Science.gov

Sample records for alcohol-induced fatty liver

  1. Establishment of the tree shrew as an alcohol-induced Fatty liver model for the study of alcoholic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huijie; Jia, Kun; He, Jun; Shi, Changzheng; Fang, Meixia; Song, Linliang; Zhang, Pu; Zhao, Yue; Fu, Jiangnan; Li, Shoujun

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) is not clear. As a result, there is no effective treatment for ALDs. One limitation is the lack of a suitable animal model for use in studying ALDs. The tree shrew is a lower primate animal, characterized by a high-alcohol diet. This work aimed to establish a fatty liver model using tree shrews and to assess the animals' suitability for the study of ALDs. Tree shrews were treated with alcohol solutions (10% and 20%) for two weeks. Hemophysiology, blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), oxidative stress factors, alcohol metabolic enzymes and hepatic pathology were checked and assayed with an automatic biochemical analyzer, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and oil red O staining, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with the normal group, the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly enhanced in alcohol-treated tree shrews. However, the activity of reduced glutathione hormone (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) declined. Notable changes in alcohol dehydrogenase(ADH1), aldehyde dehydrogenase(ALDH2), CYP2E1, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) and nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were observed. HE and oil red O staining showed that hepatocyte swelling, hydropic degeneration, and adipohepatic syndrome occurred in the tree shrews. Alcohol can induce fatty liver-like pathological changes and result in alterations in liver function, oxidative stress factors, alcohol metabolism enzymes and Nrf2. Therefore, the established fatty liver model of tree shrews induced by alcohol should be a promising tool for the study of ALDs. PMID:26030870

  2. Acute Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation, and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, which also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic. PMID:22701432

  3. Exacerbation of Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats by Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Iron Load

    PubMed Central

    Patere, S. N.; Majumdar, A. S.; Saraf, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that excessive intake of vegetable oil containing polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron load precipitate alcohol-induced liver damage was investigated in a rat model. In order to elucidate the mechanism underlying this synergism, the serum levels of iron, total protein, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase in liver of rats treated with alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron per se and in combination were examined. Alcohol was fed to the rats at a level of 10-30% (blood alcohol was maintained between 150-350 mg/dl by using head space gas chromatography), polyunsaturated fatty acids at a level of 15% of diet and carbonyl iron 1.5-2% of diet per se and in combination to different groups for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, which was elevated and serum total protein, which was decreased significantly in rats fed with a combination of alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. It was also associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption of antioxidant defense in combination fed rats as compared to rats fed with alcohol or polyunsaturated fatty acids or iron. The present study revealed significant exacerbation of the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. PMID:22303057

  4. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Valcin, Jennifer A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases. PMID:26473939

  5. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Udoh, Uduak S; Valcin, Jennifer A; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2015-10-14

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  6. Protective effects of dioscin against alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies have shown that dioscin has protective effect against liver injury. However, the action of the compound against ethanol-induced liver injury is still unknown. In the present paper, ethanol-induced acute and chronic liver damage rat models were used, and the results showed that dioscin significantly alleviated liver steatosis, reduced the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and malondialdehyde, and increased the levels of high-density lipoprotein, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. Transmission electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assays showed that dioscin prevented mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations and apoptosis caused by ethanol. In addition, dioscin significantly inhibited ethanol-induced cytochrome P450 2E1 activation, down-regulated the levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases phosphorylation, inhibited the expressions of nuclear factor kappa B, glucose regulated protein 78, activating transcription factor 6 and alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 to attenuate oxidative damage, decreased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6, and down-regulated the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins including p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase and cytokeratin-18. Further investigation indicated that dioscin markedly increased the expressions of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α and its target genes including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase I and acyl-CoA oxidase to advance fatty acid β-oxidation, up-regulated the expressions of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5, alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase to promote fatty acid metabolism, and down-regulated the expressions of glycerol

  7. Protective effect of oligomeric proanthocyanidins against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Su, Bo; Fan, Sumei; Fei, Haixia; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-20

    The long-term consumption of alcohol has been associated with multiple pathologies at all levels, such as alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis, malnutrition, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and cancer. In the current study, we investigated the protective effect of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury and the possible mechanisms using ethanol-induced chronic liver damage mouse models. The results showed that OPC significantly improved alcohol-induced dyslipidemia and alleviated liver steatosis by reducing levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density cholesterol (LDL-c) and liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and increasing levels of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL-c), liver superoxide dismutase (SOD). Further investigation indicated that OPC markedly decreased the expressions of lipid synthesis genes and inflammation genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (Srebp-1c), protein-2 (Srebp2), interleukin IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, AML-12 cells line was used to investigate the possible mechanisms which indicated that OPC might alleviate liver steatosis and damage through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation involving oxidative stress. In conclusion, our study demonstrated excellent protective effect of OPC against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury, which could a potential drug for the treatment of alcohol-induced liver injury in the future. PMID:25680468

  8. Sexual Dimorphism in Alcohol Induced Adipose Inflammation Relates to Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fulham, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease occurs due to chronic, heavy drinking and is driven both by metabolic alterations and immune cell activation. Women are at a higher risk than men for developing alcohol induced liver injury and this dimorphism is reflected in animal models of alcoholic liver disease. The importance of adipose tissue in alcoholic liver disease is emerging. Chronic alcohol consumption causes adipose tissue inflammation, which can influence liver injury. Sex differences in body fat composition are well known. However, it is still unclear if alcohol-induced adipose tissue inflammation occurs in a sex-dependent manner. Here we have employed the clinically relevant NIAAA model of chronic-binge alcohol consumption to investigate this sexual dimorphism. We report that female mice have greater liver injury than male mice despite lower alcohol consumption. Chronic-binge alcohol induces adipose tissue inflammation in vivo in female mice, which is illustrated by increased expression of TNFα, IL-6, and CCL2, compared to only IL-6 induction in male adipose tissue. Further, macrophage activation markers such as CD68 as well as the pro-inflammatory activation markers CD11b and CD11c were higher in female adipose tissue. Interestingly, alcohol induced expression of TLR2, 3, 4, and 9 in female but not male adipose tissue, without affecting the TLR adaptor, MyD88. Higher trends of serum endotoxin in female mice may likely contribute to adipose tissue inflammation. In vitro chronic alcohol-mediated sensitization of macrophages to endotoxin is independent of sex. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that there is a sexual dimorphism in alcohol-induced adipose tissue inflammation and female mice exhibit a higher degree of inflammation than male mice. PMID:27711160

  9. The Effects of Syzygium samarangense, Passiflora edulis and Solanum muricatum on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Zheng, Jie; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that fruits have different effects on alcohol metabolism and alcohol-induced liver injury. The present work selected three fruits and aimed at studying the effects of Syzygium samarangense, Passiflora edulis and Solanum muricatum on alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. The animals were treated daily with alcohol and fruit juices for fifteen days. Chronic treatment with alcohol increased the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), total bilirubin (TBIL), triglyceride (TG), malondialdehyde (MDA), and decreased total protein (TP). Histopathological evaluation also showed that ethanol induced extensive fat droplets in hepatocyte cytoplasm. Syzygium samarangense and Passiflora edulis normalized various biochemical parameters. Solanum muricatum increased the level of ALT and induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the liver. These results strongly suggest that treatment with Syzygium samarangense and Passiflora edulis could protect liver from the injury of alcohol, while Solanum muricatum could aggravate the damage. PMID:27681723

  10. Ginger-derived nanoparticles protect against alcohol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhong-Bin; Mu, Jingyao; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Feng, Wenke; McClain, Craig J; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Daily exposure of humans to nanoparticles from edible plants is inevitable, but significant advances are required to determine whether edible plant nanoparticles are beneficial to our health. Additionally, strategies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying any beneficial effects. Here, as a proof of concept, we used a mouse model to show that orally given nanoparticles isolated from ginger extracts using a sucrose gradient centrifugation procedure resulted in protecting mice against alcohol-induced liver damage. The ginger-derived nanoparticle (GDN)-mediated activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) led to the expression of a group of liver detoxifying/antioxidant genes and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species, which partially contributes to the liver protection. Using lipid knock-out and knock-in strategies, we further identified that shogaol in the GDN plays a role in the induction of Nrf2 in a TLR4/TRIF-dependent manner. Given the critical role of Nrf2 in modulating numerous cellular processes, including hepatocyte homeostasis, drug metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and cell-cycle progression of liver, this finding not only opens up a new avenue for investigating GDN as a means to protect against the development of liver-related diseases such as alcohol-induced liver damage but sheds light on studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying interspecies communication in the liver via edible plant-derived nanoparticles. PMID:26610593

  11. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-12-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent.

  12. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent. PMID:24113767

  13. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  14. Potential Role of the Gut/Liver/Lung Axis in Alcohol-Induced Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Beier, Juliane I.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Both Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD) and alcohol-related susceptibility to acute lung injury are estimated to account for the highest morbidity and mortality related to chronic alcohol abuse and, thus, represent a focus of intense investigation. In general, alcohol-induced derangements to both organs are considered to be independent and are often evaluated separately. However, the liver and lung share many general responses to damage, and specific responses to alcohol exposure. For example, both organs possess resident macrophages that play key roles in mediating the immune/inflammatory response. Additionally, alcohol-induced damage to both organs appears to involve oxidative stress that favors tissue injury. Another mechanism that appears to be shared between the organs is that inflammatory injury to both organs is enhanced by alcohol exposure. Lastly, altered extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition appears to be a key step in disease progression in both organs. Indeed, recent studies suggest that early subtle changes in the ECM may predispose the target organ to an inflammatory insult. The purpose of this chapter is to review the parallel mechanisms of liver and lung injury in response to alcohol consumption. This chapter will also explore the potential that these mechanisms are interdependent, as part of a gut-liver-lung axis. PMID:26437442

  15. Cannabidiol protects liver from binge alcohol-induced steatosis by mechanisms including inhibition of oxidative stress and increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Wu, Defeng; Devi, Lakshmi A; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Acute alcohol drinking induces steatosis, and effective prevention of steatosis can protect liver from progressive damage caused by alcohol. Increased oxidative stress has been reported as one mechanism underlying alcohol-induced steatosis. We evaluated whether cannabidiol, which has been reported to function as an antioxidant, can protect the liver from alcohol-generated oxidative stress-induced steatosis. Cannabidiol can prevent acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice, possibly by preventing the increase in oxidative stress and the activation of the JNK MAPK pathway. Cannabidiol per se can increase autophagy both in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells and in mouse liver. Importantly, cannabidiol can prevent the decrease in autophagy induced by alcohol. In conclusion, these results show that cannabidiol protects mouse liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through multiple mechanisms including attenuation of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress, prevention of JNK MAPK activation, and increasing autophagy.

  16. Sequential acetaldehyde production, lipid peroxidation, and fibrogenesis in micropig model of alcohol-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, O; Parkkila, S; Ylä-Herttuala, S; Villanueva, J; Ruebner, B; Halsted, C H

    1995-10-01

    The pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver disease involves the adverse effects of ethanol metabolites and oxidative tissue injury. Previous studies indicated that covalent protein adducts with reactive aldehydes may be formed in alcohol consumers. To study the role of such protein adducts in the development of liver injury, we examined the sequential appearances of adducts of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde (AA) and of two products of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenol (HNE), in ethanol-fed micropigs. Immunohistochemical stainings using specific antibodies that recognize epitopes of each adduct were performed from liver biopsy specimens obtained at 1, 5, and 12 months from micropigs fed either control diet (n = 5) or ethanol-containing diets (n = 5). After 1 month on the ethanol diet, AA and MDA adducts were observed primarily in the perivenous regions co-localizing with each other and coinciding with increased concentrations of serum aminotransferase markers of liver injury. HNE adducts were usually less intense and more diffuse, and were also seen in some biopsy specimens from control animals. Although the most intense staining reactions at 5 months remained in zone 3, a more widespread distribution was usually seen together with increased evidence of steatonecrosis and focal inflammation. In terminal biopsies at 12 months, perivenous fibrosis was present in three of five biopsy specimens. More extensive pericentral and intralobular fibrosis was noted in one micropig fed ethanol for 21 months. These studies demonstrate that covalent adducts of proteins with reactive aldehydes are formed in early phases of alcohol-induced liver disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Effects of triterpenoid from Schisandra chinensis on oxidative stress in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Lijie; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jiachen; Jiao, Xinyao; Liu, Xiuying; Wang, Yanqun; Meng, Xianjun

    2015-03-01

    Alcohol-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathological development of alcoholic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triterpenoid from Schisandra chinensis on oxidative stress in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats. We found that the administration of triterpenoid attenuated alcohol-induced oxidative stress in multiple organs including liver. Moreover, the impaired liver function and histological changes resulted from alcohol consumption was improved by triterpenoid treatment. Finally, we found that pretreatment with triterpenoid from Schisandra chinensis to alcohol-fed rats increased the expression level of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) while inhibited the induction of cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) in liver microsomes. Further assays revealed that the microsomal activity of HO-1 was accordingly induced whereas CYP2E1 was suppressed in rats received triterpenoid intervention. Our findings suggest that triterpenoid from Schisandra chinensis may protect against alcohol-induced liver injury through ameliorating oxidative stress in rats.

  18. Betulinic acid prevents alcohol-induced liver damage by improving the antioxidant system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Yuan, Liyun; Wu, Jing; Tu, Di; Fang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane-type triterpene, has a wide range of bioactivities. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of BA and the potential mechanism underlying the ability of this compound to prevent liver damage induced by alcohol in vivo. Mice were given oral doses of BA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg) daily for 14 days, and induced liver injury by feeding 50% alcohol orally at the dosage of 10 ml/kg after 1 h last administration of BA. BA pretreatment significantly reduced the serum levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total cholesterol, and triacylglycerides in a dose-dependent manner in the mice administered alcohol. Hepatic levels of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were remarkably increased, while malondialdehyde contents and microvesicular steatosis in the liver were decreased by BA in a dose-dependent manner after alcohol-induced liver injury. These findings suggest that the mechanism underlying the hepatoprotective effects of BA might be due to increased antioxidant capacity, mainly through improvement of the tissue redox system, maintenance of the antioxidant system, and decreased lipid peroxidation in the liver. PMID:24378582

  19. Milk osteopontin, a nutritional approach to prevent alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaodong; Lu, Yongke; Leung, Tung-Ming; Sørensen, Esben S; Nieto, Natalia

    2013-05-15

    Alcohol consumption is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic interventions. Key events for the onset and progression of alcoholic liver disease result in part from the gut-to-liver interaction. Osteopontin is a cytokine present at high concentration in human milk, umbilical cord, and infants' plasma with beneficial potential. We hypothesized that dietary administration of milk osteopontin could prevent alcohol-induced liver injury perhaps by maintaining gut integrity and averting hepatic inflammation and steatosis. Wild-type mice were fed either the control or the ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diets alone or in combination with milk osteopontin for 3 wk, and parameters of gut and liver damage were measured. Milk osteopontin protected the stomach and the gut by increasing gland height, crypt cell plus enterocyte proliferation, and mucin content in addition to lowering macrophages, plasmacytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in the mucosa and submucosa in alcohol-fed mice. Milk osteopontin targeted the gut-liver axis, preserving the expression of tight-junction proteins in alcohol-fed mice thus maintaining intestinal integrity and permeability. There was protection from liver injury since transaminases, the activity scores, triglyceride levels, neutrophil infiltration, 3-nitrotyrosine residues, lipid peroxidation end products, translocation of gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide levels, and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in cotreated than in ethanol-fed mice. Furthermore, milk osteopontin diminished ethanol-mediated liver injury in OPN knockout mice. Milk osteopontin could be a simple effective nutritional therapeutic strategy to prevent alcohol hepatotoxicity due, among others, to gut protective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-steatotic actions. PMID:23518682

  20. Effect of resveratrol on alcohol-induced mortality and liver lesions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; García-Barcina, María; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Bidaurrazaga, Joseba; de Luco, Marian Fernández; Gutiérrez-Stampa, Marian; Larzabal, Mikel; Hijona, Elisabeth; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Echenique-Elizondo, Miguel; Arenas, Juan I

    2006-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a polyphenol with important antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on alcohol-induced mortality and liver lesions in mice. Methods Mice were randomly distributed into four groups (control, resveratrol-treated control, alcohol and resveratrol-treated alcohol). Chronic alcohol intoxication was induced by progressively administering alcohol in drinking water up to 40% v/v. The mice administered resveratrol received 10 mg/ml in drinking water. The animals had free access to standard diet. Blood levels were determined for transaminases, IL-1 and TNF-α. A histological evaluation was made of liver damage, and survival among the animals was recorded. Results Transaminase concentration was significantly higher in the alcohol group than in the rest of the groups (p < 0.05). IL-1 levels were significantly reduced in the alcohol plus resveratrol group compared with the alcohol group (p < 0.05). TNF-α was not detected in any group. Histologically, the liver lesions were more severe in the alcohol group, though no significant differences between groups were observed. Mortality in the alcohol group was 78% in the seventh week, versus 22% in the alcohol plus resveratrol group (p < 0.001). All mice in the alcohol group died before the ninth week. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that resveratrol reduces mortality and liver damage in mice. PMID:17105669

  1. Cinnamon extract protects against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Weber, Synia; Volynets, Valentina; Spruss, Astrid; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2009-03-01

    Acute and chronic consumption of alcohol can cause increased intestinal permeability and bacterial overgrowth, thereby increasing portal endotoxin levels. This barrier impairment subsequently leads to an activation of hepatic Kupffer cells and increased release of reactive oxygen species as well as of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). Recent studies have suggested that cinnamon extract may have antiinflammatory effects. In the present study, the protective effects of an alcoholic extract of cinnamon bark was assessed in a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced steatosis and in RAW 264.7 macrophages, used here as a model of Kupffer cells. Acute alcohol ingestion caused a >20-fold increase in hepatic lipid accumulation. Pretreatment with cinnamon extract significantly reduced the hepatic lipid accumulation. This protective effect of cinnamon extract was associated with an inhibition of the induction of the myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD) 88, inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 mRNA expression found in livers of alcohol-treated animals. In vitro prechallenge with cinnamon extract suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MyD88, iNOS, and TNFalpha expression as well as NO formation almost completely. Furthermore, LPS treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages further resulted in degradation of inhibitor kappaB; this effect was almost completely blocked by cinnamon extract. Taken together, our data show that an alcohol extract of cinnamon bark may protect the liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through mechanisms involving the inhibition of MyD88 expression. PMID:19126670

  2. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8-10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  3. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8–10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  4. Lipid peroxidation may not be important in an early stage of alcohol-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Inomata, T.; Rao, G.A.; Tsukamoto, H.

    1986-03-01

    Role of lipid peroxidation (LP) in alcoholic liver injury (ALI) is still controversial. The authors have previously described a rat model which produced the sequential injury from alcoholic fatty liver to liver necrosis and fibrosis. In the present study, the authors have examined the degree of LP and GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to investigate whether the LP can be identified in an early stage of progressive ALI. Six pairs of male Wistar rats were continuously infused intragastrically for 30 days with a high fat diet (25% total calories) plus either ethanol or isocaloric amount of dextrose. Following intoxication, the content of diene conjugates in mitochondrial and microsomal lipids as well as the liver GSH/GSSG ratio were determined by the diene difference spectrum and fluorometry, respectively. The UV absorption at 234nm by mitochondrial lipid from alcoholic rats (0.668 +/- 0.023 OD/mg) was significantly (p<0.05) lower than that of controls (0.977 +/- 0.102 OD/mg). The microsomal lipid, however, exhibited a similar absorbance in the two groups (0.986 +/- 0.086 vs 1.149 +/- 0.091 OD/mg0. Similarly, no difference in the ratio of GSH/GSSG was found (6.05 +/- 0.27 vs 5.35 +/- 0.44). These results do not support a concept that LP is an important pathogenetic factor for the progression of alcoholic fatty liver to liver necrosis.

