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Sample records for alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk

  1. A Dual-Focus Motivational Intervention to Reduce the Risk of Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasquez, Mary M.; Ingersoll, Karen S.; Sobell, Mark B.; Floyd, R. Louise; Sobell, Linda Carter; von Sternberg, Kirk

    2010-01-01

    Project CHOICES developed an integrated behavioral intervention for prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure in women at high risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Settings included primary care, university-hospital based obstetrical/gynecology practices, an urban jail, substance abuse treatment settings, and a media-recruited sample in three large…

  2. Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, R. Louise; Sobell, Mark; Velasquez, Mary M.; Ingersoll, Karen; Nettleman, Mary; Sobell, Linda; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Ceperich, Sherry; von Sternberg, Kirk; Bolton, Burt; Skarpness, Bradley; Nagaraja, Jyothi

    2010-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure is a leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities in the United States. Design A randomized controlled trial (2002–2005; data analyzed 2005–2006) of a brief motivational intervention to reduce the risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP) in preconceptional women by focusing on both risk drinking and ineffective contraception use. Setting/Participants A total of 830 nonpregnant women, aged 18–44 years, and currently at risk for an AEP were recruited in six diverse settings in Florida, Texas, and Virginia. Combined settings had higher proportions of women at risk for AEP (12.5% overall) than in the general population (2%). Interventions Participants were randomized to receive information plus a brief motivational intervention (n=416) or to receive information only (n=414). The brief motivational intervention consisted of four counseling sessions and one contraception consultation and services visit. Main Outcome Measures Women consuming more than five drinks on any day or more than eight drinks per week on average, were considered risk drinkers; women who had intercourse without effective contraception were considered at risk of pregnancy. Reversing either or both risk conditions resulted in reduced risk of an AEP. Results Across the follow-up period, the odds ratios (ORs) of being at reduced risk for AEP were twofold greater in the intervention group: 3 months, 2.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.69–3.20); 6 months, 2.15 (CI=1.52–3.06); 9 months, 2.11 (CI=1.47–3.03). Between-groups differences by time phase were 18.0%, 17.0%, and 14. 8%, respectively. Conclusions A brief motivational intervention can reduce the risk of an AEP. PMID:17218187

  3. Motivational interviewing + feedback intervention to reduce alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk among college binge drinkers: determinants and patterns of response.

    PubMed

    Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Ingersoll, Karen S

    2011-10-01

    Many college women are at risk for pregnancy, and binge drinking college women are often at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Brief interventions with sustainable outcomes are needed, particularly for college women who are binge drinking, at risk for pregnancy, and at increased risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Two-hundred-twenty-eight women at a Mid-Atlantic urban university at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy enrolled in the randomized clinical trial, and 207 completed the 4 month follow-up. The BALANCE intervention used Motivational Interviewing plus feedback to target drinking and contraception behaviors. Main outcome measures included (1) the rate of risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy, (2) the rate of risk drinking, and (3) the rate of pregnancy risk. At 4-month follow-up, the rate of alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk was significantly lower in the intervention (20.2%) than the control condition (34.9%), (P < .02). Assignment to the intervention condition halved the odds of women remaining at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy, while not receiving the intervention doubled the odds of continued alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk (OR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.16-4.09). A baseline history of blackouts, continued high blood alcohol drinking days at 1 month, and continued risk for pregnancy at 1 month independently contributed to a multivariate model of continued alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk at 4 month follow-up. BALANCE reduced alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk, with similar outcomes to longer interventions. Because early response predicted sustained alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk reduction, those who fail to achieve initial change could be identified for further intervention. The BALANCE intervention could be adopted into existing student health or university alcohol programs. The risks of unintended pregnancy and alcohol-exposed pregnancy among binge drinking women in college merit greater prevention efforts.

  4. Preconceptional motivational interviewing interventions to reduce alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Ceperich, Sherry D; Hettema, Jennifer E; Farrell-Carnahan, Leah; Penberthy, J Kim

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol exposed pregnancy (AEP) is a leading cause of preventable birth defects. While randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown that multi-session motivational interviewing-based interventions reduce AEP risk, a one-session intervention could facilitate broader implementation. The purposes of this study were to: (1) test a one-session motivational AEP prevention intervention for community women and (2) compare outcomes to previous RCTs. Participants at risk for AEP (N=217) were randomized to motivational interviewing+assessment feedback (EARLY), informational video, or informational brochure conditions. Outcomes were drinks per drinking day (DDD), ineffective contraception rate, and AEP risk at 3 and 6 months. All interventions were associated with decreased DDD, ineffective contraception rate, and AEP risk. Participants who received EARLY had larger absolute risk reductions in ineffective contraception and AEP risk, but not DDD. Effect sizes were compared to previous RCTs. The one-session EARLY intervention had less powerful effects than multi-session AEP prevention interventions among community women, but may provide a new option in a continuum of preventive care.

  5. Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy among American-Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jamie; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete; Hanson, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Research has determined that the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) must occur preconceptually, either by reducing alcohol intake in women planning pregnancy or at risk for becoming pregnant, or by preventing pregnancy in women drinking at risky levels. One such AEP prevention programme with non-pregnant American-Indian (AI) women is…

  6. A Novel Integration Effort to Reduce the Risk for Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Among Women Attending Urban STD Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Heidi E.; Chander, Geetanjali; Green, Patricia P.; Hutsell, Catherine A.; Weingarten, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP) is a significant public health problem in the United States. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics serve female clients with a high prevalence of heavy alcohol consumption coupled with ineffective contraceptive use. Project CHOICES (Changing High-Risk AlcOhol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness) is an evidence-based, brief intervention to lower risk of AEP by targeting alcohol and contraceptive behaviors through motivational interviewing and individualized feedback. We describe our experience integrating and implementing CHOICES in STD clinics. This endeavor aligns with CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention's program collaboration and service integration strategic priority to strengthen collaborative work across disease areas and integrate services provided by related programs at the client level. PMID:24385650

  7. CHOICES: an integrated behavioral intervention to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies among high-risk women in community settings.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Mary M; von Sternberg, Kirk; Parrish, Danielle E

    2013-01-01

    CHOICES is an integrated behavioral intervention for prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure in women at high risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. The intervention uses motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral strategies, and targets adoption of effective contraception and reduction of alcohol use. The CHOICES intervention includes four manual-guided counseling sessions delivered by behavioral health counselors and one contraceptive session with a family planning clinician. CHOICES's efficacy has been established through a series of randomized controlled trials in settings including primary care, university hospital-based obstetrical/gynecology practices, urban jails, substance abuse treatment settings, and a media-recruited sample in three large cities. This article describes the CHOICES line of research including the epidemiology, feasibility, and efficacy studies. It also details the CHOICES intervention and the components of each session. In addition, the authors describe current studies testing modifications of the CHOICES intervention, the dissemination efforts to date, and implications for social work practice.

  8. Preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancy among American-Indian youth.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jamie; Baete Kenyon, Den Yelle; Hanson, Jessica D

    Research has determined that the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) must occur pre-conceptually with women, either by reducing alcohol intake in women planning pregnancy or at-risk for becoming pregnant, or by preventing pregnancy in women drinking at risky levels. One such AEP prevention programme with non-pregnant American Indian women is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) CHOICES (Changing High-risk alcohOl use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study) Programme, which shows promise in reducing AEP risk in American Indian women aged 18 or older. A community needs assessment was conducted with key informant interviews and focus groups with an emphasis on how to expand OST CHOICES. To identify interconnected themes, a content analysis methodology was used on the qualitative feedback from the focus groups and interviews. Altogether, key informant interviews were completed with 25 health and social service professionals. Eight focus groups were held with 58 American Indian participants, including adult women of child-bearing age, elder women, and adult men. Several sub-themes regarding the prevention of AEP with youth were identified, expanding the OST CHOICES curriculum into the schools, and the role of family and culture within AEP prevention.

  9. A Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkku, Leigh E.; Mengel, Mark B.; Nicholson, Robert A.; Hile, Matthew G.; Morris, Daniel S.; Salas, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Despite warnings that drinking during pregnancy is unsafe, many women are still at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP). This article describes the outcomes of a web-based, self-guided change intervention designed to lower the risk for AEPs in a community. A sample of 458 women, between the ages of 18 and 44 years and at risk for an AEP…

  10. Depressive Symptoms Moderate Treatment Response to Brief Intervention for Prevention of Alcohol Exposed Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, J. Kim; Hook, Joshua; Hettema, Jennifer; Farrell-Carnahan, Leah; Ingersoll, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The previously published randomized controlled trial, EARLY, tested the efficacy of a Motivational Interviewing (MI) plus Feedback condition against a Video Information (VI) condition and an Informational Brochure (IB) condition in reducing drinking and/or increasing contraception effectiveness, and found that drinking and rates of effective contraception improved in all conditions. In this reanalysis of the data from EARLY, potential moderating effects of depressive, global distress, and anxiety symptoms in response to the 3 brief interventions to reduce alcohol exposed pregnancy risk were examined. Women with higher levels of depression at baseline reported greater improvements in the MI plus Feedback condition versus the VI and IB conditions with depression moderating both drinking and contraceptive effectiveness. Global distress moderated only drinking behavior in the MI plus Feedback but not other groups and anxiety was not a moderator of outcome in any of the intervention groups. Depressed or distressed women at risk for AEP may benefit from an AEP risk reduction intervention that incorporates interaction with a treatment provider versus educational information provided via video or written materials. PMID:23810264

  11. Depressive symptoms moderate treatment response to brief intervention for prevention of alcohol exposed pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Penberthy, J Kim; Hook, Joshua N; Hettema, Jennifer; Farrell-Carnahan, Leah; Ingersoll, Karen

    2013-10-01

    The previously published randomized controlled trial, EARLY, tested the efficacy of a motivational interviewing (MI) plus feedback condition against a video information (VI) condition and an informational brochure (IB) condition in reducing drinking and/or increasing contraception effectiveness, and found that drinking and rates of effective contraception improved in all conditions. In this reanalysis of the data from EARLY, potential moderating effects of depressive, global distress, and anxiety symptoms in response to the three brief interventions to reduce alcohol exposed pregnancy risk were examined. Women with higher levels of depression at baseline reported greater improvements in the MI plus feedback condition versus the VI and IB conditions with depression moderating both drinking and contraceptive effectiveness. Global distress moderated only drinking behavior in the MI plus feedback but not other groups and anxiety was not a moderator of outcome in any of the intervention groups. Depressed or distressed women at risk for AEP may benefit from an AEP risk reduction intervention that incorporates interaction with a treatment provider versus educational information provided via video or written materials.

  12. Toward prevention of alcohol exposed pregnancies: characteristics that relate to ineffective contraception and risky drinking

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Stefania; Farrell, Leah V.; Penberthy, J. Kim; Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Ingersoll, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancy is a leading cause of preventable birth defects in the United States. This paper describes the motivational patterns that relate to risky drinking and ineffective contraception, two behaviors that can result in alcohol-exposed pregnancy. As part of an intervention study aimed at reducing alcohol-exposed pregnancy 124 women were recruited and reported demographic characteristics, readiness to change, stages of change, drinking, contraception, and sexual behavior history. Our results showed the following. Drinking: A significant positive correlation was found between the number of drinks consumed in 90 days and the Importance to reduce drinking (r = .23, p = .008). A significant negative correlation between number of drinks and confidence to reduce drinking (r = −.39, p = .000) was found as well. Significant differences were found in the total number of drinks consumed in 90 days between the five stages of change (F = (4,118), 3.12, p = .01). Women in Preparation reported drinking a significantly higher number of drinks than women in other stages of change. Contraception: There were significant negative correlations between ineffective contraception and Importance (r = −.38, p = .00), confidence (r = −.20, p = .02) and Readiness (r = −.43, p = .00) to use contraception effectively. Significant differences in contraception ineffectiveness were found for women in different stages of change (F = (4,115) 8.58, p = .000). Women in Precontemplation reported significantly higher levels of contraception ineffectiveness compared to women in other stages of change. Results show a clear relationship between higher alcohol consumption and higher levels of motivation to reduce drinking. In contrast, higher levels of ineffective contraception were related to lower levels of motivation to use contraception effectively. This suggests risky drinking may be better targeted with brief skills building interventions and ineffective contraception may

  13. The impact of micronutrient supplementation in alcohol-exposed pregnancies on information processing skills in Ukrainian infants.

    PubMed

    Kable, J A; Coles, C D; Keen, C L; Uriu-Adams, J Y; Jones, K L; Yevtushok, L; Kulikovsky, Y; Wertelecki, W; Pedersen, T L; Chambers, C D

    2015-11-01

    The potential of micronutrients to ameliorate the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) was explored in a clinical trial conducted in Ukraine. Cardiac orienting responses (ORs) during a habituation/dishabituation learning paradigm were obtained from 6 to 12 month-olds to assess neurophysiological encoding and memory. Women who differed in prenatal alcohol use were recruited during pregnancy and assigned to a group (No study-provided supplements, multivitamin/mineral supplement, or multivitamin/mineral supplement plus choline supplement). Heart rate was collected for 30 s prior to stimulus onset and 12 s post-stimulus onset. Difference values (∆HR) for the first 3 trials of each condition were aggregated for analysis. Gestational blood samples were collected to assess maternal nutritional status and changes as a function of the intervention. Choline supplementation resulted in a greater ∆HR on the visual habituation trials for all infants and for the infants with no PAE on the dishabituation trials. The latency of the response was reduced in both conditions for all infants whose mothers received choline supplementation. Change in gestational choline level was positively related to ∆HR during habituation trials and levels of one choline metabolite, dimethylglycine (DMG), predicted ∆HR during habituation trials and latency of responses. A trend was found between DMG and ∆HR on the dishabituation trials and latency of the response. Supplementation did not affect ORs to auditory stimuli. Choline supplementation when administered together with routinely recommended multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements during pregnancy may provide a beneficial impact to basic learning mechanisms involved in encoding and memory of environmental events in alcohol-exposed pregnancies as well as non- or low alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Changes in maternal nutrient status suggested that one mechanism by which choline supplementation may positively impact brain development is

  14. Development and Implementation of CHOICES Group to Reduce Drinking, Improve Contraception, and Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies in American Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jessica D; Ingersoll, Karen; Pourier, Susan

    2015-12-01

    Public health officials assert that prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) should begin before conception, by reducing alcohol consumption in women at-risk for or planning pregnancy, and/or preventing pregnancy in women who are drinking at risky levels. One such effort is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) CHOICES Program. While the OST CHOICES Program has been successfully implemented, a community-based needs assessment determined that the OST CHOICES intervention should expand and be delivered in a group setting using group motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. After extensive group MI and CHOICES group trainings, recruitment for CHOICES Group began and within a ten month period, a total of twelve groups with non-pregnant American Indian women were held for this pilot intervention. Evaluations completed by participants indicated that CHOICES Group sessions positively engaged members, had low levels of anger or tension, and had average levels of avoidance of personal responsibility. An evaluation of the CHOICES Group leaders indicated strengths in certain MI skills, although improvement is needed in some core MI and group leadership skills. This is an important expansion of a successful AEP prevention program (CHOICES), as well as a novel application of MI, and recommendations and future plans for this intervention are outlined.

  15. Development and Implementation of CHOICES Group to Reduce Drinking, Improve Contraception, and Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies in American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Karen; Pourier, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Public health officials assert that prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) should begin before conception, by reducing alcohol consumption in women at-risk for or planning pregnancy, and/or preventing pregnancy in women who are drinking at risky levels. One such effort is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) CHOICES Program. While the OST CHOICES Program has been successfully implemented, a community-based needs assessment determined that the OST CHOICES intervention should expand and be delivered in a group setting using group motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. After extensive group MI and CHOICES group trainings, recruitment for CHOICES Group began and within a ten month period, a total of twelve groups with non-pregnant American Indian women were held for this pilot intervention. Evaluations completed by participants indicated that CHOICES Group sessions positively engaged members, had low levels of anger or tension, and had average levels of avoidance of personal responsibility. An evaluation of the CHOICES Group leaders indicated strengths in certain MI skills, although improvement is needed in some core MI and group leadership skills. This is an important expansion of a successful AEP prevention program (CHOICES), as well as a novel application of MI, and recommendations and future plans for this intervention are outlined. PMID:26265591

  16. The Impact of Micronutrient Supplementation in Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies on Information Processing Skills in Ukrainian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kable, J. A.; Coles, C. D.; Keen, C. L.; Uriu-Adams, J. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Yevtushok, L.; Kulikovsky, Y.; Wertelecki, W.; Pedersen, T. L.; Chambers, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    the dishabituation trials (r = .19) and latency of the response (r = −.18). Multivitamin/mineral or multivitamin/mineral plus choline supplementation did not significantly affect cardiac orienting responses to the auditory stimuli. Conclusion Choline supplementation when administered together with routinely recommended multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements during pregnancy may provide a beneficial impact to basic learning mechanisms involved in encoding and memory of environmental events in alcohol-exposed pregnancies as well as non- or low alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Changes in nutrient status of the mother suggested that this process may be mediated by the breakdown of choline to betaine and then to DMG. One mechanism by which choline supplementation may positively affect brain development is through prevention of fetal alcohol-related depletion of DMG, a metabolic nutrient that can protect against overproduction of glycine, during critical periods of neurogenesis. PMID:26493109

  17. CHOICES: An Empirically Supported Intervention for Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Shannon K.; Velasquez, Mary M.; von Sternberg, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Examples of behavioral interventions that are efficacious in the research setting as well as practical and translatable to the "real-world" are critically needed as models for social work researchers and clinicians. This article presents the Changing High-Risk Alcohol Use and Improving Contraception Effectiveness Study (CHOICES)…

  18. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program: Modifying an Existing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Intervention for Use in an American Indian Community

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica D.; Pourier, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancies are a health issue for many American Indian communities. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how an existing alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program with non-pregnant women (Project CHOICES) was modified to fit the needs and norms of an American Indian community. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program was developed and implemented using community feedback through initial meetings, reviewing materials, gathering input into recruitment and intervention logistics, and conducting interviews to evaluate the program. The intervention was implemented and has been enrolling non-pregnant American Indian women for the past several years. While data collection is ongoing, it has shown preliminary success in changing behaviors and in impacting how the community views the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Overall, this study highlights the potential to expand this prevention program to other sites and with other populations, such as adolescents. By the end of this article, readers will comprehend the steps necessary to replicate such a program at other tribal and rural sites. PMID:26703670

  19. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program: Modifying an Existing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Intervention for Use in an American Indian Community.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jessica D; Pourier, Susan

    2015-12-22

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancies are a health issue for many American Indian communities. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how an existing alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program with non-pregnant women (Project CHOICES) was modified to fit the needs and norms of an American Indian community. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program was developed and implemented using community feedback through initial meetings, reviewing materials, gathering input into recruitment and intervention logistics, and conducting interviews to evaluate the program. The intervention was implemented and has been enrolling non-pregnant American Indian women for the past several years. While data collection is ongoing, it has shown preliminary success in changing behaviors and in impacting how the community views the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Overall, this study highlights the potential to expand this prevention program to other sites and with other populations, such as adolescents. By the end of this article, readers will comprehend the steps necessary to replicate such a program at other tribal and rural sites.

  20. [Detecting high risk pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal

    2009-12-20

    Antenatal care is aiming to reduce maternal land foetal mortality and morbidity. Maternal and foetal mortality can be due to different causes. Their knowledge allows identifying pregnancy (high risk pregnancy) with factors associated with an increased risk for maternal and/or foetal mortality and serious morbidity. Identification of high risk pregnancies and initiation of appropriate treatment and/or surveillance should improve maternal and/or foetal outcome. New risk factors are continuously described thanks to improvement in antenatal care and development in biology and cytopathology, increasing complexity in identifying high risk pregnancies. Level of risk can change all over the pregnancy. Ideally, it should be evaluated prior to the pregnancy and at each antenatal visit. Clinical examination is able to screen for intra-uterin growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, threatened for preterm labour; ultrasounds help in the diagnosis of foetal morphological anomalies, foetal chromosomal anomalies, placenta praevia and abnormal foetal growth; biological exams are used to screen for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, trisomy 21 (for which screening method just changed), rhesus immunisation, seroconversion for toxoplasmosis or rubeola, unknown infectious disease (syphilis, hepatitis B, VIH). During pregnancy, most of the preventive strategies have to be initiated during the first trimester or even before conception. Prevention for neural-tube defects, neonatal hypocalcemia and listeriosis should be performed for all women. On the opposite, some measures are concerning only women with risk factors such as prevention for toxoplasmosis, rhesus immunization (which recently changed), tobacco complications and pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth factor restriction.

  1. Pregnancy and Obesity: Know the Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy week by week Concerned about pregnancy and obesity? Understand the risks of obesity during pregnancy — plus steps to promote a healthy ... you can do to promote a healthy pregnancy. Obesity is defined as having an excessive amount of ...

  2. Reducing the Risks of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, M. Faith

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the medical and social risks of teenage pregnancy and describes two successful programs dealing with pregnancy and parenting: the St. Paul Maternal and Infant Care Project in Minnesota and the Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project in San Francisco. (SK)

  3. What Is the Risk for a Second Ectopic Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old What Is the Risk for a Second Ectopic Pregnancy? KidsHealth > For Parents > What Is the Risk for ... TOPIC Medical Care During Pregnancy Pregnancy & Newborn Center Pregnancy Precautions: FAQs Ectopic Pregnancy Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  4. Management of high-risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coco, L; Giannone, T T; Zarbo, G

    2014-08-01

    Today, 88% of pregnancies has a physiological course during which just basic care, while in 12% of cases there is a high-risk pregnancy that requires additional assistance and specific. The approach that should be used is that of supervision in all pregnant women considering their potential to have a normal pregnancy until there is no clear evidence to the contrary. Pregnancy is considered at risk if there are medical conditions that may affect maternal or fetal health or life of the mother, fetus or both. Among the risk factors for pregnancy there is first the woman's age, in fact the increase in high-risk pregnancies in the last 20 years is attributable to the increase in the average age of women who face pregnancy. In addition, the diet is very important during pregnancy and diabetes or autoimmune diseases often lead to the failure of a pregnancy. Risk factors for pregnancy, also, are the complications that occur during its course as hypertension during pregnancy, and infectious diseases. Fears and anxieties typical of a high-risk pregnancy prevent the couple to live happily in the months of gestation. Effective communication, control and early detection are important tools that doctors must be able to ensure that women in order to plan the best treatment strategies and to minimize the risks of maternal and / or fetal.

  5. Case Management Reduces Drinking During Pregnancy among High Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip A.; Marais, Anna-Susan; Gossage, J. Phillip; Barnard, Ronel; Joubert, Belinda; Cloete, Marise; Hendricks, Natalie; Roux, Sumien; Blom, Annalien; Steenekamp, Jeanetta; Alexander, Theresa; Andreas, Romena; Human, Suzanne; Snell, Cudore; Seedat, Soraya; Parry, Charles C.; Kalberg, Wendy O.; Buckley, David; Blankenship, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Aim Estimate the efficacy of Case Management (CM) for women at high risk for bearing a child with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Design Women were recruited from antenatal clinics and engaged in 18 months of CM. Setting A South African community with a subculture of heavy, regular, weekend, recreational drinking and high documented rates of FASD. Participants Forty-one women who were high risk for bearing a child with FASD. Measures Statistical analysis of trends in drinking and other risk factors. Findings At intake 87.8% were pregnant, most had previous alcohol-exposed pregnancies, most/all of their friends drink alcohol (67.5%), and 50.0% had stressful lives. CM was particularly valuable for pregnant women, as statistically significant reductions in alcohol risk were obtained for them in multiple variables: total drinks on weekends after six months of CM (p = .026) and estimated peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at six (p < .001) and 18 months (p < .001). For participants completing 18 months of CM, AUDIT scores improved significantly by 6-month follow-up (from 19.8 to 9.7, p = .000), and even though rising at 12 and 18 months, AUDIT scores indicate that problematic drinking remained statistically significantly lower than baseline throughout CM. Happiness scale scores correlated significantly with reduced drinking in most time periods. Conclusions An enduring change in drinking behavior is difficult in this social setting. Yet, CM provided by skilled and empathic case managers reduced maternal drinking at critical times, and therefore, alcohol exposure levels to the fetus. PMID:24729823

  6. Smoking, HIV, and risk of pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Westreich, Daniel; Cates, Jordan; Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen M.; Seidman, Dominika; Cropsey, Karen; Wright, Rodney; Milam, Joel; Young, Mary A.; Mehta, C. Christina; Gustafson, Deborah R.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Fischl, Margaret A.; Adimora, Adaora A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Cigarette smoking during pregnancy increases risks of poor pregnancy outcomes including miscarriage and stillbirth (pregnancy loss), but the effect of smoking on pregnancy loss among HIV-infected women has not been explored. Here, investigated the impact of smoking on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, and estimated the potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive women. Design: We analyzed pregnancy outcomes in HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study between 1994 and 2014. Methods: We estimated effects of current smoking at or immediately before pregnancy on pregnancy loss; we controlled for confounding using regression approaches, and estimated potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions using a semiparametric g-formula approach. Results: Analysis examined 1033 pregnancies among 659 women. The effect of smoking on pregnancy loss differed dramatically by HIV status: adjusted for confounding, the risk difference comparing current smokers to current nonsmokers was 19.2% (95% confidence limit 10.9–27.5%) in HIV-positive women and 9.7% (95% confidence limit 0.0–19.4%) in HIV-negative women. These results were robust to sensitivity analyses. We estimated that we would need to offer a realistic smoking cessation intervention to 36 women to prevent one pregnancy loss. Conclusion: Smoking is a highly prevalent exposure with important consequences for pregnancy in HIV-positive pregnant women in the United States, even in the presence of potent highly active antiretroviral therapy. This evidence supports greater efforts to promote smoking cessation interventions among HIV-positive women, especially those who desire to become pregnant. PMID:27902507

  7. High-risk pregnancy and the rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Soh, May Ching; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Rheumatologists are increasingly involved in the care of young women who, in the age of biologic therapy, are now gaining control of their rheumatic diseases and attempting pregnancy. With careful planning, most women with rheumatic diseases have successful pregnancies. This article focuses specifically on the highest-risk pregnancies and controversial areas. We discuss the women at risk of complications, the types of maternal and fetal complications, the treatments that can be used in pregnancy (and breastfeeding) and longer-term outcomes that could affect the mother. SLE, RA, ANCA-associated vasculitides, large vessel vasculitis (e.g. Takayasu's) and other CTDs (e.g. scleroderma) are among the conditions covered. The evidence and controversies regarding the recommendations for the use of biologics in pregnancy are discussed. The role of the rheumatologist in pregnancy planning and caring for the pregnant and post-partum woman as part of the multidisciplinary team is discussed.

  8. [Hereditary thrombophilia and pregnancy: thrombotic risk and pregnancy outcome].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Glória

    2012-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease and obstetric complications related to ischemia of the placenta are currently the major causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. Thrombophilia been implicated in their aetiology and the magnitude of the risk depends on the type of thrombophilia. As the evidence is still unclear and controversial, questions about the clinical management of pregnant women with thrombophilia are a daily issue. We aim to review, bearing in mind the consensus and controversies, the impact of inherited thrombophilia in the risk of thrombosis related to pregnancy and of obstetric complications. Moreover, the diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic approach during pregnancy and puerperium, including the role of antithrombotic pharmacopoeia available, will be discussed.

  9. Preventing adolescent pregnancy and associated risks.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R.

    1995-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a complex and frustrating problem that exacts a large social and personal cost. This year approximately 40,000 Canadian teenagers will become pregnant. With proper prevention, this number could be reduced. Pregnant teenagers seem to be at increased risk for some obstetric complications and their children for some neonatal complications. Family physicians who see patients over the course of a lifetime are in a good position to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the associated complications. PMID:8520241

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy during high-risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Walker, R; Swartz, C M

    1994-09-01

    Pregnancy increases the risk of injury associated with mental illness. The varieties of malnutrition, substance abuse, and aggression that may accompany mental illness can injure the unborn child in more severe ways than the patient herself. Dangers associated with illness-related behavior can outweight the risks of pharmacotherapy, but no psychotropic drug is approved for use during pregnancy. Failure to produce a prompt or lasting remission of psychiatric symptoms also is a significant possibility with medication. The morbidity from continued illness and the incompletely described adverse effects of psychotropic drugs increases the attractiveness of ECT for severely depressed pregnant patients, especially with associated high-risk conditions. This paper discusses physiologic changes occurring during pregnancy and ECT and reviews contemporary monitors of maternal and fetal well-being. Guidelines are suggested for ECT during regular and high-risk pregnancies. The authors conclude that using additional precautions with high-risk pregnant patients permits ECT to be given with relative safety; medical and obstetric risk factors need not prevent its use.

  11. Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164081.html Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies Finding suggests other ... HealthDay News) -- Two tests that screen for preterm birth risk rarely spot trouble in first-time pregnancies, ...

  12. Who Is at Increased Risk of Health Problems during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Research Goals Activities and Advances ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications ...

  13. Heart Conditions and Pregnancy: Know the Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... week by week Pregnancy stresses your heart and circulatory system, but many women who have heart conditions deliver ... conditions and pregnancy. Pregnancy stresses your heart and circulatory system. During pregnancy, your blood volume increases by 30 ...

  14. Analyzing risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Michael S; Zhang, Xun; Platt, Robert W

    2014-02-01

    Approaches for analyzing the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes have been the source of much debate and many publications. Much of the problem, in our view, is the conflation of time at risk with gestational age at birth (or birth weight, a proxy for gestational age). We consider the causal questions underlying such analyses with the help of a generic directed acyclic graph. We discuss competing risks and populations at risk in the context of appropriate numerators and denominators, respectively. We summarize 3 different approaches to quantifying risks with respect to gestational age, each of which addresses a distinct etiological or prognostic question (i.e., cumulative risk, prospective risk, or instantaneous risk (hazard)) and suggest the appropriate denominators for each. We show how the gestational age-specific risk of perinatal death (PND) can be decomposed as the product of the gestational age-specific risk of birth and the risk of PND conditional on birth at a given gestational age. Finally, we demonstrate how failure to consider the first of these 2 risks leads to selection bias. This selection bias creates the well-known crossover paradox, thus obviating the need to posit common causes of early birth and PND other than the study exposure.

  15. Risk perception regarding drug use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Widnes, Sofia F; Schjøtt, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Pregnant women, but also physicians, have unrealistically high perceptions of teratogenic drug effects. This may result in suboptimal treatment of disease and even influence decisions of whether to continue pregnancy. To attain more realistic teratogenic risk perceptions, several factors that influence this issue should be considered, and these are further discussed in this Clinical Opinion. Importantly, drug use may have several benefits, both for the pregnant woman's health and to avoid negative fetal effects of untreated maternal disease. A greater focus on this aspect may act to balance risk perceptions. Furthermore, both pregnant women and physicians need access to drug information sources that provide realistic risk estimates to increase confidence in appropriate drug use and prescribing. We suggest that access to decision support and individually tailored information provided by drug information centers may contribute to this goal.

  16. Inter-Pregnancy Weight Change and the Risk of Recurrent Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jacqueline M.; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Campbell, Doris M.; Horgan, Graham W.

    2016-01-01

    Women with specific adverse pregnancy outcomes in their first pregnancy may be receptive to inter-pregnancy weight management guidance aimed at preventing these complications reoccurring in subsequent pregnancies. Thus the association between inter-pregnancy weight change and the risk of recurrent pregnancy complications at the second pregnancy was investigated in a retrospective cohort study of 24,520 women with their first-ever and second consecutive deliveries in Aberdeen using logistic regression. Compared with women who were weight stable, weight loss (>2BMI units) between pregnancies was associated with an increased risk of recurrent small for gestational age (SGA) birth and elective Cesarean-section, and was protective against recurrent pre-eclampsia, placental oversize and large for gestational age (LGA) birth. Conversely weight gain (>2BMI units) between pregnancies increased the risk of recurrent gestational hypertension, placental oversize and LGA birth and was protective against recurrent low placental weight and SGA birth. The relationships between weight gain, and placental and birth weight extremes were evident only in women with a healthy weight at first pregnancy (BMI<25units), while that between weight gain and the increased risk of recurrent gestational hypertension was largely independent of first pregnancy BMI. No relationship was detected between inter-pregnancy weight change and the risk of recurrent spontaneous preterm delivery, labour induction, instrumental delivery, emergency Cesarean-section or postpartum hemorrhage. Therefor inter-pregnancy weight change impacts the risk of recurrent hypertensive disorders, SGA and LGA birth and women with a prior history of these specific conditions may benefit from targeted nutritional advice to either lose or gain weight after their first pregnancy. PMID:27145132

  17. Risk minimization practices for pregnancy prevention: understanding risk, selecting tools.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Kathleen; Trontell, Anne; Kennedy, Dianne

    2007-03-01

    According to the March of Dimes, approximately 4% (1/28) of babies are born in the US each year with a birth defect. For the majority of birth defects the etiology is unknown, although chemicals, including drug exposures, probably account for less than 1% of all birth defects. The identification of potential human teratogenicity during drug development is important because drug-induced adverse fetal effects are potentially preventable with the application of risk assessment strategies and risk minimization tools and programs to minimize risk of pregnancy exposure while preserving access to drug benefits; risk assessment and risk minimization together comprise risk management. It is important that risk minimization programs intended to limit fetal exposure use a consistent approach and are tailored to the product-specific risk concerns in order to optimize the benefit-risk balance for a particular drug. This paper highlights general considerations in developing specific risk minimization programs to prevent fetal drug exposure including the relative advantages and disadvantages of each strategy.

  18. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy.

  19. Dermatoses of Pregnancy - Clues to Diagnosis, Fetal Risk and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The specific dermatoses of pregnancy represent a heterogeneous group of pruritic skin diseases that have been recently reclassified and include pemphigoid (herpes) gestationis, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy (syn. pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and atopic eruption of pregnancy. They are associated with severe pruritus that should never be neglected in pregnancy but always lead to an exact work-up of the patient. Clinical characteristics, in particular timing of onset, morphology and localization of skin lesions are crucial for diagnosis which, in case of pemphigoid gestationis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, will be confirmed by specific immunofluorescence and laboratory findings. While polymorphic and atopic eruptions of pregnancy are distressing only to the mother because of pruritus, pemphigoid gestationis may be associated with prematurity and small-for-date babies and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy poses an increased risk for fetal distress, prematurity, and stillbirth. Corticosteroids and antihistamines control pemphigoid gestationis, polymorphic and atopic eruptions of pregnancy; intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, in contrast, should be treated with ursodeoxycholic acid. This review will focus on the new classification of pregnancy dermatoses, discuss them in detail, and present a practical algorithm to facilitate the management of the pregnant patient with skin lesions. PMID:21909194

  20. [Research on the socioeconomic risk factors in pregnancy and delivery].

    PubMed

    Bompiani, A; Arduini, D; Marchetti, P; Matarazzo, C

    1980-01-01

    The effects of various socioeconomic factors on the outcome of pregnancy and delivery in Italy are investigated. Variables considered include marital status, area of residence, educational level, occupation, income, and attitude toward pregnancy. Methods for accurate evaluation of risk factors are discussed. The need for physicians to consider the social and psychological aspects of pregnancy and delivery is emphasized. Data are for women interviewed at the Obstetrical and Gynaecological Clinic of the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Rome.

  1. Hypertension in Pregnancy and Future Cardiovascular Event Risk in Siblings.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Tracey L; Turner, Stephen T; Mosley, Thomas H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hanis, Craig L; Milic, Natasa M; Garovic, Vesna D

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for future hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This may reflect an underlying familial predisposition or persistent damage caused by the hypertensive pregnancy. We sought to isolate the effect of hypertension in pregnancy by comparing the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in women who had hypertension in pregnancy and their sisters who did not using the dataset from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study, which examined the genetics of hypertension in white, black, and Hispanic siblings. This analysis included all sibships with at least one parous woman and at least one other sibling. After gathering demographic and pregnancy data, BP and serum analytes were measured. Disease-free survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Compared with their sisters who did not have hypertension in pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop new onset hypertension later in life, after adjusting for body mass index and diabetes (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.42). A sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy was also associated with an increased risk of hypertension in brothers and unaffected sisters, whereas an increased risk of cardiovascular events was observed in brothers only. These results suggest familial factors contribute to the increased risk of future hypertension in women who had hypertension in pregnancy. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential role of nonfamilial factors. Furthermore, a sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy may be a novel familial risk factor for future hypertension.

  2. Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163962.html Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids But study authors stress that ... chances that their baby could be born with cerebral palsy, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at information ...

  3. Women with Epilepsy: Drug Risks and Safety During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy is related to three major birth defects: neural tube defects, facial clefts, and hypospadias. This last defect ... in the first trimester lowers the risk of neural tube defects and facial clefts. The evidence is weak ...

  4. Risk of death following pregnancy in rural Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Elizabeth Kimbrough; West, Keith P.; Katz, Joanne; Christian, Parul; Khatry, Subarna K.; Leclerq, Steven C.; Dali, Sanu Maiya; Shrestha, Sharada Ram

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the length of time following pregnancy during which the risk of mortality was elevated among women in rural Nepal. METHODS: An analysis was performed of prospective data on women participating in the control group of a large, population-based trial. Weekly visits were made for three years to 14805 women aged 14-45 years. Pregnancy and vital status were assessed. A total of 7325 pregnancies were followed. Mortality during and following pregnancy, expressed on a person-time basis, was compared to referent mortality unrelated to pregnancy (52 weeks after pregnancy) in the same cohort. FINDINGS: The relative risk (RR) of death during pregnancy but before the onset of labour was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38-2.32). During the perinatal period, defined as lasting from the onset of labour until seven days after outcome, the RR of death was 37.02 (95% CI: 15.03-90.92). The RR for 2 to 6 weeks, 7 to 12 weeks, and 13 to 52 weeks after pregnancy were 4.82, 2.59 and 1.01 with 95% CI of 1.77-13.07, 0.81-8.26 and 0.40-2.53, respectively. The RR of death was 2.21 (95% CI. 1.03-4.71) during the conventional maternal mortality period (pregnancy until 6 weeks after outcome). It was 2.26 (95% CI: 1.05-4.90) when the period was extended to 12 weeks after pregnancy outcome. CONCLUSION: The risk of mortality associated with pregnancy should be assessed over the first 12 weeks following outcome instead of over the first 6 weeks. PMID:12481211

  5. [Early pregnancy risk: development and validation of a predictive instrument].

    PubMed

    Burrows, R; Rosales, M E; Díaz, M; Muzzo, S

    1994-06-01

    An early pregnancy risk scale, with scores ranging from 11 to 66 points from lower to higher risk, was constructed using variables associated with teenager's pregnancy. This scale was applied to 3000 female teenagers, coming from Metropolitan Santiago public schools. The sample was divided in three risk groups: group A (high risk) with scores equal or over 35 points, group B (low risk) with scores equal or below 20 points and group B (intermediate risk) with scores between 20.1 and 34.9 points. These girls were followed during 2 years. During this period, 84 girls became pregnant, 24 of 184 (13%) in group A, 60 of 2332 (2.6%) in group C and none of 307 in group B. There were 104 school desertions in group A and 37 in group B. To study associations and analyze risk, the sample was divided in two risk groups: high, with scores over 27 and low, with scores below 27. There was a high association between pregnancy risk score and the occurrence of pregnancy (RR 5.25 p < 0.0001) and school desertion (RR 3.32 p < 0.0001). Pregnancy was predicted with a 78% sensitivity and 55.6% specificity. School desertion was predicted with a 74% sensitivity and 56% specificity. The importance variable weighing using multiple regression models, to improve the predictor's sensitivity and specificity, is discussed.

  6. Sexual Risk and Intravaginal Practice Behavior Changes During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Chloe A; Abrams, Elaine J; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Justman, Jessica; Blanchard, Kelly; Jones, Heidi E

    2017-02-01

    Data suggest that pregnant women in some settings have high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We examined changes in sexual risk behaviors and intravaginal practices during pregnancy that may contribute to HIV and STI incidence using data from the Methods for Improved Reproductive Health in Africa study conducted in South Africa and Zimbabwe 2003-2006. We used a crossover design and modified Poisson regression to compare behaviors among HIV negative women 18-45 years during pregnant and non-pregnant periods. Among the 4802 women <45 years at enrollment, 483 (10.1 %) had a pregnancy and were included in the analysis. Compared to non-pregnant periods, pregnancy was associated with fewer than 3 sex acts per week (adjusted risk ratio [ARR] 0.89; 95 % CI 0.79-0.99) but more sex acts without condoms (ARR 1.32; 95 % CI 1.15-1.51). Pregnancy was also associated with decreased reporting of other sexual risk behaviors including any anal sex, multiple sexual partners, and/or sex in exchange for drugs or money. Women also reported less intravaginal wiping during pregnancy (ARR 0.84; 95 % CI 0.76-0.93). We found pregnancy decreased sexual activity and some high-risk sexual behaviors but increased the risk of sex without a condom.

  7. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Page, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents glucose levels in the high end of the population distribution during pregnancy. GDM carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a longer-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements compliment maternal glucose measurements in identifying pregnancies that need such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after pregnancy can stratify the near-term diabetes risk in mothers, Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA1C testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes, usually type 2. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning allows optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity. PMID:22751341

  8. Teratogenic Risk of Drugs Used in Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruedy, John

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of common illnesses in early pregnancy is complicated because of the risk of teratogenic effects of drugs on the fetus. The period of greatest risk is between the first and eighth week of pregnancy. Since much of this period occurs before a diagnosis of pregnancy is made, care must be used in treatment of common illnesses in all women susceptible to becoming pregnant. Few, if any, drugs have been tested for teratogenicity in controlled clinical trials. Risk must therefore be based on epidemiological studies, individual case reporting and extrapolation from animal studies. Sufficient information is available on commonly used drugs to establish such risks. It is important that drugs of least known risk but adequate efficacy be used in treating intercurrent illness in the first trimester. PMID:21279129

  9. Risks of Myrrh usage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jaroudi, Dania; Kaddour, Ouhoud; Al-Amin, Nahla

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage places a huge psychological burden on a woman who is trying to conceive. Meanwhile, the use of traditional medicine still plays an important role within the Saudi Arabian culture, where many patients still seek alternative forms of therapy. However, this traditional way of treatment might expose patients to many hazards. We present a case of a 32-year-old pregnant woman with a history of infertility and recurrent miscarriages. She used large amounts of myrrh herbs for 2 months, since a traditional healer told her that her current pregnancy would progress safely by its use. However, her pregnancy was complicated with an acute abdominal pain. Her symptom was relieved as soon as she stopped taking myrrh. We assume that myrrh acted as a uterine stimulant causing acute abdominal pain. Scientific studies should be carried out to evaluate the safety of Myrrh intake during pregnancy. PMID:28050964

  10. Risks associated with pregnancy in spinal cord-injured women.

    PubMed

    Baker, E R; Cardenas, D D; Benedetti, T J

    1992-09-01

    We reviewed the experience with pregnancy in spinal cord-injured women at the University of Washington over the past 10 years. During that time, 11 women with spinal cord injury had 13 pregnancies. Infant outcome was uniformly good. No major obstetric complication occurred. The mothers experienced medical problems including urinary tract infection in ten and pyelonephritis in three. Autonomic hyperreflexia occurred in three of five subjects with lesions at or above the sixth thoracic vertebra. Pregnancy in the spinal cord-injured patient involves medical risk for the mother, but with careful management, an excellent outcome for both mother and infant may be anticipated.

  11. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with CKD.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Attini, Rossella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Maxia, Stefania; Lepori, Nicola; Tuveri, Milena; Massidda, Marco; Marchi, Cecilia; Mura, Silvia; Coscia, Alessandra; Biolcati, Marilisa; Gaglioti, Pietro; Nichelatti, Michele; Pibiri, Luciana; Chessa, Giuseppe; Pani, Antonello; Todros, Tullia

    2015-08-01

    CKD is increasingly prevalent in pregnancy. In the Torino-Cagliari Observational Study (TOCOS), we assessed whether the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes is associated with CKD by comparing pregnancy outcomes of 504 pregnancies in women with CKD to outcomes of 836 low-risk pregnancies in women without CKD. The presence of hypertension, proteinuria (>1 g/d), systemic disease, and CKD stage (at referral) were assessed at baseline. The following outcomes were studied: cesarean section, preterm delivery, and early preterm delivery; small for gestational age (SGA); need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); new onset of hypertension; new onset/doubling of proteinuria; CKD stage shift; "general" combined outcome (preterm delivery, NICU, SGA); and "severe" combined outcome (early preterm delivery, NICU, SGA). The risk for adverse outcomes increased across stages (for stage 1 versus stages 4-5: "general" combined outcome, 34.1% versus 90.0%; "severe" combined outcome, 21.4% versus 80.0%; P<0.001). In women with stage 1 CKD, preterm delivery was associated with baseline hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 3.42; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.87 to 6.21), systemic disease (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.51 to 6.50), and proteinuria (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 1.63 to 8.36). However, stage 1 CKD remained associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes (general combined outcome) in women without baseline hypertension, proteinuria, or systemic disease (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.79). The risk of intrauterine death did not differ between patients and controls. Findings from this prospective study suggest a "baseline risk" for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes linked to CKD.

  12. Diet before pregnancy and the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Margaretha; Vikanes, Ase; Brantsaeter, Anne Lise; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Grjibovski, Andrej M; Magnus, Per

    2011-08-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis), characterised by severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, has an unknown aetiology. The aim of the present study was to investigate food and nutrient intake before pregnancy and the risk of developing hyperemesis in women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. From 1999 to 2002, a total of 7710 pregnant women answered a FFQ about their diet during the 12 months before becoming pregnant and a questionnaire about illnesses during pregnancy, including hyperemesis. Only women who were hospitalised for hyperemesis were included as cases. Nutrient intakes during the year before pregnancy did not differ between the ninety-nine women who developed hyperemesis and the 7611 who did not. However, the intake of seafood, allium vegetables and water was significantly lower among women who developed hyperemesis than among women in the non-hyperemesis group. Relative risks of hyperemesis were approximated as OR, and confounder control was performed with multiple logistic regression. Women in the upper tertile of seafood consumption had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the lower tertile (OR 0·56, 95 % CI 0·32, 0·98), and women in the second tertile of water intake had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the first tertile (OR 0·43, 95 % CI 0·25, 0·73). The findings suggest that a moderate intake of water and adherence to a healthy diet that includes vegetables and fish are associated with a lower risk of developing hyperemesis.

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus: risks and management during and after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Thomas A; Xiang, Anny H; Page, Kathleen A

    2012-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a long-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of developing diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements complement maternal glucose monitoring in the identification of pregnancies that require such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after delivery can stratify the short-term diabetes risk in mothers. Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA(1c) testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes mellitus, usually type 2 diabetes mellitus. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning enables optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity.

  14. Humanized birth in high risk pregnancy: barriers and facilitating factors.

    PubMed

    Behruzi, Roxana; Hatem, Marie; Goulet, Lise; Fraser, William; Leduc, Nicole; Misago, Chizuru

    2010-02-01

    The medical model of childbearing assumes that a pregnancy always has the potential to turn into a risky procedure. In order to advocate humanized birth in high risk pregnancy, an important step involves the enlightenment of the professional's preconceptions on humanized birth in such a situation. The goal of this paper is to identify the professionals' perception of the potential obstacles and facilitating factors for the implementation of humanized care in high risk pregnancies. Twenty-one midwives, obstetricians, and health administrator professionals from the clinical and academic fields were interviewed in nine different sites in Japan from June through August 2008. The interviews were audio taped, and transcribed with the participants' consent. Data was subsequently analyzed using content analysis qualitative methods. Professionals concurred with the concept that humanized birth is a changing and promising process, and can often bring normality to the midst of a high obstetric risk situation. No practice guidelines can be theoretically defined for humanized birth in a high risk pregnancy, as there is no conflict between humanized birth and medical intervention in such a situation. Barriers encountered in providing humanized birth in a high risk pregnancy include factors such as: the pressure of being responsible for the safety of the mother and the fetus, lack of the women's active involvement in the decision making process and the heavy burden of responsibility on the physician's shoulders, potential legal issues, and finally, the lack of midwifery authority in providing care at high risk pregnancy. The factors that facilitate humanized birth in a high risk include: the sharing of decision making and other various responsibilities between the physicians and the women; being caring; stress management, and the fact that the evolution of a better relationship and communication between the health professional and the patient will lead to a stress

  15. Teenage Pregnancy among Latinas: Examining Risk and Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan-Ates, Aysun; Carrion-Basham, Carla Y.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the role of three groups of risk and protective factors (e.g., individual, family, and extrafamilial) that are associated with teen pregnancy. Two groups of Latina adolescents (aged 15 to 19), nonpregnant/ nonparenting (NP; N = 48) and pregnant/parenting (P; N = 46), completed a demographic survey, an adolescent profile…

  16. Pregnancy-Linked Diabetes Poses Risks for Mom, Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163632.html Pregnancy-Linked Diabetes Poses Risks for Mom, Baby Study confirms numerous hazards, and experts stress the condition must be treated immediately To use ...

  17. Risk Factors for Adolescent Pregnancy Reports among African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Johnson, Shari; C. Winn, Donna-Marie; Coie, John D.; Malone, Patrick S.; Lochman, John

    2004-01-01

    This study examined childhood and adolescent risk factors for males' reports of getting someone pregnant during adolescence. These questions were examined in an urban sample of 335 African American males involved in a prospective, longitudinal study. Childhood aggression significantly predicted reported pregnancies during adolescence. Boys who…

  18. Risk factors for depressive symptoms during pregnancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Christie A; Gold, Katherine J; Flynn, Heather A; Yoo, Harim; Marcus, Sheila M; Davis, Matthew M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for antepartum depressive symptoms that can be assessed in routine obstetric care. We evaluated articles in the English-language literature from 1980 through 2008. Studies were selected if they evaluated the association between antepartum depressive symptoms and > or =1 risk factors. For each risk factor, 2 blinded, independent reviewers evaluated the overall trend of evidence. In total, 57 studies met eligibility criteria. Maternal anxiety, life stress, history of depression, lack of social support, unintended pregnancy, Medicaid insurance, domestic violence, lower income, lower education, smoking, single status, and poor relationship quality were associated with a greater likelihood of antepartum depressive symptoms in bivariate analyses. Life stress, lack of social support, and domestic violence continued to demonstrate a significant association in multivariate analyses. Our results demonstrate several correlates that are consistently related to an increased risk of depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

  19. [Evaluation of the embryotoxic risk of industrial chemicals in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Spielmann, H

    1986-06-01

    For the first time exposure levels during pregnancy have been evaluated for industrial chemicals in the German list of "Maximal occupational exposure limits and biological tolerance levels of occupational chemicals 1985" (MAK-Werte-Liste). According to this evaluation only a single substance (methylmercury) is embryotoxic in man, a prenatal risk cannot be excluded for eight chemicals, and 18 chemicals are safe at occupational exposure limits (MAK-Werte). Furthermore, pregnant women should avoid exposure to any of the 112 carcinogenic chemicals of the list and to 26 substances which are under evaluation for embryotoxic properties. Occupational chemicals are subdivided into four pregnancy riskgroups and discussed with respect to prenatal counselling.

  20. Major malformation risk, pregnancy outcomes, and neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with metformin use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-04-01

    There are several reasons why metformin treatment may be considered for women in neuropsychiatric practice. These include prevention or attenuation of antipsychotic-associated weight gain, prevention or treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improvement of conception chances and pregnancy outcomes in the presence of polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). This article examines the benefits and risks associated with metformin use during pregnancy. The available data suggest that metformin exposure during the first trimester is not associated with major congenital malformations; that metformin reduces the risk of early pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and GDM in women with PCOD; that metformin is associated with at least comparable benefits relative to insulin treatment in women with mild GDM; and that neurodevelopmental outcomes at age 1.5-2.5 years are comparable after gestational exposure to metformin and insulin. Whereas study designs were not always ideal and sample sizes were mostly small to modest, the study findings are more encouraging than discouraging and can guide shared decision-making in women who are receiving or may need metformin during pregnancy.

  1. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  2. Corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

    PubMed Central

    Hviid, Anders; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    Background The association between the risk of orofacial clefts in infants and the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy is unclear from the available evidence. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all live births in Denmark over a 12-year period. Methods We collected data on all live births in Denmark from Jan. 1, 1996, to Sept. 30, 2008. We included live births for which information was available from nationwide health registries on the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy, the diagnosis of an orofacial cleft and possible confounders. Results There were 832 636 live births during the study period. Exposure to corticosteroids during the first trimester occurred in 51 973 of the pregnancies. A total of 1232 isolated orofacial clefts (i.e., cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and cleft palate) were diagnosed within the first year of life, including 84 instances in which the infant had been exposed to corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy. We did not identify any statistically significant increased risk of orofacial clefts associated with the use of corticosteroids: cleft lip with or without cleft palate, prevalence odds ratio (OR) 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–1.38]; cleft palate alone, prevalence OR 1.23 (95% CI 0.83–1.82). Odds ratios for risk of orofacial clefts by method of delivery (i.e., oral, inhalant, nasal spray, or dermatologic and other topicals) were consistent with the overall results of the study and did not display significant heterogeneity, although the OR for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with the use of dermatologic corticosteroids was 1.45 (95% CI 1.03–2.05). Interpretation Our results add to the safety information on a class of drugs commonly used during pregnancy. Our study did not show an increased risk of orofacial clefts with the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy. Indepth investigation of the pattern of association between orofacial clefts and the use of dermatologic

  3. [Epidemiology of high risk pregnancy in Sousse, Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Bouafia, N; Mahjoub, M; Nouira, A; Ben Aissa, R; Saïdi, H; Guedana, N; Njah, M

    2013-05-01

    This descriptive study assessed the frequency of selected risk factors for high risk pregnancy (HRP) among women in Sousse region. All pregnant women (beyond 28 weeks gestation) giving birth in 4 public maternity hospitals between 15 February 2005 and 15 August 2005 and who had at least 1 risk factorwere enrolled. Data were collected within 24 hours of birth from obstetric and antenatal records and by interview. Of 4660 pregnant women, 1194 (25.6%) had at least 1 risk factor and were considered at-risk pregnancies. Mean age of the at-risk women was 31.3 (SD 5.4) years, 73% were urban residents, 38% had secondary education or higher and 75% were housewives. The mean number of risk factors was 1.5 per woman. The majority of women (59.3%) had 1 risk factor and 30.4% had 2. The mean number of prenatal visits was 4, 68.6% were seen by an obstetrician and 43% used the private sector. Certain factors were inadequately screened: age >35 years, parity >4, previous low birth weight and neonatal death, excessive fundal height and anaemia.

  4. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy - A Life-Long Risk?!

    PubMed

    Schausberger, C E; Jacobs, V R; Bogner, G; Wolfrum-Ristau, P; Fischer, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Arterial hypertension is one of the most important causes of cardiovascular diseases, and the latter are responsible for almost half of the deaths in the industrialised nations. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy constitute one of the most frequent causes of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality; on the other hand the occurrence of a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy represents a risk for the later development of hypertension and the cardiovascular risks resulting therefrom. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the association of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy with consecutive cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: Specific selective literature research. Results: After the occurrence of a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy the relative risks for hypertension are 3.7 (2.70-5.05), for ischaemic heart disease 2.2 (1.86-2.52), for cerebral insult 1.8 (1.45-2.27) and for mortality resulting from cardiovascular causes 1.5 (1.05-2.14) and are thus significant. According to a recent study 56 % of internal specialists and 23 % of gynecologists do not know about the association of preeclampsia with ischemic heart disease, 48 % and 38 % respectively are not aware of the link with stroke and 79 % and 77 % respectively are not aware of the association with a reduced life expectancy after preeclampsia. The presence of hypertension is not known by many of the patients, merely 28-38 % receive an appropriate therapy. Conclusion: Adequate follow-up after hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and the early recognition of and therapy for hypertension represent the cornerstones in the prevention of late cardiovascular sequelae. General practitioners, specialist for internal medicine and gynaecologists have a special responsibility with regard to the reduction of later complications.

  5. Fetal and umbilical Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Zarko; Stampalija, Tamara; Gyte, Gillian ML

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal blood flow patterns in fetal circulation detected by Doppler ultrasound may indicate poor fetal prognosis. It is also possible false positive Doppler ultrasound findings could encourage inappropriate early delivery. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of Doppler ultrasound used to assess fetal well-being in high-risk pregnancies on obstetric care and fetal outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009) and the reference lists of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of Doppler ultrasound for the investigation of umbilical and fetal vessels waveforms in high-risk pregnancies compared to no Doppler ultrasound. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. Data entry was checked. Main results Eighteen completed studies involving just over 10,000 women were included. The trials were generally of unclear quality with some evidence of possible publication bias. The use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancy was associated a reduction in perinatal deaths (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52 to 0.98, 16 studies, 10,225 babies, 1.2% versus 1.7 %, numbers needed to treat = 203; 95%CI 103 to 4352). There were also fewer inductions of labour (average RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.99, 10 studies, 5633 women, random effects) and fewer caesarean sections (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97, 14 studies, 7918 women). No difference was found in operative vaginal births (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.14, four studies, 2813 women) nor in Apgar scores less than seven at five minutes (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.24, seven studies, 6321 babies). Authors’ conclusions Current evidence suggests that the use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies reduced the risk of perinatal deaths and resulted in less

  6. Use of tramadol in early pregnancy and congenital malformation risk.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Reis, Margareta

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies exist regarding the risk of a teratogenic effect of tramadol when used in early pregnancy. Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, women (deliveries in 1997-2013) who had reported the use of tramadol in early pregnancy were identified. Maternal characteristics and concomitant drug use were analyzed. Among 1,682,846 women (1,797,678 infants), 1751 (1776 infants) had used tramadol, 96 of the infants had a congenital malformation and 70 of them were relatively severe. The adjusted odds ratio for a relatively severe malformation was 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.70). The odds ratios for cardiovascular defects (1.56, 95% CI 1.04-2.29) and for pes equinovarus (3.63, 95% CI 1.61-6.89) were significantly increased. The study suggests a teratogenic effect of tramadol but the risk increase is moderate.

