mg/L surfactant feed at 25 C showed no acute toxicity to either Daphnia or fathead minnows, with the exception of a unit containing nonylphenol ethoxylate. Chronic effluent toxicity was greatest in effluent from the nonylphenol ethoxylate unit and least in the effluent from the linear alcohol ethoxylate unit. Chronic toxicity of the highly branched C[sub 13] alcohol ethoxylate effluent was greater than that for the linear alcohol ethoxylate unit effluent.

  14. Amino alcohol-based degradable poly(ester amide) elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Currently available synthetic biodegradable elastomers are primarily composed of crosslinked aliphatic polyesters, which suffer from deficiencies including (1) high crosslink densities, which results in exceedingly high stiffness, (2) rapid degradation upon implantation, or (3) limited chemical moieties for chemical modification. Herein, we have developed poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate)s, a new class of synthetic, biodegradable elastomeric poly(ester amide)s composed of crosslinked networks based on an amino alcohol. These crosslinked networks feature tensile Young’s modulus on the order of 1 MPa and reversable elongations up to 92%. These polymers exhibit in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. These polymers have projected degradation half-lives up to 20 months in vivo. PMID:18295329

  15. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile dye Disperse Red 54 by Brevibacillus laterosporus and determination of its metabolic fate.

    PubMed

    Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Khandare, Rahul V; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2016-04-01

    Bioremediation is one of the milestones achieved by the biotechnological innovations. It is generating superior results in waste management such as removal of textile dyes, which are considered xenobiotic compounds and recalcitrant to biodegradation. In the present bioremedial approach, Brevibacillus laterosporus was used as an effective microbial tool to decolorize disperse dye Disperse Red 54 (DR54). Under optimized conditions (pH 7, 40°C), B. laterosporus led to 100% decolorization of DR54 (at 50 mg L(-1)) within 48 h. Yeast extract and peptone, supplemented in medium enhanced the decolorization efficiency of the bacterium. During the decolorization process, activities of enzymes responsible for decolorization, such as tyrosinase, veratryl alcohol oxidase and NADH--DCIP reductase were induced by 1.32-, 1.51- and 4.37-fold, respectively. The completely different chromatographic/spectroscopic spectrum of metabolites obtained after decolorization confirmed the biodegradation of DR54 as showed by High pressure liquid chromatography, High pressure thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Gas chromatography-Mass spectroscopy studies suggested the parent dye was biodegraded into simple final product, N-(1λ(3)-chlorinin-2-yl)acetamide. Phytotoxicity study suggested that the metabolites obtained after biodegradation of DR54 were non-toxic as compared to the untreated dye signifying the detoxification of the DR54 by B. laterosporus.

  16. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  17. Improving the biodegradative capacity of subsurface bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, M.F.; Brockman, F.J.

    1993-04-01

    The continual release of large volumes of synthetic materials into the environment by agricultural and industrial sources over the last few decades has resulted in pollution of the subsurface environment. Cleanup has been difficult because of the relative inaccessibility of the contaminants caused by their wide dispersal in the deep subsurface, often at low concentrations and in large volumes. As a possible solution for these problems, interest in the introduction of biodegradative bacteria for in situ remediation of these sites has increased greatly in recent years (Timmis et al. 1988). Selection of biodegradative microbes to apply in such cleanup is limited to those strains that can survive among the native bacterial and predator community members at the particular pH, temperature, and moisture status of the site (Alexander, 1984). The use of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments would be advantageous because the organisms are already adapted to the subsurface conditions. The options are further narrowed to strains that are able to degrade the contaminant rapidly, even in the presence of highly recalcitrant anthropogenic waste mixtures, and in conditions that do not require addition of further toxic compounds for the expression of the biodegradative capacity (Sayler et al. 1990). These obstacles can be overcome by placing the genes of well-characterized biodegradative enzymes under the control of promoters that can be regulated by inexpensive and nontoxic external factors and then moving the new genetic constructs into diverse groups of subsurface microbes. ne objective of this research is to test this hypothesis by comparing expression of two different toluene biodegradative enzymatic pathways from two different regulatable promoters in a variety of subsurface isolates.

  18. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  19. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  20. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches.

  1. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  2. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  3. Genetics and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  4. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; French, Barbara A.; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J.; McKillop, Iain H.; Kirpich, Irina A.; McClain, Craig J.; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M.; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomas, Paul G.; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based upon the “Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia” organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its comorbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible

  5. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  6. [Alcohol and crime].

    PubMed

    Lévay, Boglárka

    2006-01-01

    The role alcohol abuse plays in criminality has been a matter of primary concern for scholars for decades, as indicated by numerous studies and research projects. Most of these studies focus on determining the presence of a relationship between criminal behaviour and alcohol use, and whether criminal inclinations increase with the consumption of alcohol. Research shows that alcohol use indeed increases the risk of criminal behaviour, and that there is an especially strong and consistent correlation between alcohol abuse and violent crimes. However, researchers still disagree on the exact extent to which alcohol use effects criminality, and on the mechanisms causing alcohol to induce violent behaviour. A significant proportion of studies have focused in recent years on aggressive behaviour as a result of drinking alcohol. One of the most important means of measurement is the study of violent behaviour in places where alcohol is on sale. Studying the forms and frequency of violence in pubs and near off-licence stores greatly enables experts to understand the general context of the problem. This is the reason for the increasing interest in the topic throughout the past few decades. The present study focuses mainly on the literature published in English and German in leading journals of criminology since 1980, as well as on the most recent and fundamental publications on the topic, with special regard to results concerning drinking habits, and the relationship between drinking alcohol and violent or criminal behaviour, respectively.

  7. Biodegradability of biodegradable/degradable plastic materials under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohee, R; Unmar, G D; Mudhoo, A; Khadoo, P

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted on two types of plastic materials, Mater-Bi Novamont (MB) and Environmental Product Inc. (EPI), to assess their biodegradability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For aerobic conditions, organic fractions of municipal solid wastes were composted. For the anaerobic process, anaerobic inoculum from a wastewater treatment plant was used. Cellulose filter papers (CFP) were used as a positive control for both mediums. The composting process was monitored in terms of temperature, moisture and volatile solids and the biodegradation of the samples were monitored in terms of mass loss. Monitoring results showed a biodegradation of 27.1% on a dry basis for MB plastic within a period of 72 days of composting. Biodegradability under an anaerobic environment was monitored in terms of biogas production. A cumulative methane gas production of 245 ml was obtained for MB, which showed good degradation as compared to CFP (246.8 ml). However, EPI plastic showed a cumulative methane value of 7.6 ml for a period of 32 days, which was close to the blank (4.0 ml). The EPI plastic did not biodegrade under either condition. The cumulative carbon dioxide evolution after 32 days was as follows: CFP 4.406 cm3, MB 2.198 cm3 and EPI 1.328 cm3. The cumulative level of CO2 varying with time fitted sigmoid type curves with R2 values of 0.996, 0.996 and 0.995 for CFP, MB and EPI, respectively.

  8. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  9. Enhanced biodegradation resistance of biomodified jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suvendu; Saha, Prosenjit; Roy, Debasis; Sen, Ramkrishna; Adhikari, Basudam; Das, Sancharini

    2013-04-01

    A bio-catalyzed process has been developed for treating jute fibers to enhance their tensile strength and resistance against biodegradation. Lipolytic bacteria were used in the process to transesterify jute fibers by replacing hydrophilic hydroxyl groups within cellulose chains with hydrophobic fatty acyl chains. Transesterification of some of the hydroxyl groups within the fiber was confirmed with FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopy, (13)C solid state NMR, gas chromatography and analytical determination of ester content. Biomodified fibers exhibited remarkably smaller affinity to water and moisture and retained 62% of their initial tensile strengths after being exposed to a composting environment over 21 days. The corresponding figure for untreated fibers was only 30%. Efficacy of the process reported herein in terms of tensile strength and biodegradation resistance enhancement of fibers achieved after treatment appears to be comparable with similar chemical processes and better than the enzyme-catalyzed alternatives.

  10. Modeling ready biodegradability of fragrance materials.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, Lidia; Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Boethling, Robert; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, quantitative structure activity relationships were developed for predicting ready biodegradability of approximately 200 heterogeneous fragrance materials. Two classification methods, classification and regression tree (CART) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), were applied to perform the modeling. The models were validated with multiple external prediction sets, and the structural applicability domain was verified by the leverage approach. The best models had good sensitivity (internal ≥80%; external ≥68%), specificity (internal ≥80%; external 73%), and overall accuracy (≥75%). Results from the comparison with BIOWIN global models, based on group contribution method, show that specific models developed in the present study perform better in prediction than BIOWIN6, in particular for the correct classification of not readily biodegradable fragrance materials.

  11. Biodegradable inflatable balloons for tissue separation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Haim-Zada, Moran; Domb, Abraham J

    2016-10-01

    Confining radiation to a specific region (during radiation therapy) minimizes damage to surrounding tissues. Biodegradable inflatable balloons (bio-balloons) were developed. The device protects the normal tissues by increasing the gap between radiation source and critical structures. The radiation fades away while passing through the inflated balloon preventing the surrounding tissues from harmful radiation. These bio-balloons have also found clinical use to treat massive rotator cuff tear. This review summarizes the chemistry, engineering, and clinical development of these biomedical devices. These balloons are made of biodegradable polymers folded into the edge of a trocar and inserted between the tissues to be separated, and inflated by normal saline in the site of the application. The inserted balloon protects the tissues from radiation or mechanical stress. They remain inflated on site for two months and are finally eliminated within 12 months. PMID:27521613

  12. Biodegradable foam plastics based on castor oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Juan; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Hui Wen; Czigány, Tibor

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a simple but effective approach was proposed for preparing biodegradable plastic foams with a high content of castor oil. First of all, castor oil reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleated castor oil (MACO) without the aid of any catalyst. Then plastic foams were synthesized through free radical initiated copolymerization between MACO and diluent monomer styrene. With changes in MACO/St ratio and species of curing initiator, mechanical properties of MACO foams can be easily adjusted. In this way, biofoams with comparable compressive stress at 25% strain as commercial polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared, while the content of castor oil can be as high as 61 wt %. The soil burial tests further proved that the castor oil based foams kept the biodegradability of renewable resources despite the fact that some petrol-based components were introduced. PMID:18163578

  13. Enhanced biodegradation resistance of biomodified jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suvendu; Saha, Prosenjit; Roy, Debasis; Sen, Ramkrishna; Adhikari, Basudam; Das, Sancharini

    2013-04-01

    A bio-catalyzed process has been developed for treating jute fibers to enhance their tensile strength and resistance against biodegradation. Lipolytic bacteria were used in the process to transesterify jute fibers by replacing hydrophilic hydroxyl groups within cellulose chains with hydrophobic fatty acyl chains. Transesterification of some of the hydroxyl groups within the fiber was confirmed with FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopy, (13)C solid state NMR, gas chromatography and analytical determination of ester content. Biomodified fibers exhibited remarkably smaller affinity to water and moisture and retained 62% of their initial tensile strengths after being exposed to a composting environment over 21 days. The corresponding figure for untreated fibers was only 30%. Efficacy of the process reported herein in terms of tensile strength and biodegradation resistance enhancement of fibers achieved after treatment appears to be comparable with similar chemical processes and better than the enzyme-catalyzed alternatives. PMID:23499101

  14. Biodegradable, hydrophobic coatings based on crosslinked polycaprolactone

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.F.

    1993-12-31

    Crosslinked poly(caprolactone) (PCL) has been explored as a hydrophobic and biodegradable coating for hydrophilic substrates. Crosslinking of PCL is known to retard its degradation rate, but does not affect its biodegradability. The cross-linking efficiencies of several organic peroxides have been determined for PCL. This has been accomplished by calculating the crosslink density (M{sub c} from dynamic mechanical data) for a given molar concentration of organic peroxide. Various thicknesses of crosslinked PCL have been coated on several different hydrophilic substrates, including paper, MaterBi (regsign), and PCL/starch composites. The hydrophobicity of the coating has been measured by following the weight gain of the coated samples upon exposure to water and a high relative humidity for various lengths of time. Results show that a coating as thin as 10 {mu}m reduces water absorption of paper by a factor of five, and thicker coatings (0.25 mm) by more than two orders of magnitude.

  15. Biodegradable foam plastics based on castor oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Juan; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Hui Wen; Czigány, Tibor

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a simple but effective approach was proposed for preparing biodegradable plastic foams with a high content of castor oil. First of all, castor oil reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleated castor oil (MACO) without the aid of any catalyst. Then plastic foams were synthesized through free radical initiated copolymerization between MACO and diluent monomer styrene. With changes in MACO/St ratio and species of curing initiator, mechanical properties of MACO foams can be easily adjusted. In this way, biofoams with comparable compressive stress at 25% strain as commercial polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared, while the content of castor oil can be as high as 61 wt %. The soil burial tests further proved that the castor oil based foams kept the biodegradability of renewable resources despite the fact that some petrol-based components were introduced.

  16. Alcohol Expectancies in Young Adult Sons of Alcoholics and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra A.; And Others

    Adolescent offspring of alcoholics have been found to have higher alcohol reinforcement expectancies than do teenagers from nonalcoholic families. In particular, those with a positive family history of alcoholism expect more cognitive and motor enhancement with alcohol consumption. This study examined the alcohol expectancies of 58 matched pairs…

  17. Exposure to Televised Alcohol Ads and Subsequent Adolescent Alcohol Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Alan W.; Zogg, Jennifer B.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Dent, Clyde W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective : To assess the impact of televised alcohol commercials on adolescents' alcohol use. Methods : Adolescents completed questionnaires about alcohol commercials and alcohol use in a prospective study. Results : A one standard deviation increase in viewing television programs containing alcohol commercials in seventh grade was associated…

  18. An assessment of biodegradability of quaternary carbon-containing fragrance compounds: comparison of experimental OECD screening test results and in silico prediction data.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Markus; Boschung, Alain

    2014-05-01

    An assessment of biodegradability was carried out for fragrance substances containing quaternary carbons by using data obtained from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 301F screening tests for ready biodegradation and from Biowin and Catalogic prediction models. Despite an expected challenging profile, a relatively high percentage of common-use fragrance substances showed significant biodegradation under the stringent conditions applied in the OECD 301F test. Among 27 test compounds, 37% met the pass level criteria after 28 d, while another 26% indicated partial breakdown (≥20% biodegradation). For several compounds for which structural analogs were available, the authors found that structures that were rendered less water soluble by either the presence of an acetate ester or the absence of oxygen tended to degrade to a lesser extent compared to the primary alcohols or oxygenated counterparts under the test conditions applied. Difficulties were encountered when attempting to correlate experimental with in silico data. Whereas the Biowin model combinations currently recommended by regulatory agencies did not allow for a reliable discrimination between readily and nonbiodegradable compounds, only a comparably small proportion of the chemicals studied (30% and 63% depending on the model) fell within the applicability domain of Catalogic, a factor that critically reduced its predictive power. According to these results, currently neither Biowin nor Catalogic accurately reflects the potential for biodegradation of fragrance compounds containing quaternary carbons.