  5. OSTEOPONTIN BINDING TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE LOWERS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α AND PREVENTS EARLY ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaodong; Leung, Tung-Ming; Arriazu, Elena; Lu, Yongke; Urtasun, Raquel; Christensen, Brian; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Mochida, Satoshi; Sørensen, Esben S.; Nieto, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Although osteopontin (OPN) is induced in alcoholic patients, its role in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains unclear. Increased translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gut is key for the onset of ALD since it promotes macrophage infiltration and activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production and liver injury. Since OPN is protective for the intestinal mucosa, we postulated that enhancing OPN expression in the liver and consequently in the blood and/or in the gut could protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Results: Wild-type (WT), OPN knockout (Opn−/−) and transgenic mice overexpressing OPN in hepatocytes (OpnHEP Tg) were chronically fed either the control or the ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol increased hepatic, plasma, biliary and fecal OPN more in OpnHEP Tg than in WT mice. Steatosis was lesser in ethanol-treated OpnHEP Tg mice as shown by decreased liver-to-body weight ratio, hepatic triglycerides, the steatosis score, oil red-O staining and lipid peroxidation. There was also less inflammation and liver injury as demonstrated by lower ALT activity, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration, LPS levels, the inflammation score and the number of macrophages and TNFα+ cells. To establish if OPN could limit LPS availability and its noxious effects in the liver, binding studies were performed. OPN showed affinity for LPS and the binding prevented macrophage activation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and TNFα production. Treatment with milk OPN (m-OPN) blocked LPS translocation in vivo and protected from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Natural induction plus forced overexpression of OPN in the liver and treatment with m-OPN protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury by blocking the gut-derived LPS and TNFα effects in the liver. PMID:24214181

  6. Parkin regulates mitophagy and mitochondrial function to protect against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica A.; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease claims two million lives per year. We previously reported that autophagy protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis by removing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanisms for removal of these mitochondria are unknown. Parkin is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that is recruited to damaged mitochondria to initiate ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and subsequent mitochondrial degradation by mitophagy. In addition to its role in mitophagy, Parkin has been shown to have other roles in maintaining mitochondrial function. We investigated whether Parkin protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis using wild-type (WT) and Parkin knockout (KO) mice treated with alcohol by the acute-binge and Gao-binge (chronic plus acute-binge) models. We found that Parkin protected against liver injury in both alcohol models, likely because of Parkin's role in maintaining a population of healthy mitochondria. Alcohol caused greater mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in Parkin KO livers compared with WT livers. After alcohol treatment, Parkin KO mice had severely swollen and damaged mitochondria that lacked cristae, which were not seen in WT mice. Furthermore, Parkin KO mice had decreased mitophagy, β-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and cytochrome c oxidase activity after acute alcohol treatment compared with WT mice. Interestingly, liver mitochondria seemed able to adapt to alcohol treatment, but Parkin KO mouse liver mitochondria had less capacity to adapt to Gao-binge treatment compared with WT mouse liver mitochondria. Overall, our findings indicate that Parkin is an important mediator of protection against alcohol-induced mitochondrial damage, steatosis, and liver injury. PMID:26159696

  7. Fortilin potentiates the peroxidase activity of Peroxiredoxin-1 and protects against alcohol-induced liver damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Pinkaew, Decha; Doan, Hung Q.; Jacob, Reed B.; Verma, Sunil K.; Friedman, Hana; Peterson, Alan C.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.; McDougal, Owen M.; Fujise, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Fortilin, a pro-survival molecule, inhibits p53-induced apoptosis by binding to the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein and preventing it from transcriptionally activating Bax. Intriguingly, fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, independent of p53. The signaling pathway through which fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, however, is unknown. Here we report that fortilin physically interacts with the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin-1 (PRX1), protects it from proteasome-mediated degradation, and keeps it enzymatically active by blocking its deactivating phosphorylation by Mst1, a serine/threonine kinase. At the whole animal level, the liver-specific overexpression of fortilin reduced PRX1 phosphorylation in the liver, enhanced PRX1 activity, and protected the transgenic animals against alcohol-induced, ROS-mediated, liver damage. These data suggest the presence of a novel oxidative-stress-handling pathway where the anti-p53 molecule fortilin augments the peroxidase PRX1 by protecting it against degradation and inactivation of the enzyme. Fortilin-PRX1 interaction in the liver could be clinically exploited further to prevent acute alcohol-induced liver damage in humans. PMID:26726832

  8. Fortilin potentiates the peroxidase activity of Peroxiredoxin-1 and protects against alcohol-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Pinkaew, Decha; Doan, Hung Q; Jacob, Reed B; Verma, Sunil K; Friedman, Hana; Peterson, Alan C; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N; McDougal, Owen M; Fujise, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Fortilin, a pro-survival molecule, inhibits p53-induced apoptosis by binding to the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein and preventing it from transcriptionally activating Bax. Intriguingly, fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, independent of p53. The signaling pathway through which fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, however, is unknown. Here we report that fortilin physically interacts with the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin-1 (PRX1), protects it from proteasome-mediated degradation, and keeps it enzymatically active by blocking its deactivating phosphorylation by Mst1, a serine/threonine kinase. At the whole animal level, the liver-specific overexpression of fortilin reduced PRX1 phosphorylation in the liver, enhanced PRX1 activity, and protected the transgenic animals against alcohol-induced, ROS-mediated, liver damage. These data suggest the presence of a novel oxidative-stress-handling pathway where the anti-p53 molecule fortilin augments the peroxidase PRX1 by protecting it against degradation and inactivation of the enzyme. Fortilin-PRX1 interaction in the liver could be clinically exploited further to prevent acute alcohol-induced liver damage in humans. PMID:26726832

  9. Prevention of alcoholic fatty liver and mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Olsson, Nils U.; Salem, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims We reported that reduced dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as arachidonic (AA,20:4n6, omega-6) and docosahexaenoic (DHA,22:6n3, omega-3) acids led to alcohol-induced fatty liver and fibrosis. This study was aimed at studying the mechanisms by which a DHA/AA-supplemented diet prevents alcohol-induced fatty liver. Methods Male Long-Evans rats were fed an ethanol or control liquid-diet with or without DHA/AA for 9 weeks. Plasma transaminase levels, liver histology, oxidative/nitrosative stress markers, and activities of oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins were evaluated. Results Chronic alcohol administration increased the degree of fatty liver but fatty liver decreased significantly in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. Alcohol exposure increased oxidative/nitrosative stress with elevated levels of ethanol-inducible CYP2E1, nitric oxide synthase, nitrite and mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. However, these increments were normalized in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. The number of oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins was markedly increased following alcohol exposure but significantly reduced in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. The suppressed activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase in ethanol-exposed rats were also recovered in animals fed the ethanol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. Conclusions Addition of DHA/AA prevents alcohol-induced fatty liver and mitochondrial dysfunction in an animal model by protecting various mitochondrial enzymes most likely through reducing oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:18571270

  10. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    MedlinePlus

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease What is Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)? FAT N AFLD is a name that is given to a ... and under “Liver Health Information view ‘Nonalcoholic fatty liver Disease (NAFLD/NASH)’ IMPORTANT REMINDER: This information from the ...

  11. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)--A Review.

    PubMed

    Karim, M F; Al-Mahtab, M; Rahman, S; Debnath, C R

    2015-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Hepatology clinics. It is closely related to the increased frequency of overweight or obesity. It has recognised association with metabolic syndrome. Central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia are commonest risk factors. Association with hepatitis C genotype 3 is also recognised. NAFLD is an important cause of cyptogenic cirrhosis of liver. It affects all populations and all age groups. Most patients with NAFLD are asymptomatic or vague upper abdominal pain. Liver function tests are mostly normal or mild elevation of aminotranferases. Histological features almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. Two hit hypothesis is prevailing theory for the development of NAFLD. Diagnosis is usually made by imaging tools like ultrasonogram which reveal a bright liver while liver biopsy is gold standard for diagnosis as well as differentiating simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Prognosis is variable. Simple hepatic steatosis generally has a benign long-term prognosis. However, one to two third of NASH progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis and may have a similar prognosis as cirrhosis from other liver diseases. Treatment is mostly control of underlying disorders and dietary advice, exercise, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, or cytoprotective agents. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. So it needs more research to address this problem. PMID:26620035

  12. Fatty liver - nonalcoholic

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have the following tests to measure liver function: Complete blood count Prothrombin time Blood albumin level Your health care provider may ask for certain imaging tests, including: Ultrasound is often ...

  13. The protective effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill, submerged culture using the optimized medium composition, on alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wenyu; Han, Chunchao; Xu, Xin; Li, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM), an edible mushroom native to Brazil, is widely used for nonprescript and medicinal purposes. Alcohol liver disease (ALD) is considered as a leading cause for a liver injury in modern dietary life, which can be developed by a prolonged or large intake of alcohol. In this study, the medium composition of ABM was optimized using response surface methodology for maximum mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. The model predicts to gain a maximal mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide at 1.047 g/100 mL, and 0.367 g/100 mL, respectively, when the potato is 29.88 g/100 mL, the glucose is 1.01 g/100 mL, and the bran is 1.02 g/100 mL. The verified experiments showed that the model was significantly consistent with the model prediction and that the trends of mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide were predicted by artificial neural network. After that, the optimized medium was used for the submerged culture of ABM. Then, alcohol-induced liver injury in mice model was used to examine the protective effect of ABM cultured using the optimized medium on the liver. And the hepatic histopathological observations showed that ABM had a relatively significant role in mice model, which had alcoholic liver damage.

  14. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  15. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF HYPOTHALAMIC BETA-ENDORPHIN NEURONS AGAINST ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURIES AND LIVER CANCERS IN RAT ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Sengottuvelan; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, retrograde tracing has provided evidence for an influence of hypothalamic β-endorphin (BEP) neurons on the liver, but functions of these neurons are not known. We evaluated the effect of BEP neuronal activation on alcohol-induced liver injury and hepatocellular cancer. Methods Male rats received either BEP neuron transplants or control transplants in the hypothalamus and randomly assigned to feeding alcohol-containing liquid diet or control liquid diet for 8 weeks or to treatment of a carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Liver tissues of these animals were analyzed histochemically and biochemically for tissue injuries or cancer. Results Alcohol-feeding increased liver weight and induced several histopathological changes such as prominent microvesicular steatosis and hepatic fibrosis. Alcohol feeding also increased protein levels of triglyceride, hepatic stellate cell activation factors and catecholamines in the liver and endotoxin levels in the plasma. However, these effects of alcohol on the liver were reduced in animals with BEP neuron transplants. BEP neuron transplants also suppressed carcinogen-induced liver histopathologies such as extensive fibrosis, large focus of inflammatory infiltration, hepatocelluar carcinoma, collagen deposition, numbers of preneoplastic foci, levels of hepatic stellate cell activation factors and catecholamines, as well as inflammatory milieu and the levels of NK cell cytotoxic factors in the liver. Conclusion These findings are the first evidence for a role of hypothalamic BEP neurons in influencing liver functions. Additionally, the data identify that BEP neuron transplantation prevents hepatocellular injury and hepatocellular carcinoma formation possibly via influencing the immune function. PMID:25581653

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-24

    Essential facts Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an excess of fat in the liver that is not the result of excessive alcohol consumption or other secondary causes, such as hepatitis C. According to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, fatty liver - steatosis - affects between 20% and 30% of the population and its prevalence is increasing. PMID:27641564

  17. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART.

  18. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART. PMID:26484872

  19. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Tagle Arrospide, Martín

    2003-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more agressive form, non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are entities that are becoming subject of interest of the medical community in general, especially because of the increased prevalence of diabetes and obesity in the world population. There is solid evidence linking NAFLD with the so called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X, to the point of accepting hepatic steatosis and its spectrum as one more element of the latter, along with diabetes, hipertension, hypertriglyceridemia and obesity. Insulin resistance seems to be the common link between these entities. Clinical evaluation of every patient with abnormal aminotransferase levels should take into account non alcoholic fatty liver and its spectrum, especially if the subject is obese or diabetic. Despite the important developments in the field of imaging, currenty the only way to differentiate NASH from simple NAFLD is by performing a liver biopsy, which should be discussed extensively with the patient. The prognosis of simple NAFLD is generally benign, but if there is fibrosis, ballooning of the hepatocytes, inflammation and Mallory bodies there is risk to progression to cirrhosis. Liver histology in NAFLD is indistinguishable from alcoholic hepatitis, although the clinical course is generally more benign. Despite this long and protracted clinical course, an important number of subjects have complications of cirrhosis including hepatocellular carcinoma, and many patients require a liver transplantation. There is no specific treatment for this condition, although every therapeutic regimen should include a gradual and supervised weight reduction, a balanced diet and exercise, as well as correction of precipitant factors. There is currently no specific pharmacologic treatment for NASH or NAFLD. Current body of evidence and some pilot studies suggest that the future might be concentrated in agents improving insulin resistance. Meanwhile, we should do our best to

  20. Hepatoprotective Activity of Elephantopus scaber on Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Abdul Rahim, Raha; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    Elephantopus scaber has been traditionally used as liver tonic. However, the protective effect of E. scaber on ethanol-induced liver damage is still unclear. In this study, we have compared the in vivo hepatoprotective effect of E. scaber with Phyllanthus niruri on the ethanol-induced liver damage in mice. The total phenolic and total flavanoid content of E. scaber ethanol extract were determined in this study. Accelerating serum biochemical profiles (including AST, ALT, ALP, triglyceride, and total bilirubin) associated with fat drop and necrotic body in the liver section were observed in the mice treated with ethanol. Low concentration of E. scaber was able to reduce serum biochemical profiles and the fat accumulation in the liver. Furthermore, high concentration of E. scaber and positive control P. niruri were able to revert the liver damage, which is comparable to the normal control. Added to this, E. scaber did not possess any oral acute toxicity on mice. These results suggest the potential effect of this extract as a hepatoprotective agent towards-ethanol induced liver damage without any oral acute toxicity effect. These activities might be contributed, or at least in part, by its high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. PMID:22973401

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Alcoholic Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Gao, Bin; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a potentially pathologic condition which can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis if alcohol consumption is continued. Alcohol exposure may induce fatty liver by increasing NADH/NAD+ ratio, increasing sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) activity, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activity, and increasing complement C3 hepatic levels. Alcohol may increase SREBP-1 activity by decreasing the activities of AMP-activated protein kinase and sirtuin-1. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) produced in response to alcohol exposure may cause fatty liver by up-regulating SREBP-1 activity, whereas betaine and pioglitazone may attenuate fatty liver by down-regulating SREBP-1 activity. PPAR-α agonists have potentials to attenuate alcoholic fatty liver. Adiponectin and interleukin-6 may attenuate alcoholic fatty liver by up-regulating PPAR-α and insulin signaling pathways while down-regulating SREBP-1 activity, and suppressing TNF-α production. Recent studies show that paracrine activation of hepatic cannabinoid receptor 1 by hepatic stellate cell-derived endocannabinoids also contributes to the development of alcoholic fatty liver. Furthermore, oxidative modifications and inactivation of the enzymes involved in the mitochondrial and/or peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids could contribute to fat accumulation in the liver. PMID:19032584

  2. Aberrant post-translational protein modifications in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A; Carter, Wayne G; Ganesan, Murali; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Petersen, Dennis R; Shearn, Colin T; Tomasi, Maria L; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2016-07-21

    It is likely that the majority of proteins will undergo post-translational modification, be it enzymatic or non-enzymatic. These modified protein(s) regulate activity, localization and interaction with other cellular molecules thereby maintaining cellular hemostasis. Alcohol exposure significantly alters several of these post-translational modifications leading to impairments of many essential physiological processes. Here, we present new insights into novel modifications following ethanol exposure and their role in the initiation and progression of liver injury. This critical review condenses the proceedings of a symposium at the European Society for the Biomedical Research on Alcoholism Meeting held September 12-15, 2015, in Valencia, Spain. PMID:27468209

  3. Aberrant post-translational protein modifications in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A; Carter, Wayne G; Ganesan, Murali; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Petersen, Dennis R; Shearn, Colin T; Tomasi, Maria L; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2016-01-01

    It is likely that the majority of proteins will undergo post-translational modification, be it enzymatic or non-enzymatic. These modified protein(s) regulate activity, localization and interaction with other cellular molecules thereby maintaining cellular hemostasis. Alcohol exposure significantly alters several of these post-translational modifications leading to impairments of many essential physiological processes. Here, we present new insights into novel modifications following ethanol exposure and their role in the initiation and progression of liver injury. This critical review condenses the proceedings of a symposium at the European Society for the Biomedical Research on Alcoholism Meeting held September 12-15, 2015, in Valencia, Spain. PMID:27468209

  4. Pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver disease: classical concepts and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; Haber, Paul S; Syn, Wing-Kin; Diehl, Anna Mae; Day, Christopher P

    2011-07-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a primary consequence of heavy and prolonged drinking. ALD contributes to the bulk of liver disease burden worldwide. Progression of ALD is a multifactorial and multistep process that includes many genetic and environmental risk factors. The molecular pathogenesis of ALD involves alcohol metabolism and secondary mechanisms such as oxidative stress, endotoxin, cytokines and immune regulators. The histopathological manifestation of ALD occurs as an outcome of complex but controlled interactions between hepatic cell types. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the key drivers of fibrogenesis, but transformation of hepatocytes to myofibroblastoids also implicate parenchymal cells as playing an active role in hepatic fibrogenesis. Recent discoveries indicate that lipogenesis during the early stages of ALD is a risk for advancement to cirrhosis. Other recently identified novel molecules and physiological/cell signaling pathways include fibrinolysis, osteopontin, transforming growth factor-β-SMAD and hedgehog signaling, and involvement of novel cytokines in hepatic fibrogenesis. The observation that ALD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis share common pathways and genetic polymorphisms suggests operation of parallel pathogenic mechanisms. Future research involving genomics, epigenomics, deep sequencing and non-coding regulatory elements holds promise to identify novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets for ALD. There is also a need for adequate animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms at the molecular level and targeted therapy.

  5. Neonatal androgenization exacerbates alcohol-induced liver injury in adult rats, an effect abrogated by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, Whitney M; Lakner, Ashley M; Hamilton, Alicia; McKillop, Iain H; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Steuerwald, Nury M; Huet, Yvette M; Schrum, Laura W

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) affects millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. However, fewer than 10% of heavy drinkers progress to later stages of injury, suggesting other factors in ALD development, including environmental exposures and genetics. Females display greater susceptibility to the early damaging effects of ethanol. Estrogen (E2) and ethanol metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, CYP450) are implicated in sex differences of ALD. Sex steroid hormones are developmentally regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which controls sex-specific cycling of gonadal steroid production and expression of hepatic enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine if early postnatal inhibition of adult cyclic E2 alters ethanol metabolizing enzyme expression contributing to the development of ALD in adulthood. An androgenized rat model was used to inhibit cyclic E2 production. Control females (Ctrl), androgenized females (Andro) and Andro females with E2 implants were administered either an ethanol or isocalorically-matched control Lieber-DeCarli diet for four weeks and liver injury and CYP450 expression assessed. Androgenization exacerbated the deleterious effects of ethanol demonstrated by increased steatosis, lipid peroxidation, profibrotic gene expression and decreased antioxidant defenses compared to Ctrl. Additionally, CYP2E1 expression was down-regulated in Andro animals on both diets. No change was observed in CYP1A2 protein expression. Further, continuous exogenous administration of E2 to Andro in adulthood attenuated these effects, suggesting that E2 has protective effects in the androgenized animal. Therefore, early postnatal inhibition of cyclic E2 modulates development and progression of ALD in adulthood.