  7. Risk management of seasonal influenza during pregnancy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Mark H

    2014-01-01

    Influenza poses unique risks to pregnant women, who are particularly susceptible to morbidity and mortality. Historically, pregnant women have been overrepresented among patients with severe illness and complications from influenza, and have been more likely to require hospitalization and intensive care unit admission. An increased risk of adverse outcomes is also present for fetuses/neonates born to women affected by influenza during pregnancy. These risks to mothers and babies have been observed during both nonpandemic and pandemic influenza seasons. During the H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009–2010, pregnant women were more likely to be hospitalized or admitted to intensive care units, and were at higher risk of death compared to nonpregnant adults. Vaccination remains the most effective intervention to prevent severe illness, and antiviral medications are an important adjunct to ameliorate disease when it occurs. Unfortunately, despite national guidelines recommending universal vaccination for women who are pregnant during influenza season, actual vaccination rates do not achieve desired targets among pregnant women. Pregnant women are also sometimes reluctant to use antiviral medications during pregnancy. Some of the barriers to use of vaccines and medications during pregnancy are a lack of knowledge of recommendations and of safety data. By improving knowledge and understanding of influenza and vaccination recommendations, vaccine acceptance rates among pregnant women can be improved. Currently, the appropriate use of vaccination and antiviral medications is the best line of defense against influenza and its sequelae among pregnant women, and strategies to increase acceptance are crucial. This article will review the importance of influenza in pregnancy, and discuss vaccination and antiviral medications for pregnant women. PMID:25114593

  8. Early pregnancy vitamin D status and risk of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Litonjua, Augusto A.; McElrath, Thomas F.; O’Connor, George; Lee-Parritz, Aviva; Iverson, Ronald; Macones, George; Strunk, Robert C.; Bacharier, Leonard B.; Zeiger, Robert; Hollis, Bruce W.; Handy, Diane E.; Sharma, Amitabh; Laranjo, Nancy; Qiu, Weilliang; Santolini, Marc; Liu, Shikang; Chhabra, Divya; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Williams, Michelle A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Weiss, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Low vitamin D status in pregnancy was proposed as a risk factor of preeclampsia. METHODS. We assessed the effect of vitamin D supplementation (4,400 vs. 400 IU/day), initiated early in pregnancy (10–18 weeks), on the development of preeclampsia. The effects of serum vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25OHD]) levels on preeclampsia incidence at trial entry and in the third trimester (32–38 weeks) were studied. We also conducted a nested case-control study of 157 women to investigate peripheral blood vitamin D–associated gene expression profiles at 10 to 18 weeks in 47 participants who developed preeclampsia. RESULTS. Of 881 women randomized, outcome data were available for 816, with 67 (8.2%) developing preeclampsia. There was no significant difference between treatment (N = 408) or control (N = 408) groups in the incidence of preeclampsia (8.08% vs. 8.33%, respectively; relative risk: 0.97; 95% CI, 0.61–1.53). However, in a cohort analysis and after adjustment for confounders, a significant effect of sufficient vitamin D status (25OHD ≥30 ng/ml) was observed in both early and late pregnancy compared with insufficient levels (25OHD <30 ng/ml) (adjusted odds ratio, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.10–0.96). Differential expression of 348 vitamin D–associated genes (158 upregulated) was found in peripheral blood of women who developed preeclampsia (FDR <0.05 in the Vitamin D Antenatal Asthma Reduction Trial [VDAART]; P < 0.05 in a replication cohort). Functional enrichment and network analyses of this vitamin D–associated gene set suggests several highly functional modules related to systematic inflammatory and immune responses, including some nodes with a high degree of connectivity. CONCLUSIONS. Vitamin D supplementation initiated in weeks 10–18 of pregnancy did not reduce preeclampsia incidence in the intention-to-treat paradigm. However, vitamin D levels of 30 ng/ml or higher at trial entry and in late pregnancy were associated with a lower risk of

  9. Pregnancy and lactation in relation to breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vorherr, H

    1979-07-01

    In the past, numerous efforts have been made to define risk and protective factors of breast cancer. Among these, pregnancy and lactation have been extensively discussed in connection with breast cancer. Unfortunately, many of the reports on the protective effects of pregnancy and lactation are equivocal; caution needs to be exercised when interpreting the results of a single publication. Development of breast cancer is often preceded by the occurrence of preneoplastic mammary lesions, which may be the result of long-term exposure to estrogens and prolactin. Since endogenous estrogen levels regulate pituitary prolactin secretion to some extent, it has been postulated that a hormonal imbalance exists in early mammary carcinogenesis. Exogenous estrogens directly increase pituitary prolactin secretion. During gestation, greatly increased levels of endogenous sex steroids efficiently stimulate pituitary prolactin secretion; during lactation, the stimulus of suckling is responsible for hyperprolactinemia. However, most studies did not reveal a cause-effect relationship between prolactin levels and enhanced risk of breast cancer. At present, the role of pregnancy and lactation in the development and prognosis of breast cancer is not determined.

  10. Cardiovascular risk, lipids and pregnancy: preeclampsia and the risk of later life cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Francesca; Tooher, Jane; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Hennessy, Annemarie

    2014-03-01

    It has been widely thought that the effects of hypertension in pregnancy reversed after delivery and hypertension values returned to their pre-pregnancy level as it was seen as a disease of short duration in otherwise healthy young women. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the principal underlying abnormality, endothelial dysfunction, remains in women who had preeclampsia and that it is this damage that increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life. The contributions of hypertension and dyslipidaemia before and during the pregnancy are also important and contribute to future risk. Serum lipids are complex and change dramatically in pregnancy. In general there is an increase in most plasma lipid components, notably triglycerides, total cholesterol and the major particles of HDL and LDL. Aberrations or exaggerations in this shift (i.e. decrease HDL and a greater increase in LDL) are associated with poor outcomes of pregnancy such as preeclampsia. Long term cardiovascular disease is influenced by preeclampsia and in part potentially by the lipid changes which escalate late in disease. Whether we can influence the risk of preeclampsia by controlling cardiovascular risk factors preceding or during preeclampsia, or cardiovascular disease after preeclampsia is yet to be determined. Ultimately, strategies to control lipid concentrations will only be viable when we understand the safety to the mother at the time of the pregnancy, and to the foetus both immediately and in the very long term. Strategies to control blood pressure are well established in the non-pregnant population, and previous preeclampsia and gestational hypertension should be considered in any cardiovascular risk profile. Whether control of blood pressure in the pregnancy per se is of any longer term benefit is also yet to be determined.

  11. Risk Prediction for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in a Medicaid Population

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Eric S.; Greenberg, James M.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite prior efforts to develop pregnancy risk prediction models, there remains a lack of evidence to guide implementation in clinical practice. The current aim was to develop and validate a risk tool grounded in social determinants theory for use among at-risk Medicaid patients. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 409 women across 17 Cincinnati health centers between September 2013 and April 2014. The primary outcomes included preterm birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal demise, and neonatal death. After random allocation into derivation and validation samples, a multivariable model was developed, and a risk scoring system was assessed and validated using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values. Results: The derived multivariable model (n=263) included: prior preterm birth, interpregnancy interval, late prenatal care, comorbid conditions, history of childhood abuse, substance use, tobacco use, body mass index, race, twin gestation, and short cervical length. Using a weighted risk score, each additional point was associated with an odds ratio of 1.57 for adverse outcomes, p<0.001, AUROC=0.79. In the validation sample (n=146), each additional point conferred an odds ratio of 1.20, p=0.03, AUROC=0.63. Using a cutoff of 20% probability for the outcome, sensitivity was 29%, with specificity 82%. Positive and negative predictive values were 22% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Risk scoring based on social determinants can discriminate pregnancy risk within a Medicaid population; however, performance is modest and consistent with prior prediction models. Future research is needed to evaluate whether implementation of risk scoring in Medicaid prenatal care programs improves clinical outcomes. PMID:26102375

  12. Pregnancy-specific anxiety: which women are highest and what are the alcohol-related risks?

    PubMed

    Arch, Joanna J

    2013-04-01

    In a national US sample of pregnant women (n=311), we investigated the question of who becomes highly anxious about pregnancy by examining putative sociodemographic, pregnancy- and mental health-related predictors of pregnancy anxiety. We also assessed the contribution of pregnancy anxiety to the risk of significant alcohol consumption during pregnancy. English-speaking pregnant women aged 18+years were recruited online. Results indicated that sociodemographic factors (younger age, white, unmarried, lower education, lower household income, no previous children), feelings about current pregnancy (unwanted), and general anxiety (higher general and state anxiety) predicted higher pregnancy-related anxiety, whereas age, religiosity, number of weeks pregnant, unplanned pregnancy, and maternal depressive symptoms did not. Pregnancy anxiety was the single strongest predictor of alcohol drinking risk during pregnancy (p<.001, ∆R(2)=.10) a relationship that held after controlling for other significant predictors. Pregnancy anxiety also represented the strongest predictor of screening positively for drinking risk during pregnancy at the total T-ACE (an alcohol risk screener for pregnancy) level of 3+ (odds ratio 95% CI=1.61-4.14, p<.001), though not at the level of 2+ (odds ratio 95% CI=0.98-1.68, p=.07). We discuss implications for the link between maternal mental health and birth/ child outcomes.

  13. Pregnancy termination: techniques, risks, and complications and their management.

    PubMed

    Castadot, R G

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the current modalities of pregnancy termination, as well as their risks and complications, in 3 phases of pregnancy: 1) up to 49 days past the last menstrual period, 2) 8-15 weeks, and 3) 16-24 weeks. Before 8 weeks of pregnancy, suction dilatation and curettage (D and C) is the preferred method. However, a medical approach, possibly self-administered, is viewed as more satisfactory and requires only an improvement in side effects. From 8-15 weeks' gestation, suction D and C and dilatation and evacuation (D and E) are the methods of choice. The use of laminaria tents improves both the facility and safety of these procedures in nulliparous patients and perhaps in multiparous patients. Priming of the cervix with prostaglandin could further decrease the difficulty and risks of these procedures. The use of a hydrogel compound is especially worthy of consideration. There is controversy about the preferred method between 16-20 weeks' gestation. D and E appears to have fewer complications and to be more cost-effective than hypertonic saline injection. Urea-prostaglandin has fewer and less severe complications than saline injection, and seems to be more cost-effective than saline injection in terms of duration of hospitalization. The high frequency of failure and side effects, combined with the possibility of expulsion of a live fetus, make prostaglandin-only injection less desirable. After 20 weeks' gestation, urea-prostaglandin injection is probably the safer method. Given the rapid increase in complications with passing weeks, any delay in providing late abortion services should be avoided. 2nd trimester pregnancy terminations, especially those after 18 weeks' gestation, are associated with increased mortality and morbidity and should be performed at specialized centers where providers are better equipped to manage complications.

  14. Risk of Fetal Death after Treatment with Antipsychotic Medications during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Merete Juul; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Jacob; Olsen, Jørn; Parner, Erik; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic medications are increasingly used during pregnancy. Nevertheless, fetal risks are still not fully studied. It is currently unclear whether the antipsychotic treatment might induce a higher risk of fetal death. We aimed to determine if use of antipsychotic medication during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion or stillbirth. Methods In a historical cohort study, we identified all clinically recognized pregnancies registered in the nationwide Danish registries from 1997 to 2008 (N = 1,005,319). Exposure was defined as any prescription of antipsychotic medications redeemed by the pregnant women during the exposure window, and recorded in the Danish National Prescription Register. Outcome was defined as any spontaneous abortion or stillbirth recorded in the Danish National Hospital Register and the Danish Medical Birth Register respectively. Results Women exposed to antipsychotic medications during pregnancy had a 34% higher risk of spontaneous abortion (adjusted relative risk = 1.34; 95% confidence interval = 1.22; 1.46) compared to unexposed women, but a similar risk compared to women exposed prior to (but not during) pregnancy (adjusted relative risk = 1.04; 95% confidence interval = 0.93; 1.17). The risk of spontaneous abortion was not increased in exposed pregnancies when compared to unexposed pregnancies in the same women (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.94; 1.31). A twofold higher risk of stillbirth was found in women exposed to antipsychotic medications compared with unexposed women (relative risk = 2.27; 95% confidence interval = 1.45; 3.55) and compared with women exposed only prior to pregnancy (relative risk = 2.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.01; 4.19). Conclusions The increased risk of spontaneous abortion found in women treated with antipsychotic medications during pregnancy is most likely due to confounding factors. The risk of stillbirth was twofold higher in pregnancies exposed to

  15. Vitamin D status in early pregnancy and risk of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Madonna; Dodds, Linda; Giguère, Yves; Forest, Jean-Claude; Armson, B. Anthony; Woolcott, Christy; Agellon, Sherry; Spencer, Anne; Weiler, Hope A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to examine the association between maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration in early pregnancy and the subsequent diagnosis of preeclampsia (PE). STUDY DESIGN This was a nested case-control study from 2 prospective Canadian cohorts conducted in Quebec City, Quebec, and Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 2002 through 2010. Participants were pregnant women (n=169 cases with PE and 1975 controls). Maternal serum was drawn <20 weeks of gestation, and 25(OH)D measurement was performed. Cases were ascertained from medical records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Women who developed PE had a significantly lower 25(OH)D concentration at a mean gestational age of 14 weeks compared with women in the control group (mean ± SD 25[OH]D 47.2 ± 17.7 vs 52.3 ± 17.2 nmol/L, P < .0001). Women with 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L compared to those with at least 50 nmol/L had a greater risk of developing PE (adjusted odds ratio, 2.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–3.83) after adjustment for prepregnancy body mass index, maternal age, smoking, parity, season and year of blood collection, gestational week at blood collection, and cohort site. Exploratory analysis with cubic splines demonstrated a dose-response relationship between maternal 25(OH)D and risk of PE, up to levels around 50 nmol/L, where the association appeared to plateau. CONCLUSION Maternal vitamin D deficiency early in pregnancy defined as 25(OH)D<30 nmol/L may be an independent risk factor for PE. The relevance of vitamin D supplementation for women of child-bearing age should be explored as a strategy for reducing PE and for promoting a healthier pregnancy. PMID:25446694

  16. Management of glaucoma in pregnancy: risks or choices, a dilemma?

    PubMed

    Sethi, Harinder Singh; Naik, Mayuresh; Gupta, Vishnu Swarup

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of glaucoma in and around pregnancy offers the unique challenge of balancing the risk of vision loss to the mother as against the potential harm to the fetus or newborn. Most anti-glaucoma drugs (i.e. beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogues, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors topical and systemic, cholinergics, anticholinesterases, and apraclonidine) are considered category C agents and ophthalmologists are usually limited to treating patients with the category B drugs of brimonidine and dipivefrin. Brimonidine is generally the preferred first-line drug in the first, second and early third trimester. Late in the third trimester, brimonidine should be discontinued because it can induce central nervous system depression in newborns wherein topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may be the optimal choice. Glaucoma surgery can be performed with caution in second and third trimester if the patients have a strong indication for the procedure. However, anesthetics, sedative agents, and antimetabolites still have potential risk for the fetus. Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) or selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is an alternative treatment that can be performed in all trimesters. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and β-blockers are certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics for use during nursing. However, low doses of these medications should be considered when used in the breast feeding period. Optimum treatment for glaucoma in pregnancy must not be withheld so as to prevent any further deterioration in progressive vision loss and quality of life.

  17. Management of glaucoma in pregnancy: risks or choices, a dilemma?

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Harinder Singh; Naik, Mayuresh; Gupta, Vishnu Swarup

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of glaucoma in and around pregnancy offers the unique challenge of balancing the risk of vision loss to the mother as against the potential harm to the fetus or newborn. Most anti-glaucoma drugs (i.e. beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogues, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors topical and systemic, cholinergics, anticholinesterases, and apraclonidine) are considered category C agents and ophthalmologists are usually limited to treating patients with the category B drugs of brimonidine and dipivefrin. Brimonidine is generally the preferred first-line drug in the first, second and early third trimester. Late in the third trimester, brimonidine should be discontinued because it can induce central nervous system depression in newborns wherein topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may be the optimal choice. Glaucoma surgery can be performed with caution in second and third trimester if the patients have a strong indication for the procedure. However, anesthetics, sedative agents, and antimetabolites still have potential risk for the fetus. Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) or selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is an alternative treatment that can be performed in all trimesters. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and β-blockers are certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics for use during nursing. However, low doses of these medications should be considered when used in the breast feeding period. Optimum treatment for glaucoma in pregnancy must not be withheld so as to prevent any further deterioration in progressive vision loss and quality of life. PMID:27990376

  18. Risk of ectopic pregnancy following day-5 embryo transfer compared with day-3 transfer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura P; Oskowitz, Selwyn P; Dodge, Laura E; Hacker, Michele R

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of ectopic pregnancy after IVF is increased approximately 2.5-5-fold compared with natural conceptions; however, the aetiology for this increased risk remains unclear. One proposed practice change to decrease the incidence of ectopic pregnancy is blastocyst embryo transfer on day 5 rather than cleavage-stage embryo transfer on day 3. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to compare the risk of ectopic pregnancy following fresh day-5 embryo transfer with day-3 embryo transfer among women who underwent IVF and achieved pregnancy from 1998 to 2011. There were 13,654 eligible pregnancies; 277 were ectopic. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy was 2.1% among day-3 pregnancies and 1.6% among day-5 pregnancies. The adjusted risk ratio for ectopic pregnancy from day-5 compared with day-3 transfer was 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.46-1.10). Although this analysis included 13,654 cycles, with a two-sided significance level of 0.05, it had only 21.9% power to detect a difference between the low incidence of ectopic pregnancy among both day-3 and day-5 transfers. In conclusion, this study was not able to demonstrate a difference in the risk of ectopic pregnancy among day-3 compared with day-5 transfers.

  19. Pregnancy in women with heart disease: risk assessment and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasmine; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease, present in 0.5% to 3% of pregnant women, is an important cause of morbidity and the leading cause of death among pregnant women in the developed world. Certain heart conditions are associated with an increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy or the postpartum period; for these conditions, management during pregnancy benefits from multidisciplinary care at a center with expertise in pregnancy and heart disease. This article focuses on cardiac risks and management strategies for women with acquired and congenital heart disease who are at increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy.

  20. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome and the risk of pregnancy complications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Hong-Su; Rao, Da-Pang; Gong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is inconsistently associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to summarize the evidence regarding the strength of the association between pregnancy in women with PCOS and pregnancy complications. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library to identify observational studies up to January 2016. The primary focus was pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, oligohydramnios, and polyhydramnios. Effect estimates were pooled using the random-effects model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect these associations. Results: We included 40 observational studies that reported data on a total of 17,816 pregnancies with PCOS and 123,756 pregnancies without PCOS. Overall, PCOS in pregnancy was associated with greater risk of GDM, preeclampsia, PIH, preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, miscarriage, hypoglycemia, and perinatal death. However, PCOS in pregnancy had little or no effect on oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, large-for-gestational age (LGA), small-for-gestational-age (SGA), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preterm premature membrane rupture, fasting blood glucose (FBG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride, total cholesterol, congenital malformation, macrosomia, and respiratory distress syndrome. Subgroup analysis suggested that these associations might be influenced by study design and pre-BMI. Conclusion: PCOS in pregnancy is associated with a significantly increased risk of adverse pregnancy, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. PMID:28002314

  1. Does Father Absence Place Daughters at Special Risk for Early Sexual Activity and Teenage Pregnancy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Pettit, Gregory S.; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    Longitudinal studies in two countries investigated impact of father absence on girls' early sexual activity (ESA) and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicated that greater exposure to father absence strongly related to elevated ESA and adolescent pregnancy risk. Elevated risk was not explained (U.S. sample) or only partly explained (New Zealand…

  2. Pregnancy in Adolescent Females with Serious Emotional Disturbance: Risk Factors and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Brown, Eric C.; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    This 7-year study examined the consequences of early pregnancy and parenting for girls with serious emotional disturbances (SED) and risk factors identified with teenage pregnancy. Risk factors that were examined included sociodemographic characteristics, psychological characteristics, and psychopathology. The 109 participants in the study were…

  3. Maternal Obesity in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Henriquez-Sanchez, Patricia; Alemán-Perez, Nestor; Garcia-Salvador, Jose J.; Gonzalez-Quesada, Alicia; García-Hernández, Jose A.; Serra-Majem, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the role of the health consequences of maternal overweight and obesity at the start of pregnancy on gestational pathologies, delivery and newborn characteristics. Methods A cohort of pregnant women (n = 6.558) having delivered at the Maternal & Child University Hospital of Gran Canaria (HUMIGC) in 2008 has been studied. Outcomes were compared using multivariate analyses controlling for confounding variables. Results Compared to normoweight, overweight and obese women have greater risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (RR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.52–2.98) and (RR = 2.85 (95% CI: 2.01–4.04), gestational hypertension (RR = 2.01 (95% CI: 1.27–3.19) and (RR = 4.79 (95% CI: 3.13–7.32) and preeclampsia (RR = 3.16 (95% CI: 1.12–8.91) and (RR = 8.80 (95% CI: 3.46–22.40). Obese women have also more frequently oligodramnios (RR = 2.02 (95% CI: 1.25–3.27), polyhydramnios. (RR = 1.76 (95% CI: 1.03–2.99), tearing (RR = 1.24 (95% CI: 1.05–1.46) and a lower risk of induced deliveries (RR = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72–0.95). Both groups have more frequently caesarean section (RR = 1.36 (95% CI: 1.14–1.63) and (RR = 1.84 (95% CI: 1.53–2.22) and manual placenta extraction (RR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.28–2.11) and (RR = 1.77 (95% CI: 1.35–2.33). Newborns from overweight and obese women have higher weight (p<0.001) and a greater risk of being macrosomic (RR = 2.00 (95% CI: 1.56–2.56) and (RR = 2.74 (95% CI: 2.12–3.54). Finally, neonates from obese mother have a higher risk of being admitted to special care units (RR = 1.34 (95% CI: 1.01–1.77). Apgar 1 min was significantly higher in newborns from normoweight mothers: 8.65 (95% CI: 8.62–8.69) than from overweight: 8.56 (95% CI: 8.50–8.61) or obese mothers: 8.48 (95% CI: 8.41–8.54). Conclusion Obesity and overweight status at the beginning of pregnancy increase the adverse outcomes of the pregnancy. It is important to promote

  4. Automatic Classification of Structured Product Labels for Pregnancy Risk Drug Categories, a Machine Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Laritza M; Fushman, Dina Demner

    2015-01-01

    With regular expressions and manual review, 18,342 FDA-approved drug product labels were processed to determine if the five standard pregnancy drug risk categories were mentioned in the label. After excluding 81 drugs with multiple-risk categories, 83% of the labels had a risk category within the text and 17% labels did not. We trained a Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm on the labels containing pregnancy risk information segmented into standard document sections. For the evaluation of the classifier on the testing set, we used the Micromedex drug risk categories. The precautions section had the best performance for assigning drug risk categories, achieving Accuracy 0.79, Precision 0.66, Recall 0.64 and F1 measure 0.65. Missing pregnancy risk categories could be suggested using machine learning algorithms trained on the existing publicly available pregnancy risk information.

  5. Automatic Classification of Structured Product Labels for Pregnancy Risk Drug Categories, a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Laritza M.; Fushman, Dina Demner

    2015-01-01

    With regular expressions and manual review, 18,342 FDA-approved drug product labels were processed to determine if the five standard pregnancy drug risk categories were mentioned in the label. After excluding 81 drugs with multiple-risk categories, 83% of the labels had a risk category within the text and 17% labels did not. We trained a Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm on the labels containing pregnancy risk information segmented into standard document sections. For the evaluation of the classifier on the testing set, we used the Micromedex drug risk categories. The precautions section had the best performance for assigning drug risk categories, achieving Accuracy 0.79, Precision 0.66, Recall 0.64 and F1 measure 0.65. Missing pregnancy risk categories could be suggested using machine learning algorithms trained on the existing publicly available pregnancy risk information. PMID:26958248

  6. Preeclampsia and hypertensive disease in pregnancy: their contributions to cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Valdiviezo, Carolina; Garovic, Vesna D; Ouyang, Pamela

    2012-03-01

    More women than men die each year of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Sex-specific factors, including pregnancy-related disorders, should be considered when assessing cardiovascular (CV) risk in women. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy have been associated with CV risk later in life and may identify women in whom earlier primary prevention may reduce their risk. This article reviews the physiologic changes in blood pressure during pregnancy, current definitions of hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and preeclampsia, and postulated pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to preeclampsia that might contribute to later CV risk. Also summarized are studies providing evidence on the association between hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and future CV risk.

  7. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  8. Betel quid chewing and risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among aborigines in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, M S; Chang, F T; Chen, S S; Lee, C H; Ko, Y C

    1999-07-01

    It is known that substance use is associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy, outcomes. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of alcohol, cigarette, betel quid and drug use during pregnancy and to assess the risk of adverse effects of betel quid chewing on pregnancy outcomes in aboriginal women in southern Taiwan. The study population included 62 women with adverse pregnancy outcomes and 124 age-matched women. Subjects were interviewed at their homes by trained interviewers using a structure questionnaire. Prevalences of various substance use in aborigines with adverse pregnancy outcomes were estimated as follows: alcohol, 43.6%; smoking, 14.5%; betel quid chewing, 43.6% and over-the-counter drug use, 8.1%; whereas in the comparison group it was alcohol, 38.7%; smoking, 8.1%; betel quid chewing, 28.2% and none used drugs. Univariate analysis revealed that adverse pregnancy outcomes were associated with maternal betel quid chewing, maternal illness during pregnancy, and the number of pregnancies (gravidity) experienced. After adjusting for maternal illness and number of previous pregnancies covariates, the prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcome was computed to be 2.8-fold higher among betel quid chewing women as compared to non-chewers (AOR=2.8, 95% CI=1.2-6.8). Among the aboriginal women, prenatal care is essential not only for routine care, but also to focus health education on the harmful effects of substance use, especially betel quid use during pregnancy.

  9. Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for microalbuminuria later in life.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Asad, Reem; Scantlebury, Dawn C; Bailey, Kent R; Wiste, Heather J; Hunt, Steven C; Mosley, Thomas H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Turner, Stephen T; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-09-01

    The authors aimed to compare renal function by estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria in 3 groups of women: nulliparous women, women with a history of normotensive pregnancies, and women with a history of at least one hypertensive pregnancy. Women who participated in the second Family Blood Pressure Program Study visit (2000-2004) and had serum creatinine and urine albumin measurements (n=3015) were categorized as having had no pregnancy lasting >6 months (n=341), having had only normotensive pregnancies (n=2199), or having had at least 1 pregnancy with hypertension (n=475) based on a standardized questionnaire. Women who reported having had at least one pregnancy with hypertension were significantly more likely to be hypertensive (75.6% vs 59.4%, P<.001), diabetic (34.2% vs 27.3%, P≤.001), and have higher body mass index (32.8 vs 30.5, P<.001) than those who reported normotensive pregnancies. There was a significantly greater risk of microalbuminuria (urine albumin-creatinine ratio >25 mg/g) in those who reported at least one pregnancy with hypertension (odds ratio, 1.37; confidence interval, 1.02-1.85; P=.04) than in those with normotensive pregnancies, after adjusting for risk factors for chronic kidney and cardiovascular disease. Hypertension in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of future microalbuminuria.

  10. Assessment of foetal risk associated with 93 non-US-FDA approved medications during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-jedai, Ahmed H.; Balhareth, Sakra S.; Algain, Roaa A.

    2012-01-01

    Health care practitioners utilize the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) pregnancy categorization (A, B, C, D, X) for making decision on the appropriateness of certain medications during pregnancy. Many non US-FDA approved medications are registered and marketed in Saudi Arabia. However, these medications do not have an assigned pregnancy risk categorization like those approved in the US. The objective of this review is to evaluate, report, and categorize the foetal risk associated with non-US-FDA approved medications registered by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (S-FDA) according to the US-FDA pregnancy risk categorization system. We identified 109 non-US-FDA approved medications in the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) as of October 2007. We searched for data on functional or anatomical birth defects or embryocidal-associated risk using different databases and references. An algorithm for risk assessment was used to determine a pregnancy risk category for each medication. Out of 93 eligible medications, 73% were assigned category risk C, 10 medications (11%) were assigned category risk D, and 12 medications (13%) were assigned category risk B. Only three medications were judged to be safe during pregnancy based on the available evidence and were assigned category risk A. Inconsistencies in defining and reporting the foetal risk category among different drug regulatory authorities could create confusion and affect prescribing. We believe that standardization and inclusion of this information in the medication package insert is extremely important to all health care practitioners. PMID:23960803

  11. Risk during pregnancy and birth after assisted reproductive technologies: an integral view of the problem.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Pregnancy and obstetric outcome are the final steps in infertility treatment. Additional data from recent studies demonstrate an increased risk for pregnancy course and obstetric outcome. These risks include an increased risk for intrauterine growth retardation, preeclampsia, and premature birth. Children born after in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have an increased risk for major malformations compared with spontaneously conceived pregnancies. Patients have to be counseled about these risks. The question is where these increased risks originate. At present, there are insufficient data available from pregnancies established following hormonal treatment or intrauterine insemination cycles. Therefore, the question is still open for debate, whether either in vitro culture or infertility per se or perhaps other components of the treatment cycle contribute to this risk. There is some evidence that at least the ICSI technique or the in vitro culture technique is not the only or most prominent factor. A long time to pregnancy with subsequent spontaneous pregnancy results in a similar risk profile as pregnancies following infertility treatment. This article discusses a possible pathogenetic model for these observations.

  12. Timing of Pregnancy After Kidney Transplantation and Risk of Allograft Failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Gill, J; Zalunardo, N; Johnston, O; Mehrotra, A; Gill, J S

    2016-08-01

    The optimal timing of pregnancy after kidney transplantation remains uncertain. We determined the risk of allograft failure among women who became pregnant within the first 3 posttransplant years. Among 21 814 women aged 15-45 years who received a first kidney-only transplant between 1990 and 2010 captured in the United States Renal Data System, n = 729 pregnancies were identified using Medicare claims. The probability of allograft failure from any cause including death (ACGL) at 1, 3, and 5 years after pregnancy was 9.6%, 25.9%, and 36.6%. In multivariate analyses, pregnancy in the first posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of ACGL (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 1.40) and death censored graft loss (DCGL) (HR:1.25; 95% CI 1.04, 1.50), while pregnancy in the second posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of DCGL (HR: 1.26; 95% CI 1.06, 1.50). Pregnancy in the third posttransplant year was not associated with an increased risk of ACGL or DCGL. These findings demonstrate a higher incidence of allograft failure after pregnancy than previously reported and that the increased risk of allograft failure extends to pregnancies in the second posttransplant year.

  13. Implementation Science and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Denise V.; Harrison, Leslie L.; Taraporewalla, Aspy J.; Shulman, Holly; Smith, Ruben A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the restructuring of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), a surveillance system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Division of Reproductive Health conducted for 25 years in collaboration with state and city health departments. With the ultimate goal to better inform health care providers, public health programs, and policy, changes were made to various aspects of PRAMS to enhance its capacity on assessing and monitoring public health interventions and clinical practices in addition to risk behaviors, disease prevalence, comorbidities, and service utilization. Specifically, the three key PRAMS changes identified as necessary and described in this paper are questionnaire revision, launching the web-based centralized PRAMS Integrated Data Collection System, and enhancing the access to PRAMS data through the web query system known as Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's PRAMS Online Data for Epidemiologic Research/PRAMStat. The seven action steps of Knowledge To Action cycle, an illustration of the implementation science process, that reflect the milestones necessary in bridging the knowledge-to-action gap were used as framework for each of these key changes. PMID:25405525

  14. Prospective risk of intrauterine fetal death in monoamniotic twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takashi; Yamada, Takahiro; Sato, Shoji; Minakami, Hisanori

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to review the overall short-term outcome of monoamniotic twins in Japan and to determine the prospective risk of fetal death so as to adequately counsel parents with monoamniotic twins. Study subjects were 101 women with monoamniotic twins who were registered with the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology Successive Pregnancy Birth Registry System and who had given birth at ≥22 weeks of gestation during 2002-2009. The gestational week at delivery (mean±SD) was 31.8±3.7. Fourteen women experienced intrauterine fetal death (IUFD). Short-term outcomes of co-twins born to the 14 women included 8 IUFDs, one early neonatal death within 7 days of life (END), and 5 survivors. Four other women experienced 5 ENDs. Thus, 13.9% (28/202) of infants died perinatally (22 IUFDs and 6 ENDs), 13.9% (14/101) of women experienced IUFD, and 82.2% (83/101) of women experienced neither IUFD nor END. Structural anomalies and twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome explained 17.9% (five infants) and 10.7% (three infants) of the 28 perinatal deaths, respectively. The prospective risk of IUFD was 13.9% (14/101) for women who reached gestational week 22(-0/7), gradually decreasing thereafter but remaining at between 4.5% and 8.0% between gestational week 30(-0/7) and 36(-0/7).

  15. Maternal and foetal outcome of 206 high risk pregnancy cases in border guard hospital, dhaka.

    PubMed

    Shapla, N R; Islam, M A; Shahida, S M; Parveen, Z; Lipe, Y S

    2015-04-01

    This observational study was carried out to identify the various types of high risk pregnancy and to determine the maternal and foetal outcome. The study was carried out on 206 pregnant high risk women in the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of Border Guard Hospital, Dhaka from January 2012 to December 2012. During mentioned period among 598 pregnant women 206 high risk pregnancy cases were randomly selected. Pregnant women (gestational age from 34 weeks upto 40 weeks) having medical condition and pregnancy related high risk factors were included and uncomplicated pregnancy, pregnancy before 37 weeks, post dated pregnancy were excluded from this study. Data was collected from semi structured history sheet and data analysis done by percentage. High risk pregnant women were grouped into three. Group A and Group B includes pregnant women having medical condition before and during pregnancy respectively. Group C consists of pregnant women had pregnancy related high risk issues. Among 206 high risk pregnancy cases majority 47.57% women had medical condition during pregnancy, 31.55% patient had medical condition before pregnancy. Among them majority 30.58% of the patient suffered from pregnancy induced hypertension, 15.04% patients suffered from gestational Diabetes Mellitus and premature rupture of membranes were 12.13%. In this study majority 43.68% of high risk pregnant patients were in age group of 30-35 years, 19.90% pregnant women were in age group of >35 years and 19.40% were in age group of upto 20 years. Among study groups maximum 65.04% of the patients were multiparous. Among 206 study population 60.19% high risk pregnant women were at term at the time of delivery and 39.8% women delivered their babies preterm. Caesarean section was done in 69.41% of high risk pregnant women. After delivery majority 77.66% women had no complication, only 10.19%, 8.25%, 2.91% and 0.97% high risk pregnant women suffered from fever, UTI, abdominal wound infection and post

  16. Association Between Stillbirth and Risk Factors Known at Pregnancy Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Context Stillbirths account for almost half of US deaths from 20 weeks’ gestation to 1 year of life. Most large studies of risk factors for stillbirth use vital statistics with limited data. Objective To determine the relation between stillbirths and risk factors that could be ascertained at the start of pregnancy, particularly the contribution of these factors to racial disparities. Design, Setting, and Participants Multisite population-based case-control study conducted between March 2006 and September 2008. Fifty-nine US tertiary care and community hospitals, with access to at least 90% of deliveries within 5 catchment areas defined by state and county lines, enrolled residents with deliveries of 1 or more stillborn fetuses and a representative sample of deliveries of only live-born infants, over-sampled for those at less than 32 weeks’ gestation and those of African descent. Main Outcome Measure Stillbirth. Results Analysis included 614 case and 1816 control deliveries. In multivariate analyses, the following factors were independently associated with stillbirth: non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity (23.1% stillbirths, 11.2% live births) (vs non-Hispanic whites; adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.12 [95% CI, 1.41–3.20]); previous stillbirth (6.7% stillbirths, 1.4% live births); nulliparity with (10.5% stillbirths, 5.2% live births) and without (34.0% stillbirths, 29.7% live births) previous losses at fewer than 20 weeks’ gestation (vs multiparity without stillbirth or previous losses; AOR, 5.91 [95% CI, 3.18–11.00]; AOR, 3.13 [95% CI, 2.06–4.75]; and AOR, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.51–2.60], respectively); diabetes (5.6% stillbirths, 1.6% live births) (vs no diabetes; AOR, 2.50 [95% CI, 1.39–4.48]); maternal age 40 years or older (4.5% stillbirths, 2.1% live births) (vs age 20–34 years; AOR, 2.41 [95% CI, 1.24–4.70]); maternal AB blood type (4.9% stillbirths, 3.0% live births) (vs type O; AOR, 1.96 [95% CI, 1.16–3.30]); history of drug addiction (4

  17. Prospective risk of stillbirth and neonatal complications in twin pregnancies: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheong-See, Fiona; Schuit, Ewoud; Arroyo-Manzano, David; Khalil, Asma; Barrett, Jon; Joseph, K S; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Hack, Karien; Lewi, Liesbeth; Lim, Arianne; Liem, Sophie; Norman, Jane E; Morrison, John; Combs, C Andrew; Garite, Thomas J; Maurel, Kimberly; Serra, Vicente; Perales, Alfredo; Rode, Line; Worda, Katharina; Nassar, Anwar; Aboulghar, Mona; Rouse, Dwight; Thom, Elizabeth; Breathnach, Fionnuala; Nakayama, Soichiro; Russo, Francesca Maria; Robinson, Julian N; Dodd, Jodie M; Newman, Roger B; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Tang, Selphee; Mol, Ben Willem J; Thilaganathan, Basky; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risks of stillbirth and neonatal complications by gestational age in uncomplicated monochorionic and dichorionic twin pregnancies. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (until December 2015). Review methods Databases were searched without language restrictions for studies of women with uncomplicated twin pregnancies that reported rates of stillbirth and neonatal outcomes at various gestational ages. Pregnancies with unclear chorionicity, monoamnionicity, and twin to twin transfusion syndrome were excluded. Meta-analyses of observational studies and cohorts nested within randomised studies were undertaken. Prospective risk of stillbirth was computed for each study at a given week of gestation and compared with the risk of neonatal death among deliveries in the same week. Gestational age specific differences in risk were estimated for stillbirths and neonatal deaths in monochorionic and dichorionic twin pregnancies after 34 weeks’ gestation. Results 32 studies (29 685 dichorionic, 5486 monochorionic pregnancies) were included. In dichorionic twin pregnancies beyond 34 weeks (15 studies, 17 830 pregnancies), the prospective weekly risk of stillbirths from expectant management and the risk of neonatal death from delivery were balanced at 37 weeks’ gestation (risk difference 1.2/1000, 95% confidence interval −1.3 to 3.6; I2=0%). Delay in delivery by a week (to 38 weeks) led to an additional 8.8 perinatal deaths per 1000 pregnancies (95% confidence interval 3.6 to 14.0/1000; I2=0%) compared with the previous week. In monochorionic pregnancies beyond 34 weeks (13 studies, 2149 pregnancies), there was a trend towards an increase in stillbirths compared with neonatal deaths after 36 weeks, with an additional 2.5 per 1000 perinatal deaths, which was not significant (−12.4 to 17.4/1000; I2=0%). The rates of neonatal morbidity showed a consistent reduction with increasing

  18. If You Do Not Ask, They Will Not Tell: Evaluating Pregnancy Risk in Young Women in Pediatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Coles, Mandy S; Lau, May; Akers, Aletha Y

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents experience some of the highest rates of unintended pregnancy among women of all reproductive age groups. And despite the fact that adolescents often receive care in pediatric hospital settings, evaluation of pregnancy risk is inconsistent. Pregnancy risk assessments can identify opportunities to deliver reproductive health services, allow earlier pregnancy diagnoses, and reduce morbidity and mortality for medically complex adolescent patients and their pregnancies. In this commentary we discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions to performing pregnancy risk assessments in pediatric hospital settings.

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Risk and Adequacy of Prophylaxis in High Risk Pregnancy in the Arabian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Faisal; Al-Jassar, Waleed; Wani, Salima; Tahlak, Muna; Al-Bahar, Awatef; Al-Kharusi, Lamya; Al-Tamimi, Halima; El-Taher, Faten; Mahmood, Naeema; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors in pregnancy and the proportion of pregnancies at risk of VTE that received the recommended prophylaxis according to the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) 2012 published guidelines in antenatal clinics in the Arabian Gulf. Methods: The evaluation of venous thromboembolism (EVE)-Risk project was a non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre, multi-national study of all eligible pregnant women (≥17 years) screened during antenatal clinics from 7 centres in the Arabian Gulf countries (United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and Oman). Pregnant women were recruited during a 3-month period between September and December 2012. Results: Of 4,131 screened pregnant women, 32% (n=1,337) had ≥1 risk factors for VTE. Common VTE risk factors included obesity (76%), multiparity (33%), recurrent miscarriages (9.1%), varicose veins (6.9%), thrombophilia (2.6%), immobilization (2.0%), sickle cell disease (2.8%) and previous VTE (1.6%). Only 8.3% (n=111) of the high risk patients were on the recommended VTE prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was used in 80% (n=89) of the cases followed by tinzaparin (4%; n=4). Antiplatelet agents were prescribed in 11% (n=149) of pregnant women. Of those on anticoagulants (n=111), 59% (n=66) were also co-prescribed antiplatelet agents. Side effects (mainly local bruising at the injection site) were reported in 12% (n=13) of the cases. Conclusion: A large proportion of pregnant women in the Arabian Gulf countries have ≥1 VTE risk factor with even a smaller fraction on prophylaxis. VTE risk assessment must be adopted to identify those at risk who would need VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26517701

  20. Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Obesity and Risk for Inattention and Negative Emotionality in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Alina

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to replicate and extend previous work showing an association between maternal pre-pregnancy adiposity and risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children. Methods: A Swedish population-based prospective pregnancy-offspring cohort was followed up when children were 5 years old (N = 1,714).…

  1. Risk of subsequent pregnancy in women with a history of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Elkayam, Uri

    2014-10-14

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a pregnancy-associated myocardial disease with marked left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Although this condition can lead to major complications, including severe heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolic events, and death, the majority of women with this condition demonstrate a complete or partial recovery. Many of these women desire to become pregnant again and are concerned regarding the safety of additional pregnancies. The purpose of this paper is to review the available information related to subsequent pregnancies in women with a history of PPCM in an attempt to reach conclusions regarding the risk of such pregnancies in this group of patients.

  2. [Hypothyroidism during pregnancy risks the child's neurocognitive development. New guidelines and remaining knowledge gaps].

    PubMed

    Skalkidou, Alkistis; Bixo, Marie; Sköldebrand Sparre, Ann-Charlotte; Strandell, Annika; Lindén Hirschberg, Angelica; Filipsson Nyström, Helena

    2016-02-05

    Thyroid abnormalities are common during pregnancy and can affect pregnancy outcome. In 2012, the working group for endocrinology was assigned by SFOG to develop evidence based guidelines for their management. There is high quality evidence that untreated clinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of pregnancy and fetal complications. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with pregnancy complications. The presence of TPO-antibodies is linked to miscarriage and premature birth. It is uncertain whether subclinical hypothyroidism/maternal TPO-antibodies adversely affect the child's neurocognitive development. Reference intervals for TSH among pregnant women in Sweden need to be established.

  3. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease Is a Very High-Risk Situation: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Elenga, Narcisse; Adeline, Aurélie; Balcaen, John; Vaz, Tania; Calvez, Mélanie; Terraz, Anne; Accrombessi, Laetitia; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious genetic disorder affecting 1/235 births in French Guiana. This study aimed to describe the follow-up of pregnancies among sickle cell disease patients in Cayenne Hospital, in order to highlight the most reported complications. 62 records of pregnancies were analyzed among 44 females with sickle cell disease, between 2007 and 2013. Our results were compared to those of studies conducted in Brazil and Guadeloupe. There were 61 monofetal pregnancies and 2 twin pregnancies, 27 pregnancies among women with SS phenotype, 30 SC pregnancies, and five S-beta pregnancies. The study showed that the follow-up of patients was variable, but no maternal death was found. We also noted that the main maternofetal complications of pregnancies were anemia (36.5%), infection (31.7%), vasoocclusive crisis (20.6%), preeclampsia (17.5%), premature birth (11.1%), intrauterine growth retardation (15.9%), abnormal fetal heart rate (14.3%), and intrauterine fetal death (4.8%). Pregnancies were more at risk among women with SS phenotype. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients requires a supported multidisciplinary team including the primary care physician, the obstetrician, and the Integrated Center for Sickle Cell Disease. PMID:27403164

  4. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Profiles Multimedia Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes Skip sharing ... that women who maintain a healthy diet and exercise before they become pregnant are less likely to ...

  5. Modelling sequence of prior pregnancies on subsequent risk of very preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lyndsey F; Rayner, Jo-Anne; King, James; Jolley, Damien; Forster, Della; Lumley, Judith

    2010-09-01

    The prevalence and intractability of preterm birth is known as is its association with reproductive history, but the relationship with sequence of pregnancies is not well studied. The data were from a population-based case-control study, conducted in Victoria, Australia. The study recruited women giving birth between April 2002 and April 2004 from 73 maternity hospitals. Detailed reproductive histories were collected by interview a few weeks after the birth. The cases were 603 women having a singleton birth between 20 and <32 weeks gestation (very preterm births including terminations of pregnancy). The controls were 796 randomly selected women from the population having a singleton birth of at least 37 completed weeks gestation. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of very preterm birth with sequence of pregnancies defined by their outcome (prior abortion - spontaneous or induced, and prior preterm or term birth) with adjustment for sociodemographic factors. The outcomes of each prior pregnancy, stratified by pregnancy order, and starting with the pregnancy immediately before the index or control pregnancy, were categorised as one of abortion, preterm birth or term birth. We showed that each of these prior pregnancy events was an independent risk of very preterm birth. This finding does not support the hypothesis of a neutralising effect of a term birth after an abortion on the subsequent risk for very preterm birth and is further evidence for the cumulative or increasing risk associated with increasing numbers of prior abortions or preterm births.

  6. Rates and risk factors associated with depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Nancy; Da Costa, Deborah; Marchand, André; Ireland, Kierla; Dritsa, Maria; Khalifé, Samir

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months postpartum and to prospectively identify risk factors associated with elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset. About 364 women attending antenatal clinics or at the time of their ultrasound were recruited and completed questionnaires in pregnancy and 226 returned their questionnaires at 3 months postpartum. Depressed mood was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; score of ≥ 10). The rate of depressed mood during pregnancy was 28.3% and 16.4% at 3 months postpartum. Among women with postpartum depressed mood, 6.6% were new postpartum cases. In the present study, belonging to a non-Caucasian ethnic group, a history of emotional problems (e.g. anxiety and depression) or of sexual abuse, comorbid anxiety, higher anxiety sensitivity and having experienced stressful events were associated with elevated depressed mood during pregnancy. Four risk factors emerged as predictors of new onset elevated depressed mood at 3 months postpartum: higher depressive symptomatology during pregnancy, a history of emotional problems, lower social support during pregnancy and a delivery that was more difficult than expected. The importance of identifying women at risk of depressed mood early in pregnancy and clinical implications are discussed.

  7. Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Weinberg, Janice M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Winter, Michael R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; Webster, Thomas F.; Ozonoff, David M.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on the impact of solvent-contaminated drinking water on pregnancy outcomes. This retrospective cohort study examined whether maternal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) - contaminated drinking water in the Cape Cod region of Massachusetts influenced the risk of clinically recognized pregnancy loss. The study identified exposed (n=959) and unexposed (1,087) women who completed a questionnaire on their residential and pregnancy histories, and confounding variables. Exposure was estimated using water distribution system modeling software. No meaningful associations were seen between PCE exposure level and the risk of clinically recognized pregnancy loss at the exposure levels experienced by the study population. Because PCE remains a common water contaminant, it is important to continue monitoring its impact on women and their pregnancies. PMID:20613966

  8. Unintended pregnancy and perinatal depression trajectories in low-income, high-risk Hispanic immigrants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anna L; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Perry, Deborah F; Le, Huynh-Nhu

    2011-09-01

    Perinatal depression is a prevalent and detrimental condition. Determining modifiable factors associated with it would identify opportunities for prevention. This paper: 1) identifies depressive symptom trajectories and heterogeneity in those trajectories during pregnancy through the first-year postpartum, and 2) examines the association between unintended pregnancy and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms (BDI-II) were collected from low-income Hispanic immigrants (n=215) five times from early pregnancy to 12-months postpartum. The sample was at high-risk for perinatal depression and recruited from two prenatal care settings. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify distinct trajectories of depressive symptoms over the perinatal period. Multinomial logistic regression was then conducted to examine the association between unintended pregnancy (reported at baseline) and the depression trajectory patterns. Three distinct trajectory patterns of depressive symptoms were identified: high during pregnancy, but low postpartum ("Pregnancy High": 9.8%); borderline during pregnancy, with a postpartum increase ("Postpartum High": 10.2%); and low throughout pregnancy and postpartum ("Perinatal Low": 80.0%). Unintended pregnancy was not associated with the "Pregnancy High" pattern, but was associated with a marginally significant nearly four fold increase in risk of the "Postpartum High" pattern in depressive symptoms (RRR=3.95, p<0.10). Family planning is a potential strategy for the prevention of postpartum depression. Women who report unintended pregnancies during prenatal care must be educated of their increased risk, even if they do not exhibit antenatal depressive symptoms. Routine depression screening should occur postpartum, and referral to culturally appropriate treatment should follow positive screening results.

  9. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... each trimester are described below. 1 First Trimester (Week 1 to Week 12) The events that lead to pregnancy begin ... and oxygen to the fetus. 2 Second Trimester (Week 13 to Week 28) At 16 weeks, and ...

  10. Characteristics of women age 15-24 at risk for excess weight gain during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy; Moniz, Michelle H.; Plegue, Melissa A.; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Excess weight gain during pregnancy is a serious health concern among young pregnant women in the US. This study aimed to characterize young women at highest risk for gaining over the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy. Methods Using a database that is representative of births in large U.S. cities, The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we identified mothers of singleton term-infants age 15–24 years at the time of delivery. Institute of Medicine guidelines were used to categorize each mother’s weight gain as less than, within, or more than recommended during pregnancy. Multinomial logistic regression models for weight gain category were performed, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, federal poverty level (FPL), health status, and prepregnancy BMI. Results Among the weighted sample (n = 1,034, N = 181,375), the mean (SD) age was 21 (3) years, 32% were black, 39% were Hispanic, 44% reported income under the Federal Poverty Level, 45% were overweight or obese before pregnancy, and 55% gained more weight than recommended during pregnancy. Women who were overweight or obese before pregnancy were at increased risk for gaining more pregnancy weight than recommended, compared to normal-weight women (adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) = 3.82, p = 0.01; RRR = 3.27, p = 0.03, respectively). Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanics to gain more weight than recommended (RRR = 0.39, p = 0.03). Conclusions The majority of mothers ages 15–24 gained excess weight during pregnancy, a strong risk factor for later obesity. Prepregnancy overweight or obesity and non-Hispanic ethnicity predicted excess pregnancy weight gain. Interventions and policies should target these high-risk young women to prevent excess weight gain. PMID:28291802

  11. The impact of micronutrient supplementation in alcohol-exposed pregnancies on information processing skills in Ukrainian infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: The role that micronutrients play in ameliorating the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure was explored in a clinical trial conducted in the Ukraine. Cardiac orienting responses during a habituation/dishabituation learning paradigm were obtained from 6-12 month-olds to assess neurodevelop...

  12. Impact of Pregestational Weight and Weight Gain during Pregnancy on Long-Term Risk for Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of maternal BMI at start of pregnancy and maternal weight gain during pregnancy on the risk of various diseases later in life. Methods In a population-based cohort from southern Sweden, women with at least one delivery registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register ten or more years before answering a health questionnaire were identified (n = 13,608). Complete data were found in 3,539 women. Results Women with BMI >25 at start of pregnancy had increased risk of developing obesity (OR 21.9), diabetes (OR 6.4), cardiac disease (OR 2.7), endocrine diseases (OR 2.3), and other morbidity (OR 1.4), compared with women of normal weight. A high weight gain (>15 kg) during pregnancy was associated to later risk of overweight (OR 2.0) and obesity (OR 2.2), but not diabetes, cardiac disease, or endocrine diseases. A positive association was found between low weight gain and the risk of developing psychiatric disorders (OR 1.6). Conclusions A high BMI at start of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of several diseases later in life. However, a high weight gain during pregnancy was only significant for future overweight and obesity. These findings have implications for both pregestational intervention and post gestational follow up of obese and overweight women. PMID:28045917

  13. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women’s changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p < 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the women considered cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy. PMID:27043593

  14. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-30

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women's changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p < 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the women considered cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy.

  15. Single-session motivational intervention to decrease alcohol use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Robin L; Carle, Adam C; Ammerman, Robert T; Gates, Donna

    2014-07-01

    This randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of a single-session of motivational interviewing (MI) to decrease alcohol use during pregnancy, while examining theory-based mechanisms of the intervention. Eligible pregnant women who drank any amount of alcohol in the previous year (n=122) were randomized to an intervention or comparison group. Drinking behaviors, basic psychological need satisfaction, and autonomous motivation to decrease prenatal alcohol use were measured at baseline, 30 day postbaseline, and 30 day postpartum follow-ups. Poisson and linear regression with generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate treatment effects over time. Although MI was not found effective in decreasing alcohol use, low levels of reported alcohol use by the women at baseline left little room for improvement due to the intervention. To prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, future studies will use self-report and biomarkers to more accurately identify women in need of interventions to reduce their risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

  16. Single-session motivational intervention to decrease alcohol use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Robin L.; Carle, Adam C.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Gates, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of a single-session of motivational interviewing (MI) to decrease alcohol use during pregnancy, while examining theory-based mechanisms of the intervention. Eligible pregnant women who drank any amount of alcohol in the previous year (n=122) were randomized to an intervention or comparison group. Drinking behaviors, basic psychological need satisfaction, and autonomous motivation to decrease prenatal alcohol use were measured at baseline, 30 day postbaseline, and 30 day postpartum follow-ups. Poisson and linear regression with generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate treatment effects over time. Although MI was not found effective in decreasing alcohol use, low levels of reported alcohol use by the women at baseline left little room for improvement due to the intervention. To prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, future studies will use self-report and biomarkers to more accurately identify women in need of interventions to reduce their risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. PMID:24637202

  17. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you.

  18. Drug use assessment and risk evaluation in pregnancy--the PEGASUS-project.

    PubMed

    Irl, C; Kipferler, P; Hasford, J

    1997-10-01

    Since the thalidomide tragedy it is well accepted that drugs can have adverse effects on the unborn child. Although numerous studies show that drug use during pregnancy is widespread, there still is a serious lack of comprehensive and valid data on the risks of drug use during pregnancy. One objective of the PEGASUS-project, which focuses on Munich, is to enlarge the knowledge on embryo- and fetotoxic properties of drugs by prospectively recording information on drug exposure during pregnancy and analysing these data with regard to untoward fetal outcome. First results of PEGASUS confirm that drug utilization during pregnancy is rather common-85% of women use at least one preparation. The most frequent groups are haematologicals, minerals, iodide, and vitamins. Randomized studies have shown that periconceptional folic acid supplementation considerably reduces the risk of neural tube defects. However, only very few women in the PEGASUS-project recorded folic acid intake during the critical period or in sufficient dosage.

  19. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use during Pregnancy and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Takoua; Bérard, Anick

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used during pregnancy. Several studies have shown that the use of antidepressants during pregnancy is linked to adverse outcomes, including congenital malformations, prematurity, and low birth weight. However, there is a knowledge gap regarding the potential association between gestational exposure to antidepressants and the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The etiology of ASD remains unclear, although studies have implicated genetic predispositions and environmental risk factors in the development of ASD in children. In this review, we describe the association between gestational use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and the risk of ASD. PMID:27617119

  20. Spirituality and high-risk pregnancy: another aspect of patient care.

    PubMed

    Breen, Glenn V; Price, Sheri; Lake, Margaret

    A high-risk pregnancy can be a stressful situation for a woman, her partner and her family. Many women utilize their spiritual beliefs as a way to make sense of their situation. Health care professionals, including nurses, midwives and physicians, can provide effective spiritual care and support consistent with their professional scopes of practice. Spiritually focused interventions can help to reduce stress and anxiety and create a more open and confident approach to the management of pregnancy complications.

  1. Parental Attitudes about Teenage Pregnancy: Impact on Sexual Risk Behaviour of African-American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annang, Lucy; Lian, Brad; Fletcher, Faith E.; Jackson, Dawnyéa

    2014-01-01

    African-American youth suffer disproportionately from sexual risk consequences including unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Parents educating young people about sex may be one approach to reduce sexual risk behaviour among this population. The purpose of this study was to determine young people's perceptions of parents'…

  2. Physical activity from menarche to first pregnancy and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Rosner, Bernard; Malik, Vasanti; Cespedes, Elizabeth; Joshi, Amit D.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Colditz, Graham A.

    2017-01-01

    Breast tissue is particularly susceptible to exposures between menarche and first pregnancy, and a longer interval between these reproductive events is associated with elevated breast cancer risk. Physical activity during this time period may offset breast cancer risk, particularly for those at highest risk with longer menarche-to-first-pregnancy intervals. We used data from 65,576 parous women in the Nurses’ Health Study II free of cancer in 1989 (baseline) and recalled their leisure-time physical activity at ages 12–34 in 1997. Current activity was collected at baseline and over follow-up. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Between 1989 and 2011, 2,069 invasive breast cancer cases were identified. Total recreational activity between menarche and first pregnancy was not significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer. However, physical activity between menarche and first pregnancy was associated with significantly lower breast cancer risk among women in the highest category of a menarche-to first-pregnancy interval (≥20 years; RR for the highest versus the lowest quartile = 0.73, 95% confidence interval = 0.55–0.97; Ptrend = 0.045; Pinteraction = 0.048). This was not observed in women with a shorter interval. Physical activity between menarche and first pregnancy was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer among women with at least 20 years between these reproductive events. This may provide a modifiable factor that women can intervene on to mitigate their breast cancer risk associated with a longer interval. PMID:27130486

  3. Risking the Future. Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

    This book examines in detail the complex, controversial problem of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Compiled by a panel of distinguished experts, it is a comprehensive review of data on such issues as sex education in the schools, contraception, abortion, adoption, prenatal and pediatric care, child support enforcement, and Aid to Families…

  4. Pregnancy risk among black, white, and Hispanic teen girls in New York City public schools.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Elizabeth Needham; Orr, Mark G; Sackoff, Judith; Santelli, John S

    2010-05-01

    Disparities in teen pregnancy rates are explained by different rates of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Identifying other components of risk such as race/ethnicity and neighborhood can inform strategies for teen pregnancy prevention. Data from the 2005 and 2007 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were used to model demographic differences in odds of recent sexual activity and birth control use among black, white, and Hispanic public high school girls. Overall pregnancy risk was calculated using pregnancy risk index (PRI) methodology, which estimates probability of pregnancy based on current sexual activity and birth control method at last intercourse. Factors of race/ethnicity, grade level, age, borough, and school neighborhood were assessed. Whites reported lower rates of current sexual activity (23.4%) than blacks (35.4%) or Hispanics (32.7%), and had lower predicted pregnancy risk (PRI = 5.4% vs. 9.0% and 10.5%, respectively). Among sexually active females, hormonal contraception use rates were low in all groups (11.6% among whites, 7.8% among blacks, and 7.5% among Hispanics). Compared to white teens, much of the difference in PRI was attributable to poorer contraceptive use (19% among blacks and 50% among Hispanics). Significant differences in contraceptive use were also observed by school neighborhood after adjusting for age group and race/ethnicity. Interventions to reduce teen pregnancy among diverse populations should include messages promoting delayed sexual activity, condom use and use of highly effective birth control methods. Access to long-acting contraceptive methods must be expanded for all sexually active high school students.

  5. A Meta-Analysis of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorder Risk in Offspring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiming; Wang, Ying; Gong, Xuan; Wang, Gaohua

    2015-08-26

    The association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk in offspring has been investigated in several studies, but the evidence is not conclusive. We, therefore, conducted this meta-analysis to explore whether an association exists between maternal smoking during pregnancy and ASD risk in offspring. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for studies of maternal smoking during pregnancy and ASD risk in offspring up to 10 June 2015. The random-effects model was used to combine results from individual studies. 15 observational studies (6 cohort studies and 9 case-control studies), with 17,890 ASD cases and 1,810,258 participants were included for analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) was 1.02 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-1.13) comparing mothers who smoked during pregnancy with those who did not. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis suggested the overall result of this analysis was robust. Results from this meta-analysis indicate that maternal smoking during pregnancy is not associated with ASD risk in offspring. Further well-designed cohort studies are needed to confirm the present findings.

  6. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  7. Geophagy during pregnancy: Is there a health risk for infants.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Claudia; Kutalek, Ruth; Glaunach, Rosina; Deweis, Coloman; Hengstschläger, Markus; Prinz, Armin

    2017-03-23

    Prenatal lead exposure is a public health concern. Geophagy, the practice of soil eating, is documented for pregnant women of sub-Saharan Africa to treat pregnancy-related malaise. The soils however can contain substantial amounts of lead. In an exploratory study on 48 mother-child pairs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, we found striking site-specific differences in prenatal lead exposure, i.e., higher lead levels at Kisangani than at Isiro. Kisangani women consumed 1/ more often soil during the first trimester of pregnancy as well as 2/ a different type of soil compared to Isiro women (P<0.05). We conclude geophagy may be a potential source of prenatal lead exposure.