  19. Natural biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W W; Rice, D W

    1998-09-23

    There has recently been a growing awareness that natural processes are degrading contaminants of concern, and that the contribution these natural processes make to achieving cleanup goals needs to be formally considered during site-specific cleanup. Historical case data from a large number of releases has been used to evaluate the expectation for natural attenuation to contribute to the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. The use of historical case data has several advantages, among them: 1) sites can reduce characterization costs by sharing information on key hydrogeologic parameters controlling contaminant fate and transport, and 2) standard reference frameworks can be developed that individual sites can use as a basis of comparison regarding plume behavior. Definition of cleanup times must take into account basic constraints imposed by natural laws governing the transport and natural degradation process of petroleum hydrocarbons. The actual time to reach groundwater cleanup goals is determined by these laws and the limitations on residual subsurface contamination attenuation rates, through either active or natural biological processes. These limitations will practically constrain the time to achieve low concentration cleanup goals. Recognition is needed that sites will need to be transitioned to remediation by natural processes at some point following implementation of active remediation options. The results of an analysis of approximately 1800 California and 600 Texas fuel hydrocarbon (FHC) releases and 2.50 chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) plumes will be summarized. Plume lengths and natural biodegradation potential were evaluated. For FHC releases, 90% of benzene groundwater plumes were less than 280 feet in length and evidence of natural biodegradation was found to be present at all sites studied in detail. For CVOC releases, source strength and groundwater flow velocity are dominant factors controlling groundwater plume

  20. Anaerobic biodegradation of surrogate naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Lindsay N; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Surface bitumen extraction from the Alberta's oil sands region generates large settling basins known as tailings ponds. The oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in these ponds contain solid and residual bitumen-associated compounds including naphthenic acids (NAs) that can potentially be biodedgraded by indigenous tailings microorganisms. While the biodegradation of some NAs is known to occur under aerobic conditions, little is understood about anaerobic NA biodegradation even though tailings ponds are mainly anoxic. Here, we investigated the potential for anaerobic NA biodegradation by indigenous tailings microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established from anoxic tailings that were amended with 5 single-ringed surrogate NAs or acid-extractable organics (AEO) from OSPW and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Surrogate NA depletion was observed under all anaerobic conditions tested to varying extents, correlating to losses in the respective electron acceptor (sulfate or nitrate) or the production of predicted products (Fe(II) or methane). Tailings-containing cultures incubated under the different electron-accepting conditions resulted in the enrichment and putative identification of microbial community members that may function in metabolizing surrogate NAs under the various anoxic conditions. In addition, more complex NAs (in the form of AEO) was observed to drive sulfate and iron reduction relative to controls. Overall, this study has shown that simple surrogate NAs can be biodegraded under a variety of anoxic conditions, a key first step in understanding the potential anaerobic metabolism of NAs in oil sands tailings ponds and other industrial wastewaters. PMID:26724449

  1. Polymer blends with biodegradable components and reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Di Landro, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric blends based on ethylene vinyl acetate rubbers filled with high mol. wt. carboxymethyl cellulose were investigated in view of possible employment as biodegradable materials. The effect of vinyl acetate content and of addition of transesterification agent to increase interaction between EVA and cellulosic components was considered. Blends reinforced with cellulose microfibers in different amounts were also characterized in their mechanical, rheological and thermal behavior.

  2. Biodegradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Theresa M; Seech, Alan G; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T

    2005-08-01

    The organochlorine pesticide Lindane is the gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). Technical grade Lindane contains a mixture of HCH isomers which include not only gamma-HCH, but also large amounts of predominantly alpha-, beta- and delta-HCH. The physical properties and persistence of each isomer differ because of the different chlorine atom orientations on each molecule (axial or equatorial). However, all four isomers are considered toxic and recalcitrant worldwide pollutants. Biodegradation of HCH has been studied in soil, slurry and culture media but very little information exists on in situ bioremediation of the different isomers including Lindane itself, at full scale. Several soil microorganisms capable of degrading, and utilizing HCH as a carbon source, have been reported. In selected bacterial strains, the genes encoding the enzymes involved in the initial degradation of Lindane have been cloned, sequenced, expressed and the gene products characterized. HCH is biodegradable under both oxic and anoxic conditions, although mineralization is generally observed only in oxic systems. As is found for most organic compounds, HCH degradation in soil occurs at moderate temperatures and at near neutral pH. HCH biodegradation in soil has been reported at both low and high (saturated) moisture contents. Soil texture and organic matter appear to influence degradation presumably by sorption mechanisms and impact on moisture retention, bacterial growth and pH. Most studies report on the biodegradation of relatively low (< 500 mg/kg) concentrations of HCH in soil. Information on the effects of inorganic nutrients, organic carbon sources or other soil amendments is scattered and inconclusive. More in-depth assessments of amendment effects and evaluation of bioremediation protocols, on a large scale, using soil with high HCH concentrations, are needed.

  3. Behaviour of biodegradable plastics in composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Körner, I; Redemann, K; Stegmann, R

    2005-01-01

    Composting is a preferred treatment strategy for biodegradable plastics (BDPs). In this sense, the collection of BDPs together with organic household wastes is a highly discussed possibility. Under the aspect of the behaviour of BDPs in composting facilities, a telephone survey was carried out with selected composting facility operators. They were interviewed with respect to treated wastes, content of impurities, processes for impurity separation, experiences with biodegradable plastics and assumptions to the behaviour of biodegradable plastics in their facility. Forty percent of the facilities had some experiences with BDPs due to test runs, and also since the occurrence of BDPs in their waste was known. The majority of the operators expressed apprehension regarding an increase of impurities resulting from a combined collection of biowaste and BDPs. In the facilities, measures for the impurity separation from the biowaste were used in common practice - in 33% of the cases, separation of disturbing plastics was done before composting, in 33% after composting, and in 13% before and after composting. The most important separation processes for conventional plastics were sieving and manual sorting. In two cases air classification was also used. When asked about the separation possibility of the conventional but not of the biodegradable plastics in their facilities, the majority of operators were not in a position to comment or they replied that it was not an option. No problems were seen in most cases if the impurity separation follows composting. If impurity separation takes place before composting it was often assumed that the BDPs are mainly separated by sieving. In conclusion, in more than half of the cases, BDPs would not be composted if delivered to a composting facility. Under the actual conditions regarding the collection and the treatment/disposal possibilities, an application of BDPs seems to only be reasonable for clean (i.e., source separated on their own

  4. Tianeptine and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Favre, J D; Guelfi-Sozzi, C; Delalleau, B; Lôo, H

    1997-10-01

    Several arguments are in favour of the use of antidepressant drugs in alcohol-dependent patients, especially those acting on the serotoninergic system: (1) neurochemical data indicate the interaction between alcohol and 5-HT metabolism, (2) pharmacological studies show an improvement in the behaviour of alcoholized animals treated with antidepressants, (3) depression is a frequent disease in alcoholic patients. Tianeptine has been shown to be active in the treatment of depression in patients with history of alcohol abuse or dependence. In a first double-blind study performed versus amitryptiline, depression after withdrawal was improved by tianeptine, and biological abnormalities usually related to chronic alcohol intake tended to decrease. Similar results were found in an open study carried out on 277 alcoholic patients treated for 1 year. As these patients were depressed, no definite conclusion could be drawn from these results in respect of a specific action of tianeptine on alcohol dependence. Thus, a multicentre double-blind study has been performed which compared tianeptine (12.5 mg t.i.d) and placebo in 342 non-depressed patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for Psychoactive Substance Dependence (alcohol). Other inclusion criteria were: daily alcohol intake higher than 80 g, minimum score of 3 on the Short-Mast Questionnaire, mean corpuscular volume above 98 fl and/or gamma Gt more than twice the upper limit of normal. The patients were treated for 9 months. The intention-to-treat population and the per protocol population were made up of 327 patients and 111 patients, respectively. The main efficacy criterion was the absence of alcoholic relapse (abstinence) defined by the patient's statements, the investigators clinical judgement and some biological parameters: alcohol blood levels, gamma Gt levels. Secondary criteria were the evolution of the alcohol consumption in the patients who relapsed, cumulative abstinence duration, a visual analogue scale for the

  5. Biodegradation potential of a modified natural product

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, W.

    1996-12-31

    Biodegradation potential of a modified natural product for treating petroleum contaminated soils was investigated along with some commercially available microbial cultures in three different scales from a laboratory to pilot to case studies. The modified natural product is lignocellulosic in nature and proprietary product of a company in Iowa. The production process of this product involves mechanical size reduction, blending/coating, and aerobic digestion of hay, corn cob residue, straw or crop residue in presence of poultry manure. The degradation kinetics of the petroleum products in the contaminated soils were measured both directly and indirectly. Residual petroleum products in different soils (treated and untreated) at various time periods were quantified by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis on extracted samples. The indirect assessment of the kinetics of biological activity involved the measurement of CO{sub 2} evolved from flasks (250 ml capacity) containing contaminated soil (about 50 ml) with various treatments. The results indicated that the biodegradation kinetics of petroleum products in the contaminated soils were significantly improved by treatment with this modified natural product. In most cases tested, this product performed significantly better than the available commercial bacterial cultures for biological removal of petroleum products from contaminated soils. This study also demonstrated the significance of temperature and moisture content in biodegradation kinetics.

  6. Transport and biodegradation of perchlorate in soils.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Deborah K; Rolston, Dennis E; Scow, Kate M

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground water and surface water is a widespread problem, particularly in the western United States. This study examined the effect of biodegradation on perchlorate fate and transport in soils. Solute transport experiments were conducted on two surface soils. Pulses of solution containing perchlorate and Br- were applied to saturated soil columns at steady state water flow. Perchlorate behaved like a nonreactive tracer in Columbia loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Oxyaquic Xerofluvent) but was degraded in Yolo loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Mollic Xerofluvent). Batch experiments demonstrated that perchlorate removal from solution in Yolo loam was caused by biodegradation. Other batch experiments with Yolo loam surface and subsurface soils, Columbia loam surface soil, and dredge tailings demonstrated that perchlorate biodegradation required anaerobic conditions, an adequate carbon source, and an active perchlorate-degrading microbial population. The sequential reduction of perchlorate and NO3- by an indigenous soil microbial community in Yolo loam batch systems was also studied. Nitrate reduction occurred much sooner than perchlorate reduction in soils that had not been previously exposed to perchlorate, but NO3- and perchlorate were simultaneously reduced in soils previously exposed to perchlorate. The results of this study have implications for in situ remediation schemes and for agricultural soils that have been contaminated by perchlorate-tainted irrigation water. PMID:12549540

  7. Systematic approach for modeling tetrachloroethene biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, D.M.

    1998-11-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) is a reasonably well understood process. Specific organisms capable of using PCE as an electron acceptor for growth require the addition of an electron donor to remove PCE from contaminated ground waters. However, competition from other anaerobic microorganisms for added electron donor will influence the rate and completeness of PCE degradation. The approach developed here allows for the explicit modeling of PCE and byproduct biodegradation as a function of electron donor and byproduct concentrations, and the microbiological ecology of the system. The approach is general and can be easily modified for ready use with in situ ground-water models or ex situ reactor models. Simulations conducted with models developed from this approach show the sensitivity of PCE biodegradation to input parameter values, in particular initial biomass concentrations. Additionally, the dechlorination rate will be strongly influenced by the microbial ecology of the system. Finally, comparison with experimental acclimation results indicates that existing kinetic constants may not be generally applicable. Better techniques for measuring the biomass of specific organisms groups in mixed systems are required.

  8. Bacterial production of the biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Urtuvia, Viviana; Villegas, Pamela; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Petroleum-based plastics constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is of increasing interest. Microbial polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics. Life cycle assessment indicates that PHB is more beneficial than petroleum-based plastics. In this report, bacterial production of PHAs and their industrial applications are reviewed and the synthesis of PHAs in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 is described. PHAs are synthesized by a large number of microorganisms during unbalanced nutritional conditions. These polymers are accumulated as carbon and energy reserve in discrete granules in the bacterial cytoplasm. 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two main PHA units among 150 monomers that have been reported. B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the degradation of polychlorobiphenyls and a wide range of aromatic compounds. A bioinformatic analysis of LB400 genome indicated the presence of pha genes encoding enzymes of pathways for PHA synthesis. This study showed that B. xenovorans LB400 synthesize PHAs under nutrient limitation. Staining with Sudan Black B indicated the production of PHAs by B. xenovorans LB400 colonies. The PHAs produced were characterized by GC-MS. Diverse substrates for the production of PHAs in strain LB400 were analyzed.

  9. [Alcohol and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Maillot, F; Farad, S; Lamisse, F

    2001-11-01

    Alcoholism and alcohol-associated organ injury is one of the major health problems worldwide. Alcohol may lead to an alteration in intermediary metabolism and the relation between alcohol intake and body weight is a paradox. The effect of alcohol intake on resting metabolic rate, assessed by indirect calorimetry, and lipid oxidation, is still controversial. Small quantities of ethanol seem to have no effect on body weight. Ingestion of moderate amounts may lead to an increase in body weight, via a lipid-oxidizing suppressive effect. Chronic intake of excessive amounts in alcoholics leads to a decrease in body weight, probably via increased lipid oxidation and energy expenditure. Chronic ethanol abuse alters lipid-soluble (vitamins A, D and E) and water-soluble (B-complex vitamins, vitamin C) vitamins status, and some trace elements status such as magnesium, selenium or zinc.

  10. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Torok, Natalie J

    2015-11-02

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%-50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies.

  11. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  12. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  13. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  14. High barrier multilayer packaging by the coextrusion method: The effect of nanocomposites and biodegradable polymers on flexible film properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellen, Christopher T.

    The objective of this research was to investigate the use of nanocomposite and multilayer co-extrusion technologies for the development of high gas barrier packaging that is more environmentally friendly than many current packaging system. Co-extruded bio-based and biodegradable polymers that could be composted in a municipal landfill were one direction that this research was aimed. Down-gauging of high performance barrier films using nanocomposite technology and co-extrusion was also investigated in order to reduce the amount of solid waste being generated by the packaging. Although the research is focused on military ration packaging, the technologies could easily be introduced into the commercial flexible packaging market. Multilayer packaging consisting of poly(m-xylylene adipamide) nanocomposite layers along with adhesive and tie layers was co-extruded using both laboratory and pilot-scale film extrusion equipment. Co-extrusion of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) along with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and tie layers was also accomplished using similar co-extrusion technology. All multilayer films were characterized for gas barrier, mechanical, and thermal properties. The biodegradability of the PVOH and PHA materials in a marine environment was also investigated. The research has shown that co-extrusion of these materials is possible at a research and pilot level. The use of nanocomposite poly(m-xylylene adipamide) was effective in down-gauging the un-filled barrier film to thinner structures. Bio-based PHA/PVOH films required the use of a malefic anhydride grafted PHA tie layer to improve layer to layer adhesion in the structure to avoid delamination. The PHA polymer demonstrated a high rate of biodegradability/mineralization in the marine environment while the rate of biodegradation of the PVOH polymer was slower.

  15. Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs, and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are fetal alcohol spectrum disorders? • What is fetal alcohol syndrome? • What amounts of alcohol can cause FAS? • Is ... disabilities that can last a lifetime. What is fetal alcohol syndrome? Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most severe ...

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  17. Affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related mortality in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse has numerous adverse health and social consequences. The consumer response to changes in alcohol affordability is an important issue on alcohol policy debates. Studies from many countries have shown an inverse relationship between alcohol prices and alcohol consumption in the population. There are, however, suggestions that increasing the price of alcohol by rising taxes may have limited effect on alcohol-related problems, associated with long-term heavy drinking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between alcohol affordability and alcohol-related mortality rates in post-Soviet Belarus. For this purpose trends in alcohol-related mortality rates (mortality from liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, alcoholism and alcohol psychoses) and affordability of vodka between 1990 and 2010 were compared. The time series analysis revealed that 1% increase in vodka affordability is associated with an increase in liver cirrhosis mortality of 0,77%, an increase in pancreatitis mortality of 0.53%, an increase in mortality from alcoholism and alcohol psychoses of 0,70%. The major conclusion emerging from this study is that affordability of alcohol is one of the most important predictor of alcohol-related problems in a population. These findings provide additional evidence that decreasing in affordability of alcohol is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

  18. [Alcohol and criminal behavior].