  6. New role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Arteel, Gavin E

    2008-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, thereby playing a major role in fibrinolysis. Whereas hyperfibrinolysis is common in alcoholic cirrhosis, hypofibrinolysis (driven mostly by elevated levels of PAI-1) is common during the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, whether or not PAI-1 plays a causal role in the development of ALD has been unclear. The role of PAI-1 was therefore investigated in models of early (steatosis), intermediate (inflammation/necrosis) and late (fibrosis) stages of alcoholic liver disease. For example, hepatic steatosis caused by both acute and chronic ethanol was blunted by inhibiting PAI-1 activation. This effect of inhibiting PAI-1 appears to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis in the absence of PAI-1. The results from that study also indicated that PAI-1 plays a critical role in both acute and chronic hepatic inflammation. Lastly, knocking out PAI-1 potently protected against experimental hepatic fibrosis; the mechanism of this protective effect appears to be mediated predominantly by extracellular matrix (ECM) resolution by matrix metalloproteases, which are indirectly inhibited by PAI-1. In summary, targeting PAI-1 protects against all three stages of ALD in model systems. The mechanisms by which PAI-1 contributes to these disease stages appear to not only involve the ‘classical’ function of PAI-1 (i.e. in mediating fibrinolysis), but also other functions of this protein. These data support a role of PAI-1 in the initiation and progression of ALD, and suggest that PAI-1 may be a useful target for clinical therapy to halt or blunt disease progression. PMID:18336665

  7. Enzymatic modification enhances the protective activity of citrus flavonoids against alcohol-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Young; Choi, Hee-Don; Eom, Hyojin; Choi, Inwook

    2013-08-15

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) can be developed by a prolonged or large intake of alcohol in a short period of time. ALD is considered as a leading cause for a liver injury in modern dietary life. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of orally administrated citrus flavonoids (CFs) and their enzymatically modified ones (EM-CFs) to prevent ALD. Hesperidin and narirutin were extracted from peels of Citrus unshiu by ultra-sonication and purified further. These CFs were modified enzymatically through glycosylation and de-rhamnosylation by the actions of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) and hesperidinase, respectively. CFs and EM-CFs were fed to ICR mouse along with ethanol for 8 weeks, and changes in lipid contents, lipid peroxidation, GSH, antioxidant enzymes activity and proinflammatory cytokines in hepatic tissues were observed. Administration of CFs and EM-CFs along with alcohol significantly suppressed increases in prognostic parameters of a hepatocellular injury. Especially, EM-CFs fed groups maintained malondialdehyde, GSH levels and catalase activity in hepatic tissues close to those of the normal diet fed group. Abrupt increases in proinflammatory cytokines such as IκB-α, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in hepatocytes due to a chronic alcohol uptake were significantly suppressed by co-administration of EM-CFs. These results indicate that although the administration of CFs can alleviate ALD through preventing excessive lipid formation, protecting the antioxidant system and suppressing induction of inflammation in hepatocytes, their effectiveness can be further improved by glycosylation and de-rhamnosylation.

  8. Geniposide protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junming; Zhang, Yueyue; Liu, Ruixin; Li, Xiaobing; Cui, Ying; Qu, Lingbo

    2015-04-01

    Geniposide (GP) is one of main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, with both medicinal and nutritional value. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how GP from G. jasminoides protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury, and the underlying mechanisms. Mice were orally administered alcohol (6.0 g/kg body mass) 2 h after intragastric administration of GP and bifendate, every day for 7 continuous days. Six hours after the alcohol was administered, levels of serum alanine/aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST), hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), and catalase (CAT), and mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT were assayed. The results demonstrated that GP (20.0, 40.0, or 80 mg/kg) significantly reversed the excessive, alcohol-induced elevation in both serum ALT/AST and hepatic LPO levels. Moreover, hepatic GSH, GST, GPx, CuZn-SOD, and CAT levels were all decreased in the alcohol-treated mice, whereas treatment with GP reversed these decreases. Further analysis indicated that hepatic mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT in the alcohol-treated mice was significantly down-regulated, whereas GP up-regulated such decreases. Taken together, this study shows that GP protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes, and thus ameliorates alcohol-induced oxidative stress injury in the liver. PMID:25730420

  9. Geniposide protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junming; Zhang, Yueyue; Liu, Ruixin; Li, Xiaobing; Cui, Ying; Qu, Lingbo

    2015-04-01

    Geniposide (GP) is one of main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, with both medicinal and nutritional value. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how GP from G. jasminoides protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury, and the underlying mechanisms. Mice were orally administered alcohol (6.0 g/kg body mass) 2 h after intragastric administration of GP and bifendate, every day for 7 continuous days. Six hours after the alcohol was administered, levels of serum alanine/aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST), hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), and catalase (CAT), and mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT were assayed. The results demonstrated that GP (20.0, 40.0, or 80 mg/kg) significantly reversed the excessive, alcohol-induced elevation in both serum ALT/AST and hepatic LPO levels. Moreover, hepatic GSH, GST, GPx, CuZn-SOD, and CAT levels were all decreased in the alcohol-treated mice, whereas treatment with GP reversed these decreases. Further analysis indicated that hepatic mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT in the alcohol-treated mice was significantly down-regulated, whereas GP up-regulated such decreases. Taken together, this study shows that GP protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes, and thus ameliorates alcohol-induced oxidative stress injury in the liver.

  10. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus protects against alcohol-induced liver damage by modulating inflammatory mediators in mice and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung Dae; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Taeseong; Jang, Seon-A; Kang, Se Chan; Koo, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Eunsoo; Bak, Jong Phil; Namkoong, Seung; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In Sung; Kim, Nari; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Han, Jin

    2015-02-01

    Fucoidan is an l-fucose-enriched sulfated polysaccharide isolated from brown algae and marine invertebrates. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus on alcohol-induced murine liver damage. Liver injury was induced by oral administration of 25% alcohol with or without fucoidan (30 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg) for seven days. Alcohol administration increased serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, but these increases were suppressed by the treatment of fucoidan. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a liver fibrosis-inducing factor, was highly expressed in the alcohol-fed group and human hepatoma HepG2 cell; however, the increase in TGF-β1 expression was reduced following fucoidan administration. Treatment with fucoidan was also found to significantly reduce the production of inflammation-promoting cyclooygenase-2 and nitric oxide, while markedly increasing the expression of the hepatoprotective enzyme, hemeoxygenase-1, on murine liver and HepG2 cells. Taken together, the antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of fucoidan on alcohol-induced liver damage may provide valuable insights into developing new therapeutics or interventions.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of garlic-induced hepatoprotection against alcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Rajasekaran; Liu, Chun-Ting; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Tang, Xiaojia; Kalari, Krishna R; Subramanian, Subbaya; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Fatty liver induced by alcohol abuse is a major worldwide health hazard leading to morbidity and mortality. Previous studies indicate antifatty liver properties of garlic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms of garlic oil (GO) or diallyl disulfide (DADS) imparted hepatoprotection against alcohol induced fatty liver in C57BL/6 mice using microarray-based global gene expression analysis. Alcohol liquid diet resulted in severe fatty liver with increased levels of serum aspartate aminotransferease and alanine aminotransferease as well as triglycerides and decreased levels of liver glutathione and antioxidant enzymes. The major canonical pathways implicated by alcohol treatment are the metabolisms of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, glutathione, and arachidonic acid. Treatment with DADS or GO normalized the serum aminotransferease levels and liver antioxidant enzymes and reduced the contents of triglycerides and cholesterol. The canonical pathways involved in the amelioration of liver include arachidonic acid metabolism, altered T cell and B cell signaling, tryptophan metabolism, antigen presentation pathway for DADS, metabolism of xenobiotics, mitotic roles of Polo-like kinase, fatty acid metabolism, LPS/IL-1 mediated inhibition of RXR function, and C21-steroid hormone metabolism for GO.

  12. Alcohol-induced insulin resistance in liver: Potential roles in regulation of ADH expression; ethanol clearance and alcohol liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using total enteral nutrition (TEN), we demonstrated that low carbohydrate, high alcohol-containing diets (10-12 g/kg/dO produced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (300 g). Intragastric infusion of this diet generates regular pulses of blood ethanol concentrations (BEC...

  13. [Non-invasive assessment of fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2015-04-01

    As the result of various harmful effects (infectious agents, metabolic diseases, unhealthy diet, obesity, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) hepatic damage may develop, which can progress towards liver steatosis, and fibrosis as well. The most common etiological factors of liver damages are hepatitis B and C infection, alcohol consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic liver diseases. Due to the dangers and complications of liver biopsy, studies are focused on non-invasive markers and radiological imaging for liver steatosis, progression of fatty liver, activity of the necroinflammation and the severity of the fibrosis. Authors review the possibilities of non-invasive assessment of liver steatosis. The statistical features of the probes (positive, negative predictive values, sensitivity, specificity) are reviewed. The role of radiological imaging is also discussed. Although the non-invasive methods discussed in this article are useful to assess liver steatosis, further studies are needed to validate to follow progression of the diseases and to control therapeutic response.

  14. Increased hepatic receptor interacting protein kinase 3 expression due to impaired proteasomal functions contributes to alcohol-induced steatosis and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Nawabi, Atta; Komatsu, Masaaki; Huang, Heqing; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 3 expression and necroptosis in the liver but its mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that chronic alcohol feeding plus binge (Gao-binge) increased RIP3 but not RIP1 protein levels in mouse livers. RIP3 knockout mice had decreased serum alanine amino transferase activity and hepatic steatosis but had no effect on hepatic neutrophil infiltration compared with wild type mice after Gao-binge alcohol treatment. The hepatic mRNA levels of RIP3 did not change between Gao-binge and control mice, suggesting that alcohol-induced hepatic RIP3 proteins are regulated at the posttranslational level. We found that Gao-binge treatment decreased the levels of proteasome subunit alpha type-2 (PSMA2) and proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 1 (PSMC1) and impaired hepatic proteasome function. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of proteasome resulted in the accumulation of RIP3 in mouse livers. More importantly, human alcoholics had decreased expression of PSMA2 and PSMC1 but increased protein levels of RIP3 compared with healthy human livers. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreased Gao-binge-induced hepatic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and NF-κB subunit (p65) nuclear translocation but failed to protect against steatosis and liver injury induced by Gao-binge alcohol. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that impaired hepatic proteasome function by alcohol exposure may contribute to hepatic accumulation of RIP3 resulting in necroptosis and steatosis while RIP1 kinase activity is important for alcohol-induced inflammation. PMID:26769846

  15. Fatty liver incidence and predictive variables.

    PubMed

    Tsuneto, Akira; Hida, Ayumi; Sera, Nobuko; Imaizumi, Misa; Ichimaru, Shinichiro; Nakashima, Eiji; Seto, Shinji; Maemura, Koji; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2010-06-01

    Although fatty liver predicts ischemic heart disease, the incidence and predictors of fatty liver need examination. The objective of this study was to determine fatty liver incidence and predictive variables. Using abdominal ultrasonography, we followed biennially through 2007 (mean follow-up, 11.6+/-4.6 years) 1635 Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors (606 men) without fatty liver at baseline (November 1990 through October 1992). We examined potential predictive variables with the Cox proportional hazard model and longitudinal trends with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. In all, 323 (124 men) new fatty liver cases were diagnosed. The incidence was 19.9/1000 person-years (22.3 for men, 18.6 for women) and peaked in the sixth decade of life. After controlling for age, sex, and smoking and drinking habits, obesity (relative risk (RR), 2.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.33-3.69, P<0.001), low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (RR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.42-2.47; P<0.001), hypertriglyceridemia (RR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.96-3.15; P<0.001), glucose intolerance (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.09-2.10; P=0.013) and hypertension (RR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.30-2.04; P<0.001) were predictive of fatty liver. In multivariate analysis including all variables, obesity (RR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.93-3.38; P<0.001), hypertriglyceridemia (RR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.41-2.62; P<0.001) and hypertension (RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.01-1.71; P=0.046) remained predictive. In fatty liver cases, body mass index and serum triglycerides, but not systolic or diastolic blood pressure, increased significantly and steadily up to the time of the diagnosis. Obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and, to a lesser extent, hypertension might serve as predictive variables for fatty liver. PMID:20379184

  16. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  17. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  18. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  19. How to Diagnose Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    de Alwis, Nimantha M W; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are asymptomatic and present with either unexplained abnormal liver blood tests or a bright liver on ultrasonography. Some patients will have normal liver blood tests raising the issue of whether patients with risk factors for NAFLD (diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome [MS]) should be screened for its presence with biomarkers, such as the fatty liver index (FLI). The diagnosis of NAFLD requires the exclusion of other causes of chronic liver disease and steatosis, especially heavy alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis particularly HCV genotype 3. Diagnostic work-up should include evaluation of family and personal history of components of the MS and assessment of liver tests, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and HDL levels. A drug history is important due to a number being associated with steatosis. To confirm the diagnosis of NAFLD and quantify steatosis, ultrasound (US) and MRI-based techniques are available but none are in routine use outside clinical trials. Standard US is no more accurate than biomarkers such as FLI. The accurate staging of NAFLD requires liver biopsy; however, this is clearly impractical for such a prevalent disease. Accordingly, a number of imaging and blood-based biomarker tests have been evaluated. While none have proved reliable for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, several have proved accurate in diagnosing the presence of stage 3 or 4 fibrosis, including the NAFLD fibrosis score, fibrosis-4 and the enhanced liver fibrosis test. Of the imaging techniques, elastography has received the most attention and is being used in routine clinical practice. US acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and MR-based elastography have recently been described but none are sufficiently accurate to replace liver biopsy for clinical trials as yet or are cost effective for use in routine clinical settings. PMID:27547937

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Gene Deficiency Ameliorates Hepatic Injury in a Mouse Model of Chronic Binge Alcohol-Induced Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huilin; Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Ramsden, Christopher E.; Feldstein, Ariel E.; McClain, Craig J.; Kirpich, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental alcohol-induced liver injury is exacerbated by a high polyunsaturated fat diet rich in linoleic acid. We postulated that bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) play a critical role in the development/progression of alcohol-mediated hepatic inflammation and injury. OXLAMs are endogenous ligands for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Herein, we evaluated the role of signaling through TRPV1 in an experimental animal model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Chronic binge alcohol administration increased plasma OXLAM levels, specifically 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids. This effect was associated with up-regulation of hepatic TRPV1. Exposure of hepatocytes to these OXLAMs in vitro resulted in activation of TRPV1 signal transduction with increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. Genetic depletion of TRPV1 did not blunt hepatic steatosis caused by ethanol, but prevented hepatic injury. TRPV1 deficiency protected from hepatocyte death and prevented the increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. TRPV1 depletion markedly blunted ethanol-mediated induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, an important alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation mediator, via fibrin accumulation. This study indicates, for the first time, that TRPV1 receptor pathway may be involved in hepatic inflammatory response in an experimental animal model of ALD. TRPV1-OXLAM interactions appear to play a significant role in hepatic inflammation/injury, further supporting an important role for dietary lipids in ALD. PMID:25447051

  1. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanliang; Ni, Yinhua; Nagata, Naoto; Xu, Liang; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin. PMID:27563875

  2. Probiotics and Nonalcoholic Fatty liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eslamparast, Tannaz; Eghtesad, Sareh; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Poustchi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide, both in adults and in children. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. However, NAFLD is more prevalent in overweight and obese individuals. Evidences thus far suggest that hepatic triglyceride accumulation is not always derived from obesity; gut microbiota can also play a role in the development of insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis. On the other hand, probiotics can strengthen the intestinal wall, reducing its permeability, bacterial translocation, and endotoxemia according to animal and human studies. They can also reduce oxidative and inflammatory liver damage, while improving the histological state in certain situations. This review article focuses on research that has been conducted on probiotics and NAFLD, highlighting their efficacy as a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of this condition. PMID:24829682

  3. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Elizabeth M; Tiniakos, Dina G

    2010-01-01

    Histological analysis of liver biopsies remains a standard against which other methods of assessment for the presence and amount of hepatic injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are measured. Histological evaluation remains the sole method of distinguishing steatosis from advanced forms of NAFLD, i.e. nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Included in the lesions of NAFLD are steatosis, lobular and portal inflammation, hepatocyte injury in the forms of ballooning and apoptosis, and fibrosis. However, patterns of these lesions are as distinguishing as the lesions themselves. Liver injury in adults and children due to NAFLD may have different histological patterns. In this review, the rationale for liver biopsy, as well as the histopathological lesions, the microscopically observable patterns of injury, and the differential diagnoses of NAFLD and NASH are discussed. PMID:21072891

  4. Clinicopathological evaluation of downer dairy cows with fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzakis, Emmanouil; Panousis, Nikolaos; Roubies, Nikolaos; Giadinis, Nektarios; Kaldrymidou, Eleni; Georgiadis, Marios; Karatzias, Harilaos

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between severity of fatty liver and macromineral status in downer dairy cows and determined the usefulness of selected biochemical analytes for assessing prognosis. Blood and liver biopsy specimens were obtained from 36 Holstein downer cows shortly after the cows became recumbent and before they were treated. Liver tissue was examined histologically and serum activity of liver-derived enzymes and concentration of total lipids, triglycerides, bile acids, glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetic acid, total bilirubin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol and macrominerals (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P) were determined. Fatty liver infiltration was severe in 44% of the cows and moderate in 44%. Serum activities of ornithine carbamoyltransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and NEFA/cholesterol ratio were good indicators of fatty liver. Cows with severe fatty liver had the lowest mean K values. The prognosis is guarded for downer cows with moderate and severe fatty liver and when total bilirubin concentration is high. PMID:20808573

  5. Clinicopathological evaluation of downer dairy cows with fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzakis, Emmanouil; Panousis, Nikolaos; Roubies, Nikolaos; Giadinis, Nektarios; Kaldrymidou, Eleni; Georgiadis, Marios; Karatzias, Harilaos

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between severity of fatty liver and macromineral status in downer dairy cows and determined the usefulness of selected biochemical analytes for assessing prognosis. Blood and liver biopsy specimens were obtained from 36 Holstein downer cows shortly after the cows became recumbent and before they were treated. Liver tissue was examined histologically and serum activity of liver-derived enzymes and concentration of total lipids, triglycerides, bile acids, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetic acid, total bilirubin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol and macrominerals (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P) were determined. Fatty liver infiltration was severe in 44% of the cows and moderate in 44%. Serum activities of ornithine carbamoyltransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and NEFA/cholesterol ratio were good indicators of fatty liver. Cows with severe fatty liver had the lowest mean K values. The prognosis is guarded for downer cows with moderate and severe fatty liver and when total bilirubin concentration is high.