  8. Pregnancy is not a risk factor for gallstone disease: Results of a randomly selected population sample

    PubMed Central

    Walcher, Thomas; Haenle, Mark Martin; Kron, Martina; Hay, Birgit; Mason, Richard Andrew; von Schmiesing, Alexa Friederike Alice; Imhof, Armin; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kern, Peter; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Kratzer, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence, risk factors, and selection of the study population for cholecystolithiasis in an urban population in Germany, in relation to our own findings and to the results in the international literature. METHODS: A total of 2 147 persons (1 111 females, age 42.8 ± 12.7 years; 1 036 males, age 42.3 ± 13.1 years) participating in an investigation on the prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis were studied for risk factors and prevalence of gallbladder stone disease. Risk factors were assessed by means of a standardized interview and calculation of body mass index (BMI). A diagnostic ultrasound examination of the gallbladder was performed. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, using the SAS statistical software package. RESULTS: Gallbladder stones were detected in 171 study participants (8.0%, n = 2 147). Risk factors for the development of gallbladder stone disease included age, sex, BMI, and positive family history. In a separate analysis of female study participants, pregnancy (yes/no) and number of pregnancies did not exert any influence. CONCLUSION: Findings of the present study confirm that age, female sex, BMI, and positive family history are risk factors for the development of gallbladder stone disease. Pregnancy and the number of pregnancies, however, could not be shown to be risk factors. There seem to be no differences in the respective prevalence for gallbladder stone disease in urban and rural populations. PMID:16425387

  9. [High risk infective endocarditis embolism during pregnancy: Medical or surgical management?].

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; Figueredo, Antonio; Gómez, Juan Carlos; Salazar, Leonardo Alberto; Rodriguez, Jaime Alberto; Pizarro, Camilo Ernesto; Riaño, Carlos Eduardo; Perroni, Addy; Cuadros, Alba Lucía; Villamizar, María Cristina; Suárez, Edwin Uriel

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old pregnant woman was seen at 14 weeks of pregnancy for infective endocarditis with a vegetation of 15 mm and wide mobility, which affected the native mitral valve accompanied by severe valvular insufficiency. Antibiotic treatment was given for 4 weeks despite the embolism risk. Due to persistence of vegetation size and after considering the fetal and maternal risk, the surgical procedure was favored. We decided to perform valvuloplasty and removal of lesion at 18 weeks of pregnancy. Fetal protection techniques were used and a bioprosthesis was placed before attempting a repair. The postoperative follow-up was satisfactory, achieving a successful birth by cesarean section at 30 weeks.

  10. Risk Factors and Health Profiles of Recent Migrant Women Who Experienced Violence Associated with Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Anita J.; Merry, Lisa A.; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Violence associated with pregnancy is a major public health concern, but little is known about it in recent migrant women. This study looked at (1) risk factors for violence associated with pregnancy among newly arrived migrant women in Canada and (2) if those who experienced violence associated with pregnancy had a different health profile or use of healthcare services for themselves or their infants during pregnancy and up to 4 months postpartum compared to other childbearing migrant women. Methods Pregnant migrant women in Canada <5 years were recruited in 12 hospitals in 3 large cities between 2006 and 2009 and followed to 4 months postpartum. Data were collected on maternal background, migration history, violence associated with pregnancy, maternal and infant physical and mental health, and services used. Results Of a total of 774 pregnant migrant women, 59 (7.6%) women reported violence associated with pregnancy. Migrant women who experienced violence, compared to those who did not, were at increased risk of violence if they lived without a partner, were asylum seekers, migrated <2 years ago, or had less than high school education. Women who reported violence were less likely to have up-to-date vaccinations, take folic acid before pregnancy, more likely to commence prenatal care after 3 months gestation and to not use contraceptives after birth. They were also more likely to have a history of miscarriage and report more postpartum pain and increased bleeding. They were also more likely to have inadequate social support and report more depression, anxiety, somatization, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on standardized tests. No differences were found in the health status of the infants of women who experienced violence compared to those who did not. Conclusions Clinicians should sensitively ask recent migrant women (asylum seekers, refugees, and nonrefugee immigrants) about violence associated with pregnancy and appropriately assess

  11. Risk factors of hypertensive pregnancies in women with diabetes and the influence on their future life.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Teramo, Kari; Kaaja, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Diabetic women carry a 2-4 times increased risk of a hypertensive pregnancy compared to non-diabetic people. This risk is related to presence of diabetic nephropathy, but also poor glycaemic control. Efforts to improve glycaemic control have decreased perinatal morbidity and mortality related to diabetic nephropathy. Despite good glycaemic control, overt nephropathy is associated with a variety of pregnancy complications, such as fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. General population studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia are more prone to develop cardiovascular disease later in life than women with a history of normotensive pregnancy. Furthermore, recent data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications indicate that these women should be followed and treatment should be started early. In this review we summarize data on risk factors and long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications that may be of clinical relevance in the prevention of these complications.

  12. Vaginal douching as a potential risk factor for tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chow, W H; Daling, J R; Weiss, N S; Moore, D E; Soderstrom, R

    1985-12-01

    The incidence of ectopic pregnancy in the United States has more than doubled in the past decade. Because a previous study has suggested that the practice of vaginal douching may increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease, a condition known to predispose to ectopic pregnancy, and because the sale of commercial douching products in the United States has more than tripled since 1974, we investigated this practice as a possible risk factor. We interviewed 155 women who had a tubal ectopic pregnancy treated at five Seattle hospitals between 1975 and 1979 as to their reproductive, contraceptive, and medical histories, demographic characteristics, and personal hygiene practices. During the same period, 456 women who were delivered of a baby in King County were identified from Vital Records and interviewed as controls. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported ever having douched in the past. Cases also douched more frequently than controls. After simultaneous adjusting for confounding factors in our data by means of a multiple logistic regression technique, the risk of tubal ectopic pregnancy for women who douched at least weekly was twice that of women who never douched (95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 4.00). The risk for women who used commercial douches on a weekly basis was 4.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.6 to 12.7) the risk for women who never douched.

  13. Invited Commentary: Induced Abortion and the Risk of Preeclampsia in a Subsequent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Basso, Olga

    2015-10-15

    Although it is well established that a having a pregnancy that ends in a birth protects against subsequent preeclampsia, it is unclear whether a pregnancy ending in miscarriage or induced abortion confers any protection. In this issue of the Journal, Parker et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;182(8):663-669) examine whether, in nulliparous women, a history of induced abortion is associated with a lower risk of preeclampsia in a later pregnancy, focusing on the hypothesis that endometrial injury facilitates later implantation. The authors take advantage of data obtained by linking several Finnish population-based registries that include detailed data on induced abortions, although information on miscarriages was of lower quality. Parker et al. found a modest reduction in risk among women with a history of induced abortion. However, there was little evidence that risk differed between women who had medical abortions and those who had surgical abortions (the latter of which is presumably associated with a higher degree of injury). History of miscarriage was not associated with preeclampsia risk. Although the study by Parker et al. adds to the evidence that suggests that women with a history of induced abortion have a lower risk of preeclampsia, it is difficult to evaluate whether the observed association is due to having had a previous pregnancy (however short) versus none, to confounding, or to an actual effect of induced abortion.

  14. Evaluating a Pregnancy and STI Prevention Programme in Rural, At-Risk, Middle School Girls in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Julie C.; Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D.; Graber, Julia A.; Johnson, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Young people in urban areas are often the focus of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention programmes because of their high risk of unwanted pregnancy and contracting an STI. Young people in rural areas are far less studied but also have a high risk of similar outcomes. This study evaluates Giving Our Girls…

  15. Sex education and knowledge of pregnancy risk among U.S. teenage women.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, M

    1979-01-01

    Seven in 10 never-married U.S. women aged 15-19 have had a sex education course, almost all of them in school. Young black women are slightly more likely than whites to have had such a course. About half of all never-married teenagers have had courses which included some teaching about modern contraceptive methods; six in 10 have had some formal instruction about VD, and seven in 10 have had courses that included detailed instruction about the monthly menstrual cycle. Six in 10 of those who have had a course with information on the menstrual cycle claim to know the period of greatest pregnancy risk; but only one-third of those who have had such a course can in fact correctly identify the time when the risk of pregnancy is highest. Young white women are nearly two times more likely than blacks to identify the period of risk correctly. Knowledge of the period of risk is a particularly important issue in relation to teenage pregnancy, because many sexually active teenagers say that they do not use contraception because they believe they are protected from the risk of pregnancy by the time of month when they have intercourse. Among those who claim to know the period of greatest risk, a sex education course is the most common source of information for both blacks and whites, with home a distant second. Medical personnel and facilities convey information about pregnancy risk the most effectively, but they are the first source for only a tiny fraction of teenagers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Risk factors for ectopic pregnancy: a case-control study in France, with special focus on infectious factors.

    PubMed

    Coste, J; Job-Spira, N; Fernandez, H; Papiernik, E; Spira, A

    1991-05-01

    A case-control study was conducted in 1988 in seven Paris area maternity hospitals to evaluate the role of several risk factors, particularly infectious factors, in ectopic pregnancy. A total of 279 cases and 279 controls were compared for sociodemographic characteristics, cigarette smoking, sexual, reproductive and surgical histories, and conditions of conception. Pelvic inflammatory disease confirmed by celioscopy (odds ratio (OR) = 5.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-13.9) and Chlamydia trachomatis seropositivity (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 2.3-6.7) appeared to be important risk factors for ectopic pregnancy. Other risk factors found to be associated with an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy were dose-related cigarette smoking at the time of conception (ORs 1.3 to 2.5), appendectomy (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.5), prior tubal surgery (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.7-15.4), induced conception cycle (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.3), and prior ectopic pregnancy (OR = 13.3, 95% CI 4.5-39.2). However, some of the latter risk factors, i.e., prior tubal surgery, prior ectopic pregnancy, and perhaps appendectomy, may be considered to be the results of pelvic inflammatory disease and sexually transmitted diseases. Maternal age, parity, prior induced abortion, and prior spontaneous abortion were not associated with ectopic pregnancy. Use of intrauterine device, progestagen micropill, and also combined estroprogestative pill at the time of conception were associated with a better prevention of intrauterine pregnancy than of ectopic pregnancy. These findings confirm the importance of several previously reported risk factors of ectopic pregnancy: sexually transmitted diseases, cigarette smoking, and prior ectopic pregnancy. They also identified new risk factors, appendectomy and induced conception cycle, and revealed that the combined estroprogestative pill does not prevent ectopic pregnancy as effectively as it does intrauterine pregnancy.

  17. Impacts of Abstinence Education on Teen Sexual Activity, Risk of Pregnancy, and Risk of Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenholm, Christopher; Devaney, Barbara; Fortson, Kenneth; Clark, Melissa; Bridgespan, Lisa Quay; Wheeler, Justin

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of four abstinence-only education programs on adolescent sexual activity and risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Based on an experimental design, the impact analysis uses survey data collected in 2005 and early 2006 from more than 2,000 teens who had been randomly assigned to either a…

  18. Does father absence place daughters at special risk for early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Ellis, Bruce J; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Fergusson, David M; Horwood, L John; Pettit, Gregory S; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    The impact of father absence on early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy was investigated in longitudinal studies in the United States (N = 242) and New Zealand (N = 520), in which community samples of girls were followed prospectively from early in life (5 years) to approximately age 18. Greater exposure to father absence was strongly associated with elevated risk for early sexual activity and adolescent pregnancy. This elevated risk was either not explained (in the US. study) or only partly explained (in the New Zealand study) by familial, ecological, and personal disadvantages associated with father absence. After controlling for covariates, there was stronger and more consistent evidence of effects of father absence on early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy than on other behavioral or mental health problems or academic achievement. Effects of father absence are discussed in terms of life-course adversity, evolutionary psychology, social learning, and behavior genetic models.

  19. Acute Aortic Dissection in Third Trimester Pregnancy without Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kinney-Ham, Lisa; Nguyen, H. Bryant; Steele, Robert; Walters, Elizabeth L

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous aortic dissection in pregnancy is rare and life threatening for both the mother and the fetus. Most commonly, it is associated with connective tissue disorders, cardiac valve variants, or trauma. We present the case of a 23-year-old previously healthy woman, 36 weeks pregnant with a syncopal episode after dyspnea and vomiting. She subsequently developed cardiac arrest and underwent aggressive resuscitation, emergent thoracotomy, and cesarean delivery without recovery. On autopsy, she was found to have an aortic dissection of the ascending aorta. This case is presented to raise awareness and review the literature and the clinical approach to critical care for pregnant patients. PMID:22224164

  20. Self-reported Vitamin Supplementation in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Olshan, Andrew F.; Herring, Amy H.; Savitz, David A.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Miscarriage is a common and poorly understood adverse pregnancy outcome. In this study, the authors sought to evaluate the relation between self-reported use of prenatal vitamins in early pregnancy and the risk of miscarriage. Between 2000 and 2008, 4,752 US women were prospectively enrolled in Right From the Start. Information about vitamin use was obtained from a first-trimester interview. Discrete-time hazard models were used, candidate confounders were assessed, and the following variables were included in the model: study site, maternal age, gravidity, marital status, education, race/ethnicity, smoking, and use of progesterone in early pregnancy. Approximately 95% of participants reported use of vitamins during early pregnancy. A total of 524 women had a miscarriage. In the final adjusted model, any use of vitamins during pregnancy was associated with decreased odds of miscarriage (odds ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.30, 0.60) in comparison with no exposure. These results should be viewed in the context of a potentially preventive biologic mechanism mitigated by possible confounding by healthy behaviors and practices that are also associated with vitamin supplement use during pregnancy. PMID:19372214

  1. Women with Intellectual Disability at Risk of Adverse Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcconnell, D.; Mayes, R.; Llewellyn, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of women with intellectual disability (ID) have children. Cross-sectional, clinical population data suggest that these women face an increased risk of delivering preterm and/or low birthweight babies. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of poor pregnancy and birth outcomes in women with ID and/or…

  2. Risk and Protective Factors Predictive of Adolescent Pregnancy: A Longitudinal, Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Khoo, Siek Toon; Reyes, Barbara T.

    2006-01-01

    One hundred twenty-eight Latina and African American girls from high-risk environments (e.g., poverty, family history of teen parenting, etc.) were studied from age 13 through age 19 to prospectively identify the protective factors that might guard against teenage pregnancy. Results indicated that involved and strict parenting during early…

  3. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (<20 weeks gestation) mood disorder and pre-pregnancy migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders.

  4. Low maternal serum vitamin D during pregnancy and the risk for postpartum depression symptoms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Monique; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Newnham, John P; Gorman, Shelley; Jacoby, Peter; Holt, Barbara J; Serralha, Michael; Tearne, Jessica E; Holt, Pat G; Hart, Prue H; Kusel, Merci M H

    2014-06-01

    Pregnancy is a time of vulnerability for vitamin D insufficiency, and there is an emerging literature associating low levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D with depressive symptoms. However, the link between 25(OH)-vitamin D status in pregnancy and altered risk of postnatal depressive symptoms has not been examined. We hypothesise that low levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D in maternal serum during pregnancy will be associated with a higher incidence of postpartum depressive symptoms. We prospectively collected sera at 18 weeks gestation from 796 pregnant women in Perth (1989-1992) who were enrolled in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study and measured levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D. Women reported postnatal depressive symptoms at 3 days post-delivery. Women in the lowest quartile for 25(OH)-vitamin D status were more likely to report a higher level of postnatal depression symptoms than women who were in the highest quartile for vitamin D, even after accounting for a range of confounding variables including season of birth, body mass index and sociodemographic factors. Low vitamin D during pregnancy is a risk factor for the development of postpartum depression symptoms.

  5. Sleep Disordered Breathing in a High-Risk Cohort Prevalence and Severity across Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Facco, Francesca L.; Ouyang, David W.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Grobman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and incidence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in pregnancy among high-risk women. Study Design This was a prospective, observational study. We recruited women with a body mass index (BMI) 30 ≥ kg/m2, chronic hypertension, pregestational diabetes, history of preeclampsia, and/or a twin gestation. Objective assessment of SDB was completed between 6 and 20 weeks and again in the third trimester. SDB was defined as an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5, and further grouped into severity categories: mild (5–14.9), moderate (15–29.9) and severe (≥30). Subjects who had a normal AHI at the baseline (AHI < 5), but an abnormal study in the third trimester (AHI 5) were classified as having “new-onset” SDB. Results A total of 128 women were recruited. In early pregnancy 21, 6 and 3% had mild, moderate, or severe SDB, respectively. These frequencies increased to 35, 7, and 5% in the third trimester (p < 0.001). About 27% (n = 34) experienced a worsening of SDB during pregnancy; 26 were cases of new-onset SDB, while the other 8 had SDB in early pregnancy that worsened in severity. The incidence of new-onset SDB was 20%. The majority of these new-onset cases were mild. Conclusions SDB in early pregnancy is common in high-risk women and new-onset SDB occurs in 20% of these women. PMID:24515622

  6. [Bipolar disorder, pregnancy and the postpartum--risks and possibilities of pharmacotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krüger, Stephanie

    2009-06-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum are times of increased risk for women with bipolar disorder to develop mood episodes, especially depressions that may require pharmacotherapy. If mood stabilizing agents are discontinued prior or due to pregnancy, the risk for relapse increases dramatically. On the other hand, there is no psychotropic drug that is completely risk-free for the unborn. Some mood stabilizing medications are teratogenic, others can cause severe perinatal complications. Thus, the decision whether to treat the pregnant women with psychotropic drugs is difficult to make. In this paper, the reproductive risks of mood stabilizing agents, antidepressants, neuroleptics and benzodiazepines for the fetus are reviewed. During the postpartum period severe mood disorders can occur. The signs and symptoms of these disorders are reviewed and therapeutic strategies are discussed.

  7. Depression during pregnancy: rates, risks and consequences--Motherisk Update 2008.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Sheila M

    2009-01-01

    Affective illness is common in women, and the puerperium is a time of particular vulnerability. Gender differences in the expression of affective disorders have been attributed to the impact of hormonal influence, socialization, and genetics. Dramatic fluctuations in gonadal hormones that occur following childbirth, influences the increased incidence of mood disorders during this time. Numerous tools including the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale can be used to screen for depression during pregnancy and postpartum. While screening tools may assist with appropriately identifying women who should be further assessed, their use alone does not significantly increase treatment seeking in women, even when their providers are notified about risk. Many studies demonstrate that only a small number (18%) of women who meet criteria for major depressive disorder seek treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Additionally, common symptoms of depression (sleep, energy and appetite change) may be misinterpreted as normative experiences of pregnancy.Treatment engagement is important as untreated depression during pregnancy may have unfavorable outcomes for both women and children. Complications of pregnancy associated with depression include: inadequate weight gain,under utilization of prenatal care, increased substance use, and premature birth. Human studies demonstrate that perceived life-event stress, as well as depression and anxiety predicted lower birth weight, decreased Apgar scores, and smaller head circumference, and small for gestational age babies. Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common clinical disorder occurring in 15% of deliveries,making it one of the most frequent conditions to complicate pregnancy. Risk factors include past personal or family history of depression, sing marital status, poor health functioning, lower SES, and alcohol use. Women who have a prior history of postpartum depression, particularly with features of bipolarity or psychosis may be at

  8. Preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, Candace A.; Mendola, Pauline; Yeung, Edwina; Männistö, Tuija; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Liu, Danping; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Grantz, Katherine L.

    2015-02-15

    Background: Air pollution has been linked to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) but no studies have evaluated impact of preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures on GDM risk. Methods: Electronic medical records provided data on 219,952 singleton deliveries to mothers with (n=11,334) and without GDM (n=208,618). Average maternal exposures to particulate matter (PM) ≤ 2.5 μm (PM{sub 2.5}) and PM{sub 2.5} constituents, PM ≤ 10 μm (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were estimated for the 3-month preconception window, first trimester, and gestational weeks 1–24 based on modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models for delivery hospital referral regions. Binary regression models with robust standard errors estimated relative risks (RR) for GDM per interquartile range (IQR) increase in pollutant concentrations adjusted for study site, maternal age and race/ethnicity. Results: Preconception maternal exposure to NO{sub X} (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.13) and SO{sub 2} (RR=1.05, 1.01, 1.09) were associated with increased risk of subsequent GDM and risk estimates remained elevated for first trimester exposure. Preconception O{sub 3} was associated with lower risk of subsequent GDM (RR=0.93, 0.90, 0.96) but risks increased later in pregnancy. Conclusion: Maternal exposures to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} preconception and during the first few weeks of pregnancy were associated with increased GDM risk. O{sub 3} appeared to increase GDM risk in association with mid-pregnancy exposure but not in earlier time windows. These common exposures merit further investigation. - Highlights: • Air pollution may be related to gestational diabetes (GDM). • No prior studies have examined preconception exposure. • Maternal exposure to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} before conception increased subsequent GDM risk. • NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} exposure in the first seven weeks of pregnancy also increased

  9. Successful Non-fluoroscopic Radiofrequency Ablation of Incessant Atrial Tachycardia in a High Risk Twin Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zuberi, Zia; Silberbauer, John; Murgatroyd, Francis

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient presenting with incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia during a high risk twin pregnancy. Tachycardia was resistant to escalating doses of beta-blockade with digoxin. Because of increasing left ventricular dysfunction early in the third trimester, catheter ablation was performed successfully at 30 weeks gestation. Electro-anatomic mapping permitted the entire procedure to be conducted without the use of ionizing radiation. The pregnancy proceeded to successful delivery near term and after three years the patient remains recurrence free with normal left ventricular function, off all medication.

  10. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood.

  11. Increased Risk of Asthma in Children with ADHD: Role of Prematurity and Maternal Stress during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grizenko, Natalie; Osmanlliu, Esli; Fortier, Marie-Ève; Joober, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: ADHD and asthma are prevalent conditions in childhood, with complex pathophysiology involving genetic-environmental interplay. The study objective is to examine the prevalence of asthma in our ADHD population and explore factors that may increase the risk of developing asthma in children with ADHD. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the presence of maternal stress during pregnancy and history of asthma in 201 children diagnosed with ADHD. Results: Chi-square analysis indicated significant higher presence of asthma in our ADHD sample compared to Quebec children, χ2(1, N = 201) = 15.37, P<0.001. Only prematurity and stress during pregnancy significantly predicted asthma in a logistic regression model, χ2(2)=23.70, P<0.001, with odds ratios of 10.6 (95% CI: 2.8–39.5) and 3.2 (95% CI: 1.4–7.3), respectively. Conclusion: Children with ADHD have a higher prevalence of asthma than the general Quebec pediatric population. Children with ADHD born prematurely and/or those whose mothers experienced stress during pregnancy have a significantly increased risk of developing asthma. The study highlights the importance of potentially offering social and psychological support to mothers who experienced stress during pregnancy and/or are at risk of delivering prematurely. PMID:26379722

  12. Fetal Hemodynamic Parameters in Low Risk Pregnancies: Doppler Velocimetry of Uterine, Umbilical, and Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Dertkigil, M. S.; Pereira, S. L.; Bennini, J. R.; Mayrink, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To elaborate curves of longitudinal reference intervals of pulsatility index (PI) and systolic velocity (SV) for uterine (UtA), umbilical (UA), and middle cerebral arteries (MCA), in low risk pregnancies. Methods. Doppler velocimetric measurements of PI and SV from 63 low risk pregnant women between 16 and 41 weeks of gestational age. Means (±SD) for intervals of gestational age and percentiles 5, 50, and 95 were calculated for each parameter. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were also estimated for assessing intra- and intervariability of measurements. Results. Mean PI of UtA showed decreasing values during pregnancy, but no regular pattern was identified for mean SV. For UA, PI decreased and SV increased along gestation. MCA presented PI increasing values until 32–35 weeks. SV showed higher levels with increasing gestation. High ICC values indicated good reproducibility. Conclusions. Reference intervals for the assessment of SV and PI of UtA, UA, and MCA were established. These reference intervals showed how a normal pregnancy is expected to progress regarding these Doppler velocimetric parameters and are useful to follow high risk pregnancies. The comparison between results using different curves may provide insights about the best patterns to be used. PMID:27957524

  13. Seasonal influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women: pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Indu B; Singleton, James A; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Harrison, Leslie

    2011-05-01

    Since 2004, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have recommended that pregnant women receive the seasonal influenza vaccine, regardless of pregnancy trimester, because of their increased risk for severe complications from influenza. However, the uptake of the influenza vaccine by pregnant women has been low. During the 2009-2010 influenza season, pregnant women were identified as a priority population to receive the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (2009 H1N1) monovalent vaccine in addition to the seasonal influenza vaccine. In this issue, we highlight information from the 10 states that collected data using the survey administered by the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) about seasonal vaccine coverage among women with recent live births and reasons for those who chose not to get vaccinated. The combined estimates from PRAMS of influenza vaccination coverage for the 2009-2010 season, which included data from October 2009 to March 2010, from 10 states were 50.7% for seasonal and 46.6% for 2009 H1N1 vaccine among women with recent live births. Among women who did not get vaccinated, reasons varied from worries about the safety of the vaccines for self and baby to not normally getting the vaccination. Further evaluation is needed on ways to increase influenza vaccination among pregnant women, effectively communicate the risk of influenza illness during pregnancy, and address women's concerns about influenza vaccination safety during pregnancy.

  14. Risk of fetal death after pandemic influenza infection or vaccination during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Håberg, Siri E; Trogstad, Lill; Gunnes, Nina; Wilcox, Allen J.; Gjessing, Håkon K.; Samuelsen, Sven Ove; Skrondal, Anders; Cappelen, Inger; Engeland, Anders; Aavitsland, Preben; Madsen, Steinar; Buajordet, Ingebjørg; Furu, Kari; Nafstad, Per; Vollset, Stein Emil; Berit, Feiring; Nøkleby, Hanne; Magnus, Per; Stoltenberg, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Background During the 2009 influenza pandemic, pregnant women were at particular risk of serious influenza illness. This concern was further complicated by questions about vaccine safety in pregnant women raised by anecdotal reports of fetal deaths following vaccination. Methods We explored the safety of influenza vaccination of pregnant women by linking Norwegian national registries and medical consultation data to determine influenza diagnosis, vaccination status, birth outcomes, and background information for pregnant women before, during, and after the pandemic. We used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios of fetal death, with gestational day as the time metric and vaccination and pandemic exposure as time-dependent exposure variables. Results There were 117,347 eligible pregnancies in Norway in 2009–2010. Fetal mortality was 4.9/1000. 54% of pregnant women in their second or third trimester during the pandemic were vaccinated. Vaccination in pregnancy substantially reduced the risk of influenza diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.25 to 0.34). A clinical diagnosis of influenza in the mother increased the risk of fetal death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.41). Among pregnant women, the risk of fetal death was lower with vaccination, although this reduction was not statistically significant (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.17). Conclusions Pandemic influenza in pregnancy was associated with increased risk of fetal death. Vaccination during pregnancy reduced the risk of influenza diagnosis. Vaccination itself did not increase fetal mortality, and may have reduced the risk of influenza-related fetal death during the pandemic. PMID:23323868

  15. [Deep venous thrombosis in pregnancy: risk factors and possibilities for prevention].

    PubMed

    Heilmann, L; Hojnacki, B; Fischer, W M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two cases of acute venous thrombosis in pregnancy (0.64%) were studied. Concomitant pulmonary embolism was documented in 0.23%. Prophylactic heparinization was performed in 32 gravidae. In the acute thrombosis group therapy was instituted in the 26th week, and in the prophylaxis group in the 20th week of pregnancy. Recurrent thromboses after cesarean section occurred in 4.5% of the patients with acute venous thrombosis and in 5.6% of those in the prophylaxis group. Reduced red blood cell deformability, low antithrombin III and high leukocyte count were identified as risk factors. Heparinization did not prevent increased red blood cell aggregation and plasma viscosity at birth. Rheologic factors played only a secondary role in the prophylaxis group. Prophylactic heparinization in pregnancy is currently the only means of reducing the thrombosis recurrence rate in patients with a history of thromboembolism.

  16. Intervention to Decrease Risk for STDs and Unintended Pregnancies Among Navy Women Aboard Ships: A Biopsychosocial Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    Unintended pregnancies (UIPs) and STDs with their sequelae of ectopic pregnancy continue to be epidemic among active duty enlisted women. Such...reproductive health problems result in major morbidity among affected women as well as posing a potential threat to combat readiness. UIPs and STDs result...intervention on the experimental group using both self-report questionnaires (psychosocial and behavioral risk factors) and results from the STD and pregnancy

  17. Comorbidities of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Pregnancy Risk Factors and Parent Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Silva, Desiree; Houghton, Stephen; Hagemann, Erika; Bower, Carol

    2015-08-01

    Our study examined the risk of maternal smoking and alcohol consumption in pregnancy associated with child comorbidity in a community sample of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We used a cross sectional community retrospective questionnaire of 321 children diagnosed with ADHD. Our results suggest that maternal smoking increased the risk of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) in children with ADHD twofold (OR 2.27; CI 1.29-4.11). Maternal alcohol consumption increased the risk although not significantly for ADHD child comorbid ODB, anxiety disorder and depression. Parent mental health significantly impacted on child comorbidity. Our study suggests that smoking in pregnancy is associated with comorbid ODB, independent of parent mental health, family history of ADHD and socioeconomic factors. Parent mental health is independently associated with comorbid ODB, anxiety disorder and depression.

  18. Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel diseases: Current perspectives, risks and patient management

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Carroll, Pegah; Mutyala, Monica; Seth, Abhishek; Nageeb, Shaheen; Soliman, Demiana; Boktor, Moheb; Sheth, Ankur; Chapman, Jonathon; Morris, James; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Becker, Felix; Alexander, Jonathan Steven

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic idiopathic inflammatory conditions characterized by relapsing and remitting episodes of inflammation which can affect several different regions of the gastrointestinal tract, but also shows extra-intestinal manifestations. IBD is most frequently diagnosed during peak female reproductive years, with 25% of women with IBD conceiving after their diagnosis. While IBD therapy has improved dramatically with enhanced surveillance and more abundant and powerful treatment options, IBD disease can have important effects on pregnancy and presents several challenges for maintaining optimal outcomes for mothers with IBD and the developing fetus/neonate. Women with IBD, the medical team treating them (both gastroenterologists and obstetricians/gynecologists) must often make highly complicated choices regarding conception, pregnancy, and post-natal care (particularly breastfeeding) related to their choice of treatment options at different phases of pregnancy as well as post-partum. This current review discusses current concerns and recommendations for pregnancy during IBD and is intended for gastroenterologists, general practitioners and IBD patients intending to become, (or already) pregnant, and their families. We have addressed patterns of IBD inheritance, effects of IBD on fertility and conception (in both men and women), the effects of IBD disease activity on maintenance of pregnancy and outcomes, risks of diagnostic procedures during pregnancy and potential risks and complications associated with different classes of IBD therapeutics. We also have evaluated the clinical experience using “top-down” care with biologics, which is currently the standard care at our institution. Post-partum care and breastfeeding recommendations are also addressed. PMID:26558150

  19. Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel diseases: Current perspectives, risks and patient management.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Carroll, Pegah; Mutyala, Monica; Seth, Abhishek; Nageeb, Shaheen; Soliman, Demiana; Boktor, Moheb; Sheth, Ankur; Chapman, Jonathon; Morris, James; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Becker, Felix; Alexander, Jonathan Steven

    2015-11-06

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic idiopathic inflammatory conditions characterized by relapsing and remitting episodes of inflammation which can affect several different regions of the gastrointestinal tract, but also shows extra-intestinal manifestations. IBD is most frequently diagnosed during peak female reproductive years, with 25% of women with IBD conceiving after their diagnosis. While IBD therapy has improved dramatically with enhanced surveillance and more abundant and powerful treatment options, IBD disease can have important effects on pregnancy and presents several challenges for maintaining optimal outcomes for mothers with IBD and the developing fetus/neonate. Women with IBD, the medical team treating them (both gastroenterologists and obstetricians/gynecologists) must often make highly complicated choices regarding conception, pregnancy, and post-natal care (particularly breastfeeding) related to their choice of treatment options at different phases of pregnancy as well as post-partum. This current review discusses current concerns and recommendations for pregnancy during IBD and is intended for gastroenterologists, general practitioners and IBD patients intending to become, (or already) pregnant, and their families. We have addressed patterns of IBD inheritance, effects of IBD on fertility and conception (in both men and women), the effects of IBD disease activity on maintenance of pregnancy and outcomes, risks of diagnostic procedures during pregnancy and potential risks and complications associated with different classes of IBD therapeutics. We also have evaluated the clinical experience using "top-down" care with biologics, which is currently the standard care at our institution. Post-partum care and breastfeeding recommendations are also addressed.

  20. Pregravid Liver Enzyme Levels and Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus During a Subsequent Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Darbinian, Jeanne; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Hedderson, Monique M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Liver enzymes are independent predictors of type 2 diabetes. Although liver fat content correlates with features of insulin resistance, a risk factor for developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the relationship between liver enzymes and GDM is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess whether pregravid liver enzyme levels are associated with subsequent risk of GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A nested case-control study was conducted among women who participated in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multiphasic health checkup (1984–1996) and had a subsequent pregnancy (1984–2009). Case patients were 256 women who developed GDM. Two control subjects were selected for each case patient and matched for year of blood draw, age at examination, age at pregnancy, and number of intervening pregnancies. RESULTS Being in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels was associated with a twofold increased risk of subsequent GDM (odds ratio 1.97 [95% CI 1.14–3.42]), after adjusting for race/ethnicity, prepregnancy BMI, family history of diabetes, and alcohol use. This result was attenuated after adjusting for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting status, and rate of gestational weight gain. There was significant interaction between GGT and HOMA-IR; the association with GGT was found among women in the highest tertile of HOMA-IR. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were not associated with increased GDM risk. CONCLUSIONS Pregravid GGT level, but not alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase level, predicted the subsequent risk of GDM. Markers of liver fat accumulation, such as GGT level, are present years before pregnancy and may help to identify women at increased risk for subsequent GDM. PMID:24795397

  1. Validation of the High-Risk Pregnancy Stress Scale in a sample of hospitalized Greek high-risk pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Karpathiotaki, Natassa; Karapanou, Vassiliki; Antzaklis, Panos; Daskalakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Greek adaptation of the High-Risk Pregnancy Stress Scale (HRPSS) in a sample of high-risk hospitalized pregnant women. The sample consisted of 133 high-risk pregnant women with gestational age from 9 to 37 weeks. Data were collected between February and June of 2014. HRPSS was "forward-backward" translated from English to Greek. Principal axis factoring with promax rotation was used to test the factor structure of the HRPSS. Measures of state anxiety (STAI) and depressive symptoms (EPDS) were used to assess the convergent validity of the HRPSS. Exploratory factor analysis suggested three factors: concerns of pregnancy, movement restriction, and isolation and restriction of external activities. Construct validity was confirmed by computing correlations between the HRPSS and constructions of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory (α = 0.813). The original factor structure of the HRPSS was only partly replicated. The results of the exploratory factor analysis suggested that a three-factor solution instead of a two-factor solution would be the most adequate. The HRPSS is an appropriate measure for assessing the levels of concerns regarding pregnancy outcome, movement restriction, isolation, and external activity restrictions in Greek high-risk pregnant women.

  2. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  3. Pregnancy and cardiovascular risk: A review focused on women with heart disease undergoing fertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Rossberg, Nora; Stangl, Karl; Stangl, Verena

    2016-10-17

    A growing number of women with heart disease are considering pregnancy with the help of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Although an ever-increasing amount of knowledge exists on pregnancy in both congenital and acquired heart disease patients, little information is available on fertility treatments specifically in these women. This review seeks to provide an overview of the existing data and explores areas in need of research in this field. Changes in the hormonal environment seen in ART patients initially entail an increase then a decrease in blood pressure and peripheral vascular resistance. A shift in the thrombotic-thrombolytic balance towards coagulation is observed. Compared to normal pregnancy, ART-conceived pregnancies exhibit an increased adverse event rate for both the mother and foetus, including a higher incidence of hypertensive disorders and an increase in thromboembolic events during the first trimester. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in particular can cause dramatic haemodynamic changes and an increase in upper body thrombosis. Viewing these findings within the context of women with an underlying heart disease reveals indications that maternal and neonatal complications after fertility treatments are higher. Pre-pregnancy risk assessment is essential to identifying women with heart disease for whom ART may be dangerous and therefore inappropriate.

  4. Pulmonary imaging in pregnancy. Maternal risk and fetal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, C.S.; Mason, G.R.; Kuperus, J.H.; Mena, I.

    1985-01-01

    A Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scan and a Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation scan were performed for suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE) in a patient who was ten weeks pregnant. There was considerable reluctance on the part of the obstetricians to permit this study. Standard MIRD dose estimates to the fetus were performed, which showed a maximum fetal exposure of about 50 mrem. It was concluded that the risk to mother and fetus from undiagnosed and untreated PE is much greater than the negligible risk to the fetus from the radiation exposure; fear of fetal radiation damage should not be a deterrent to performing these scans.

  5. Antihistamine Use in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Mitchell, Allen A.; Werler, Martha M.; Yau, Wai-Ping; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported an association between use of specific antihistamines in early pregnancy and certain specific birth defects. Objective To test 16 previously-hypothesized associations between specific antihistamines and specific birth defects, and identify possible new associations. Methods We used 1998-2010 data from the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study, a multicenter case-control surveillance program of birth defects in North America. Mothers were interviewed within six months of delivery about demographic, reproductive, medical, and behavioral factors, and details on use of prescription and non-prescription medications. We compared 1st trimester exposure to specific antihistamines between 13,213 infants with specific malformations and 6,982 non-malformed controls, using conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, including indication for use. Results Overall, 13.7% of controls were exposed to antihistamines during the 1st trimester. The most commonly-used medications were diphenhydramine (4.2%), loratadine (3.1%), doxylamine (1.9%), and chlorpheniramine (1.7%). Where estimates were stable, none supported the previously-hypothesized associations. Among over 100 exploratory comparisons of other specific antihistamine/defect pairs, 14 had ORs ≥1.5 of which 6 had 95% CI bounds excluding 1.0 before but not after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Our findings do not provide meaningful support for previously-posited associations between antihistamines and major congenital anomalies; at the same time, we identified associations that had not been previously suggested. We suspect that previous associations may be chance findings in the context of multiple comparisons, a situation which may also apply to our new findings. PMID:24565715

  6. Smoking and Pregnancy — A Review on the First Major Environmental Risk Factor of the Unborn

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Mathias; Louwen, Frank; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Smoking cigarettes throughout pregnancy is one of the single most important avoidable causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes and it represents the first major environmental risk of the unborn. If compared with other risk factors in the perinatal period, exposure to tobacco smoke is considered to be amongst the most harmful and it is associated with high rates of long and short term morbidity and mortality for mother and child. A variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes are linked with cigarette consumption before and during pregnancy. Maternal prenatal cigarette smoke disturbs the equilibrium among the oxidant and antioxidant system, has negative impact on the genetic and cellular level of both mother and fetus and causes a large quantity of diseases in the unborn child. These smoking-induced damages for the unborn offspring manifest themselves at various times in life and for most only a very limited range of causal treatment exists. Education, support and assistance are of high importance to decrease maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, as there are few other avoidable factors which influence a child’s health that profoundly throughout its life. It is imperative that smoking control should be seen as a public health priority. PMID:24351784

  7. [Prevalence and determinants of medication during pregnancy by risk class among mothers of liveborn infants].

    PubMed

    Geib, Lorena Teresinha Consalter; Vargas Filho, Edson Fauth; Geib, Débora; Mesquita, Débora Iasmin; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2007-10-01

    In order to identify the maternal determinants of the consumption of medication during pregnancy according to risk class, we conducted a population cohort baseline cross-sectional study with 2,262 mothers of liveborn infants in Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected from the Information System on Live Births and through home interviews (an instrument adapted from the Maternity Advice Survey). The drugs were classified according to criteria. We conducted bivariate analyses and logistic regression according to the hierarchical model of determination. 80% of the mothers consumed at least one medicine during the pregnancy, distributed in risk classes as follows: A (53.4%), B (18.1%), C (24.46%), D (1.47%), X (0.06%), and V (various) (2.1%). Incomplete prenatal care and maternal age < 20 years determined the consumption of medication in class A and pregnancy complications in classes B, C, and D. In class C, cesarean section and previous abortion also determined consumption, which in class V was independent of the variables analyzed. Maternal factors, especially health complications, determine the consumption of medicines during pregnancy, suggesting that the prescribing physician should orient the safe and proper use of such medication.

  8. Parental smoking in pregnancy and the risks of adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Layla L; Harris, Holly R; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Willett, Walter C; Forman, Michele R; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Michels, Karin B

    2013-02-01

    Fetal exposure to parental smoking may lead to developmental adaptations and promote various diseases in later life. This study evaluated the associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the daughter in adulthood, and assessed whether these associations are explained by birth weight or body weight throughout life. We used data on 33086 participants of the Nurses' Health Study II and the Nurses' Mothers' Cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with the nurse daughter, with self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension from 1989 until 2007. Overall, 8575 (25.9%) mothers and 18874 (57.0%) fathers smoked during pregnancy. During follow-up, 7825 incident cases of adult-onset hypertension were reported. Both maternal and paternal smoking of ≥ 15 cigarettes/d during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of hypertension (rate ratio, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.09-1.29; and rate ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.25, respectively) in the age-adjusted models. Further adjustment for birth weight did not affect the effect estimates appreciably, whereas additional adjustment for body shape and weight until age 18, or current body mass index, attenuated the associations with both maternal and paternal smoking (rate ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.98-1.16; and rate ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12, respectively). The associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the offspring were largely explained by body weight throughout life, suggesting that these associations may not reflect direct intrauterine mechanisms.

  9. Does Chocolate Intake During Pregnancy Reduce the Risks of Preeclampsia and Gestational Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Saftlas, Audrey F.; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Beydoun, Hind; Bracken, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Chocolate consumption is associated with favorable levels of blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease risk markers. We analyzed a prospective cohort study to determine if regular chocolate intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced risks of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension (GH). Methods Subjects were recruited from 13 prenatal care practices in Connecticut (1988-1991). In-person interviews were administered at <16 weeks gestation to ascertain risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Hospital delivery and prenatal records were abstracted to classify preeclampsia (n=58), GH (n=158), and normotensive pregnancies (n=2351). Chocolate consumption (servings/week) during the 1st and 3rd trimesters was ascertained at initial interview and immediately postpartum, respectively. Consumers of <1 serving/week comprised the referent group. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were estimated using logistic regression. Results Chocolate intake was more frequent among normotensives (80.7%) than preeclamptics (62.5%) or GH women (75.8%), and associated with reduced odds of preeclampsia (1st trimester: aOR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.95; 3rd trimester: aOR=0.56, 95% CI: 0.32-0.97). Only 1st trimester intake was associated with reduced odds of GH (aOR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.87). Conclusions These findings provide additional evidence of the benefits of chocolate. Prospective studies are needed to confirm and delineate protective effects of chocolate intake on risk of preeclampsia. PMID:20609337

  10. Risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes after high technology infertility treatment: a comprehensive systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Homburg, Roy; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Orvieto, Raoul

    2016-11-04

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that subfertile patients who conceived after infertility treatments have an increased risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications and this is particularly true for patients who conceived through use of high technology infertility treatments. Moreover, high technology infertility treatments include many concomitant clinical and biological risk factors. This review aims to summarize in a systematic fashion the current evidence regarding the relative effect of the different procedures for high technology infertility treatments on the risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcome. A literature search up to August 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar and an evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyze. Data on prepregnancy maternal factors, low technology interventions, specific procedures for male factor, ovarian tissue/ovary and uterus transplantation, and chromosomal abnormalities and malformations of the offspring were excluded. The available evidences were analyzed assessing the level and the quality of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, respectively. Current review highlights that every single procedure of high technology infertility treatments can play a crucial role in increasing the risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications. Due to the suboptimal level and quality of the current evidence, further well-designed studies are needed.

  11. Risk screening, emergency care, and lay concepts of complications during pregnancy in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Ojanguren, Rolando; Glantz, Namino M; Martinez-Hernandez, Imelda; Ovando-Meza, Ismael

    2008-03-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality are widespread in Chiapas, Mexico's southernmost state, as in many developing regions. Globally, the utility of three approaches to addressing such problems has been debated: (a) obstetric risk screening (i.e. screening women for risk during pregnancy and channeling those at risk to preventive care); (b) emergency obstetric care (i.e. identifying complications during pregnancy or birth and providing prompt effective treatment); and (c) combined risk screening and emergency care. Unaddressed to date in peer-reviewed journals are the lay perceptions of complications and risk that precede and incite the quest for obstetric care in Mexico. High incidence of maternal mortality in Chiapas, exacerbated by the predominantly rural, highly indigenous, geographically dispersed, and economically marginalized nature of the state's southern Border Region, prompted us to conduct 45 open-ended interviews with a convenience sample of women and their close relative/s, including indigenous and non-indigenous informants in urban and rural areas of four municipalities in this region. Interviews suggest that none of the three approaches is effective in this context, and we detail reasons why each approach has fallen short. Specific obstacles identified include that (1) many women do not access adequate prenatal screening care on a regular basis; (2) emergency obstetric care in this region is severely circumscribed; and (3) lay notions of pregnancy-related risk and complications contrast with official clinical criteria, such that neither clinical nor extra-clinical prenatal monitoring encompasses the entire range of physical and social risk factors and danger signs. Findings reported here center on a rich description of the latter: lay versus clinical criteria for risk of antepartum complication.

  12. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors for Obesity During Pregnancy Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Stüber, T. N.; Künzel, E. C.; Zollner, U.; Rehn, M.; Wöckel, A.; Hönig, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The increasing prevalence of obesity is having an impact on morbidity worldwide. Since young mature women are equally affected by the general increase in weight, the aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of obesity together with associated maternal risk factors, complications during pregnancy, and fetal outcomes in a local cohort for the years 2006 and 2011. Study Design: Maternal and fetal records of women who delivered at the University of Würzburg, with a 5-year interval (2006 and 2011) between investigations, were retrospectively analyzed. Descriptive statistics included prevalence of obesity, maternal weight gain, as well as several complications during pregnancy and fetal characteristics. The association between maternal or fetal complications and extent of maternal obesity was analyzed. Results: Our analysis included 2838 mothers with singleton pregnancies who delivered in 2006 (n = 1293) or 2011 (n = 1545) in our department. We found that neither pre-pregnancy body mass index (23.77 ± 4.85 vs. 24.09 ± 5.10 kg/m2, p = 0.25) nor weight gain (14.41 ± 5.77 vs. 14.78 ± 5.65 kg; p = 0.09) increased significantly over time. But the majority of all overweight (71 %) or obese (60.4 %) mothers gained more weight than generally recommended. The prevalence of gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia increased significantly and was associated with high pre-pregnancy body mass index, as was delivery by cesarean section. However, obesity was not associated with prolonged pregnancy and did not seem to negatively affect fetal outcome. Conclusion: There is a trend to increasing weight gain during pregnancy, and the majority of mothers, especially those with a high pre-pregnancy body mass index, exceeded the weight gain recommendations. Associated risk factors such as gestational diabetes, hypertension, and delivery by cesarean section are increasing. PMID:26500368

  13. Estimating the Risk of Monochorionic Twins in IVF Pregnancies From the Perspective of a Prenatal Diagnosis Unit.

    PubMed

    Sarais, Veronica; Paffoni, Alessio; Baffero, Giulia Maria; Parazzini, Fabio; Persico, Nicola; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to estimate the risk of monochorionic twin (MCT) pregnancies in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles using data from a prenatal diagnosis unit. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study reporting on the frequency of IVF pregnancies among women attending a prenatal diagnosis service specifically dedicated to the management of monochorionic pregnancies. The observed rate was compared with the local regional rate of IVF births (2.2%). A binomial distribution model was used to calculate the 95% CI of proportions. One hundred and forty-five monochorionic pregnancies were selected. Ten of these were achieved with IVF, corresponding to a rate of 6.9% (95% CI: 3.5-11.8), significantly higher than the background rate in the local population of 2.2%. When considering exclusively monochorionic pregnancies achieving delivery of two viable newborns (n = 132), the number of IVF pregnancies was nine (6.8%, 95% CI: 3.7-12.5). We did not detect major differences in pregnancy outcome between IVF and natural monochorionic pregnancies, with the exception of the proportion of newborns with a neonatal birth < 2,500 g (100% vs. 80%, p = .03). In conclusion, data obtained from the perspective of a prenatal diagnosis unit suggest that women undergoing IVF face a 3- to 4-fold increased risk of monochorionic pregnancies.

  14. Pregnancy and the Use of Disease-Modifying Therapies in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: Benefits versus Risks

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Ayse; Al Jumah, Mohammed; Sahraian, Mohammadali; Alsharoqi, Issa; AlTahan, Abdurahman; Dahdaleh, Maurice; Deleu, Dirk; Fernandez, Oscar; Inshasi, Jihad; Karabudak, Rana; Taha, Karim; Totolyan, Natalia; Yamout, Bassem I.; Zakaria, Magd; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The burden of multiple sclerosis (MS) in women of childbearing potential is increasing, with peak incidence around the age of 30 years, increasing incidence and prevalence, and growing female : male ratio. Guidelines recommend early use of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), which are contraindicated or recommended with considerable caution, during pregnancy/breastfeeding. Many physicians are reluctant to prescribe them for a woman who is/is planning to be pregnant. Interferons are not absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy, since interferon-β appears to lack serious adverse effects in pregnancy, despite a warning in its labelling concerning risk of spontaneous abortion. Glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, and alemtuzumab also may not induce adverse pregnancy outcomes, although natalizumab may induce haematologic abnormalities in newborns. An accelerated elimination procedure is needed for teriflunomide if pregnancy occurs on treatment or if pregnancy is planned. Current evidence supports the contraindication for fingolimod during pregnancy; data on other DMTs remains limited. Increased relapse rates following withdrawal of some DMTs in pregnancy are concerning and require further research. The postpartum period brings increased risk of disease reactivation that needs to be carefully addressed through effective communication between treating physicians and mothers intending to breastfeed. We address the potential for use of the first- and second-line DMTs in pregnancy and lactation. PMID:28078140

  15. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and subsequent risk of solid cancer--A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ida; Basit, Saima; Jensen, Allan; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Kjær, Susanne K; Melbye, Mads; Boyd, Heather Allison

    2016-07-01

    Women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) have higher levels of antiangiogenic growth factors during pregnancy than women with normotensive pregnancies. Since angiogenesis is necessary for solid cancer growth and spread, we hypothesized that women with a history of HDP might have a reduced risk of solid cancers (cancers other than lymphomas, hematologic cancers and nonmelanoma skin cancers) later in life. In a register-based cohort study of 1.08 million women giving birth at least once between 1978 and 2011, we used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) comparing solid cancer rates for women with and without a history of HDP. In this cohort, 68,236 women (6.3%) had ≥1 pregnancy complicated by HDP and 42,236 women (3.9%) developed solid tumors during follow-up. A history of HDP was not associated with a clinically meaningful reduction in the overall rate of solid cancer (HR 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.00), regardless of HDP severity or time since HDP, nor was there a general tendency toward reduced solid cancer rates across organ sites. A history of HDP was only significantly associated with decreased rates of breast and lung cancers and with increased rates of endometrial and urinary tract cancers. Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that women with a history of HDP have a reduced overall risk of solid cancer due to a persistent post-HDP antiangiogenic state or an innate tendency toward antiangiogenesis. Observed associations with specific cancers may instead be due to other pregnancy-related mechanisms or to residual/unmeasured confounding.

  16. Urinary Bisphenol A Levels during Pregnancy and Risk of Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Kelly K.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; McElrath, Thomas F.; Meeker, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB), a leading cause of infant mortality and morbidity, has a complex etiology with a multitude of interacting causes and risk factors. The role of environmental contaminants, particularly bisphenol A (BPA), is understudied with regard to PTB. Objectives In the present study we examined the relationship between longitudinally measured BPA exposure during gestation and PTB. Methods A nested case–control study was performed from women enrolled in a prospective birth cohort study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, during 2006–2008. Urine samples were analyzed for BPA concentrations at a minimum of three time points during pregnancy on 130 cases of PTB and 352 randomly assigned controls. Clinical classifications of PTB were defined as “spontaneous,” which was preceded by spontaneous preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes, or “placental,” which was preceded by preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction. Results Geometric mean concentrations of BPA did not differ significantly between cases and controls. In adjusted models, urinary BPA averaged across pregnancy was not significantly associated with PTB. When examining clinical classifications of PTB, urinary BPA late in pregnancy was significantly associated with increased odds of delivering a spontaneous PTB. After stratification on infant’s sex, averaged BPA exposure during pregnancy was associated with significantly increased odds of being delivered preterm among females, but not males. Conclusions These results provide little evidence of a relationship between BPA and prematurity, though further research may be warranted given the generalizability of participant recruitment from a tertiary teaching hospital, limited sample size, and significant associations among females and within the clinical subcategories of PTB. Citation Cantonwine DE, Ferguson KK, Mukherjee B, McElrath TF, Meeker JD. 2015. Urinary bisphenol A levels during

  17. Risk of Vertical Transmission of Human Papillomavirus throughout Pregnancy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Mi; Park, Joong Shin; Norwitz, Errol R.; Koo, Ja Nam; Oh, Ig Hwan; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, Sun Min; Kim, Yun Hwan; Park, Chan-Wook; Song, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Much controversy still exists about maternal-to-infant transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, specifically about the magnitude of the risk and the route and timing of such vertical transmission. This prospective cohort study examines the risk of vertical transmission of maternal HPV in each trimester of pregnancy. Study design One hundred fifty three healthy pregnant women were followed longitudinally throughout pregnancy and cervical swabs obtained in each trimester and postpartum for HPV detection. Cord blood, neonatal nasopharyngeal aspirates, and placental biopsies were collected at delivery. DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and hybridization were performed using the GG HPV Genotyping Chip Kit (Goodgene Inc., Seoul, Korea). Detection of HPV in neonates was defined as the presence of HPV DNA in either cord blood or neonatal nasopharyngeal aspirate. Results HPV DNA was detected in 14%(22/153) of healthy women in the first trimester, 18%(22/124) in the second trimester, and 10%(15/153) in the third trimester; 24%(37/153) were positive for HPV DNA on at least one occasion in pregnancy. At birth, 5.2%(8/153) of neonates were HPV DNA positive. Seven of these eight infants were born to HPV-positive mothers. Placental HPV DNA was positive in 3.3%(5/152) of cases, and all five cases were from mothers with at least one HPV-positive test. Detection of HPV DNA in neonates was associated with detection of HPV in mothers during any of the three trimesters of pregnancy. Conclusion HPV DNA was detected at birth in 5.2%(8/153) of neonates born to healthy women, and was associated with the detection of HPV in mothers during any of the three trimesters of pregnancy. PMID:23785495

  18. Association Between Low Dairy Intake During Pregnancy and Risk of Small-for-Gestational-Age Infants.

    PubMed

    Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Amezcua-Prieto, Carmen; Luna-Del-Castillo, Juan de Dios; Lewis-Mikhael, Anne-Mary; Mozas-Moreno, Juan; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan

    2016-06-01

    Background Inadequate maternal nutrition is regarded as one of the most important indicators of fetal growth. The aim of this study was to analyze the associated risk of having a small for gestational age (SGA) infant according to the mother's dairy intake during the first half of pregnancy. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed using 1175 healthy pregnant women selected from the catchment area of Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada (Spain). SGA was defined as neonates weighing less than the 10th percentile, adjusted for gestational age. Factors associated with SGA were analyzed using logistic regression models. Population attributable fractions of SGA according to dairy intake were estimated. Results Dairy intake among women who gave birth to SGA infants was 513.9, versus 590.3 g/day for women with appropriate size for gestational age infants (P = 0.003). An increased intake of dairy products by 100 g/day during the first half of pregnancy decreased the risk of having a SGA infant by 11.0 %, aOR = 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). A dose-response gradient between dairy intake and SGA was observed. Conclusions An inadequate intake of dairy products is associated with a higher risk of SGA. Our results suggest a possible causal relation between dairy intake during pregnancy and the weight of the newborn, although we cannot discard residual confounding. These results should be further supported by properly designed studies.

  19. Does maternal body mass index during pregnancy influence risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring?

    PubMed

    Khandaker, G M; Dibben, C R M; Jones, P B

    2012-06-01

    Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with several adverse outcomes in offspring including schizophrenia. The rising prevalence of obesity may contribute to an increase in the number of schizophrenia cases in the near future; therefore, it warrants further exploration. We reviewed current evidence regarding maternal body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in adult offspring. We searched PubMed and Embase databases and included studies that were based on large and representative population-based datasets. A qualitative review was undertaken due to heterogeneity between studies. Four studies with 305 cases of schizophrenia and 24,442 controls were included. Maternal obesity (pre-pregnant BMI over 29 or 30 compared with mothers with low or average BMI) was associated with two- to threefold increased risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring in two birth cohorts. High maternal BMI at both early and late pregnancy also increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. Discrepant findings from one study could be attributable to sample characteristics and other factors. The area needs more research. Future studies should take into account obstetric complications, diabetes, maternal infections and immune responses that might potentially mediate this association.

  20. Does maternal body mass index during pregnancy influence risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring?

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, G M; Dibben, C R M; Jones, P B

    2012-01-01

    Summary Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with several adverse outcomes in offspring including schizophrenia. The rising prevalence of obesity may contribute to an increase in the number of schizophrenia cases in the near future; therefore, it warrants further exploration. We reviewed current evidence regarding maternal body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in adult offspring. We searched PubMed and Embase databases and included studies that were based on large and representative population-based datasets. A qualitative review was undertaken due to heterogeneity between studies. Four studies with 305 cases of schizophrenia and 24,442 controls were included. Maternal obesity (pre-pregnant BMI over 29 or 30 compared with mothers with low or average BMI) was associated with two- to threefold increased risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring in two birth cohorts. High maternal BMI at both early and late pregnancy also increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. Discrepant findings from one study could be attributable to sample characteristics and other factors. The area needs more research. Future studies should take into account obstetric complications, diabetes, maternal infections and immune responses that might potentially mediate this association. PMID:22188548

  1. From Braxton Hicks to preterm labour: the constitution of risk in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Karen; McIntyre, Marjorie

    2006-06-01

    With the recent introduction of preterm birth prevention programs there has been a shift in our understanding of what the presence of contractions during pregnancy means and a reconstituting of risk in ways that position increasing numbers of women at risk for preterm birth. This paper highlights the findings of a study exploring the influences of risk discourses on women's experiences of preterm labour. The primary goals of this institutional ethnographic study were to describe the effects of societal discourses, institutional structures, and nursing work processes on the everyday lives of childbearing women experiencing preterm labour. The findings suggest that risk discourses exert social control over pregnant women and result in fear, guilt, feelings of being judged or punished, and an overwhelming sense of personal responsibility for preventing preterm birth. The study also exposes ways in which biomedical constructions of risk and preterm labour affect the organization of health services, including nursing practice.