    PubMed

    Arzt, G

    1990-05-01

    The topic 'alcohol and crime' has several aspects. This article shows how drug administration is based on a complex network of legal provisions and is enforced by criminal law sanctions. As to crimes influenced by alcohol, drunken driving is by far the most important and best researched field. Next, the article turns to the role of alcohol with regard to severe common crimes such as murder or child abuse. Finally, the issue of drunkenness as a defence is raised and the treatment of alcoholics as a criminal law sanction discussed.

  19. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used “over the counter” sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to understand how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models, and a combination of multi-disciplinary experimental methodologies to examine and understand anatomical and cellular substrates mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure on sleep-wakefulness. The results of our studies suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol’s action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Lesions of the BF cholinergic neurons or blockade of AD A1 receptors results in attenuation of alcohol-induced sleep promotion, suggesting that AD and BF cholinergic neurons are critical for sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern

  20. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones ...

  1. Microwave alcohol fuel sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, K.; Endo, A.; Morozumi, H.; Shibata, T.

    1984-06-05

    A microwave alcohol fuel sensor comprises a microwave oscillator, a microwave receiver, and a microwave transmission circuit connected to the oscillator and the receiver. The microwave transmission circuit comprises a dielectric substrate and, a strip line mounted on the substrate so that microwaves leak from the substrate to an alcohol gasoline fuel, and the microwaves attenuate by alcohol dielectric loss, whereby output voltage from the receiver corresponds to alcohol content rate. The dielectric substrate is formed tubular so that a constant amount of the fuel is fed the sensor.

  2. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs.

    PubMed

    Marin, Edgar; Briceño, Maria Isabel; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2013-01-01

    Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, flexibility, and minimal side effects. Applications of these materials include creation of skin, blood vessels, cartilage scaffolds, and nanosystems for drug delivery. These biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles enhance properties such as bioavailability and stability, and provide controlled release of bioactive compounds. This review evaluates the classification, synthesis, degradation mechanisms, and biological applications of the biodegradable polymers currently being studied as drug delivery carriers. In addition, the use of nanosystems to solve current drug delivery problems are reviewed.

  3. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Edgar; Briceño, Maria Isabel; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2013-01-01

    Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, flexibility, and minimal side effects. Applications of these materials include creation of skin, blood vessels, cartilage scaffolds, and nanosystems for drug delivery. These biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles enhance properties such as bioavailability and stability, and provide controlled release of bioactive compounds. This review evaluates the classification, synthesis, degradation mechanisms, and biological applications of the biodegradable polymers currently being studied as drug delivery carriers. In addition, the use of nanosystems to solve current drug delivery problems are reviewed. PMID:23990720

  4. Prenatal alcohol consumption and knowledge about alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oksoo; Park, Kyungil

    2011-09-01

    The study investigated prenatal alcohol consumption and knowledge of alcohol risks and fetal alcohol syndrome among Korean women. The participants were 221 Korean women who attended the post-partum care centers in Seoul, Korea. The data included the participants' background characteristics, quantity-frequency typology, Student Alcohol Questionnaire, and a scale on the participants' knowledge of fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcohol was consumed during pregnancy by 12.7% of the participants. Of these, 60.7% drank alcohol with their spouse. A few participants reported that nurses identified their drinking habits and gave them information on alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome. Most of the participants did not have the opportunity for prenatal counseling about fetal alcohol syndrome. The knowledge level regarding alcohol risks and fetal alcohol syndrome among the participants was poor. Alcohol consumption before pregnancy was significantly related to prenatal alcohol consumption. Prenatal alcohol consumption was not related to knowledge about alcohol consumption and fetal alcohol syndrome. The assessment of alcohol consumption and counseling about alcohol are needed for pregnant women in order to prevent fetal alcohol syndrome.

  5. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  6. Alcoholism: A Developmental Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarter, Ralph E.; Vanyukov, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism etiology is discussed from developmental behavior genetic perspective. Temperament features that appear to be associated with heightened risk for alcoholism are examined. Their interactions with the environment during course of development are considered within epigenetic framework and, as discussed, have ramifications for improving…

  7. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy.

  8. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy. PMID:25307570

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  10. Cardiovascular effects of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, D M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of alcohol on the heart include modification of the risk of coronary artery disease, the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, exacerbation of conduction disorders, atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias, and an increased risk of hypertension, hemorrhagic stroke, infectious endocarditis, and fetal heart abnormalities. PMID:2686174

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  12. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  13. Alcohol and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Ruth; And Others

    Prepared in response to a request from members of the United Methodist Church, this guide can be used with high school students generally, if the theological orientation is recognized. The guide provides opportunities, in four lesson outlines, to share experiences concerning alcohol use, to present information regarding the effect of alcohol on…

  14. Enhanced biodegradation of iopromide and trimethoprim in nitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Batt, Angela L; Kim, Sungpyo; Aga, Diana S

    2006-12-01

    Iopromide (an X-ray contrast agent) and trimethoprim (an antibacterial drug) are frequently detected pharmaceuticals in effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and in surface waters due to their persistence and high usage. Laboratory-scale experiments showed that a significantly higher removal rate in nitrifying activated sludge as compared to conventional activated sludge was observed for both iopromide and trimethoprim. When the activity of the nitrifying bacteria was inhibited, the percent removal of iopromide decreased from 97 to 86% while trimethoprim removal decreased from 70 to 25%. The metabolite of iopromide identified when nitrification was not inhibited was a dehydroxylated iopromide at the two side chains. However, when the nitrifying bacteria were inhibited the metabolite identified was a carboxylate, formed during the oxidation of the primary alcohol on the side chain of iopromide. These results suggest that the nitrifying bacteria are important in the observed biodegradation of iopromide in the activated sludge with higher solid retention time (SRT). Results from the laboratory-scale study were corroborated by the observed removal efficiencies in a full-scale municipal WWTP, which showed that iopromide (ranging from 0.10 to 0.27 microg/L) and trimethoprim (ranging from 0.0.08 to 0.53 microg/L) were removed more effectively in the nitrifying activate sludge which has a higher SRT (49 days) than in the conventional activated sludge (SRT of 6 days). In nitrifying activated sludge, the percent removal of iopromide in the WWTP reached 61%, while in conventional activated sludge, average removal was negligible. For trimethoprim, removal was limited to about 1% in the conventional activated sludge, while in the nitrifying activated sludge, the removal was increased to 50%.

  15. [Alcohol and working].

    PubMed

    Mangili, A

    2004-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on both health and productivity, alcohol misuse is a serious concern in the workplace. Some occupations (e.g. employees of the catering and hotel trade, seamen, sales representatives, brewers and distillers, journalists, physicians, lawyers) are associated with a high rate of alcohol abuse. Alcohol intake can modify worker's behaviour (impaired judgement and vigilance, dulled reflexes) causing reduced performance, mistakes during operating procedures, accidents and injuries. Moreover it can affect the toxicokinetic and toxicodinamic properties of several substances in the workplace, inducing a more complex evaluation of exposure assessment and diagnostic procedures of occupational diseases. The occupational physician, during health surveillance program, can face several alcohol related issues. These entail diagnostic evaluation of alcoholism, job fitness evaluation, in heavy drinkers, advise of rehabilitation and health promotion program.

  16. Phytotherapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Michał; Zovko-Koncić, Marijana; Chrostek, Lech

    2012-02-01

    Alcoholism is a medical, social, and economic problem where treatment methods mostly include difficult and long-lasting psychotherapy and, in some cases, quite controversial pharmacological approaches. A number of medicinal plants and pure natural compounds are reported to have preventive and therapeutic effects on alcoholism and alcohol dependency, but their constituents, efficacy and mechanism of action are mostly unknown so far. Recently, kudzu [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi], St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.), danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.), ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.), Japanese raisin tree (Hovenia dulcis Thunb.), ibogaine (Tabernanthe iboga H. Bn.), evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.), prickly pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill.), purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), fenugreek seed (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and many others drew the attention of researchers. Can, therefore, drugs of natural origin be helpful in the treatment of alcoholism or in decreasing alcohol consumption? PMID:22474979

  17. Alcohol and sex.

    PubMed

    Vijayasenan, M E

    1981-01-14

    Diminished sexual functioning among individuals dependent upon alcohol has been assessed. Ninety-seven male patients entered the study, all inpatients as the unit for treatment of alcoholism and drug addiction (Villa 6) in Porirua Hospital, Porirua. The sexual ability of these patients before the development of alcoholism was also rated for the same items and this rating was used as a control. Of the 97 patients, 69 (71 percent) suffered from sexual dysfunction for a period more than 12 months prior to admission to hospital. The disturbances noted were diminished sexual desire (58 percent of patients), erectile impotence (16 percent), premature ejaculation (4 percent), ejaculatory in competence (22 percent). A high proportion of the alcoholics showed signs of sexual deviation-19 percent having performed sexual crimes and a further 28 percent having repeated thought of sexual crimes. The possible causes of alcohol induced sexual dysfunction are discussed.

  18. Isomer-specific biodegradation of nonylphenol in an activated sludge bioreactor and structure-biodegradability relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Reif, Rubén; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), one of the priority hazardous substances, is in fact a mixture of numerous isomers. It is inconclusive whether or not biodegradation during wastewater treatment process is isomer-specific, leading to the environmental release of NP in different isomer profiles. In this study, we evaluated the isomer selectivity of 19 NP isomers in a laboratory-scale continuous flow conventional activated sludge bioreactor under various operational conditions. The removal efficiency of NP isomers ranged from 90 to 99%, depending on the operational conditions and isomer structures. Isomer selective biodegradation resulted in the increase of composition of recalcitrant isomers, such as, NP₁₉₃a/b, NP₁₁₀a and NP₁₉₄ in the effluent. Moreover, biodegradability was related to the bulkiness of α-substituents and followed α-dimethyl > α-ethyl-α-methyl > α-methyl-α-n-propyl > α-iso-propyl-α-methyl. Steric effect index, a quantitative descriptor of steric hindrance, was linearly correlated with residues of NP isomers in the effluent (R² = 0.76). Decrease of temperature to 10 °C decreased the overall biodegradability and also enhanced the relative enrichment of recalcitrant isomers. These findings suggest that isomer compositions of NP entering the environment may be different from those in technical mixtures and that isomeric selectivity should be taken into account to better understand the occurrence, fate, and ecological risks of NP.

  19. Heterostereocomplexation between biodegradable and optically active polyesters as a versatile preparation method for biodegradable materials.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hideto; Yamamoto, Satomi; Okumura, Ayaka; Sugiura, Yu

    2010-01-11

    The thermal properties and crystallization of biodegradable and optically active poly[(S)-2-hydroxybutyrate] [P(S-2HB)], poly(l-lactide) (PLLA), poly(d-lactide) (PDLA) and their blends were investigated. The results of differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and polarized optical microscopy first indicated heterostereocomplexation between biodegradable and optically active polyesters having different chemical structures and opposite configurations, that is, P(S-2HB) and PDLA. The melting temperature of the heterostereocomplex was higher than those of pure polymers. Such cocrystallization was not observed for P(S-2HB)/PLLA blends having identical configurations. The WAXS profile of P(S-2HB)/PDLA heterostereocomplex was very similar to those of the PLLA/PDLA and P(S-2HB)/P(R-2HB) homostereocomplexes and each crystalline diffraction peak of the heterostereocomplex was located between those of the homostereocomplexes. The present study strongly suggests that heterostereocomplexation will provide a novel versatile method for preparing biodegradable polyester materials with a wide range of physical properties and biodegradability.

  20. Isomer-specific biodegradation of nonylphenol in an activated sludge bioreactor and structure-biodegradability relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Reif, Rubén; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), one of the priority hazardous substances, is in fact a mixture of numerous isomers. It is inconclusive whether or not biodegradation during wastewater treatment process is isomer-specific, leading to the environmental release of NP in different isomer profiles. In this study, we evaluated the isomer selectivity of 19 NP isomers in a laboratory-scale continuous flow conventional activated sludge bioreactor under various operational conditions. The removal efficiency of NP isomers ranged from 90 to 99%, depending on the operational conditions and isomer structures. Isomer selective biodegradation resulted in the increase of composition of recalcitrant isomers, such as, NP₁₉₃a/b, NP₁₁₀a and NP₁₉₄ in the effluent. Moreover, biodegradability was related to the bulkiness of α-substituents and followed α-dimethyl > α-ethyl-α-methyl > α-methyl-α-n-propyl > α-iso-propyl-α-methyl. Steric effect index, a quantitative descriptor of steric hindrance, was linearly correlated with residues of NP isomers in the effluent (R² = 0.76). Decrease of temperature to 10 °C decreased the overall biodegradability and also enhanced the relative enrichment of recalcitrant isomers. These findings suggest that isomer compositions of NP entering the environment may be different from those in technical mixtures and that isomeric selectivity should be taken into account to better understand the occurrence, fate, and ecological risks of NP. PMID:25462736

  1. Development of aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhang, Yi; Gautam, Santosh; Liu, Li; Dey, Jagannath; Chen, Wei; Mason, Ralph P.; Serrano, Carlos A.; Schug, Kevin A.; Tang, Liping

    2009-01-01

    None of the current biodegradable polymers can function as both implant materials and fluorescent imaging probes. The objective of this study was to develop aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (BPLPs) and their associated cross-linked variants (CBPLPs) for biomedical applications. BPLPs are degradable oligomers synthesized from biocompatible monomers including citric acid, aliphatic diols, and various amino acids via a convenient and cost-effective polycondensation reaction. BPLPs can be further cross-linked into elastomeric cross-linked polymers, CBPLPs. We have shown representatively that BPLP-cysteine (BPLP-Cys) and BPLP-serine (BPLP-Ser) offer advantages over the traditional fluorescent organic dyes and quantum dots because of their preliminarily demonstrated cytocompatibility in vitro, minimal chronic inflammatory responses in vivo, controlled degradability and high quantum yields (up to 62.33%), tunable fluorescence emission (up to 725 nm), and photostability. The tensile strength of CBPLP-Cys film ranged from 3.25 ± 0.13 MPa to 6.5 ± 0.8 MPa and the initial Modulus was in a range of 3.34 ± 0.15 MPa to 7.02 ± 1.40 MPa. Elastic CBPLP-Cys could be elongated up to 240 ± 36%. The compressive modulus of BPLP-Cys (0.6) (1:1:0.6 OD:CA:Cys) porous scaffold was 39.60 ± 5.90 KPa confirming the soft nature of the scaffolds. BPLPs also possess great processability for micro/nano-fabrication. We demonstrate the feasibility of using BPLP-Ser nanoparticles (“biodegradable quantum dots”) for in vitro cellular labeling and noninvasive in vivo imaging of tissue engineering scaffolds. The development of BPLPs and CBPLPs represents a new direction in developing fluorescent biomaterials and could impact tissue engineering, drug delivery, bioimaging. PMID:19506254

  2. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking.

  3. Biodegradable Long-Circulating Polymeric Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gref, Ruxandra; Minamitake, Yoshiharu; Peracchia, Maria Teresa; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Torchilin, Vladimir; Langer, Robert

    1994-03-01

    Injectable nanoparticulate carriers have important potential applications such as site-specific drug delivery or medical imaging. Conventional carriers, however, cannot generally be used because they are eliminated by the reticulo-endothelial system within seconds or minutes after intravenous injection. To address these limitations, monodisperse biodegradable nanospheres were developed from amphiphilic copolymers composed of two biocompatible blocks. The nanospheres exhibited dramatically increased blood circulation times and reduced liver accumulation in mice. Furthermore, they entrapped up to 45 percent by weight of the drug in the dense core in a one-step procedure and could be freeze-dried and easily redispersed without additives in aqueous solutions.