  6. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  7. Structural characterization, molecular modification and hepatoprotective effect of melanin from Lachnum YM226 on acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Li, Shenglan; Su, Nana; Li, Jinglei; Shi, Fang; Ye, Ming

    2016-08-10

    In this paper, the possible structural formula of the intracellular homogeneous melanin of Lachnum YM226 (LM) was concluded based on an elemental assay, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS) and equivalent series resistance (ESR). Meanwhile, a d-glucosamine melanin derivative (GLM) was also prepared and its cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The hepatoprotective effect of LM and GLM was evaluated in an acute alcohol-induced liver injury model. The results showed that pretreatments with LM and GLM markedly decreased subsequent alcohol elicited acute hepatic oxidative and inflammatory stress via improving the activity of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total superoxide dismutase (SOD)), reducing hepatic levels of nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB), cytokines related to its activation (interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and hepatic activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. The protection properties of alcoholic liver injury of GLM were more obvious than that of LM at the same dose. The present findings recommend that LM and GLM may be used as a prototype for the prevention of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:27485489

  8. Secondary causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kneeman, Jacob M.; Misdraji, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the developing world, found in 17-30% of the population in Western countries and 2-4% worldwide. Defined as the accumulation of fatty acid content greater than 5% of liver weight, NAFLD is a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The pathophysiology of NAFLD involves increased de novo synthesis of fatty acids in hepatocytes, the retention of lipids due to impaired hepatocyte apolipoprotein secretion or beta-oxidation. The well-known primary causes of NAFLD are obesity, type II diabetes, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. However, other less common conditions can cause a similar clinical and histologic picture, and should be considered in patients who present with NAFLD but do not have traditional risk factors. In this review, we discuss uncommon but important causes of NAFLD, including inborn errors of metabolism, iatrogenic causes, viral hepatitis, and nutritional disorders to provide practicing clinicians with an understanding of the less well recognized causes of NAFLD. PMID:22570680

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: new treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Timothy; Anstee, Quentin M.; Day, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver dysfunction in the western world because of its close association with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a particular health concern due to the increased morbidity and mortality associated with progressive disease. At present, without specific targeted pharmacological therapies, the mainstay of therapy remains weight loss through dietary modification and lifestyle change; thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the recent evidence for current and emerging therapies in NASH. Recent findings Some existing medications, including pioglitazones and angiotensin receptor antagonists, may be repurposed to help treat this condition. Vitamin E may improve histology in NASH, but safety issues limit its use. Recently, a number of novel agents specifically targeting nonalcoholic fatty liver disease pathogenesis have entered clinical trials, including the farnesoid X receptor agonist obeticholic acid, which has shown significant histological improvements in steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Summary Diet/lifestyle modification remains the mainstay of treatment. For patients with NASH and advanced fibrosis, current liver-directed pharmacotherapy with vitamin E and pioglitazone offer some benefits; obeticholic acid appears promising and is currently being tested. Comorbidities must be diagnosed and treated; cardiovascular disease remains a primary cause of death in these patients. PMID:25774446

  10. Nuclear receptor-mediated alleviation of alcoholic fatty liver by polyphenols contained in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruiqing; Yasuoka, Akihito; Kamei, Asuka; Ushiama, Shota; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Rogi, Tomohiro; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of the polyphenols contained in alcoholic beverages on the metabolic stress induced by ethanol consumption, four groups of mice were fed for five weeks on Lieber's diet with or without ethanol, with ethanol plus ellagic acid, and with ethanol plus trans-resveratrol. Alcoholic fatty liver was observed in the group fed the ethanol diet but not in those fed the ethanol plus polyphenol diets. Liver transcriptome analysis revealed that the addition of the polyphenols suppressed the expression of the genes related to cell stress that were up-regulated by ethanol alone. Conversely, the polyphenols up-regulated the genes involved in bile acid synthesis, unsaturated fatty acid elongation, and tetrahydrofolate synthesis that were down-regulated by ethanol alone. Because parts of these genes were known to be regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), we performed the same experiment in the CAR-deficient mice. As a result, fatty liver was observed not only in the ethanol group but also with the ethanol plus polyphenol groups. In addition, there was no segregation of the gene expression profiles among these groups. These results provide a molecular basis for the prevention of alcohol-induced stress by the polyphenols in alcoholic beverages.

  11. Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Alleviation of Alcoholic Fatty Liver by Polyphenols Contained in Alcoholic Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruiqing; Yasuoka, Akihito; Kamei, Asuka; Ushiama, Shota; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Rogi, Tomohiro; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of the polyphenols contained in alcoholic beverages on the metabolic stress induced by ethanol consumption, four groups of mice were fed for five weeks on Lieber's diet with or without ethanol, with ethanol plus ellagic acid, and with ethanol plus trans-resveratrol. Alcoholic fatty liver was observed in the group fed the ethanol diet but not in those fed the ethanol plus polyphenol diets. Liver transcriptome analysis revealed that the addition of the polyphenols suppressed the expression of the genes related to cell stress that were up-regulated by ethanol alone. Conversely, the polyphenols up-regulated the genes involved in bile acid synthesis, unsaturated fatty acid elongation, and tetrahydrofolate synthesis that were down-regulated by ethanol alone. Because parts of these genes were known to be regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), we performed the same experiment in the CAR-deficient mice. As a result, fatty liver was observed not only in the ethanol group but also with the ethanol plus polyphenol groups. In addition, there was no segregation of the gene expression profiles among these groups. These results provide a molecular basis for the prevention of alcohol-induced stress by the polyphenols in alcoholic beverages. PMID:24498295

  12. Protection of Nicotinic Acid against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Hepatocytes Contributes to Its Beneficial Effect on Alcohol-induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaobing; Shen, Chen; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Songtao; Zhang, Ximei; Song, Zhenyuan

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pathological role in the development of alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of nicotinic acid (NA) supplementation on H2O2-induced cell death in hepatocytes and alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. Hepatocytes were exposed to H2O2 (0–0.4 mM) for 16 hours after a 2-hour pretreatment with NA (0–100 µM). Cell viability, intracellular glutathione and total NAD contents were determined. In animal experiments, male C57 BL/6 mice were exposed to Lieber-De Carli liquid diet (+/− ethanol with/without NA supplementation (0.5%, w/v) for 4 weeks. Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRT) is the first enzyme participated in the NA metabolism, converting NA to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN). In NaPRT-expressing Hep3B cells, H2O2-induced cell death was attenuated by NA, whereas in NaPRT-lost HepG2 cells, only NaMN conferred protective effect, suggesting that NA metabolism is required for its protective action against H2O2. In Hep3B cells, NA supplementation prevented H2O2-inudced declines in intracellular total NAD and GSH/GSSG ratios. Further mechanistic investigations revealed that conservation of Akt activity contributed to NA’s protective effect against H2O2-inudced cell death. In alcohol-fed mice, NA supplementation attenuated liver injury induced by chronic alcohol exposure, which was associated with alleviated hepatic lipid peroxidation and increased liver GSH concentrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate that exogenous NA supplementation may be an ideal choice for the treatment of liver diseases involved oxidative stress. PMID:23465591

  13. [Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children].

    PubMed

    Bojórquez-Ramos, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States of America (USA) and probably in the entire western hemisphere, due to the increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Steatosis can progress to inflammation, fibrosis and even cirrhosis, which increases the morbidity and mortality associated to liver disease. In every overweight and obese child a thorough analysis should be performed including liver function tests and liver ultrasound, in order to establish a timely diagnosis. The liver biopsy is the most specific study to rule out other potentially treatable entities. It is necessary to count on non-invasive methods to detect children with NAFLD and identify those in risk of progression. Biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and fibrosis have been reported. The main goal of the treatment is to modify the life style, starting with a healthy diet and an increase of physical activity. Regarding pharmacological treatment, there is evidence of histological improvement with vitamin E use, as opposed to metformin, but more conclusive studies regarding this subject are needed.

  14. Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi extract protects against alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice and affects the mechanism of ER stress

    PubMed Central

    DONG, QINGQING; CHU, FEI; WU, CHENGZHU; HUO, QIANG; GAN, HUAIYONG; LI, XIAOMING; LIU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the hepatoprotective effect of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi extract (Scutellariae Radix extract; SRE) against acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice, and investigate the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. High performance liquid chromatography was used for the phytochemical analysis of SRE. Animals were administered orally with 50% alcohol (12 ml/kg) 4 h following administration of doses of SRE every day for 14 days, with the exception of normal control group. The protective effect was investigated by measuring the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and triglyceride (TG) in the serum, and the levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver tissues. The levels of glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78) were detected using immunohistochemical localization and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatocyte apoptosis was assessed using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling. The SRE contained 31.2% baicalin. Pretreatment with SRE had a marked protective effect by reversing the levels of biochemical markers and levels of GRP78 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of the present study demonstrated that pretreatment with SRE exerted a marked hepatoprotective effect by downregulating the expression of GRP78, which is a marker of ER stress. PMID:26936686

  15. Lipid content in the liver of fatty metamorphosis of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, J. W.; Barker, E. A.; Smuckler, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Lipid analyses were performed on the liver of a patient who died during an episode of acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and on livers from normal subjects and from subjects suffering from nutritional fatty livers. Comparison of these data indicates that in fatty liver of pregnancy the increased hepatic lipids consist primarily of free fatty acids. The recognized toxicity of fatty acids suggests a pathogenic mechanism for the disease. Nutritional fatty liver is associated predominantly with an increase in triglyceride. These changes are not the result of postmortem change, and they confirm and extend the previous data concerning the fat accumulation in human hepatic illness. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 PMID:1239955

  16. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  17. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  18. [Fatty liver and global cardiometabolic risk].

    PubMed

    Szollár, Lajos

    2010-11-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can be found in approximately 30% of adults in industrialized societies. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is its most severe histological form and progresses to cirrhosis in 20% of these patients. Once developed, 30% to 40% of patients with cirrhosis will suffer liver-related death. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Recent findings linking the components of metabolic syndrome with NAFLD and the progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis will be reviewed; in particular, the role of visceral adipose tissue, insulin resistance, adipocytokines, oxidative stress and diminished antioxidants within the liver in the exacerbation of these conditions. It is now widely accepted that non-hepatic mechanisms are largely responsible for the development of insulin resistance, which causes hepatic steatosis. Insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome, is crucial for NASH development. We have a classical chicken-egg problem: insulin resistance causes hepatic steatosis or vice-versa? A possible sequence of the pathogenetic events is the following: increased free fatty acid supply - increased de novo lipogenesis - triglyceride and VLDL overproduction - atherogenic dyslipidemia- oxidative stress (lipid oxidation and peroxidation) - exhaustion of antioxidant defense system- "Tsunami" of inflammatory cytokines- fibrosis- carcinogenesis. Given the strong association of NAFLD with metabolic syndrome, early recognition, assessment and management are essential. The management emphasizes weight reduction and attention to global cardiometabolic risk factors, similar to recommendations for management of the elements of metabolic syndrome. PMID:21071306

  19. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  20. Studies on ethionine-induced fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Puddu, P.; Caldarera, C. M.; Marchetti, M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The effects of the administration of dl-ethionine on some aspects of lipid and nucleotide metabolism in rat liver were studied. 2. In ethionine-treated animals neutral fat was increased, whereas phospholipids and cholesterol were unchanged. Lipogenesis in vitro was inhibited. 3. The concentration of nicotinamide nucleotides, purine nucleotides and pyrimidine nucleotides was decreased. The decrease was due to free adenine nucleotides, inosine nucleotides, uridine nucleotides and cytidine nucleotides. Also, the protein-bound biotin content was lower. 4. In biotin-deficient rats the development of ethionine-induced fatty liver was inhibited. 5. The possibility was considered that ethionine might produce an inhibition of the synthesis of biotin-dependent acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:6030278

  1. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  2. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  3. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future.

  4. Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response by ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia provides protection against alcohol-induced oxidative stress in liver by upregulation of glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rejitha, S; Prathibha, P; Indira, M

    2015-03-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant property of ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia (SAE) on alcohol-induced oxidative stress and to elucidate its mechanism of action. Methods Male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain were grouped into four: (1) control, (2) alcohol (4 g/kg body weight), (3) SAE (50 mg/100 g body weight), and (4) alcohol (4 g/kg body weight) + SAE (50 mg/100 g body weight). Alcohol and SAE were given orally each day by gastric intubation. The duration of treatment was 90 days. Results The activities of toxicity markers in liver and serum increased significantly in alcohol-treated rats and to a lesser extent in the group administered SAE + alcohol. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase and the reactive oxygen species level were increased significantly in alcohol-treated rats but attenuated in the SAE co-administered group. Oxidative stress was increased in alcohol-treated rats as evidenced by the lowered activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreased level of reduced glutathione (GSH), increased lipid peroxidation products, and decreased expression of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthase in liver. The co-administration of SAE with alcohol almost reversed these changes. The activity of glutathione-S-transferase and translocation of Nrf2 from cytosol to nucleus in the liver was increased in both the alcohol and alcohol + SAE groups, but the maximum changes were observed in the latter group. Discussion The SAE most likely elicits its antioxidant potential by reducing oxidative stress, enhancing the translocation of Nrf2 to nucleus and thereby regulating glutathione metabolism, leading to enhanced GSH content.

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora.

  6. Bariatric surgery and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bower, Guy; Athanasiou, Thanos; Isla, Alberto M; Harling, Leanne; Li, Jia V; Holmes, Elaine; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Ashrafian, Hutan

    2015-07-01

    The rising prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with the increasing global pandemic of obesity. These conditions cluster with type II diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome to result in obesity-associated liver disease. The benefits of bariatric procedures on diabetes and the metabolic syndrome have been recognized for some time, and there is now mounting evidence to suggest that bariatric procedures improve liver histology and contribute to the beneficial resolution of NAFLD in obese patients. These beneficial effects derive from a number of weight-dependent and weight-independent mechanisms including surgical BRAVE actions (bile flow changes, restriction of stomach size, anatomical gastrointestinal rearrangement, vagal manipulation, enteric hormonal modulation) and subsequent effects such as reduced lipid intake, adipocytokine secretion, modulation of gut flora, improvements in insulin resistance and reduced inflammation. Here, we review the clinical investigations on bariatric procedures for NAFLD, in addition to the mounting mechanistic data supporting these findings. Elucidating the mechanisms by which bariatric procedures may resolve NAFLD can help enhance surgical approaches for metabolic hepatic dysfunction and also contribute toward developing the next generation of therapies aimed at reducing the burden of obesity-associated liver disease.

  7. Nonmedicinal interventions in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G; Nanau, Radu M; Cohen, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    Unhealthy diet and lack of physical exercise are responsible for fat accumulation in the liver, which may lead to liver disease. Histologically, the severity of the disease has two stages: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is defined by the presence of steatosis with no evidence of cellular injury such as hepatocyte ballooning. NASH is a distinct entity from NAFLD, and is characterized by the presence of inflammation with hepatocytes damage, with or without fibrosis. While several therapeutic strategies have been proposed to improve this condition, the present review aims to discuss nonmedicinal interventions used to reduce liver involvement or to prevent the disease altogether. The authors investigated dietary patterns and vitamin deficiencies associated with NAFLD, and their role in enhancing disease severity. Additionally, they reviewed the role of exercise and the use of interventions, such as as intragastric balloon and bariatric surgery, for improving disease progression. The authors propose monitoring disease progression or repair by following changes in cytoadipokine levels. PMID:26076224

  8. Proteomics analysis of human nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Suarez, Eva; Mato, Jose M; Elortza, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being increasingly recognized as a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity in western countries, NAFLD has become an important public health problem. The principal aim of this study was to find differences in protein expression between patients with NAFLD and healthy controls. Changes in protein expression of liver samples from controls, nonalcoholic steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) subjects were analyzed by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). With this proteomic technique, hundreds of proteins can be analyzed simultaneously and their relative abundance can be calculated. Proteins showing significant changes (ratio ≥ 1.5, p < 0.05) were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Western blot of tissue homogenates was then used as a complementary method to validate protein expression changes observed by DIGE. With the aim to have a noninvasive approach to detect changes produced in NAFLD-affected liver, validated proteins were further tested in serum samples of different cohorts of patients. Following this approach, we identified two candidate markers CPS1 and GRP78 that were differentially expressed between control, steatosis, and NASH. This proteomics approach demonstrates that DIGE combined with MALDI TOF/TOF and Western blot analysis of tissue and serum samples is a useful approach to identify candidate markers associated with NAFLD.

  9. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Reenam S; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-08-01

    Cirrhosis secondary to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common indication for liver transplant. In comparison to other cirrhotic patients, patients with NASH cirrhosis are more likely to be older and have the metabolic syndrome. Pre-transplant, patients require careful evaluation of cardiovascular risk. As the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, a greater proportion of donor grafts have steatosis greater than 30%, which is associated with poor outcomes. Grafts with steatosis greater than 60% are unsuitable for transplant. Overall, post-transplant survival outcomes for patients with NASH cirrhosis are similar to those with cirrhosis without NASH. However, NASH cirrhosis is associated with a higher 30-day mortality, predominantly from an increase in cardiovascular events and infections. Following liver transplant, there is a significant risk of NASH recurrence, although this seldom results in allograft loss. Furthermore, a significant number of patients who had a liver transplant for other reasons develop NASH de novo. When patients with NASH cirrhosis are considered for transplant, one of the major challenges lies in identifying which patients are too high risk for surgery. This review aims to provide information to aid this decision making process, and to provide guidance on the peri-operative care strategies that can modify risk. PMID:26997540

  10. Is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease? - A mechanistic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Ivanildo Coutinho; de Lima, Josivan Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) are so similar that only a detailed history of alcohol intake can distinguish one from the other. Because subjects with NAFLD produce significantly more endogenous ethanol (EE) than controls, some researchers suspected that these similarities are not merely coincidental. For this reason, it was attempted to show that NAFLD is actually an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease (EAFLD). However, negligible blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and the inability of gut microbiota to produce hepatotoxic concentrations of EE rejected this hypothesis. To clarify these conflicting results, we provide a mechanistic framework explaining how NAFLD may be an EAFLD. First of all, the key finding is that ethanol is a prodrug, enabling the idea that AFLD may develop with negligible/absent BAC. Second, extrahepatic acetaldehyde (ACD) alone recapitulates AFLD and is about 330-fold more hepatotoxic than that generated inside the liver. Third, gut microbiota can even produce much larger amounts of EE than those currently considered cirrhotogenic for man. Fourth, an extensive gut-liver axis first-pass metabolism of ethanol prevents the development of significant BAC in NAFLD. Fifth, all genes involved in EE metabolism are upregulated in the livers of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Last, overexpression of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 implicates liver exposure to high concentrations of EE. In conclusion, this work provides mechanistic explanation supporting the assumption that NAFLD may indeed be an EAFLD. If validated by further testing, the hypothesis may help develop novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against this ubiquitous condition.