  2. Sleep deprivation during late pregnancy produces hyperactivity and increased risk-taking behavior in offspring.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Aswathy, B S; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Gulia, Kamalesh K

    2015-01-30

    Sleep deprivation in women resulting from their modern lifestyle, especially during pregnancy, is a serious concern as it can affect the health of the newborn. Anxiety disorders and cognitive deficits in the offspring are also on the rise. However, experimental studies on the effects of sleep loss during pregnancy, on emotional development and cognitive function of the newborn, are scanty in literature. In the current study, female rats were sleep-deprived for 5h by gentle handling, during the 6 days of the third trimester (days 14-19 of pregnancy). The effects of this sleep deprivation on anxiety-related behaviors of pups during their peri-adolescence age were studied using elevated plus maze (EPM). In addition to body weights of dams and offspring, the maternal behavior was also monitored. The weanlings of sleep-deprived dams showed heightened risk-taking behavior as they made increased explorations into the open arms of EPM. They also showed higher mobility in comparison to the control group. Though the body weights of sleep-deprived dams were comparable to those of the control group, their newborns had lower birth weight. Nevertheless, these pups gained weight and reached the control group values during the initial post-natal week. But after weaning, their rate of growth was lower than that of the control group. This is the first report providing evidences for the role of sleep during late pregnancy in shaping the neuropsychological development in offspring.

  3. Volume and Type of Alcohol during Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Roberts, Sarah; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Block, Gladys; Li, De-Kun

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the relationship between alcohol use during pregnancy and miscarriage. A cohort study of pregnant women (n=1061) recruited from 1996 –1998 in the San Francisco area. 3% (n=32) drank 4 or more drinks per week, 38% (n=403) consumed <4 drinks per week and 59% (n= 626) reported no alcohol intake. Women were also categorized by the type of alcohol consumed. An increased risk of miscarriage was found for 1) women who drank four or more drinks a week and 2) women who drank spirits. Future research assessing miscarriage risk should consider the volume and type of alcohol consumed. PMID:24810392

  4. Juvenile Delinquency and Teenage Pregnancy: A Comparison of Ecological Risk Profiles among Midwestern White and Black Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurana, Atika; Cooksey, Elizabeth C.; Gavazzi, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined ecological risk factors associated with teen pregnancy with a sample of 1,190 court-involved female juvenile offenders between 11 and 18 years of age. Data were obtained from five Midwestern juvenile county courts using a recently developed youth risk assessment instrument called the global risk assessment device (GRAD). In…

  5. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring.

  6. Childhood maltreatment and the risk of pre-pregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Jill C; Bodnar, Lisa M; Day, Nancy L; Larkby, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate whether maternal history of childhood maltreatment was associated with pre-pregnancy obesity or excessive gestational weight gain. Pregnant women (n = 472) reported pre-pregnancy weight and height and gestational weight gain and were followed up to 16 years post-partum when they reported maltreatment on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). CTQ score ranged from no maltreatment (25) to severe maltreatment (125). Prenatal mental health modified the association between CTQ score and maternal weight (P < 0.15), and thus stratified models are presented. After adjusting for race, prenatal tobacco, marijuana and alcohol use, a one standard deviation (1 SD) increase in CTQ score was associated with a 45% increase in the risk of pre-pregnancy obesity among the 141 women with elevated anxiety (≥75th percentile on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory) [relative risk, RR (95% confidence interval, CI): 1.45 (1.12, 1.88)], but was not associated among less anxious (<75th percentile) women [RR (95% CI): 1.10 (0.81, 1.51)]. Risk of excessive gestational weight gain was higher [adjusted RR (95% CI): 1.21 (1.07, 1.37)] with every 1 SD increase in CTQ score for anxious women. No association was observed for less anxious women [adjusted RR (95% CI): 0.89 (0.78, 1.02)]. Prenatal depression similarly modified the association between maltreatment and weight gain. Factors such as psychological status and traumatic experiences in early childhood may contribute to pre-pregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain.

  7. Mefloquine gap junction blockade and risk of pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington Lee

    2012-09-01

    Obstetric use of the antimalarial drug mefloquine has historically been discouraged during the first trimester and immediately before conception owing to concerns of potential fetal harm. With the rise of resistance to the antimalarial drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), mefloquine is now being considered as a replacement for SP for universal antenatal administration to women from malaria-endemic regions. Recent recommendations have also suggested that mefloquine may be used cautiously among pregnant travelers who cannot otherwise avoid visiting these areas. Mefloquine has been demonstrated to cause blockade of gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1) gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), and recent evidence suggests that GJA1 GJIC is critical to successful embryonic implantation and early placental development. During routine use, mefloquine accumulates in organ and peripheral tissue, crosses the blood-placental barrier, and may plausibly accumulate in developing decidua and trophoblast at concentrations sufficient to interfere with GJA1 GJIC and, thus, cause deleterious effects on fetal outcomes. This conclusion is supported by epidemiological evidence that demonstrates use of the drug during early development is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth. Confirmatory studies are pending, but the available experimental and epidemiological evidence support renewed adherence, where feasible, to existing mefloquine package insert guidance that women avoid the drug during the periconceptional period.

  8. Risk factors for the development of stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy in primigravidae: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sangsawang, Bussara

    2014-07-01

    The most common type of urinary incontinence (UI) in pregnant women is stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The number of pregnant women with SUI was variable, the prevalence ranged from 18.6% to 75% and increased with gestational age. It can affect the quality of life (QoL) of approximately 54.3% of all pregnant women in four domains including physical activity, travel, social relationships and emotional health. Pregnancy is one of the main risk factors for the development of SUI in young women. Physiological changes during pregnancy, such as increasing pressure of the growing uterus and fetal weight on the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) throughout pregnancy, together with pregnancy-related hormonal changes such as increased progesterone, decreased relaxin, and decreased collagen levels, may lead to reduced strength and supportive and sphincteric function of the PFM. Pregnancy may associate with the reduction of the PFM strength which can develop the SUI. However, the exact causes of pregnancy-related SUI remain unclear. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with the development of SUI during pregnancy. In genetic risk factors, aging is an important role in SUI development. The other risk factors such as obesity, smoking, constipation, pre-pregnancy SUI, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) that utilized preventive strategies can reduce SUI in pregnant women. The purpose of this review is to identify the risk factors for the development of SUI in pregnant women. These understanding can be useful for health professions to inform and counsel the pregnant women to prevent and reduce the risk factors that contribute to the development of SUI during pregnancy and postpartum period.

  9. High maternal serum ferritin in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Khambalia, Amina Z; Collins, Clare E; Roberts, Christine L; Morris, Jonathan M; Powell, Katie L; Tasevski, Vitomir; Nassar, Natasha

    2015-08-14

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent associations between maternal serum ferritin concentrations and the risk of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). The aim of the present study was to examine the association between Fe biomarkers, including serum ferritin concentrations, and the risk of total ( 75th percentile ( ≥ 43 μg/l) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.06, 2.10) and >90th percentile ( ≥ 68 μg/l) (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.25, 2.96). Increased odds of early and moderate-to-late sPTB were associated with ferritin levels >90th percentile (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.32, 4.73) and >75th percentile (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.03, 2.37), respectively. No association was found between the risk of sPTB and elevated sTfR levels or Fe deficiency. In conclusion, elevated maternal serum ferritin levels in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of sPTB from 34 weeks of gestation. The usefulness of early pregnancy ferritin levels in identifying women at risk of sPTB warrants further investigation.

  10. Excess risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with porphyria: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tollånes, Mette Christophersen; Aarsand, Aasne Karine; Sandberg, Sverre

    2011-02-01

    The porphyrias comprise a heterogeneous group of rare, primarily hereditary, metabolic diseases caused by a partial deficiency in one of the eight enzymes involved in the heme biosynthesis. Our aim was to assess whether acute or cutaneous porphyria has been associated with excess risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. A population-based cohort study was designed by record linkage between the Norwegian Porphyria Register, covering 70% of all known porphyria patients in Norway, and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, based on all births in Norway during 1967-2006. The risks of the adverse pregnancy outcomes preeclampsia, delivery by caesarean section, low birth weight, premature delivery, small for gestational age (SGA), perinatal death, and congenital malformations were compared between porphyric mothers and the rest of the population. The 200 mothers with porphyria had 398 singletons during the study period, whereas the 1,100,391 mothers without porphyria had 2,275,317 singletons. First-time mothers with active acute porphyria had an excess risk of perinatal death [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 4.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-16.0], as did mothers with the hereditable form of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) (3.0, 1.2-7.7). Sporadic PCT was associated with an excess risk of SGA [adjusted relative risk (RR) 2.0, 1.2-3.4], and for first-time mothers, low birth weight (adjusted OR 3.4, 1.2-10.0) and premature delivery (3.5, 1.2-10.5) in addition. The findings suggest women with porphyria should be monitored closely during pregnancy.

  11. Hereditary risk factors of thrombophilia and probability of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Andrea; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Greer, Ian A; Zotz, Rainer B

    2016-09-09

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Few studies have evaluated the individual risk of gestational VTE associated with heritable thrombophilia and current recommendations for antenatal thromboprophylaxis in women with severe thrombophilia such as homozygous factor V Leiden mutation (FVL) depend on a positive family history of VTE. To better stratify thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy, we aimed to estimate the individual probability (absolute risk) of gestational VTE associated with thrombophilia and whether these risk factors are independent of a family history of VTE in first-degree relatives. We studied 243 women with first VTE during pregnancy and the puerperium, and 243 age-matched normal women. Baseline incidence of VTE of 1:483 pregnancies in women ≥35 years and 1:741 deliveries in women <35 years was assumed, according to a recent population-based study. In women ≥35 years [<35 years], the individual probability of gestational VTE was: 0.7% [0.5%] for heterozygous FVL; 3.4% [2.2%], for homozygous FVL; 0.6% [0.4%], for heterozygous prothrombin G20210A; 8.2% [5.5%] for compound heterozygotes for FVL and prothrombin G20210A; 9.0% [6.1%] for antithrombin deficiency; 1.1% [0.7%] for protein C deficiency; and 1.0% [0.7%] for protein S deficiency These results were independent of a positive family history of VTE. We provide evidence that unselected women with these thrombophilias have an increased risk of gestational VTE independent of a positive family history of VTE. In contrast to current guidelines, these data suggest that women with high-risk thrombophilia should be considered for antenatal thromboprophylaxis regardless of family history of VTE.

  12. The influence of social and political violence on the risk of pregnancy complications.

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, B C; Rebolledo, A; Atalah, E; Newman, B; King, M C

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Events in Chile provided an opportunity to evaluate health effects associated with exposure to high levels of social and political violence. METHODS. Neighborhoods in Santiago, Chile, were mapped for occurrences of sociopolitical violence during 1985-86, such as bomb threats, military presence, undercover surveillance, and political demonstrations. Six health centers providing prenatal care were then chosen at random: three from "high-violence" and three from "low-violence" neighborhoods. The 161 healthy, pregnant women due to deliver between August 1 and September 7, 1986, who attended these health centers were interviewed twice about their living conditions. Pregnancy complications and labor/delivery information were subsequently obtained from clinic and hospital records. RESULTS. Women living in the high-violence neighborhoods were significantly more likely to experience pregnancy complications than women living in lower violence neighborhoods (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.9-12.6; p less than 0.01). Residence in a high-violence neighborhood was the strongest risk factor observed; results persisted after controlling for several sets of potential confounders. CONCLUSION. Living in areas of high social and political violence increased the risk of pregnancy complications among otherwise healthy women. PMID:1566947

  13. Sex-specific risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline: pregnancy and menopause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biology of sex differences is integral to personalized medicine. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline are two related conditions, with distinct sex differences in morbidity and clinical manifestations, response to treatments, and mortality. Although mortality from all-cause cardiovascular diseases has declined in women over the past five years, due in part to increased educational campaigns regarding the recognition of symptoms and application of treatment guidelines, the mortality in women still exceeds that of men. The physiological basis for these differences requires further research, with particular attention to two physiological conditions which are unique to women and associated with hormonal changes: pregnancy and menopause. Both conditions have the potential to impact life-long cardiovascular risk, including cerebrovascular function and cognition in women. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of hypertensive pregnancy disorders on cardiovascular disease and cognitive function later in life, and examines the effects of post-menopausal hormone treatments on cardiovascular risk and cognition in midlife women. We suggest that hypertensive pregnancy disorders and menopause activate vascular components, i.e., vascular endothelium and blood elements, including platelets and leukocytes, to release cell-membrane derived microvesicles that are potential mediators of changes in cerebral blood flow, and may ultimately affect cognition in women as they age. Research into specific sex differences for these disease processes with attention to an individual’s sex chromosomal complement and hormonal status is important and timely. PMID:23537114

  14. Homelessness during pregnancy: a unique, time-dependent risk factor of birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cutts, Diana B; Coleman, Sharon; Black, Maureen M; Chilton, Mariana M; Cook, John T; de Cuba, Stephanie Ettinger; Heeren, Timothy C; Meyers, Alan; Sandel, Megan; Casey, Patrick H; Frank, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate homelessness during pregnancy as a unique, time-dependent risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. 9,995 mothers of children <48 months old surveyed at emergency departments and primary care clinics in five US cities. Mothers were classified as either homeless during pregnancy with the index child, homeless only after the index child's birth, or consistently housed. Outcomes included birth weight as a continuous variable, as well as categorical outcomes of low birth weight (LBW; <2,500 g) and preterm delivery (<37 weeks). Multiple logistic regression and adjusted linear regression analyses were performed, comparing prenatal and postnatal homelessness with the referent group of consistently housed mothers, controlling for maternal demographic characteristics, smoking, and child age at interview. Prenatal homelessness was associated with higher adjusted odds of LBW (AOR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.14, 1.80, p < 0.01) and preterm delivery (AOR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.98, 1.56, p = 0.08), and a 53 g lower adjusted mean birth weight (p = 0.08). Postnatal homelessness was not associated with these outcomes. Prenatal homelessness is an independent risk factor for LBW, rather than merely a marker of adverse maternal and social characteristics associated with homelessness. Targeted interventions to provide housing and health care to homeless women during pregnancy may result in improved birth outcomes.

  15. Childhood victimization and subsequent risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Widom, C S; Kuhns, J B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which being abused and/or neglected in childhood increases a person's risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy. METHODS: A prospective cohorts design was used to match, on the basis of age, race, sex, and social class, cases of abused and/or neglected children from 1967 to 1971 with nonabused and nonneglected children; subjects were followed into young adulthood. From 1989 to 1995 1196 subjects (676 abused and/or neglected and 520 control subjects were located and interviewed. RESULTS: Early childhood abuse and/or neglect was a significant predictor of prostitution for females (odds ratio [OR] = 2.96). For females, sexual abuse (OR = 2.54) and neglect (OR = 2.58) were associated with prostitution, whereas physical abuse was only marginally associated. Childhood abuse and neglect were not associated with increased risk for promiscuity or teenage pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strongly support a relationship between childhood victimization and subsequent prostitution. The presumed causal sequence between childhood victimization and teenage pregnancy may need to be reevaluated. PMID:8916528

  16. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, James E.; Craig, Wendy Y.; Neveux, Louis M.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D.; D’Alton, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11–14 weeks’ gestation (first trimester) and 15–18.9 weeks’ gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37–3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26–2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97–2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74–1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  17. Prenatal diagnosis for epidermolysis bullosa: a study of 144 consecutive pregnancies at risk.

    PubMed

    Pfendner, Ellen G; Nakano, Aoi; Pulkkinen, Leena; Christiano, Angela M; Uitto, Jouni

    2003-06-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by increased skin fragility, resulting in blisters and erosions after minor trauma. Mutations in 10 structural genes expressed in the cutaneous basement membrane zone have been reported. The DebRA Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory at Jefferson Medical College has performed 144 DNA-based prenatal diagnoses since 1993 in families at risk for recurrence of the most severe forms of EB, including the recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB), junctional EB (JEB), EB with pyloric atresia (EB-PA), and EB simplex (EBS). A mutation-detection strategy using either conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) or denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) scanning analysis, followed by nucleotide sequencing, was applied to most cases with DEB and to all JEB, EB-PA, and EBS families. For some RDEB families, linkage analysis was performed, either alone when the inheritance pattern was clear or in combination with one mutation. Among the 144 prenatal diagnoses, 63 were for RDEB, 69 for JEB, 6 for EB-PA, and 6 for EBS. Twenty-eight normal, 73 heterozygous carrier, and 28 affected RDEB, JEB, and EB-PA pregnancies were reported in these recessively inherited diseases. Two affected and four normal pregnancies were predicted in dominantly inherited EBS. Among the 144 pregnancies, 9 were terminated without confirmation, 13 cases were lost to follow-up, and 6 pregnancies are ongoing. There were 6 families with inconclusive results due either to recombination events between flanking markers, absence of informative markers for one allele, or lack of sample from the previously affected child. There were three discordant results, one that was explained by maternal contamination of the chorionic villus sample and two that were unresolved. Overall, the availability, relative ease, and over 98% success rate make molecular DNA-based prenatal diagnosis a viable option for EB families at risk.

  18. Maternal-Fetal Cancer Risk Assessment of Ochratoxin A during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Chit Shing Jackson; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-03-23

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that in utero exposure to environmental chemicals may interfere with fetal development and increase the risk of disease and cancer development later in life. Ochratoxin A (OTA) has been proven to induce diverse toxic effects including teratogenicity, carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity and potential endocrine disruption. Due to the continuous and widespread occurrence of OTA as a potential contaminant of staple foods, there is increasing concern of in utero exposure of fetus to this mycotoxin. In this study, maternal-fetal risk assessment of OTA during pregnancy was conducted using the benchmark dose approach for genotoxic carcinogens. The daily intake of OTA for Egyptian pregnant women was estimated based on their serum OTA level using the refined Klaassen equation for pregnancy. Fetal exposure level was also estimated based on the maternal data. Comparison between the estimated daily exposure and the negligible cancer risk intake (NCRI), and the calculation of margin of exposure (MOE) implicated that OTA exposure from dietary intake would be of low health concern for this general subpopulation of Egyptian women. This subpopulation of pregnant women was generally estimated not to be in high-risk for toxicity induced by OTA.

  19. More than Poverty—Teen Pregnancy Risk and Reports of Child Abuse Reports and Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Gerassi; Melissa, Jonson-Reid; Katie, Plax; Brett, Drake

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare risk for teen pregnancies between children living in poverty with no Child Protection Services (CPS) report history, and those in poverty with a history of CPS report. Methods Children selected from families in poverty, both with and without CPS report histories were prospectively followed from 1993–2009 using electronic administrative records from agencies including child protective services, emergency departments, Medicaid services and juvenile courts. A total of 3281 adolescent females were followed until age 18. Results For teens with history of poverty only, 16.8% had been pregnant at least once by age 17. In teens with history of both poverty and report of child abuse or neglect, 28.9% had been pregnant at least once by age 17. While multivariate survival analyses revealed several other significant factors at the family and youth services levels, a report of maltreatment remained significant (about a 66% higher risk). Conclusions Maltreatment is a significant risk factor for teen pregnancy among low income youth even after controlling for neighborhood disadvantage, other caregiver risks and indicators of individual emotional and behavioral problems. PMID:26206437

  20. Maternal-Fetal Cancer Risk Assessment of Ochratoxin A during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Chit Shing Jackson; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that in utero exposure to environmental chemicals may interfere with fetal development and increase the risk of disease and cancer development later in life. Ochratoxin A (OTA) has been proven to induce diverse toxic effects including teratogenicity, carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity and potential endocrine disruption. Due to the continuous and widespread occurrence of OTA as a potential contaminant of staple foods, there is increasing concern of in utero exposure of fetus to this mycotoxin. In this study, maternal-fetal risk assessment of OTA during pregnancy was conducted using the benchmark dose approach for genotoxic carcinogens. The daily intake of OTA for Egyptian pregnant women was estimated based on their serum OTA level using the refined Klaassen equation for pregnancy. Fetal exposure level was also estimated based on the maternal data. Comparison between the estimated daily exposure and the negligible cancer risk intake (NCRI), and the calculation of margin of exposure (MOE) implicated that OTA exposure from dietary intake would be of low health concern for this general subpopulation of Egyptian women. This subpopulation of pregnant women was generally estimated not to be in high-risk for toxicity induced by OTA. PMID:27023600

  1. Hypofibrinogenemia and the α-Fibrinogen Thr312Ala Polymorphism may be Risk Factors for Early Pregnancy Loss.

    PubMed

    Kamimoto, Yuki; Wada, Hideo; Ikejiri, Makoto; Nakatani, Kaname; Sugiyama, Takashi; Osato, Kazuhiro; Murabayashi, Nao; Habe, Koji; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Ohishi, Kohshi; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed a cohort of 36 females with pregnancy loss. In addition to 11 patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and 2 patients with congenital antithrombin (AT) or protein C deficiency, we identified 5 patients with low fibrinogen levels (median 110 mg/dL) prior to 10 weeks of gestation. Four of these 5 patients underwent a fibrinogen gene analysis, and all 4 were found to be heterozygotes for the α-fibrinogen (FGA) Thr321Ala polymorphism. One female without hypofibrinogenemia with a history of 8 pregnancy losses was found to be homozygous for the same polymorphism, and she also showed hypercoagulability without thrombosis. In conclusion, there was a relatively high frequency of pregnancy loss in the setting of hypofibrinogenemia and/or the FGA Thr312Ala polymorphism, and this may be an important risk factor for pregnancy loss and a hypercoagulable state in later pregnancy.

  2. Risk factors for depressive symptoms in adolescent pregnancy in a late-teen subsample.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Hristina; Stuart, Scott

    2014-04-01

    Depression in adolescent pregnancy is common but underrecognized and can be associated with negative medical outcomes. This brief report examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and various demographic and obstetrical risk factors, as well as the use of antidepressants in pregnant adolescents of late teenage years. Data were derived from a relatively large sample (506 women) recruited from university-based and community mental health centers in Iowa. A cross-sectional analysis did not reveal significant statistical associations between the risk factors and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). Antidepressant use was very low (3.7 %), and adolescents with higher depression scores were more likely to take medications. In conclusion, screening for depression in pregnant adolescents should be universal, regardless of demographic and obstetrical risk factors, and promptly addressed.

  3. Patient versus professional based psychosocial risk factor screening for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quispel, Chantal; van Veen, Mieke J; Zuijderhoudt, Christianne; Steegers, Eric A P; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P

    2014-11-01

    To identify Psychopathology, Psychosocial problems and substance use (PPS) as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes, two screen-and-advice instruments were developed: Mind2Care (M2C, self-report) and Rotterdam Reproductive Risk Reduction (R4U, professional's checklist). To decide on the best clinical approach of these risks, the performance of both instruments was compared. Observational study of 164 pregnant women who booked at two midwifery practices in Rotterdam. Women were consecutively screened with M2C and R4U. For referral to tailored care based on specific PPS risks, inter-test agreement of single risks was performed in terms of overall accuracy and positive accuracy (risk present according to both instruments). With univariate regression analysis we explored determinants of poor agreement (<90 %). For triage based on risk accumulation and for detecting women-at-risk for adverse birth outcomes, M2C and R4U sum scores were compared. Overall accuracy of single risks was high (mean 93 %). Positive accuracy was lower (mean 46 %) with poorest accuracy for current psychiatric symptoms. Educational level and ethnicity partly explained poor accuracy (p < 0.05). Overall low PPS prevalence decreased the statistical power. For triage, M2C and R4U sum scores were interchangeable from sum scores of five or more (difference <1 %). The probability of adverse birth outcomes similarly increased with risk accumulation for both instruments, identifying 55-75 % of women-at-risk. The self-report M2C and the professional's R4U checklist seem interchangeable for triage of women-at-risk for PPS or adverse birth outcomes. However, the instruments seem to provide complementary information if used as a guidance to tailored risk-specific care.

  4. [The socio-cultural and eating aspects of women experiencing risk pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Sámano, Reyna Sámano; Martínez, Estela Godinez; Pérez, Irma Romero; Miranda, Georgina Sánchez; Polis, José Manuel Espíndola; Courtois, Mayra Lilia Chávez

    2014-05-01

    To promote a healthy diet, the dietary guidance should consider socio-cultural factors as they influence both the food standards and preferences of each population. The aim of this study was to describe the socio-cultural contexts of pregnancy and feeding in the domestic arena, using a qualitative approach. In-depth interviews were conducted using the data saturation technique with six women experiencing high-risk pregnancy. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed in accordance with the Bardin method and the IT Atlas program. The following aspects were identified: uncertainty due to unplanned pregnancy and limited partner support; a few dietary changes to improve health; perception of bad and good feeding habits, although it did not comply with the characteristics of a good diet; omission of fruit and vegetable group from dinner. The people in charge of preparing and serving food were not always the pregnant woman; food products perceived as being harmful were consumed and beneficial products were rarely consumed. This highlighted the need to train professionals to consider the socio-cultural context when providing dietary guidance.

  5. Maternal risk factors and anaemia in pregnancy: a prospective retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Noronha, J A; Bhaduri, A; Vinod Bhat, H; Kamath, A

    2010-02-01

    Anaemia in pregnancy is still a concern during the reproductive period, as it is associated with increased maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. This study examined the maternal risk factors associated with increased prevalence of anaemia among antenatal and postnatal women. A prospective-retrospective cohort approach was carried out among 1,077 antenatal and 1,000 postnatal women. The haemoglobin was estimated using the cyanmethaemoglobin method. The maternal factors included were age, parity, education, socioeconomic status, spacing, history of bleeding, worm infestation, period of gestation, knowledge regarding anaemia in pregnancy, food selection ability and compliance to iron supplementation. Of the 1,077 antenatal women studied, 540 were anaemic. Among the 1,000 postnatal women, the prevalence was 537 (53.7%). The high prevalence was strongly associated with low socioeconomic status (OR 1.409 [1.048-1.899]; p < 0.023) which affected their knowledge and health seeking behaviour in both the groups. Hence it can be concluded that empowering women in terms of education and economic status is the key factor in combating anaemia in pregnancy to prevent the vicious cycle of associated problems.

  6. Risk Factors and Early Predictors for Heterotopic Pregnancy after In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ling; Xia, Mingdi; Zhai, Junyu; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yuchao; Sun, Yinhua; Zhang, Jiangtao; Zhu, Dongyi; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the risk factors and early predictors for heterotopic pregnancy (HP) after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). From January 2008 to January 2013, 41 cases of HP and 72 cases of intrauterine twin pregnancy after IVF-ET were recruited and retrospectively analyzed. Compared with intrauterine twin pregnancy group, the HP group had a lower basal luteinizing hormone (LH) level (P = 0.005) and more cases had a history of hydrosalpinx (P = 0.008). After 14 days of IVF-ET, the serum β-HCG (β-human chorionic gonadotropin), E2 (Estradiol) and P (Progesterone) levels were lower in HP group (P<0.001, respectively). Moreover, vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain were the significant features of HP before diagnosis (P<0.001, respectively). Further by logistic regression, serum β-hCG, P levels on the 14th day after ET, and vaginal bleeding were identified as the independent factors of HP. These results indicate that when two or more embryos transferred in IVF procedure, β-hCG, P levels on the 14th day after ET, and vaginal bleeding could be taken as predictors for HP. PMID:26510008

  7. Maternal Alcohol Consumption during Pregnancy and Early Age Leukemia Risk in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jeniffer Dantas; Couto, Arnaldo Cézar; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Koifman, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the association between the maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and early age leukemia (EAL) in offspring. Methods. Datasets were analyzed from a case-control study carried out in Brazil during 1999–2007. Data were obtained by maternal interviews using a standardized questionnaire. The present study included 675 children (193 acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 59 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 423 controls). Unconditional logistic regression was performed, and adjusted odds ratios (adj. OR) on the association between alcohol consumption and EAL were ascertained. Results. Alcohol consumption was reported by 43% of ALL and 39% of AML case mothers and 35.5% of controls'. Beer consumption before and during pregnancy was associated with ALL in crude analysis (OR = 1.54, 95% CI, 1.08–2.19), although in adjusted analysis no statistical significance was found. For weekly intake of ≤1 glass (adj. OR = 1.30, 95% CI, 0.71–2.36) and ≥1 glass/week (adj. OR = 1.47, 95% CI, 0.88–2.46) a potential dose-response was observed (P trend < 0.03). Conclusion. This study failed to support the hypothesis of an increased risk of EAL associated with maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy, neither with the interaction with tobacco nor with alcohol consumption. PMID:26090439

  8. Abrupt discontinuation of psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: fear of teratogenic risk and impact of counselling.

    PubMed Central

    Einarson, A; Selby, P; Koren, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the consequences to mother and baby of abruptly discontinuing antidepressant or benzodiazepine medication during pregnancy and to assess the impact of our counselling. PARTICIPANTS: All women who consulted the Motherisk Program between November 1996 and December 1997 and who stopped taking antidepressant or benzodiazepine medication when pregnancy was confirmed agreed to participate in the study. DESIGN AND INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were interviewed, received counselling, and completed a questionnaire 1 month after their initial call and after the birth of their baby. RESULTS: Of 36 women who completed the study, 34 discontinued their medication abruptly for fear of harming the fetus, 28 on the advice of their physician; 26 (70.3%) women reported physical and psychological adverse effects, 11 reported psychological effects only, and 11 reported suicidal ideation (4 were admitted to hospital). After counselling, 22 of 36 (61.1%) women resumed taking their medication, and 4 found that they no longer required it. One woman had a therapeutic abortion and 2 experienced spontaneous abortions; there were therefore 35 healthy babies (including 2 sets of twins) born to 33 women; 14 of 21 mothers breast-fed their babies while taking their psychotropic medication, with no adverse effects reported. CONCLUSIONS: When assessing the risks and benefits of taking psychotropic medication during pregnancy, women and their physicians should be aware that the abrupt discontinuation of psychotropic drugs can lead to serious adverse effects. Counselling is effective in reassuring women to adhere to therapy. PMID:11212593

  9. Promotive effect of zinc supplementation on the growth of children from high-risk pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z.Y.; Zhang, Y.W. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Zn deficiency is one of the factors involved in the growth retardation of infants from high risk pregnancy. At birth, 102 high risk children were divided into 3 groups: breast-feeding group; test group (cow's milk and supplemented with elemental zinc 1-2 ug/kg/d; and control group). The test and control groups were divided by double blind, randomized, pair-matched method. Anthropometric data on infants were collected at 0, 3 and 6 mos. At 3 mos, the increase in body length, weight and serum Zn concentration in both breast-feeding and test group exceeded that of the control group. From 4th month all of these children were given yolk, meat, fish as subsidiary foods and in the second test period the growth rate of these 3 groups of children were not different. But at the end of 6 mos the weight and length increases of the breast-feeding and the test group children still exceeded that of the control group. It is concluded that children from high risk pregnancy should receive mother's milk. If they cannot be breast-fed they should receive a zinc-supplemented formula.

  10. Occupational Risks and Pregnancy and Infant Health Outcomes in Florida Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, Jennifer; Flocks, Joan; Economos, Jeannie; Tovar-Aguilar, J. Antonio; McCauley, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The agricultural industry has some of the highest incidence rates and numbers of occupational injuries and illnesses in the United States. Injuries and illnesses in agriculture result from accidents, falls, excessive heat, repetitive motion and adverse pesticide exposure. Women working in agriculture are exposed to the same hazards and risks as their male counterparts, but can face additional adverse impacts on their reproductive health. Yet, few occupational risk assessment studies have considered the reproductive health of female farmworkers. The objective of this community-based participatory research study was to conduct a retrospective, cross-sectional survey to collect information on workplace conditions and behaviors and maternal, pregnancy and infant health outcomes among a sample of female nursery and fernery farmworkers in Central Florida. Survey results showed that nursery workers were more likely to report health symptoms during their pregnancy than fernery workers. We also observed a self-reported increased risk of respiratory illness in the first year of life for infants whose mothers worked in ferneries. Our findings confirm that agricultural work presents potential reproductive hazards for women of childbearing age. PMID:25101767

  11. Risk of leukemia in relation to exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy and early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    There are few established causes of leukemia, the most common type of cancer in children. Studies in adults suggest a role for specific environmental agents, but little is known about any effect from exposures in pregnancy to toxics in ambient air. In our case-control study, we ascertained 69 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 46 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from California Cancer Registry records of children < age 6, and 19,209 controls from California birth records within 2km (1.3 miles) (ALL) and 6km (3.8 miles) (AML) of an air toxics monitoring station between 1990–2007. Information on air toxics exposures was taken from community air monitors. We used logistic regression to estimate the risk of leukemia associated with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Risk of ALL was elevated with 3rd trimester exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.16, 95%CI 1.04, 1.29), arsenic (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.02, 1.73), benzene (OR=1.50, 95%CI 1.08, 2.09), and three other toxics related to fuel combustion. Risk of AML was increased with 3rd trimester exposure to chloroform (OR=1.30, 95%CI 1.00, 1.69), benzene (1.75, 95%CI 1.04, 2.93), and two other traffic-related toxics. During the child’s first year, exposure to butadiene, ortho-xylene, and toluene increased risk for AML and exposure to selenium increased risk for ALL. Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults; this study supports that ambient exposures to this and other chemicals in pregnancy and early life may also increase leukemia risk in children. PMID:24472648

  12. Association between immunoreactivity to Anisakis spp. antigens and high-risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Israel; Vericimo, Mauricio; Terra, Luciana; Ferreira, Taylane; São Clemente, Sergio Carmona; Teixeira, Gerlinde

    2015-12-01

    Numerous factors contribute to perinatal risk, many of which remain undefined. This study sought to determine the frequency of fish intake in postpartum women, and to establish a relationship between the rates of immunoreactivity for antigens from Anisakis spp. and high-risk pregnancy. In this prospective noninterventional study, a structured questionnaire was administered and serum was collected from postpartum women at two perinatal centers (a high-risk birth unit [HRBU] and a low-risk birth unit [LRBU]) in the Niteroi municipality of Brazil. Anisakis species-specific IgG and IgE were measured by ELISA. The chisquared test was performed, and odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals were estimated. The t-test or Mann-Whitney test was applied to continuous, normally distributed variables. In total, 309 women (170 from HRBU, 139 from LRBU) between 24.8 and 26.7 years old with a median of 6 to 8 prenatal visits were enrolled. Women in the two units exhibited differences in some variables, including prenatal care (p = 0.01), maternal and fetal risk (p = 0.00; OR = 6.17), and gestational age (p = 0.00), but no differences in fish consumption (p = 0.29), frequency of fish intake (p = 0.40), allergic symptoms (p = 0.51), or frequency of anti-Anisakis reactivity (p = 0.22). Logistic regression analysis revealed that only age was independently associated with postpartum anti-Anisakis reactivity. This study confirmed a low prevalence of fish intake and suggested that Anisakis spp. had no impact on high-risk pregnancies among this postpartum study population.

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk factors after early-onset preeclampsia, late-onset preeclampsia, and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Jan H W; Hermes, Wietske; Breimer, Anath Y; van Rijn, Bas B; Koenen, Steven V; Mol, Ben W; Franx, Arie; de Groot, Christianne J M; Koster, Maria P H

    2015-03-01

    Observational studies have shown an increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women who experienced a hypertensive disorder in pregnancy. This risk is related to the severity of the pregnancy-related hypertensive disease and gestational age at onset. However, it has not been investigated whether these differences in CVD risk factors are already present at postpartum cardiovascular screening. We evaluated postpartum differences in CVD risk factors in 3 subgroups of patients with a history of hypertensive pregnancy. We compared the prevalence of common CVD risk factors postpartum among 448 women with previous early-onset preeclampsia, 76 women with previous late-onset preeclampsia, and 224 women with previous pregnancy-induced hypertension. Women with previous early-onset preeclampsia were compared with women with late-onset preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension and had significantly higher fasting blood glucose (5.29 versus 4.80 and 4.83 mmol/L), insulin (9.12 versus 6.31 and 6.7 uIU/L), triglycerides (1.32 versus 1.02 and 0.97 mmol/L), and total cholesterol (5.14 versus 4.73 and 4.73 mmol/L). Almost half of the early-onset preeclampsia women had developed hypertension, as opposed to 39% and 25% of women in the pregnancy-induced hypertension and late-onset preeclampsia groups, respectively. Our data show differences in the prevalence of common modifiable CVD risk factors postpartum and suggest that prevention strategies should be stratified according to severity and gestational age of onset for the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

  14. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-12

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log

  15. Inter-Pregnancy Intervals and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results of a Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Maureen S.; DuBois, Lindsay A.; Maenner, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported an increased risk of autism among second-born children conceived <12 versus >36 months after the birth of a sibling. Confirmation of this finding would point to inter-pregnancy interval (IPI) as a potentially modifiable risk factor for autism. This study evaluated the relationship between IPI and autism spectrum…

  16. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen may result in compromised neurodevelopment through inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms, through predisposition to oxidative stress, and through endocrine, endogenous cannabinoid, and other mechanisms. Several small and large prospective studies have found an association between gestational acetaminophen exposure and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behaviors, use of ADHD medication, and ADHD diagnoses in offspring during childhood; the only negative study was a small investigation that examined only one aspect of attention as an outcome. Creditably, most of the studies adjusted analyses for many (but not all) confounds associated with ADHD risk. Importantly, one pivotal study also adjusted for pain, infection, inflammation, and fever to reduce confounding by indication; this study found a dose-dependent risk. In the light of the finding of a single study that infection and fever during pregnancy by themselves do not raise the ADHD risk, it appears possible that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is itself responsible for the increased risk of ADHD. This suggests that acetaminophen may not be as safe in pregnancy as is widely believed. However, since fever during pregnancy may itself be associated with adverse gestational outcomes, given the present level of uncertainty about the ADHD risk with acetaminophen, it is suggested that, until more data are available, the use of acetaminophen in pregnancy should not be denied in situations in which the need for the drug is clear.

  17. Social Norms and Beliefs Regarding Sexual Risk and Pregnancy Involvement among Adolescent Males Treated for Dating Violence Perpetration

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michele R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Rothman, Emily F.; Hathaway, Jeanne E.; Raj, Anita; Miller, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The present study explored perceived sexual norms and behaviors related to sexual risk and pregnancy involvement among adolescent males (ages 13 to 20) participating in programs for perpetrators of dating violence. The purpose of this study was to generate hypotheses regarding the contexts and mechanisms underlying the intersection of adolescent dating violence, sexual risk and pregnancy. Six focus groups were conducted (N = 34 participants). A number of major themes emerged: 1) male norm of multiple partnering, 2) perceived gain of male social status from claims of sexual activity, 3) perception that rape is uncommon combined with belief that girls claiming to be raped are liars, 4) perception that men rationalize rapes to avoid responsibility, 5) condom non-use in the context of rape and sex involving substance use, 6) beliefs that girls lie and manipulate boys in order to become pregnant and trap them into relationships, and 7) male avoidance of responsibility and negative responses to pregnancy. The combination of peer-supported norms of male multiple partnering and adversarial sexual beliefs appear to support increased male sexual risk, lack of accountability for sexual risk, and rationalization of rape and negative responses to pregnancy. Further research focused on the context of male sexual risk and abusive relationship behaviors is needed to inform intervention with young men to promote sexual health and prevent rape, dating violence, and adolescent pregnancy. PMID:16845498

  18. Risk factors and clinical features of ovarian pregnancy: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qian; Li, Cheng; Zhao, Wei-Hong; Yuan, Jiang-Jing; Yan, Ming-Xing; Qin, Guo-Juan; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for ovarian pregnancy (OP) and compare clinical features between OP and tubal pregnancy (TP) patients. Design Case–control study. Setting University hospital. Participants A case–control study was conducted from January 2005 to May 2014. Women diagnosed with OP were recruited as the case group (n=71), 145 women with TP and 146 with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) were matched as controls at a ratio of 1:2:2. Women who refused interviews or provided incomplete information were excluded. Results OP risk was lower than TP risk in women with serological evidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection (adjusted OR1 0.17, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.52), previous adnexal surgery (adjusted OR1 0.25, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.95), and current levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive use (adjusted OR1 0.24, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.78). In vitro fertilisation-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) carried a higher risk of OP (adjusted OR1 12.18, 95% CI 2.23 to 66.58) than natural conception. When Controlled by IUP women, current users of intrauterine devices (IUDs) carried a higher risk of OP than non-users of any contraceptives (adjusted OR2 9.60, 95% CI 1.76 to 42.20). β-Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels on the day of surgery were higher in OP patients than in TP patients (p<0.01). Women with OP were less likely to initially present with vaginal bleeding than those with TP (p=0.02). Moreover, shock (p=0.02), rupture (p<0.01), haemoperitoneum (p<0.01) and emergency laparotomy (p<0.01) were more common in the OP group than in the TP group. Conclusions IVF-ET and IUD use may be risk factors for OP, and OP patients tend to have high β-hCG levels and a poor clinical outcome (shock, rupture, haemoperitoneum and need for emergency laparotomy). Our findings may contribute to the prevention and early diagnosis of OP. PMID:25472658

  19. Maternal dyslipidemia during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm birth: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuying; Jiang, Jingxin; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Shuojia; Liu, Zeyu; Li, Minchao; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Shuangshuang; Wang, Lijuan; Fei, Ying; Li, Xiawei; Ding, Yongfeng; Wang, Zhaopin; Yu, Yunxian

    2017-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported an inconsistent relationship between maternal lipid levels and preterm birth (PTB). We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between maternal dyslipidemia and PTB. Overall, three nested case-control studies and eight cohort studies were eligible. Effect estimates [odds ratio(OR)/relative risk] were pooled using a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. Subgroup and metaregression analyses were conducted to evaluate the sources of heterogeneity. Eleven studies involving 13,025 pregnant women were included. Compared with pregnant women with normal lipid levels, the women with elevated levels of lipids had an increased risk of PTB, and the pooled OR was 1.68 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25-2.26)]; meanwhile, women with lower levels of lipids also had a trend of an increased risk of PTB (OR=1.52, 95% CI=0.60-3.82). The pooled ORs for elevated levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and lower levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol were 1.71 (95% CI: 1.05-2.79), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.13-2.12), 1.19 (95% CI: 0.95-1.48), and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.14-1.56), respectively. The present meta-analysis found that maternal dyslipidemia during pregnancy, either the elevated total cholesterol or triglycerides, was associated with an increased risk of PTB. These findings indicate that a normal level of maternal lipid during pregnancy may reduce the risk of PTB.

  20. Autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha during early pregnancy and risk of oral clefts in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bille, Camilla; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Christensen, Kaare; Ballard, Johnathan L; Gorman, Elizabeth B; Cabrera, Robert M; Finnell, Richard H

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether IgG and IgM autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha (FRalpha) in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk of oral cleft-affected offspring. A case-control study nested in the prospective Danish National Birth Cohort (100,418 pregnancies, enrolled during 1997-2003) was done. Hundred eighty-five children were born with an oral cleft. Maternal serum from their mothers (cases) was compared with maternal serum from 779 randomly selected mothers of nonmalformed children (controls). We found that the average level of FRalpha IgG autoantibodies did not differ significantly among cases and controls (p = 0.71). Slightly higher levels of FRalpha IgM autoantibodies were found among controls compared with cases. This was, however, not statistically significant (p = 0.06), except for mothers of children with isolated cleft lip (p = 0.04). Blocking of folate binding to FR was similar among cases and controls (p = 0.54). The results did not change when stratifying into the cleft subgroups, nor when only isolated oral cleft cases were considered. In conclusion, high maternal autoantibody levels and blocking of folate binding to FRalpha in maternal serum during pregnancy are not associated with an increased risk of oral clefts in the offspring in this population-based cohort.

  1. Intrauterine growth correlation to postnatal growth--influence of risk factors and complications in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T; Greisen, G; Petersen, S

    1997-01-20

    In a population of 616 pregnant women with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, we examined the relationship of third trimester fetal growth to maternal and pregnancy risk factors, the infants condition at birth, and postnatal growth. Intrauterine growth velocity was calculated from repeated estimations of fetal weight using ultrasound. Postnatal growth up to 3 months was measured in 313 of the infants. Intrauterine growth velocity was directly correlated to birth weight deviation (R = 0.35, P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated to postnatal growth (R = 0.21, P = 0.0001). Heavy smoking throughout pregnancy was the most pronounced factor associated with loss of fetal growth percentiles (P = 0.006), and it was also associated with postnatal catchup (P = 0.01). Infants who needed neonatal care had significantly lower intrauterine growth velocities compared to the rest of the study group; no correlation was found between intrauterine growth velocity and Apgar scores or umbilical pH. It is concluded that growth retardation in the third trimester can be identified by ultrasound fetometry, and is associated with maladaptation at birth and postnatal catchup. However, the correlations were weak suggesting that deviation at birth reflects, only to a limited degree, acceleration or deceleration of growth in the third trimester.

  2. Medication use in pregnancy in relation to the risk of isolated clubfoot in offspring.

    PubMed

    Werler, Martha M; Yazdy, Mahsa M; Kasser, James R; Mahan, Susan T; Meyer, Robert E; Anderka, Marlene; Druschel, Charlotte M; Mitchell, Allen A

    2014-07-01

    Clubfoot, a common major structural malformation, develops early in gestation. Epidemiologic studies have identified higher risks among boys, first-born children, and babies with a family history of clubfoot, but studies of risks associated with maternal exposures are lacking. We conducted the first large-scale, population-based, case-control study of clubfoot with detailed information on maternal medication use in pregnancy. Study subjects were ascertained from birth defect registries in Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina during 2007-2011. Cases were 646 mothers of children with clubfoot without other major structural malformations (i.e., isolated clubfoot); controls were mothers of 2,037 children born without major malformations. Mothers were interviewed within 12 months of delivery about medication use, including product, timing, and frequency. Odds ratios were estimated for exposure to 27 medications in pregnancy months 2-4 after adjustment for study site, infant sex, first-born status, body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), and smoking. Odds ratios were less than 1.20 for 14 of the medications; of the remainder, most odds ratios were only slightly elevated (range, 1.21-1.66), with wide confidence intervals. The use of antiviral drugs was more common in clubfoot cases than in controls (odds ratio = 4.22, 95% confidence interval: 1.52, 11.73). Most of these results are new findings and require confirmation in other studies.

  3. Medication Use in Pregnancy in Relation to the Risk of Isolated Clubfoot in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Werler, Martha M.; Yazdy, Mahsa M.; Kasser, James R.; Mahan, Susan T.; Meyer, Robert E.; Anderka, Marlene; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2014-01-01

    Clubfoot, a common major structural malformation, develops early in gestation. Epidemiologic studies have identified higher risks among boys, first-born children, and babies with a family history of clubfoot, but studies of risks associated with maternal exposures are lacking. We conducted the first large-scale, population-based, case-control study of clubfoot with detailed information on maternal medication use in pregnancy. Study subjects were ascertained from birth defect registries in Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina during 2007–2011. Cases were 646 mothers of children with clubfoot without other major structural malformations (i.e., isolated clubfoot); controls were mothers of 2,037 children born without major malformations. Mothers were interviewed within 12 months of delivery about medication use, including product, timing, and frequency. Odds ratios were estimated for exposure to 27 medications in pregnancy months 2–4 after adjustment for study site, infant sex, first-born status, body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2), and smoking. Odds ratios were less than 1.20 for 14 of the medications; of the remainder, most odds ratios were only slightly elevated (range, 1.21–1.66), with wide confidence intervals. The use of antiviral drugs was more common in clubfoot cases than in controls (odds ratio = 4.22, 95% confidence interval: 1.52, 11.73). Most of these results are new findings and require confirmation in other studies. PMID:24824985

  4. Medications Used to Treat Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy and the Risk of Selected Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Anderka, Marlene; Mitchell, Allen A.; Louik, Carol; Werler, Martha M.; Hernández-Diaz, Sonia; Rasmussen, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) occurs in up to 80% of pregnant women, yet its association with birth outcomes is not clear. Several medications are used for the treatment of NVP; however, data are limited on their possible associations with birth defects. Methods Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), a multi-site population-based case-control study, we examined whether NVP or its treatment was associated with the most common non-cardiac defects in the NBDPS (non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), cleft palate alone (CP), neural tube defects (NTDs), and hypospadias) compared to randomly-selected non-malformed live births. Results Among the 4524 cases and 5859 controls included in this study, 67.1% reported first trimester NVP, and 15.4% of them reported using at least one agent for NVP. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was not associated with CP or NTDs, but modest risk reductions were observed for CL/P (aOR=0.87, 0.77–0.98), and hypospadias (OR=0.84, 0.72–0.98). In regards to treatments for NVP in the first trimester, the following adjusted associations were observed with an increased risk: proton pump inhibitors and hypospadias (aOR=4.36, 1.21–15.81), steroids and hypospadias (aOR=2.87, 1.03–7.97), and ondansetron and CP (aOR=2.37, 1.18–4.76), while antacids were associated with a reduced risk for CL/P (aOR=0.58, 0.38–0.89). Conclusions Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was not observed to be associated with an increased risk of birth defects, but possible risks related to three treatments (i.e. proton pump inhibitors, steroids and ondansetron), which could be chance findings, warrant further investigation. PMID:22102545

  5. Effect of dietary factors in pregnancy on risk of pregnancy complications: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Nilsen, Roy M; Magnus, Per; Alexander, Jan; Haugen, Margareta

    2011-12-01

    There has been a thrilling development , as well as profound changes, in our understanding of the effect of fetal nutrition on the development and health of the child. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is an ongoing nationwide population-based pregnancy cohort study that between 1999 and 2008 recruited 90,723 women with 106,981 pregnancies and 108,487 children. The objective of MoBa is to test specific etiologic hypotheses by estimating the association between exposures and diseases with a special focus on disorders that may originate in early life. An important aspect in this regard is maternal diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Nutritional factors have long been considered to be important determinants of maternal and fetal health, and dietary information is currently being collected in a number of pregnancy cohorts in Europe and the United States. Thus far, pregnancy complications studied in MoBa are preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth; and the aim of this article is to report results of recently published studies of dietary factors in relation to these outcomes. Numerous studies are planned using MoBa data, and the aim is to add to the knowledge of the interplay between dietary factors, nonnutrients, and toxic dietary substances and epigenetic modulation on fetal development and health later in life.

  6. Retinol and α-Tocopherol in the Breast Milk of Women after a High-Risk Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sámano, Reyna; Martínez-Rojano, Hugo; Hernández, Rosa M.; Ramírez, Cristina; Flores Quijano, María E.; Espíndola-Polis, José M.; Veruete, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is scant information about whether, after a high-risk pregnancy, breast milk provides enough vitamins for assuring satisfactory bodily reserves in newborns. Objective: To comparatively evaluate, in women with high-risk and normal pregnancy, the concentration of retinol and α-tocopherol in breast milk. Methods: This cross-sectional, analytical study was evaluated with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Informed consent was signed by 95 mothers with a high-risk pregnancy and 32 mothers with a normal pregnancy. From the mothers with a high-risk pregnancy were obtained: 23 samples of colostrum, 24 of transitional milk, and 48 of mature milk. From the normal pregnancy group, 32 mature milk samples were collected. Pregestational Body Mass Index (BMI) and the gestational weight gain were noted. Models of logistic regression were constructed to identify the variables related to a low concentration of either retinol or α-tocopherol in breast milk. Results: The concentration of retinol and α-tocopherol in mature milk was 60 (interquartile range (IQR), 41–90) and 276 (103–450) μg/dL, respectively, for the high-risk pregnancy group, and 76 (65–91) and 673 (454–866) µg/dL, respectively, for the normal pregnancy group (p = 0.001). The concentration of retinol and α-tocopherol was similar in the subgroups of mothers with different disorders during gestation. A clear correlation was found between a greater pregestational weight and a lower concentration of retinol (Rho = –0.280, p = 0.006), and between α-tocopherol and retinol in all cases (Rho = 0.463, p = 0.001). Among women having a high-risk pregnancy, those delivering prematurely rather than carrying their pregnancy to term had a reduced concentration of retinol (54 (37–78) vs. 70 (49–106) µg/dL; p = 0.002) and a tendency to a lower concentration of α-tocopherol in breast milk (185 (75–410) vs. 339 (160–500) µg/dL; p = 0.053). Compared to mothers with a

  7. Genome-Wide Identification of Epigenetic Hotspots Potentially Related to Cardiovascular Risk in Adult Women after a Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Cees; Poutsma, Ankie; Michel, Omar; Mulders, Joyce; Visser, Allerdien; van Dijk, Marie; Nauta, Tessa; Bokslag, Anouk; Paulus, Walter; de Haas, Andreas; Koolwijk, Pieter; de Groot, Christianne J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The physiological demands of pregnancy on the maternal cardiovascular system can catapult women into a metabolic syndrome that predisposes to atherosclerosis in later life. We sought to identify the nature of the epigenomic changes associated with the increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adult women following pre-eclampsia. Findings We assessed the genome wide epigenetic profile by methyl-C sequencing of monozygotic parous twin sister pairs discordant for a severe variant of pre-eclampsia. In the adult twin sisters at risk for CVD as a consequence of a complicated pregnancy, a set of 12 differentially methylated regions with at least 50% difference in methylation percentage and the same directional change was found to be shared between the affected twin sisters and significantly different compared to their unaffected monozygous sisters. Conclusion The current epigenetic marker set will permit targeted analysis of differentially methylated regions potentially related to CVD risk in large cohorts of adult women following complicated pregnancies. PMID:26870946

  8. Elective amniocentesis in low-risk pregnancies: decision making in the era of information and uncertainty.

    PubMed Central

    Lesser, Y; Rabinowitz, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rational choice theory was applied to explain women's use of amniocentesis. Variables included knowledge about prenatal diagnostics, attitudes, and emotional preferences. METHODS: Using structured instruments at 9 to 14 and at 29 to 34 weeks' gestation, we interviewed 232 Israeli women who had low-risk pregnancies. RESULTS: Women who had elective amniocentesis (n = 39) were more knowledgeable about prenatal diagnostics, risks of invasive procedures, and probability of fetal abnormality in high maternal age; had fewer children; and had less favorable attitudes toward parenthood than those who had medically indicated amniocentesis (n = 57) and those who did not have amniocentesis (n = 136). CONCLUSIONS: The use and possible overuse of amniocentesis were associated with having more information about prenatal diagnostics and definite emotional preferences. PMID:11291381

  9. β-endorphin neuronal transplantation into the hypothalamus alters anxiety-like behaviors in prenatal alcohol exposed rats and non-preferring and preferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan; Wynne, Olivia; Maglakelidze, George; Zhang, Changqing; O’Connell, Stephanie; Boyadjieva, Nadka I.; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol exposure has adverse effects on stress physiology and behavioral reactivity. This is suggested to be due, in part, to the effect of alcohol on β-endorphin (β-EP) producing neurons in the hypothalamus. In response to stress, β-EP normally provides negative feedback to the HPA axis and interacts with other neurotransmitter systems in the amygdala to regulate behavior. We examined whether β-EP neuronal function in the hypothalamus reduces the corticosterone response to acute stress, attenuates anxiety-like behaviors, and modulates alcohol drinking in rats. Methods To determine if β-EP neuronal transplants modulate the stress response, anxiety behavior and alcohol drinking, we implanted differentiated β-EP neurons into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of normal, prenatal alcohol exposed, and alcohol-preferring (P) and non-preferring (NP) rats. We then assessed corticosterone levels in response to acute restraint stress and other markers of stress response in the brain, and anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and open-field assays. Results We showed that β-EP neuronal transplants into the PVN reduced the peripheral corticosterone response to acute stress and attenuated anxiety-like behaviors. Similar transplants completely reduced the hyper-corticosterone response and elevated anxiety behaviors in prenatal alcohol exposed adult rats. Moreover, we showed that β-EP reduced anxiety behavior in P rats with minimal effects on alcohol drinking during and following restraint stress. Conclusions These data further establish a role of β-EP neurons in the hypothalamus for regulating physiological stress response and anxiety behavior, and resembles a potential novel therapy for treating stress-related psychiatric disorders in prenatal alcohol exposed children and those genetically predisposed to increased alcohol consumption. PMID:25623413

  10. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Noboru; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Konishi, Toshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism.

  11. Reduced levels of maternal progesterone during pregnancy increase the risk for allergic airway diseases in females only.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Isabel R V; Bruenahl, Christian A; Ramisch, Katherina; Keil, Thomas; Inman, Mark; Arck, Petra C; Pincus, Maike

    2014-10-01

    Observational as well as experimental studies support that prenatal challenges seemed to be associated with an increased risk for allergic airway diseases in the offspring. However, insights into biomarkers involved in mediating this risk are largely elusive. We here aimed to test the association between endogenous and exogenous factors documented in pregnant women, including psychosocial, endocrine, and life style parameters, and the risk for allergic airway diseases in the children later in life. We further pursued to functionally test identified factors in a mouse model of an allergic airway response. In a prospectively designed pregnancy cohort (n = 409 families), women were recruited between the 4th and 12th week of pregnancy. To investigate an association between exposures during pregnancy and the incidence of allergic airway disease in children between 3 and 5 years of age, multiple logistic regression analyses were applied. Further, in prenatally stressed adult offspring of BALB/c-mated BALB/c female mice, asthma was experimentally induced by ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization. In addition to the prenatal stress challenge, some pregnant females were treated with the progesterone derivative dihydrodydrogesterone (DHD). In humans, we observed that high levels of maternal progesterone in early human pregnancies were associated with a decreased risk for an allergic airway disease (asthma or allergic rhinitis) in daughters (adjusted OR 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 to 1.00) but not sons (aOR 1.02, 95% CI 0.94-1.10). In mice, prenatal DHD supplementation of stress-challenged dams attenuated prenatal stress-induced airway hyperresponsiveness exclusively in female offspring. Reduced levels of maternal progesterone during pregnancy-which can result from high stress perception-increase the risk for allergic airway diseases in females but not in males. Key messages: Lower maternal progesterone during pregnancy increases the risk for allergic airway disease

  12. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation and vitamin B12 status in a cohort of Chinese early pregnancy women with the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gu, Yan; Wei, Xiaoping; Liang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jie; Liu, Youxue; Zhang, Ting; Li, Tingyu

    2017-01-01

    Maternal folate and vitamin B12 deficiency predict poor pregnancy outcome. To improve pregnancy outcomes in rural area of China, we investigate rural women’s folic acid supplementation (FAS) status and the associations between maternal vitamin B status during the first trimester and subsequent adverse pregnancy outcomes. We collected the questionnaire information and drew 5 ml of blood from 309 early pregnant rural women. The birth outcomes were retrieved from medical records after delivery. Out of the total, 257 had taken FAS, including 50 before conception (group A) and 207 during the first trimester (group B). The concentration of plasma folate and the RBC folate supplementation groups were obviously higher than that of no-supplementation group (group N, p<0.01). The mean vitamin B12 levels in FAS group were significantly higher than those in groups N and B (p<0.05). Women who delivered SGA or premature infants had reduced plasma folate levels (p<0.05) compared with controls. The multiple linear regression models revealed that RBC folate levels affected the infant birth weight (p<0.01) and birth length (p<0.05). In conclusion, FAS can significantly improve plasma folate and RBC folate levels in childbearing-age women and reduce the risk of subsequent adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:28366994

  13. Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table ... turn Javascript on. What is a High-Risk Pregnancy? All pregnancies involve a certain degree of risk ...

  14. Maternal obesity: implications for pregnancy outcome and long-term risks-a link to maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Amir; Hod, Moshe; Yogev, Yariv

    2011-11-01

    As obesity becomes a worldwide epidemic, its prevalence during reproductive age is also increased. Alarming reports state that two-thirds of adults in the USA are overweight or obese, with half of them in the latter category, and the rate of obese pregnant women is estimated at 18-38%. These women are of major concern to women's health providers because they encounter numerous pregnancy-related complications. Obesity-related reproductive health complications range from infertility to a wide spectrum of diseases such as hypertensive disorders, coagulopathies, gestational diabetes mellitus, respiratory complications, and fetal complications such as large-for-gestational-age infants, congenital malformations, stillbirth, and shoulder dystocia. Recent reports suggest that obesity during pregnancy can be a risk factor for developing obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases in the newborn later in life. This review will address the implication of obesity on pregnancy and child health, and explore recent literature on obesity during pregnancy.

  15. Exposure to electromagnetic fields during pregnancy and associated risks for intrauterine growth retardation and spontaneous abortion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, M.B.