  4. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano-oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  5. Biosynthesis and biodegradation of wood components

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, T.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook containing 22 chapters by various authors covers the structure of wood, the localization of polysaccharides and lignins in wood cell walls, metabolism and synthetic function of cambial tissue, cell organelles and their function in the biosynthesis of cell wall components, biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides, lignin, cutin, suberin and associated waxes, phenolic acids and monolignols, quinones, flavonoids, tannins, stilbenes and terpenoid wood extractives, the occurrence of extractives, the metabolism of phenolic acids, wood degradation by micro-organisms and fungi, and biodegradation of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, and aromatic extractives of wood. An index is included.

  6. Biodegradable long-circulating polymeric nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Gref, R; Minamitake, Y; Peracchia, M T; Trubetskoy, V; Torchilin, V; Langer, R

    1994-03-18

    Injectable nanoparticulate carriers have important potential applications such as site-specific drug delivery or medical imaging. Conventional carriers, however, cannot generally be used because they are eliminated by the reticulo-endothelial system within seconds or minutes after intravenous injection. To address these limitations, monodisperse biodegradable nanospheres were developed from amphiphilic copolymers composed of two biocompatible blocks. The nanospheres exhibited dramatically increased blood circulation times and reduced liver accumulation in mice. Furthermore, they entrapped up to 45 percent by weight of the drug in the dense core in a one-step procedure and could be freeze-dried and easily redispersed without additives in aqueous solutions.

  7. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  8. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano‐oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  9. 76 FR 44599 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review..., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, National Institutes...

  10. 75 FR 63494 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Special Emphasis..., Extramural Project Review Branch, EPRB, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism,...

  11. 76 FR 78014 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

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  12. 76 FR 26308 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

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  13. 75 FR 57473 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

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  14. 75 FR 10291 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Initial Review..., MBA, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Office...

  15. 77 FR 22794 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

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  16. 76 FR 77841 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

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  17. 75 FR 38533 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Special Emphasis... Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Office of Extramural Activities, Extramural Project Officer, 5635...

  18. 77 FR 70171 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review... Review Officer, National Institute ] on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health,...

  19. 75 FR 10808 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

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  20. 77 FR 22794 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism...

  1. 78 FR 42529 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review....D., Scientific Review Administrator, National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism,...

  2. 78 FR 42530 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Initial Review..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism,...

  3. Alcohol Alert: Link Between Stress and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... people continue to try and deal with its effects by drinking alcohol. Instead of “calming your nerves,” long-term, heavy ... pleasure” systems. Researchers believe this may contribute to alcohol’s reinforcing effects, motivating the drinker to consume higher levels of ...

  4. KINETICS OF ETHANOL BIODEGRADATION UNDER METHANOGENIC CONDITIONS IN GASOLINE SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that biodegradation of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by mi...

  5. SCREENING OF BACTERIAL PRODUCTS FOR THEIR CRUDE OIL BIODEGRADATION EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although petroleum hydrocarbons have been known to be biodegradable for decades (1-5), use of microbial cultures to enhance natural biodegradation (bioaugmentation) has met with limited success (6-10). Despite the paucity of controlled field studies demonstrating the effectivene...

  6. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in the Vadose Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are two major impediments to a better understanding of the influence of biodegradation on the risk of intrusion of petroleum vapors. We describe the contribution of biodegradation as an attenuation factor between the source and the receptor. The use of attenuation factors...

  7. A Sensitive and Biodegradable Pressure Sensor Array for Cardiovascular Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clementine M; Nguyen, Amanda; Lawal, Qudus Omotayo; Chortos, Alex; Rondeau-Gagné, Simon; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-11-18

    An array of highly sensitive pressure sensors entirely made of biodegradable materials is presented, designed as a single-use flexible patch for application in cardiovascular monitoring. The high sensitivity in combination with fast response time is unprecedented when compared to recent reports on biodegradable pressure sensors (sensitivity three orders of magnitude higher), as illustrated by pulse wave velocity measurements, toward hypertension detection.

  8. Kraft lignin biodegradation by Novosphingobium sp. B-7 and analysis of the degradation process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuehui; Chai, Liyuan; Tang, Chongjian; Yang, Zhihui; Zheng, Yu; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Huan

    2012-11-01

    This study focused on the biodegradation of kraft lignin (KL) by Novosphingobium sp. B-7 using KL as sole carbon source. Results revealed that Novosphingobium sp. B-7 reduced the chemical oxygen demand (COD) by 34.7% in KL mineral salt medium after 7days of incubation. Additionally, the maximum activities of manganese peroxidase (MnP) of 3229.8Ul(-1) and laccase (Lac) of 1275Ul(-1) were observed at 4th and 5th day, respectively. GC-MS analysis indicated that after incubated with Novosphingobium sp. B-7, low molecular weight alcohols and lignin-related monomer compounds such as ethanediol, p-hydroxy benzoic acid and vanillic acid were formed in the system, which strongly confirmed the degradation of KL by Novosphingobium sp. B-7. PMID:22921251

  9. Assessment of the aquatic and terrestrial toxicity of five biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Arfsten, Darryl P; Burton, Dennis T; Fisher, Daniel J; Callahan, John; Wilson, Cody L; Still, Kenneth R; Spargo, Barry J

    2004-02-01

    Radiofrequency countermeasures (i.e., chaff) may be released by fighter jets during tactical countermeasures training. Chaff cartridges, pistons, and endcaps (i.e., chaff dispenser materials), all currently made of styrene, are also released into the environment. Accumulation of chaff dispenser materials in the environment is a concern of the Department of Defense. The US Navy is exploring the possibility of constructing degradable chaff dispenser components made of biodegradable polymers. Five polymers are being considered. Degradability and toxicity tests are two of several criteria being used to evaluate various available biodegradable options. Dissolution products from four of five polymers being considered were toxic to aquatic organisms with LC50s/LOELs ranging between 1.24 and 731.30 mg total organic concentration/L. Supernatant from dissolving a 90:10 polyester amide/polyvinyl alcohol copolymer in water for 24h inhibited shoot growth of Brassica rappa and Lepidium sativum. Since our results were obtained using fractions of saturated degradable polymer solutions (1 or 10 g/L), we conclude that the tested degradable polymers were of low toxicity to the seven aquatic organisms and two terrestrial plant species used in our assays. However, our characterization of the toxicity of these degradable polymers may not be applicable to all species or environmental situations. Information gained from these studies will be used for making decisions on which polymers should be used in the engineering of environmentally friendly chaff dispenser cartridges, pistons, and endcaps. PMID:14757383

  10. Development and physical characterization of chloramphenicol loaded biodegradable nanoparticles for prolonged release.

    PubMed

    Mandal, B; Halder, K K; Dey, S K; Bhoumik, M; Debnath, M C; Ghosh, L K

    2009-07-01

    The objectives of our study were to prepare a biodegradable nanoparticulate system of chloramphenicol (CHL) and to evaluate its ability to prolong in vitro release of CHL compared to free drug suspension (FDS). CHL-loaded polylactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles (CHL-PLGA-NPs) were prepared by an emulsion/solvent evaporation method using ethyl acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. CHL-PLGA-NPs were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, infrared spectra, drug entrapment efficiency and in vitro release kinetics measurement. Sonication was done with an ultrasound pulse sonicator at 70 W, 30 kHz for 60 s to produce stable NPs of mean size range from 277 nm to 433 nm. Drug to polymer ratio (D:P) was selected as formulation variable and significantly influenced entrapment efficiency (approximately 30% to 66%) and release (p < 0.05). Entrapment of CHL in biodegradable NPs significantly prolonged drug release compared to FDS and thus implies potential antibiotic delivery system for ocular application.

  11. Assessment of the aquatic and terrestrial toxicity of five biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Arfsten, Darryl P; Burton, Dennis T; Fisher, Daniel J; Callahan, John; Wilson, Cody L; Still, Kenneth R; Spargo, Barry J

    2004-02-01

    Radiofrequency countermeasures (i.e., chaff) may be released by fighter jets during tactical countermeasures training. Chaff cartridges, pistons, and endcaps (i.e., chaff dispenser materials), all currently made of styrene, are also released into the environment. Accumulation of chaff dispenser materials in the environment is a concern of the Department of Defense. The US Navy is exploring the possibility of constructing degradable chaff dispenser components made of biodegradable polymers. Five polymers are being considered. Degradability and toxicity tests are two of several criteria being used to evaluate various available biodegradable options. Dissolution products from four of five polymers being considered were toxic to aquatic organisms with LC50s/LOELs ranging between 1.24 and 731.30 mg total organic concentration/L. Supernatant from dissolving a 90:10 polyester amide/polyvinyl alcohol copolymer in water for 24h inhibited shoot growth of Brassica rappa and Lepidium sativum. Since our results were obtained using fractions of saturated degradable polymer solutions (1 or 10 g/L), we conclude that the tested degradable polymers were of low toxicity to the seven aquatic organisms and two terrestrial plant species used in our assays. However, our characterization of the toxicity of these degradable polymers may not be applicable to all species or environmental situations. Information gained from these studies will be used for making decisions on which polymers should be used in the engineering of environmentally friendly chaff dispenser cartridges, pistons, and endcaps.

  12. Polymeric cryogels are biocompatible, and their biodegradation is independent of oxidative radicals.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-10-01

    Biocompatibility and in vivo degradation are two important characteristics of cell scaffolds. We evaluated these properties for four different polymeric macroporous cryogels, polyvinylcaprolactam, polyvinyl alcohol-alginate-bioactive glass composite, polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate-gelatin (pHEMA-gelatin), and chitosan-agarose-gelatin in mice. All the cryogels were synthesized at subzero temperature and were implanted subcutaneously in C57Bl/10.Q inbred mice. Both local and systemic toxicities were negligible as determined by serum tumor necrosis factor α analysis and histology of surrounding tissues nearby the implants. Complete integration of cryogels into the surrounding tissues with neovascular formation was evident in all the mice. At the implantation site, massive infiltration of macrophages and few dendritic cells were observed but neutrophils and mast cells were clearly absent. Macrophage infiltrations were observed even inside the pores of cryogel implants. To ascertain whether oxidative radicals are involved in the cryogel degradation, we implanted these gels in mice deficient for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rapid gel degradation was observed in the absence of ROS, and there was no significant difference in the biodegradation of these cryogels between ROS sufficient and deficient mice thereby excluding any major role for ROS in this process. Thus, we demonstrate the biocompatibility and ROS-independent biodegradable properties of cryogels that could be useful for tissue-specific tissue engineering applications.

  13. Biodegradation pathway and detoxification of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Enayatizamir, Naeimeh; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana; Yakhchali, Bagher; Alikhani, Hossein A; Mohammadi, Leila

    2011-11-01

    The in vivo biodegradation of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium immobilised on cubes of nylon sponge and on sunflower-seed shells (SS) in laboratory-scale bioreactors was investigated. The SS cultivation led to the best results with a decolouration percentage of 90.3% in 72 h for an initial RB5 concentration of 100 mg/L. It was found that the addition of 0.4 mM veratryl alcohol (VA) into the medium considerably increased the decolouration rate in SS cultivation. However, the addition of VA had no effect in the nylon cultivation. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed that RB5 was transformed into one metabolite after 24 h. UV-vis spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) also confirmed the biodegradation of RB5. Toxicity of RB5 solutions before and after fungal treatment was assayed using Sinorhizobium meliloti as a sensitive soil microorganism. P. chrysosporium transformed the toxic dye RB5 into a non-toxic product.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of highly-magnetic biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanospheres.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Kaminski, M. D.; Chen, H.; Torno, M.; Taylor, L.; Rosengart, A. J.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-05-14

    The objective of this study was to develop high magnetization, biodegradable/biocompatible polymer-coated magnetic nanospheres for biomedical applications. Magnetic spheres were prepared by a modified single oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method utilizing highly-concentrated hydrophobic magnetite and poly(d,l lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Hydrophobic magnetite prepared using oleic acid exhibited high magnetite concentrations (84 wt.%) and good miscibility with biopolymer solvents to form a stable oily suspension. The oily suspension was then emulsified within an aqueous solution containing poly(vinyl alcohol). After rapid evaporation of the organic solvent, we obtained solid magnetic nanospheres. We characterized these spheres in terms of external morphology, microstructure, size and zeta potential, magnetite content and distribution within the nanospheres, and magnetic properties. The results showed good encapsulation where the magnetite distorted the smooth surface morphology only at the highest magnetite concentrations. The mean diameter was 360-370 nm with polydispersity indices of 0.12-0.20. We obtained high magnetite content (40-60%) and high magnetization (26-40 emu/g). The high magnetization properties were obtained while leaving sufficient polymer to retain drugs making these biodegradable spheres suitable as a potential platform for the design of magnetically-guided drug delivery and other in vivo biomagnetic applications.

  15. Alcoholic Relatives and Their Impact on Alcohol-Related Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patrick B.; And Others

    Although research on children of alcoholics indicates that they are at high risk for later problem drinking, the etiological dynamics associated with this heightened risk status are not yet understood. This study compared the alcohol-related beliefs of subjects who possessed close relatives with alcohol problems with alcohol-related beliefs of…

  16. Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-21

    Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

  17. Reactivity to alcohol cues and induced moods in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Litt, M D; Cooney, N L; Kadden, R M; Gaupp, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been theorized that respondent conditioning processes in part underlie desire for alcohol and thus contribute to relapse after alcoholism treatment. One implication of this theory is that the relevant conditioned responses could be eliminated by respondent extinction, in which the alcoholic patient is exposed to alcohol-related stimuli while being prevented from consuming alcohol. However, exteroceptive cues such as the sight and smell of alcoholic beverages are not always sufficient to elicit desire for alcohol. In view of this, it has been suggested that interoceptive cues, such as mood states, may also play a role in eliciting desire for alcohol. To test this, eight alcoholic subjects were induced to experience negative or neutral moods on four separate days, and then exposed to the sight and smell of their favorite alcoholic drink, and to a neutral stimulus (seltzer water), in a within-subjects design. Results from this work indicate that: (a) negative moods can be reliably induced in the laboratory as confirmed by subjects' reports; (b) exposure to alcohol cues had no effect on desire for alcohol while subjects were in a relaxed, neutral mood state; (c) the presence of negative mood states alone appeared to be sufficient to elicit desire for alcohol in some subjects, regardless of whether alcohol or water was presented. These data argue that negative mood states may cue desire for alcohol independent of other cues. The data also suggest that reactivity to alcohol cues may be substantially reduced by relaxation.

  18. Alcohol Alert: Alcohol's Damaging Effects on the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Crews, F.T. , and Nixon, K. Alcohol, neural stem cells, and adult neurogenesis. Alcohol Research & Health 27(2): 197–204, 2003. (31) Nixon, ... Miller, M.W.; Ma, W.; et al. Neural stem cells and alcohol. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 27(2):324–335, 2003. (34) Oscar–Berman, ...