  11. Is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease? - A mechanistic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Ivanildo Coutinho; de Lima, Josivan Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) are so similar that only a detailed history of alcohol intake can distinguish one from the other. Because subjects with NAFLD produce significantly more endogenous ethanol (EE) than controls, some researchers suspected that these similarities are not merely coincidental. For this reason, it was attempted to show that NAFLD is actually an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease (EAFLD). However, negligible blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and the inability of gut microbiota to produce hepatotoxic concentrations of EE rejected this hypothesis. To clarify these conflicting results, we provide a mechanistic framework explaining how NAFLD may be an EAFLD. First of all, the key finding is that ethanol is a prodrug, enabling the idea that AFLD may develop with negligible/absent BAC. Second, extrahepatic acetaldehyde (ACD) alone recapitulates AFLD and is about 330-fold more hepatotoxic than that generated inside the liver. Third, gut microbiota can even produce much larger amounts of EE than those currently considered cirrhotogenic for man. Fourth, an extensive gut-liver axis first-pass metabolism of ethanol prevents the development of significant BAC in NAFLD. Fifth, all genes involved in EE metabolism are upregulated in the livers of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Last, overexpression of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 implicates liver exposure to high concentrations of EE. In conclusion, this work provides mechanistic explanation supporting the assumption that NAFLD may indeed be an EAFLD. If validated by further testing, the hypothesis may help develop novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against this ubiquitous condition. PMID:25956735

  12. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  13. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  14. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  15. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  16. Relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammation in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi, Mehdi; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Khayyatzadeh, Saeid; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza; Iraj, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver is the most chronic liver disease that eventually can become cirrhosis. One of the underlying assumptions for the fatty liver created by inflammation of the hepatocytes. We aimed to assess the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and sub-clinical inflammation. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted on 55 patients over 30 years, with NAFLD. Fatty liver grade was assessed using liver ultrasound. Liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase), anthropometric characteristics and inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Qualitative variables (sex and fatty liver grade) and quantitative variables such as were compared with independent t-test and Chi-square test. Relationship between fatty liver grade and inflammatory index was assessed with SPSS software (version 20; SPSS, Inc. Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Non-alcoholic fatty liver grades were associated with CRP level and this relationship remains in statistically significant level even after adjusting the effects of confounding variables such as age, sex and body mass index of participants (P = 0.016). Conclusion: In this cross-sectional study, presentation of NAFLD showed a significant correlation with sub-clinical systemic inflammation and CRP level. PMID:27014655

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD. PMID:24133660

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 21 deficiency exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanlong; Zhao, Cuiqing; Xiao, Jian; Liu, Liming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Cuiling; Wu, Guicheng; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Xu, Lan-Man; Chen, Yong-Ping; Mohammadi, Moosa; Chen, Shao-Yu; Cave, Matthew; McClain, Craig; Li, Xiaokun; Feng, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hepatokine that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver. We sought to determine the role of FGF21 in hepatic steatosis in mice exposed to chronic alcohol treatment and to discern underlying mechanisms. Male FGF21 knockout (FGF21 KO) and control (WT) mice were divided into groups that were fed either the Lieber DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol or an isocaloric (control) diet for 4 weeks. One group of WT mice exposed to alcohol received recombinant human FGF21 (rhFGF21) in the last 5 days. Liver steatosis and inflammation were assessed. Primary mouse hepatocytes and AML-12 cells were incubated with metformin or rhFGF21. Hepatic genes and the products involved in in situ lipogenesis and fatty acid β-oxidation were analyzed. Alcohol exposure increased circulating levels and hepatic expression of FGF21. FGF21 depletion exacerbated alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury, which was associated with increased activation of genes involved in lipogenesis mediated by SREBP1c and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation mediated by PGC1α. rhFGF21 administration reduced alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation in WT mice. These results reveal that alcohol-induced FGF21 expression is a hepatic adaptive response to lipid dysregulation. Targeting FGF21 signaling could be a novel treatment approach for alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:27498701

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 21 deficiency exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlong; Zhao, Cuiqing; Xiao, Jian; Liu, Liming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Cuiling; Wu, Guicheng; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Xu, Lan-Man; Chen, Yong-Ping; Mohammadi, Moosa; Chen, Shao-Yu; Cave, Matthew; McClain, Craig; Li, Xiaokun; Feng, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hepatokine that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver. We sought to determine the role of FGF21 in hepatic steatosis in mice exposed to chronic alcohol treatment and to discern underlying mechanisms. Male FGF21 knockout (FGF21 KO) and control (WT) mice were divided into groups that were fed either the Lieber DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol or an isocaloric (control) diet for 4 weeks. One group of WT mice exposed to alcohol received recombinant human FGF21 (rhFGF21) in the last 5 days. Liver steatosis and inflammation were assessed. Primary mouse hepatocytes and AML-12 cells were incubated with metformin or rhFGF21. Hepatic genes and the products involved in in situ lipogenesis and fatty acid β-oxidation were analyzed. Alcohol exposure increased circulating levels and hepatic expression of FGF21. FGF21 depletion exacerbated alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury, which was associated with increased activation of genes involved in lipogenesis mediated by SREBP1c and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation mediated by PGC1α. rhFGF21 administration reduced alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation in WT mice. These results reveal that alcohol-induced FGF21 expression is a hepatic adaptive response to lipid dysregulation. Targeting FGF21 signaling could be a novel treatment approach for alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:27498701

  20. Maltol, a Food Flavoring Agent, Attenuates Acute Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Xu, Qi; Hu, Jiang-ning; Han, Xin-yue; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of maltol, a food-flavoring agent, on alcohol-induced acute oxidative damage in mice. Maltol used in this study was isolated from red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A Meyer) and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, pretreatment with maltol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg; 15 days) drastically prevented the elevated activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) in serum and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in liver tissue (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of hepatic antioxidant, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were elevated by maltol pretreatment, compared to the alcohol group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that maltol pretreatment significantly inhibited alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. Interestingly, pretreatment of maltol effectively relieved alcohol-induced oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner. Maltol appeared to possess promising anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities. It was suggested that the hepatoprotective effect exhibited by maltol on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25608939

  1. Experimental rat model for alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shunichiro; Nagoya, Satoshi; Tateda, Kenji; Katada, Ryuichi; Mizuo, Keisuke; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is observed in alcohol abusers and patients with alcoholic fatty liver disease. It has been reported that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic fatty liver disease. We previously reported a corticosteroid-induced ONFH rat model, and suggested that TLR4 signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of ONFH. Thus, it is thought that the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced ONFH is probably similar to that of corticosteroid-induced ONFH. The aim of this study was to develop a new animal model for alcohol-induced ONFH and to evaluate the relationship between the pro-inflammatory response via TLRs and the development of ONFH in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a Lieber–DeCarli liquid diet containing 5% ethanol (experimental group) or dextran (control group) for 1–24 weeks. Histopathological and biochemical analyses were performed. Feeding the ethanol-containing liquid diet resulted in the development of ONFH with hepatic steatosis, hepatic dysfunction and hyperlipidaemia, whereas feeding the dextran-containing diet did not cause ONFH. However, we could not recognize any relationship between the pro-inflammatory response via TLR4 and the development of alcohol-induced ONFH. Thus in this study we have developed a new rat model for alcohol-induced ONFH based on the feeding of an ethanol liquid diet. ONFH was observed within seven days from the start of feeding with 5% ethanol-containing liquid diet. Although this was linked to hepatic steatosis, a TLR4 association was not a feature of this model. PMID:24020403

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Lu, Hong-Yun

    2014-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are two diseases that are common in the general population. To date, many studies have been conducted and demonstrate a direct link between NAFLD and CVD, but the exact mechanisms for this complex relationship are not well established. A systematic search of the PubMed database revealed that several common mechanisms are involved in many of the local and systemic manifestations of NAFLD and lead to an increased cardiovascular risk. The possible mechanisms linking NAFLD and CVD include inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin resistance, ectopic adipose tissue distribution, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, and adiponectin, among others. The clinical implication is that patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk of CVD and should undergo periodic cardiovascular risk assessment. PMID:25024598

  3. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K.; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N.; Rao, Padaki N.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed. PMID:26155043

  4. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N; Rao, Padaki N

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed.

  5. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N; Rao, Padaki N

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed. PMID:26155043

  6. Hepatoprotective effect of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. lignans and its formula with Rubus idaeus on chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ou; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the liver protection effect of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (SC) lignans and its combination with Rubus idaeus (RI) on chronic alcohol-induced mice. A low level of SC lignans (SL) was prepared from the clear juice of sarcocarp. Lignans were further extracted from the SC seeds and added to the SL to form high-level SC lignans (SH). Moreover, RI clear juice lyophilized powder was mixed with SL (SR), and the liver protection effects of SL, SH and SR were investigated. Male ICR mice were administered with the corresponding samples and gastrically infused with 50% alcohol (1 h later) once per day for 60 d. In the in vitro study, the characteristic lignans in the SC clear juice and the seed extract were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capability of SL, SH, and SR were determined. The results of the in vivo study showed that SC lignans exhibited a dose-dependent effect on the regulation of hepatic antioxidant status, serum transaminases levels, hyperlipidemia and hepatic fat deposition in mice. However, hepatic lesions were observed in the SH mice, which indicated a potential side effect caused by long-term consumption of SH under chronic alcohol administration. By contrast, SR exhibited a similar hepatoprotective effect as SH without any abnormality found in the histological analysis. After analysis with HPLC, Schizandrol A and Schizandrol B were identified in the SC clear juice, and two more kinds of lignans, Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B, were identified in the seed extracts. The SR sample had the highest TPC and exhibited the best antioxidant capability. In conclusion, RI strengthened the liver protection effect of SC lignans effectively and safely, which was probably achieved by enhancing the antioxidant status and the positive effect of their combination was possibly attributed to both lignans and polyphenols. This study demonstrated that the

  7. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD.

  8. Dietary fructose in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vos, Miriam B; Lavine, Joel E

    2013-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in adults and children. A number of genetic and environmental factors are known to predispose individuals to NAFLD. Certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are suspected to contribute to the development of NAFLD and its progression. The increasing quantity of fructose in the diet comes from sugar additives (most commonly sucrose and high fructose corn syrup) in beverages and processed foods. Substantial links have been demonstrated between increased fructose consumption and obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. Growing evidence suggests that fructose contributes to the development and severity of NAFLD. In human studies, fructose is associated with increasing hepatic fat, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Whether fructose alone can cause NAFLD or if it serves only as a contributor when consumed excessively in the setting of insulin resistance, positive energy balance, and sedentary lifestyle is unknown. Sufficient evidence exists to support clinical recommendations that fructose intake be limited through decreasing foods and drinks high in added (fructose-containing) sugars. PMID:23390127

  9. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ur Rahman, Zia; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to study nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a relevant risk factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with and without cirrhosis. HCC is a common cancer worldwide that predominantly involves patients with hepatic cirrhosis. HCC has recently been linked to NAFLD, the hepatic manifestation of obesity and related metabolic disorders. This association is alarming due to the high prevalence of NAFLD globally, which may contribute to the rising incidence of HCC. A 31-year-old female with a history of dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus presented with abdominal pain that persisted for six months. The pain was associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and weight loss. She was drug-free and a nonalcoholic and a nonsmoker. The physical examination was unremarkable. The abdominal exam showed a soft and non-tender abdomen, with no organomegaly or ascites. The laboratory evaluation was unremarkable. The imaging studies showed a hypodense lesion in the right hepatic lobe with strong arterial enhancement. Subsequently, the patient underwent a liver biopsy. The histopathology results were consistent with HCC. The patient underwent an uneventful segment VI liver resection and tumor-free margins were achieved. In our patient, NAFLD was designated as an independent etiology for HCC, without cirrhosis. Our patient recovered well and has been disease free for over a year. HCC may complicate non-cirrhotic NAFLD with mild or absent fibrosis, greatly expanding the population potentially at higher risk of HCC. These results provide new targets for surveillance, prevention, early recognition, and effective treatment of HCC associated with NAFLD. PMID:27733959

  10. Wild bitter gourd protects against alcoholic fatty liver in mice by attenuating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuan-Hung; Tseng, Hui-Chun; Liu, Chun-Ting; Huang, Ching-Jang; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) is a common vegetable grown widely in Asia that is used as a traditional medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate whether wild bitter gourd possessed protective effects against chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed an alcohol-containing liquid diet for 4 weeks to induce alcoholic fatty liver. Meanwhile, mice were treated with ethanol extracts from four different wild bitter gourd cultivars: Hualien No. 1', Hualien No. 2', Hualien No. 3' and Hualien No. 4'. The results indicated that the daily administration of 500 mg kg body weight(-1) of a Hualien No. 3' extract (H3E) or a Hualien No. 4' extract (H4E) markedly reduced the steatotic alternation of liver histopathology. In addition, the activation of serum aminotransferases (AST and ALT) and the accumulation of hepatic TG content caused by alcohol were ameliorated. The hepatoprotective effects of H3E and H4E involved the enhancement of the antioxidant defence system (GSH, GPx, GRd, CAT and SOD), inhibition of lipid peroxidation (MDA) and reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) in the liver. Moreover, H3E and H4E supplementation suppressed the alcohol-induced elevation of CYP2E1, SREBP-1, FAS and ACC protein expression. These results demonstrated that ethanol extracts of Hualien No. 3' and Hualien No. 4' have beneficial effects against alcoholic fatty liver, in which they attenuate oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  11. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; Porsche, Cara E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1), CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27454769

  12. Antioxidant Mechanisms in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wensheng; Baker, Susan S; Baker, Robert D; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a broad spectrum of histological abnormalities with clinical presentations ranging from hepatic steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Some NAFLD patients may progress to cirrhosis and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatic steatosis, the hallmark of NAFLD, is defined by the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in more than 5% of the hepatocytes. NASH is characterized by inflammation along with variable degrees of fibrosis in addition to steatosis. NAFLD has been considered to be the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MS), as it is frequently associated with MS conditions such as insulin resistance (IR) and obesity. Hepatic steatosis mainly results from disrupted homeostasis of lipid metabolism in the setting of IR. Although the mechanism underlying the progression from steatosis to NASH is still not fully elucidated, mounting evidence has suggested oxidative stress (OS) to be a key driving force. Elevated OS has been well documented in NAFLD patients. OS can cause direct damages to lipid, protein, and DNA molecules and trigger the inflammatory and fibrogenesis signaling pathways, which promotes the progression from steatosis to NASH. OS may also have various effects on antioxidant defense mechanisms. Overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) may directly deplete antioxidant molecules such as glutathione (GSH) and inhibit the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD). ROS may also induce the expression of antioxidant genes to counteract the OS effects. The aim of this review is to discuss oxidative stress and antioxidant mechanisms in NAFLD.

  13. Imaging patterns of fatty liver in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, H. Nursun; Oğuz, Berna; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Orhan, Diclehan; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver can present as focal, diffuse, heterogeneous, and multinodular forms. Being familiar with various patterns of steatosis can enable correct diagnosis. In patients with equivocal findings on ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging can be used as a problem solving tool. New techniques are promising for diagnosis and follow-up. We review imaging patterns of steatosis and new quantitative methods such as proton density fat fraction and magnetic resonance elastography for diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children. PMID:26027765

  14. Alcohol-induced disruption of endocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Wands, Jack R; Badger, Thomas M; de la Monte, Suzanne M; Lang, Charles H; Calissendorff, Jan

    2007-08-01

    This article contains the proceedings of a symposium at the 2006 ISBRA meeting in Sydney Australia, organized and cochaired by Martin J. Ronis and Thomas M. Badger. The presentations were (1) Effect of long-term ethanol consumption on liver injury and repair, by Jack R. Wands; (2) Alcohol-induced insulin resistance in liver: potential roles in regulation of ADH expression, ethanol clearance, and alcoholic liver disease, by Thomas M. Badger; (3) Chronic gestational exposure to ethanol causes brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor resistance, by Suzanne M de la Monte; (4) Disruption of IGF-1 signaling in muscle: a mechanism underlying alcoholic myopathy, by Charles H. Lang; (5) The role of reduced plasma estradiol and impaired estrogen signaling in alcohol-induced bone loss, by Martin J. Ronis; and (6) Short-term influence of alcohol on appetite-regulating hormones in man, by Jan Calissendorff.

  15. Effect of liver fatty acid binding protein on fatty acid movement between liposomes and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, M; Brecher, P

    1987-01-01

    Although movement of fatty acids between bilayers can occur spontaneously, it has been postulated that intracellular movement is facilitated by a class of proteins named fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). In this study we have incorporated long chain fatty acids into multilamellar liposomes made of phosphatidylcholine, incubated them with rat liver microsomes containing an active acyl-CoA synthetase, and measured formation of acyl-CoA in the absence or presence of FABP purified from rat liver. FABP increased about 2-fold the accumulation of acyl-CoA when liposomes were the fatty acid donor. Using fatty acid incorporated into liposomes made either of egg yolk lecithin or of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, it was found that the temperature dependence of acyl-CoA accumulation in the presence of FABP correlated with both the physical state of phospholipid molecules in the liposomes and the binding of fatty acid to FABP, suggesting that fatty acid must first desorb from the liposomes before FABP can have an effect. An FABP-fatty acid complex incubated with microsomes, in the absence of liposomes, resulted in greater acyl-CoA formation than when liposomes were present, suggesting that desorption of fatty acid from the membrane is rate-limiting in the accumulation of acyl-CoA by this system. Finally, an equilibrium dialysis cell separating liposomes from microsomes on opposite sides of a Nuclepore filter was used to show that liver FABP was required for the movement and activation of fatty acid between the compartments. These studies show that liver FABP interacts with fatty acid that desorbs from phospholipid bilayers, and promotes movement to a membrane-bound enzyme, suggesting that FABP may act intracellularly by increasing net desorption of fatty acid from cell membranes. PMID:3446187

  16. [Acute fatty liver during pregnancy: report of case].

    PubMed

    Ibargüen Burgos, Moira

    2003-01-01

    Acute fatty liver during pregnancy constitutes a rarely clinical entity with unknown pathogenesis and etiology. Its clinical picture is similar to preeclampsia including liver failure manifestations. Here in me expose a clinical case of a young woman 35 week first pregnancy with mild preeclampsia symptoms. We include a review of the literature.

  17. Mechanisms linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, W; Shalata, A; Marmor, A; Assy, N

    2011-12-01

    The most common cause of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is coronary artery disease (CAD), not chronic liver disease. Fatty liver increases cardiovascular risk by classical (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes) and by less conventional mechanisms. Common pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fatty liver and CAD includes hepatic insulin resistance and sub clinical inflammation. The hepatic insulin resistance state of fatty liver infiltration is characterized by increased FFA, which causes lipotoxicity and impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, increases oxidative stress, and has a cardio toxic effect. Additional metabolic risk factors include leptin, adiponectin, pro inflammatory cytokines [such as IL-6, C-reactive protein and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)], which together lead to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, finally promoting coronary artery disease (CAD). When classical risk factors are superimposed on fatty liver accumulation, they may further increase the new metabolic risk factors, exacerbating CAD. The clinical implication is that patients with NAFLD are at higher risk (steatohepatitis, diabetes, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia) and should undergo periodic cardiovascular risk assessment including the Framingham score, cardiac effort test, and measurement of intimae-media thickening of the carotids arteries. This may improve risk stratification for CAD. PMID:21655948

  18. Fatty acid profiles in relation to triglyceride level in the liver of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mohamed, Tharwat; Goto, Akiko; Oikawa, Shin; Kurosawa, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate possible relationships between triglyceride (TG) levels and fatty acid composition in bovine liver, hepatic TG and seven individual fatty acids were measured in 23 Holstein dairy cows, of them 6 are healthy. Liver TG level was greater than 3 % in 12 cows which were ruled fatty liver. Palmitic and oleic acid proportions were significantly higher in fatty liver cows than in the healthy cows, while stearic acid was lower in fatty liver cows. With increased liver TG, stearic acid proportions decreased dramatically. Results indicate that hepatic lipidosis markedly alters the proportions of the various fatty acids in the liver of dairy cows.