    1995-12-01

    This joint EPRI/National Institutes of Health study is the largest epidemiological study ever undertaken to examine the relationship between exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) during pregnancy and reproductive outcomes. Overall, the study concludes that EMF exposure during pregnancy is unrelated to pregnancy outcome. In specific, the study reveals no association between electromagnetic field exposure from electrically heated beds and intrauterine growth retardation or spontaneous abortion. Among the many strengths of this study are clearly specified hypotheses; prospective design; randomized assignment to exposure monitoring; very large sample size; detailed assessment of potential confounding by known risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes; and comprehensive statistical analyses. The study also featured extensive exposure assessment, including measurements of EMF from a variety of sources, personal monitoring, and wire coding information.

  16. Risk of Congenital Heart Defects after Ambient Heat Exposure Early in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Nathalie; Fraser, William D.; Sauve, Reg; Bilodeau-Bertrand, Marianne; Kosatsky, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital heart defects may be environmentally related, but the association with elevated ambient temperature has received little attention. Objectives: We studied the relationship between outdoor heat during the first trimester of pregnancy and risk of congenital heart defects. Methods: We carried out a retrospective cohort study of 704,209 fetuses between 2 and 8 weeks postconception from April to September in Quebec, Canada, 1988–2012. We calculated the prevalence of congenital heart defects at birth according to the number of days women were exposed to maximum temperature ≥ 30°C. In log-binomial regression models, we estimated prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the relationship of temperature with seven critical and eight noncritical heart defects, adjusted for pregnancy characteristics. Results: Prevalence of congenital heart defects was 979.5 per 100,000 for 10 days or more of temperature ≥ 30°C compared with 878.9 per 100,000 for 0 days of exposure. Temperature was more precisely associated with noncritical than critical defects, which had lower prevalence. Fetuses exposed to 15 days of temperature ≥ 30°C between 2 and 8 weeks postconception had 1.06 times the risk of critical defects (95% CI: 0.67, 1.67) and 1.12 times the risk of noncritical defects (95% CI: 0.98, 1.29) relative to 0 days. Associations were higher for atrial septal defects (PR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.70) than for other noncritical defects. For atrial septal defects, associations with elevated temperatures began the 3rd week postconception. Conclusions: Extreme heat exposure during the first trimester may be associated with noncritical heart defects, especially of the atrial septum. Citation: Auger N, Fraser WD, Sauve R, Bilodeau-Bertrand M, Kosatsky T. 2017. Risk of congenital heart defects after ambient heat exposure early in pregnancy. Environ Health Perspect 125:8–14; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP171 PMID:27494594

  17. Urinary Concentrations of Bisphenol A and Phthalate Metabolites Measured during Pregnancy and Risk of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Cantonwine, David E.; Meeker, John D.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; McElrath, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia represents a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Although it is known that the placenta plays a central role in development of preeclampsia, investigation into the contribution of environmental toxicants to the risk of preeclampsia has been sparse. Objectives: In the present study we examined the relationship between longitudinally measured urinary BPA and phthalate metabolite concentrations during gestation and preeclampsia. Methods: A nested case–control study of preterm birth was performed in 2011 from women enrolled in a prospective birth cohort study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. There were 50 cases of preeclampsia as part of this study. Urine samples were analyzed for concentrations of BPA and nine phthalate metabolites several times during pregnancy. Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios of preeclampsia in association with an interquartile range increase in BPA and phthalate concentrations and were weighted to reflect results generalizable to the base population. Results: Adjusted hazard ratios indicated that an interquartile range increase of urinary concentrations of BPA (1.53; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.25) and MEP (monoethyl phthalate) (1.72; 95% CI: 1.28, 2.30) at 10 weeks gestation was associated with onset of preeclampsia, whereas significantly elevated hazard ratios were found across gestation for all DEHP [di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] metabolites. These relationships differed based on infant sex. Conclusions: Urinary concentrations of BPA and several phthalate metabolites were significantly associated with increased risk of preeclampsia. If validated, these results indicate an environmental contribution of endocrine-disrupting chemicals to preeclampsia and suggest a modifiable means to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with this condition. Citation: Cantonwine DE, Meeker JD, Ferguson KK, Mukherjee B, Hauser R, McElrath TF. 2016. Urinary

  18. Increased risk for the development of preeclampsia in obese pregnancies: weighing in on the mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Palei, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder typically presenting as new-onset hypertension and proteinuria. While numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity increases the risk of PE, the mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Growing evidence from animal and human studies implicate placental ischemia in the etiology of this maternal syndrome. It is thought that placental ischemia is brought about by dysfunctional cytotrophoblast migration and invasion into the uterus and subsequent lack of spiral arteriole widening and placental perfusion. Placental ischemia/hypoxia stimulates the release of soluble placental factors into the maternal circulation where they cause endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the kidney, to elicit the clinical manifestations of PE. The most recognized of these factors are the anti-angiogenic sFlt-1 and pro-inflammatory TNF-α and AT1-AA, which promote endothelial dysfunction by reducing levels of the provasodilator nitric oxide and stimulating production of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that obesity-related metabolic factors increase the risk for developing PE by impacting various stages in the pathogenesis of PE, namely, 1) cytotrophoblast migration and placental ischemia; 2) release of soluble placental factors into the maternal circulation; and 3) maternal endothelial and vascular dysfunction. This review will summarize the current experimental evidence supporting the concept that obesity and metabolic factors like lipids, insulin, glucose, and leptin affect placental function and increase the risk for developing hypertension in pregnancy by reducing placental perfusion; enhancing placental release of soluble factors; and by increasing the sensitivity of the maternal vasculature to placental ischemia-induced soluble factors. PMID:26447211

  19. Maternal mental disorders in pregnancy and the puerperium and risks to infant health.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Lima, Lúcia Abelha; Legay, Letícia Fortes; de Cintra Santos, Jacqueline Fernandes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2012-12-08

    Prenatal and postnatal period presents the highest prevalence of mental disorders in women's lives and depression is the most frequent one, affecting approximately one in every five mothers. The aggravating factor here is that during this period psychiatric symptoms affect not only women's health and well-being but may also interfere in the infant's intra and extra-uterine development. Although the causes of the relationship between maternal mental disorders and possible risks to a child's health and development remain unknown, it is suspected that these risks may be related to the use of psychotropic drugs during pregnancy, to substance abuse and the mother's lifestyle. Moreover, after delivery, maternal mental disorders may also impair the ties of affection (bonding) with the newborn and the maternal capacity of caring in the post-partum period thus increasing the risk for infant infection and malnutrition, impaired child growth that is expressed in low weight and height for age, and even behavioral problems and vulnerability to presenting mental disorders in adulthood. Generally speaking, research on this theme can be divided into the type of mental disorder analyzed: studies that research minor mental disorders during pregnancy such as depression and anxiety find an association between these maternal disorders and obstetric complications such as prematurity and low birth weight, whereas studies that evaluate severe maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have found not only an association with general obstetric complications as well as with congenital malformations and perinatal mortality. Therefore, the success of infant growth care programs also depends on the mother's mental well being. Such findings have led to the need for new public policies in the field of maternal-infant care geared toward the population of mothers. However, more research is necessary so as to confirm the association between all factors with greater

  20. Maternal mental disorders in pregnancy and the puerperium and risks to infant health

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Lima, Lúcia Abelha; Legay, Letícia Fortes; de Cintra Santos, Jacqueline Fernandes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal period presents the highest prevalence of mental disorders in women’s lives and depression is the most frequent one, affecting approximately one in every five mothers. The aggravating factor here is that during this period psychiatric symptoms affect not only women’s health and well-being but may also interfere in the infant’s intra and extra-uterine development. Although the causes of the relationship between maternal mental disorders and possible risks to a child’s health and development remain unknown, it is suspected that these risks may be related to the use of psychotropic drugs during pregnancy, to substance abuse and the mother’s lifestyle. Moreover, after delivery, maternal mental disorders may also impair the ties of affection (bonding) with the newborn and the maternal capacity of caring in the post-partum period thus increasing the risk for infant infection and malnutrition, impaired child growth that is expressed in low weight and height for age, and even behavioral problems and vulnerability to presenting mental disorders in adulthood. Generally speaking, research on this theme can be divided into the type of mental disorder analyzed: studies that research minor mental disorders during pregnancy such as depression and anxiety find an association between these maternal disorders and obstetric complications such as prematurity and low birth weight, whereas studies that evaluate severe maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have found not only an association with general obstetric complications as well as with congenital malformations and perinatal mortality. Therefore, the success of infant growth care programs also depends on the mother’s mental well being. Such findings have led to the need for new public policies in the field of maternal-infant care geared toward the population of mothers. However, more research is necessary so as to confirm the association between all factors with

  1. Adolescent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Heidi K; Alves, Marcus Vinicius Ortega

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, although on the decline, represents a significant public health concern. Often adolescents present late to prenatal care, either from lack of knowledge, fear of consequences, limited access, stigma, or all of the above. Although multifaceted, there are many risks both to mother and child that are increased in adolescent pregnancy. Many are unintended and are at risk for repeat adolescent pregnancy, especially within the first 2 years. Risks include but are not limited to: low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and preeclampsia, as well as feelings of social isolation, delayed or neglected educational goals, and maternal depression.

  2. Women participating in a web-based preconception study have a high prevalence of risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) can be increased by preconception risk factors and lifestyles. We measured the prevalence of preconception risk factors for APOs in a population of Italian women of childbearing age enrolled in a web-based study. Methods Participants were enrolled through a web platform (http://www.mammainforma.it). After enrollment, participants filled in a questionnaire regarding socio-demographic characteristics, clinical data and preconception risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Through logistic regression, we explored how the prevalence of risk factors was affected by age, education level, employment, parity, physician’s recommendation and knowledge of the specific risk factor. Results We enrolled a total of 728 women. Sixty-two percent had a University degree, 84% were employed and 77% were planning their first pregnancy. Nearly 70% drank alcohol in any quantity; 16% were smokers; 6% was underweight; 21.4% was overweight; 51.6% did not assume folic acid; 22% was susceptible to rubella, 44.5% to hepatitis b and 13.2% to varicella. According to the multivariate analysis, compared to women who already had at least one pregnancy, nulliparous women had a higher BMI [OR 1.60 (CI 1.02;2.48)] and were less likely to be susceptible to rubella [OR 0.33 (CI 0.20;0.58)] and to be consuming alcohol [OR 0.47 (CI 0.31;0.70)] or cigarettes [OR 0.48 (CI 0.26;0.90)]. Appropriate knowledge was associated with a correct behavior regarding smoking, drinking alcohol and folic acid supplementation. Conclusions This study shows that the prevalence of risk factors for APOs in our population is high. Interventions aimed at reducing risk factors for APOs are needed and, to this purpose, a web intervention may represent a feasible tool to integrate tailored information and to inform preconception counseling targeting a specific group of women planning a pregnancy who are engaged on the web. PMID:24885235

  3. Risks to the fetus from diagnostic imaging during pregnancy: review and proposal of a clinical protocol.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mafalda; Matias, Alexandra; Macedo, Filipe

    2015-12-01

    Every day, medical practitioners face the dilemma of exposing pregnant or possibly pregnant patients to radiation from diagnostic examinations. Both doctors and patients often have questions about the risks of radiation. The most vulnerable period is between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation. Deterministic effects like pregnancy loss, congenital malformations, growth retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities have threshold doses above 100-200 mGy. The risk is considered negligible at 50 mGy and in reality no diagnostic examination exceeds this limit. The risk of carcinogenesis is slightly higher than in the general population. Intravenous iodinated contrast is discouraged, except in highly selected patients. Considering all the possible noxious effects of radiation exposure, measures to diminish radiation are essential and affect the fetal outcome. Nonionizing procedures should be considered whenever possible and every radiology center should have its own data analysis on fetal radiation exposure. In this review, we analyze existing literature on fetal risks due to radiation exposure, producing a clinical protocol to guide safe radiation use in a clinical setting.

  4. Marijuana and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Marijuana and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to marijuana may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  5. Pesticides and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pesticides and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to pesticides may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  6. Homeostatic model assessment and risk for hypertension during pregnancy: a longitudinal prospective study.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Amador, Norma; Fierro-Martínez, César; Muñoz-Guevara, Luis Manuel; Molina-Rodríguez, Roberto

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between insulin resistance and hypertension during pregnancy with the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). A longitudinal prospective study was carried out. One hundred sixty normotensive pregnant women were followed from the first trimester until delivery. HOMA-IR levels were determined each trimester. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression. At follow-up, 134 women (83.8%) remained normotensive, 18 (11.2%) developed gestational hypertension, and 8 (5%) developed preeclampsia. At first trimester, HOMA-IR levels were higher in women who developed gestational hypertension (2.1 +/- 0.2) than in women who developed preeclampsia (1.2 +/- 0.0), or remained normotensive (1.2 +/- 0.3); p < 0.01. In the logistic regression analysis, HOMA-IR levels at first trimester were statistically significant ( p = 0.03) to predict development of gestational hypertension. Our results support the use of the HOMA-IR as an alternative index for the assessment of the risk for hypertension during pregnancy.

  7. Apheresis in high risk antiphospholipid syndrome pregnancy and autoimmune congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Ruffatti, Amelia; Favaro, Maria; Brucato, Antonio; Ramoni, Veronique; Facchinetti, Myriam; Tonello, Marta; Del Ross, Teresa; Calligaro, Antonia; Hoxha, Ariela; Grava, Chiara; De Silvestro, Giustina

    2015-12-01

    In the first part a prospective cohort study was reported to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a treatment protocol including plasma exchange (PE) or PE plus intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) or immunoadsorption (IA) plus IVIG administered in addition to conventional therapy to 22 pregnant women with high-risk APS. The results indicate that PE or IA treatments administered along with IVIG and conventional antithrombotic therapy could be a valuable and safe therapeutic option in pregnant APS women with triple antiphospholipid antibody positivity along with a history of thrombosis and/or one or more severe pregnancy complications. In the second part the efficacy and safety of PE combined with IVIG and steroids were evaluated for the treatment of 10 patients with autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) by comparing maternal features, pregnancy outcome and side effects with those of 24 CHB patients treated with steroids only. The patients treated with the combined therapy showed a statistically significant regression of 2nd degree blocks, an increase in heart rate at birth and a significantly lower prevalence of pacing in the first year of life. Moreover, no side effects were observed except for a few steroid-related events. If these results are confirmed by large-scale studies, the apheretic procedures could lead to improved outcomes in the treatment of these devastating diseases.

  8. Increased risk of placenta previa is associated with endometriosis and tubal factor infertility in assisted reproductive technology pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yuri; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Akihisa; Oi, Nagisa; Tsutsumi, Ryo; Koizumi, Minako; Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji

    2013-02-01

    Although assisted reproductive technology (ART) is suspected to increase the risk of placenta previa, a life-threatening complication of pregnancy, the reason is poorly understood. We recruited consecutive 318 pregnancies conceived by ART in our clinic and examined relation of ten variables, i.e. maternal age, gravidity, parity, male or female fetus, previous abortion, previous cesarean delivery, endometriosis, ovulatory disorder, tubal disease, and male infertility, to placenta previa, by logistic regression analysis. As a result, we found that endometriosis (odds ratio = 15.1; 95% CI = 7.6-500.0) and tubal disease (odds ratio = 4.4; 95% CI = 1.1-26.3) were significantly associated with placenta previa. It would be preferable to take the increased risk of placenta previa into account in treating ART pregnancy with endometriosis and tubal disease.

  9. Postpartum Mental Health and Breastfeeding Practices: An Analysis Using the 2010-2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Wouk, Kathryn; Stuebe, Alison M; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2017-03-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that women with postpartum depression (PPD) are at risk for early breastfeeding cessation, but previous studies have been limited by small samples. The objective of this analysis is to estimate the association between PPD symptoms and breastfeeding using a national, stratified, random sample of U.S. mothers. Methods Data from the 2010-2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System were analyzed for New York City and the 29 states for which data were available. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between a pre-pregnancy mental health visit and subsequent breastfeeding initiation as well as PPD and 3-month any and exclusive breastfeeding. To identify state-level variation, we created maps of prevalence and adjusted odds of breastfeeding by PPD and pre-pregnancy mental health status. Results Women reporting a pre-pregnancy mental health visit had 0.61 (95 % CI 0.56, 0.67) times the odds of initiating breastfeeding compared with women who reported no pre-pregnancy visit. At 3 months postpartum, women with PPD symptoms since birth had 0.79 (95 % CI 0.70, 0.88) times the odds of any breastfeeding and reduced odds of exclusive breastfeeding modified by race/ethnicity. We found variation in state-level PPD symptoms and pre-pregnancy mental health prevalence and adjusted odds of breastfeeding. Conclusions for Practice Our results highlight the importance of providing targeted breastfeeding support to women with PPD symptoms, because they are at risk of early breastfeeding cessation. Given the cross-sectional nature of these data, women with early breastfeeding cessation may also be at risk for PPD, requiring screening and treatment.

  10. Hyperemesis, gestational hypertensive disorders, pregnancy losses and risk of autoimmune diseases in a Danish population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Jacobsen, Søren; Frisch, Morten

    2012-05-01

    The risk of some female predominant autoimmune diseases (ADs) has previously been shown to be higher in women who experience hyperemesis, gestational hypertensive disorders and idiopathic pregnancy losses. This study assessed the association between such pregnancy-related experiences and the subsequent risk of female predominant and other ADs. Our study cohort comprised 1.6 million Danish women born since 1955 for whom we had information about hyperemesis, gestational hypertensive disorders and pregnancy losses and subsequent hospital contacts for 31 ADs between 1982 and 2008. Ratios of first hospitalization rates (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, birth cohort, calendar period, marital status and childbirths. During 27.0 million person-years of follow-up 51,732 women were hospitalized with one or more ADs. Overall, compared with women without the specific pregnancy experiences, the risk of any AD was significantly increased for women with hyperemesis (RR = 1.41; 95% CI 1.30-1.51), gestational hypertensive disorders (1.21; 1.16-1.26), spontaneous abortions (1.10; 1.07-1.14), missed abortions (1.09; 1.04-1.13), stillbirths (1.25; 1.12-1.40), ectopic pregnancies (1.08; 1.02-1.14) and induced abortions (1.07; 1.04-1.09). Associations with female predominant ADs (i.e., ADs with a female:male ratio >2:1) were strongest in the first five years after the studied pregnancy experiences, but overall there was little difference between the RRs for groups of female predominant ADs and other ADs. Strong and potentially biological associations were observed for a number of specific ADs; including systemic lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and pernicious anemia, and for some specific ADs associations persisted even more than five years after the abnormal pregnancy experience. Abnormal pregnancies are associated with increased risk of certain ADs, possibly because of underlying

  11. Validation of self-reported maternal and infant health indicators in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Patricia; Bombard, Jennifer; Mulready-Ward, Candace; Gauthier, John; Sackoff, Judith; Brozicevic, Peggy; Gambatese, Melissa; Nyland-Funke, Michael; England, Lucinda; Harrison, Leslie; Taylor, Allan

    2014-12-01

    To assess the validity of self-reported maternal and infant health indicators reported by mothers an average of 4 months after delivery. Three validity measures-sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV)-were calculated for pregnancy history, pregnancy complications, health care utilization, and infant health indicators self-reported on the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) questionnaire by a representative sample of mothers delivering live births in New York City (NYC) (n = 603) and Vermont (n = 664) in 2009. Data abstracted from hospital records served as gold standards. All data were weighted to be representative of women delivering live births in NYC or Vermont during the study period. Most PRAMS indicators had >90 % specificity. Indicators with >90 % sensitivity and PPV for both sites included prior live birth, any diabetes, and Medicaid insurance at delivery, and for Vermont only, infant admission to the NICU and breastfeeding in the hospital. Indicators with poor sensitivity and PPV (<70 %) for both sites (i.e., NYC and Vermont) included placenta previa and/or placental abruption, urinary tract infection or kidney infection, and for NYC only, preterm labor, prior low-birth-weight birth, and prior preterm birth. For Vermont only, receipt of an HIV test during pregnancy had poor sensitivity and PPV. Mothers accurately reported information on prior live births and Medicaid insurance at delivery; however, mothers' recall of certain pregnancy complications and pregnancy history was poor. These findings could be used to prioritize data collection of indicators with high validity.

  12. Exposure to partner, family, and community violence: gang-affiliated Latina women and risk of unintended pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth; Levenson, Rebecca; Herrera, Lili; Kurek, Laura; Stofflet, Marney; Marin, Leni

    2012-02-01

    While teen pregnancy rates appear to be declining in the U.S.A. overall, the rate of decline among young Latinas has been less than other ethnic groups. Among the myriad factors associated with elevated pregnancy rates, for Latina girls living in the inner city, exposure to gang and community violence may be a critical context for increased pregnancy risk. This study explores the relationship between gang involvement and reproductive health, and the pathways through which childhood, family, and relationship violence exposure may lead to unintended pregnancy. Interviews of 20 young adult Latinas with known gang involvement in Los Angeles County were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded for key themes related to violence exposure and reproductive health. Limited access to reproductive health care compounded by male partner sexual and pregnancy coercion, as well as physical and sexual violence, emerged in the interviews. Exposures to interparental domestic violence, childhood physical and sexual abuse, and gang violence were prominent and closely associated with unhealthy and abusive intimate relationships. Adverse childhood experiences and exposure to partner, family, and community violence impact the reproductive lives and choices of young Latina women in gangs. These findings may guide targeted pregnancy prevention efforts among urban gang-affiliated Latinas as well as encourage the integration of sexual violence prevention and reproductive health promotion within gang violence intervention programs.

  13. Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy as vascular risk signals: an overview and grading of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2014-07-01

    The occurrence of common pregnancy-related medical disorders identifies women at high risk of developing future vascular disease. Systematic reviews of cohort studies demonstrate that gestational diabetes confers a 7-fold risk increase for type 2 diabetes, and preeclampsia confers a 1.8-fold risk increase for type 2 diabetes and 3.4-fold risk increase for hypertension. Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) increase the risk of premature vascular disease, but the 2-fold risk increase associated with preeclampsia is only partially explained by the development of traditional vascular risk factors. Despite the compelling evidence for gestational diabetes and HDP as vascular risk indicators, there are no published Canadian vascular prevention guidelines that recognize these postpartum women. In contrast, the 2011 American Heart Association guidelines on cardiovascular disease in women include gestational diabetes and HDP in their vascular risk assessment. Studies indicate that the importance surveillance of vascular risk factors in these women after pregnancy is underappreciated by the women themselves and their physicians. Although a prudent diet and physically active lifestyle were demonstrated to reduce diabetes risk in women with a gestational diabetes history in the American Diabetes Prevention Program trial, adoption of these health behaviours is low; qualitative studies confirm a need for tailored strategies that address barriers and provide social support. Further research is also needed on approaches to reduce vascular risk in women with a history of gestational diabetes and HDP. Otherwise, an early window of opportunity for chronic disease prevention in young, high-risk women will be missed.

  14. Effects of relaxation on depression levels in women with high-risk pregnancies: a randomised clinical trial 1

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Wanda Scherrer; Romero, Walckiria Garcia; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyse the effects of relaxation as a nursing intervention on the depression levels of hospitalised women with high-risk pregnancies. Methods: a randomised clinical trial realised in a reference centre for high-risk pregnancies. The sample consisted of 50 women with high-risk pregnancies (25 in the control group and 25 in the intervention group). The Benson relaxation technique was applied to the intervention group for five days. Control variables were collected using a predesigned form, and the signs and symptoms of depression were evaluated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 20.0, was used with a significance level of 5%. The Wilcoxon and paired t-tests were used to evaluate depression levels between two timepoints. Using categorical data, the McNemar test was used to analyse differences in depression severity before and after the intervention. Results: depression levels decreased in the intervention group five days after the relaxation technique was applied (4.5 ± 3, p<0.05) compared with the levels at the first timepoint (10.3±5.9). Conclusion: as a nursing intervention, relaxation was effective in decreasing the symptoms of depression in hospitalised women with high-risk pregnancies. PMID:27627126

  15. RISK FACTORS OF HIV-1 VERTICAL TRANSMISSION (VT) AND THE INFLUENCE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY (ART) IN PREGNANCY OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Maria F.M.; de Oliveira, Gisele R.; Lobato, Rubens C.; Mendoza-Sassi, Raul A.; Martínez, Ana M.b.; Gonçalves, Carla V.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of intervention, the rate of vertical transmission of HIV can range from 15-45%. With the inclusion of antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy and the choice of delivery route this amounts to less than 2%. However ARV use during pregnancy has generated several questions regarding the adverse effects of the gestational and neonatal outcome. This study aims to analyze the risk factors for vertical transmission of HIV-1 seropositive pregnant women living in Rio Grande and the influence of the use of ARVs in pregnancy outcome. Among the 262 pregnant women studied the rate of vertical transmission of HIV was found to be 3.8%. Regarding the VT, there was a lower risk of transmission when antiretroviral drugs were used and prenatal care was conducted at the referral service. However, the use of ART did not influence the outcome of pregnancy. However, initiation of prenatal care after the first trimester had an influence on low birth weight, as well as performance of less than six visits increased the risk of prematurity. Therefore, the risk factors analyzed in this study appear to be related to the realization of inadequate pre-natal and maternal behavior. PMID:24626415

  16. African-American Adolescent Females in the Southeastern United States: Associations among Risk Factors for Teen Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killebrew, Alyssa E.; Smith, Michelle L.; Nevels, Robert M.; Weiss, Nicole H.; Gontkovsky, Samuel T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the associations among three external variables (Peer Substance Use Before Sex, Peer Number of Children, and Parental Influence and Substance Use Before Sex and History of Pregnancy) identified on the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey and a demographic survey, using Bandura's Social Learning Theory as an interpretive…

  17. Iron metabolism in African American women in the second and third trimesters of high-risk pregnancies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To examine iron metabolism during the second and third trimesters in African American women with high-risk pregnancies. Design: Longitudinal pilot study. Setting: Large, university-based, urban Midwestern U.S. medical center. Participants: Convenience sample of 32 African American wome...

  18. Identifying Risk for Onset of Major Depressive Episodes in Low-Income Latinas during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Munoz, Ricardo F.; Soto, Jose A.; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Ippen, Chandra Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to identify subgroups of pregnant women at imminent (1 year) risk for major depressive episodes. Participants were 84 low-income, predominantly Mexican women using public sector obstetrics services who participated in monthly interviews during pregnancy and up to 6 months postpartum. Participants were designated a priori as "more…

  19. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and risk of type 2 diabetes in later life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengfang; Wang, Zengyan; Wang, Luang; Qiu, Mingyue; Wang, Yangang; Hou, Xu; Guo, Zhong; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Many studies assessed the association between hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in later life, but contradictory findings were reported. A systemic review and meta-analysis was carried out to elucidate type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in women with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for cohort or case-control studies on the association between hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus. Random-effect model was used to pool risk estimates. Bayesian meta-analysis was carried out to further estimate the type 2 diabetes mellitus risk associated with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Seventeen cohort or prospective matched case-control studies were finally included. Those 17 studies involved 2,984,634 women and 46,732 type 2 diabetes mellitus cases. Overall, hypertensive disorders during pregnancy were significantly correlated with type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 1.56, 95 % confidence interval 1.21-2.01, P = 0.001). Preeclampsia was significantly and independently correlated with type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 2.25, 95 % confidence interval 1.73-2.90, P < 0.001). In addition, gestational hypertension was also significantly and independently correlated with subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 2.06, 95 % confidence interval 1.57-2.69, P < 0.001). The pooled estimates were not significantly altered in the subgroup analyses of studies on preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. Bayesian meta-analysis showed the relative risks of type 2 diabetes mellitus risk for individuals with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy, preeclampsia, and gestational hypertension were 1.59 (95 % credibility interval: 1.11-2.32), 2.27 (95 % credibility interval: 1.67-2.97), and 2.06 (95 % credibility interval: 1.41-2.84), respectively. Publication bias was not evident

  20. Folic acid supplementation during early pregnancy and the risk of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwen; Ye, Rongwei; Zhang, Le; Li, Hongtian; Liu, Jianmeng; Ren, Aiguo

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that folic acid-containing multivitamins may markedly reduce the risk of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia. We examined whether maternal supplementation with folic acid alone during early pregnancy can prevent the occurrence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. The data are from a large population-based cohort study established to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign to prevent neural tube defects with folic acid supplementation in China. We selected participants who were registered in 2 southern provinces, had exact information on folic acid use, and were not affected by chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus before 20 weeks gestation. A logistic regression model was used to adjust for the effects of the main potential confounders, including age, body mass index, education, occupation, parity, and multiple births. The study size had 99.9% power (α=0.05) to detect a decrease of 10% over the unexposed rate of 9.4% for gestational hypertension. Among the 193 554 women (47.9% took folic acid, 52.1% did not), the overall incidence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia was 9.5% and 2.5%, respectively. The incidence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia was 9.7% and 2.5% for women who took folic acid, and 9.4% and 2.4% for women who did not use it. The adjusted risk ratio associated with folic acid use was 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.11) for gestational hypertension and 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.18) for preeclampsia. Our findings suggest that daily consumption of 400 μg folic acid alone during early pregnancy cannot prevent the occurrence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

  1. A proposed unified mechanism for the reduction of human breast cancer risk by the hormones of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Herbert I; Lemanski, Nicole; Agarwal, Anu; Narendran, Amithi; Turner, Kelvin E; Bennett, James A; Andersen, Thomas T

    2010-02-01

    Parity in women is associated with reduced lifetime risk of breast cancer, and hormones of pregnancy [estrogen (E), progesterone (P), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)] are implicated. Parity also reduces mammary cancer risk in carcinogen-exposed rats, and administering pregnancy hormones to these animals is similarly effective. Because pregnancy hormones are also able to stimulate cancer growth, we proposed to resolve this dichotomy by determining whether administered pregnancy hormones elicit the cancer-inhibiting agent alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) from the liver, which would implicate AFP as a proximal effector of hormonal anticancer activity. Accordingly, we treated groups of nitrosomethylurea-exposed rats with saline, E(3), E(2) + P, E(3) + P, hCG, or allowed them to experience pregnancy, and then monitored mammary cancer incidence and serum levels of AFP over time. Each hormone treatment reduced mammary cancer incidence and elevated serum AFP levels. To challenge human tissues, human HepG2 liver cells in culture were treated with the same hormonal agents. Each hormone regimen increased the levels of AFP in the culture medium. Medium containing AFP elicited by hCG inhibited the E(2)-stimulated proliferation of cultured human MCF7 breast cancer cells, whereas hCG alone did not inhibit their growth. Furthermore, antibodies to AFP neutralized the growth-inhibiting effect of AFP-containing HepG2 medium. We conclude that in the treatment of carcinogen-exposed rats with the hormones of pregnancy, and by inference in women who have experienced pregnancy, that AFP is a proximal agent that inhibits mammary gland cancer.

  2. Inter-Pregnancy Intervals and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results of a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Maureen S.; Allerton, Lindsay; Maenner, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported an increased risk of autism among second-born children conceived <12 versus >36 months after the birth of a sibling. Confirmation of this finding would point to inter-pregnancy interval (IPI) as a potentially modifiable risk factor for autism. This study evaluated the relationship between IPI and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk in a Wisconsin birth cohort of 31,467 second-born children, of whom 160 resided in the study area and were found to have ASD at age 8 years. In adjusted analyses, both short (<12) and long (>84 month) IPIs were associated with a two-fold risk of ASD relative to IPIs of 24-47 months (p<0.05). The long IPI association was partially confounded by history of previous pregnancy loss. PMID:25636677

  3. Risks associated with obesity in pregnancy, for the mother and baby: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Marchi, J; Berg, M; Dencker, A; Olander, E K; Begley, C

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with adverse outcomes for mothers and babies. To get an overview of risks related to obesity in pregnant women, a systematic review of reviews was conducted. For inclusion, reviews had to compare pregnant women of healthy weight with women with obesity, and measure a health outcome for mother and/or baby. Authors conducted full-text screening, quality assurance using the AMSTAR tool and data extraction steps in pairs. Narrative analysis of the 22 reviews included show gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, depression, instrumental and caesarean birth, and surgical site infection to be more likely to occur in pregnant women with obesity compared with women with a healthy weight. Maternal obesity is also linked to greater risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age babies, foetal defects, congenital anomalies and perinatal death. Furthermore, breastfeeding initiation rates are lower and there is greater risk of early breastfeeding cessation in women with obesity compared with healthy weight women. These adverse outcomes may result in longer duration of hospital stay, with concomitant resource implications. It is crucial to reduce the burden of adverse maternal and foetal/child outcomes caused by maternal obesity. Women with obesity need support to lose weight before they conceive, and to minimize their weight gain in pregnancy.

  4. Paternal military service in Vietnam and the risk of late adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, A; Monson, R R

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between paternal military service in Vietnam and the risk of late adverse pregnancy outcomes, we conducted a case-control study of women who delivered infants from August 1977 until March 1980 at Boston Hospital for Women. Paternal military service history among 857 congenital anomaly cases, 61 stillbirth cases, and 48 neonatal death cases were compared with that of 998 normal controls. Military service veterans were identified by crossmatching identifying information from obstetric records with state and national military records. After controlling for confounding variables, we found that the Vietnam veterans' relative risk of fathering an infant with one or more major malformations was 1.7 (95% CI = 0.8, 3.5) compared to non-Vietnam veterans. The increased risk was present in several organ systems and did not seem to be related to a particular type of defect. No associations or highly unstable associations were found between paternal military service in Vietnam and the occurrence of congenital anomalies overall, minor malformations, normal variants, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths. These findings should be viewed with caution since maternal and delivery characteristics appear to have contributed to the etiology of several of the major malformations among the Vietnam veterans' children. PMID:2400033

  5. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of major congenital malformations in a cohort of depressed pregnant women: an updated analysis of the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bérard, Anick; Zhao, Jin-Ping; Sheehy, Odile

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant use during gestation has been associated with risk of major congenital malformations but estimates can lack statistical power or be confounded by maternal depression. We aimed to determine the association between first-trimester exposure to antidepressants and the risk of major congenital malformations in a cohort of depressed/anxious women. Setting and participants Data were obtained from the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort (QPC). All pregnancies with a diagnosis of depression or anxiety, or exposed to antidepressants in the 12 months before pregnancy, and ending with a live-born singleton were included. Outcome measures Antidepressant classes (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and other antidepressants) and types were individually compared with non-exposure during the first trimester (depressed untreated). Major congenital malformations overall and organ-specific malformations in the first year of life were identified. Results 18 487 pregnant women were included. When looking at the specific types of antidepressant used during the first trimester, only citalopram was increasing the risk of major congenital malformations (adjusted OR, (aOR) 1.36, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.73; 88 exposed cases), although there was a trend towards increased risk for the most frequently used antidepressants. Antidepressants with serotonin reuptake inhibition effect (SSRI, SNRI, amitriptyline (the most used TCA)) increased the risk of certain organ-specific defects: paroxetine increased the risk of cardiac defects (aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.88), and ventricular/atrial septal defects (aOR 1.39, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.93); citalopram increased the risk of musculoskeletal defects (aOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.40 to 2.62), and craniosynostosis (aOR 3.95, 95% CI 2.08 to 7.52); TCA was associated with eye, ear, face and neck defects (aOR 2.45, 95% CI 1.05 to 5.72), and digestive defects (aOR 2

  6. The role of preterm placental calcification in high-risk pregnancy as a predictor of poor uteroplacental blood flow and adverse pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Hu; Chen, Li-Ru; Lee, Yu-Hsiang

    2012-06-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to clarify the role of preterm placental calcification in high-risk (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, placenta previa or severe anemia) pregnant women as a predictor of poor uteroplacental blood flow (absent or reverse end-diastolic velocity [AREDV]) and adverse pregnancy outcome. Monthly ultrasound was performed starting at 28 weeks' gestation to establish the diagnosis of Grade III placental calcification, with measurement of Doppler velocimetry in the umbilical vessels at 32 weeks' gestation. The participants were classified into three groups: Group A (n = 776), a low-risk group without antenatal complication; group B (n = 42), a high-risk group with preterm (28 to 36 weeks) placental calcification; and group C (n = 71), a high-risk control group without preterm (<36 weeks) placental calcification. Analyzed by logistic regression, the risks of AREDV (OR 4.32, 95%CI 1.25 to 14.94), adverse maternal outcome including postpartum hemorrhage (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.20 to 13.20), placental abruption (OR 4.80, 95% CI 1.19 to 19.35), maternal transfer to intensive care unit (OR 3.83, 95% CI 1.10 to 13.33) and adverse fetal outcome including preterm birth (OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.32 to 11.29), low birth weight (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.11 to 8.03), low Apgar score (OR 5.14, 95% CI 1.64 to 16.08) and neonatal death (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.15 to 17.73) were greater in group B compared with group C. In contrast, the risks of AREDV and adverse pregnancy outcome were significantly lower in group A than those in group C, except postpartum hemorrhage (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.46). We conclude that in high-risk pregnant women, the presence of preterm placental calcification is a predictor of poor uteroplacental flow and adverse pregnancy outcome, requiring closer surveillance for maternal and fetal well-being. This finding helps identify the most dangerous population among high-risk pregnant women.

  7. Substance Use and the Risk for Sexual Intercourse With and Without a History of Teenage Pregnancy Among Adolescent Females*

    PubMed Central

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Krauss, Melissa J.; Spitznagel, Edward L.; Schootman, Mario; Cottler, Linda B.; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined the associations between initiation and intensity of substance use and with sexual experience with and without a history of teenage pregnancy. Method: Participants were high school females (weighted n = 3,451) who participated in the 1999–2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey. Multinomial multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of being sexually experienced (but never pregnant) and teenage pregnancy (reference group: never had sexual intercourse) as a function of age at substance use initiation (i.e., age 12 or younger, 13–14 years of age, and age 15 or older) and intensity of substance use (i.e., nonuser, experimental/ new or nondaily, nonexperimental/daily user) for alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana, while controlling for race/ethnicity, metropolitan location, symptoms of depression, and illegal drug availability at school. Results: A major finding of our study is that substance use behaviors across each substance (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) independently contributed to an increased risk in sexual intercourse experience with and without a history of teenage pregnancy (vs. nonsexually experienced females). A dose-response relationship was also observed between an increased likelihood of a teenage pregnancy and marijuana behaviors. Furthermore, the risk for teenage pregnancy was compounded for daily cigarette smokers who initiated use at age 12 or younger. Conclusions: Screening substance use behaviors can help to identify girls who may benefit from pregnancy prevention strategies. Targeting cigarette and marijuana behaviors as early as age 12 or younger may provide an added benefit. Prevention strategies should also consider the role of race above and beyond substance use behaviors. PMID:21388592

  8. Early pregnancy prediction of preeclampsia in nulliparous women, combining clinical risk and biomarkers: the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) international cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Louise C; Black, Michael A; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Rennae; Myers, Jenny E; Baker, Philip N; McCowan, Lesley M; Simpson, Nigel A B; Dekker, Gus A; Roberts, Claire T; Rodems, Kelline; Noland, Brian; Raymundo, Michael; Walker, James J; North, Robyn A

    2014-09-01

    More than half of all cases of preeclampsia occur in healthy first-time pregnant women. Our aim was to develop a method to predict those at risk by combining clinical factors and measurements of biomarkers in women recruited to the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study of low-risk nulliparous women. Forty-seven biomarkers identified on the basis of (1) association with preeclampsia, (2) a biological role in placentation, or (3) a role in cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia were measured in plasma sampled at 14 to 16 weeks' gestation from 5623 women. The cohort was randomly divided into training (n=3747) and validation (n=1876) cohorts. Preeclampsia developed in 278 (4.9%) women, of whom 28 (0.5%) developed early-onset preeclampsia. The final model for the prediction of preeclampsia included placental growth factor, mean arterial pressure, and body mass index at 14 to 16 weeks' gestation, the consumption of ≥3 pieces of fruit per day, and mean uterine artery resistance index. The area under the receiver operator curve (95% confidence interval) for this model in training and validation cohorts was 0.73 (0.70-0.77) and 0.68 (0.63-0.74), respectively. A predictive model of early-onset preeclampsia included angiogenin/placental growth factor as a ratio, mean arterial pressure, any pregnancy loss <10 weeks, and mean uterine artery resistance index (area under the receiver operator curve [95% confidence interval] in training and validation cohorts, 0.89 [0.78-1.0] and 0.78 [0.58-0.99], respectively). Neither model included pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, previously reported to predict preeclampsia in populations of mixed parity and risk. In nulliparous women, combining multiple biomarkers and clinical data provided modest prediction of preeclampsia.

  9. Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S Y; Henriksen, T B; Hjøllund, N H; Mølbak, K; Andersen, A M N

    2014-07-01

    Maternal infection in pregnancy is a known risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome, and a number of zoonotic pathogens may constitute a risk to pregnant women and their fetuses. With animal contact as a proxy for the risk of zoonotic infection, this study aimed to evaluate pregnancy outcome in women with self-reported occupational or domestic contact with livestock compared to pregnant women without such contact. The Danish National Birth Cohort collected information on pregnancy outcome from 100 418 pregnant women (1996-2002) from which three study populations with occupational and/or domestic exposure to livestock and a reference group of women with no animal contact was sampled. Outcome measures were miscarriage, very preterm birth (before gestational week 32), preterm birth (before 37 gestational weeks), small for gestational age (SGA), and perinatal death. Adverse reproductive outcomes were assessed in four different exposure groups of women with occupational or domestic exposure to livestock with no association found between exposure to livestock and miscarriage, preterm birth, SGA or perinatal death. These findings should diminish general occupational health concerns for pregnant women with exposures to a range of different farm animals.

  10. Early pregnancy sex steroids and maternal risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Helena; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Grankvist, Kjell; Lakso, Hans-Åke; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Well-established associations between reproductive characteristics and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) support an involvement of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC. Limited prior studies have evaluated circulating androgens and risk of EOC, and estrogens and progesterone have been investigated in only one prior study. Further, there is little data on potential heterogeneity in the association between circulating hormones and EOC by histologic subgroup. Therefore, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Finnish Maternity Cohort and the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort to investigate the associations between circulating pre-diagnostic sex steroid concentrations with the histologic subtypes of EOC. We identified 1,052 EOC cases among cohort members diagnosed after recruitment (1975-2008) and before March 2011. Up to three controls were individually matched to each case (n=2,694). Testosterone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), progesterone, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured in serum samples collected during the last pregnancy before EOC diagnosis. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI]. Associations between hormones and EOC differed by tumor histology and invasiveness. Sex steroid concentrations were not associated with invasive serous tumors, however, doubling of testosterone and 17-OHP concentration was associated with ~40% increased risk of borderline serous tumors. A doubling of androgen concentrations was associated with a 50% risk increase for mucinous tumors. Risk of endometrioid tumors increased with higher estradiol concentrations (OR: 1.89 [1.20-2.98]). This large prospective study in pregnant women supports a role of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC arising in the ovaries. PMID:25270324

  11. Prenatal exposure to elevated maternal body temperature and risk of epilepsy in childhood: a population-based pregnancy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuelian; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Jakob; Olsen, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    Elevated maternal body temperature during pregnancy is of clinical concern as side effects have been reported. We estimated the association between maternal fever and sauna bathing during pregnancy and risk of epilepsy in the offspring. We identified 86,810 liveborn singletons from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) and followed them for up to 9 years of age. Information on fever including number, timing, level, duration, and symptoms of each fever episodes was collected in two computer-assisted telephone interviews around 17 and 32 gestational weeks; information on maternal use of a sauna was collected in the latter interview, and information on epilepsy was obtained from the Danish National Hospital Register. We applied Cox regression models to estimate the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of epilepsy for children exposed to maternal fever and sauna bathing during pregnancy. Maternal sauna bathing during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of epilepsy. Maternal fever during pregnancy in general was not associated with an increased risk of epilepsy in the offspring [IRR = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85, 1.19], and no dose-response pattern was found according to number, level and duration of fever. However we did find an increased risk of epilepsy among children exposed to at least 3 fever episodes (IRR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.19, 2.98), to maternal fever with symptoms in the urinary system (IRR = 4.86, 95% CI 1.56, 15.17), and to one-day maternal fever of 39.0-39.4°C (IRR = 2.79, 95% CI 1.60, 4.84). Our findings do not support a strong association between hyperthermia and epilepsy but the associations between underlying causes of fever, especially prenatal infections, call for more research.

  12. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and risk of diabetes in Indian women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data from high-income countries suggest that women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are more likely to develop diabetes later in life. Objective We investigated the association between pre-eclampsia and eclampsia (PE&E) during pregnancy and the risk of diabetes in Indian women. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting India. Methods Data from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005–2006), a cross-sectional survey of women aged 15–49 years, are used. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE&E were obtained from 39 657 women who had a live birth in the 5 years preceding the survey. The association between PE&E and self-reported diabetes status was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for dietary intake, body mass index (BMI), tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, frequency of TV watching, sociodemographic characteristics and geographic region. Results The prevalence of symptoms suggestive of PE&E in women with diabetes was 1.8% (n=207; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.0; p<0.0001) and 2.1% (n=85; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.3; p<0.0001), respectively, compared with 1.1% (n=304; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.4) and 1.2% (n=426; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.5) in women who did not report any PE&E symptoms. In the multivariable analysis, PE&E was associated with 1.6 times (OR=1.59; 95% CI 1.31 to 1.94; p<0.0001) and 1.4 times (OR=1.36; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.77; p=0.001) higher risk for self-reported diabetes even after controlling for dietary intake, BMI and sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions HDP is strongly associated with the risk of diabetes in a large nationally representative sample of Indian women. These findings are important for a country which is already tackling the burden of young onset of diabetes in the population. However, longitudinal medical histories and a clinical measurement of diabetes are needed in this low-resource setting. PMID:27496230

  13. MTHFR C677T polymorphism and recurrent early pregnancy loss risk in north Indian population.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rohini R; Khanna, Anuradha; Singh, Kiran

    2012-02-01

    Recurrent early pregnancy loss (REPL) is a multifactorial disorder as both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of disease. Folate metabolism is an important mechanism to ensure proper fetal growth. Hyperhomocysteinemia leads to a number of disorders and REPL is one of them. In a case-control study DNA from 106 cases with the history of 3 or more REPL and 140 healthy fertile controls with successful pregnancy outcomes were genotyped for C677T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) gene through polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), which was further confirmed by sequencing. Allele frequencies of REPL cases were compared with healthy controls and a statistically significant association was found between REPL and the mutant T allele (χ² = 8.786, odds ratio [OR] = 2.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.323-3.9658, P = .003). The genotype frequencies of SNP C677T also differ significantly between these 2 groups (χ² = 8.237, P = .016). The OR for heterozygous CT in the REPL versus controls is 1.9591 (95% CI = 1.0285-3.7318, P = .04). The OR for TT homozygous is 6.3009 (95% CI = 1.2065, P = .02). Combined odds ratio of CT and TT against the control has been calculated as 2.2194 (95% CI = 1.2029-4.0952, P = .02) which is also significant. Thus the present study clearly indicates that homozygosity and heterozygosity for the MTHFR C677T polymorphism confer a 6.3009- and 1.9591-fold increased risk of idiopathic REPL, respectively.

  14. Equity in the development of telemedicine sites in an Arkansas high-risk pregnancy programme.

    PubMed

    Britt, David W; Norton, Jonathan D; Lowery, Curtis L

    2006-01-01

    We investigated where telemedicine sites were placed in a telemedicine network to assist high-risk pregnancies in Arkansas. There were 14 telemedicine sites in 75 counties, excluding the central site in Pulaski county. Logistic regression was used to examine site placement. Five potential predictors of site placement were examined: (1) the logarithm of the number of births in the county (LOGBIRTHS); (2) an indicator of whether a county had an abnormal rate of low birthweight babies (HIGHLBW); (3) the proportion of the county population below the government's poverty level; (4) the ratio of black to white births; (5) an indicator of whether the county bordered the telemedicine hub site county. The results suggested that telemedicine sites were placed where there were more births (LOGBIRTHS, P = 0.001) and more low birthweight babies (HIGHLBW, P = 0.004). After controlling for these variables, the county poverty level did not reduce the likelihood of site placement. Thus telemedicine sites had been established in those areas where the need was great both in terms of immediate risk (rate of low birthweight babies) and in terms of the continuing pressure of large numbers of births. This is significant in view of the concentration of poor minorities in certain areas, which historically have not been matched by past distribution of resources.

  15. Increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Hu, Li-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysregulation of the immune system plays a role in the pathogenesis of both, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is well known that SLE predisposes to be complicated with PIH. However, few studies have attempted to investigate whether PIH increased subsequent SLE risk. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between PIH and subsequent SLE risk and identify predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) and compared with a matched cohort without PIH based on age and the year of delivery. The incidence of new-onset SLE was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the NHIRD, 29,091 patients with PIH and 116,364 matched controls were identified. The incidence of SLE was higher among patients with PIH than in the matched controls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98–4.05, P < 0.0001). The IRR for subsequent SLE development remained significantly higher in all stratifications during the follow-up years. The multivariate Cox regression model was performed and the results showed that PIH may be an independent risk factors for the development of subsequent SLE (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.87, 95% CI 2.07–3.98, P < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate Cox regression model was used again among the PIH cohort only in order to identify the possible risk factors for subsequent SLE in the population with PIH. Patients with PIH may have higher risk of developing newly diagnosed SLE than those without PIH. In addition, among individuals who have experienced PIH, those younger than 30 years, having experienced preeclampsia/eclampsia, single parity, preterm birth, or chronic kidney disease, may display an increased subsequent risk of SLE. PMID:27472738

  16. Maternal folate and other vitamin supplementation during pregnancy and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Milne, Elizabeth; Royle, Jill A; Miller, Margaret; Bower, Carol; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Bailey, Helen D; van Bockxmeer, Frank; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney J; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle; Thompson, Judith R; Fritschi, Lin; Marshall, Glenn M; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2010-06-01

    The Australian Study of Causes of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children (Aus-ALL) was designed to test the hypothesis, raised by a previous Western Australian study, that maternal folic acid supplementation during pregnancy might reduce the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Aus-ALL was a national, population-based, multicenter case-control study that prospectively recruited 416 cases and 1,361 controls between 2003 and 2007. Detailed information was collected about maternal use of folic acid and other vitamin supplements before and during the index pregnancy. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for matching factors and potential confounders. A meta-analysis with the results of previous studies of folic acid supplementation was also conducted. We found weak evidence of a protective effect of maternal folate supplementation before pregnancy against risk of childhood ALL, but no evidence for a protective effect of its use during pregnancy. A meta-analysis including this and 2 other studies, but not the study that raised the hypothesis, also found little evidence that folate supplementation during pregnancy protects against ALL: the summary odds ratios (ORs) for folate supplementation were 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.48] with reference to no folate supplementation and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.86-1.20) with reference to no vitamin supplementation. For vitamin supplementation in general, the summary OR from a meta-analysis of 5 studies-including Aus-ALL-was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.73-0.94). Vitamin supplementation in pregnancy may protect against childhood ALL, but this effect is unlikely to be large or, if real, specifically due to folate.

  17. Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

  18. Maternal TSH level and TPOAb status in early pregnancy and their relationship to the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hao; Tang, Yu-Ping; Bao, Yi-Rong; Su, Xiu-Juan; Cai, XueYa; Li, Yu-Hong; Wang, De-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is common in pregnant women and often related to adverse pregnancy outcomes, but its relationship with gestational diabetes remains controversial. In particular, the impact of thyroperoxidase antibodies status on the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and gestational diabetes is not clear. We investigated the association between combined thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and thyroperoxidase antibodies status in early pregnancy (<20 weeks of gestation) and gestational diabetes mellitus. A total of 7084 pregnant women met the inclusion criteria, which included thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(+)] (n = 78), thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(-)] (n = 281), thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(+)] (n = 648), and thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(-)] (n = 6077). Of the 7084 cases included in our study, 1141 cases were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in TSH(N)TPOAb(-), TSH(H)TPOAb(-), TSH(N)TPOAb(+), and TSH(H)TPOAb(+) was 14.65, 19.57, 24.85, and 46.15 %, respectively. Compared with TSH(N)TPOAb(-) women, the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus was increased in all other groups of women in early pregnancy. After dividing early pregnancy into first and second trimesters, we found that TSH(H)TPOAb(-) women in the first trimester do not show this increase. Our study suggests that subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  19. A longitudinal study on emotional dysregulation and obesity risk: From pregnancy to 3 years of age of the baby.

    PubMed

    de Campora, Gaia; Larciprete, Giovanni; Delogu, Anna Maria; Meldolesi, Cristina; Giromini, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Some recent findings indicate that maternal sensitivity and emotional regulation may play a key role in predicting the risk for obesity of the child in early ages. The current article describes a longitudinal study encompassing more than 50 women, across a time-span that currently goes from pregnancy (n = 65) to three years of age of the baby (n = 53). In a previous report on our ongoing research project, we showed that emotional regulation during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy BMI significantly predicted the quality of the early, dyadic feeding interactions, at 7 months of age of the baby. The current study confirmed and extended those findings, by showing that maternal emotional dysregulation (r = .355, p = .009) and pre-pregnancy BMI (r = .389, p = .004) predicted the BMI of the child at three years of age too, with a medium to large effect size. However, neither maternal emotional regulation nor pre-pregnancy BMI significantly predicted infant attachment at one year of age.

  20. Prevalence and Predictors of Alcohol Consumption during Pregnancy in South-Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwuka, Chidinma Ifechi; Dim, Cyril Chukwudi; Menuba, Ifeanyi Emmanuel; Iloghalu, Emeka Ifeanyi; Onwuka, Chidozie Ifechi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a major public health problem because of the enormous deleterious effects on a developing fetus. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is among the highest per capita rates of alcohol consumption in the world, thus suggesting a high burden of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD) in the sub-region. Despite this, there is limited data on alcohol exposed pregnancies for most SSA countries including Nigeria. Aim To determine the prevalence and predictors of alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Enugu, South-Eastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods It was a cross-sectional study of 380 consecutive consenting parturients accessing antenatal care at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. The information sought for, included the women’s socio-demographic characteristics, alcohol use in pregnancy, awareness of the harmful effects of alcohol on the babies including FASD, sources of initial information on awareness, type and quantity of alcohol ingested, reasons for taking alcohol and willingness to stop alcohol ingestion in pregnancy after counseling on the risk of alcohol use in pregnancy. Statistical analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The prevalence of alcohol consumption in pregnancy was 22.6%. The most common brand of alcoholic beverage consumed was stout beer (62.8%, 54/86). A total of 135 (35.5%) respondents were aware that alcohol is harmful to the fetus. Maternal age 30 years or less, nulliparity, less than tertiary education, pre-pregnancy alcohol consumption and lack of awareness of the harmful effect of alcohol on the fetus, were associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy (p< 0.05). Conclusion The prevalence of alcohol consumption during pregnancy among women in Enugu, South-Eastern Nigeria is high and lack of awareness of harmful effect of alcohol on fetus was a major

  1. Early pregnancy levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein a and the risk of intrauterine growth restriction, premature birth, preeclampsia, and stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon C S; Stenhouse, Emily J; Crossley, Jennifer A; Aitken, David A; Cameron, Alan D; Connor, J Michael

    2002-04-01

    The risk of adverse perinatal outcome among 8839 women recruited to a multicenter, prospective cohort study was related to maternal circulating concentrations of trophoblast-derived proteins at 8-14 wk gestation. Women with a pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in the lowest fifth percentile at 8-14 wk gestation had an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction [adjusted odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.0-4.1], extremely premature delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.5), moderately premature delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.5), preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.3), and stillbirth (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2-11.0). The strengths of the associations were similar when the test was performed before 13 wk gestation or between 13 and 14 wk gestation. In contrast, levels of free beta-human CG, another circulating protein synthesized by the syncytiotrophoblast, were not predictive of later outcome in multivariate analysis. PAPP-A has been identified as a protease specific for IGF binding proteins. We conclude that control of the IGF system in the first and early second trimester trophoblast may have a key role in determining subsequent pregnancy outcome.

  2. Calcium supplementation reducing the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and related problems: A meta-analysis of multicentre randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    An, Li-bin; Li, Wen-tao; Xie, Tie-nan; Peng, Xin; Li, Bo; Xie, Shu-hong; Xu, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-hua; Guo, Shao-ning

    2015-05-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are closely related to maternal mortality and morbidity. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy seems to reduce the risk of hypertensive disorders. No systematic review on multicentre RCTs of calcium supplementation during pregnancy has been published. The purpose of this study was to report a quantitative systematic review of the effectiveness of calcium supplementation during pregnancy on reducing the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and related problems. Publications over the years of 1991-2012 were searched through PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Science. The literatures were selected of the multicentre RCTs on calcium supplementation during pregnancy in prevention of hypertensive disorders and related problems. Reference lists from the studies were also examined for additional references. Studies were critically appraised by three independent reviewers, and the Cochrane Handbook was used to assess the quality of those included trials. Four studies were included in this systematic review. All included studies were high quality, with low risk of bias. There was an observed risk reduction in hypertension in calcium group. However, there was no reduction in the risk of severe gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, severe pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and low birthweight. Calcium supplementation appears to reduce the risk of hypertension in pregnancy.

  3. Parental pre‐pregnancy BMI is a dominant early‐life risk factor influencing BMI of offspring in adulthood.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, S. R.; Marsh, J. A.; Newnham, J. P.; Zhu, K.; Atkinson, H. C.; Mountain, J.; Oddy, W. H.; Hughes, I. P.; Harris, M.; Leong, G. M.; Cotterill, A. M.; Sly, P. D.; Pennell, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective We examined parental and early‐life variables in order to identify risk factors for adulthood overweight and obesity in offspring. We report here on the longitudinal prevalence of overweight and obesity in Australian children born between 1989 and 1991 and followed from birth to age 22. Methods Data were analysed on 1355 participants from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, with anthropometry collected during pregnancy, at birth, one year and at three yearly intervals thereafter. Multivariate analyses and cross‐sectional logistic regression quantified the timing and contribution of early‐life risk factors for overweight and obesity in young‐adulthood. Results At five years of age 12.6% of children were overweight and 5.2% were obese. By early adulthood, the prevalence of obesity had increased to 12.8%, whilst overweight remained relatively stable at 14.2% (range from early childhood to adulthood 11–16%). Parental pre‐pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was the strongest determinant of adult offspring BMI. Although rapid first year weight gain was associated with increased offspring BMI, the impact of first year weight‐gain diminished over childhood, whilst the impact of parental BMI increased over time. Conclusions Parental pre‐pregnancy BMI and rapid early‐life weight gain predispose offspring to obesity in adulthood. PMID:27812379

  4. Milk consumption during pregnancy increases birth weight, a risk factor for the development of diseases of civilization.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2015-01-16

    Antenatal dietary lifestyle intervention and nutrition during pregnancy and early postnatal life are important for appropriate lifelong metabolic programming. Epidemiological evidence underlines the crucial role of increased birth weight as a risk factor for the development of chronic diseases of civilization such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. Obstetricians and general practitioners usually recommend milk consumption during pregnancy as a nutrient enriched in valuable proteins and calcium for bone growth. However, milk is not just a simple nutrient, but has been recognized to function as an endocrine signaling system promoting anabolism and postnatal growth by activating the nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1. Moreover, pasteurized cow's milk transfers biologically active exosomal microRNAs into the systemic circulation of the milk consumer apparently affecting more than 11,000 human genes including the mTORC1-signaling pathway. This review provides literature evidence and evidence derived from translational research that milk consumption during pregnancy increases gestational, placental, fetal and birth weight. Increased birth weight is a risk factor for the development of diseases of civilization thus involving key disciplines of medicine. With regard to the presented evidence we suggest that dietary recommendations promoting milk consumption during pregnancy have to be re-evaluated.