  19. Clinical pathology of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, V

    1983-01-01

    There is good though not conclusive evidence that a small to modest average daily intake of alcohol--that is, 20-30 g/day is associated with increased longevity due mainly to a reduction in death from cardiovascular disease. Larger average daily alcohol intakes--especially those in excess of 60 g/day for men and 40 g/day for women--are associated with gradually increasing morbidity and mortality rates from a variety of diseases. Alcohol may be unrecognised as the cause of somatic disease, which can occur without overt psychosocial evidence of alcohol abuse, unless the index of suspicion is high and a thorough drink history obtained. Laboratory tests for the detection and/or confirmation of alcohol abuse are useful but subject to serious limitations being neither as sensitive nor specific as sometimes believed. The value of random blood and/or breath alcohol measurements, in outpatients, as an aid to diagnosis of alcohol-induced organic disease is probably not sufficiently appreciated and, though relatively insensitive, is highly specific. PMID:6339563

  20. [Genetic predisposition for alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Kozlowski, K; Agarwal, D P

    2000-04-01

    A number of socio-economic, cultural, biobehavioral factors and ethnic/gender differences are among the strongest determinants of drinking patterns in a society. Both epidemiological and clinical studies have implicated the excessive use of alcohol in the risk of developing a variety of organ, neuronal and metabolic disorders. Alcohol abuse related metabolic derangements affect almost all body organs and their functions. Race and gender differences in drinking patterns may play an important role in the development of medical conditions associated with alcohol abuse. The incidence of alcoholism in a community is influenced by per capita alcohol consumption and covariates with the relative price and availability of alcoholic drinks. The majority of the family, twin and adoption studies suggest that alcoholism is familial, a significant proportion of which can be attributed to genetic factors. The question is how much of the variance is explained by genetic factors and to what degree is this genetically mediated disorder moderated by personal characteristics. Among the most salient personal characteristics moderating, the genetic vulnerability may be factors such as age, ethnicity, and presence of psychiatric co morbidity. Cultural factors and familial environmental factors are most likely predictors as well.

  1. [Progress on biodegradation of polylactic acid--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Wang, Sha; Liu, Weifeng; Chen, Guanjun

    2008-02-01

    Polylactic acid is a high molecular-weight polyester made from renewable resources such as corn or starch. It is a promising biodegradable plastic due to its mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability. To achieve natural recycling of polylactic acid, relative microorganisms and the underlying mechanisms in the biodegradation has become an important issue in biodegradable materials. Up to date, most isolated microbes capable of degrading polylactic acid belong to actinomycetes. Proteases secreted by these microorganisms are responsible for the degradation. However, subtle differences exist between these polylactic acid degrading enzymes and typical proteases with respect to substrate binding and catalysis. Amino acids relative to catalysis are postulated to be highly plastic allowing their catalytic hydrolysis of polylactic acid. In this paper we reviewed current studies on biodegradation of polylactic acid concerning its microbial, enzymatic reactions and the possible mechanisms. We also discussed the probability of biologically recycling PLA by applying highly efficient strains and enzymes.

  2. Best conditions for biodegradation of diesel oil by chemometric tools

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Héberger, Károly; Kemény, Sándor; Olszanowski, Andrzej; Voelkel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Diesel oil biodegradation by different bacteria-yeast-rhamnolipids consortia was tested. Chromatographic analysis of post-biodegradation residue was completed with chemometric tools (ANOVA, and a novel ranking procedure based on the sum of ranking differences). These tools were used in the selection of the most effective systems. The best results of aliphatic fractions of diesel oil biodegradation were observed for a yeast consortia with Aeromonas hydrophila KR4. For these systems the positive effect of rhamnolipids on hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed. However, rhamnolipids addition did not always have a positive influence on the biodegradation process (e.g. in case of yeast consortia with Stenotrophomonas maltophila KR7). Moreover, particular differences in the degradation pattern were observed for lower and higher alkanes than in the case with C22. Normally, the best conditions for “lower” alkanes are Aeromonas hydrophila KR4 + emulsifier independently from yeasts and e.g. Pseudomonas stutzeri KR7 for C24 alkane. PMID:24948922

  3. Porous Biodegradable Metals for Hard Tissue Scaffolds: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yusop, A. H.; Bakir, A. A.; Shaharom, N. A.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.; Hermawan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds have been utilized in tissue regeneration to facilitate the formation and maturation of new tissues or organs where a balance between temporary mechanical support and mass transport (degradation and cell growth) is ideally achieved. Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and porous structure. Metals that can degrade in physiological environment, namely, biodegradable metals, are proposed as potential materials for hard tissue scaffolding where biodegradable polymers are often considered as having poor mechanical properties. Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored degradation behaviour. The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be easily applied to metals. With further optimization in topologically ordered porosity design exploiting material property and fabrication technique, porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. PMID:22919393

  4. Biodegradation of PuEDTA and Impacts on Pu Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying; Bolton, Jr., Harvey

    2001-06-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetate (NTA) are synthetic chelating agents, which can form strong water-soluble complexes with radionuclides and metals and has been used to decontaminate and process nuclear materials. Synthetic chelating agents were co-disposed with radionuclides (e.g., 60Co, Pu) and heavy metals enhancing their transport in the subsurface. An understanding of EDTA biodegradation is essential to help mitigate enhanced radionuclide transport by EDTA. The objective of this research is to develop fundamental data on factors that govern the biodegradation of radionuclide-EDTA. These factors include the dominant EDTA aqueous species, the biodegradation of various metal-EDTA complexes, the uptake of various metal-EDTA complexes into the cell, the distribution and mobility of the radionuclide during and after EDTA biodegradation, and the enzymology and genetics of EDTA biodegradation.

  5. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2001-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  6. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2003-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  7. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2002-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  8. Biodegradable plastic agricultural mulches and key features of microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Brodhagen, Marion; Peyron, Mark; Miles, Carol; Inglis, Debra Ann

    2015-02-01

    The development of biodegradable plastic mulch films for use in agriculture has been ongoing for decades. These films consist of mixtures of polymers with various additives. As a result, their physical and chemical properties differ from those of the pure polymers often used for in vitro enzymatic and microbial degradation studies, raising questions about the biodegradation capability of mulch films. Currently, standards exist for the biodegradation of plastics in composting conditions but not in soil. Biodegradation in soil or compost depends on a complex synergy of biological and abiotic degradative processes. This review discusses the physicochemical and structural properties of biodegradable plastic mulches, examines their potential for on-site decomposition in light of site-to-site variance due to environmental and biological conditions, and considers the potential for long-term effects on agroecosystem sustainability and functionality.

  9. Management of alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Anthony P

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews the spectrum of alcohol use disorders. The pharmacologic properties of ethanol and its metabolism, and the historical, physical, and laboratory elements that may help diagnose an alcohol use disorder are examined. The concepts of motivational interviewing and stages of change are mentioned, along with the American Society of Addiction Medicine patient placement criteria, to determine the best level of treatment for alcoholism. Various therapeutic management options are reviewed, including psychological, pharmacologic, and complementary/alternative choices. This article provides a basic understanding of available tools to diagnose and treat this cunning and baffling brain and multisystem disease.

  10. Tailoring the biodegradability of porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hon, Nick K; Shaposhnik, Zory; Diebold, Eric D; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Jalali, Bahram

    2012-12-01

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (PSiNPs) are attractive carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine. For in vivo applications, the biodegradation property of PSiNPs provides a pathway for their safe clearance from the body. Particles sizes of 80-120 nm are of particular interest as they are important for cellular applications, such as drug delivery for cancer therapy, because these nanoparticles can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect to deliver drug preferentially to tumors with leaky vasculature, yet large enough to avoid renal clearance. However, the biodegradability rate of such particles is often too fast, which limits particle half-life and potentially reduces their in vivo delivery efficiency. In this work, we focus on the degradation of nanoscale particles and study the effect of both thermal oxidation and silica coating on the stability of PSiNPs in phosphate buffered saline solution (a close mimic of a basic biological fluid). Using thermal oxidation, the half-life of PSiNPs can be varied from 10 min up to 3 h. Using silica coating, the half-life can be extended further to 8 h. The particles produced using both these techniques can be functionalized using standard silica surface chemistries developed for applications in drug delivery.

  11. Wood biodegradation in laboratory-scale landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M; De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this research was to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of major wood products in municipal waste by measuring methane yields, decay rates, the extent of carbohydrate decomposition, carbon storage, and leachate toxicity. Tests were conducted in triplicate 8 L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane yields for red oak, eucalyptus, spruce, radiata pine, plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB) from hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW), particleboard (PB) and medium-density fiberboard (MDF) were 32.5, 0, 7.5, 0.5, 6.3, 84.5, 0, 5.6, and 4.6 mL CH(4) dry g(-1), respectively. The red oak, a HW, exhibited greater decomposition than either SW (spruce and radiata), a trend that was also measured for the OSB-HW relative to OSB-SW. However, the eucalyptus (HW) exhibited toxicity. Thus, wood species have unique methane yields that should be considered in the development of national inventories of methane production and carbon storage. The current assumption of uniform biodegradability is not appropriate. The ammonia release from urea formaldehyde as present in PB and MDF could contribute to ammonia in landfill leachate. Using the extent of carbon conversion measured in this research, 0-19.9%, predicted methane production from a wood mixture using the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change waste model is only 7.9% of that predicted using the 50% carbon conversion default. PMID:21749061

  12. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications. PMID:27689136

  13. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications.

  14. Wood biodegradation in laboratory-scale landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M; De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this research was to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of major wood products in municipal waste by measuring methane yields, decay rates, the extent of carbohydrate decomposition, carbon storage, and leachate toxicity. Tests were conducted in triplicate 8 L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane yields for red oak, eucalyptus, spruce, radiata pine, plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB) from hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW), particleboard (PB) and medium-density fiberboard (MDF) were 32.5, 0, 7.5, 0.5, 6.3, 84.5, 0, 5.6, and 4.6 mL CH(4) dry g(-1), respectively. The red oak, a HW, exhibited greater decomposition than either SW (spruce and radiata), a trend that was also measured for the OSB-HW relative to OSB-SW. However, the eucalyptus (HW) exhibited toxicity. Thus, wood species have unique methane yields that should be considered in the development of national inventories of methane production and carbon storage. The current assumption of uniform biodegradability is not appropriate. The ammonia release from urea formaldehyde as present in PB and MDF could contribute to ammonia in landfill leachate. Using the extent of carbon conversion measured in this research, 0-19.9%, predicted methane production from a wood mixture using the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change waste model is only 7.9% of that predicted using the 50% carbon conversion default.

  15. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  16. Monitoring Biodegradation of Magnesium Implants with Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Xuefei; Kuhlmann, Julia; Doepke, Amos; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Heineman, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys exhibit properties such as high strength, light weight, and in vivo corrosion that make them promising candidates for the development of biodegradable metallic implant materials for bone repair, stents and other medical applications. Sensors have been used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium and its alloys by measuring the concentrations of the following corrosion products: magnesium ions, hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. The corrosion characterization system with home-made capillary pH and Mg2+ microsensors has been developed for real-time detection of magnesium corrosion in vitro. A hydrogen gas sensor was used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium by measuring the concentration of the hydrogen gas reaction product in vivo. The high permeability of hydrogen through skin allows transdermal monitoring of the biodegradation of a magnesium alloy implanted beneath the skin by detecting hydrogen gas at the skin surface. The sensor was used to map hydrogen concentration in the vicinity of an implanted magnesium alloy.

  17. Biodegradability of industrial textile wastewater - batch tests.

    PubMed

    Paździor, Katarzyna; Klepacz-Smółka, Anna; Wrębiak, Julita; Liwarska-Bizukojć, Ewa; Ledakowicz, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Following new trends we applied oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests as well as long-term tests (in two batch bioreactors systems) in order to assess the biodegradability of textile wastewater. Effluents coming from a dyeing factory were divided into two streams which differed in inorganic and organic contaminants loads. Usefulness of the stream division was proved. Biodegradation of the low-loaded stream led to over 97% reduction of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) together with 80% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC). Most of the controlled parameter values were below the levels allowed by legislation for influents to surface water, whereas the high-loaded stream was so contaminated with recalcitrant organic compounds that despite the reduction of BOD5 by over 95%, COD, TOC, total nitrogen and total phosphorus levels exceeded permissible values. OUR tests were aimed at determination of the following kinetic parameters: maximum specific growth rate (μMax), half-saturation constant, hydrolysis constant and decay coefficient for activated sludge biomass for both types of textile wastewater studied. The values of kinetic parameters will be applied in activated sludge models used for prediction and optimisation of biological treatment of textile wastewater. PMID:27642827

  18. Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Nitroaromatic compounds are relatively rare in nature and have been introduced into the environment mainly by human activities. This important class of industrial chemicals is widely used in the synthesis of many diverse products, including dyes, polymers, pesticides, and explosives. Unfortunately, their extensive use has led to environmental contamination of soil and groundwater. The nitro group, which provides chemical and functional diversity in these molecules, also contributes to the recalcitrance of these compounds to biodegradation. The electron-withdrawing nature of the nitro group, in concert with the stability of the benzene ring, makes nitroaromatic compounds resistant to oxidative degradation. Recalcitrance is further compounded by their acute toxicity, mutagenicity, and easy reduction into carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nitroaromatic compounds are hazardous to human health and are registered on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants for environmental remediation. Although the majority of these compounds are synthetic in nature, microorganisms in contaminated environments have rapidly adapted to their presence by evolving new biodegradation pathways that take advantage of them as sources of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. This review provides an overview of the synthesis of both man-made and biogenic nitroaromatic compounds, the bacteria that have been identified to grow on and completely mineralize nitroaromatic compounds, and the pathways that are present in these strains. The possible evolutionary origins of the newly evolved pathways are also discussed. PMID:20508249

  19. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  20. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Beaudry, W.T.; Szafraniec, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    One technology recommended for consideration for the disposal of the U.S. Chemical Stockpile is chemical neutralization followed by biodegradation. In the case of sulfur mustard ({open_quotes}mustard gas{close_quotes}, 2,2{prime}-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), alkaline hydrolysis yields a detoxified and biodegradable product. The hydrolysis reaction was studied with respect to the effects of temperature and sulfur mustard concentration on the rate and products of the reaction. A 28-fold overall rate enhancement was observed at 70{degrees}C vs. 30{degrees}C corresponding to an enthalpy of activation value of 17.9 Kcal/mole. Material balance studies conducted by {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis showed that the products of the reaction consisted of thiodiglycol was relatively greater at lower sulfur mustard concentrations and higher temperatures. As temperatures were decreased or sulfur mustard concentrations was increased, the proportion of ether-type compounds increased accordingly. Conditions of 1% (vol//vol) sulfur mustard, 5% stoichiometric excess of NaOH and 90{degrees}C were selected for generation of the hydrolyzed bioreactor influent material. The bioreactor was seeded with activated sludge and was initially operated as 5 liter sequencing batch reactor with a hydraulic residence time of approximately days. Early results show total organic carbon removal of greater than 90%.

  1. Isotopic fractionation indicates anaerobic monochlorobenzene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kaschl, Arno; Vogt, Carsten; Uhlig, Sylvia; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Weiss, Holger; Kästner, Matthias; Richnow, Hans H

    2005-06-01

    The concentration and isotopic composition of monochlorobenzene (MCB) was monitored in the plume of an anaerobic, contaminated aquifer in Bitterfeld, Germany. An enrichment in the carbon isotopic composition of more than 4 delta units was found at the fringes of the plume relative to the center (-26.5 %), suggesting the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of MCB. A similar enrichment was measured in a detailed cross-section of the plume and in depth-specific samples obtained in a multilevel sampling well. The latter samples gave a good correlation of MCB concentrations and respective isotopic composition according to the Rayleigh equation. On the other hand, batch experiments using the aerobic MCB-degrading strains Ralstonia sp. DSM 8910, Acidovorax facilis UFZ B517, Rhodococcus erythropolis UFZ B528, and Pseudomonas veronii UFZ B547 showed that the known aerobic pathway initiated by dioxygenases does not result in a significant isotopic fractionation. Thus, a novel anaerobic pathway resulting in an isotopic fractionation appears to be the predominant process of MCB degradation in this aquifer. The study also clearly demonstrates the usefulness of isotopic fractionation analysis to prove biodegradation directly in the field, even when microcosm studies are not available and a metabolic pathway has not yet been elucidated.