  19. Fatty Liver, Insulin Resistance, and Features of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki-Chul; Wild, Sarah H.; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Byrne, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) coexists with insulin resistance (IR), but it is uncertain whether NAFLD and IR contribute independently to atherosclerosis. We tested whether fatty liver, IR, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) features (waist, glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol [HDL-C], and blood pressure) were associated with a marker of atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] score >0), independently of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were analyzed from a South Korean occupational cohort of 10,153 people who all received ultrasound measurements of fatty liver and a cardiac computed tomography CAC score. IR was defined by homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) ≥75th percentile. Odds ratios (ORs) (95% CIs) for the presence of a CAC score >0 were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS There were 915 people with a CAC score >0. MetS features were increased (glucose, blood pressure, triglyceride, and waist) or decreased (HDL-C) among people with a CAC score >0 (all comparisons against CAC score ≤0; P < 0.0001). Of subjects with a CAC score >0, 55% had fatty liver and 33.7% were insulin resistant. Fatty liver (OR 1.21 [95% CI 1.01–1.45]; P = 0.04) and HOMA-IR (1.10 [1.02–1.18]; P = 0.02) were associated with CAC score >0, independently of all MetS features, conventional cardiovascular risk factors, and prior evidence of CVD. The presence of IR and fatty liver combined was associated with CAC score >0 (1.53 [1.20–1.95]; P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Fatty liver and HOMA-IR are both associated with a CAC score >0 (independently of each other), features of MetS, conventional cardiovascular risk factors, and existing CVD. PMID:22829522

  20. Current advances in proteomic analysis of (fatty) liver.

    PubMed

    Molette, C; Théron, L; Marty-Gasset, N; Fernandez, X; Rémignon, H

    2012-07-19

    In this review, an overview on proteomic studies conducted in livers of farm animals is conducted with a special focus on liver steatosis in waterfowl. Several studies had interest in understanding liver metabolism in dairy cows under various conditions (e.g. fasting) or the evolution of liver proteome during embryonic phases or growing periods in chicken. Those studies provide interesting results leading to a better understanding of the liver metabolism. Liver steatosis development in waterfowl represents a special case and a focus on proteomic studies conducted in these birds will be done. Indeed, recent studies aimed at resolving protein evolution during overfeeding in duck. Proteomic analysis combining two complementary approaches (2-dimensional electrophoresis gels and shot gun strategy) in order to better understand the mechanisms underlying the variability of cooking yield of fatty liver will be presented.

  1. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: an update on mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Thangaraj, Kavitha R; Goel, Ashish; Eapen, C E; Balasubramanian, K A; Ramachandran, Anup

    2011-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), characterized by hepatic microvesicular steatosis, is a sudden catastrophic illness occurring almost exclusively in the third trimester of pregnancy. Defective fatty acid oxidation in the fetus has been shown to be associated with this disease. Since the placenta has the same genetic makeup as the fetus and as AFLP patients generally recover following delivery, we hypothesized that the placenta might be involved in pathogenesis of this disease. In an animal model of hepatic microvesicular steatosis (using sodium valproate), we found that microvesicular steatosis results in mitochondrial structural alterations and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles of the liver. In placentas from patients with AFLP, we observed placental mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles. In addition, defective placental fatty acid oxidation results in accumulation of toxic mediators such as arachidonic acid. Escape of these mediators into the maternal circulation might affect the maternal liver resulting in microvesicular steatosis.

  2. Comparison of the relationships of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Fukumura, Atsushi; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Nomura, Tomoe; Tsuchishima, Mutsumi; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

    2013-01-01

    We compared the relationships of alcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Using a nationwide Japanese survey, we collected data on subjects with biopsy-proven alcoholic fatty liver or nonalcoholic fatty liver. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether alcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver are associated factors for these diseases. Data on 191 subjects (65, alcoholic fatty liver; 126, nonalcoholic fatty liver) were analyzed. Alcoholic fatty liver (odds ratio, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–6.32; p = 0.040), age ≥55 years, and body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 were correlated with hypertension, whereas nonalcoholic fatty liver (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–5.20; p = 0.035) and serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels ≥75 IU/l were correlated with dyslipidemia. Furthermore, we found that there were biological interactions between alcoholic fatty liver and body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 in ≥55-year-old subjects (attributable proportion due to interaction, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–1.17), as well as between alcoholic fatty liver and age ≥55 years in subjects with body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (attributable proportion due to interaction, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.24–1.18). Alcoholic fatty liver was more strongly associated with hypertension than nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver was more strongly associated with dyslipidemia than alcoholic fatty liver. Moreover, alcoholic fatty liver, obesity, and older age may interact to influence hypertension status. PMID:23341703

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Boursier, Jerome; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress has allowed a more comprehensive study of the gut microbiota. Gut microbiota helps in health maintenance and gut dysbiosis associates with chronic metabolic diseases. Modulation of short-chain fatty acids and choline bioavailability, lipoprotein lipase induction, alteration of bile acid profile, endogenous alcohol production, or liver inflammation secondary to endotoxemia result from gut dysbiosis. Modulation of the gut microbiota by pre/probiotics gives promising results in animal, but needs to be evaluated in human before use in clinical practice. Gut microbiota adds complexity to the pathophysiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but represents an opportunity to discover new therapeutic targets.

  4. Mechanisms of disease progression in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jou, Janice; Choi, Steve S; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis (also called nonalcoholic fatty liver or NAFL) in its most benign form, to cirrhosis in its most advanced form. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an intermediate level of hepatic pathology. Hepatocyte accumulation of triglyceride is a hallmark of NAFL and NASH, but this sometimes subsides once cirrhosis has developed. Triglyceride storage per se is not hepatotoxic. Rather, it is a marker of increased exposure of hepatocytes to potentially toxic fatty acids. NAFL progresses to NASH when adaptive mechanisms that protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-mediated lipotoxicity become overwhelmed and rates of hepatocyte death begin to outstrip mechanisms that normally regenerate dead hepatocytes. This triggers repair responses that involve activation of hepatic stellate cells to myofibroblasts. The myofibroblasts generate excessive matrix and produce factors that stimulate expansion of liver progenitor populations. The progenitor cells produce chemokines to attract various kinds of inflammatory cells to the liver. They also differentiate to replace the dead hepatocytes. The intensity of these repair responses generally parallel the degree of hepatocyte death, resulting in variable distortion of the hepatic architecture with fibrosis, infiltrating immune cells, and regenerating epithelial nodules. As in other types of chronic liver injury, cirrhosis ensues in patients with NAFLD when repair is extreme and sustained, but ultimately unsuccessful, at reconstituting healthy hepatic epithelia. PMID:18956293

  5. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma - 2016].

    PubMed

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2016-06-19

    In the past decade non-alcoholic liver disease became the most frequently diagnosed liver disease in developed countries. At the same time, the dramatic rise in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is attributed to this common metabolic disorder, and mainly to its severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The risk factors of these associated diseases are genetic predisposition, obesity and diabetes as well as chronic low grade necro-infammation, which often leads to liver fibrosis. Free fatty acids, cytokines, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, microRNS dysregulation and alteration in intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - weight reduction and physical exercise in obesity, metformin in diabetes, statins in dyslipidemia and, as a new option, obeticholic acid - may diminish the risk of the hepatocellular carcinoma related to this metabolic disease. PMID:27287838

  6. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma - 2016].

    PubMed

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2016-06-19

    In the past decade non-alcoholic liver disease became the most frequently diagnosed liver disease in developed countries. At the same time, the dramatic rise in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is attributed to this common metabolic disorder, and mainly to its severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The risk factors of these associated diseases are genetic predisposition, obesity and diabetes as well as chronic low grade necro-infammation, which often leads to liver fibrosis. Free fatty acids, cytokines, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, microRNS dysregulation and alteration in intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - weight reduction and physical exercise in obesity, metformin in diabetes, statins in dyslipidemia and, as a new option, obeticholic acid - may diminish the risk of the hepatocellular carcinoma related to this metabolic disease.

  7. Moro orange juice prevents fatty liver in mice

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Federico; Li Volti, Giovanni; Titta, Lucilla; Puzzo, Lidia; Barbagallo, Ignazio; La Delia, Francesco; Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Malaguarnera, Michele; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Giorgio, Marco; Galvano, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish if the juice of Moro, an anthocyanin-rich orange, may improve liver damage in mice with diet-induced obesity. METHODS: Eight-week-old mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and were administrated water or Moro juice for 12 wk. Liver morphology, gene expression of lipid transcription factors, and metabolic enzymes were assessed. RESULTS: Mice fed HFD displayed increased body weight, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Moro juice administration limited body weight gain, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and decreased serum triglycerides and total cholesterol. Mice fed HFD showed liver steatosis associated with ballooning. Dietary Moro juice markedly improved liver steatosis by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and its target gene acylCoA-oxidase, a key enzyme of lipid oxidation. Consistently, Moro juice consumption suppressed the expression of liver X receptor-α and its target gene fatty acid synthase, and restored liver glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1 activity. CONCLUSION: Moro juice counteracts liver steatogenesis in mice with diet-induced obesity and thus may represent a promising dietary option for the prevention of fatty liver. PMID:22876038

  8. Computer image analysis of toxic fatty degeneration in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Stetkiewicz, J; Zieliński, K; Stetkiewicz, I; Koktysz, R

    1989-01-01

    Fatty degeneration of the liver is one of the most frequently observed pathological changes in the experimental estimation of the toxicity of chemical compounds. The intensity of this kind of damage is most often detected by means of a generally accepted scale of points, whereas the classification is performed according to the subjective "feeling" of the pathologist. In modern pathological diagnostics, computer analysis of images is used to perform an objective estimation of the degree of damage to various organs. In order to check the usefulness of this kind of method, comparative biochemical and morphometrical studies were undertaken in trichloroethylene (TRI)-induced fatty degeneration of the liver. TRI was administered to rats intragastrically, in single doses: 1/2; 1/3; 1/4; 1/6 and 1/18 DL50. 24 hours after the administration, the animals were sacrificed. The content of triglycerides in the liver was determined according to Folch et al. (1956). Simple lipids in the histochemical samples were detected by means of staining with a lipotropic, Fat Red 7B. The area of fatty degeneration was estimated in the microscopic samples by the use of an automatic image analyser IBAS 2000 (Kontron). The morphometrical data concerning the area of fatty degeneration in the liver amplified a high degree of correlation with the content of triglycerides (r = 0.89) and the dose of TRI (r = 0.96). The degree of correlation between the biochemical data and the dose of TRI was 0.88. The morphometrical studies performed have proved to be of great use in estimating the degree of fatty degeneration in the liver. This method enables precise, quantitative measuring of this sort of liver damage in the material prepared for routine histopathological analysis. It requires, however, the application of a specialized device for quantitative image analysis.

  9. Audio-Visual Aid in Teaching "Fatty Liver"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Sambit; Kamath, Ullas; Rao, Guruprasad; Prakash, Jay; Mishra, Snigdha

    2016-01-01

    Use of audio visual tools to aid in medical education is ever on a rise. Our study intends to find the efficacy of a video prepared on "fatty liver," a topic that is often a challenge for pre-clinical teachers, in enhancing cognitive processing and ultimately learning. We prepared a video presentation of 11:36 min, incorporating various…

  10. Probiotics in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, and Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Amir A

    2015-01-01

    With the growing epidemic of obesity, the incidence of both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing. The intestinal microbiota differs between individuals who are obese or have normal body mass indices. Animal studies have shown increased intestinal permeability in NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. This increases the risk of oxidative and inflammatory injury to the liver from intestinal microbacteria. It may also increase the risk of fatty acid injury and fatty deposition. Bacterial translocation is associated with increased portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis. By preventing bacterial adhesion and translocation, probiotics may have a role in the management of patients with NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. Multiple small studies have suggested that probiotics improve some of the clinical markers of activity in patients with NAFL and NASH. Controlled studies have also shown improved outcomes in patients with cirrhosis who were treated with probiotics. PMID:26447961

  11. Carotenoids and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Bahiddin; Sahin, Kazim; Bilen, Hande; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim H.; Bilir, Birdal; Ashraf, Sara; Halazun, Karim J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing health problem around the world, especially in developed countries. NAFLD includes all cases of fatty liver disease from simple steatosis to cirrhosis, without excessive alcohol intake, use of steatogenic medication or hereditary disorders. Pathogenesis is associated with dietary high fat intake, decreased free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation, increased hepatic lipogenesis and lipolysis from the adipose tissue. These metabolic alterations contribute to the hepatic fat accumulation. Consequently, stimulated oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in hepatocellular damage. Therefore, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents may have a role in the prevention of this disease. Carotenoids are potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory micronutrients, which have been investigated in the prevention and treatment of NAFLD. The main sources of the carotenoids are fruits and vegetables. In this article we review the potential role and possible molecular mechanism of carotenoids in NAFLD. PMID:26151056

  12. The cheating liver: imaging of focal steatosis and fatty sparing.

    PubMed

    Dioguardi Burgio, Marco; Bruno, Onorina; Agnello, Francesco; Torrisi, Chiara; Vernuccio, Federica; Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Soresi, Maurizio; Petta, Salvatore; Calamia, Mauro; Papia, Giovanni; Gambino, Angelo; Ricceri, Viola; Midiri, Massimo; Lagalla, Roberto; Brancatelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Focal steatosis and fatty sparing are a frequent finding in liver imaging, and can mimic solid lesions. Liver regional variations in the degree of fat accumulation can be related to vascular anomalies, metabolic disorders, use of certain drugs or coexistence of hepatic masses. CT and MRI are the modalities of choice for the noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. Knowledge of CT and MRI appearance of focal steatosis and fatty sparing is crucial for an accurate diagnosis, and to rule-out other pathologic processes. This paper will review the CT and MRI techniques for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis and the CT and MRI features of common and uncommon causes of focal steatosis and fatty sparing.

  13. Clinical approaches to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwenger, Katherine JP; Allard, Johane P

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), leading to fibrosis and potentially cirrhosis, and it is one of the most common causes of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is associated with other medical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. NASH can only be diagnosed through liver biopsy, but noninvasive techniques have been developed to identify patients who are most likely to have NASH or fibrosis, reducing the need for liver biopsy and risk to patients. Disease progression varies between individuals and is linked to a number of risk factors. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are associated with diet and lifestyle, influx of free fatty acids to the liver from adipose tissue due to insulin resistance, hepatic oxidative stress, cytokines production, reduced very low-density lipoprotein secretion and intestinal microbiome. Weight loss through improved diet and increased physical activity has been the cornerstone therapy of NAFLD. Recent therapies such as pioglitazone and vitamin E have been shown to be beneficial. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and statins may offer additional benefits. Bariatric surgery should be considered in morbidly obese patients. More research is needed to assess the impact of these treatments on a long-term basis. The objective of this article is to briefly review the diagnosis, management and treatment of this disease in order to aid clinicians in managing these patients. PMID:24587650

  14. Metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver surgery: The new scourges?

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, François; Fuks, David; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban; Belghiti, Jacques; Costi, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this topic highlight is to review relevant evidence regarding the influence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its associated liver manifestation, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), on the development of liver cancer as well as their impact on the results of major liver surgery. MS and NAFLD, whose incidences are significantly increasing in Western countries, are leading to a changing profile of the patients undergoing liver surgery. A MEDLINE search was performed for relevant articles using the key words “metabolic syndrome”, “liver resection”, “liver transplantation”, “non alcoholic fatty liver disease”, “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” and “liver cancer”. On one hand, the MS favors the development of primary liver malignancies (hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma) either through NAFLD liver parenchymal alterations (steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis) or in the absence of significant underlying liver parenchyma changes. Also, the existence of NAFLD may have a specific impact on colorectal liver metastases recurrence. On the other hand, the postoperative period following partial liver resection and liver transplantation is at increased risk of both postoperative complications and mortality. These deleterious effects seem to be related to the existence of liver specific complications but also higher cardio-vascular sensitivity in a setting of MS/NAFLD. Finally, the long-term prognosis after curative surgery joins that of patients operated on with other types of underlying liver diseases. An increased rate of patients with MS/NAFLD referred to hepatobiliary units has to be expected. The higher operative risk observed in this subset of patients will require specific improvements in their perioperative management. PMID:24868324

  15. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is often associated with a cluster of increased health risks collectively known as "Metabolic Syndrome" (MS). MS is often accompanied by development of fatty liver. Sometimes fatty liver results in damage leading to reduced liver function, and need for a transplant. This condition is known...

  16. [Acute fatty liver in pregnancy: revealing fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders].

    PubMed

    Lamireau, D; Feghali, H; Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Mesli, S; Carles, D; Brissaud, O

    2012-03-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome are serious maternal illnesses occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy with significant perinatal and maternal mortality. AFLP may result from mitochondrial defects in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in particular a deficiency of the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) in the fetus. Clinical findings in AFLP vary and its diagnosis is complicated by a significant overlap in clinical and biochemical features with HELLP syndrome. We report the case of 2 siblings who died, the first one in the neonatal period of asphyxia with multivisceral presentation and the second one from sudden death at 7 months. Autopsy of the latter infant revealed hepatic steatosis associated with cardiomyopathy, which led to suspicion of a fatty acid oxidation deficiency. Mutation analysis demonstrated that both children were homozygous for the common mutation c.1528G>C and the parents were heterozygous for this same mutation. This case demonstrates the importance of screening mothers with acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy and their children at birth for a metabolic disease. This article proposes several metabolic tests for mother and child suspected of having beta-oxidation of a fatty acid disorder.

  17. Management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neel; Beaton, Melanie D

    2015-12-28

    There is no single pharmacologic therapy that has been approved to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the general population. The backbone of therapy currently includes intensive lifestyle modification with established targets for diet and weight loss. The use of unsweetened, unfiltered coffee along with limiting high fructose corn syrup have emerged as beneficial dietary recommendations. The use of empiric oral hypoglycemic agents and vitamin E, however, has not been widely accepted. Developing bariatric surgical techniques are promising, but additional studies with long-term follow up are needed before it can be widely recommended. Finally, liver transplantation is an increasingly frequent consideration once complications of end-stage disease have developed. The future treatment of those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will likely involve a personalized approach. The importance of the gut microbiome in mediating hepatocyte inflammation and intestinal permeability is emerging and may offer avenues for novel treatment. The study of anti-fibrotic agents such as pentoxifylline and FXR agonists hold promise and new pathways, such as hepatocyte cannabinoid receptor antagonists are being studied. With the incidence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome increasing throughout the developed world, the future will continue to focus on finding novel agents and new applications of existing therapies to help prevent and to mediate the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26730275

  18. Soft drinks consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nseir, William; Nassar, Fares; Assy, Nimer

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common clinical condition which is associated with metabolic syndrome in 70% of cases. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress combine to increase free fatty acid delivery to the liver, and increased hepatic triglyceride accumulation contributes to fatty liver. Regular soft drinks have high fructose corn syrup which contains basic sugar building blocks, fructose 55% and glucose 45%. Soft drinks are the leading source of added sugar worldwide, and have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. The consumption of soft drinks can increase the prevalence of NAFLD independently of metabolic syndrome. During regular soft drinks consumption, fat accumulates in the liver by the primary effect of fructose which increases lipogenesis, and in the case of diet soft drinks, by the additional contribution of aspartame sweetener and caramel colorant which are rich in advanced glycation end products that potentially increase insulin resistance and inflammation. This review emphasizes some hard facts about soft drinks, reviews fructose metabolism, and explains how fructose contributes to the development of obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD. PMID:20518077

  19. Soft drinks consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, William; Nassar, Fares; Assy, Nimer

    2010-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common clinical condition which is associated with metabolic syndrome in 70% of cases. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress combine to increase free fatty acid delivery to the liver, and increased hepatic triglyceride accumulation contributes to fatty liver. Regular soft drinks have high fructose corn syrup which contains basic sugar building blocks, fructose 55% and glucose 45%. Soft drinks are the leading source of added sugar worldwide, and have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. The consumption of soft drinks can increase the prevalence of NAFLD independently of metabolic syndrome. During regular soft drinks consumption, fat accumulates in the liver by the primary effect of fructose which increases lipogenesis, and in the case of diet soft drinks, by the additional contribution of aspartame sweetener and caramel colorant which are rich in advanced glycation end products that potentially increase insulin resistance and inflammation. This review emphasizes some hard facts about soft drinks, reviews fructose metabolism, and explains how fructose contributes to the development of obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD.