  5. Childbirth and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer: The Influence of Pregnancy, Placental, and Birth Characteristics. A Population-Based Swedish Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    authors sought to examine associations between the weight of the placenta and birth weight and mother’s breast cancer risk. This was a population-based...WEIGHT, PLACENTAL FACTORS, *PREGNANCY HORMONES, * BIRTH WEIGHT , PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS, GESTATIONAL AGE, INFANT GENDER, AGE AT FIRST BIRTH, MATERNAL

  6. Factors Associated with Monozygosity in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Pregnancies And Risk of Recurrence Using Linked Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B.; Wantman, Ethan; Stern, Judy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate factors associated with monozygosity (number of fetal heartbeats on early ultrasound greater than number of embryos transferred) and the risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies using a national ART database Design Historical cohort study Setting Clinic-based data Patients 197,327 pregnancies (including 2,824 with evidence of monozygosity) from cycles reported to SART CORS between 2004 and 2010. Adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were computed from logistic regression models. Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Evidence of monozygosity. Results In the univariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with ovulation disorders, donor oocytes, GnRHA suppression, assisted hatching (AZH), and day 5–6 transfer, and decreased with higher FSH doses (≥3,000 IU). In the multivariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with GnRHA suppression, AZH, and decreased with ICSI and higher FSH dose. The interaction showed that although MZ was more likely with day 5–6 embryos, AZH had a minimal nonsignificant effect, whereas in day 2–3 embryos, AZH had a substantial significant effect. Only one woman had a recurrence of monozygosity in a subsequent ART pregnancy, which is consistent with randomness. Conclusions The risk of MZ was higher with fresh day 5–6 embryos, donor oocytes, GnRHA suppression, lower FSH doses, and AZH (particularly with day 2–3 embryos). PMID:24388206

  7. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women. We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed. Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05–1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM. ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM. PMID:27258493

  8. High-risk pregnancy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): a case of ectopic, abdominal pregnancy with birth of a live, term infant, and a case of gestational diabetes complicated by pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Luck, Melissa; Hartley, Deborah; Crispen, Heather M.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Several cases of abdominal pregnancy have been described in nonhuman primates. These previous occurrences have been mummified fetuses found in the abdominal cavity. This report describes a case of abdominal pregnancy in a timed-bred rhesus monkey with delivery of a live term infant. The mother died 14 days later from complications of septic peritonitis. At necropsy, the monkey had an intestinal adenocarcinoma that may have allowed leakage of intestinal contents into the abdomen. The second case of pregnancy complication was a rhesus monkey found to have gestational diabetes that later developed pre-eclampsia. She was treated for 5 days with a regimen similar to that used in women, and a live infant was delivered at day 157 of gestation by Caesarian section. These cases of high-risk pregnancy underscore the value of timed-breeding and careful monitoring of pregnant monkeys and the similarities between pregnancy complications in women and in nonhuman primates. PMID:19490364

  9. Prevalence of domestic violence during pregnancy and related risk factors: a cross-sectional study in southern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Domestic violence during pregnancy is a serious public health issue which threatens maternal and foetal health outcomes. The aim of the study was to explore prevalence of domestic violence among pregnant women in southern Sweden (Scania) and to explore associations with background factors, as symptoms of depression and sense of coherence. Methods This study has a cross-sectional design and is the first part of a longitudinal, cohort study. Inclusion criteria were women ≥ 18 years, registered at antenatal care when pregnant and who understand and write Swedish or English. Questionnaires were collected prospectively at seventeen antenatal care receptions situated in the two cities and six smaller municipalities in Scania. Statistical analyses were done using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, bivariate logistic regression and multiple regression with Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results Study sample included 1939 women. History of violence was reported by 39.5% (n =761) women. Significant differences were obtained between the groups with or without history of violence regarding being single/living apart, unemployment, financial distress, smoking/snuffing, unintended pregnancy as well as history of miscarriage/legalised abortion (p < 0.001). Experience of domestic violence during pregnancy regardless of type or level of abuse was 1.0% (n = 18); history of physical abuse by actual intimate partner was 2.2% (n = 42). History of violence was the strongest risk factor associated with domestic violence during pregnancy, where all women (n = 18) exposed reported history of violence (p < 0.001). Several symptoms of depression (adjusted for low socio-economic status, miscarriage/abortion, single/living apart, lack of sleep, unemployment, age and parity) were associated with a 7.0 fold risk of domestic violence during pregnancy (OR 7.0; 95% CI: 1.9-26.3). Conclusions The reported prevalence of domestic

  10. Increased Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients With Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Liou, Wen-Shiung; Tang, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) may be a major predictor of pregnancy-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, the relationship between PIH and long-term ICH risk is unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the association between PIH and ICH and to identify the predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. PIH patients were divided into gestational hypertension (GH) and preeclampsia groups. The 2 groups were separately compared with matched cohorts of patients without PIH based on age and date of delivery. The occurrence of ICH was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database, 28,346 PIH patients, including 7390 with GH and 20,956 with preeclampsia, were identified. The incidences of ICH were increased in both groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 3.72 in the GH group, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.63–3.81, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 8.21 in the preeclampsia group, 95% CI 8.12–8.31, P < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, according to the results of stratification of follow-up years, both groups were associated with a highest risk of ICH at 1 to 5 years of follow-up (IRR = 11.99, 95% CI 11.16–12.88, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 21.83, 95% CI 21.24–22.44, P < 0.0001, respectively). After adjusting for age, parity, severity of PIH, number of PIH occurrences, gestational age, and comorbidities in the multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model, age ≥30 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, 95% CI 1.27–3.10, P = 0.0026), patients with preeclampsia (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.22–3.90, P = 0.0089), multiple PIH occurrences (HR 4.08, 95% CI 1.85–9.01, P = 0.0005), hypertension (HR 4.51, 95% CI 1.89–10.74, P = 0.0007), and obesity (HR 7.21, 95

  11. Hypertension in Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiovascular Risk in Young Adulthood: Prospective and Sibling Studies in the HUNT Study (Nord-Trøndelag Health Study) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Alsnes, Ingvild V; Vatten, Lars J; Fraser, Abigail; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Romundstad, Pål R; Åsvold, Bjørn O

    2017-04-01

    Women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are at increased lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease. We examined the offspring's cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood and their siblings' cardiovascular risk profile. From the HUNT study (Nord-Trøndelag Health Study) in Norway, 15 778 participants (mean age: 29 years), including 210 sibling groups, were linked to information from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Blood pressure, anthropometry, serum lipids, and C-reactive protein were assessed. Seven hundred and six participants were born after exposure to maternal hypertension in pregnancy: 336 mothers had gestational hypertension, 343 had term preeclampsia, and 27 had preterm preeclampsia. Offspring whose mothers had hypertension in pregnancy had 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure, 1.5 (0.9-2.1) mm Hg higher diastolic blood pressure, 0.66 (0.31-1.01) kg/m(2) higher body mass index, and 1.49 (0.65-2.33) cm wider waist circumference, compared with offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Similar differences were observed for gestational hypertension and term preeclampsia. Term preeclampsia was also associated with higher concentrations of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.14 mmol/L, 0.03-0.25) and triglycerides (0.13 mmol/L, 0.06-0.21). Siblings born after a normotensive pregnancy had nearly identical risk factor levels as siblings born after maternal hypertension. Offspring born after maternal hypertension in pregnancy have a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood than offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Their siblings, born after a normotensive pregnancy, have a similar risk profile, suggesting that shared genes or lifestyle may account for the association, rather than an intrauterine effect. All children of mothers who have experienced hypertension in pregnancy may be at increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Is the Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birth Weight Affected by the Use of Antidepressant Agents during Pregnancy? A Population-Based Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Luca; Monzani, Emiliano; Giaquinto, Carlo; Corrao, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Untreated depression during pregnancy increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in the mother and child. Therefore, specific treatments are required for this population. Objective The study aimed to investigating the effect of antidepressant medication used during pregnancy with reference to the risk of preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). Methods A population-based study was carried out with data provided by the healthcare utilization database of Lombardy, an Italian region with about ten million inhabitants. The study included 384,673 births from 2005 to 2010. Maternal use of antidepressants before and during pregnancy was investigated. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate the association between the use of antidepressants during pregnancy, compared to the non-use or use just before pregnancy, and the prevalence ratio of PTB and LBW. Results Women who used antidepressants during pregnancy had a 20% (95% CI: 10–40%) increased prevalence of both PTB and LBW compared to those who never used antidepressants. There was no evidence that women who used antidepressants during pregnancy had a higher prevalence of the considered outcomes compared to women who used antidepressants before pregnancy, but stopped during pregnancy. Such findings were confirmed by considering separately the effects of SSRIs and other antidepressants together. Conclusions Our findings suggest that depression in itself, rather than antidepressant medication, might be implicated in the causal pathway of PTB and LBW. PMID:27977749

  13. Risks of spontaneously and IVF-conceived singleton and twin pregnancies differ, requiring reassessment of statistical premises favoring elective single embryo transfer (eSET).

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Kushnir, Vitally A; Barad, David H

    2016-05-03

    A published review of the literature by Dutch investigators in 2004 suggested significant outcome differences between spontaneously - and in vitro fertilization (IVF) - conceived singleton and twin pregnancies. Here we review whether later studies between 2004-2015 confirmed these findings. Though methodologies of here reviewed studies varied, and all were retrospective, they overall confirmed results of the 2004 review, and supported significant outcome variances between spontaneously- and IVF-conceived pregnancies: IVF singletons demonstrate significantly poorer and IVF twins significantly better perinatal outcomes than spontaneously conceived singletons and twins, with differences stable over time, and with overall obstetrical outcomes significantly improved. Exaggerations of severe IVF twin risks are likely in the 50 % range, while exaggerations of milder perinatal risks are approximately in 25 % range. Though elective single embryo transfers (eSET) have been confirmed to reduce pregnancy chances, they are, nevertheless, increasingly utilized. eSET, equally unquestionably, however, reduces twin pregnancies. Because twin pregnancies have been alleged to increase outcome risks in comparison to singleton pregnancies, here reported findings should affect the ongoing discussion whether increased twin risks are factual. With no risk excess, eSET significantly reduces IVF pregnancy chances without compensatory benefits and, therefore, is not advisable in IVF, unless patients do not wish to conceive twins or have medical contraindications to conceiving twins.

  14. Association between levonorgestrel emergency contraception and the risk of ectopic pregnancy: a multicenter case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Cheng; Zhao, Wei-Hong; Xi, Xiaowei; Cao, Shu-Jun; Ping, Hua; Qin, Guo-Juan; Cheng, Linan; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Cases of ectopic pregnancy (EP) following levonorgestrel emergency contraception (LNG-EC) failure have been reported continuously, but whether there is an association between EP risk and LNG-EC is unclear. We concluded a case-control study to explore this association by recruiting 2,411 EP patients as case group, and 2,416 women with intrauterine pregnancy and 2,419 non-pregnant women as control groups. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidential intervals (CIs) were calculated and adjusted for potential confounding factors. Previous use of LNG-EC was not correlated with the EP. Compared to women who did not use contraceptives, current use of LNG-EC reduced the risk for intrauterine pregnancy (Adjusted OR [AOR] = 0.20, 95%CI: 0.14–0.27), but did not increase the risk for EP (AOR2 = 1.04, 95%CI: 0.76–1.42). Furthermore, compared to women who did not have further act of intercourse, women with unprotected further act of intercourse were at a higher risk of EP (AOR1 = 2.35, 95%CI: 1.17–4.71), and women with repeated use of LNG-EC for further intercourse during the same cycle was also associated with a higher risk for EP (AOR1 = 3.08, 95%CI: 1.09–8.71; AOR2 = 2.49, 95%CI: 1.00–6.19). A better understanding of the risk of EP following LNG-EC failure can optimize LNG-EC use and thus reduce the risk of EP. PMID:25674909

  15. Vitamin D Status during Pregnancy and the Risk of Subsequent Postpartum Depression: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Nina O.; Strøm, Marin; Boyd, Heather A.; Andersen, Elisabeth W.; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Lundqvist, Marika; Cohen, Arieh; Hougaard, David M.; Melbye, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided evidence of an association between vitamin D insufficiency and depression and other mood disorders, and a role for vitamin D in various brain functions has been suggested. We hypothesized that low vitamin D status during pregnancy might increase the risk of postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of the study was thus to determine whether low vitamin D status during pregnancy was associated with postpartum depression. In a case-control study nested in the Danish National Birth Cohort, we measured late pregnancy serum concentrations of 25[OH]D3 in 605 women with PPD and 875 controls. Odds ratios [OR) for PPD were calculated for six levels of 25[OH]D3. Overall, we found no association between vitamin D concentrations and risk of PPD (p = 0.08). Compared with women with vitamin D concentrations between 50 and 79 nmol/L, the adjusted odds ratios for PPD were 1.35 (95% CI: 0.64; 2.85), 0.83 (CI: 0.50; 1.39) and 1.13 (CI: 0.84; 1.51) among women with vitamin D concentrations < 15 nmol/L, 15–24 nmol/L and 25–49 nmol/L, respectively, and 1.53 (CI: 1.04; 2.26) and 1.89 (CI: 1.06; 3.37) among women with vitamin D concentrations of 80–99 nmol/L and ≥ 100 nmol/L, respectively. In an additional analysis among women with sufficient vitamin D (≥ 50 nmol/L), we observed a significant positive association between vitamin D concentrations and PPD. Our results did not support an association between low maternal vitamin D concentrations during pregnancy and risk of PPD. Instead, an increased risk of PPD was found among women with the highest vitamin D concentrations. PMID:24312237

  16. Is perforation of the appendix a risk factor for tubal infertility and ectopic pregnancy? An appraisal of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Urbach, David R.; Cohen, Marsha M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To critically assess the evidence that appendiceal perforation is a risk factor for subsequent tubal infertility or ectopic pregnancy. Data sources Epidemiologic studies investigating the relationship between appendectomy and infertility or ectopic pregnancy were identified by searching the MEDLINE database from 1966 to 1997. Appropriate citations were also extracted from a manual search of the bibliographies of selected papers. Study selection Twenty-three articles were retrieved. Only 4 presented original data including comparisons to a nonexposed control group and they form the basis for this study. Data extraction Because the raw data or specific techniques of data analysis were not always explicitly described, indices of risk for exposure were extracted from the data as presented and were analysed without attempting to convert them to a common measure. Data synthesis Articles were assessed according to the criteria of the Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group for evaluating articles on harm. Review of the literature yielded estimates of the risk of adverse fertility outcomes ranging from 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 2.5) for ectopic pregnancy after an appendectomy to 4.8 (95% CI 1.5 to 14.9) for tubal infertility from perforation of the appendix. Recall bias, and poor adjustment for confounding variables in some reports, weakened the validity of the studies. Conclusions The methodologic weaknesses of the studies do not permit acceptance of increased risk of tubal pregnancy or infertility as a consequence of perforation of the appendix, so a causal relationship cannot be supported by the data currently available. Only a well-designed case-control study with unbiased ascertainment of exposure and adjustment for confounding variables will provide a definitive answer. PMID:10223070

  17. Gaucher Disease in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... as soon as you learn you are pregnant. Assessing your bone disease before pregnancy or as soon as you find out you’re pregnant is important because pregnancy increases the risk for severe bone pain (bone crisis). Your treatment ...

  18. Folic acid supplementation, dietary folate intake during pregnancy and risk for spontaneous preterm delivery: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health authorities in numerous countries recommend periconceptional folic acid to pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects. The objective of this study was to examine the association of folic acid supplementation during different periods of pregnancy and of dietary folate intake with the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD). Methods The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 65,668 women with singleton pregnancies resulting in live births in 1999–2009 were included. Folic acid supplementation was self-reported from 26 weeks before pregnancy until week 24 during pregnancy. At gestational week 22, the women completed a food frequency questionnaire, which allowed the calculation of their average total folate intake from foods and supplements for the first 4–5 months of pregnancy. Spontaneous PTD was defined as the spontaneous onset of delivery between weeks 22+0 and 36+6 (n = 1,628). Results The median total folate intake was 266 μg/d (interquartile range IQR 154–543) in the overall population and 540 μg/d (IQR 369–651) in the supplement users. Eighty-three percent reported any folic acid supplementation from <8 weeks before to 24 weeks after conception while 42% initiated folic acid supplementation before their pregnancy. Cox regression analysis showed that the amount of folate intake from the diet (hazard ratio HR 1.16; confidence interval CI 0.65-2.08) and from the folic acid supplements (HR 1.04; CI 0.95-1.13) was not significantly associated with the risk of PTD. The initiation of folic acid supplementation more than 8 weeks before conception was associated with an increased risk for PTD (HR 1.19; CI 1.05-1.34) compared to no folic acid supplementation pre-conception. There was no significant association with PTD when supplementation was initiated within 8 weeks pre-conception (HR 1.01; CI 0.88-1.16). All analyses were adjusted for maternal characteristics and

  19. [Risk factors for ectopic pregnancy. Results of a case control study in the Rhone-Alpes region].

    PubMed

    Job-Spira, N; Collet, P; Coste, J; Brémond, A; Laumon, B

    1993-04-01

    A case-control study was conducted in 14 Rhône-Alpes area (France) maternity hospitals to evaluate the role of several risk factors, particularly infectious factors, in ectopic pregnancy. A total of 624 cases and 1,247 controls were compared for sociodemographic characteristics, cigarette smoking, sexual reproductive and surgical histories, and condition of conception. Different risk factors were found to be associated with an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy: pelvic inflammatory disease confirmed by celioscopy (OR = 3.8, 95%, CI = 2.1-6.9), Chlamydia trachomatis seropositivity (OR = 4.6, 95%, CI = 3.4-6.3), cigarette smoking at the time of conception with a dose-related effect (OR = 1.6 to 2.6), prior tubal surgery (OR = 1.8, 95%, CI = 1.0-3.1), prior uterus, surgery (OR = 3.2, 95%, CI = 1.4-7.1), prior ectopic pregnancy (OR = 6.4, 95%, CI = 3.6-11.3), induced conception cycle by clomiphene citrate (OR = 4.5, 95%, CI = 1.7-12.0), endometriosis (OR = 6.7, 95%, CI = 2.6-17.4) and maternal age, with a strong relation after the age of 35. These findings confirm the major role of pelvic inflammatory disease which could explain fifty percent of the cases and the one of cigarette smoking at the time of conception which could explain twenty percent of the cases.

  20. Effects of area and family deprivation on risk factors for teenage pregnancy among 13-15-year-old girls.

    PubMed

    Smith, Debbie M; Elander, James

    2006-11-01

    Information is needed about how the effects of socio-economic deprivation on teenage pregnancy are mediated by proximal risk factors, in order to target area-wide and family interventions more effectively. Using a 2x2 factorial design, we tested the separate and interacting effects of area deprivation and family deprivation on six specific proximal risk factors for teenage pregnancy: early sexual activity, life expectations, knowledge and beliefs about contraceptives, attitude to abortion, beliefs about love, and use of local sexual health services. Data were collected from 201 13-15-year-old girls in deprived and non-deprived families living in deprived and more affluent areas of the United Kingdom. Area deprivation significantly increased early sexual activity, and both area and family deprivation significantly reduced life expectations. Significant interactions between area and family deprivation showed that the impact of living in a deprived area depends to some extent on family circumstances, with implications for targeting different types of intervention. Living in a deprived area increased early sexual activity much more markedly among girls in deprived families, so interventions to reduce early sexual activity could target individually deprived girls living in deprived areas. Living in a more affluent area increased life expectations, but only among girls in non-deprived families, so both area-wide and individually targeted interventions would be needed to raise life expectations among girls most at risk of teenage pregnancy.

  1. INCREASED RISK OF CHILDHOOD BRAIN TUMORS AMONG CHILDREN WHOSE PARENTS HAD FARM-RELATED PESTICIDE EXPOSURES DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Kunkle, Brian; Bae, S.; Singh, K. P.; Roy, D.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors rank second in both incidence and mortality by cancer in children, and they are the leading cause of cancer death in children. Relatively little is known about the etiology of childhood brain tumor (CBT). While there are several studies which link pesticide exposure to increased risk of CBT, findings have been inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis on 15 published epidemiological studies to test that in utero exposure to pesticides may be involved in the development of brain cancer in children. Meta-analysis was performed using the general variance-based method and homogeneity was tested by means of the Q statistic. Summary relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated for childhood brain cancer from (1) paternal exposure to pesticides prior to conception, (2) both maternal and paternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy, (3) maternal exposure during pregnancy to: (a) agricultural and (b) non-agricultural activities, and (4) childhood exposure to: (a) agricultural and (b) nonagricultural activities up to date of diagnosis with CBT. The comparative toxicogenomics database (CTD) was used to identify gene-pesticide-CBT interactions. Findings of meta-analyses revealed a significantly increased risk of CBT among children whose mothers had farm-related exposures during pregnancy (RR=1.48, 95% CI=1.18–1.84). A dose response was recognized when this risk estimate was compared to those for risk of CBT from maternal exposure to non-agricultural pesticides (e.g., home extermination, pest strips) during pregnancy (RR=1.36, 1.10–1.68), and risk of CBT among children exposed to agricultural activities (RR=1.32, 1.04–1.67). Three studies combined for the paternal exposure to pesticides during preconception produced a calculated summary risk estimate of odds ratio (OR) = 2.29 (95% CI: 1.39–3.78). Meta-analysis of five studies of paternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy produced a final calculated summary risk estimate of OR = 1.63 (95

  2. Provision of fertility services for women at increased risk of complications during fertility treatment or pregnancy: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    This opinion addresses the ethics of providing fertility treatment to women at elevated risk from fertility treatment or pregnancy. Providers ethically may treat women at elevated risk provided that they are carefully assessed; that specialists in their medical condition are consulted as appropriate; and that patients are fully informed about risks, benefits, and alternatives, including oocyte and embryo donation, use of a gestational surrogate, not undergoing fertility care, and adoption. Providers also may conclude that the risks are too high for them to treat particular patients ethically; such determinations must be made in a medically objective and unbiased manner and patients must be fully informed of the decision. Counseling of women who wish to initiate fertility treatment with underlying medical conditions that confer increased risk during treatment or pregnancy should incorporate the most current knowledge available, being cognizant of the woman's personal determinants in relation to her reproductive desires. In such a way, both physician and patient will optimize decision making in an ethically sound, patient-supportive context.

  3. THE DERMATOSES OF PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2008-01-01

    The skin changes in pregnancy can be either physiological (hormonal), changes in pre-existing skin diseases or development of new pregnancy specific dermatoses. Pregnancy-specific skin dermatoses include an ill-defined heterogeneous group of pruritic skin eruptions which are seen only in pregnancy. These include atopic eruption of pregnancy, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, pemphigoid gestationis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Atopic eruption of pregnancy is the most common of these disorders. Most skin eruptions resolve postpartum and require only symptomatic treatment. Antepartum surveillance is recommended for patients with pemphigoid gestationis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy as they carry fetal risk. This article deals with the classification, clinical features and treatment of the specific dermatoses of pregnancy. PMID:19882004

  4. Rescue of holoprosencephaly in fetal alcohol-exposed Cdon mutant mice by reduced gene dosage of Ptch1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mingi; Krauss, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a commonly occurring developmental defect in which midline patterning of the forebrain and midface is disrupted. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is required during multiple stages of rostroventral midline development, and heterozygous mutations in SHH pathway components are associated with HPE. However, clinical presentation of HPE is highly variable, and carriers of heterozygous mutations often lack apparent defects. It is therefore thought that such mutations must interact with more common modifiers, genetic and/or environmental. We have modeled this scenario in mice. Cdon mutant mice have a largely subthreshold defect in SHH signaling, rendering them sensitive to a wide spectrum of HPE phenotypes by additional hits that are themselves insufficient to produce HPE, including transient in utero exposure to ethanol. These variable HPE phenotypes may arise in embryos that fail to reach a threshold level of SHH signaling at a specific developmental stage. To provide evidence for this possibility, here we tested the effect of removing one copy of the negative regulator Ptch1 from Cdon(-/-) embryos and compared their response to ethanol with that of Cdon(-/-);Ptch1(+/+) embryos. Ptch1 heterozygosity decreased the penetrance of HPE in this system by >75%. The major effect of reduced Ptch1 gene dosage was on penetrance, as those Cdon(-/-);Ptch1(+/-) embryos that displayed HPE did not show major differences in phenotype from Cdon(-/-);Ptch1(+/+) embryos with ethanol-induced HPE. Our findings are consistent with the notion that even in an etiologically complex model of HPE, the level of SHH pathway activity is rate-limiting. Furthermore, the clinical outcome of an individual carrying a SHH pathway mutation will likely reflect the sum effect of both deleterious and protective modifier alleles and their interaction with non-genetic risk factors like fetal alcohol exposure.

  5. Maternal chronic HBV infection would not increase the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension--results from pregnancy cohort in Liuyang rural China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Tan, Hongzhuan; Li, Xun; Zhou, Shujin; Wen, Shi Wu; Luo, Meiling

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between maternal HBV (hepatitis B virus) infection and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is inconclusive. Few studies have been conducted in rural areas of China. In order to examine the association between maternal chronic HBV infection and risk of PIH in Liuyang rural area China, we enrolled 6,195 eligible pregnant women in 2010-2011 in selected 14 towns of Liuyang on their first prenatal visit to local maternity care unit. A total of 461 subjects (7.44% (95%CI: 6.79%, 8.10%)) were identified with positive HBsAg status (exposed group) and 5734 were non-HBV carriers (unexposed group). Multivariate log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the risk of PIH, gestational hypertension (GH), and preeclampsia (PE) in relation to maternal chronic HBV infection. There are total of 455 subjects diagnosed with PIH (7.34% (95%CI: 6.70%, 7.99%)), including 371 GH (5.99% (95%CI: 5.40%, 6.58%)) and 81 PE (1.31% (95%CI: 1.07%, 1.64%)). The crude risk ratio between PIH, GH, PE and maternal HBV infection were 1.20 (95%CI: 0.88, 1.64), 1.30(95%CI: 0.93, 1.81) and 0.79 (95%CI: 0.32, 1.93), respectively. After adjustment for gravidity history, abortion history, family history of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and family history of hypertension, positive HBsAg status was still not significantly associated with PIH (RR = 1.18, 95%CI: 0.87, 1.62), GH (RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 0.91, 1.78) or PE (RR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.32, 1.95). Additional adjustment for maternal age, marital status, parity history, family history of DM, Body Mass Index at first antenatal visit, folic acid supplementation, smoking status during pregnancy and economic status of living area, multivariate analysis provided similar results. In conclusion, our study found that maternal chronic HBV infection prevalence rate is 7.4% among Liuyang rural area and there is no significant association between maternal HBV infection and the risk of PIH, GH or PE.

  6. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  7. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor for prediction of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women: AngioPred study

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolomeo, Aurélie; Chauleur, Céline; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Chapelle, Céline; Noblot, Edouard; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate if the rate of tissue factor pathway inhibitor during pregnancy and following delivery could be a predictive factor for placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women. Methods This was a prospective multicentre cohort study of 200 patients at a high risk of occurrence or recurrence of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes conducted between June 2008 and October 2010. Measurements of tissue factor pathway inhibitor resistance (normalized ratio) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity were performed for the last 72 patients at 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks of gestation and during the postpartum period. Results Overall, 15 patients presented a placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcome. There was no difference in normalized tissue factor pathway inhibitor ratios between patients with and without placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes during pregnancy and in the post-partum period. Patients with placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes had tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity rates that were significantly higher than those in patients without at as early as 24 weeks of gestation. The same results were observed following delivery. Conclusion Among high-risk women, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity of patients with gestational vascular complications is higher than that in other patients. Hence, these markers could augment a screening strategy that includes an analysis of angiogenic factors as well as clinical and ultrasound imaging with Doppler measurement of the uterine arteries. PMID:28328938

  8. Pregnancy-Associated Risk Factors of Postpartum Breast Cancer in Korea: A Nationwide Health Insurance Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun Joo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Log Young; Park, Geun U.; Oh, Min-Jeong; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Cho, Geum Joon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with postpartum breast cancer have been reported to have a poor prognosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the pregnancy-related risk factors of postpartum breast cancer in Korea. We collected patient data from the Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) for the 2009–2013 period. We evaluated the pregnancy-related risk factors for postpartum breast cancer in two population groups. For Group 1 (women who had given birth during the 2010–2012 period), data on those who were diagnosed with breast cancer from childbirth to 1-year postpartum were extracted. For Group 2, we extracted the data of women who gave birth in 2010 and traced them until December 31, 2013. In Group 1, 1,384,551 deliveries and 317 postpartum breast cancer patients were recorded in Korea between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Women aged ≥35 years (Odds Ratio [OR], 2.003; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.567–2.560) and those who gave birth via cesarean delivery (OR, 1.237; 95% CI, 0.986–1.553) were considered to be at a higher risk for breast cancer. Lower risk was noted in primiparous women (OR, 0.737; 95% CI, 0.585–0.928). In Group 2, the data of 457,924 women who gave birth in 2010 were traced until December 31, 2013. Among them, 655 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer, and age ≥35 years and cesarean delivery were associated with an higher risk of breast cancer, whereas primiparous status was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. In conclusion, older age (≥35 years) and cesarean delivery are significant risk factors for postpartum breast cancer, and primiparous women have a lower risk of developing postpartum breast cancer. PMID:27977789

  9. Psychosocial stress related to the loss of a close relative the year before or during pregnancy and risk of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    László, Krisztina D; Liu, Xiao Qin; Svensson, Tobias; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Obel, Carsten; Vestergaard, Mogens; Cnattingius, Sven

    2013-07-01

    The role of stress in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia has only been investigated in a few studies, and the findings are not conclusive. We analyzed whether maternal bereavement shortly before or during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia. We conducted a cohort study of singleton births in Denmark during 1978-2008 and in Sweden during 1973-2006 (n=4 122 490) by linking national population-based registers. Mothers were considered exposed to bereavement if they lost a parent, a sibling, a partner, or a child the year before or during pregnancy (n=124 553). The risk of preeclampsia was slightly increased for women who lost a close relative during the 6 months before conception (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.23) or during the first trimester of pregnancy (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03-1.29). Exposure during these periods tended to be more closely related to early preeclampsia (delivery before 34 weeks of gestation; OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.12-1.67) than to late preeclampsia (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.20). The strongest association was observed between loss of a child and early preeclampsia when the exposure window was from 6 months before pregnancy until start of second trimester (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.46-6.61). Our results related to timing of exposure suggest that severe stress may influence early placentation. However, the public health implications of our findings are limited in populations with a low prevalence of severe stress exposures.

  10. Dyslipidemia in pregnancy may contribute to increased risk of neural tube defects -a pilot study in north Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Supriya; Arora, Sarika; Trivedi, S S; Singh, Ritu

    2009-04-01

    Neural tube defects are congenital structural abnormalities of the brain and vertebral column resulting from improper or non-timely closure of the neural tube. Prevalence of neural tube defects is reported to be higher among women with diabetes mellitus and obesity. This study was designed to investigate the relation between the presence of dyslipidemia in antenatal patients and the risk of fetal neural tube defects. The present study was an observational, cross-sectional study involving 129 pregnant women in 16 to 18 weeks gestation period. Of these, 80 women had normal pregnancies and 49 were clinically high-risk cases for neural tube defects. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for blood sugar and lipid profile by enzymatic assay and alpha-fetoprotein levels using Enzyme Immunoassay. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) values were converted to Multiples of Median (MoM) appropriate for the gestational age. Based on AFP values, women were labeled as screen negative (AFP <2 MoM, n= 102) and screen positive (AFP > 2 MoM, n =27). Screen positive women were further evaluated by ultrasound and 21 women were found to carry a neural tube defects positive pregnancy. Statistical analysis was done on SPSS software. Body weight of the women showed a significant positive correlation with serum triglycerides, plasma sugar and AFP MoM values. A significant difference was observed in serum cholesterol levels (p= 0.038), triglycerides (p=0.001) and plasma sugar levels (p=0.002) between normal women and those with neural tube defects positive pregnancy. The Odds ratio for neural tube defects risk in dyslipidemic cases was 24.23 (CI 4.73 - 148.60) with a relative risk of 12.12. Dyslipidemia especially hypertriglyceridemia was found to be significantly associated with fetal neural tube defects.

  11. Risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes among Inuit and North American Indian women in Quebec, 1985-97.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Wilkins, Russell; Platt, Robert W; Kramer, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    We used Statistics Canada's linked stillbirth, live birth and infant death files to assess the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes among Inuit and North American Indian vs. other ethnic women in Quebec, 1985-97 (1 125 462 singleton births). Mother tongue was used to define ethnicity, with the largest French language group as the reference. Main outcome measures are adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age (SGA), stillbirth, neonatal and postneonatal death controlled for maternal age, education, marital status, parity, infant sex, community size, and community-level random effects using multilevel logit models. Inuit women had higher risks of preterm birth (AOR = 1.49, 95% CI [1.25, 1.78]) and immaturity-related infant mortality (AOR = 3.03 [1.36, 6.74]), while Indian women did not. Infants of Inuit (AOR = 0.39 [0.31, 0.49]) and Indian (AOR = 0.27 [0.24, 0.31]) women had substantially lower risks of SGA. Elevated risks of stillbirth were observed among Indian women [AOR = 1.53 (1.09, 2.15)], and of postneonatal death among both Inuit (AOR = 4.45 [2.74, 7.22]) and Indian (AOR = 1.86 [1.28, 2.70]) infants. Both Inuit and Indian infants had much higher risks of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and infection-related mortality. Although the absolute risks of adverse outcomes declined from 1985-87 to 1995-97, the relative disparities between aboriginal and non-aboriginal women changed little over this period. We conclude that Inuit and Indian women have different risk profiles for adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that prevention of preterm birth among Inuit women, and of SIDS and infection-related infant mortality in both aboriginal groups, are important targets for future research and intervention.

  12. Young adolescent girls are at high risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa: an observational multicountry study

    PubMed Central

    Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Mackanga, Jean Rodolphe; González, Raquel; Ouedraogo, Smaila; Kakolwa, Mwaka A; Manego, Rella Zoleko; Basra, Arti; Rupérez, María; Cot, Michel; Kabanywany, Abdunoor M; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Agnandji, Seldiji T; Vala, Anifa; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Adegnika, Ayôla A; Sevene, Esperança; Macete, Eusebio; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Aponte, John J; Menéndez, Clara; Ramharter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives One of Africa's most important challenges is to improve maternal and neonatal health. The identification of groups at highest risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes is important for developing and implementing targeted prevention programmes. This study assessed whether young adolescent girls constitute a group at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes among pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. Setting Data were collected prospectively as part of a large randomised controlled clinical trial evaluating intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (NCT00811421—Clinical Trials.gov), conducted between September 2009 and December 2013 in Benin, Gabon, Mozambique and Tanzania. Participants Of 4749 participants, pregnancy outcomes were collected for 4388 deliveries with 4183 live births including 83 multiple gestations. Of 4100 mothers with a singleton live birth delivery, 24% (975/4100) were adolescents (≤19 years of age) and 6% (248/4100) were aged ≤16 years. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes of this predefined analysis were preterm delivery and low birth weight. Results The overall prevalence of low birthweight infants and preterm delivery was 10% (371/3851) and 4% (159/3862), respectively. Mothers aged ≤16 years showed higher risk for the delivery of a low birthweight infant (OR: 1.96; 95% CI 1.35 to 2.83). Similarly, preterm delivery was associated with young maternal age (≤16 years; OR: 2.62; 95% CI 1.59 to 4.30). In a subanalysis restricted to primiparous women: preterm delivery, OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.05 to 8.93; low birth weight, OR: 1.29; 95% CI 0.82 to 2.01. Conclusions Young maternal age increases the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes and it is a stronger predictor for low birth weight and preterm delivery than other established risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa. This finding highlights the need to improve adolescent reproductive health in sub-Saharan Africa. Trial registration number NCT00811421

  13. Pregnancy hypertension and the risk for neuropsychological difficulties across early development: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mark; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Despite documented effects on fetal brain development, little is currently known about the relationship between maternal pregnancy hypertension and child neuropsychological outcomes. This brief report examined the association between maternal hypertension during pregnancy and children's social cognition and executive functioning when children were 18 months, 3 years, and 4.5 years. A community sample of 501 families (23 hypertensive mothers; 478 nonhypertensive) was recruited when children were newborns. Social cognition (including theory of mind [ToM]) and executive functioning (EF) were measured using a battery of age-appropriate standardized and/or observational tasks. Information on pregnancy and prenatal factors were measured via maternal report when children were newborns. After controlling for prenatal and demographic covariates, the presence of hypertension difficulties during pregnancy was associated with all measures of social cognition, ToM, and EF. A secondary analysis comparing the hypertension group (n = 23) to a nonhypertensive matched control group (n = 23) supported the effect of pregnancy hypertension on children's social-cognitive and EF development. Future studies using obstetrical records are encouraged based on these preliminary findings.

  14. Carotid artery elasticity decreases during pregnancy - the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims were to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on carotid artery elasticity and determine the associations between maternal lipids, endothelial function and arterial elasticity during pregnancy. Methods We examined 99 pregnant and 99 matched non-pregnant control women as part of a population-based prospective cohort study. Carotid artery elasticity indexes; carotid artery distensibility (CAD), Young’s elastic modulus (YEM) and stiffness index (SI) as well as brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were assessed using ultrasound; serum lipid levels were also determined. Results SI was 57% and YEM 75% higher and CAD 36% lower in the third trimester group than the corresponding values in the first trimester group. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in women at the end of the pregnancy than at the beginning of pregnancy (P < 0.001) and in controls (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, gestational age was the only independent correlate of arterial elasticity in pregnant women. In controls, age (P ≤ 0.001) and common carotid diameter (P = 0.001-0.029) were associated with SI, YEM and CAD. Conclusions The present study revealed that carotid artery elasticity declined towards the end of the pregnancy; this neither is straight correlating with maternal hyperlipidemia or the diameter of the carotid artery nor is it associated with changes in endothelial function. PMID:24602149

  15. Tobacco and alcohol use during pregnancy and risk of oral clefts. Occupational Exposure and Congenital Malformation Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, C; Cordier, S; Goujard, J; Aymé, S; Bianchi, F; Calzolari, E; De Walle, H E; Knill-Jones, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between maternal tobacco and alcohol consumption during the first trimester of pregnancy and oral clefts. METHODS: Data were derived from a European multicenter case-control study including 161 infants with oral clefts and 1134 control infants. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses showed an increased risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07, 3.04) and an increased risk of cleft palate associated with alcohol consumption (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.02, 5.09). The former risk increased with the number of cigarettes smoked. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides further evidence of the possible role of prevalent environmental exposures such as tobacco and alcohol in the etiology of oral clefts. PMID:10705862

  16. Diastasis recti abdominis during pregnancy and 12 months after childbirth: prevalence, risk factors and report of lumbopelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Hilde, Gunvor; Ellström-Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) is defined as a separation of the 2 muscle bellies of rectus abdominis. To date there is scant knowledge on prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the condition. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of DRA during pregnancy and post partum, presence of possible risk factors, and the occurrence of lumbopelvic pain among women with and without DRA. Methods This prospective cohort study followed 300 first-time pregnant women from pregnancy till 12 months post partum. Data were collected by electronic questionnaire and clinical examinations. DRA was defined as a palpated separation of ≥2 fingerbreadths either 4.5 cm above, at or 4.5 cm below the umbilicus. Women with and without DRA were compared with independent samples Student's t-test and χ2/Fisher exact test, and OR with significance level >0.05. Results Prevalence of DRA was 33.1%, 60.0%, 45.4%, and 32.6% at gestation week 21, 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post partum, respectively. No difference in risk factors was found when comparing women with and without DRA. OR showed a greater likelihood for DRA among women reporting heavy lifting ≥20 times weekly (OR 2.18 95% CI 1.05 to 4.52). There was no difference in reported lumbopelvic pain (p=0.10) in women with and without DRA. Conclusions Prevalence of mild DRA was high both during pregnancy and after childbirth. Women with and without DRA reported the same amount of lumbopelvic pain 12 months post partum. PMID:27324871

  17. [Hypertension and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rosas, Martín; Lomelí, Catalina; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Méndez, Arturo; Férez Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that hypertension in pregnancy is an under recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Compared with women who have had normotensive pregnancies, those who are hypertensive during pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and have a less favorable overall risk profile for CVD years after the affected pregnancies. One factor that might underlie this relationship is that hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia, in particular) and CVD share several common risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes mellitus and renal disease). Alternatively, hypertension in pregnancy could induce long-term metabolic and vascular abnormalities that might increase the overall risk of CVD later in life. In both cases, evidence regarding risk-reduction interventions specific to women who have had hypertensive pregnancies is lacking. While awaiting results of large-scale studies, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy should be screened for during assessment of a woman's overall risk profile for CVD. Women at high risk must be monitored closely for conventional risk factors that are common to both CVD and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and treated according to current evidence-based national guidelines.

  18. Personalized health planning with integrative health coaching to reduce obesity risk among women gaining excess weight during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nancy Y; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2013-07-01

    Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and drug abuse during pregnancy and the risk for orofacial clefts and related abnormalities 1

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; von Kostrisch, Lília Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Negrato, Carlos Antônio; Franzolin, Solange Braga; Trindade, Alceu Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug abuse in mothers of children with orofacial clefts (OFC). Methods: 325 women who had children (0-3y) with clefts were interviewed. Data regarding type of diabetes, use of legal/illegal drugs during pregnancy, waist girth and fasting blood sugar at the first prenatal consult were collected. Results: twenty seven percent of the women had DM, out of these, 89% had gestational DM, 5,5% type 1 DM and 5,5% type 2 DM. The prevalence of DM in mothers of children with OFC was 27%, it is significantly higher than the average Brazilian population which is 7.6% (p<0.01) (OR=4.5, 95%CI=3.5-5.8). Regarding drug abuse during pregnancy, 32% of the mothers used drugs and a significant positive correlation was observed between drug abuse and the occurrence of clefts and other craniofacial anomalies (p=0.028) (OR=2.87; 95%CI=1.1-7.4). Conclusions: DM and drug abuse during pregnancy increases the risk for OFC and related anomalies and early diagnosis of DM and prevention of drug abuse, especially in pregnant women, should be emphasized. PMID:27508899

  20. Effects of Maternal Diet During Pregnancy on the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Behnaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Sadeghi, Homa; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children that can be affected by maternal diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal dietary risk factors of ALL. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Springer Link, Wiley Online, Science Direct, Mosby, ISI Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest, and Scopus from database inception until February 2, 2016. Two reviewers scanned titles, abstracts, and keywords of articles after excluding duplicates. We included case-control studies evaluating the relationship between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood ALL. The search resulted in 2,940 papers, of which 11 full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion in the review and were analyzed. The finding of these studies suggest that maternal diet composed largely of vegetables, fruits, and protein sources before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of ALL in offspring. Maternal alcohol intake had no effect. Nevertheless, inherent limitations of case-control studies like measurement error, random error, recall bias, and selection bias preclude conclusive evidence. Persuading pregnant women to follow a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and protein may reduce the risk of childhood ALL. Avoiding alcohol intake seems prudent.

  1. Qualitative Evaluation of Historical and Relational Factors Influencing Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection Risks in Foster Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Kym R.; Spencer, Renee; Bonnar, Mavis; Coatney, Alexis; Hall, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore how attitudes, norms, behaviors, responses to early life experiences, and protective factors influence pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection risks from the perspectives of current and former foster youth to inform the development of prevention strategies. Methods We conducted semi-structured individual qualitative interviews with a diverse sample of 22 current/former foster youth aged 15–21 years (63% female; average age = 18.6 years). We then used Theoretical Thematic Analysis to systematically analyze the data for key themes related to sexual health in four categories: 1) norms and attitudes, 2) responses to early life experiences, 3) protective factors, and 4) youth-driven intervention ideas. Results Participants reported a range of sexual experience levels, varied sexual orientations, and also reported varied life experiences prior to and during foster care. We detected several norms and attitudes that likely contribute to risks of early pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. These included that one can tell by looking whether a partner is trustworthy or has a sexually transmitted infection, that condoms aren’t necessary with long-term or infrequent partners or if birth control is used, and that teen pregnancy is an inevitable event. With respect to responses to early life experiences, youth frequently described difficulties dealing with strong emotions in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships; many attributed these difficulties to early experiences with biological family members or in foster care. Participants linked emotion regulation difficulties with struggles in trust appraisal, effective communication, and impulsive behaviors. Youth also described a variety of protective factors that they felt helped them prevent sexual risk behaviors or improved their lives in other respects. Finally, participants endorsed factors likely to improve intervention acceptability and efficacy, including an open, non

  2. Postpartum diagnosis demonstrates a high risk for metastasis and merits an expanded definition of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Callihan, Eryn B; Gao, Dexiang; Jindal, Sonali; Lyons, Traci R; Manthey, Elizabeth; Edgerton, Susan; Urquhart, Alexander; Schedin, Pepper; Borges, Virginia F

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies report conflicting data on outcomes of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC). Our aim was to examine the effect of a postpartum diagnosis on maternal prognosis in a young women's breast cancer cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women age ≤45 years, diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 619) during 1981-2011 at the University of Colorado Hospital and The Shaw Cancer Center in Edwards, CO. Breast cancer cases were grouped according to time between giving birth and diagnosis: nulliparous (n = 125), pregnant (n = 24), < 5 years postpartum (n = 136), >5-<10 postpartum (n = 130), and ≥10 years postpartum (n = 147), to examine the clinicopathologic features and the risk of distance recurrence and death. Cases diagnosed after pregnancy, but within five-years postpartum, had an approximate three fold increased risk of distant recurrence (HR 2.80, 95 % CI: 1.12-6.57) and death (HR 2.65, 95 % CI: 1.09-6.42) compared to nulliparous cases. Postpartum cases diagnosed within five years of last childbirth demonstrated a higher five-year distant recurrence probability (31.1 %) and a markedly lower five-year overall survival probability (65.8 %) compared to nulliparous cases (14.8 and 98.0 %, respectively). A diagnosis of breast cancer during the first five-years postpartum confers poorer maternal prognoses after adjustment for biologic subtype, stage, and year of diagnosis. We propose that the definition of PABC should include cases diagnosed up to at least five-years postpartum to better delineate the increased risk imparted by a postpartum diagnosis. Based on emerging preclinical and epidemiologic data, we propose that pregnant and postpartum cases be researched as distinct subsets of PABC to clarify the risk imparted by pregnancy and the events subsequent to pregnancy, such as breast involution, on breast cancer. Further, we highlight the importance of postpartum breast cancer as an area for further research to reduce

  3. Maternal Caffeine Consumption during Pregnancy and Risk of Low Birth Weight: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jongeun; Kim, Rockli; Kim, Yongjoo; Tam, Melanie; Lai, Yizhen; Keum, NaNa; Oldenburg, Catherine Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent conclusions about the effect of caffeine intake during pregnancy on the risk of low birth weight (LBW). We performed a meta-analysis and linear-dose response analysis examining the association between caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of LBW. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles published up to March 2014. Eight cohort and four case-control studies met all inclusion criteria. Using a random-effects model of the twelve studies, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for the risk of LBW comparing the highest versus lowest level of caffeine intake during pregnancy was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.73). Linear dose-response analysis showed that every additional 100 mg of caffeine intake (1 cup of coffee or 2 cups of tea) per day during pregnancy was associated with a 3.0% increase in OR for LBW. There was a moderate level of overall heterogeneity with an I-squared value of 55% (95% CI: 13, 76%), and no evidence of publication bias based on Egger's test (P = 0.20) and the funnel plot. Thus, high caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the risk of LBW, and this risk appears to increase linearly as caffeine intake increases.

  4. Could molecular assessment of calcium metabolism be a useful tool to early screen patients at risk for pre-eclampsia complicated pregnancy? Proposal and rationale.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Saccardi, Carlo; Cosmi, Erich; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    One of the most frequent causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity is represented by hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Women at high risk must be subjected to a more intensive antenatal surveillance and prophylactic treatments. Many genetic risk factors, clinical features and biomarkers have been proposed but none of these seems able to prevent pre-eclampsia onset. English literature review of manuscripts focused on calcium intake and hypertensive disorders during pregnancy was performed. We performed a critical analysis of evidences about maternal calcium metabolism pattern in pregnancy analyzing all possible bias affecting studies. Calcium supplementation seems to give beneficial effects on women with low calcium intake. Some evidence reported that calcium supplementation may drastically reduce the percentage of pre-eclampsia onset consequently improving the neonatal outcome. Starting from this evidence, it is intuitive that investigations on maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy could represent a low cost, large scale tool to screen pregnant women and to identify those at increased risk of pre-eclampsia onset. We propose a biochemical screening of maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy to discriminate patients who potentially may benefit from calcium supplementation. In a second step we propose to randomly allocate the sub-cohort of patients with calcium metabolism disorders in a treatment group (calcium supplementation) or in a control group (placebo) to define if calcium supplementation may represent a dietary mean to reduce pre-eclampsia onset and to improve pregnancy outcome.

  5. Alternative versus standard packages of antenatal care for low-risk pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Carroli, Guillermo; Duley, Lelia; Gates, Simon; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Khan-Neelofur, Dina; Piaggio, Gilda GP

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of visits for antenatal (prenatal) care developed without evidence of how many visits are necessary. The content of each visit also needs evaluation. Objectives To compare the effects of antenatal care programmes with reduced visits for low-risk women with standard care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010), reference lists of articles and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing a reduced number of antenatal visits, with or without goal-oriented care, with standard care. Data collection and analysis Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results We included seven trials (more than 60,000 women): four in high-income countries with individual randomisation; three in low- and middle-income countries with cluster randomisation (clinics as the unit of randomisation). The number of visits for standard care varied, with fewer visits in low- and middle- income country trials. In studies in high-income countries, women in the reduced visits groups, on average, attended between 8.2 and 12 times. In low- and middle- income country trials, many women in the reduced visits group attended on fewer than five occasions, although in these trials the content as well as the number of visits was changed, so as to be more ‘goal oriented’. Perinatal mortality was increased for those randomised to reduced visits rather than standard care, and this difference was borderline for statistical significance (five trials; risk ratio (RR) 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.31). In the subgroup analysis, for high-income countries the number of deaths was small (32/5108), and there was no clear difference between the groups (2 trials; RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.45 to 1.80); for low- and middle-income countries perinatal mortality was significantly higher in the reduced visits group (3 trials RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.01 to 1

  6. [Teenage pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mora-Cancino, María; Hernández-Valencia, Varcelino

    2015-05-01

    In Mexico, 20% of the annual births are presented in women younger than 20 years old. Pregnancy in adolescents puts at risk mother and child health. This risk is major while the woman is younger, especially when the social and economic conditions are not favorable, which is decisive in later psychosocial development. It has been pointed out that the youths with low education, with minor academic and laboral expectations, with low self-esteem and assertiveness, tend to begin early their active sexual life, to use less frequently contraceptives, and in the case of younger women, to be pregnant, with the risk of abortion because they cannot to make the best decision. It is important to take into account the social context and the special characteristics of the family to understand situation of adolescent at risk of pregnancy.

  7. Smoking during Pregnancy Is a Risk Factor for Executive Function Deficits in Preschool-aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Daseking, M.; Petermann, F.; Tischler, T.; Waldmann, H.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Maternal nicotine use during pregnancy has a negative impact on the child. Numerous studies have demonstrated an association between smoking during pregnancy and psychological deficits. This study looks at deficits in executive functioning in preschool-aged children. Methods: The executive functioning of preschool children was assessed by asking parents to complete the parental form of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions – Preschool Version (BRIEF-P, German version). The results for preschool children whose mothers had smoked during pregnancy (n = 71) were compared with those of a control group. In a subsample, parental assessments of children of smokers (n = 42) and non-smokers (n = 27) were complemented by the teacher form of the BRIEF-P (German version), which allowed inter-rater agreement (parents vs. preschool teachers) to be assessed. Results: An increased incidence of executive function deficits was noted in the children of smokers, based on parental assessment. Clinically relevant deficits were particularly evident with regard to inhibition, with inhibitory deficits in children of smokers found to be almost four times higher than in the control group (p = 0.006). Inhibitory deficits were reported both by parents and by preschool teachers. Discussion: The increased percentage of executive function deficits described here, particularly the increased inhibitory deficits, confirms the current state of research on smoking during pregnancy. Poor inhibition or impulse control is a key symptom of ADHD. PMID:25684788

  8. Sexually Transmitted Infections and Unintended Pregnancy: A Longitudinal Analysis of Risk Transmission through Friends and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, David B.; Deptula, Daneen P.; Schoeny, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Data from 1,087 adolescent participants in three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used to examine the effects of peer selection and socialization processes in adolescence on later reports of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and unintended pregnancies. Friends' attitudes and behavior were assessed with…

  9. Mother's pre-pregnancy BMI is an important determinant of adverse cardiometabolic risk in childhood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal adiposity is associated with poor offspring cardiometabolic health. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) on the BMI, body composition and cardiometabolic characteristics of the offspring. Forty offspring of overweight/obese mothers (O-OW) and...

  10. Comparing School-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programming: Mixed Outcomes in an At-Risk State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oman, Roy F.; Merritt, Breanca T.; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a national comprehensive teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) intervention to a national abstinence-only TPP intervention on middle school students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to teen sexual behaviors in a state with high teen birth rates. Methods: Pre- and…

  11. Orphaned and Abused Youth Are Vulnerable to Pregnancy and Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Bogoliubova, Olga; Yorick, Roman V.; Kraft, Joan Marie; Jamieson, Denise J.; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Hillis, Susan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the magnitude and consequences of violence against children for those living outside family care. We sought to estimate the frequency of childhood abuse and examine its association with lifetime pregnancy involvement (LPI) and past year suicide ideation among orphaned youth. Methods: We analyzed data collected via…

  12. Violence and Pregnancy: Are Pregnant Women at Greater Risk of Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Examined data from Second National Family Violence Survey. Found women under age 25 to be more likely than older women to be both pregnant and to be hit and abused by husbands and partners. Although pregnant women were not particularly vulnerable group, pregnancy did not insulate them from high rates of violence experienced by young women.…

  13. Hormonal Contraception, Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Risk of HIV Disease Progression Among Zambian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kilembe, William; Haddad, Lisa; Vwalika, Bellington; Lakhi, Shabir; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Mulenga, Joseph; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies suggest that hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and/or breastfeeding may influence rates of HIV disease progression. Methods: From 1994 to 2012, HIV discordant couples recruited at couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing centers in Lusaka were followed 3-monthly. Multivariate survival analyses explored associations between time-varying contraception, pregnancy, and breastfeeding and 2 outcomes among HIV-positive women: (1) time to death and (2) time to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Results: Among 1656 female seropositive, male seronegative couples followed for 3359 person-years (PY), 224 women died [6.7/100 PY; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.8 to 7.6]. After 2003, 290 women initiated ART (14.5/100 PY; 95% CI: 12.9 to 16.2). In a multivariate model of time to death, hormonal implant [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.98] and injectable (aHR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.97) were significantly protective relative to nonhormonal method use, whereas oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use was not (aHR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.57) controlling for baseline HIV disease stage, time-varying pregnancy, time-varying breastfeeding, and year of enrollment. In a multivariate model of time-to-ART initiation, implant was significantly protective (aHR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.95), whereas OCP (aHR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.44 to 1.10) and injectable (aHR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.55 to 1.32) were not relative to nonhormonal method use controlling for variables above, woman's age, and literacy. Pregnancy was not significantly associated with death (aHR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.66) or ART initiation (aHR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.86), whereas breastfeeding was protective for death (aHR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.62) and ART initiation (aHR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.85). Conclusions: Hormonal implants and injectables significantly predicted lower mortality; implants were protective for ART initiation. OCPs and pregnancy were not associated with

  14. Body condition and pregnancy in northern Yellowstone elk: evidence for predation risk effects?

    PubMed

    White, P J; Garrott, Robert A; Hamlin, Kenneth L; Cook, Rachel C; Cook, John G; Cunningham, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    S. Creel et al. reported a negative correlation between fecal progesterone concentrations and elk:wolf ratios in greater Yellowstone elk (Cervus elaphus) herds and interpreted this correlation as evidence that pregnancy rates of elk decreased substantially in the presence of wolves (Canis lupus). Apparently, the hypothesized mechanism is that decreased forage intake reduces body condition and either results in elk failing to conceive during the autumn rut or elk losing the fetus during winter. We tested this hypothesis by comparing age-specific body condition (percentage ingesta-free body fat) and pregnancy rates for northern Yellowstone elk, one of the herds sampled by Creel et al., before (1962-1968) and after (2000-2006) wolf restoration using indices developed and calibrated for Rocky Mountain elk. Mean age-adjusted percentage body fat of female elk was similarly high in both periods (9.0%-0.9% pre-wolf; 8.9%-0.8% post-wolf). Estimated pregnancy rates (proportion of females that were pregnant) were 0.91 pre-wolf and 0.87 post-wolf for 4-9 year-old elk (95% CI on difference = -0.15 to 0.03, P = 0.46) and 0.64 pre-wolf and 0.78 post-wolf for elk > 9 years old (95% CI on difference = -0.01 to 0.27, P = 0.06). Thus, there was little evidence in these data to support strong effects of wolf presence on elk pregnancy. We caution that multiple lines of evidence and/or strong validation should be brought to bear before relying on indirect measures of how predators affect pregnancy rates.