  2. Nitroaromatic compounds, from synthesis to biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E

    2010-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are relatively rare in nature and have been introduced into the environment mainly by human activities. This important class of industrial chemicals is widely used in the synthesis of many diverse products, including dyes, polymers, pesticides, and explosives. Unfortunately, their extensive use has led to environmental contamination of soil and groundwater. The nitro group, which provides chemical and functional diversity in these molecules, also contributes to the recalcitrance of these compounds to biodegradation. The electron-withdrawing nature of the nitro group, in concert with the stability of the benzene ring, makes nitroaromatic compounds resistant to oxidative degradation. Recalcitrance is further compounded by their acute toxicity, mutagenicity, and easy reduction into carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nitroaromatic compounds are hazardous to human health and are registered on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants for environmental remediation. Although the majority of these compounds are synthetic in nature, microorganisms in contaminated environments have rapidly adapted to their presence by evolving new biodegradation pathways that take advantage of them as sources of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. This review provides an overview of the synthesis of both man-made and biogenic nitroaromatic compounds, the bacteria that have been identified to grow on and completely mineralize nitroaromatic compounds, and the pathways that are present in these strains. The possible evolutionary origins of the newly evolved pathways are also discussed.

  3. Oxidation and biodegradation of polyethylene films containing pro-oxidantadditives: Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation on the oxidation and biodegradation of linear low density poly (ethylene) PE-LLD films containing pro-oxidant were examined. To achieve oxidation and degradation, films were first exposed to the sunlight for 93 days du...

  4. Marital Interaction in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Couples: Alcoholic Subtype Variations and Wives’ Alcoholism Status

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Frank J.; Daugherty, Michelle Klotz; Fitzgerald, Hiram H.; Cranford, James A.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined problem-solving marital interactions of alcoholic and nonalcoholic couples (N = 132). Four alcoholic groups (husband alcoholic with antisocial personality disorder or not, paired with alcoholic or nonalcoholic wives) were compared with each other and with a both-spouses-nonalcoholic group. Consistent with the alcoholic subtypes hypothesis, couples with an antisocial alcoholic husband had higher levels of hostile behavior regardless of wives’ alcoholism status. In contrast, rates of positive behaviors and the ratio of positive to negative behaviors were greatest among couples in which either both or neither of the spouses had alcoholic diagnoses and were lowest among alcoholic husbands with nonalcoholic wives. Discussion focuses on possible mechanisms linking antisocial alcoholism and discrepant alcoholic diagnoses to poorer marital outcomes. PMID:16492103

  5. Theories of the Alcoholic Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, W. Miles

    Several theories of the alcoholic personality have been devised to determine the relationship between the clusters of personality characteristics of alcoholics and their abuse of alcohol. The oldest and probably best known theory is the dependency theory, formulated in the tradition of classical psychoanalysis, which associates the alcoholic's…

  6. Alcohol in Suicides and Homicides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donald W.

    This paper discusses research findings about 2 sources of violent death associated with alcohol -- suicide and homicide. After depression, alcoholism is the 2nd most common psychiatric diagnosis among suicide victims. Suicide attempters also are frequently alcoholic. The association between alcoholism and suicide, however, may only apply to white…

  7. [Prevention of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Trova, A C; Paparrigopoulos, Th; Liappas, I; Ginieri-Coccossis, M

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of cardiovascular diseases, no other medical condition causes more serious dysfunction or premature deaths than alcohol-related problems. Research results indicate that alcohol dependent individuals present an exceptionally poor level of quality of life. This is an outcome that highlights the necessity of planning and implementing preventive interventions on biological, psychological or social level, to be provided to individuals who make alcohol abuse, as well as to their families. Preventive interventions can be considered on three levels of prevention: (a) primary prevention, which is focused on the protection of healthy individuals from alcohol abuse and dependence, and may be provided on a universal, selective or indicated level, (b) secondary prevention, which aims at the prevention of deterioration regarding alcoholic dependence and relapse, in the cases of individuals already diagnosed with the condition and (c) tertiary prevention, which is focused at minimizing deterioration of functioning in chronically sufferers from alcoholic dependence. The term "quaternary prevention" can be used for the prevention of relapse. As for primary prevention, interventions focus on assessing the risk of falling into problematic use, enhancing protective factors and providing information and health education in general. These interventions can be delivered in schools or in places of work and recreation for young people. In this context, various programs have been applied in different countries, including Greece with positive results (Preventure, Alcolocks, LST, SFP, Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device). Secondary prevention includes counseling and structured help with the delivery of programs in schools and in high risk groups for alcohol dependence (SAP, LST). These programs aim at the development of alcohol refusal skills and behaviors, the adoption of models of behaviors resisting alcohol use, as well as reinforcement of general social skills. In the

  8. Bone Changes in Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Raymond O.

    1979-01-01

    Man has consumed alcohol for its euphoric and sedative effect down through the ages. Attention in the medical literature has been primarily focused on the effects of alcohol on the nervous system and liver. In the past few years, isolated reports have appeared in the medical literature concerning the effects of alcohol on the bony skeleton. The purpose of this paper is to classify these lesions, discuss their pathophysiology, and briefly review their clinical course. The lesions discussed include osteoporosis, hip fractures, aseptic necrosis of the hip, and fat embolism. For the purpose of this discussion these lesions are divided into two groups. Group I includes the battered alcoholic syndrome. Group II includes fat embolism, both acute and chronic, and aseptic necrosis of the hip. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:522187

  9. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  10. Alcohol advertising and youth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Susan E; Snyder, Leslie B; Hamilton, Mark; Fleming-Milici, Fran; Slater, Michael D; Stacy, Alan; Chen, Meng-Jinn; Grube, Joel W

    2002-06-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2001 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Montreal, Canada. The symposium was organized and chaired by Joel W. Grube. The presentations and presenters were (1) Introduction and background, by Susan E. Martin; (2) The effect of alcohol ads on youth 15-26 years old, by Leslie Snyder, Mark Hamilton, Fran Fleming-Milici, and Michael D. Slater; (3) A comparison of exposure to alcohol advertising and drinking behavior in elementary versus middle school children, by Phyllis L. Ellickson and Rebecca L. Collins; (4) USC health and advertising project: assessment study on alcohol advertisement memory and exposure, by Alan Stacy; and (5) TV beer and soft drink advertising: what young people like and what effects? by Meng-Jinn Chen and Joel W. Grube. PMID:12068260

  11. Alcohol and Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a non-drinker with hepatitis C has. Alcohol and hepatitis C both damage the liver, so together, the risk of serious liver damage (cirrhosis) is much higher than with either alone. < Previous Living with Hepatitis ...

  12. Alcohol and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ... break of 1 hour between drinks. Drink soda, water, or juice after a drink with alcohol. Do ...

  13. Inpatient alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monte-Secades, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R; Guerrero-Sande, H

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted for a femur fracture; an alcohol fetor was noted on admission. The following day, the patient began to experience tremors and nervousness. Intravenous haloperidol was administered. Shortly afterwards, the patient experienced two generalized seizures and then began to experience delirium and uncontrollable agitation. The patient was diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal syndrome; high doses of intravenous midazolam were prescribed and infused. A few hours later, the patient presented signs of respiratory depression, requiring a transfer to the intensive care unit. After a review of the medical history, it was determined that the patient had been admitted on 3 previous occasions due to alcohol withdrawal and had progressed to delirium tremens after experiencing seizures. Can the risk of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and the need for prophylactic treatment be assessed on admission? Were appropriate monitoring and treatment measures employed? Would it have been possible to change his outcome? PMID:25559647

  14. Alcohol Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths (31 percent of overall driving fatalities). 11 Economic Burden: In 2010, alcohol misuse problems cost the ... teenage years could interfere with normal adolescent brain development and increase the risk of developing an AUD. ...

  15. Alcohol and masculinity.

    PubMed

    Lemle, R; Mishkind, M E

    1989-01-01

    Alcohol use--and abuse--has always been more prevalent among males than among females. The sex role prescription for men to affirm their masculinity by drinking is a major determinant of this sex difference. This paper reviews the intricate interrelationship between masculinity and both social and alcoholic drinking. A large body of evidence indicates that social drinking is a primary cultural symbol of manliness; portrayals in the media strengthen this association. Less evidence exists to connect masculinity issues with alcoholic dependence, but there has been much speculation: Three psychodynamic theories of alcoholism--the repressed homosexuality, dependency, and power theories--hypothesized that men who drink addictively have the most fragile masculine identities. The 1980s have witnessed a widespread recognition of the dangers of equating drinking and manliness, and societal changes suggest that drinking may be gradually losing its masculine aura.

  16. Analysis of Alcohols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Brother Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Presents a novel approach to identification of unknown alcohols using experimental measurements of boiling point and viscosity which are easily obtained without expensive equipment of instrumentation. Provides instructions for preparing capillary viscometer, listing special hints for obtaining good results. (JM)

  17. Alcohol: Pleasures and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Lawson, Jane

    This student booklet is to be used in conjunction with the Teacher Manual and films of the DIAL A-L-C-O-H-O-L series. It presents facts and illustrations on the use of alcohol, and is intended to aid young people in deciding whether or not to drink. This booklet is divided into the following parts: (1) Introduction; (2) The Enjoyment of Drinking;…

  18. Research approach to teaching groundwater biodegradation in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, L.; Byl, T.; Painter, R.

    2006-01-01

    TSU in partnership with the USGS has conducted extensive research regarding biode??gradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This research resulted in the development of a numerical approach to modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers that is taught to environmental engineering students in several steps. First, environmental engineering students are taught chemical-reaction engineering principles relating to a wide variety of environmental fate and transport issues. Second, as part of TSU's engineering course curriculum, students use a non-ideal flow laboratory reactor system and run a tracer study to establish residence time distribution (RTD). Next, the students couple that formula to a first-order biodegradation rate and predict the removal of a biodegradable contaminant as a function of residence time. Following this, students are shown data collected from karst bedrock wells that suggest that karst aquifers are analogous to non-ideal flow reactors. The students are challenged to develop rates of biodegradation through lab studies and use their results to predict biodegradaton at an actual contaminated karst site. Field studies are also conducted to determine the accuracy of the students' predictions. This academic approach teaches biodegradation processes, rate-kinetic processes, hydraulic processes and numerical principles. The students are able to experience how chemical engineering principles can be applied to other situations, such as, modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This paper provides background on the chemical engineering principles and karst issues used in the research-enhanced curriculum. ?? American Society for Engineering Education, 2006.

  19. Degradation of Oxo-Biodegradable Plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Paes, Sirlaine Albino; Nunes, Mateus Dias; da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV) or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W) plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate. PMID:23967057

  20. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu. PMID:27506025

  1. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu.

  2. Effects of carbon nanotubes on atrazine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Liu, Na

    2015-04-28

    The environmental risks of engineered nanoparticles have attracted attention. However, little is known regarding the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the biodegradation and persistence of organic contaminants in water. We investigated the impacts of pristine and oxidized multiwalled CNTs on the atrazine biodegradation rate and efficiency using Arthrobacter sp. At a concentration of 25mg/L, the CNTs enhanced the biodegradation rate by up to 20%; however, at a concentration of 100mg/L, the CNTs decreased the biodegradation rate by up to 50%. The stimulation effects resulted from enhanced bacterial growth and the overexpression of degradation genes. The inhibitory effects resulted from the toxicity of the CNTs at high concentrations. The differences between the two CNTs at tested concentrations were not significant. The biodegradation efficiency was not impacted by adsorption, and the pre-adsorbed atrazine on the CNTs was fully biodegraded when the CNT concentration was ≤25mg/L. This finding was consistent with the lack of observable desorption hysteresis for atrazine on the tested CNTs. Our results indicate that CNTs can enhance or inhibit biodegradation through a balance of two effects: the toxic effects on microbial activity and the effects of the changing bioavailability that result from adsorption and desorption.

  3. Elevated dissolved organic carbon biodegradability from thawing and collapsing permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Benjamin W.; Larouche, Julia R.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Bowden, William B.; Balser, Andrew W.

    2014-10-01

    As high latitudes warm, a portion of the large organic carbon pool stored in permafrost will become available for transport to aquatic ecosystems as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). If permafrost DOC is biodegradable, much will be mineralized to the atmosphere in freshwater systems before reaching the ocean, accelerating carbon transfer from permafrost to the atmosphere, whereas if recalcitrant, it will reach marine ecosystems where it may persist over long time periods. We measured biodegradable DOC (BDOC) in water flowing from collapsing permafrost (thermokarst) on the North Slope of Alaska and tested the role of DOC chemical composition and nutrient concentration in determining biodegradability. DOC from collapsing permafrost was some of the most biodegradable reported in natural systems. However, elevated BDOC only persisted during active permafrost degradation, with a return to predisturbance levels once thermokarst features stabilized. Biodegradability was correlated with background nutrient concentration, but nutrient addition did not increase overall BDOC, suggesting that chemical composition may be a more important control on DOC processing. Despite its high biodegradability, permafrost DOC showed evidence of substantial previous microbial processing, and we present four hypotheses explaining this incongruity. Because thermokarst features form preferentially on river banks and lake shores and can remain active for decades, thermokarst may be the dominant short-term mechanism delivering sediment, nutrients, and biodegradable organic matter to aquatic systems as the Arctic warms.

  4. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon cuts used for diesel oil formulation.

    PubMed

    Penet, Sophie; Marchal, Rémy; Sghir, Abdelghani; Monot, Frédéric

    2004-11-01

    The biodegradability of various types of diesel oil (DO), such as straight-run DO, light-cycle DO, hydrocracking DO, Fischer-Tropsch DO and commercial DO, was investigated in biodegradation tests performed in closed-batch systems using two microflorae. The first microflora was an activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant as commonly used in biodegradability tests of commercial products and the second was a microflora from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil with possible specific capacities for hydrocarbon degradation. Kinetics of CO(2) production and extent of DO biodegradation were obtained by chromatographic procedures. Under optimised conditions, the polluted-soil microflora was found to extensively degrade all the DO types tested, the degradation efficiencies being higher than 88%. For all the DOs tested, the biodegradation capacities of the soil microflora were significantly higher than those of the activated sludge. Using both microflora, the extent of biodegradation was highly dependent upon the type of DO used, especially its hydrocarbon composition. Linear alkanes were completely degraded in each test, whereas identifiable branched alkanes such as farnesane, pristane or phytane were degraded to variable extents. Among the aromatics, substituted mono-aromatics were also variably biodegraded.

  5. Degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Paes, Sirlaine Albino; Nunes, Mateus Dias; da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV) or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W) plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate.

  6. Comparing the effects of various fuel alcohols on the natural attenuation of Benzene Plumes using a general substrate interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Diego E.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2010-04-01

    The effects of five fuel alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, iso-butanol and n-butanol) on the natural attenuation of benzene were compared using a previously developed numerical model (General Substrate Interaction Module — GSIM) and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Simulations with a 30 gal dissolving LNAPL (light non-aqueous phase liquid) source consisting of a range of gasoline blends (10% and 85% v:v alcohol content) suggest that all fuel alcohols can hinder the natural attenuation of benzene, due mainly to accelerated depletion of dissolved oxygen and a decrease in the specific degradation rate for benzene (due to catabolite repression and metabolic flux dilution). Simulations for blends with 10% alcohol, assuming a homogeneous sandy aquifer, inferred maximum benzene plume elongations (relative to a regular gasoline release) of 26% for ethanol, 47% for iso-butanol, 147% for methanol, 188% for 1-propanol, and 265% for n-butanol. The corresponding elongation percentages for blends with 85% alcohol were generally smaller (i.e., 25%, 54%, 135%, 163%, and 181%, respectively), reflecting a lower content of benzene in the simulated release. Benzene plume elongation and longevity were more pronounced in the presence of alcohols that biodegrade slower (e.g., propanol and n-butanol), forming longer and more persistent alcohol plumes. Conversely, ethanol and iso-butanol exhibited the lowest potential to hinder the natural attenuation of benzene, illustrating the significant effect that a small difference in chemical structure (e.g., isomers) can have on biodegradation. Overall, simulations were highly sensitive to site-specific biokinetic coefficients for alcohol degradation, which forewarns against generalizations about the level of impact of specific fuel alcohols on benzene plume dynamics.