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2015-01-01

    There is worldwide epidemic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a clinical entity related to metabolic syndrome. Majority of the patients are obese but the disease can affect non-obese individuals as well. Metabolic factors and genetics play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disorder. The spectrum of disorders included in NAFLD are benign macrovesicular hepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the disease remains asymptomatic most of the time, it can slowly progress to end stage liver disease. It will be the most common indication of liver transplantation in the future. It is diagnosed by abnormal liver chemistry, imaging studies and liver biopsy. As there are risks of potential complications during liver biopsy, many patients do not opt for liver biopsy. There are some noninvasive scoring systems to find out whether patients have advanced hepatic fibrosis. At the present time, there are limited treatment options which include lifestyle modification to loose weight, vitamin E and thioglitazones. Different therapeutic agents are being investigated for optimal management of this entity. There are some studies done on incretin based therapies in patients with NAFLD. Other potential agents will be silent information regulator protein Sirtuin and antifibrotic monoclonal antibody Simtuzumab against lysyl oxidase like molecule 2. But they are still in the investigational phase. PMID:26085906

  1. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from "bland steatosis" to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death.

  2. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from “bland steatosis” to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death. PMID:27213358

  3. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from "bland steatosis" to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death. PMID:27213358

  4. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  5. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD.

  6. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  7. Functional pitch of a liver: fatty liver disease diagnosis with photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuoxian; Lin, Jiandie; Carson, Paul; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    To provide more information for classification and assessment of biological tissues, photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) moves beyond the quantification of the intensities of the photoacoustic (PA) signals by the use of the frequency-domain power distribution, namely power spectrum, of broadband PA signals. The method of PASA quantifies the linear-fit to the power spectrum of the PA signals from a biological tissue with 3 parameters, including intercept, midband-fit and slope. Intercept and midband-fit reflect the total optical absorption of the tissues whereas slope reflects the heterogeneity of the tissue structure. Taking advantage of the optical absorption contrasts contributed by lipid and blood at 1200 and 532 nm, respectively and the heterogeneous tissue microstructure in fatty liver due to the lipid infiltration, we investigate the capability of PASA in identifying histological changes of fatty livers in mouse model. 6 and 9 pairs of normal and fatty liver tissues from rat models were examined by ex vivo experiment with a conventional rotational PA measurement system. One pair of rat models with normal and fatty livers was examined non-invasively and in situ with our recently developed ultrasound and PA parallel imaging system. The results support our hypotheses that the spectrum analysis of PA signals can provide quantitative measures of the differences between the normal and fatty liver tissues and that part of the PA power spectrum can suffice for characterization of microstructures in biological tissues. Experimental results also indicate that the vibrational absorption peak of lipid at 1200nm could facilitate fatty liver diagnosis.

  8. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tolman, Keith G; Dalpiaz, Anthony S

    2007-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, defined as the presence of macrovascular steatosis in the presence of less than 20 gm of alcohol ingestion per day, is the most common liver disease in the USA. It is most commonly associated with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. It is manifested by steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and, rarely, hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic steatosis results from an imbalance between the uptake of fat and its oxidation and export. Insulin resistance, predisposing to lipolysis of peripheral fat with mobilization to and uptake of fatty acids by the liver, is the most consistent underlying pathogenic factor. It is not known why some patients progress to cirrhosis; however, the induction of CYP 2E1 with generation of reactive oxygen species appears to be important. Treatment is directed at weight loss plus pharmacologic therapy targeted toward insulin resistance or dyslipidemia. Bariatric surgery has proved effective. While no pharmacologic therapy has been approved, emerging data on thiazolidinediones have demonstrated improvement in both liver enzymes and histology. There are fewer, but promising data, with statins which have been shown to be hepatoprotective in other liver diseases. The initial enthusiasm for ursodeoxycholic acid has not been supported by histologic studies. PMID:18516264

  9. Barley Sprouts Extract Attenuates Alcoholic Fatty Liver Injury in Mice by Reducing Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Joung-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Oh, Ji Youn; Seo, Woo Duck; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Jae-Chul; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that barley leaves possess beneficial properties such as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, antidepressant, and antidiabetic. Interestingly, barley sprouts contain a high content of saponarin, which showed both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of barley sprouts on alcohol-induced liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Raw barley sprouts were extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of its components were performed. The mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without barley sprouts for four weeks. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were used to study the effect of barley sprouts on inflammation. Alcohol intake for four weeks caused liver injury, evidenced by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. The accumulation of lipid in the liver was also significantly induced, whereas the glutathione (GSH) level was reduced. Moreover, the inflammation-related gene expression was dramatically increased. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively prevented by barley sprouts treatment. In particular, pretreatment with barley sprouts significantly blocked inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7. This study suggests that the protective effect of barley sprouts against alcohol-induced liver injury is potentially attributable to its inhibition of the inflammatory response induced by alcohol. PMID:27455313

  10. Barley Sprouts Extract Attenuates Alcoholic Fatty Liver Injury in Mice by Reducing Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Joung-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Oh, Ji Youn; Seo, Woo Duck; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Jae-Chul; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that barley leaves possess beneficial properties such as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, antidepressant, and antidiabetic. Interestingly, barley sprouts contain a high content of saponarin, which showed both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of barley sprouts on alcohol-induced liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Raw barley sprouts were extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of its components were performed. The mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without barley sprouts for four weeks. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were used to study the effect of barley sprouts on inflammation. Alcohol intake for four weeks caused liver injury, evidenced by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. The accumulation of lipid in the liver was also significantly induced, whereas the glutathione (GSH) level was reduced. Moreover, the inflammation-related gene expression was dramatically increased. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively prevented by barley sprouts treatment. In particular, pretreatment with barley sprouts significantly blocked inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7. This study suggests that the protective effect of barley sprouts against alcohol-induced liver injury is potentially attributable to its inhibition of the inflammatory response induced by alcohol. PMID:27455313

  11. Plasma phospholipids and fatty acid composition differ between liver biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D W L; Arendt, B M; Hillyer, L M; Fung, S K; McGilvray, I; Guindi, M; Allard, J P

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with perturbations in liver lipid metabolism. Liver phospholipid and fatty acid composition have been shown to be altered in NAFLD. However, detailed profiles of circulating lipids in the pathogenesis of NAFLD are lacking. Objective: Therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine circulating lipids and potential mechanisms related to hepatic gene expression between liver biopsy-proven simple steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy subjects. Subjects: Plasma phospholipid and fatty acid composition were determined in 31 healthy living liver donors as healthy controls (HC), 26 patients with simple hepatic steatosis (SS) and 20 with progressive NASH. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed by Illumina microarray in a subset of 22 HC, 16 SS and 14 NASH. Results: Concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) increased relative to disease progression, HCFatty acid composition of phospholipids was also remodeled. In particular, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid were higher (P<0.05) in SS and NASH relative to HC in PS. Differentially expressed hepatic genes included ETNK1 and PLSCR1 that are involved in PE synthesis and PS transport, respectively. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that there is a disruption in phospholipid metabolism that is present in SS, but more pronounced in NASH. Intervention studies targeted at lipid metabolism could benefit SS and NASH. PMID:27428872

  12. Serum proteomics for biomarker discovery in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2012-08-16

    Proteomic platforms have gained increasing attention in the clinical spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This approach allows for the unbiased discovery of circulating biochemical markers, i.e., it is not limited to known molecules of presumed importance. This manuscript provides an overview of proteomic serum biomarker discovery in NAFLD. Hemoglobin is currently the most widely replicated proteomic circulating biomarker of NAFLD; it was identified as a biomarker of fatty liver in two distinct proteomic studies and subsequently validated using distinct analytical methods by independent research groups in large replication cohorts. Given the increasing availability of numerous serum samples and the refinement of the technological platforms available to scrutinize the blood proteome, large collaborative studies between academia and industry are warmly encouraged to identify novel, unbiased circulating biomarkers of NAFLD.

  13. Dietary and plasma phosphorus in hens with fatty liver syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miles, R D; Christmas, R B; Harms, R H

    1982-12-01

    Plasma inorganic phosphorus was determined in two experiments in hens that had fatty liver syndrome. In Experiment 1, plasma inorganic phosphorus was determined in twelve strains of hens all fed the same diet. Plasma inorganic phosphorus immediately following oviposition was elevated in all strains. The two strains in the first experiment with the highest as well as the two strains with the lowest plasma inorganic phosphorus were used in the second experiment. Each of the four strains were subdivided into three groups of 60 hens each and fed a practical layer diet containing either .30, .75, or 1.40% total phosphorus and 3.4% calcium. Significant differences were found in plasma inorganic phosphorus between strains fed the three dietary phosphorus levels. Results indicated that plasma inorganic phosphorus is related to dietary phosphorus in hens with an elevated plasma inorganic phosphorus level associated with fatty liver syndrome.

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular pathways and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Along with rising numbers of patients with metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased in proportion with the obesity epidemic. While there are no established treatments for NAFLD, current research is targeting new molecular mechanisms that underlie NAFLD and associated metabolic disorders. This review discusses some of these emerging molecular mechanisms and their therapeutic implications for the treatment of NAFLD. The basic research that has identified potential molecular targets for pharmacotherapy will be outlined. PMID:24209497

  15. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  16. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  17. Nutritional and management strategies for the prevention of fatty liver in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Grummer, Ric R

    2008-04-01

    Fatty liver occurs in dairy cattle during periods of elevated blood non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Elevated blood NEFAs are associated with hormonal changes at parturition and negative energy balance. Approaches for preventing fatty liver include inhibition of fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissues and altering hepatic metabolism to enhance fatty acid oxidation or export as a constituent of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). Nutritional and management strategies to implement these approaches have been examined. Increasing energy density of diet, either by increasing non-fiber carbohydrate or fat, has failed to prevent fatty liver. Two nutritional supplements, ruminally-protected choline and propylene glycol, have proven effective at preventing fatty liver. Choline probably enhances hepatic VLDL secretion. Propylene glycol most likely reduces fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue. Shortening or eliminating the dry period is a management strategy that reduces the magnitude of negative energy balance after calving and triglyceride accumulation in the liver.

  18. Translational approaches: From fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Natalia; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Tiribelli, Claudio; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one, if not the most common, cause of chronic liver disease affecting both adults and children. The increasing number of cases at an early age is the most worrying aspect of this pathology, since it provides more time for its evolution. The spectrum of this disease ranges from liver steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and in some cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD may not always be considered a benign disease and hepatologists must be cautious in the presence of fatty liver. This should prompt the use of the available experimental models to understand better the pathogenesis and to develop a rational treatment of a disease that is dangerously increasing. In spite of the growing efforts, the pathogenesis of NAFLD is still poorly understood. In the present article we review the most relevant hypotheses and evidence that account for the progression of NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. The available in vitro and in vivo experimental models of NASH are discussed and revised in terms of their validity in translational studies. These studies must be aimed at the discovery of the still unknown triggers or mediators that induce the progression of hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis. PMID:25083077

  19. Ketogenesis prevents diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Ercal, Baris; Huang, Xiaojing; Leid, Jamison M.; d’Avignon, D. André; Graham, Mark J.; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Patti, Gary J.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum disorders affect approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. However, the drivers of progressive steatohepatitis remain incompletely defined. Ketogenesis can dispose of much of the fat that enters the liver, and dysfunction in this pathway could promote the development of NAFLD. Here, we evaluated mice lacking mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGCS2) to determine the role of ketogenesis in preventing diet-induced steatohepatitis. Antisense oligonucleotide–induced loss of HMGCS2 in chow-fed adult mice caused mild hyperglycemia, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis from pyruvate, and augmented production of hundreds of hepatic metabolites, a suite of which indicated activation of the de novo lipogenesis pathway. High-fat diet feeding of mice with insufficient ketogenesis resulted in extensive hepatocyte injury and inflammation, decreased glycemia, deranged hepatic TCA cycle intermediate concentrations, and impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis due to sequestration of free coenzyme A (CoASH). Supplementation of the CoASH precursors pantothenic acid and cysteine normalized TCA intermediates and gluconeogenesis in the livers of ketogenesis-insufficient animals. Together, these findings indicate that ketogenesis is a critical regulator of hepatic acyl-CoA metabolism, glucose metabolism, and TCA cycle function in the absorptive state and suggest that ketogenesis may modulate fatty liver disease. PMID:25347470

  20. Ketogenesis prevents diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; Ercal, Baris; Huang, Xiaojing; Leid, Jamison M; d'Avignon, D André; Graham, Mark J; Dietzen, Dennis J; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Patti, Gary J; Crawford, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum disorders affect approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. However, the drivers of progressive steatohepatitis remain incompletely defined. Ketogenesis can dispose of much of the fat that enters the liver, and dysfunction in this pathway could promote the development of NAFLD. Here, we evaluated mice lacking mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGCS2) to determine the role of ketogenesis in preventing diet-induced steatohepatitis. Antisense oligonucleotide-induced loss of HMGCS2 in chow-fed adult mice caused mild hyperglycemia, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis from pyruvate, and augmented production of hundreds of hepatic metabolites, a suite of which indicated activation of the de novo lipogenesis pathway. High-fat diet feeding of mice with insufficient ketogenesis resulted in extensive hepatocyte injury and inflammation, decreased glycemia, deranged hepatic TCA cycle intermediate concentrations, and impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis due to sequestration of free coenzyme A (CoASH). Supplementation of the CoASH precursors pantothenic acid and cysteine normalized TCA intermediates and gluconeogenesis in the livers of ketogenesis-insufficient animals. Together, these findings indicate that ketogenesis is a critical regulator of hepatic acyl-CoA metabolism, glucose metabolism, and TCA cycle function in the absorptive state and suggest that ketogenesis may modulate fatty liver disease.

  1. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L’Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development. PMID:25621497

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; El-Den Ashmawy, Eman M Salah

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most frequent chronic liver disease that occurs across all age groups and is recognized to occur in 14%-30% of the general population, representing a serious and growing clinical problem due to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight. Histologically, it resembles alcoholic liver injury but occurs in patients who deny significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of conditions, ranging from benign hepatocellular steatosis to inflammatory nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The majority of hepatocellular lipids are stored as triglycerides, but other lipid metabolites, such as free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids, may also be present and play a role in disease progression. NAFLD is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and visceral adiposity. Confirmation of the diagnosis of NAFLD can usually be achieved by imaging studies; however, staging the disease requires a liver biopsy. Current treatment relies on weight loss and exercise, although various insulin-sensitizing agents, antioxidants and medications appear promising. The aim of this review is to highlight the current information regarding epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of NAFLD as well as new information about pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:25937862

  3. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: East Versus West

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10% to 30% in various countries. It has become an important cause of unexplained rise in transaminases, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathogenesis is related to obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and resultant inflammation in the liver progressing to fibrosis. Pharmacological treatment in patients with NAFLD is still evolving and the treatment of these patients rests upon lifestyle modification with diet and exercise being the cornerstones of therapy. While there are many similarities between patients with NAFLD from Asia and the West, there are certain features which make the patients with NAFLD from Asia stand apart. This review highlights the data on NAFLD from Asia comparing it with the data from the West. PMID:25755421

  4. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: East Versus West.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay K

    2012-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10% to 30% in various countries. It has become an important cause of unexplained rise in transaminases, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathogenesis is related to obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and resultant inflammation in the liver progressing to fibrosis. Pharmacological treatment in patients with NAFLD is still evolving and the treatment of these patients rests upon lifestyle modification with diet and exercise being the cornerstones of therapy. While there are many similarities between patients with NAFLD from Asia and the West, there are certain features which make the patients with NAFLD from Asia stand apart. This review highlights the data on NAFLD from Asia comparing it with the data from the West. PMID:25755421

  5. UPLC-MS-based urine metabolomics reveals indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid as conserved biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver disease in the Ppara-null mouse model.

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumen K; Patterson, Andrew D; Yang, Qian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Fornace, Albert J; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2011-09-01

    Since the development and prognosis of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) vary significantly with genetic background, identification of a genetic background-independent noninvasive ALD biomarker would significantly improve screening and diagnosis. This study explored the effect of genetic background on the ALD-associated urinary metabolome using the Ppara-null mouse model on two different backgrounds, C57BL/6 (B6) and 129/SvJ (129S), along with their wild-type counterparts. Reversed-phase gradient UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS analysis revealed that urinary excretion of a number of metabolites, such as ethylsulfate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid sulfate, adipic acid, pimelic acid, xanthurenic acid, and taurine, were background-dependent. Elevation of ethyl-β-d-glucuronide and N-acetylglycine was found to be a common signature of the metabolomic response to alcohol exposure in wild-type as well as in Ppara-null mice of both strains. However, increased excretion of indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid was found to be a conserved feature exclusively associated with the alcohol-treated Ppara-null mouse on both backgrounds that develop liver pathologies similar to the early stages of human ALD. These markers reflected the biochemical events associated with early stages of ALD pathogenesis. The results suggest that indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid are potential candidates for conserved and pathology-specific high-throughput noninvasive biomarkers for early stages of ALD.

  6. Carbonic Anhydrase Protects Fatty Liver Grafts against Ischemic Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; De Luca, Viviana; Panisello, Arnau; Folch-Puy, Emma; Hotter, Georgina; Capasso, Clemente; T. Supuran, Claudiu; Rosselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton. CAs are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acid-base homeostasis, electrolyte balance, oxygen delivery to tissues and nitric oxide generation. Given that these processes are found to be dysregulated during ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), and taking into account the high vulnerability of steatotic livers to preservation injury, we hypothesized a new role for CA as a pharmacological agent able to protect against ischemic damage. Two different aspects of the role of CA II in fatty liver grafts preservation were evaluated: 1) the effect of its addition to Institut Georges Lopez (IGL-1) storage solution after cold ischemia; 2) and after 24h of cold storage followed by two hours of normothermic ex-vivo perfusion. In all cases, liver injury, CA II protein concentration, CA II mRNA levels and CA II activity were determined. In case of the ex-vivo perfusion, we further assessed liver function (bile production, bromosulfophthalein clearance) and Western blot analysis of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen activated protein kinases family (MAPKs) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) parameters (GRP78, PERK, IRE, eIF2α and ATF6). We found that CA II was downregulated after cold ischemia. The addition of bovine CA II to IGL-1 preservation solution efficiently protected steatotic liver against cold IRI. In the case of reperfusion, CA II protection was associated with better function, AMPK activation and the prevention of ERS and MAPKs activation. Interestingly, CA II supplementation was not associated with enhanced CO2 hydration. The results suggest that CA II modulation may be a promising target for fatty liver graft preservation. PMID:26225852

  7. Clinical differences between alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro; Arisawa, Tomiyasu

    2014-07-14

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are serious health problems worldwide. These two diseases have similar pathological spectra, ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although most subjects with excessive alcohol or food intake experience simple hepatic steatosis, a small percentage of individuals will develop progressive liver disease. Notably, both ALD and NAFLD are frequently accompanied by extrahepatic complications, including cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The survival of patients with ALD and NAFLD depends on various disease-associated conditions. This review delineates the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with ALD and NAFLD by comparing their epidemiology, the factors associated with disease susceptibility and progression, and the predictors and characteristics of outcomes. A comprehensive understanding of the characteristics and outcomes of ALD and NAFLD is imperative in the management of these chronic liver diseases. PMID:25024597

  8. Caffeine protects against alcohol-induced liver fibrosis by dampening the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Dai, Xuefei; Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, He; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun; Lv, Xiongwen

    2015-04-01

    Alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF) is characterized by hyperplasia of extracellular matrix under long-term alcohol stimulation. Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation plays an important role in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Caffeine, as the main active component of coffee and tea, was widely consumed in daily life. It was always a thought that caffeine can reduce the probability of suffering from liver diseases. In this study, we attempt to validate the hypothesis that caffeine inhibits activation of HSCs which were isolated from rat ALF model. The rats were gavaged by ethanol to establish ALF model and then treated with different concentrations of caffeine or colchicine. Serum was collected to measure the contents of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and type IV collagen (CIV). Then liver tissues were obtained for hematoxylin-eosin staining and Sirius-red staining. Others were treated through liver perfusion to isolate primary rat HSCs. Interestingly, we found that caffeine significantly decreased ALT, AST, HA, LN, PIIINP and CIV levels and reversed liver fibrosis in rat ALF models. Results of immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and western blot indicated that caffeine could reduce fibrosis and inhibit cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway in HSC. Caffeine has a preventive effect on ALF. The mechanism may be interpreted that caffeine inhibits the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway through adenosine A2A receptors in HSC.