  15. Exposure to Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons During Pregnancy and Risk of Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Amy M.; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Lurmann, Fred W.; Yang, Wei; Tager, Ira B.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is an important marker of health and has a prevalence of 12-13% in the U.S. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of organic contaminants that form during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons, such as coal, diesel and gasoline. Studies suggest that exposure to PAHs during pregnancy is related to adverse birth outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between exposure to PAHs during the pregnancy and preterm birth. Methods The study population included births from years 2001-2006 of women whose maternal residence was within 20 km of the primary monitoring site in Fresno, California. Data in the Fresno area were used to form a spatio-temporal model to assign daily exposure to PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings at the maternal residence throughout pregnancy of all of the births in the study area. Gestational age at birth and relevant covariates were extracted from the birth certificate. Results We found an association between PAHs during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy and birth at 20-27 weeks (OR=2.74; 95% CI: 2.24-3.34) comparing the highest quartile to the lower three. The association was consistent when each quartile was compared to the lowest (OR2nd=1.49, 95% CI: 1.08-2.06; OR3rd=2.63, 95% CI:1.93-3.59; OR4th=3.94, 95% CI:3.03-5.12). Inverse associations were also observed for exposure to PAHs during the entire pregnancy and the first trimester and birth at 28-31 weeks and 20-27 weeks. Conclusion An association between PAH exposure during the 6 weeks before delivery and early preterm birth was observed. However, the inverse association with early preterm birth offers an unclear, and potentially complex, inference of these associations. PMID:25282280

  16. Pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Zhang, Cuilin

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Fried foods are frequently consumed in Western countries. However, the health effects of frequent fried food consumption in humans are not well understood. We aimed to prospectively examine the association between pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and risk of incident gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods We included 21,079 singleton pregnancies from 15,027 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort. Since 1991 and every 4 years thereafter, we collected diet information, including consumption of fried foods at home and away from home, using a validated food frequency questionnaire. We used generalised estimating equations with log-binomial models to estimate the RRs and 95% CIs. Results We documented 847 incident GDM pregnancies during 10 years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, parity, dietary and non-dietary factors, the RRs (95% CIs) of GDM among women who consumed total fried foods 1–3, 4–6 and ≥ 7 times/week, compared with those who consumed it less than once/week, were 1.13 (0.97, 1.32), 1.31 (1.08, 1.59) and 2.18 (1.53, 3.09), respectively (p for trend < 0.001). The association persisted after further adjustment for BMI (p for trend = 0.01). When analysed separately, we found a significant association of GDM with fried food consumption away from home, but not with fried food consumption at home. Conclusions/interpretation Frequent fried food consumption, particularly away from home, was significantly associated with a greater risk of incident GDM. Our study indicates potential benefits of limiting fried food consumption in the prevention of GDM in women of reproductive age. PMID:25303998

  17. Mother’s Pre-pregnancy BMI is an Important Determinant of Adverse Cardiometabolic Risk in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hong Chang; Roberts, James; Catov, Janet; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Shypailo, Roman; Bacha, Fida

    2015-01-01

    Objective Maternal adiposity is associated with poor offspring cardiometabolic health. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) on the BMI, body composition and cardiometabolic characteristics of the offspring. Methods Forty offspring of overweight/obese mothers (O-OW) and 28 offspring of normal weight mothers (O-NW) underwent evaluation of body composition, abdominal fat distribution, blood pressure measurement, fasting lipids and an oral glucose tolerance test. The anthropometric and cardiometabolic characteristics of O-OW were compared to those of O-NW, and the relationship to maternal BMI was evaluated. Results Subjects (mean age 12.6±0.4, Female 52.9%) had similar gestational age, birth weight, age, gender, and Tanner stage. However, O-OW had a significantly higher BMI (24.4±1.2 vs. 19.7±0.8 kg/m2p=0.001), % body fat (31.7± 1.6 vs. 24.6±1.1 %, p<0.001), visceral fat (41.9±4.7 vs. 26.1±3.9 cm2p=0.012) with no difference in lean body mass compared with O-NW. O-OW had lower whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) with an adverse cardiovascular disease risk profile (higher BP, triglycerides to HDL ratio, hs-CRP and lower HDL). In addition to offspring’s %body fat (β=−0.60, p<0.001), maternal pre-pregnancy BMI (β= −0.19, p=0.046) contributed significantly and independently to the offspring’s WBISI (R2=0.55, p<0.001). Conclusions High pre-pregnancy BMI is an important contributor to excess adiposity, insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disease risk in the offspring during childhood. PMID:25800542

  18. Pregnancy-Related Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Clinical Features, Outcome and Risk Factors of Disease Flares — A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lidan; Wang, Qian; Leng, Xiaomei; Zheng, Wenjie; Zhang, Fengchun; Tang, Fulin; Zhang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features, outcome, and risk factors of disease flares in patients with pregnancy-related lupus (PRL). Methods Medical charts of 155 consecutive PRL inpatients were systematically reviewed, including demographic data, clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, and outcome. Results PRL cases were divided into active (a-PRL) (n = 82, 53.0%) and stable lupus (s-PRL) (n = 73, 47.0%). Compared with nonpregnant active female systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, a-PRL including new-onset lupus (n-PRL) and flare lupus (f-PRL) (n = 41 respectively), had a higher incidence of renal and hematological involvement but less mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal involvement (p<0.05). The incidence of preeclampsia/eclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm birth were significantly higher in a-PRL than in s-PRL (p<0.05). Despite receiving a more vigorous glucocorticoid treatment, a-PRL mothers had a poorer prognosis (p<0.001). Five (6.1%) of them died and 13 (15.9%) developed severe irreversible organ failure, whereas none of these events was observed in the s-PRL group. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that a history of lupus flares and serological activity (hypocomplementemia and/or anti-dsDNA positivity) at the time of conception were associated with lupus flares in PRL mothers. Conclusions SLE patients with a flare history and serological activity at the time of conception were at an increased risk of disease flares during pregnancy and puerperium. a-PRL patients were more prone to renal and hematological involvement, pregnancy complications, and a poorer prognosis despite more vigorous glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:25118692

  19. An exploratory study of ambient air toxics exposure in pregnancy and the risk of neuroblastoma in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S.; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the etiology of neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. In this study, we examined maternal exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy in relation to neuroblastoma in the child. We ascertained all cases of neuroblastoma listed in the California Cancer Registry 1990-2007 that could be linked to a California birth certificate, and controls were selected at random from California birth records. Average air toxics exposures during pregnancy were determined based upon measures from community-based air pollution monitors. The study included 75 cases and 14,602 controls who lived with 5 kilometers of an air pollution monitor, and we additionally examined results for those living within a smaller radius around the monitor (2.5 km). Logistic regression was used to determine the risk of neuroblastoma with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Neuroblastoma risk was increased with higher maternal exposure to carbon tetrachloride (OR=2.65, 95%CI 1.07, 6.53) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.39, 95%CI 1.05, 1.84), particularly indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and dibenz(a,h)anthracene. Hexavalent chromium was associated with neuroblastoma at the 5 km distance (OR=1.32, 95%CI 1.00, 1.74) but not at the 2.5 km distance. This is one of the first studies to report associations between neuroblastoma and these air toxics. PMID:24139061

  20. [Risk factors for the development of venous insufficiency of the lower limbs during pregnancy--part 1].

    PubMed

    Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Kasperczak, Jarosław; Breborowicz, Grzegorz H

    2012-12-01

    The venous system alters its function in pregnancy--the changes are both functional and structural. It becomes particularly vulnerable to the development of venous thrombosis and related complications. These adverse factors acting on the veins in pregnancy include: an increase in circulating blood volume, expansion of the uterus, weight gain, reduced physical activity hormonal changes. The changes in the plasma have a significant impact on the venous system. In pregnancy an increased level of fibrinogen and coagulation factors VII, VIII, IX and X, and von Willenbrand factor can be observed. Smooth muscle relaxation and relaxation of collagen fibers are caused by progesterone and estrogen, and it may result in the development of varicose veins, venous thrombosis and venous insufficiency The relationships between the hormones and the muscle pump efficiency has not been proven as yet. Estrogens cause an increase in the synthesis of coagulation proteins and it may result in the high risk of venous thrombosis and its consequences. Progesterone inhibits smooth muscle contraction, while estrogens cause relaxation and loosening of the bonds between the collagen fibers. The increase in the level of progesterone is of particular importance. It has a relaxing effect on the muscle, resulting in disorders of the vein shrinkage, affecting the increase of their capacity and valvular insufficiency, and valvular edges are not in contact with each other due to the vasodilatation. Estrogens have a similar effect, and additionally it may also cause an impairment in the collagen fibers connection and synthesis. This can result in the formation of telanglectasia without venous hypertension. Estrogens may also affect the synthesis of prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Estradiol inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and stimulates cell migration and secretion of matrix proteins, as well as regeneration of the damaged vessels. Estrogen inhibits the production of cytokines

  1. Physical and Sexual Violence During Pregnancy and After Delivery: A Prospective Multistate Study of Women With or at Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Linda J.; Whitaker, Daniel J.; Royce, Rachel A.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Ethier, Kathleen; Fernandez, M. Isabel

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to describe and compare prevalence rates of and risk factors for violence against women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods. Physical and sexual violence and violence risk factors were assessed during late pregnancy and 6 months postpartum in a prospective study of pregnant women with (n=336) and without (n=298) HIV in 4 US states. Results. Overall, 10.6% of women reported having experienced violence, 8.9% during pregnancy and 4.9% after delivery. Of these women, 61.7% were abused only during their pregnancy, 21.7% were repeatedly abused, and 16.7% were abused only after their delivery. Sexual violence rarely occurred in the absence of physical violence. The strongest predictor of violence was engaging in bartered sex (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=5.54; 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.0, 15.4). Other predictors included frequent changes in residence (adjusted OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.1, 2.2), financial support from family or partners (adjusted OR=0.42; 95% CI=0.2, 0.8), and HIV diagnosis during current pregnancy (adjusted OR=0.30; 95% CI=0.1, 0.7). Conclusions. Women more commonly experienced violence during than after their pregnancy, but violence was best predicted by socioeconomic and behavioral indicators whose influence did not vary over time. PMID:16670222

  2. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  3. Risk factors for unplanned and unwanted teenage pregnancies occurring over two years of follow-up among a cohort of young South African women

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Nicola J.; Jewkes, Rachel K.; Dunkle, Kristin L.; McCarty, Frances; Shai, Nwabisa Jama; Nduna, Mzikazi; Sterk, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Background Although teenage pregnancies in South Africa have declined, the short and longer term health and social consequences are a potential public health concern. This longitudinal study aimed to describe the range of risk and protective factors for incident unwanted and unplanned pregnancies occurring over 2 years of follow-up among a cohort of adolescent women in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. It also investigated the relationship between gender inequality and gender-based violence and subsequent unplanned and unwanted pregnancies among the cohort. Objective Teenage girls, aged 15–18 years (n=19), who were volunteer participants in a cluster randomized controlled trial and who had data from at least one follow-up were included in this analysis. To assess risk and protective factors for incident unwanted or unplanned pregnancies, we constructed multivariate polytomous regression models adjusting for sampling clusters as latent variables. Covariates included age, having a pregnancy prior to baseline, education, time between interviews, study intervention arm, contraceptive use, experience of intimate partner violence, belief that the teenage girl and her boyfriend are mutual main partners, and socioeconomic status. Results Overall, 174 pregnancies occurred over the 2-year follow-up period. Beliefs about relationship control were not associated with unwanted and unplanned pregnancies, nor were experiences of forced first sex or coerced sex under the age of 15. Hormonal contraception was protective against unplanned pregnancies (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.21–0.79); however, using condoms was not protective. Physical abuse (OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.05–2.72) was a risk factor for, and having a pregnancy prior to baseline was protective against an unwanted pregnancy (OR 0.25; 95% CI 0.07–0.80). Higher socioeconomic status was protective for both unplanned and unwanted pregnancies (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.58–0.83 and OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.64–0.96). Believing that the teenage girl

  4. Maternal occupational exposure to asthmogens during pregnancy and risk of asthma in 7-year-old children: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Berit Hvass; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Skadhauge, Lars R; Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Frydenberg, Morten; Schlünssen, Vivi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal exposure to asthmogens during pregnancy is associated with the development of asthma in 7-year-old Danish children, taking atopic status and sex into consideration. Design The study is a prospective follow-up of a birth cohort. Setting and participants A total of 41 724 women and their children from The Danish National Birth Cohort were categorised according to maternal occupational exposure. Exposure information was obtained by combining job title in pregnancy and 18 months after pregnancy with a commonly used asthma Job Exposure Matrix. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was parent-reported asthma among their 7-year-old children in an internet-based questionnaire. Secondary outcome was asthma among the same children with or without atopic dermatitis and among boys and girls, respectively. Results Prenatal exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) agents was borderline associated with asthma in children with OR 1.17 (0.95 to 1.44) for children with atopic dermatitis and 1.10 (0.98 to 1.22) for children without. Maternal postnatal exposure was associated with asthma (OR 1.15 (1.04 to 1.28). After mutual adjustment,postnatal exposure (OR 1.13 (0.99 to 1.29) and the combined effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure (OR 1.34 (1.19 to 1.51)) seem to increase the risk of asthma in children. No significant associations were observed for other prenatal or postnatal exposures. The gender of the child did not modify the aforementioned associations. Conclusions Maternal occupational exposures during pregnancy do not seem to be a substantial risk factor for the development of asthma in 7-year-old children. Maternal prenatal and postnatal exposures to LMW agents may predispose the propensity of the children to develop asthma. Future studies should prioritise the characterisation of the timing of exposure in relation to the birth. PMID:23585388

  5. Association between unintentional injury during pregnancy and excess risk of preterm birth and its neonatal sequelae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiliang; Basso, Olga; Kramer, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    The sequelae of preterm births may differ, depending on whether birth follows an acute event or a chronic condition. In a population-based cohort study of 2,711,645 Canadian hospital deliveries from 2003 to 2012, 3,059 women experienced unintentional injury during pregnancy. We assessed the impact of the acute event on pregnancy outcome and on neonatal complications, such as nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage, respiratory distress syndrome, intubation, and death. We adjusted for maternal age, parity, pregnancy conditions, and (for neonates) gestational age in logistic regression analyses. Injury was significantly associated with fetal mortality and early preterm delivery. For preterm infants born to injured women during the hospitalization for injury versus those born to noninjured women, the adjusted odds ratios were 2.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23, 4.17) for neonatal death, 2.44 (95% CI: 1.76, 3.37) for respiratory distress, 2.20 (95% CI: 1.26, 3.84) for nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.60, 2.96) for intubation, despite more favorable fetal growth in those born to noninjured women (adjusted birth-weight-for-gestational-age z score: 0.154 vs. 0.024, P = 0.041; small-for-gestational-age rate: 4.5% vs. 9.5%, P = 0.001). Our findings suggest that adaptation to the suboptimal intrauterine environment underlying chronic causes of preterm birth may protect preterm infants from adverse sequelae.

  6. [Teenage pregnancy: analysis of risk factors for low birth weight, prematurity and cesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Santos, Nilma Lázara de Almeida Cruz; Costa, Maria Conceição Oliveira; Amaral, Magali Teresópolis Reis; Vieira, Graciete Oliveira; Bacelar, Eloisa Barreto; de Almeida, André Henrique do Vale

    2014-03-01

    The scope of the study was to analyze possible associations between maternal age under 16 years and the weight and gestational age of the newborn child, as well as the occurrence of cesarean delivery. A cross-sectional study was conducted using data of Live Birth Certificates/DN from the National System of Live Births/SINASC in Feira de Santana, State of Bahia, Brazil, in the 2006-2012 period. In the analyses, logistic regression for the odds ratio (OR) and a confidence interval of 95% was used, measuring the strength of association between variables adjusted for confounding factors. Newborns (NB), with low birth weight and underweight, revealed a significant association with maternal age (≤ 16 years) and statistical interaction of inadequate prenatal care and cesarean delivery. In teenage pregnancy under the age of 16 years, cesarean delivery showed a significant association with single marital status (OR 1.24), inadequate prenatal care (OR 1.58) and newborns with low weight (OR 1.34). The data suggest that multiple factors may interfere with the type of delivery and pregnancy outcome of adolescents at an early age, pointing to the importance of investment in policies and actions directed at this group considered highly vulnerable to perinatal and pregnancy complications.

  7. Pregnancy and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Rachel H; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Williamson, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy associated liver diseases affect up to 3% of pregnant women and are the most frequent cause of liver dysfunction in pregnancy. When severe, they are associated with significant morbidity and mortality for both mother and infant. A rapid evaluation to distinguish them from non-pregnancy related liver dysfunction is essential, in order to facilitate appropriate management. Liver disease unrelated to pregnancy can present de novo in pregnancy, or pregnancy can occur in women with preexisting liver pathology (Table 1). Research and subsequent advances in medical care have resulted in improved but still not satisfactory maternal and fetal outcomes. In this review we provide an overview of the liver diseases specific to the pregnant state and an update on their pathogenesis, treatment and outcomes. The risks of pregnancy in women with pre-existent liver pathology is detailed and recent advances in our understanding of specific risks and outcomes are discussed.

  8. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina Cartes, Ramiro; González Araya, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Teen pregnancy is a social problem not resolved in developing and some developed countries. Adolescent fecundity has become the most exact bio-demographic and health indicator of development. In developing countries that are expected to follow the sexual behaviour patterns of developed countries, without offering the levels of education and services for adolescents, the consequences will be adolescent fecundity and STI prevalence increase. The ignorance about sexuality and reproduction both in parents, teachers and adolescents increases the early initiation of coital relations and of unwanted pregnancies. Extreme poverty and being the son or daughter of an adolescent mother are risk factors of repeating the early pregnancy model. The application of predictive risk criteria in pregnant adolescents to facilitate the rational use of Health Services to diminish the maternal and perinatal mortality is discussed as well as the social factors associated with adolescent pregnancy as socioeconomic levels, structure - types and characteristics of the family, early leaving school, schooling after delivery, female employment, lack of sexual education, parental and family attitudes in different periods of adolescent pregnancy, adolescent decisions on pregnancy and children, unstable partner relationship and adoption as an option. Social consequences are analyzed as: incomplete education, more numerous families, difficulties in maternal role, abandonment by the partner, fewer possibilities of having a stable, qualified and well-paid job, greater difficulty in improving their socioeconomic level and less probability of social advancement, lack of protection of the recognition of the child. Finally, based on evidence, some measures that can reduce adverse consequences on adolescent mothers, fathers and their children are suggested.

  9. Pregnancy during Adolescence and Associated Risks: An 8-Year Hospital-Based Cohort Study (2007-2014) in Romania, the Country with the Highest Rate of Teenage Pregnancy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Socolov, Demetra-Gabriela; Iorga, Magdalena; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Ilea, Ciprian; Blidaru, Iolanda; Boiculese, Lucian; Socolov, Razvan-Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To determine pregnancy and delivery outcomes among teenagers. Materials and Methods. An 8-year retrospective comparative hospital-based cohort study is analysing singleton pregnancy comorbidities and delivery parameters of a teenage group under the age of 20 compared with a young adult group 20-24 years of age in a university hospital. Results. Teenage is a risk factor for preterm birth <37 weeks (1.21 [1.08-1.35]), foetal growth restriction (1.34 [1.21-1.48]), episiotomy (1.27 [1.21-1.34]), uterine revision (1.15 [1.06-1.25]), APGAR <7 at 1 min (2.42 [1.21-1.67]), cephalopelvic disproportion (1.26 [1.07-1.48]), and postpartum haemorrhage (1.42 [1.25-1.62]); however, caesarean delivery occurs less frequently in teenagers than in adults (0.75 [0.70-0.80]). The following comorbidities are risk factors for teenage pregnancy (risk ratio [CI 95%]): anaemia (1.13 [1.10-1.17]), low urinary tract infection (1.10 [1.03-1.18]), pediculosis (2.42 [1.90-3.00]), anogenital condyloma (1.50 [1.04-2.17]), and trichomoniasis (1.74 [1.12-2.68]). The risks for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, premature rupture of membranes, and placenta praevia were lower compared with those in the young adult group, respectively, 0.43 (0.26-0.71), 0.90 (0.85-0.96), and 0.29 (0.20-0.41), while the risk for gestational diabetes and preeclampsia were the same in both groups. Conclusion. Considering the high risks for teenage pregnancy, this information should be provided to pregnant adolescent women and their caregivers.

  10. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Vaccines and Pregnancy Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to vaccines may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  11. Methotrexate and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Methotrexate In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to methotrexate may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  12. Depression and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  13. Previous experience of spontaneous or elective abortion and risk for posttraumatic stress and depression during subsequent pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hamama, Lydia; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Sperlich, Mickey; Defever, Erin; Seng, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of elective and spontaneous abortion (EAB/SAB) on mental health during subsequent pregnancy in a sample of women involved in a larger prospective study of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) across the childbearing year (n = 1,581). Women expecting their first baby completed standardized telephone assessments including demographics, trauma history, PTSD, depression, pregnancy wantedness, and religiosity. Fourteen percent (n=221) experienced a prior elective abortion (EAB), 13.1% (n=206) experienced a prior spontaneous abortion (SAB), and 1.4% (n=22) experienced both. Of those women who experienced either an EAB or SAB, 13.9% (n=220) appraised the EAB or SAB experience as having been “a hard time” (i.e., potentially traumatic) and 32.6% (n=132) rated it as their index trauma (i.e., their worst or second worst lifetime exposure). Among the subset of 405 women with prior EAB or SAB, the rate of PTSD during the subsequent pregnancy was 12.6% (n=51), the rate of depression was 16.8% (n=68), and 5.4% (n=22) met criteria for both disorders. History of sexual trauma predicted appraising the experience of EAB or SAB as “a hard time”. Wanting to be pregnant sooner was predictive of appraising the experience of EAB or SAB as the worst or second worst (index) trauma. EAB or SAB was appraised as less traumatic than sexual or medical trauma exposures and conveyed relatively lower risk for PTSD. The patterns of predictors for depression were similar. PMID:20577979

  14. Heterotopic pregnancy in HIV women

    PubMed Central

    Savasi, Valeria; Antonazzo, Patrizio; Personeni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy occurs when intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy are concomitant; overall rate rises from 1/30.000 to 1.5/1000 in assisted reproductive technology pregnancies. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) patients are at increased risk of heterotopic pregnancies due to the greater frequency of assisted reproductive technology and pelvic inflammatory disease. We report the first case of heterotopic pregnancy in HIV woman. PMID:27928504

  15. Vaginal progesterone in risk reduction of preterm birth in women with short cervix in the midtrimester of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Meena

    2012-01-01

    Preterm birth is a major health problem for the neonate, family, country, and society in general. Despite many risk factors being identified for women destined to deliver preterm, short cervical length detected on transvaginal ultrasound is the most plausible, practical and sensitive risk factor for prediction of spontaneous preterm birth. The definition of short cervix has varied in various studies, but most commonly accepted is ≤2.5 cm in the midtrimester of pregnancy, though risk of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) increases as the cervical length decreases. Vaginal progesterone, a naturally occurring steroid hormone, is the most bioavailable form of progesterone for uterine and cervical effects with the fewest side effects. Multiple prospective studies have consistently shown its benefits in decreasing sPTB rate in women with asymptomatic midtrimester short cervix. The safety for mother and fetus, and tolerability of vaginal progesterone, particularly the gel form, is also well established. Vaginal progesterone is a minimally invasive intervention that is not painful and is very safe, with reasonable cost where the benefits (even if argued to be small) clearly outweigh the risks. Thus there should be little hesitation for implementation of universal transvaginal cervical length screening and preventive vaginal progesterone treatment for women with short cervix. PMID:23071418

  16. Family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy: study of a group of adolescent girls and their families in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, S; Naranjo, J; Padilla, M; Gutiérez, R; Lammers, C; Blum, R W

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the study on the family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy among adolescent girls and their families in Quito, Ecuador. The study aimed to identify characteristics within the family associated with adolescent pregnancy. A total of 135 female adolescents (aged 12-19 years) and their families were separately interviewed. 47 were pregnant and attending prenatal care at an inner city hospital in Quito, and 88 were nonpregnant students from schools located within the same geographical area. Results showed that when compared to their pregnant peers, more nonpregnant adolescents lived with their biological parents (p 0.002); they showed higher school performance (p 0.001); and more values and religiosity (p 0.0001). Pregnant adolescents reported lower mother-daughter and father-daughter communication (p 0.02), lesser life satisfaction in general, and more school and economic difficulties (p 0.001). Moreover, they were less likely to find support for their problems in or outside the family (p 0.0001) and showed higher levels of depression (68.8%) and sexual abuse (14.9%). Parental education was higher in the families of nonpregnant adolescents and both parents worked to provide financial support for the family.

  17. Effects of calving season and milk yield on pregnancy risk and income in North Carolina Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Farin, P W; Slenning, B D; Correa, M T; Britt, J H

    1994-07-01

    Effects of season of calving and milk yield and their potential interaction on days from calving to last breeding were investigated using survival analysis and an economic model in 2000 Holstein cows that calved during 1989 and 1990. The final Cox proportional hazards model included lactation number, calving season, and herdmate deviation FCM. The interval from calving to last breeding ranged from 40 to 570 d. Compared with cows that calved in fall, cows that calved in summer were two-thirds as likely to become pregnant. Conversely, cows calving in winter or spring were more likely to become pregnant. Milk yields beyond approximately 8025 kg lowered the risk of pregnancy. The interaction of season and yield was nonsignificant, suggesting that these factors may act independently to affect reproduction. Lower pregnancy rates associated with high yield were detected earlier postpartum than were lower rates associated with calving in summer. Within each season, higher yield offset the lower income over feed costs associated with poorer reproductive performance. Nevertheless, summer calving lowered income over feed costs per cow per year by $98, $2, $176, and $68 for low, medium to low, medium to high, and high yielding cows, respectively.

  18. [Liver diseases and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Plessier, A; Hillaire, S; Delluc, C; Leroux, G; Le Guern, V; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Liver disease can be observed in pregnant women whether or not related to pregnancy. Liver disorders can be revealed by pruritus, vomiting, jaundice or abnormal liver blood tests during pregnancy. These liver manifestations can lead to the diagnosis of liver disease specifically associated to pregnancy as intrahepatic pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, Hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and preeclampsia-induced liver injury. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for other liver diseases coincident with pregnancy as viral hepatitis, thrombosis, drug toxicity or gallstone. Finally, pre-existing liver disease must be taken into account given the risk of fœto-maternal transmission risk as well as the risk of decompensation of underlying cirrhosis secondary to the hemodynamic changes caused by pregnancy. The aim of this revue is to perform an update on the various situations that can be observed, the principles of management of these liver diseases, in order to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  19. Role of calcium supplementation during pregnancy in reducing risk of developing gestational hypertensive disorders: a meta-analysis of studies from developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertension in pregnancy stand alone or with proteinuria is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the world. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that an inverse relationship exists between calcium intake and development of hypertension in pregnancy though the effect varies based on baseline calcium intake and pre-existing risk factors. The purpose of this review was to evaluate preventive effect of calcium supplementation during pregnancy on gestational hypertensive disorders and related maternal and neonatal mortality in developing countries. Methods A literature search was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and WHO regional databases. Data were extracted into a standardized excel sheet. Identified studies were graded based on strengths and limitations of studies. All the included studies were from developing countries. Meta-analyses were generated where data were available from more than one study for an outcome. Primary outcomes were maternal mortality, eclampsia, pre-eclampsia, and severe preeclampsia. Neonatal outcomes like neonatal mortality, preterm birth, small for gestational age and low birth weight were also evaluated. We followed standardized guidelines of Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) to generate estimates of effectiveness of calcium supplementation during pregnancy in reducing maternal and neonatal mortality in developing countries, for inclusion in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Results Data from 10 randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Pooled analysis showed that calcium supplementation during pregnancy was associated with a significant reduction of 45% in risk of gestational hypertension [Relative risk (RR) 0.55; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.36-0.85] and 59% in the risk of pre-eclampsia [RR 0.41; 95 % CI 0.24-0.69] in developing countries. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy was also associated with a significant reduction in neonatal mortality

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Maternal Anxiety in Late Pregnancy in China

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu-ting; Yao, Yan; Dou, Jing; Guo, Xin; Li, Shu-yue; Zhao, Cai-ning; Han, Hong-zhi; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A large number of studies have shown the adverse neonatal outcomes of maternal psychological ill health. Given the potentially high prevalence of antenatal anxiety and few studies performed among Chinese people, the authors wanted to investigate the prevalence of antenatal anxiety and associated factors among pregnant women and to provide scientific basis to reduce prenatal anxiety effectively. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out at the Changchun Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital from January 2015 to march 2015, with 467 participants of at least 38 weeks’ gestation enrolled. Antenatal anxiety was measured using the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). χ2 test and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association of related factors of antenatal anxiety. Results: Among the 467 participants, the prevalence of antenatal anxiety was 20.6% (96 of 467). After adjustment for women’s socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., area, age, household income), multivariate logistical regression analysis revealed that antenatal anxiety showed significant relationship with education level lower than middle school (years ≤ 9), expected natural delivery, anemia during pregnancy, pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome, disharmony in family relationship and life satisfaction. Conclusions: It is important to prevent or reduce antenatal anxiety from occurring by improving the health status of pregnant women and strengthening prenatal-related education and mental intervention. PMID:27153080

  1. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women Practicing Poor Sanitation in Rural India: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Bijaya K.; Baker, Kelly K.; Dutta, Ambarish; Cumming, Oliver; Freeman, Matthew C.; Satpathy, Radhanatha; Das, Bhabani S.; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal sanitation behaviour during pregnancy for birth outcomes remains unclear. Poor sanitation practices can promote infection and induce stress during pregnancy and may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). We aimed to assess whether poor sanitation practices were associated with increased risk of APOs such as preterm birth and low birth weight in a population-based study in rural India. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort of pregnant women (n = 670) in their first trimester of pregnancy was enrolled and followed until birth. Socio-demographic, clinical, and anthropometric factors, along with access to toilets and sanitation practices, were recorded at enrolment (12th week of gestation). A trained community health volunteer conducted home visits to ensure retention in the study and learn about study outcomes during the course of pregnancy. Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals for APOs were estimated by logistic regression models. Of the 667 women who were retained at the end of the study, 58.2% practiced open defecation and 25.7% experienced APOs, including 130 (19.4%) preterm births, 95 (14.2%) births with low birth weight, 11 (1.7%) spontaneous abortions, and six (0.9%) stillbirths. Unadjusted ORs for APOs (OR: 2.53; 95% CI: 1.72–3.71), preterm birth (OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.54–3.62), and low birth weight (OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.24–3.23) were found to be significantly associated with open defecation practices. After adjustment for potential confounders such as maternal socio-demographic and clinical factors, open defecation was still significantly associated with increased odds of APOs (AOR: 2.38; 95% CI: 1.49–3.80) and preterm birth (AOR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.29–3.79) but not low birth weight (AOR: 1.61; 95% CI: 0.94–2.73). The association between APOs and open defecation was independent of poverty and caste. Even though we accounted for several key

  2. Enhancement of "Reducing the Risk" for the 21st Century: Improvement to a Curriculum Developed to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and STI Transmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Cheri; Barbee, Anita P.; Antle, Becky; Christensen, Dana; Archuleta, Adrian; Sar, Bibhuti K.; Karam, Eli; van Zyl, Riaan; Cunningham, Michael R.; Borders, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To ensure that "Reducing the Risk," a successful teen pregnancy prevention education curriculum, remains relevant for today's youth, covers all information youth need to know in order to make better choices, and is delivered in a standardized way, adaptations were made and enhancements were added. This article describes results of a…

  3. The Influence of Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Perceived Susceptibility Patterns on Sexual Risk Reduction for Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershaw, Trace S.; Ethier, Kathleen A.; Milan, Stephanie; Lewis, Jessica B.; Niccolai, Linda M.; Meade, Christina; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2005-01-01

    Risky sexual behavior can lead to pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Our study of 300 adolescent females takes an integrative approach by incorporating these multiple outcomes to assess the influence of risk perceptions on sexual behavior by (1) identifying subgroups of perceived susceptibility…

  4. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  5. Factors associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and perceptions of risk factors among reproductive age women in Soba LGA, Kaduna State 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Aishatu Abubakar; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nguku, Patrick; Sabitu, Kabir; Abubakar, Aisha; Puone, Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maternal mortality defined as deaths due to complications of pregnancy or childbirth remains a public health concern. Although statistics show a decline in maternal mortality ratio from 380 deaths to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births from1990 to 2013, in Sub-Saharan Africa, maternal mortality rates remain unacceptably high. Maternal mortality In Nigeria is currently 560/100,000 live births. This study was conducted to identify the associated risk factors and perceptions of adverse pregnancy outcomes among reproductive age women in Soba local government area (LGA). Methods A 1:1 unmatched case control study with 138 respondents was used. Cases were women aged 15-49 years with a history of adverse pregnancy outcome. Controls: 15-49 years without a history of adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes were: pregnancy induced hypertension and spontaneous abortions. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were taken. Six focus group discussions (FGDs) with grandmothers, mothers and teenagers were used to explore perceptions. Quantitative data was analyzed using Epi-info version 3.5.3. Qualitative data analyzed by thematic approach. Results The median age of cases was: 25 years (Range: 16-44years), Median age of controls: 27 years (Range: 16-43years). Commencement of Antenatal care (ANC) attendance <4months (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.32; 95% CI: 0.12-0.81) and Number of pregnancies ≥4 (AOR: 5.02; 95% CI: 1.97-12.82) were found to be associated with adverse outcomes. Conclusion Risk factors associated with outcomes are multiple pregnancies and delayed commencement of antenatal care. There was poor perception of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We recommended frequent community health talks, early commencement of antenatal and Utilization of Family planning services. PMID:28292074

  6. Combined hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism within the first year following pregnancy. Danish nationwide historical cohort 1995-2009.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J F; Bergholt, T; Nielsen, A K; Paidas, M J; Løkkegaard, E C L

    2014-07-03

    Estimating the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with combined hormonal contraceptives following early terminated pregnancies or birth, a Danish nationwide retrospective cohort observing a one-year follow-up was defined using three unique registries. All Danish women with confirmed pregnancies aged 15-49 during the period of 1995-2009 were included. The main outcomes were relative and absolute risks of first time venous thromboembolism in users as well as non-users of combined hormonal contraceptives. In 985,569 person-years, 598 venous thromboembolisms were recorded. After early terminated pregnancies and births, respectively, 113 and 485 events occurred in 212,552 and 773,017 person-years. After early terminated pregnancies, the crude VTE incidence ratios were similar, and the numbers needed to harm were equal between groups that did or did not use combined hormonal contraceptives throughout the follow-up year. After childbirth, individuals that used combined hormonal contraceptives were more likely than non-users to experience VTE depicted by crude incidence ratios; however, the difference was only significant after 14 weeks. This implied that the numbers needed to harm were lower for those that used compared to those that did not use combined oral contraceptives in the initial 14 weeks postpartum. In conclusion, the use of combined hormonal contraceptives after early terminated pregnancies was not detrimental, but during the puerperal period, they should be used with caution.

  7. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ectopic Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Ectopic Pregnancy Print A A ... lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy usually happens because a fertilized ...

  8. Ectopic pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tubal pregnancy; Cervical pregnancy; Tubal ligation - ectopic pregnancy ... In most pregnancies, the fertilized egg travels through the fallopian tube to the womb (uterus). If the movement of the egg ...

  9. Pregnancy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Home A-Z Health Topics Pregnancy tests Pregnancy tests > A-Z Health Topics Pregnancy test fact ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy tests If you think you may be pregnant , ...

  10. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ectopic Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Ectopic Pregnancy A A A ... lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy usually happens because a fertilized ...

  11. Higher direct bilirubin levels during mid-pregnancy are associated with lower risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoqun; Zhong, Chunrong; Zhou, Xuezhen; Chen, Renjuan; Wu, Jiangyue; Wang, Weiye; Li, Xiating; Ding, Huisi; Guo, Yanfang; Gao, Qin; Hu, Xingwen; Xiong, Guoping; Yang, Xuefeng; Hao, Liping; Xiao, Mei; Yang, Nianhong

    2017-01-01

    Bilirubin concentrations have been recently reported to be negatively associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between bilirubin concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus. In a prospective cohort study, 2969 pregnant women were recruited prior to 16 weeks of gestation and were followed up until delivery. The value of bilirubin was tested and oral glucose tolerance test was conducted to screen gestational diabetes mellitus. The relationship between serum bilirubin concentration and gestational weeks was studied by two-piecewise linear regression. A subsample of 1135 participants with serum bilirubin test during 16-18 weeks gestation was conducted to research the association between serum bilirubin levels and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus by logistic regression. Gestational diabetes mellitus developed in 8.5 % of the participants (223 of 2969). Two-piecewise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the levels of bilirubin decreased with gestational week up to the turning point 23 and after that point, levels of bilirubin were increased slightly. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the relative risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus was lower in the highest tertile of direct bilirubin than that in the lowest tertile (RR 0.60; 95 % CI, 0.35-0.89). The results suggested that women with higher serum direct bilirubin levels during the second trimester of pregnancy have lower risk for development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  12. Maternal Continuing Folic Acid Supplementation after the First Trimester of Pregnancy Increased the Risk of Large-for-Gestational-Age Birth: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sufang; Ge, Xing; Zhu, Beibei; Xuan, Yujie; Huang, Kun; Rutayisire, Erigene; Mao, Leijing; Huang, Sanhuan; Yan, Shuangqin; Tao, Fangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with folic acid (FA) was proven to prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) and was recommended worldwide before and during early pregnancy. However, much less is known regarding the role of FA after the 12th gestational week (GW). This study aimed to investigate the related effects of continued FA supplementation after the first trimester of pregnancy on fetal growth. The study subjects came from the Ma’anshan-Anhui Birth Cohort Study (MABC) that recruited 3474 pregnant women from the city of Ma’anshan in Anhui Province in China during the period of May 2013 to September 2014. The information on use of vitamin and mineral supplements was recorded in different periods (the first/second/third trimester of pregnancy). Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births were live-born infants that were <10th percentile of birth weight, and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) births were live-born infants that were ≥90th percentile of birth weight according to nomograms based on gender and gestational age from the latest standards. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the effects of FA supplement consumption in the second/third trimester of pregnancy on the risk of LGA and SGA. In addition, propensity score analysis was also performed to examine the effects. In this prospective birth cohort study conducted in Chinese women who had taken FA in the first trimester of pregnancy, we found that continued FA supplementation with 400 micrograms/day in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of LGA (RR = 1.98 (1.29, 3.04)). This relation was strong or monotonic after adjusting for maternal age, newborn’s gender, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, maternal education level, smoking, alcohol consumption and calcium supplementation. We did not observe that continuing FA supplementation after the first trimester of pregnancy remarkably decreased the risk of SGA. The propensity score analysis showed similar results. To confirm these

  13. Hypopituitarism and successful pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xue; Yuan, Qing; Yao, Yanni; Li, Zengyan; Zhang, Huiying

    2014-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder characterized by the deficiency of one or more of the hormones secreted by the pituitary gland. Hypopituitarism patients may present the symptoms of amenorrhea, poor pregnancy potential, infertility, and no production of milk after delivery. Successful pregnancy in hypopituitarism patient is rare because hypopituitarism is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, placental abruption, premature birth, and postpartum hemorrhage. Hypopituitarism during pregnancy and perinatal period should be managed carefully. The hormone levels should be restored to normal before pregnancy. GH and HMG-hCG are combined to improve follicular growth and the success rate of pregnancy. Hypopituitary patients must be closely monitored as changes may need to be made to their medications, and serial ultrasound measurements are also necessary for fetal growth assessment. PMID:25663963

  14. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  15. Dietary patterns during pregnancy and the risk of postpartum depression in Japan: the Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hitomi; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Murakami, Kentaro; Hirota, Yoshio

    2011-04-01

    Although several nutrients and foods are suggested to be preventive against postpartum depression, all previous studies have primarily focused on single nutrients or foods. In contrast, studies on dietary patterns, namely the measurement of overall diet by considering the cumulative effects of nutrient, may provide new insights into the influence of diet on postpartum depression. We prospectively examined the association between dietary patterns during pregnancy and the risk of postpartum depression among 865 Japanese women. Diet was assessed with a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary patterns from thirty-three predefined food groups (energy-adjusted food (g/d)) were extracted by factor analysis. Postpartum depression was defined as present when the subjects had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of ≥ 9 at 2-9 months postpartum. A total of 121 women (14·0 %) were classified as having postpartum depression. Three dietary patterns were identified: 'Healthy', 'Western' and 'Japanese' patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, neither the 'Healthy' nor the 'Japanese' pattern was related to the risk of postpartum depression. Compared with the first quartile of the 'Western' pattern, only the second quartile was independently related to a decreased risk of postpartum depression (multivariate OR 0·52, 95 % CI 0·30, 0·93), although no evident exposure-response associations were observed (P for trend = 0·36). The present study failed to substantiate clear associations between dietary patterns and the risk of postpartum depression. Further studies with more accurate measurements are warranted to confirm the relationship between dietary patterns and the risk of postpartum depression.

  16. Ethno-Specific Risk Factors for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Findings from the Born in Bradford Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Tomasina; Prady, Stephanie; Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Downe, Soo; Simpson, Nigel; Pickett, Kate

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Preterm birth (PTB) and small for gestational age (SGA) are major causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Previous studies indicated a range of risk factors associated with these poor outcomes, including maternal psychosocial and economic wellbeing. This paper will explore a range of psycho-social and economic factors in an ethnically diverse population. Methods The UK's Born in Bradford cohort study recruited pregnant women attending a routine antenatal appointment at 26-28 weeks' gestation at the Bradford Royal Infirmary (2007-2010). This analysis includes 9680 women with singleton live births who completed the baseline questionnaire. Data regarding maternal socio-demographic and mental health were recorded. Outcome data were collected prospectively, and analysed using multivariate regression models. The primary outcomes measured were: PTB (<37 weeks' gestation) and SGA (<10th customised centile). Results After adjustment for socio-demographic and medical factors, financial strain was associated with a 45 % increase in PTB (OR 1.45: 95 % CI 1.06-1.98). Contrary to expectation, maternal distress in Pakistani women was negatively associated with SGA (OR 0.65: CI 0.48-0.88). Obesity in White British women was protective for PTB (OR 0.67: CI 0.45-0.98). Previously recognized risk factors, such as smoking in pregnancy and hypertension, were confirmed. Conclusions This study confirms known risk factors for PTB and SGA, along with a new variable of interest, financial strain. It also reveals a difference in the risk factors between ethnicities. In order to develop appropriate targeted preventative strategies to improve perinatal outcome in disadvantaged groups, a greater understanding of ethno-specific risk factors is required.

  17. Mediterranean diet adherence during pregnancy and risk of wheeze and eczema in the first year of life: INMA (Spain) and RHEA (Greece) mother-child cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chatzi, Leda; Garcia, Raquel; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Basterrechea, Mikel; Begiristain, Haizea; Iñiguez, Carmen; Vioque, Jesus; Kogevinas, Manolis; Sunyer, Jordi

    2013-12-14

    Maternal diet during pregnancy might influence the development of childhood allergic disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence during pregnancy on wheeze and eczema in the first year of life in two population-based mother-child cohorts in Spain and Greece. We studied 1771 mother-newborn pairs from the Spanish multi-centre 'INMA' (INfancia y Medio Ambiente) study (Gipuzkoa, Sabadell and Valencia) and 745 pairs from the 'RHEA' study in Crete, Greece. The symptoms of wheeze and eczema were based on the criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Maternal diet during pregnancy was assessed by FFQ and MD adherence was evaluated through an a priori score. Multivariate log-binomial regression models were used to adjust for several confounders in each cohort and summary estimates were obtained by a meta-analysis. MD adherence was not associated with the risk of wheeze and eczema in any cohort, and similar results were identified in the meta-analysis approach. High meat intake (relative risk (RR) 1·22, 95 % CI 1·00, 1·49) and 'processed' meat intake (RR 1·18, 95 % CI 1·02, 1·37) during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of wheeze in the first year of life, while a high intake of dairy products was significantly associated with a decreased risk of infantile wheeze (RR 0·83, 95 % CI 0·72, 0·96). The results of the present study show that high meat intake during pregnancy may increase the risk of wheeze in the first year of life, while a high intake of dairy products may decrease it.

  18. Clinical application of Medical Resonance Therapy Music in high-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, V N

    2000-01-01

    Music is an ancient method for healing. In the year 550 B.C., Pythagoras from Greece developed a concept for the use of music in medicine, esteeming music higher than many other medical treatments. The Medical Resonance Therapy Music (MRT-Music) of the German classical composer and musicologist Peter Huebner is built on this concept of Pythagorean music medicine. Its therapeutic effect may be best explained by the natural phenomenon of resonance between the harmony laws of the microcosm of music and the biological laws of the body. Results received after application of MRT-Music indicate multiple positive effects on the organism of pregnant women both with a healthy pregnancy as with a pathologic one, reducing the rate of premature births very effectively. Furthermore, MRT-Music came out to be an effective method in the complex therapy of late gestoses and a nearly irreplaceable method for preoperative preparation of pregnant woman for caesarean section. It demonstrated a powerful anti-stress effect and allowed to reduce the amount of administered pain-killers to pregnant women by the factor 1.5 to 2.0, thus reducing the negative pharmacological load to the foetus. It furthermore reduced labour time and shortened hospital stay. It helped to create optimal conditions for the course of pregnancy and heightened pain sensitivity threshold by means of improving the functional, hormonal, and psycho-emotional conditions of pregnant and lying-in women. Thus, the labour process became more natural, the delivery non-traumatic, and motherhood more happy and safe.

  19. Interrupting the Inter-Generational Cycle in High Risk Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirtzinger, Ruth; McDermid, Stephanie; Grusec, Joan; Bernardini, Silvia; Quinlan, Kathy; Marshall, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    Describes the creation of a parenting course for high-risk adolescent mothers. This study supports direction away from 'knowledge-only' prevention/interventions with high risk adolescents and advocates the integration of this type of mental health/education parenting course with secondary school health class curricula using selected, trained…

  20. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-01-18

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of antiphospholipid antibodies with thromboses and/or obstetric morbidity. Obstetric morbidity includes recurrent first trimester loss, stillbirth, intrauterine death, preeclam-psia, premature birth and fetal growth restriction. Although current treatment regimens including aspirin and low-molecular weight heparin have improved pregnancy outcomes, 30% of affected women have pregnancy complica-tions. Women with APS are therefore high-risk pregnancies who should be monitored in specialist centres according to international standards.

  1. Management of very high risk pregnancy with secondary anti-phospholipid syndrome and triple positivity to the anti-phospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rose, Hannah L; Ho, Wai Khoon

    2014-11-01

    There is a significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications in women with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). The risk is further heightened in those with previous arterial or venous thromboembolism and so-called 'triple positivity' for anti-phospholipid antibodies (i.e., when lupus anticoagulant, and anti-cardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (anti-β2Gp-I) antibodies are all detected). Management of these cases is extremely difficult and little is available in the medical literature to guide therapy. This report describes the use of regular plasma exchanges (PEx) to bring about a successful pregnancy outcome in a woman with secondary APS and previous recurrent miscarriages. The patient was also anticoagulated with enoxaparin and administered aspirin, prednisolone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine. Through regular PEx and immunomodulation therapy, levels of aCL and anti-β2Gp-I antibodies were monitored and documented to fall as pregnancy progressed. Although the outcome in this case was successful, further experience is required before this regimen can be accepted as the standard of care for these patients at very high risk of pregnancy loss.

  2. Nutrition and multifetal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; Carlson, M

    2000-03-01

    Largely because of assisted reproduction, the rate of multifetal pregnancy is rising rapidly in the United States. Accordingly, dietitians are increasingly being called upon to provide nutrition services for these high-risk pregnancies. This article gives an overview of the incidence of and risks associated with multifetal pregnancy and reviews studies that contribute to our knowledge of nutrition and multifetal pregnancy. Practice guidelines for promoting healthy outcomes based on the best available scientific data are suggested. Guidelines for weight gain for twin and triplet pregnancy, dietary intake, and supplement use are included. Suggested practice guidelines for multifetal pregnancy include a positive rate of weight gain early in pregnancy, the use of prepregnancy weight status to determine total weight gain goals in twin pregnancy, a 50-lb weight gain goal for triplet pregnancy, and higher minimal number of servings of foods from several of the Food Guide Pyramid groups. The need for additional information on the effects of nutritional status on the course and outcome of multifetal pregnancy is critical. Preliminary evidence of the benefits of nutrition services suggests that both the incorporation of dietetics services into care programs and additional research on nutrition and multifetal gestation are warranted.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Risk in Asian Population: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandana

    2016-10-01

    The C677T polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene was implicated to be associated with thrombophilia due to its role in catalyzing the formation of 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate, a co-substrate for the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Several case-control studies were investigated MTHFR C677T polymorphism as risk for recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). These studies rendered contradictory results, some indicating that the polymorphism is associated with the risk of RPL whereas others concluded there is no association. To shed light on these inconclusive findings, a meta-analysis of all available studies published from Asian population relating the C677T polymorphism to the risk of RPL was conducted. The following electronic databases were searched without language restrictions: PubMed, Google Scholars, Elsevier and Springer Link up to December, 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using MetaAnalyst and Mix version 1.7. Meta-analysis results suggested that MTHFR C677T polymorphism contributed to the increased RPL risk in Asian population using all five genetic models (for T vs. C: OR 1.35, 95 % CI 1.09-1.68, p = 0.009; for TT + CT vs. CC: OR 1.44, 95 % CI 1.14-1.82, p = 0.006; for CT vs. CC: OR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.07-1.8, p = 0.01; for TT vs. CC: OR 1.79, 95 % CI 1.23.2.6, p = 0.007; for TT vs. CT + CC: OR 1.61, 95 % CI 1.02-2.56, p = 0.04). In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrates a strong association between the MTHFR C677T variant and RPL in Asian population and raising the importance of the use of folate in its treatment and prevention.

  4. A Prospective Study of Pre-pregnancy Serum Concentrations of Perfluorochemicals and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Maisog, José; Calafat, Antonia M.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Buck Louis, Germaine M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine preconception serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and six other PFCs in relation to gestational diabetes (GDM) risk. DESIGN Prospective cohort with longitudinal follow-up. SETTING 16 counties in Michigan and Texas, 2005-2009. PATIENT(S) Among 501 women recruited upon discontinuing contraception for purposes of becoming pregnant, 258 (51%) became pregnant and were eligible for the study of which 28 (11%) women reported having physician-diagnosed GDM during followup. INTERVENTION(S) None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of GDM associated with each standard deviation (SD) increment of preconception serum PFOA concentrations (ng/mL, log-transformed) and six other PFCs were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking, and parity conditional on gravidity. RESULT(S) Preconception geometric mean (95% CI) PFOA concentrations (in ng/ml) were higher for women with than without GDM (3.94 (3.15-4.93) vs. 3.07 (2.83-3.12), respectively). Each SD increment in PFOA was associated with a 1.87 fold increased GDM risk (adjusted OR (95% CI): 1.86 (1.14, 3.02)). A slightly increased risk associated with each SD increment for the six other PFCs was observed as well (all ORs >1.0; range 1.06-1.27), although the associations were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggested that higher environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOA were significantly associated with an increased GDM risk. If corroborated, these findings may be suggestive of a possible environmental etiology for GDM. PMID:25450302

  5. The Risk Factors That Predict Chronic Hypertension After Delivery in Women With a History of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Won; Park, Sung-Ji; Oh, Soo-Young; Chang, Sung-A; Lee, Sang-Chol; Park, Seung Woo; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) is one of the most important lethal complications in pregnant mothers. It is also associated with the subsequent development of chronic hypertension. The objective of this study was to identify the clinical risk factors of postpartum chronic hypertension in women diagnosed with HDP.Six hundred patients as HDP, who diagnosed and followed-up at least 6 month after delivery, were included in the study. We divided the included subjects in 2 groups based on the development of postpartum chronic hypertension: presenting with the chronic hypertension, "case group" (n = 41) and without chronic hypertension, "control group" (n = 559).Clinical and demographic factors were evaluated. By multiple regression analysis, early onset hypertension with end-organ dysfunction, smoking, higher prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), and comorbidities, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS), were associated with progression to chronic hypertension in the postpartum period. The value of area under the curves (AUC) for the 5 models, that generated to combine the significant factors, increased from 0.645 to 0.831, which indicated improved prediction of progression to the chronic hypertension. Additional multivariate analysis revealed significant specific risk factors.This retrospective single hospital-based study demonstrated that the clinical risk factors, that is early onset hypertension with end-organ dysfunction, smoking, and higher prepregnancy BMI, were significant independent predictors of chronic hypertension in women after delivery. Identification of risk factors allowed us to narrow the subject field for monitoring and managing high blood pressure in the postpartum period.

  6. The legal aspects of the termination of unwanted pregnancies and the risks faced by the medical doctor: a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C

    2003-03-01

    Historical perspective of terminations of unwanted pregnancies in the UK. Moral and ethical considerations imposed by established church's teachings becoming increasingly in conflict with the wishes and expectations of a more secular society. Recognition that illegal abortion was, as a matter of fact available, at great risk to vulnerable girls and women. Eventually public demand and a radical and reforming government led to the current Statutory Framework. Statutory provisions: Offences against the Person Act 1861, Sections 58 and 59; Infant Life Preservation Act 1929 Section 1. Recognition of the limited flexibility allowed by the law in the original restrictive statutory framework. The direction to the jury in July 1938 by Macnaghten J in the case of R. v. Bourne [1939] 1 KB 687, where an eminent obstetrician was acquitted after carrying out an abortion on a young rape victim. Then the modern statutory provisions: Abortion Act 1967, amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. The statutory framework provides for healthcare professionals not to have to take part in terminations if they have a conscientious objection to doing so. While there are still fierce challenges from moral pressure groups when any changes in the detail of the law are proposed--such as reducing the maximum gestation period for a lawful termination--as a whole society seems to have accepted the current law. Issues affecting doctors who consider and provide terminations; current medico-legal problems relating to wanted pregnancies that have been lost by reason of clinical negligence, and unwanted children that have been born by reason of clinical negligence.

  7. Non-occupational physical activity during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth: a meta-analysis of observational and interventional studies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ju; Xun, Pengcheng; Chen, Cheng; Quan, Minghui; Wang, Ru; Liu, Yu; He, Ka

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between non-occupational physical activity (PA) during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth (PTB). By searching PubMed and EMBASE from inception to August 20, 2016, 25 observational studies (18 cohorts and 7 case-controls) and 12 interventional studies were identified. Comparing the highest to the lowest category of leisure-time PA during pregnancy, the pooled relative risk (RR) of PTB was 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.74–0.93] for cohort studies and 0.60 (95% CI = 0.43–0.84) for case-control studies. No overall significant association was found between domestic or commuting PA and the risk of PTB. In addition, PA intervention did not indicate significant beneficial effect on the risk of PTB. Evidence from the observational studies suggested that leisure-time, but not domestic or commuting, PA during pregnancy was inversely associated with the risk of PTB. The findings were not supported by small-scale and short-term interventional studies. Further research with objective measurement on leisure-time PA is warranted. PMID:28327589

  8. Small-area analysis: targeting high-risk areas for adolescent pregnancy prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Gould, J B; Herrchen, B; Pham, T; Bera, S; Brindis, C

    1998-01-01

    Traditional methods of identifying areas in need of adolescent pregnancy prevention programs may overlook small localities with high levels of adolescent childbearing in communities and counties where this is not a universal problem. The present study assessed the potential of a "geomapping" approach based on measurement of the number of births occurring to teens 15-17 years old in each California (US) zip code in 1992-94. A total of 415 zip codes with teen birth rates in excess of the state's 75th percentile cut-off point (62.8 births/1000) were identified. 210 of these zip codes, accounting for 96% of all births to 15-17 year olds in the 75th-percentile zip codes, differed significantly (p 0.01) from the state average of 44.5 births/1000 15-17 year olds. 178 (85%) of these 210 "hot spots" also included birth rates exceeding the third quartile among teens 10-14 and/or 18-19 years old. Panels of local experts reviewed these "hot spots" for accuracy and grouped them into 82 potential project areas on the basis of demographics, geography, and political infrastructure. Although there was substantial variation, localities with the highest teen birth rates tended to be characterized by minority overrepresentation, poverty, and poor prenatal care coverage. In addition to identifying areas with unmet need, this approach encourages community participation in program development.

  9. What Health Problems Can Develop during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Research Goals Activities and Advances ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications ...

  10. Pregnancy during Adolescence and Associated Risks: An 8-Year Hospital-Based Cohort Study (2007–2014) in Romania, the Country with the Highest Rate of Teenage Pregnancy in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Socolov, Demetra-Gabriela; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Ilea, Ciprian; Blidaru, Iolanda; Boiculese, Lucian; Socolov, Razvan-Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To determine pregnancy and delivery outcomes among teenagers. Materials and Methods. An 8-year retrospective comparative hospital-based cohort study is analysing singleton pregnancy comorbidities and delivery parameters of a teenage group under the age of 20 compared with a young adult group 20–24 years of age in a university hospital. Results. Teenage is a risk factor for preterm birth <37 weeks (1.21 [1.08–1.35]), foetal growth restriction (1.34 [1.21–1.48]), episiotomy (1.27 [1.21–1.34]), uterine revision (1.15 [1.06–1.25]), APGAR <7 at 1 min (2.42 [1.21–1.67]), cephalopelvic disproportion (1.26 [1.07–1.48]), and postpartum haemorrhage (1.42 [1.25–1.62]); however, caesarean delivery occurs less frequently in teenagers than in adults (0.75 [0.70–0.80]). The following comorbidities are risk factors for teenage pregnancy (risk ratio [CI 95%]): anaemia (1.13 [1.10–1.17]), low urinary tract infection (1.10 [1.03–1.18]), pediculosis (2.42 [1.90–3.00]), anogenital condyloma (1.50 [1.04–2.17]), and trichomoniasis (1.74 [1.12–2.68]). The risks for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, premature rupture of membranes, and placenta praevia were lower compared with those in the young adult group, respectively, 0.43 (0.26–0.71), 0.90 (0.85–0.96), and 0.29 (0.20–0.41), while the risk for gestational diabetes and preeclampsia were the same in both groups. Conclusion. Considering the high risks for teenage pregnancy, this information should be provided to pregnant adolescent women and their caregivers. PMID:28133615

  11. Maternal Hypertension During Pregnancy and the Risk of Congenital Heart Defects in Offspring: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Anushuya; Lee, Laura J; Mitchell, Laura E; Agopian, A J

    2015-10-01

    Maternal hypertension is common during pregnancy, and multiple studies have reported on an association between maternal hypertension and congenital heart defects (CHDs) in offspring; however, there is variability in the quality of these studies. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on the associations between untreated and treated maternal hypertension and the risk of CHDs, evaluating CHDs overall as well as specific CHD subtypes. A systematic search of peer-reviewed articles published before August 2013 identified 16 studies evaluating the associations between untreated and treated maternal hypertension and CHDs. Summary relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using fixed-effects models and random-effects models. Significant associations were observed between maternal hypertension and overall CHDs, for both treated [RR 2.0; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.5, 2.7] and untreated (RR 1.4; 95 % CI 1.2, 1.7) hypertension, as well as for overall hypertension regardless of treatment status (RR 1.8; 95 % CI 1.5, 2.2). The magnitude of effect was similar for the majority of CHD subtypes evaluated. The effects were also similar among women with hypertension who used one of multiple specific hypertension medications. There was no evidence of publication bias, and our results were robust to several factors considered in sensitivity analyses (e.g., source of exposure data, adjustment for potential confounders, and study design). Maternal hypertension was associated with CHDs. By understanding the specific mechanisms involved, appropriate strategies may be developed to reduce this risk, in order to prevent CHDs.

  12. Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy and risk of autism spectrum disorder in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Man, Kenneth K C; Tong, Henry H Y; Wong, Lisa Y L; Chan, Esther W; Simonoff, Emily; Wong, Ian C K

    2015-02-01

    This study is a critical analysis of the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) exposure during pregnancy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk in children. Electronic databases were searched for observational studies published from January 1946 to June 2014 related to the association between SSRI exposure during pregnancy and ASD in children. Studies relevant to the association between SSRI exposure during pregnancy and ASD in children were extracted and compiled for meta-analysis evaluation. Ninety-five citations were identified and seven observational studies were included. Four case-control studies were eligible for the meta-analysis and two cohort studies were narratively reviewed. The pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios of the case-control studies were 2.13 (95% CI 1.66-2.73) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.47-2.24) respectively. Low heterogeneity was observed between studies. The two population-based cohort studies, utilizing the same Denmark data set, have conflicting results. The findings of this meta-analysis and narrative review support an increased risk of ASD in children of mothers exposed to SSRIs during pregnancy; however, the causality remains to be confirmed.

  13. Pregnancy-induced hypertension and diabetes and the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes hospitalization in the year following delivery.

    PubMed

    Savitz, David A; Danilack, Valery A; Elston, Beth; Lipkind, Heather S

    2014-07-01

    Although pregnancy events predict the long-term risk of chronic disease, little is known about their short-term impact because of the rarity of clinical events. We examined hospital discharge diagnoses linked to birth certificate data in the year following delivery for 849,639 births during 1995-2004 in New York City, New York. Adjusted odds ratios characterized the relationship between pregnancy complications and subsequent hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes. Gestational hypertension was related to heart failure (adjusted odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.5, 4.5). Preeclampsia was related to all of the outcomes considered except type 1 diabetes, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 2.0 to 4.1. Gestational diabetes was strongly related to the risk of subsequent diabetes (for type 1 diabetes, adjusted odds ratio = 40.4, 95% confidence interval: 23.8, 68.5; for type 2 diabetes, adjusted odds ratio = 22.6, 95% confidence interval: 16.9, 30.4) but to no other outcomes. The relationship of pregnancy complications to future chronic disease is apparent as early as the year following delivery. Moreover, elucidating short-term clinical outcomes offers the potential for etiological insights into the relationship between pregnancy events and chronic disease over the life course.