  7. Evaluation of the biodegradation of Alaska North Slope oil in microcosms using the biodegradation model BIOB.

    PubMed

    Torlapati, Jagadish; Boufadel, Michel C

    2014-01-01

    We present the details of a numerical model, BIOB that is capable of simulating the biodegradation of oil entrapped in the sediment. The model uses Monod kinetics to simulate the growth of bacteria in the presence of nutrients and the subsequent consumption of hydrocarbons. The model was used to simulate experimental results of Exxon Valdez oil biodegradation in laboratory columns (Venosa et al., 2010). In that study, samples were collected from three different islands: Eleanor Island (EL107), Knight Island (KN114A), and Smith Island (SM006B), and placed in laboratory microcosms for a duration of 168 days to investigate oil bioremediation through natural attenuation and nutrient amendment. The kinetic parameters of the BIOB model were estimated by fitting to the experimental data using a parameter estimation tool based on Genetic Algorithms (GA). The parameter values of EL107 and KN114A were similar whereas those of SM006B were different from the two other sites; in particular biomass growth at SM006B was four times slower than at the other two islands. Grain size analysis from each site revealed that the specific surface area per unit mass of sediment was considerably lower at SM006B, which suggest that the surface area of sediments is a key control parameter for microbial growth in sediments. Comparison of the BIOB results with exponential decay curves fitted to the data indicated that BIOB provided better fit for KN114A and SM006B in nutrient amended treatments, and for EL107 and KN114A in natural attenuation. In particular, BIOB was able to capture the initial slow biodegradation due to the lag phase in microbial growth. Sensitivity analyses revealed that oil biodegradation at all three locations were sensitive to nutrient concentration whereas SM006B was sensitive to initial biomass concentration due to its slow growth rate. Analyses were also performed to compare the half-lives of individual compounds with that of the overall polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  8. Perspectives on the neuroscience of alcohol from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew T; Noronha, Antonio; Warren, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence over the last 40 years clearly indicates that alcoholism (alcohol dependence) is a disorder of the brain. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has taken significant steps to advance research into the neuroscience of alcohol. The Division of Neuroscience and Behavior (DNB) was formed within NIAAA in 2002 to oversee, fund, and direct all research areas that examine the effects of alcohol on the brain, the genetic underpinnings of alcohol dependence, the neuroadaptations resulting from excessive alcohol consumption, advanced behavioral models of the various stages of the addiction cycle, and preclinical medications development. This research portfolio has produced important discoveries in the etiology, treatment, and prevention of alcohol abuse and dependence. Several of these salient discoveries are highlighted and future areas of neuroscience research on alcohol are presented.

  9. Biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams in water.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, A; Bergendahl, J; Rangwala, A

    2015-07-01

    Fluorinated fire-fighting foams may be released into the environment during fire-fighting activities, raising concerns due to the potential environmental and health impacts for some fluorinated organics. The current study investigated (1) the biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams, and (2) the applicability of current standard measures used to assess biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams. The biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams was evaluated using a 28-day dissolved organic carbon (DOC) Die-Away Test. It was found that all three materials, diluted in water, achieved 77-96% biodegradability, meeting the criteria for "ready biodegradability". Defluorination of the fluorinated organics in the foam during biodegradation was measured using ion chromatography. It was found that the fluorine liberated was 1-2 orders of magnitude less than the estimated initial amount, indicating incomplete degradation of fluorinated organics, and incomplete CF bond breakage. Published biodegradability data may utilize biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total organic carbon (TOC) metrics to quantify organics. COD and TOC of four fluorinated compounds were measured and compared to the calculated carbon content or theoretical oxygen demand. It was found that the standard dichromate-based COD test did not provide an accurate measure of fluorinated organic content. Thus published biodegradability data using COD for fluorinated organics quantification must be critically evaluated for validity. The TOC measurements correlated to an average of 91% of carbon content for the four fluorinated test substances, and TOC is recommended for use as an analytical parameter in fluorinated organics biodegradability tests.

  10. Biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams in water.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, A; Bergendahl, J; Rangwala, A

    2015-07-01

    Fluorinated fire-fighting foams may be released into the environment during fire-fighting activities, raising concerns due to the potential environmental and health impacts for some fluorinated organics. The current study investigated (1) the biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams, and (2) the applicability of current standard measures used to assess biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams. The biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams was evaluated using a 28-day dissolved organic carbon (DOC) Die-Away Test. It was found that all three materials, diluted in water, achieved 77-96% biodegradability, meeting the criteria for "ready biodegradability". Defluorination of the fluorinated organics in the foam during biodegradation was measured using ion chromatography. It was found that the fluorine liberated was 1-2 orders of magnitude less than the estimated initial amount, indicating incomplete degradation of fluorinated organics, and incomplete CF bond breakage. Published biodegradability data may utilize biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total organic carbon (TOC) metrics to quantify organics. COD and TOC of four fluorinated compounds were measured and compared to the calculated carbon content or theoretical oxygen demand. It was found that the standard dichromate-based COD test did not provide an accurate measure of fluorinated organic content. Thus published biodegradability data using COD for fluorinated organics quantification must be critically evaluated for validity. The TOC measurements correlated to an average of 91% of carbon content for the four fluorinated test substances, and TOC is recommended for use as an analytical parameter in fluorinated organics biodegradability tests. PMID:25813673

  11. Advances in our knowledge of biodegradation of hydrocarbons in reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Connan, J. )

    1993-09-01

    Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in reservoirs is a widespread phenomenon that is currently observed by petroleum organic geochemists in most sedimentary basins. This basic phenomenon is responsible for the occurrence of large, heavy oil deposits referred to as tar mats or tar belts. Biodegradation of crude oils takes place in reservoirs in which oil-eating bacteria may thrive. For this reason, effective and present biodegradation effects are not observed at subsurface temperatures higher than 70-80[degrees]C. Significant compositional changes, especially at a molecular level, still remain linked to the aerobic biodegradation of crude oils. Under favorable circumstances, both alkanes and aromatics are degraded, but when nutrients (N, P, O[sup 2]) are impoverished, aromatics seem to be preferentially removed. Biodegradation extends also to sulfur-bearing aromatics with a preferential removal of alkylated structures. Changes in molecular patterns are used to assess degrees of biodegradation in crude oils. The most bacterially resistant structures are polycyclic alkanes and aromatics. The in-reservoir biodegradation of hydrocarbons does not generate new hydrocarbons, e.g., 25-norhopanes as proposed by several authors. In fact, the selective removal of less resistant structures concentrates preexisting minor families that were not detected on the unaltered crude due to their low absolute concentration. Consequently, the molecular spectrum found in severely biodegraded oils may be considered as highly diagnostic of a part of the primary genetic spectrum of each oil. In outcrop samples, biodegradation is associated with other complementary phenomena such as photooxidation, oxidation, inspissation, evaporation, water washing, etc. Of particular importance are weathering effects linked to oxidation, which entail drastic compositional changes, with neogenesis of resins, asphaltenes, and even insoluble residue.

  12. Biodegradable polymer adhesives, hybrids and nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylonakis, Andreas

    Biodegradable polymeric products and organic-inorganic hybrid materials for a diversity of applications are the two main fields on which this research has been focused. A novel biodegradable adhesive, which mimics marine adhesive proteins, has been synthesized by the covalent incorporation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid onto the chitosan backbone. The adhesive strength of these materials varies with the molecular weight of the polysaccharide, the amount of diphenolics present and the curing time. Infrared spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV) have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively establish the amount of the diphenolic moiety present on the backbone of the biodegradable polymers. The as synthesized polymers combine both the adhesive capability of the diphenolic function and the healing effect of chitosan. The biocompatibility and biodegradability of these modified chitosans offer the promise of utility of these novel materials in dental and medical applications. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials with low volume shrinkage and excellent mechanical properties were synthesized by the covalent incorporation of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate on pre-hydrolyzed sol-gel silica. These hybrid materials exhibited low volume shrinkage during polymerization and were crack-free during storage for about twelve months. The mechanical properties of these materials are composition dependent. Incorporation of silica effectively increased the compressive yield stress and modulus of the obtained poly(HEMAGMA-silica) hybrid materials. A series of new electroactive hybrid materials have been synthesized by covalent incorporation of polyaniline into polyacrylate-silica hybrids. The formulation involves the radical co-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate-polyaniline (GMA-PANi) and glycidyl methacrylate2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-silica (GMA-HEMA-silica) to yield poly

  13. Biodegradable thermogelling polymers: working towards clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qing Qing; Liow, Sing Shy; Ye, Enyi; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-07-01

    As society ages, aging medical problems such as organ damage or failure among senior citizens increases, raising the demand for organ repair technologies. Synthetic materials have been developed and applied in various parts of human body to meet the biomedical needs. Hydrogels, in particular, have found extensive applications as wound healing, drug delivery and controlled release, and scaffold materials in the human body. The development of the next generation of soft hydrogel biomaterials focuses on facile synthetic methods, efficacy of treatment, and tunable multi-functionalities for applications. Supramolecular 3D entities are highly attractive materials for biomedical application. They are assembled by modules via various non-covalent bonds (hydrogen bonds, p-p stacking and/or van der Waals interactions). Biodegradable thermogels are a class of such supramolecular assembled materials. Their use as soft biomaterials and their related applications are described in this Review.

  14. Biodegradation of lignin by Agaricus Bisporus

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.H.; Abbott, G.D.; Head, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    The lignolytic activity of Agaricus bisporus will be addressed in this paper. Sound and fungally degraded lignins were characterized by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FnR) and elemental analysis. Fungally degraded lignins displayed increased wt%N, wt%H and wt%O content and decreased wt%C content The FTIR spectrum of decayed lignin showed an increase in the relative intensity of absorption bands assigned to carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups located on the aliphatic side chain and a decrease in absorption bands assigned to aromatic skeletal vibration modes. Semiquantitative Py-GC-MS revealed an 82% decrease in lignin derived pyrolysis products upon biodegradation. No significant increase in pyrolysis products with an oxygenated aliphatic side chain were detected in the fungally degraded lignin however shortening of the aliphatic side chain via cleavage at the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} positions was observed.

  15. Enhancement of BTX biodegradation by benzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Rotert, K.H.; Cronkhite, L.A.; Alvarez, P.J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Aquifer microcosms were used to investigate the effect of adding environmentally benign aromatic substrates on the phenotypic composition of indigenous microbial communities. Addition of aromatic compounds (i.e., benzoate or phenylalanine) exerted preferential selective pressure for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) degraders. Addition of a non-aromatic substrate (i.e., acetate), however, did not stimulate a significant increase in the fraction of total heterotrophs capable of degrading BTX. A selective proliferation of BTX degraders would enhance biodegradation kinetics, which should decrease the duration (and cost) of BTX bioremediation. Proof of concept was obtained with laboratory aquifer columns that were continuously fed benzene, toluene, and o-xylene. Benzoate addition to the column`s influent enhanced aerobic BTX degradation and attenuated BTX breakthrough relative to acetate-amended or unamended control columns.

  16. Biodegradation of the nitramine explosive CL-20.

    PubMed

    Trott, Sandra; Nishino, Shirley F; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim C

    2003-03-01

    The cyclic nitramine explosive CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) was examined in soil microcosms to determine whether it is biodegradable. CL-20 was incubated with a variety of soils. The explosive disappeared in all microcosms except the controls in which microbial activity had been inhibited. CL-20 was degraded most rapidly in garden soil. After 2 days of incubation, about 80% of the initial CL-20 had disappeared. A CL-20-degrading bacterial strain, Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71, was isolated from enrichment cultures containing garden soil as an inoculum, succinate as a carbon source, and CL-20 as a nitrogen source. Growth experiments revealed that strain JS71 used 3 mol of nitrogen per mol of CL-20. PMID:12620886

  17. Recent advances in the biodegradation of chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Liang, Bin; Li, Feng; Li, Shunpeng

    2011-11-01

    Chlorothalonil (TPN; 2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) has been widely used as a broad-spectrum chlorinated aromatic fungicide and its application resulted in global pollution commonly detected in the diverse ecosystems. Recently, microbial degradation of TPN has been studied extensively as an effective and environmental-friendly method to reduce TPN residue levels in the environment. This review summarizes the current knowledge of recent developments in the biodegradation of TPN. Diverse pure culture strains capable of degrading TPN were widely distributed among Proteobacteria and several metabolic pathways of TPN biotransformation were discovered. The two key genes (glutathione S-transferase and chlorothalonil hydrolytic dehalogenase coding gene) responsible for the conversion of TPN and recent findings for future practical bioremediation of TPN-contaminated ecosystem are also discussed.

  18. Biodegradable thermogelling polymers: working towards clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qing Qing; Liow, Sing Shy; Ye, Enyi; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-07-01

    As society ages, aging medical problems such as organ damage or failure among senior citizens increases, raising the demand for organ repair technologies. Synthetic materials have been developed and applied in various parts of human body to meet the biomedical needs. Hydrogels, in particular, have found extensive applications as wound healing, drug delivery and controlled release, and scaffold materials in the human body. The development of the next generation of soft hydrogel biomaterials focuses on facile synthetic methods, efficacy of treatment, and tunable multi-functionalities for applications. Supramolecular 3D entities are highly attractive materials for biomedical application. They are assembled by modules via various non-covalent bonds (hydrogen bonds, p-p stacking and/or van der Waals interactions). Biodegradable thermogels are a class of such supramolecular assembled materials. Their use as soft biomaterials and their related applications are described in this Review. PMID:24488805

  19. Biodegradation and flushing of MBT wastes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, A A; Richards, D J; Powrie, W

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) processes are increasingly being adopted as a means of diverting biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill, for example to comply with the EU Landfill Directive. However, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the residual pollution potential of such wastes. This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on two different MBT waste residues, carried out to investigate the remaining potential for the generation of greenhouse gases and the flushing of contaminants from these materials when landfilled. The potential for gas generation was found to be between 8% and 20% of that for raw MSW. Pretreatment of the waste reduced the potential for the release of organic carbon, ammoniacal nitrogen, and heavy metal contents into the leachate; and reduced the residual carbon remaining in the waste after final degradation from ∼320g/kg dry matter for raw MSW to between 183 and 195g/kg dry matter for the MBT wastes. PMID:23973052

  20. Biodegradation of the Nitramine Explosive CL-20

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Sandra; Nishino, Shirley F.; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim C.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic nitramine explosive CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) was examined in soil microcosms to determine whether it is biodegradable. CL-20 was incubated with a variety of soils. The explosive disappeared in all microcosms except the controls in which microbial activity had been inhibited. CL-20 was degraded most rapidly in garden soil. After 2 days of incubation, about 80% of the initial CL-20 had disappeared. A CL-20-degrading bacterial strain, Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71, was isolated from enrichment cultures containing garden soil as an inoculum, succinate as a carbon source, and CL-20 as a nitrogen source. Growth experiments revealed that strain JS71 used 3 mol of nitrogen per mol of CL-20. PMID:12620886

  1. Evaluation and Optimization of MTBE Biodegradation in Aquifers, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Legler, T; Balser, L; Koester, C; Wilson, W

    2004-02-13

    This study was focused on meeting the following objectives concerning the process of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) biodegradation, with the goal of optimizing this process in situ: 1. Assess whether intrinsic bioattenuation of MTBE is feasible under aerobic conditions across several contaminated sites. 2. Determine the effect of co-contaminants, specifically water-soluble gasoline components (most notably benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes [BTEX]) on MTBE biodegradation. 3. Determine whether microbial and/or chemical factors contribute to different MTBE degradative activities. 4. Isolate and characterize MTBE-degrading microorganisms from sediments in which MTBE biodegradation was observed.