  14. Milk intake during pregnancy is inversely associated with the risk of postpartum depressive symptoms in Japan: the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Okubo, Hitomi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Furukawa, Shinya; Arakawa, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Only one epidemiologic study has investigated the association between dairy product intake during pregnancy and postpartum depressive symptoms. Epidemiologic evidence on the relationships between calcium and vitamin D intake during pregnancy and postpartum depressive symptoms is also lacking. The present prospective study examined these issues in Japan. Study subjects were 1319 women. During pregnancy, dietary intake during the preceding month was assessed using a self-administered diet history questionnaire in the baseline survey. Postpartum depressive symptoms were defined as present when subjects had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of 9 or higher between 3 and 4 months postpartum. Adjustment was made for age, gestation at baseline, region of residence, number of children, family structure, history of depression, family history of depression, job type, education, body mass index, having smoked during pregnancy, cesarean delivery, baby's sex, baby's birth weight, and total energy intake. After adjustment for the confounding factors, compared with milk intake in the lowest quartile, intake levels in the second and fourth quartiles were independently associated with a reduced risk of postpartum depressive symptoms, although the inverse exposure-response relationship was not significant: the adjusted odds ratio between extreme quartiles was 0.51 (95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.93; P for trend = .12). No material relationships were observed between intake of total dairy products, yogurt, cheese, calcium, or vitamin D and the risk of postpartum depressive symptoms. The present prospective cohort study in Japan suggests that higher milk intake during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of postpartum depressive symptoms.

  15. Pregnancy and Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2015-09-01

    The management of lupus nephritis in pregnancy presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for providers. Pregnancy creates a series of physiologic changes in the immune system and kidney that may result in an increased risk of disease flare and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm delivery. Conception should be delayed until disease is in remission to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes. Maternal disease activity and fetal well-being should be monitored closely by an interdisciplinary team, including obstetricians, rheumatologists, and nephrologists throughout pregnancy. Careful attention must be paid to the dosing and potential teratogenicity of medications.

  16. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  17. Maternal Adjustment and Infant Outcome in Medically Defined High-Risk Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Lerman, Maya; Har-Even, Dov; Hod, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    Explored relation of biological and psychosocial risk factors to infant development among pregnant women who had pregestational diabetes, gestational diabetes, or were nondiabetic. Found that infants of diabetic mothers scored lower on the Bayley Scales at 1 year and revealed fewer positive and more negative behaviors than infants of nondiabetic…

  18. Measurement and Associations of Pregnancy Risk Factors with Genetic Influences, Postnatal Environmental Influences, and Toddler Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Hajal, Nastassia; Leve, Leslie D.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Mayes, Linda C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the unique contributions of perinatal risk and genetic and environmental influences on child behavior using data from 561 domestic US adoption triads (birth mothers, adopted child, and adoptive parents). Findings show distinct patterns of associations among genetic (birth mother psychopathology), prenatal (six maternal…

  19. Severe psychosocial stress and heavy cigarette smoking during pregnancy: an examination of the pre- and perinatal risk factors associated with ADHD and Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Maria G; Katsovich, Liliya; Thompson, Nancy; Lin, Haiqun; Kim, Young-Shin; Scahill, Lawrence; Lombroso, Paul J; King, Robert A; Peterson, Bradley S; Leckman, James F

    2010-10-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently diagnosed in children with Tourette syndrome (TS). The basis for this co-occurrence is uncertain. This study aimed to determine if specific pre- and perinatal risk factors, including heavy maternal smoking and severe psychosocial stress during pregnancy, were associated with one or both disorders, or neither. We compared maternal report data on pre- and perinatal risk factors on 222 children between the ages of 7 and 18 years including 45 individuals with TS alone, 52 individuals with ADHD alone, 60 individuals with condition of comorbid TS + ADHD, and 65 unaffected control children. Pre- and perinatal histories as well as psychiatric assessments were performed using standardized questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with the mothers and children. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratio for each variable of interest. Compared to the mothers of unaffected control children, the mothers of children with ADHD alone reported higher rates of heavy smoking (>10 cigarettes per day) during pregnancy and higher levels of severe psychosocial stress during pregnancy (OR = 13.5, p < 0.01 and OR = 6.8, p < 0.002, respectively). The TS + ADHD and the TS alone patients also had higher rates heavy maternal smoking and high levels of psychosocial stress compared to the control children, but these differences failed to reach statistical significance (heavy smoking: OR = 8.5, p < 0.052, OR = 4.6, p < 0.19, respectively; severe psychosocial stress: OR = 3.1, p < 0.07, OR = 2.6, p < 0.11, respectively). Heavy maternal smoking and severe levels psychosocial stress during pregnancy were independently associated with a diagnosis of ADHD. TS patients also had higher rates of these risk factors, but the ORs failed to reach statistical significance. Efforts are needed to reduce the frequency of these risk factors in high-risk populations. Future studies, using genetically sensitive designs, are also needed

  20. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Two Nested Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-05-01

    There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women.We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed.Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05-1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM.ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM.

  1. Poor Vitamin C Status Late in Pregnancy Is Associated with Increased Risk of Complications in Type 1 Diabetic Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, Bente; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin C (vitC) is essential for normal pregnancy and fetal development and poor vitC status has been related to complications of pregnancy. We have previously shown lower vitC status in diabetic women throughout pregnancy compared to that of non-diabetic controls. Here, we evaluate the relationship between vitC status late in diabetic pregnancy in relation to fetal outcome, complications of pregnancy, diabetic characteristics, and glycemic control based on data of 47 women from the same cohort. We found a significant relationship between the maternal vitC level > or ≤ the 50% percentile of 26.6 μmol/L, respectively, and the umbilical cord blood vitC level (mean (SD)): 101.0 μmol/L (16.6) versus 78.5 μmol/L (27.8), p = 0.02; n = 12/16), while no relation to birth weight or Apgar score was observed. Diabetic women with complications of pregnancy had significantly lower vitC levels compared to the women without complications (mean (SD): 24.2 μmol/L (10.6) vs. 34.6 μmol/L (14.4), p = 0.01; n = 19 and 28, respectively) and the subgroup of women (about 28%) characterized by hypovitaminosis C (<23 μmol/L) had an increased relative risk of complications of pregnancy that was 2.4 fold higher than the one found in the group of women with a vitC status above this level (p = 0.02, 95% confidence interval 1.2–4.4). No correlation between diabetic characteristics of the pregnant women and vitC status was observed, while a negative association of maternal vitC with HbA1c at delivery was found at regression analysis (r = −0.39, p < 0.01, n = 46). In conclusion, our results may suggest that hypovitaminosis C in diabetic women is associated with increased risk of complications of pregnancy. PMID:28241487

  2. Preterm birth in the first pregnancy and risk of neonatal death in the second pregnancy: a propensity score-weighted matching approach.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, V E; August, E M; Mogos, M; Naik, E; Garba, M; Sanchez, E; Weldeselasse, H E; Salihu, H M

    2015-01-01

    The study purpose was to assess the relationship between various grades of preterm birth (moderate preterm: 33-36 weeks; severe preterm: 27-32 weeks; extreme preterm: ≤ 26 weeks) in the first pregnancy and neonatal mortality (death within 28 days of birth; early: 0-7 days; late: 8-28 days) in the second pregnancy. Using the Missouri maternally-linked dataset (1989-2005), a population-based, retrospective cohort analysis with propensity score-weighted matching was conducted on mothers with two consecutive singleton live births (n = 310,653 women). Women with a prior preterm birth were more likely to subsequently experience neonatal death. The odds increased in a dose-dependent pattern with ascending severity of the preterm event in the first pregnancy (moderate preterm: AOR = 1.32; 95% CI: 1.10-1.60; severe preterm: AOR = 2.62; 95% CI: 2.01-3.41; extreme preterm: AOR = 5.84; 95% CI: 4.28-7.97; p value for trend < 0.001). However, the pathway for the relationship between prior preterm birth and subsequent neonatal mortality may be the recurrence of preterm birth.

  3. Creatine supplementation during pregnancy: summary of experimental studies suggesting a treatment to improve fetal and neonatal morbidity and reduce mortality in high-risk human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hayley; Ellery, Stacey; Ireland, Zoe; LaRosa, Domenic; Snow, Rodney; Walker, David W

    2014-04-27

    While the use of creatine in human pregnancy is yet to be fully evaluated, its long-term use in healthy adults appears to be safe, and its well documented neuroprotective properties have recently been extended by demonstrations that creatine improves cognitive function in normal and elderly people, and motor skills in sleep-deprived subjects. Creatine has many actions likely to benefit the fetus and newborn, because pregnancy is a state of heightened metabolic activity, and the placenta is a key source of free radicals of oxygen and nitrogen. The multiple benefits of supplementary creatine arise from the fact that the creatine-phosphocreatine [PCr] system has physiologically important roles that include maintenance of intracellular ATP and acid-base balance, post-ischaemic recovery of protein synthesis, cerebral vasodilation, antioxidant actions, and stabilisation of lipid membranes. In the brain, creatine not only reduces lipid peroxidation and improves cerebral perfusion, its interaction with the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor is likely to counteract the effects of glutamate excitotoxicity - actions that may protect the preterm and term fetal brain from the effects of birth hypoxia. In this review we discuss the development of creatine synthesis during fetal life, the transfer of creatine from mother to fetus, and propose that creatine supplementation during pregnancy may have benefits for the fetus and neonate whenever oxidative stress or feto-placental hypoxia arise, as in cases of fetal growth restriction, premature birth, or when parturition is delayed or complicated by oxygen deprivation of the newborn.

  4. Chemotherapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Siew-Fei; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2016-05-01

    Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is uncommon, complicating between 0.02% and 0.1% of all pregnancies. Nonetheless, due to increasing age of childbearing, the incidence of cancer during pregnancy is likely to increase due to higher incidence of several age-dependent malignancies. The most common malignancies include breast cancer, cervical cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma. One of the key challenges in the management of cancer in pregnancy is treating the women with standard chemotherapy regimen, without compromising the safety of the developing foetus. Exposure of chemotherapy in the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, whereas use in the second and third trimesters is associated with intrauterine growth restriction, low birthweight and stillbirth. In this article, we review available data regarding the use of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy, and we summarise the neonatal outcomes, including malformations, perinatal complications and long-term follow-up. In addition, the management plan during pregnancy is also discussed.

  5. Pregnancy in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda Y; Fleming, Nathalie A; Rome, Ellen S

    2012-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a public health issue with significant medical, emotional, and societal consequences for the adolescent mother, her child, and her family. Teenage pregnancies are at higher risk of many adverse outcomes, including preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal and infant mortality. Teen pregnancy and motherhood may have detrimental effects on the teen mother and her child; antenatal and postpartum care need to be adapted to meet the special needs of pregnant adolescents because standard obstetrical environments may not do so. This comprehensive review of adolescent pregnancy will highlight global statistics, factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy, social implications of adolescent pregnancy, obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, and the importance of multidisciplinary antenatal and postnatal care.

  6. Docusate Sodium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Docusate Sodium Friday, 01 April 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to docusate sodium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  7. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. The most common neural tube defect is spina bifida. The general population’s risk for having a baby with a neural tube defect, such as spina bifida (an opening in the spine or brain), is ...

  8. Benzodiazepines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested a higher rate of preterm deliveries and low birth weight in infants when women take benzodiazepines during ... benzodiazepine during breastfeeding, watch your baby for sleepiness, low ... increased risk of birth defects or pregnancy complications is not expected when ...

  9. Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Anesthesia Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy, Childbirth and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery ...

  10. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  11. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Key points Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common and the severity increases as pregnancy progresses. Frequent snoring, older age and high pre-pregnancy body mass index (>25 kg⋅m−2) could be reliable indicators for SDB in early pregnancy. SDB screening tools, including questionnaires, used in the nonpregnant population have poor predictive ability in pregnancy. Accumulating evidence suggests that SDB during pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because several studies failed to adjust for potential maternal confounders and have other study limitations. There are no pregnancy-specific practice guidelines for SDB treatment. Many clinicians and practices follow recommendations for the treatment in the general population. Women with pre-existing SDB might need to be reassessed, particularly after the sixth month of pregnancy, because symptoms can worsen with nasal congestion and weight gain. Educational aims To highlight the prevalence and severity of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in the pregnant population. To inform readers about risk factors for SDB in pregnancy. To explore the impact of SDB on adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, and biological pathways for associated adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. To introduce current management options for SDB in pregnancy, including medical and behavioural approaches. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the

  12. Nutrition, weight gain and eating behavior in pregnancy: a review of experimental evidence for long-term effects on the risk of obesity in offspring.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sarbattama; Carpenter, Arielle H; Hochstadt, Jessica; Huddleston, Juli Y; Kustanovich, Vladimir; Reynolds, Ashley A; Roberts, Susan

    2012-08-20

    Obesity has reached near epidemic proportions in the developed world. As reproductive age women are a part of this trend, the effect of maternal obesity on the developing fetus must be investigated. In this review, we evaluated the experimental evidence relating maternal nutritional status and eating behavior before and during pregnancy on the risk of obesity in the offspring. The studies were compiled and selected based on their methodologies, study design and relevance. The analyzed studies were compiled to quantify, if possible, the relationship between maternal and offspring weight. Descriptive and observational studies were also included if they were seminal in the field. Based on the current data, maternal obesity is a critical factor exacerbating multigenerational obesity. Mechanistic studies, mainly in animals, have identified potential areas for intervention which might limit transmission of adverse risk factors for obesity from mothers to infants during pregnancy.

  13. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    PubMed

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step.

  14. Diabetic nephropathy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common etiology for end-stage renal disease, complicates approximately 5% of insulin-dependent diabetic pregnancies. Assessment for vasculopathy is important before pregnancy because nephropathy can increase perinatal risks including potential for preeclampsia and preterm birth. Counseling women receiving renoprotective medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has recently become complicated in light of new information suggesting a teratogenic risk for these agents. Most reproductive age women with overt diabetic nephropathy have preserved renal function and do not seem to have the progression of their disease affected by pregnancy. Perinatal outcomes are excellent for these women who have received care in tertiary institutions. However, there are relatively few women with significant renal impairment included in case series of pregnancies complicated by diabetic nephropathy. For these women, adverse perinatal outcomes are more common, and the effect of pregnancy on the course of their disease is less certain.

  15. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  16. Placental weight and efficiency in relation to maternal body mass index and the risk of pregnancy complications in women delivering singleton babies.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Horgan, G W; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-08-01

    Herein we report placental weight and efficiency in relation to maternal BMI and the risk of pregnancy complications in 55,105 pregnancies. Adjusted placental weight increased with increasing BMI through underweight, normal, overweight, obese and morbidly obese categories and accordingly underweight women were more likely to experience placental growth restriction [OR 1.69 (95% CI 1.46-1.95)], while placental hypertrophy was more common in overweight, obese and morbidly obese groups [OR 1.59 (95% CI 1.50-1.69), OR 1.97 (95% CI 1.81-2.15) and OR 2.34 (95% CI 2.08-2.63), respectively]. In contrast the ratio of fetal to placental weight (a proxy for placental efficiency) was lower (P < 0.001) in overweight, obese and morbidly obese than in both normal and underweight women which were equivalent. Relative to the middle tertile reference group (mean 622 g), placental weight in the lower tertile (mean 484 g) was associated with a higher risk of pre-eclampsia, induced labour, spontaneous preterm delivery, stillbirth and low birth weight (P < 0.001). Conversely placental weight in the upper tertile (mean 788 g) was associated with a higher risk of caesarean section, post-term delivery and high birth weight (P < 0.001). With respect to assumed placental efficiency a ratio in the lower tertile was associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia, induced labour, caesarean section and spontaneous preterm delivery (P < 0.001) and a ratio in both the lower and higher tertiles was associated with an increased risk of low birth weight (P < 0.001). Placental efficiency was not related to the risk of stillbirth or high birth weight. No interactions between maternal BMI and placental weight tertile were detected suggesting that both abnormal BMI and placental growth are independent risk factors for a range of pregnancy complications.

  17. A case-control study to examine the association between breastfeeding during late pregnancy and risk of a small-for-gestational-age birth in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Rossina G; Marquis, Grace S; Penny, Mary E; Dixon, Philip M

    2015-04-01

    Excessive demands on maternal nutritional status may be a risk factor for poor birth outcomes. This study examined the association between breastfeeding during late pregnancy (≥ 28 weeks) and the risk of having a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) newborn, using a matched case-control design (78 SGA cases: birthweight <10th percentile for gestational age; 150 non-SGA controls: 50th percentile risk of SGA were assessed by their adjusted odds ratios (aOR) from conditional logistic regression. Exposure to an overlap of breastfeeding during late pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of having a SGA newborn [aOR=0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-3.30]. However, increased risk was associated with having a previous low-birthweight birth (aOR=6.53; 95% CI: 1.43-29.70) and a low intake of animal source foods (<25th percentile; aOR=2.26; 95% CI: 1.01-5.04), and tended to be associated with being short (<150 cm; aOR=2.05; 95% CI: 0.92-4.54). This study found no evidence to support the hypothesis that breastfeeding during late pregnancy increases the risk for SGA; however, studies with greater statistical power are needed to definitively examine this possible association and clarify whether there are other risks to the new baby, the toddler and the pregnant woman.

  18. Perceived discrimination during prenatal care, labor, and delivery: an examination of data from the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 1998-1999, 2000, and 2001.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Molly; Thorburn, Sheryl; Zhao, Weiyi

    2008-10-01

    Although recent research has examined discrimination in health care, no studies have investigated women's experiences during prenatal or obstetrical care. Analyses of data from the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System showed that 18.53% of mothers reported discrimination by providers during prenatal care, labor, or delivery, most commonly because of age or insurance status. Perceived discrimination was associated with maternal characteristics such as age, marital status, and type of insurance, but not with number of subsequent well-baby visits.

  19. Influence of Perinatal Depression on Labor-Associated Fear and Emotional Attachment to the Child in High-Risk Pregnancies and the First Days After Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Joanna; Bidzan, Mariola; Smutek, Jerzy; Bidzan, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the level of perinatal depression on the labor-associated fear and emotional attachment of children born to women during high-risk pregnancies and in the first days after delivery. Material/Methods 133 women aged between 16 and 45 years took part in the study. The first group included 63 pregnant women (mean age=28.59, SD=5.578) with a high-risk pregnancy (of maternal origin, for example, cardiologic disorders and diabetes). The second group included 70 women (mean age=27.94, SD=5.164) who were in the first days post-partum. Research methods included: Analysis of medical documentation; Clinical interview; the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS); the Questionnaire of Labor-Associated Anxiety (KLP), the Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS). Results Women after delivery displayed a higher level of concern for the child’s health and life when compared to the high-risk pregnancy group. The results indicated the appearance of a postnatal fear, the level of which is connected with the perception of the role of the mother. This fear is lower in women prior to childbirth than it is after. There has also been noted a statistically significant relationship between the appearance of depression and attachment to the child. Those women with depression show less attachment to their child than is the case for those who do not suffer from depression. Conclusions The appearance of a high level of depression amongst women from the high-risk pregnancy group during the first days post childbirth was accompanied by perinatal depression and a weaker attachment to the child. PMID:27023735

  20. Teenage pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care - teenage pregnancy ... the baby. If you decide to continue the pregnancy, it is important to have good prenatal care. ... trimester is the first 3 months of your pregnancy. During this time, you will have a prenatal ...

  1. Exposure to excess estradiol or leptin during pregnancy increases mammary cancer risk and prevents parity-induced protective genomic changes in rats.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Sonia; Wang, Mingyue; Jin, Lu; Bouker, Kerrie B; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena A

    2013-11-01

    Using a preclinical model, we investigated whether excess estradiol (E2) or leptin during pregnancy affects maternal mammary tumorigenesis in rats initiated by administering carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) on day 50. Two weeks later, rats were mated, and pregnant dams were treated daily with 10 μg of 17β-estradiol, 15 μg of leptin, or vehicle from gestation day 8 to 19. Tumor development was assessed separately during weeks 1 to 12 and 13 to 22 after DMBA administration, because pregnancy is known to induce a transient increase in breast cancer risk, followed by a persistent reduction. Parous rats developed less (32%) mammary tumors than nulliparous rats (59%, P < 0.001), and the majority (93%) of tumors in the parous rats appeared before week 13 (vs. 41% in nulliparous rats), indicating that pregnancy induced a transient increase in breast cancer risk. Parous rats exposed to leptin (final tumor incidence 65%) or E2 (45%) during pregnancy developed mammary tumors throughout the tumor-monitoring period, similar to nulliparous control rats, and the incidence was significantly higher in both the leptin- and E2-exposed dams after week 12 than in the vehicle-exposed parous dams (P < 0.001). The mammary glands of the exposed parous rats contained significantly more proliferating cells (P < 0.001). In addition, the E2- or leptin-treated parous rats did not exhibit the protective genomic signature induced by pregnancy and seen in the parous control rats. Specifically, these rats exhibited downregulation of genes involved in differentiation and immune functions and upregulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  2. Alcohol consumption and other maternal risk factors for fetal alcohol syndrome among three distinct samples of women before, during, and after pregnancy: the risk is relative.

    PubMed

    May, Philip A; Gossage, J Phillip; White-Country, Mary; Goodhart, Karen; Decoteau, Sara; Trujillo, Phyllis M; Kalberg, Wendy O; Viljoen, Denis L; Hoyme, H Eugene

    2004-05-15

    Data were obtained from three samples of women of childbearing age. One sample of women is from prenatal clinics serving Plains Indian women. The second sample is of women from the Plains whose children were referred to special diagnostic developmental clinics, as their children were believed to have developmental issues consistent with prenatal alcohol consumption. The third sample is of women from South Africa, each of whom has given birth to a child diagnosed with full fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Data across samples conform to expected trends on many variables. For example, the maternal age at time of pregnancy, a major risk factor for FAS, ranged from a mean of 23.5 years for the prenatal clinic sample, to 23.8 years for the developmental clinic sample, to 27.6 for the sample of women who have delivered children with FAS. Other variables of maternal risk for FAS expected from the extant literature, such as high gravidity and parity, binge drinking, heavy intergenerational drinking in the mother's extended family and immediate social network, and length of drinking career, were compared across the three samples with variable results. However, normative measures of drinking problems are unreliable when reported across cultures. An unexpected finding from this three-sample comparison was the differential risk found when comparing U.S. women to South African women. Women in the U.S. Plains Indian samples report a high consumption of alcohol in a binge pattern of drinking, yet there is less detectable damage to the fetus than among the South African women. Body mass index (BMI) and lifelong and current nutrition may have a substantial impact, along with the above factors, in relative risk for an FAS birth. The level of risk for producing a child with FAS is influenced by environmental and behavioral conditions that vary between populations and among individual women. Also, because many syndromes are genetically based, there is a need for full behavioral and

  3. The Connections of Pregnancy-, Delivery-, and Infant-Related Risk Factors and Negative Life Events on Postpartum Depression and Their Role in First and Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Koistinen, Eeva; Hintikka, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study is to assess how negative life events and adverse experiences with pregnancy, delivery, the infant(s), and breastfeeding cessation impact on postpartum depression (PPD), specifically in first lifetime and recurrent depression. Method. The study group comprised 104 mothers with a current episode of PPD and a control group of 104 mothers who did not have current PPD. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was used for data collection. The course of the depression, adverse experiences, and breastfeeding were assessed by self-reports. Results. In age-adjusted multivariate analyses, mental and physical problems during pregnancy or delivery, postpartum problems with the infant and breastfeeding cessation, and negative life events during the previous 12 months were associated with postpartum depression. Eighteen percent (18%) of the mothers had first depression and 82% recurrent depression. Mental and physical problems during pregnancy or delivery were associated with both first lifetime and recurrent depression. Nevertheless, negative life events and infant/breastfeeding issues associated only with recurrent depression. Conclusion. Factors associated with pregnancy and delivery have an impact on PPD, but in recurrent depression other postnatal and psychosocial factors are also important risk factors. PMID:27847645

  4. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Windram, Jonathan D; Colman, Jack M; Wald, Rachel M; Udell, Jacob A; Siu, Samuel C; Silversides, Candice K

    2014-05-01

    In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, foetal and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease and discuss strategies for management.

  5. Understanding the increased risk of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies among Mexico-born women in California: immigration and anthropometric factors.

    PubMed

    Velie, Ellen M; Shaw, Gary M; Malcoe, Lorraine H; Schaffer, Donna M; Samuels, Steven J; Todoroff, Karen; Block, Gladys

    2006-05-01

    Mexico-born women in the United States have an unexplained twofold increased risk of neural tube defect (NTD)-affected pregnancies. We examined whether immigration characteristics were associated with the NTD risk and whether anthropometric factors contributed to the increased risk among Mexico-born women. Data were derived from a large population-based case-control study in California. In-person interviews were conducted with mothers of 538 (88% of eligible) NTD-affected fetuses/infants and mothers of 539 (88%) randomly selected non-malformed control infants. The crude odds ratio (OR) for NTDs among all Mexico-born women, women residing <2 years in the US, and women >16 years old at immigration compared with non-Hispanic white women was 2.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.8, 3.3], 7.2 [95% CI = 3.7, 14.0] and 3.0 [95% CI = 2.0, 4.4], respectively. Risk for second- or third-generation Mexican-Americans was similar to that of white women. The crude OR for all Mexico-born women was reduced from 2.4 to 2.0 [95% CI = 1.3, 3.0] and for those residing <2 years in the US from 8.4 to 7.1 [95% CI = 3.2, 15.3] after adjustment for maternal body mass index (BMI), height, compromised diet, diabetes, and other known risk factors. In term pregnancies, additional adjustment for pregnancy weight gain reduced the OR in all Mexico-born women and recent immigrants by 16% and 25%, respectively. Low pregnancy weight gain (<10 vs. 10-14 kg) was particularly associated with increased NTD risk among Mexico-born women (OR(ADJ) = 5.8; 95% CI = 2.1, 15.8). Findings indicate that recent Mexican immigrants have a sevenfold increased risk for NTDs. Maternal BMI and height contributed very little, and inadequate weight gain contributed modestly to the NTD risk disparity for Mexican immigrants.

  6. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ester; Amar, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HT) is a complication of 8% of all pregnancies and 10% of HT cases are due to primary aldosteronism (PA). There is very little data on PA and pregnancy. Given the changes in the renin angiotensin system during pregnancy, the diagnosis of PA is difficult to establish during gestation. It may be suspected in hypertensive patients with hypokalemia. A comprehensive literature review identified reports covering 40 pregnancies in patients suffering from PA. Analysis of these cases shows them to be high-risk pregnancies leading to maternal and fetal complications. Pregnancy must be programmed, and if the patient has a unilateral form of PA, adrenalectomy should be performed prior to conception. It is customary to stop spironolactone prior to conception and introduce antihypertensive drugs that present no risk of teratogenicity. When conventional antihypertensive drugs used during pregnancy fail to control high blood pressure, diuretics, including potassium-sparing diuretics may be prescribed. Adrenalectomy can be considered during the second trimester of pregnancy exclusively in cases of refractory hypertension. A European retrospective study is currently underway to collect a larger number of cases.

  7. Residential proximity to main roads during pregnancy and the risk of allergic disorders in Japanese infants: the Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Mitani, Yasuhiro; Ikemi, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Satoshi; Ohya, Yukihiro; Hirota, Yoshio

    2010-02-01

    The role of traffic-related air pollution in the initiation of allergic disorders in children is still not clearly understood. The present prospective study examined the relation between proximity of the home during pregnancy to the nearest main road, which was used as a surrogate for traffic-related air pollutants, and the risk of allergic disorders in Japanese infants in an urban area. Subjects were 756 mother-child pairs. Distance of each subject's home during pregnancy from the center line of all of the 235 main roads in Osaka Prefecture was computed using geographical information system software. The first survey during pregnancy and the second survey between 2 and 9 months post-partum collected information on potential confounding factors. In the third survey, which was from 16 to 24 months post-partum, a self-administered questionnaire included questions on allergic disorders. In the third survey, 22.1% and 18.7% of infants became positive for wheeze and atopic eczema based on criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), respectively. The risk of doctor-diagnosed asthma and doctor-diagnosed atopic eczema was 4.4% and 8.9%, respectively. A shorter distance of the residence during pregnancy from the nearest main road was associated with an increased risk of doctor-diagnosed asthma and atopic eczema (adjusted odds ratios for comparison of <50 m with 200 m or more = 4.01 and 2.26, 95% confidence intervals: 1.44-11.24 and 1.08-4.59, p for trend = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). No evident relationships were observed between the distance of the residence during pregnancy from the nearest main road and the risk of wheeze or atopic eczema based on the ISAAC criteria. It was difficult to distinguish the effect of the pre-natal from the post-natal exposure because most subjects lived at the same home address both before and after childbirth. Our results are likely to support the hypothesis that intrauterine exposure to traffic

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  9. Parent–Adolescent Relationship Education (PARE): Program Delivery to Reduce Risks for Adolescent Pregnancy and STDs

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Regina P.; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The first author recruited parent–adolescent dyads (N = 192) into after-school prevention education groups at middle schools in southeast Texas. This author placed participants in either (1) an Interactive Program (IP) in which they role-played, practiced resistance skills, and held parent–child discussions or (2) an Attention Control Program (ACP) that used the same curriculum but was delivered in a traditional, didactic format. Questionnaires administered at the beginning and end of the 4-session program and again after booster sessions in 3 subsequent semesters provided measures of social controls (eg, communication with parents) and self controls (eg, protection against risk) on the youths' sexual health behaviors. Linear mixed models adjusted for gender, age, and ethnicity showed that the IP, in comparison with the ACP, achieved significant gains in social control by increasing parental rules about having sex and other risky behaviors and also enhanced students' self-control by increasing their knowledge about prevention and enhancing resistance responses when pressured to have sex. PMID:18316271

  10. Does maternal exposure to benzene and PM10 during pregnancy increase the risk of congenital anomalies? A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Cherubini, Andrea; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Rodolfi, Rossella; Heck, Julia E; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Nicolini, Fausto

    2016-01-15

    A few studies have suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution from vehicular traffic and risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring, but epidemiologic evidence is neither strong nor entirely consistent. In a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community encompassing 228 cases of birth defects and 228 referent newborns, we investigated if maternal exposure to PM10 and benzene from vehicular traffic during early pregnancy, as estimated through a dispersion model, was associated with excess teratogenic risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis, and with adjustment for the other pollutant, we found that higher exposure to PM10 but not benzene was associated with increased risk of birth defects overall. Anomaly categories showing the strongest dose-response relation with PM10 exposure were musculoskeletal and chromosomal abnormalities but not cardiovascular defects, with Down syndrome being among the specific abnormalities showing the strongest association, though risk estimates particularly for the less frequent defects were statistically very unstable. Further adjustment in the regression model for potential confounders did not considerably alter the results. All the associations were stronger for average levels of PM10 than for their maximal level. Findings of this study give some support for an excess teratogenic risk following maternal exposure during pregnancy to PM10, but not benzene. Such association appears to be limited to some birth defect categories.

  11. Does maternal exposure to benzene and PM10 during pregnancy increase the risk of congenital anomalies? A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Vinceti, Marco; Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Cherubini, Andrea; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Rodolfi, Rossella; Heck, Julia E.; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Nicolini, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    A few studies have suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution from vehicular traffic and risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring, but epidemiologic evidence is neither strong nor entirely consistent. In a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community encompassing 228 cases of birth defects and 228 referent newborns, we investigated if maternal exposure to PM10 and benzene from vehicular traffic during early pregnancy, as estimated through a dispersion model, was associated with excess teratogenic risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis, and with adjustment for the other pollutant, we found that higher exposure to PM10 but not benzene was associated with increased risk of birth defects overall. Anomaly categories showing the strongest dose-response relation with PM10 exposure were musculoskeletal and chromosomal abnormalities but not cardiovascular defects, with Down syndrome being among the specific abnormalities showing the strongest association, though risk estimates particularly for the less frequent defects were statistically very unstable. Further adjustment in the regression model for potential confounders did not considerably alter the results. All the associations were stronger for average levels of PM10 than for their maximal level. Findings of this study give some support for an excess teratogenic risk following maternal exposure during pregnancy to PM10, but not benzene. Such association appears to be limited to some birth defect categories. PMID:26410719

  12. Maternal and foetal outcome after epidural labour analgesia in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Jain, Kajal; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Jain, Vanita; Samanta, Sujay; Saha, Rini

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Low concentration local anaesthetic improves uteroplacental blood flow in antenatal period and during labour in preeclampsia. We compared neonatal outcome after epidural ropivacaine plus fentanyl with intramuscular tramadol analgesia during labour in high-risk parturients with intrauterine growth restriction of mixed aetiology. Methods: Forty-eight parturients with sonographic evidence of foetal weight <1.5 kg were enrolled in this non-randomized, double-blinded prospective study. The epidural (E) group received 0.15% ropivacaine 10 ml with 30 μg fentanyl incremental bolus followed by 7–15 ml 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl in continuous infusion titrated until visual analogue scale was three. Tramadol (T) group received intramuscular tramadol 1 mg/kg as bolus as well as maintenance 4–6 hourly. Neonatal outcomes were measured with cord blood base deficit, pH, ionised calcium, sugar and Apgar score after delivery. Maternal satisfaction was also assessed by four point subjective score. Results: Baseline maternal demographics and neonatal birth weight were comparable. Neonatal cord blood pH, base deficit, sugar, and ionised calcium levels were significantly improved in the epidural group in comparison to the tramadol group. Maternal satisfaction (P = 0.0001) regarding labour analgesia in epidural group was expressed as excellent by 48%, good by 52% whereas it was fair in 75% and poor in 25% in the tramadol group. Better haemodynamic and pain scores were reported in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural labour analgesia with low concentration local anaesthetic is associated with less neonatal cord blood acidaemia, better sugar and ionised calcium levels. The analgesic efficacy and maternal satisfaction are also better with epidural labour analgesia. PMID:27013750

  13. Teenage pregnancies that end in abortion: what can they tell us about contraceptive risk-taking?

    PubMed

    Hoggart, Lesley; Phillips, Joan

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND and methodology In 1999, the Government set the ambitious target of halving the number of under-18 conceptions by 2010. It is now clear that this target will not be met. Much media and policy attention has been paid to teenage mothers, and yet approximately 50% of teenage conceptions end in abortion not motherhood. In London, where the present research was based, the percentage is significantly higher. The research into teenage abortion and repeat abortion, though based in London, generated insights that could potentially help different areas reduce the number of under-18 conceptions ending in abortion. A qualitative research methodology was adopted and a wide range of interviews were conducted with young women, and professionals, in 10 London primary care trusts. RESULTS Our analysis adds to a substantial body of qualitative research that points to the complexity of sexual decision-making for young women. Contraceptive risk-taking was evident as some young women spoke of the difficulties they experienced with user-dependent methods (primarily the condom and the pill) in often unplanned, sexual encounters. They were also generally poorly informed about different contraceptive methods. Misunderstandings about fertility also emerged as an important issue that can lead young women to draw the wrong conclusions if they do not become pregnant following unprotected sex. CONCLUSIONS Young people need improved access to, and informed understanding of, the full range of contraceptive methods available to them. In addition, efforts should be made to enable young women to have a better understanding of their own likely fertility.

  14. Thrombophilia, thrombosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    2001-07-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy is 0.05-1.8%, six times greater than in the non-pregnant state, and pulmonary embolism remains the most common cause of maternal death. Maternal age, previous history of VTE, Caesarean section and the presence of thrombophilia, significantly increase the risk of VTE. Acquired or hereditary thrombophilia occur in almost two-thirds of women presenting with recurrent miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, abruptio placentae, or stillbirth, which are associated with microvascular thrombosis in placental blood vessels. Women with VTE during pregnancy and especially those with thrombophilia require individualized management, based on the type of defect, the family history and the presence of additional risk factors. These factors are important in determining the dose and duration of antithrombotic therapy during pregnancy and the puerperium, and the thromboprophylactic strategy for future pregnancies. Oral anticoagulants are now seldom used during pregnancy because of their significant side effects. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are increasingly replacing unfractionated heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE during pregnancy. LMWHs have also been shown to be effective in improving the outcome of pregnancy in women with previous obstetric complications.

  15. AB123. Carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis for α- and β-thalassemia in pregnancies at risk in National Hospital of Pediatrics, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Diem Ngoc; Ly, Thi Thanh Ha; Ngo, Thi Tuyet Nhung; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Mai; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Duong, Ba Truc; Tran, Danh Cuong; Le, Thi Thanh Thuy; Lê, Thanh Hai; Tran, Thi Thanh Huong

    2015-01-01

    Background Thalassaemia is the most common hereditary disease in Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, the carrier rate for β-thalassemia varies from 1.5% to 25% depending on the ethnic groups of the population. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the first screening program for control of α- and β-thalassemia in a group of high-risk pregnancy patients who attended our clinic from January 2012 to April 2015. Methods The identification of pregnancies at risk was done retrospectively and prospectively. A total of 944 women with reduced levels of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) were referred to the Human Genetics Department where, together with their husbands, were screened using standard protocols. If both members of the couple were positive for these markers, then determination of the thalassemia carrier status by DNA analysis was considered and the pregnancy was considered at risk. Results Out of the 944 couples tested, 754 pregnant women and 385 husbands were positive. Among the 754 women, 493 (65.3%) were α-thal carriers; 204 (27.1%) β-thal carriers; 40 (5.3%) α- and β-thal carriers and 17 (2.2%) were positive for hemoglobin H disease (HbH). Among the men, 300 (77.9%) were α-thal carriers, 37 (9.6%) β-thal carriers; 37 (9.6%) α- and β-thal carriers and 11 (2.9%) were positive for HbH disease. In total, we identified 508 couples at risk, 306 prospectively (284/306 homozygous α0-thal, 19/306 β-thal, 3/306 both α0-β-thal) and 202 retrospectively (166/202 β-thal, 36/202 HbH disease). After genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis by fetal DNA analysis was performed on 312/508 (61.5%) couples including 91 pregnancies at risk for homozygous α0-thal, 36 at risk for HbH disease, and 185 at risk for β-thal major.

  16. Conducting rigorous research with subgroups of at-risk youth: lessons learned from a teen pregnancy prevention project in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Hohman-Billmeier, Kathryn; Nye, Margaret; Martin, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) received federal funding to test an evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program. The grant required a major modification to an existing program and a randomized control trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness. As the major modifications, Alaska used peer educators instead of adults to deliver the program to youth aged 14–19 instead of the original curriculum intended age range of 12–14. Cultural and approach adaptations were included as well. After 4 years of implementation and data collection, the sample was too small to provide statistically significant results. The lack of findings gave no information about the modification, nor any explanation of how the curriculum was received, or reasons for the small sample. This paper reports on a case study follow-up to the RCT to better understand outcome and implementation results. For this study, researchers reviewed project documents and interviewed peer educators, state and local staff, and evaluators. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) the professional growth of peer educators and development of peer education, (b) difficulties resulting from curriculum content, especially for subpopulations of sexually active youth, youth identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and/or asexual, pregnant, and parenting youth and (c) the appropriateness of an RCT with subpopulations of at-risk youth. Three recommendations emerged from the case study. First, including as many stakeholders as possible in the program and evaluation design phases is essential, and must be supported by appropriate funding streams and training. Second, there must be recognition of the multiple small subpopulations found in Alaska when adapting programs designed for a larger and more homogeneous population. Third, RCTs may not be appropriate for all population subgroups. PMID:27938637

  17. Risk factors in the pregnancy of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: association of hypocomplementaemia with poor prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, S; Sasaki, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Seino, J; Okamura, K; Yoshinaga, K; Morito, N; Kasukawa, R; Aotuka, S; Yokohari, R

    1992-01-01

    Fetal wastage is still high in the pregnancies of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We examined retrospectively the cases of 38 patients with inactive SLE in whom pregnancy was either desired or had already been obtained. The prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the group with fetal loss was high. The antibodies were, however, also detected in five of 14 patients who had had a live birth. It was noted that low levels of serum complement activity (CH50 less than 25 U/ml) occurred in five of six patients with fetal loss, but in only two of 22 with a live birth. Serial studies also confirmed a close association between decreased serum complement activity and poor fetal prognosis in lupus pregnancy. Treatment with increased doses of prednisolone may help to achieve successful live births. Thus hypocomplementaemia may be associated with a worse prognosis for the fetus in the pregnancies of some patients with SLE in remission. Images PMID:1616326

  18. Maternal Antioxidant Levels in Pregnancy and Risk of Preeclampsia and Small for Gestational Age Birth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jacqueline M.; Beddaoui, Margaret; Kramer, Michael S.; Platt, Robert W.; Basso, Olga; Kahn, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress in preeclampsia and small for gestational age (SGA) birth suggests antioxidant supplementation could prevent these conditions. However, it remains unclear whether maternal antioxidant levels are systematically lower in these pregnancies. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the association between maternal antioxidant levels during pregnancy and preeclampsia or SGA. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, and several other databases from 1970–2013 for observational studies that measured maternal blood levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamins A, C, E, and carotenoids) during pregnancy or within 72 hours of delivery. The entire review process was done in duplicate. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and additional questions. We pooled the standardized mean difference (SMD) across studies, stratified by outcome and pregnancy trimester, and investigated heterogeneity using meta-regression. Results We reviewed 1,882 unique citations and 64 studies were included. Most studies were small with important risk of bias. Among studies that addressed preeclampsia (n = 58) and SGA (n = 9), 16% and 66%, respectively, measured levels prior to diagnosis. The SMDs for vitamins A, C, and E were significantly negative for overall preeclampsia, but not for mild or severe preeclampsia subtypes. Significant heterogeneity was observed in all meta-analyses and most could not be explained. Evidence for lower carotenoid antioxidants in preeclampsia and SGA was limited and inconclusive. Publication bias appears likely. Conclusions Small, low-quality studies limit conclusions that can be drawn from the available literature. Observational studies inconsistently show that vitamins C and E or other antioxidants are lower in women who develop preeclampsia or SGA. Reverse causality remains a possible explanation for associations observed. New clinical trials are not warranted in light of this evidence; however, additional rigorous

  19. Maternal Pregnancy Levels of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Risk of Hypospadias and Cryptorchidism in Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Katherine A.; Guo, Xuguang; Graubard, Barry I.; Brock, John W.; Klebanoff, Mark A.; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The etiologies of the male urogenital anomalies cryptorchidism and hypospadias are poorly understood. It has been suggested, however, that in utero hormone levels may be related to risk. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds, may alter hormone levels and thereby affect the fetus. Objectives To examine whether in utero PCB exposure is related to cryptorchidism and hypospadias, we examined PCB levels among pregnant women enrolled in the Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP). Methods The CPP enrolled pregnant women at 12 U.S. medical centers between 1959 and 1965. For the present research, we analyzed third-trimester serum samples from the mothers of 230 sons with cryptorchidism, 201 sons with hypospadias, and 593 sons with neither condition. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using logistic regression and examined the associations of each anomaly with individual PCB congener levels, sum of PCBs, and several functional groupings of PCBs. Results In general, the ORs for cryptorchidism or hypospadias showed no notable associations with individual PCB congener levels or functional groupings of PCBs. However, the ORs and 95% CIs for the sum of PCBs associated with hypospadias were as follows: 0–1.9 μg/L, reference group; 2–2.9 μg/L, OR = 1.57, 95% CI, 1.05–2.34; 3–3.9 μg/L, OR = 1.45, 95% CI, 0.90–2.34; and ≥ 4.0 μg/L, OR = 1.69, 95% CI, 1.06–2.68; p-value for trend = 0.08. Conclusions Given the large number of associations examined, these findings do not strongly support the hypothesis that PCBs are associated with cryptorchidism or hypospadias. Because population serum PCB levels at the time of sample collection were considerably higher than levels at present, it is unlikely that current PCB exposure is related to the development of either anomaly. PMID:19750116

  20. Young Adult Outcomes Associated with Teen Pregnancy Among High-Risk Girls in an RCT of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Leve, Leslie D; Kerr, David C R; Harold, Gordon T

    2013-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is associated with a host of deleterious outcomes for girls such as drug use and poor parenting. Thus, reducing teen pregnancy rates could improve long-term developmental outcomes for girls, improving adjustment during young adulthood. Based on the positive effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to group care (GC) in a study of adolescent girls-significantly fewer pregnancies reported in the 2-year follow-up for MTFC girls-the present study followed this sample into young adulthood (approximately 7 years postbaseline) to examine the effects of adolescent pregnancy on young adult substance use and pregnancy-related outcomes. All participants were randomly assigned to MTFC (n = 81) or GC (n = 85) as adolescents as part of two RCTs. Results from logistic regression analyses indicated that becoming pregnant during the 2-year follow-up was significantly related to illicit drug use, miscarriage from a new pregnancy, and child welfare involvement at 7 years postbaseline. In addition, baseline marijuana use predicted marijuana use at 7 years postbaseline.

  1. Binge drinking prior to pregnancy detection in a nonhuman primate; behavioral evaluation of offspring

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimal scientific information is available to inform public health policy on binge drinking prior to pregnancy detection. The nonhuman primate provides a valuable animal model for examining consequences to reproduction and offspring function that may result from this common pattern of alcohol abuse. Methods Adult female rhesus monkeys were dosed with 1.5 g/kg-d ethanol by gavage two days/week beginning seven months prior to mating and continuing to pregnancy detection at 19–20 days gestation. Postnatal evaluation of control (n=6) and ethanol treated (n=4) infants included a neonatal neurobehavioral assessment, a visual paired comparison (cognitive) test at 35 days of age and mother-infant interaction at 100–112 days of age. Results Alcohol-exposed neonates did not differ from controls in posture and reflex measures. Longer durations of visual fixation, suggesting slower visual processing, and greater novelty preference were seen in the alcohol group. At early weaning age, as infants spent more time away from their dams, more of the reunions between mother and infant were initiated by the mothers in the alcohol-exposed group, suggesting a more immature mother-infant interaction. Conclusion Intermittent high dose alcohol exposure (binge drinking) discontinued at early pregnancy detection in rhesus monkey can result in altered behavioral function in the infant. Mediating effects on ovum, reproductive tract and early embryo can be explored in this model. Studies of longer-term consequences in human populations and animal models are needed. PMID:24164332

  2. Methamphetamine/Dextroamphetamine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine | Dextroamphetamine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to methamphetamine or dextroamphetamine may increase the risk for birth ...

  3. [Cervical pregnancy. Three cases].

    PubMed

    Plascencia Moncayo, Norberto; Hernández, María de la Paz; Guadarrama Sánchez, Rafael; Guerra Becerra, Leticia; Salmón Vélez, J Fernando G; Galván Aguilera, Alejandro

    2008-12-01

    We describe cervical pregnancy concept and its rareness. Its frequency is one in 2,550 to 98,000 intrauterine pregnancies. Predisposing factors are related with endometrial damage due to uterine curettages and previous cesarian section. Clinical picture was nonspecific and diagnosis was based in endovaginal ultrasonography. It can cause massive bleeding and put life in risk. During 2007 we attend 829 intrauterine pregnancies at Hospital San José de Querétaro: 11 tubal, and 3 cervical, this represents an extraordinarily high frequency of cervical pregnancy. Here we report three cases of cervical pregnancies treated with total hysterectomy, two as urgency and one elective. We remark early diagnosis importance to perform conservative treatment and maintain reproductive function.

  4. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  5. Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis - longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Maslova, Ekaterina; Strøm, Marin; Oken, Emily; Campos, Hannia; Lange, Christoph; Gold, Diane; Olsen, Sjurdur F

    2013-10-01

    Maternal fish intake during pregnancy may influence the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis, yet evidence is conflicting on its association with these outcomes. We examined the associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy with child asthma and allergic rhinitis. Mothers in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n 28 936) reported their fish intake at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Using multivariate logistic regression, we examined the associations of fish intake with child wheeze, asthma and rhinitis assessed at several time points: ever wheeze, recurrent wheeze (>3 episodes), ever asthma and allergic rhinitis, and current asthma, assessed at 18 months (n approximately 22,000) and 7 years (n approximately 17,000) using self-report and registry data on hospitalisations and prescribed medications. Compared with consistently high fish intake during pregnancy (fish as a sandwich or hot meal > or equal to 2-3 times/week), never eating fish was associated with a higher risk of child asthma diagnosis at 18 months (OR 1·30, 95% CI 1·05, 1·63, P=0·02), and ever asthma by hospitalisation (OR 1·46, 95% CI 0·99, 2·13, P=0·05) and medication prescription (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·10, 1·71, P=0·01). A dose-response was present for asthma at 18 months only (P for trend=0·001). We found no associations with wheeze or recurrent wheeze at 18 months or with allergic rhinitis. The results suggest that high (v. no) maternal fish intake during pregnancy is protective against both early and ever asthma in 7-year-old children.

  6. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time.

  7. Maternal total caffeine intake, mainly from Japanese and Chinese tea, during pregnancy was associated with risk of preterm birth: the Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hitomi; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-04-01

    The relation of maternal caffeine intake with birth outcomes is still inconclusive and has not been examined in Japan, where the sources of caffeine intake are different from those in Western countries. We hypothesized that maternal consumption of total caffeine and culture-specific major sources of caffeine would be associated with birth outcomes among Japanese pregnant. The study subjects were 858 Japanese women who delivered singleton infants. Maternal diet during pregnancy was assessed using a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Birth outcomes considered were low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), preterm birth (PTB; <37 weeks of gestation), and small for gestational age (SGA; <10th percentile). The main caffeine sources were Japanese and Chinese tea (73.5%), coffee (14.3%), black tea (6.6%), and soft drinks (3.5%). After controlling for confounders, maternal total caffeine intake during pregnancy was significantly associated with an increased risk of PTB (odds ratio per 100 mg/d caffeine increase, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.58; P for trend = .03). However, no evident relationships were observed between total caffeine intake and risk of LBW or SGA. As for caffeine sources, higher Japanese and Chinese tea consumption was associated with an increased risk of PTB (odds ratio per 1 cup/d increase, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30; P for trend = .04), but not LBW or SGA. There were no associations between consumption of the other beverages examined and birth outcomes. In conclusion, this prospective birth cohort in Japan suggests that higher maternal total caffeine intake, mainly in the form of Japanese and Chinese tea, during pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of PTB.

  8. Prolactinomas, cabergoline, and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glezer, Andrea; Bronstein, Marcello D

    2014-09-01

    Hyperprolactinemia, frequently caused by a prolactinoma, is an important cause of infertility among young women. Dopamine agonists (DA) are the treatment of choice. Although cabergoline (CAB) is currently considered the gold standard DA, bromocriptine (BRC) remains the drug of choice for women desiring pregnancy, as it was proven to be safe in more than 6,000 pregnancies. The purpose of this review is to perform a critical evaluation of CAB safety in pregnancy, as it is used by most patients harboring prolactinomas. Although the number of CAB-induced pregnancies (about 800) is still reduced as compared with those under BRC treatment, data in the literature do not point to increase risk of preterm delivery or fetal malformations, comparing to pregnancies induced by BRC and those in the general population. Moreover, CAB use throughout pregnancy was reported in about ten cases, without evidence of any harm to fetal development. Therefore, even though BRC still remains the recommended DA drug for pregnancy induction or use during pregnancy in women with prolactinomas, increasing evidences point to the safety of CAB for this purpose.

  9. Managing Prolactinomas during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Mussa Hussain; Alzahrani, Saad; Alshahrani, Fahad; Alsherbeni, Safia; Almoharib, Ohoud; Aljohani, Naji; Almagamsi, Abdurahman

    2015-01-01

    Prolactinomas are the most prevalent functional benign pituitary tumors due to a pituitary micro- or macroadenoma. The majority of patients presents with infertility and gonadal dysfunction. A dopamine agonist (DA) (bromocriptine or cabergoline) is the treatment of choice that can normalize prolactin levels, reduce tumor size, and restore ovulation and fertility. Cabergoline generally preferred over bromocriptine because of its higher efficacy and tolerability. Managing prolactinomas during pregnancy may be challenging. During pregnancy, the pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia due to a progressive increase in serum estrogens level that may lead to increase of the tumor volume with potential mass effect and visual loss. The risk of tumor enlargement may occur in 3% of those with microadenomas, 32% in those with macroadenomas that were not previously operated on, and 4.8% of those with macroadenomas with prior ablative treatment. Though both drugs appear to be safe during pregnancy, the data on fetal exposure to DAs during pregnancy have been reported with bromocriptine far exceeds that of cabergoline with no association of increased risk of pregnancy loss and premature delivery. It is advisable to stop the use of DAs immediately once pregnancy is confirmed, except in the case of women with invasive macroprolactinomas or pressure symptoms. This review outlines the therapeutic approach to prolactinoma during pregnancy, with emphasis on the safety of available DA therapy. PMID:26074878

  10. [Colpocytology and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Cordero, A A; Echeveste García de Alba, E

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between cervical infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), cervical cancer risk factors and pregnancy was studied in a group of 460 pregnant women at the time of their first prenatal examination, each woman was examined by Papanicolaou smear collected with cervexbrush. A total of 301 women (65.4%) with diagnosis of cervical infection was recorded, 4 cases of human papilomavirus infection and two women with CIN I and CIN II. 40 patients were identified with significant risk factors for the development of CIN. CIN prevalence knowledge and pregnancy cervical infection should be considered to prevent the neonates, male partner and women potential risk for cervix invasive carcinoma.

  11. Challenges of Twin Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lynn M.; Hose, Patricia M.

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians have an important role in the diagnosis and management of twin pregnancies. Optimal antepartum management begins with early detection. Provision of patient education about the risks of the pregnancy is important. Intrapartum management is dependent on gestation age, placentation, fetal presentation, and fetal well-being. Anticipatory guidance and ongoing support should be provided for postpartum issues, such as breast-feeding and family adjustment. PMID:21229108

  12. High-Risk Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Job listings, application forms & job-related information Meetings, Conferences & Events Upcoming & past scientific meetings & public events Partnering & Donations Guidance on partnering, guidelines for donations Search Email Page Print Page Health & Research A-Z ...

  13. Pregnancy - health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs, stop drinking alcohol, and limit caffeine and coffee. Talk to your health care provider about any medicines you may be taking to see if they can affect your unborn baby. Eat a well-balanced diet ...

  14. Association of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) gene polymorphism with recurrent pregnancy loss risk in the North Indian Population and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rohini Ravindran; Khanna, Anuradha; Singh, Kiran

    2014-09-01

    An appropriate ratio of interleukin 1 beta to interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1Ra) is required for successful pregnancy. Our objective was to study the genetic association between IL1RN variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). To analyze the association between IL1RN VNTR allele and RPL, we investigated the IL1RN VNTR polymorphism in 136 RPL patients and in 200 healthy control women. Meta-analysis on this polymorphism was conducted to support our findings. PCR based approach was used to analyze IL1RN VNTR polymorphism and it was further confirmed by sequencing. Systematic review and meta-analysis was done using electronic database (Pub-Med, Google Scholar and Ovid) up to February 27, 2013. This meta-analysis was assessed by comprehensive meta-analysis software version 2. For meta-analysis 549 cases and 1,450 controls were included. The frequency of IL1RN genotype 2/2 was significantly higher in RPL compared to control group (AORs 3.10, 95 % CI 1.58-6.11, p = 0.001). The presence of rare allele also increased the risk of RPL significantly (ORs 1.63, 95 % CI 1.16-2.29, p = 0.004). The meta-analysis stratified by ethnicity showed that individuals with allele 2 had increased risk of RPL (OR 1.29, 95 % CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.01), in Asians population by using fixed model. However the data of the present study clearly suggests that IL1RN VNTR polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for pregnancy loss in the study population.

  15. Periodontal disease as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Francetti, Luca; De Siena, Francesca; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent group of illnesses of microbial etiology, whose consequence is a severe breakdown of tooth-supporting structures. A link between periodontal infection and several systemic conditions, among which adverse pregnancy outcomes, has been suggested in the recent years. The aim of this review based on case-control studies was to evaluate if periodontal disease could be considered as a risk factor for preterm birth, low birth-weight and preterm low birth-weight. An electronic search (via Pubmed) was performed for case-control studies investigating the relationship between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. From the initially retrieved 417 articles, 17 case-control studies, accounting for a total of 10,148 patients, were included in the review and in the meta-analysis. The estimated odds ratio was 1.78 (CI 95%: 1.58, 2.01) for preterm birth, 1.82 (CI 95%: 1.51, 1.20) for low birth-weight and 3.00 (CI 95%: 1.93, 4.68) for preterm low birth-weight. Despite the results of the analysis of pooled data suggested a link between periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the presence of important confounders, whose effect could not be addressed, prevents a validation of the meta-analysis outcomes. Further more accurate investigations based on individual data analysis could give a better insight into the topic of the present review.

  16. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  17. Effect of supplementation during pregnancy with L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins in medical food on pre-eclampsia in high risk population: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Espino, Salvador; Avila-Vergara, Marco Antonio; Ibarra, Isabel; Ahued, Roberto; Godines, Myrna; Parry, Samuel; Macones, George; Strauss, Jerome F

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a relative deficiency in L-arginine, the substrate for synthesis of the vasodilatory gas nitric oxide, may be associated with the development of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk. Design Randomised, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial. Setting Tertiary public hospital in Mexico City. Participants Pregnant women with a history of a previous pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia, or pre-eclampsia in a first degree relative, and deemed to be at increased risk of recurrence of the disease were studied from week 14-32 of gestation and followed until delivery. Interventions Supplementation with a medical food—bars containing L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, antioxidant vitamins alone, or placebo—during pregnancy. Main outcome measure Development of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia. Results 222 women were allocated to the placebo group, 228 received L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, and 222 received antioxidant vitamins alone. Women had 4-8 prenatal visits while receiving the bars. The incidence of pre-eclampsia was reduced significantly (χ2=19.41; P<0.001) in women randomised to L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins compared with placebo (absolute risk reduction 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.21). Antioxidant vitamins alone showed an observed benefit, but this effect was not statistically significant compared with placebo (χ2=3.76; P=0.052; absolute risk reduction 0.07, 0.005 to 0.15). L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins compared with antioxidant vitamins alone resulted in a significant effect (P=0.004; absolute risk reduction 0.09, 0.05 to 0.14). Conclusions Supplementation during pregnancy with a medical food containing L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins reduced the incidence of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk of the condition. Antioxidant vitamins alone did not have a protective effect for prevention of pre-eclampsia. Supplementation with L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins needs to be

  18. Association between Maternal Serum Concentrations of Angiopoietin-like Protein 2 in Early Pregnancy and Subsequent Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lu, Shan; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background: A recent study reported a positive association between elevated serum levels of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) and the development of type 2 diabetes in a general population. However, the relationship of serum ANGPTL2 levels with the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has not been reported to date. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of maternal serum ANGPTL2 concentrations in the first trimester of pregnancy and to determine whether ANGPTL2 is a biomarker for subsequent GDM development. Methods: We conducted a prospective, nested case-control study in a pregnancy cohort. First-trimester ANGPTL2 levels were measured using a high-resolution assay in 89 women who subsequently developed GDM and in a random sample of 177 women who remained euglycemic throughout the pregnancy. Median ANGPTL2 levels were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for developing GDM among ANGPTL2 quartiles. Results: The serum levels of ANGPTL2 was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (3.06 [2.59, 3.65] ng/ml vs. 2.46 [2.05, 2.96] ng/ml, P = 0.003). Fasting blood glucose was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (5.0 ± 0.9 mmol/L vs. 4.4 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P < 0.001). Glucose challenge test showed that the blood glucose was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (9.1 ± 3.5 mmol/L vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 mmol/L, P < 0.001). A multivariate model adjusted for baseline characteristics, medical complications, and gestational characteristics revealed that the risk of developing GDM among women in Q4 compared with Q1 was 2.90-fold more likely to develop GDM later in pregnancy. Conclusions: At 11–13 weeks in pregnancies that develop GDM, the serum concentration of ANGPTL2 is increased, and it can be combined with maternal factors to provide effective early screening for GDM. PMID:27647189

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