  2. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  3. Biodegradation of crystal violet by Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, G K; Parshetti, S G; Telke, A A; Kalyani, D C; Doong, R A; Govindwar, S P

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter MTCC 8161 completely decolorized the Crystal Violet with 8 hr (10 mg/L) at static anoxic conditions. The decreased decolorization capability by A. radiobacter was observed, when the Crystal Violet concentration was increased from 10 to 100 mg/L. Semi-synthetic medium containing 1% yeast extract and 0.1% NH4C1 has shown 100% decolorization of Crystal Violet within 5 hr. A complete degradation of Crystal Violet by A. radiobacter was observed up to 7 cycles of repeated addition (10 mg/L). When the effect of increasing inoculum concentration on decolorization of Crystal Violet (100 mg/L) was studied, maximum decolorization was observed with 15% inoculum concentration. A significant increase in the activities of laccase (184%) and aminopyrine N-demethylase (300%) in cells obtained after decolorization indicated the involvement of these enzymes in decolorization process. The intermediates formed during the degradation of Crystal Violet were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). It was detected the presence of N,N,N',N"-tetramethylpararosaniline, [N, N-dimethylaminophenyl] [N-methylaminophenyl] benzophenone, N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, 4-methyl amino phenol and phenol. We proposed the hypothetical metabolic pathway of Crystal Violet biodegradation by A. radiobacter. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity study showed that Crystal Violet biodegradation metabolites were less toxic to bacteria (A. radiobacter, P. aurugenosa and A. vinelandii) contributing to soil fertility and for four kinds of plants (Sorghum bicolor Vigna radiata, Lens culinaris and Triticum aestivum) which are most sensitive, fast growing and commonly used in Indian agriculture.

  4. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  5. Acute Alcohol Consumption, Alcohol Outlets, and Gun Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Branas, Charles C.; Richmond, Therese S.; Ten Have, Thomas R.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    A case–control study of 149 intentionally self-inflicted gun injury cases (including completed gun suicides) and 302 population-based controls was conducted from 2003 to 2006 in a major US city. Two focal independent variables, acute alcohol consumption and alcohol outlet availability, were measured. Conditional logistic regression was adjusted for confounding variables. Gun suicide risk to individuals in areas of high alcohol outlet availability was less than the gun suicide risk they incurred from acute alcohol consumption, especially to excess. This corroborates prior work but also uncovers new information about the relationships between acute alcohol consumption, alcohol outlets, and gun suicide. Study limitations and implications are discussed. PMID:21929327

  6. The Influence of Alcohol-specific Communication on Adolescent Alcohol Use and Alcohol-related Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reimuller, Alison; Hussong, Andrea; Ennett, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-specific communication, a direct conversation between an adult and an adolescent regarding alcohol use, contains messages about alcohol relayed from the adult to the child. The current study examined the construct of alcohol-specific communication and the effect of messages on adolescent alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences. Parent-adolescent dyads were assessed biannually for 3 years (grades 9-11 at wave 6) to examine these relations in a large longitudinal study of adolescents initially in grades 6 through 8. An exploratory factor analysis identified two factors among alcohol-specific communication items, permissive messages and negative alcohol messages. Results showed previous level of adolescent alcohol use moderated the relation between permissive messages and alcohol use outcomes. Plotting of these interactions showed greater alcohol use and consequences with increasing permissive messages in adolescents with higher versus lower levels of previous alcohol use. Results suggest that parental messages regarding alcohol use may impact adolescent alcohol use beyond the effect of general parenting style and parental alcohol use. PMID:21667141

  7. [Clinical concept of alcoholic dementia].

    PubMed

    Kato, N

    1991-06-01

    Intellectual deterioration, changing in behavior and affect are often seen in association with long continued and heavy alcohol ingestion and such deteriorated states of patients are called alcoholic dementia. A large number of investigators have attempted to designate clinical concept of alcoholic dementia throughout the centuries and many kinds of term like as alcoholic pseudo-paralysis, alcoholic mental deficiency and alcoholic deterioration, etc, have been submitted since the beginning of 19th century. Numerous psychometric studies have indicated cognitive impairment and memory disturbance in chronic alcohol abusers and moreover brain PEG and CT-scan studies have shown sulcal widening and enlarged ventricles to be common in alcoholics. However, alcoholic dementia is hard to classify as a distinct disorder caused by alcoholic ingestion. The reason is lack of specific findings, both clinical and histopathological, like as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and other nutritional disorders in alcoholics. Victor, M. describes in his work the majority of patients who have come to autopsy with the clinical diagnosis of primary alcoholic dementia have shown the lesions of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and he postulates alcoholic dementia is heavily contaminated with burned-out Wernicke-Korsakoff disease. The clinical and pathological observations presented by this time represent alcoholic dementia is a residual category for cases in which there are severe impairment of intelligence with marked deterioration of personality following prolonged and heavy drinking.

  8. Biomass-derived chemicals: synthesis of biodegradable surfactant ether molecules from hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Arias, Karen S; Climent, Maria J; Corma, Avelino; Iborra, Sara

    2014-01-01

    A new class of biodegradable anionic surfactants with structures based on 5-alkoxymethylfuroate was prepared starting from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), through a one-pot-two-steps process which involves the selective etherification of HMF with fatty alcohols using heterogeneous solid acid, followed by a highly selective oxidation of the formyl group with a gold catalyst. The etherification step was optimized using aluminosilicates as acid catalysts with different pore topologies (H-Beta, HY, Mordenite, ZSM-5, ITQ-2, and MCM-41), different active sites (Bronsted or Lewis) and different adsorption properties. It was shown that highly hydrophobic defect-free H-Beta zeolites with Si/Al ratios higher than 25 are excellent acid catalysts to perform the selective etherification of HMF with fatty alcohols, avoiding the competitive self-etherification of HMF. Moreover, the 5-alkoxymethylfurfural derivatives obtained can be selectively oxidized to the corresponding furoic salts in excellent yield using Au/CeO2 as catalyst and air as oxidant, at moderated temperatures. Both H-Beta zeolite and Au/CeO2 could be reused several times without loss of activity. PMID:24106062

  9. The degradability of biodegradable plastics in aerobic and anaerobic waste landfill model reactors.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Tomonori; Sugano, Wataru; Nakanishi, Akane; Tateda, Masafumi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    Degradabilities of four kinds of commercial biodegradable plastics (BPs), polyhydroxybutyrate and hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) plastic, polycaprolactone plastic (PCL), blend of starch and polyvinyl alcohol (SPVA) plastic and cellulose acetate (CA) plastic were investigated in waste landfill model reactors that were operated as anaerobically and aerobically. The application of forced aeration to the landfill reactor for supplying aerobic condition could potentially stimulate polymer-degrading microorganisms. However, the individual degradation behavior of BPs under the aerobic condition was completely different. PCL, a chemically synthesized BP, showed film breakage under the both conditions, which may have contributed to a reduction in the waste volume regardless of aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Effective degradation of PHBV plastic was observed in the aerobic condition, though insufficient degradation was observed in the anaerobic condition. But the aeration did not contribute much to accelerate the volume reduction of SPVA plastic and CA plastic. It could be said that the recalcitrant portions of the plastics such as polyvinyl alcohol in SPVA plastic and the highly substituted CA in CA plastic prevented the BP from degradation. These results indicated existence of the great variations in the degradability of BPs in aerobic and anaerobic waste landfills, and suggest that suitable technologies for managing the waste landfill must be combined with utilization of BPs in order to enhance the reduction of waste volume in landfill sites.

  10. Exposure to Alcohol Advertisements and Teenage Alcohol-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Clyde W.; Stacy, Alan W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study used prospective data to test the hypothesis that exposure to alcohol advertising contributes to an increase in underage drinking and that an increase in underage drinking then leads to problems associated with drinking alcohol. METHODS: A total of 3890 students were surveyed once per year across 4 years from the 7th through the 10th grades. Assessments included several measures of exposure to alcohol advertising, alcohol use, problems related to alcohol use, and a range of covariates, such as age, drinking by peers, drinking by close adults, playing sports, general TV watching, acculturation, parents’ jobs, and parents’ education. RESULTS: Structural equation modeling of alcohol consumption showed that exposure to alcohol ads and/or liking of those ads in seventh grade were predictive of the latent growth factors for alcohol use (past 30 days and past 6 months) after controlling for covariates. In addition, there was a significant total effect for boys and a significant mediated effect for girls of exposure to alcohol ads and liking of those ads in 7th grade through latent growth factors for alcohol use on alcohol-related problems in 10th grade. CONCLUSIONS: Younger adolescents appear to be susceptible to the persuasive messages contained in alcohol commercials broadcast on TV, which sometimes results in a positive affective reaction to the ads. Alcohol ad exposure and the affective reaction to those ads influence some youth to drink more and experience drinking-related problems later in adolescence. PMID:23359585

  11. Invertebrate models of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Henrike; Mustard, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    For invertebrates to become useful models for understanding the genetic and physiological mechanisms of alcoholism related behaviors and the predisposition towards alcoholism, several general requirements must be fulfilled. The animal should encounter ethanol in its natural habitat, so that the central nervous system of the organism will have evolved mechanisms for responding to ethanol exposure. How the brain adapts to ethanol exposure depends on its access to ethanol, which can be regulated metabolically and/or by physical barriers. Therefore, a model organism should have metabolic enzymes for ethanol degradation similar to those found in humans. The neurons and supporting glial cells of the model organism that regulate behaviors affected by ethanol should share the molecular and physiological pathways found in humans, so that results can be compared. Finally, the use of invertebrate models should offer advantages over traditional model systems and should offer new insights into alcoholism-related behaviors. In this review we will summarize behavioral similarities and identified genes and mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced behaviors in invertebrates. This review mainly focuses on the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the honey bee Apis mellifera and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as model systems. We will discuss insights gained from those studies in conjunction with their vertebrate model counterparts and the implications for future research into alcoholism and alcohol-induced behaviors.

  12. Alcoholic myopathy and acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Victor R; Crabb, David W; Farrés, Jaume; Emery, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic myopathy is characterized by biochemical and morphological lesions within muscle, ranging from impairment of muscle strength and loss of lean tissue to cellular disturbances and altered gene expression. The chronic form of the disease is five times more common than cirrhosis and is characterized by selective atrophy of type 11 (anaerobic) fibres: type I (aerobic) fibres are relatively protected. Although the causative agent is known (i.e. ethanol), the intervening steps between alcohol ingestion and the development of symptoms and lesions are poorly understood. However, acetaldehyde appears to have an important role in the aetiology of the disease. For example, alcohol is a potent perturbant of muscle protein synthesis in vivo, and this effect is exacerbated by cyanamide pre-dosage, which raises acetaldehyde concentrations. Acetaldehyde alone also reduces muscle protein synthesis in vivo and proteolytic activity in vitro. The formation of acetaldehyde protein adducts is another mechanism of putative importance in alcoholic myopathy. These adducts are formed within muscle in response to either acute or chronic alcohol exposure and the adducts are located preferentially within the sarcolemmal and sub-sarcolemmal regions. However, the significance of protein adduct formation is unclear since we do not currently know the identity of the adducted muscle proteins nor whether adduction alters the biochemical or functional properties of skeletal muscle proteins.

  13. Genetics of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence strongly indicate that genetic factors contribute to the risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). There is substantial heterogeneity in AUD, which complicates studies seeking to identify specific genetic factors. To identify these genetic effects, several different alcohol-related phenotypes have been analyzed, including diagnosis and quantitative measures related to AUDs. Study designs have used candidate gene analyses, genetic linkage studies, genomewide association studies (GWAS), and analyses of rare variants. Two genes that encode enzymes of alcohol metabolism have the strongest effect on AUD: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B each has strongly protective variants that reduce risk, with odds ratios approximately 0.2-0.4. A number of other genes important in AUD have been identified and replicated, including GABRA2 and alcohol dehydrogenases 1B and 4. GWAS have identified additional candidates. Rare variants are likely also to play a role; studies of these are just beginning. A multifaceted approach to gene identification, targeting both rare and common variations and assembling much larger datasets for meta-analyses, is critical for identifying the key genes and pathways important in AUD.

  14. Biodegradable starch-based polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, Anna I.; Tyukova, Irina S.; Trufanova, Elena I.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight additives, temperature and mechanical action on the structure and properties of starch are discussed. Special attention is given to mixtures of starch with synthetic polymers, e.g., co-polymers of ethylene with vinyl acetate, vinyl alcohol, acrylic acid, cellulose derivatives and other natural polymers. These mixtures can be used in the development of novel environmentally safe materials (films, coatings, packaging materials) and various articles for short-term use. The bibliography includes 105 references.

  15. Exact Abjm Partition Function from Tba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrov, Pavel; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-11-01

    We report on the exact computation of the S3 partition function of U(N)k × U(N)-k ABJM theory for k = 1, N = 1, …, 19. The result is a polynomial in π-1 with rational coefficients. As an application of our results, we numerically determine the coefficient of the membrane 1-instanton correction to the partition function.

  16. BIOPLUME MODEL FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY OXYGEN LIMITED BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the organic pollutants entering ground water are potentially biodegradable in the subsurface. This potential has been demonstrated in aquifers contaminated by wood-creosoting process wastes. The persistence of many of these organic compounds in the subsurface indicated ...

  17. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete.

  18. Impact of metals on the biodegradation of organic pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrin, Todd R; Maier, Raina M

    2003-01-01

    Forty percent of hazardous waste sites in the United States are co-contaminated with organic and metal pollutants. Data from both aerobic and anaerobic systems demonstrate that biodegradation of the organic component can be reduced by metal toxicity. Metal bioavailability, determined primarily by medium composition/soil type and pH, governs the extent to which metals affect biodegradation. Failure to consider bioavailability rather than total metal likely accounts for much of the enormous variability among reports of inhibitory concentrations of metals. Metals appear to affect organic biodegradation through impacting both the physiology and ecology of organic degrading microorganisms. Recent approaches to increasing organic biodegradation in the presence of metals involve reduction of metal bioavailability and include the use of metal-resistant bacteria, treatment additives, and clay minerals. The addition of divalent cations and adjustment of pH are additional strategies currently under investigation. PMID:12826480

  19. COMPARING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE AND RESPIROMETRIC TECHNIQUES FOR EVALUATING BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biodegradation of petrochemical contaminants such as crude oil and polychlorinated biphenyls has been determined to remove these contaminants from the environment. The biological processes that result in the contaminant degradation have been determined primarily through bench-sc...

  20. Biodegradable elastomers for biomedical applications and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Zhang, Zheng; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W; Poot, André A

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic biodegradable polymers are of great value for the preparation of implants that are required to reside only temporarily in the body. The use of biodegradable polymers obviates the need for a second surgery to remove the implant, which is the case when a nondegradable implant is used. After implantation in the body, biomedical devices may be subjected to degradation and erosion. Understanding the mechanisms of these processes is essential for the development of biomedical devices or implants with a specific function, for example, scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications. For the engineering and regeneration of soft tissues (e.g., blood vessels, cardiac muscle and peripheral nerves), biodegradable polymers are needed that are flexible and elastic. The scaffolds prepared from these polymers should have tuneable degradation properties and should perform well under long-term cyclic deformation conditions. The required polymers, which are either physically or chemically crosslinked biodegradable elastomers, are reviewed in this article.