  9. Management of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuy-Anh; Loomba, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes and chronic liver disease in the US with expected rise in incidence paralleling the epidemic of obesity. A subset of patients with NAFLD have the progressive form of NAFLD that is termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by specific features on liver histology including hepatocellular ballooning degeneration, lobular inflammation, and zone-3 steatosis with or without peri-sinusoidal fibrosis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and result in liver-related death. Insulin resistance is commonly seen in patients with NASH and often co-exists with other features of the metabolic syndrome including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Although weight loss through lifestyle modifications including dietary changes and increased physical exercise remains the backbone of management of NASH, it has proved challenging for patients to achieve and maintain weight loss goals. Thus, it is often necessary to couple lifestyle changes with another pharmacologic treatment for NASH. Insulin sensitizers including the biguanides (metformin), thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (exenatide) are large groups of medications that have been studied for the treatment of NASH. Other agents with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, or anti-fibrotic properties which have been studied in NASH include vitamin E, pentoxifylline, betaine, and ursodeoxycholic acid. This review will provide a detailed summary on the clinical data behind the full spectrum of treatments that exist for NASH and suggest management recommendations. PMID:25755424

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Management: Dietary and Lifestyle Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vi; George, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of abnormalities that can range from bland liver fat (steatosis), to hepatic inflammation and liver injury (steatohepatitis). It is estimated that NAFLD will become the principal cause of liver disease in Western nations and the leading indication for liver transplantation. Advancements in disease recognition and management are therefore paramount. Although the development of new, reliable drug therapies is vital, lifestyle interventions remain the most effective treatment modality. In addition to weight loss as a primary measure of treatment success, there is growing recognition that other endpoints, including the prevention or delay of diabetes onset, reduced cardiovascular events, prevention of cancer, and improved overall mortality, are equally important outcomes that can be independently modified by lifestyle change. Moreover, NAFLD is inextricably part of a complex, systemic disease process that is linked with deeply entrenched maladaptive lifestyle behaviors. Thus, a holistic, multidisciplinary, and individualized approach to disease management will be the key to achieving any realistic population-level change.

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Alkhouri, Naim; Alisi, Anna; Della Corte, Claudia; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Raponi, Massimiliano; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and is considered the most common form of chronic liver disease in children. Several factors contribute to NAFLD development, including race/ethnicity, genetic factors, environmental exposures, and alterations in the gut microbiome. The histologic spectrum of NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to the more aggressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis can develop from NAFLD during childhood. Diagnosing advanced disease is challenging and may require a liver biopsy, highlighting the urgent need for reliable, noninvasive markers of disease severity. The mainstay of treatment for NAFLD remains lifestyle modifications and weight loss. Probiotics and ω-3 fatty acids may ameliorate disease progression. Recent data have suggested that vitamin E may be considered as a NASH-specific therapy in children, and there are several ongoing human studies evaluating different therapeutic targets for NAFLD. We provide an up-to-date review of the risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment to manage this common disease in children.

  12. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease. PMID:26494964

  13. Dyslipidemia in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Hemant; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Chalasani, Naga

    2012-02-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) often have dyslipidemia along with other features of metabolic syndrome such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. The dyslipidemia in NAFLD is characterized by increased serum triglycerides, increased small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL nontype A) particles, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in NAFLD is not well understood, but it is likely related to hepatic overproduction of the very low-density lipoprotein particles and dysregulated clearance of lipoproteins from the circulation. There is unequivocal evidence that cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD. Aggressive treatment of dyslipidemia plays a critical role in the overall management of patients with NAFLD. Statins are the first-line agents to treat high cholesterol and their dosage should be adjusted based on achieving therapeutic targets and tolerability. Although all statins appear to be effective in improving cholesterol levels in patients with NAFLD, there is more experience with atorvastatin in patients with NAFLD; furthermore, it is the only statin to date to show a reduced cardiovascular morbidity in patients with NAFLD. The risk for serious liver injury from statins is quite rare and patients with NAFLD are not at increased risk for statin hepatotoxicity. Omega-3 fatty acids are perhaps the first choice to treat hypertriglyceridemia because of their safety, tolerability, and efficacy in improving serum triglycerides, as well as their potential to improve liver disease. PMID:22418885

  14. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-10-21

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease.

  15. Acetaminophen Pharmacokinetics in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barshop, Nicole J.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) activity and the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of acetaminophen (APAP) in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods Twelve boys 10–17 years old with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 12 age and gender-matched controls without NAFLD were recruited. Following administration of a single oral dose of APAP (5mg/kg, maximum 325mg), APAP and its glucuronide metabolite (APAP-G) were measured in plasma, urine, and sputum at various intervals up to 24 hours. The activity of UGT was estimated by the plasma ratio of APAP-G to APAP at 4 hours. Results Following administration of APAP, children with NAFLD had significantly higher concentrations of APAP-G in serum (p=.0071) and urine (p=.0210) compared to controls. No significant differences in APAP pharmacokinetics parameters were observed between the two groups. Conclusions APAP glucuronidation is altered in children with fatty liver disease. Despite the altered disposition of this metabolite, the pharmacokinetics of a single 5 mg/kg dose of APAP is the same in children with NAFLD as in children with normal liver function. PMID:21240014

  16. Molecular classification of fatty liver by high-throughput profiling of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Fiscus, Ronald R; Le, Thuc T

    2016-04-01

    We describe an alternative approach to classifying fatty liver by profiling protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) with high-throughput capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays. Four strains of mice were studied, with fatty livers induced by different causes, such as ageing, genetic mutation, acute drug usage, and high-fat diet. Nutrient-sensitive PTMs of a panel of 12 liver metabolic and signalling proteins were simultaneously evaluated with cIEF immunoassays, using nanograms of total cellular protein per assay. Changes to liver protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and O-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation were quantified and compared between normal and diseased states. Fatty liver tissues could be distinguished from one another by distinctive protein PTM profiles. Fatty liver is currently classified by morphological assessment of lipid droplets, without identifying the underlying molecular causes. In contrast, high-throughput profiling of protein PTMs has the potential to provide molecular classification of fatty liver.

  17. Invited review: pathology, etiology, prevention, and treatment of fatty liver in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bobe, G; Young, J W; Beitz, D C

    2004-10-01

    Fatty liver (i.e., hepatic lipidosis) is a major metabolic disorder of many dairy cows in early lactation and is associated with decreased health status and reproductive performance. In severe cases, milk production and feed intake are decreased. Therefore, a practical preventative or an efficacious treatment of fatty liver could save millions of dollars yearly in treatment, replacement, and production losses for dairy farmers. Fatty liver develops when the hepatic uptake of lipids exceeds the oxidation and secretion of lipids by the liver, which usually is preceded by high concentrations of plasma NEFA mobilized from adipose tissue. Excess lipids are stored as triacylglycerol in the liver and are associated with decreased metabolic functions of the liver. Liver can be categorized into normal liver or mild, moderate, or severe fatty liver; the latter can be subdivided further into nonencephalopathic severe fatty liver and hepatic encephalopathy. Insufficient or unbalanced dietary intake, obesity, and elevated estrogen concentrations are involved in the etiology of fatty liver, which is associated with greater incidence of dystocia, diseases, infections, and inflammations. Because even mild fatty liver is associated with decreased health status and reproductive performance of dairy cows, prevention of fatty liver by supplying cows with sufficient nutrients and a clean and health-promoting environment in the peripartal period would reduce production losses of cows more than would any treatment of fatty liver. This, however, might not be enough for cows that are obese or do not eat well, had calving difficulties or twins, have metabolic or infectious diseases, or are in severe negative energy balance because of high milk production immediately after calving. Potential and commonly used preventatives, as well as treatments, are discussed in the review. Currently, detection of fatty liver is possible only by minor surgery. Ultrasonic techniques offer a potential tool to

  18. Dietary recommendations for patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Grzymisławski, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Changes to patients’ lifestyle, especially a modified dietary approach, play a key role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A balanced, limiting and individually tailored nutritional scheme enables weight loss and an improvement in the clinical picture of NAFLD. According to nutritional recommendations for patients with NAFLD, carbohydrates should comprise 40–50% of total dietary energy. It is advisable to increase the amount of complex carbohydrates rich in dietary fibre. A major role in the aetiology of NAFLD is played by excessive intake of fructose, which is related to the rise in consumption of nonalcoholic beverages among subjects in developed countries. Fat intake should comprise < 30% of daily calories. It is essential to increase consumption of food products rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ingestion of protein should constitute 15–20% of total energy. PMID:24868294

  19. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    SINGER, CRISTINA; STANCU, POLIXENIA; COŞOVEANU, SIMONA; BOTU, ALINA

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, there has been extremely much information which reveals an alarming increase of obesity in children and, at the same time, an increase of the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD implies a wide range of affections starting from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); the latter can evolve to cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma. All these affections were noticed in children, too. The article presents data on the epidemiology, pathogeny, clinical and paraclinical findings, and treatment of NAFLD in children. PMID:25729601

  20. Perspective: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Paul J; Mensink, Ronald P

    2013-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a clear risk factor for cardiovascular risk. Through its association with metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, NAFLD certainly has strong indirect associations with cardiovascular risk. Recent population studies have strengthened the association with prevalent coronary heart disease. Investigative cardiology has shown that NAFLD is also associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, such as diminished endothelial function and carotid artery intima-media thickening. Though causality between NAFLD and cardiovascular disease can only be tested in a clinical trial, these recent findings do emphasize the need to develop strategies including nutritional that may prevent NAFLD. PMID:23298957

  1. Current Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Swaytha; Rustgi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Weight loss, regular exercise, and diet composition modification seem to improve biochemical and histologic abnormalities. Other therapies directed at insulin resistance, oxidative stress, cytoprotection, and fibrosis may also offer benefits. Insulin sensitizers and vitamin E seem to be the most promising; however, they cause side effects. A multifaceted approach of lifestyle modifications, weight loss, and pharmacotherapy can be used in combination, but no single treatment approach has proved universally applicable to the general population with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Continuous clinical and preclinical studies on existing and potential drugs are needed to improve treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/NASH. PMID:27063274

  2. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. METHODS: Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0

  3. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  4. Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Antonia; Dufour, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of conditions from steatosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Steatosis is a benign reversible condition, which does not need treatment. Cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the end stages of any chronic liver disease and do not have etiology-specific treatments. In this chapter, we will review treatment options for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which is the progressive form of NAFLD. Basically there are 2 strategies, the first of which is to address lifestyle and the second to use medication. The first approach is the most physiologic, the least expensive, but is also the most difficult to implement. The second approach, which should help patients who failed the first approach, is at the advanced clinical research stage. PMID:27548081

  5. [Research advances in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Dai, Dong-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased because of the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the pediatric population. It has become the most common form of chronic liver diseases in children and the related research on NAFLD is expanded. The "two-hit" and "multiple hit" hypothesis have been widely accepted, and some research has shown that genetic, diet structure and environmental factors appear to play a crucial role in the development of pediatric NAFLD. Though it is expected by researchers, there is not an available satisfactory noninvasive marker for the diagnosis of this disease. Fortunately, some new non-invasive prediction scores for pediatric NAFLD have been developed. There is currently no established special therapy, and lifestyle intervention should be adequate for most cases of NAFLD in children. This article reviews the advances in the current knowledge and ideas concerning pediatric NAFLD, and discusses the diagnosis, perspective therapies and scoring methods for this disease.

  6. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26937136

  7. Molecular pathways in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Porras, José Antonio; Auguet, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a clinicopathological change characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes and has frequently been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. It is an increasingly recognized condition that has become the most common liver disorder in developed countries, affecting over one-third of the population and is associated with increased cardiovascular- and liver-related mortality. NAFLD is a spectrum of disorders, beginning as simple steatosis. In about 15% of all NAFLD cases, simple steatosis can evolve into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a medley of inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis, often resulting in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NAFLD progression is not completely understood. Its pathogenesis has often been interpreted by the “double-hit” hypothesis. The primary insult or the “first hit” includes lipid accumulation in the liver, followed by a “second hit” in which proinflammatory mediators induce inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis. Nowadays, a more complex model suggests that fatty acids (FAs) and their metabolites may be the true lipotoxic agents that contribute to NAFLD progression; a multiple parallel hits hypothesis has also been suggested. In NAFLD patients, insulin resistance leads to hepatic steatosis via multiple mechanisms. Despite the excess hepatic accumulation of FAs in NAFLD, it has been described that not only de novo FA synthesis is increased, but FAs are also taken up from the serum. Furthermore, a decrease in mitochondrial FA oxidation and secretion of very-low-density lipoproteins has been reported. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiological changes of hepatic lipid metabolism that contribute to NAFLD. PMID:25045276

  8. Innate immune signaling and gut-liver interactions in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and covers a disease spectrum ranging from steatosis to inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The innate immune response in the liver plays an important role during NAFLD progression. In addition, changes in the intestinal microbial balance and bacterial translocation can further affect disease progression. Immune cells in the liver recognize cell damage or pathogen invasion with intracellular or surface-expressed pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), subsequently initiating signaling cascades that trigger the release of factors promoting the inflammatory response during NAFLD progression. Therefore, mechanisms by which cells of the immune system are activated and recruited into the liver and how these cells cause injury and stress are important for understanding the inflammatory response during NAFLD. PMID:25568861

  9. Carvedilol Improves Inflammatory Response, Oxidative Stress and Fibrosis in the Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Rats by Regulating Kuppfer Cells and Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Renata Ferreira de Carvalho; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Miguel, Emilio de Castro; Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and antifibrotic effects of carvedilol (CARV) in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury. Methods Liver injury was induced by gavage administration of alcohol (7 g/kg) for 28 consecutive days. Eighty Wistar rats were pretreated with oral CARV at 1, 3, or 5 mg/kg or with saline 1 h before exposure to alcohol. Liver homogenates were assayed for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level as well as for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and liver triglyceride (TG) levels were also assayed. Immunohistochemical analyses of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/ligand (RANK/RANKL), suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS1), the Kupffer cell marker IBA-1 (ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) expression were performed. Confocal microscopy analysis of IL-1β and NF-κB expression and real-time quantitative PCR analysis for TNFα, PCI, PCIII, and NF-κB were performed. Results CARV treatment (5 mg/kg) during the alcohol exposure protocol was associated with reduced steatosis, hepatic cord degeneration, fibrosis and necrosis, as well as reduced levels of AST (p < 0.01), ALT (p < 0.01), TG (p < 0.001), MPO (p < 0.001), MDA (p < 0.05), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α, both p < 0.05), and increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (p < 0.001) and GSH (p < 0.05), compared to the alcohol-only group. Treatment with CARV 5 mg/kg also reduced expression levels of COX-2, RANK, RANKL, IBA-1, and ICAM-1 (all p < 0.05), while increasing expression of SOCS1, SOD-1, and GPx-1 (all p < 0.05) and decreasing expression of IL-1β and NF-κB (both, p < 0.05). Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that mRNA production of TNF

  10. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Aqel, Bashar; DiBaise, John K

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) continues to increase with prevalence estimates ranging from 17%-33%, making it is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in North America. Its importance is due to not only its prevalence but also its association with increased cardiovascular morbidity and progression to cirrhosis in a subset of patients. NAFLD encompasses a pathologic spectrum of disease, from relatively benign accumulation of lipid (steatosis) to progressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and necrosis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remains an important phenotypic state because this subgroup of patients is deemed at high risk for developing cirrhosis and progressing to liver failure requiring transplantation or to death. Gut microbiota has recently been identified as regulators of energy homeostasis and fat deposition, thereby implicating them in the development of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. The growing evidence that alteration in gut microbiota (dysbiosis) may affect liver pathology may allow for a better understanding of its role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, help to identify patients at risk of progression, and expose a microbial target for prevention and therapeutic intervention. In this review, we discuss the growing evidence that highlights the relationship between gut microbiota and its association with NAFLD. PMID:26449892

  11. Essential phospholipids in fatty liver: a scientific update

    PubMed Central

    Gundermann, Karl-Josef; Gundermann, Simon; Drozdzik, Marek; Mohan Prasad, VG

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although essential phospholipids (EPL) from soybean are often used in membrane-associated disorders and diseases, their high quality of purification and effects on prevalent liver diseases, especially on fatty liver diseases (FLDs) of different origin, are still widely unknown and a matter of continuous active research. The aim of this article is to review, discuss, and summarize the available results of EPL in the treatment of FLD. Methods Database research was carried out on Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, country-specific journals, and follow-up literature citations for relevant hepatogastroenterological articles published between 1988 and 2014. We searched for and reviewed only those papers that indicated minimum extraction amount of 72% (3-sn-phosphatidyl)choline from soybean as being necessary to treat patients with a considerable amount of 1,2-dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine as a key component in EPL. Results EPL has a well-established mode of action, therapeutic effectiveness, and lack of toxicity, which ensures clinically relevant efficacy-to-safety ratio. It influences membrane- dependent cellular functions and shows anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic, anti apoptotic, membrane-protective, and lipid-regulating effects. Due to its positive effects on membrane composition and functions, it accelerates the improvement or normalization of subjective symptoms; pathological, clinical, and biochemical findings; hepatic imaging; and liver histology. It is justified to administer EPL together with other therapeutic measurements in the liver. Conclusion Pharmacological and clinical results confirm the efficacy of EPL in the treatment of FLD. PMID:27217791

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Management in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mario R.; Tani, Claudia M.; Diniz, Marcio A.; Stefano, Jose T.; Chagas, Aline L.; Alencar, Regiane S.S.M.; Vezozzo, Denise C.P.; Santos, Gilmar R.; Campos, Priscila B.; Alves, Venancio AF.; Ratziu, Vlad; Carrilho, Flair J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as an important cause of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) system is the preferred staging system to evaluate patients with HCC and links prognosis assessment with treatment recommendation. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether the BCLC staging system and its treatment algorithm are suitable for patients with HCC arising from NAFLD. Methods: Forty-two patients with HCC related to either to NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis were retrieved retrospectively from 2 centers in Brazil. Patients were classified according to BCLC staging system. If the proposed HCC therapy could not be applied, the case was considered to represent deviations from the recommended BCLC guideline. Causes of treatment deviations were investigated. Results: There were 4 patients without evidence of cirrhosis according to liver biopsy and/or clinical evaluation. One (2%), 21 (50%), 10 (24%), 5 (12%), and 5 patients (12%) were classified initially to the very early (0), early (A), intermediate (B), advanced (C), and terminal (D) BCLC stages, respectively. Thirty-five patients (83%) were treated according to BCLC recommendations. There were 3 cases (of 5) of protocol deviation in BCLC C patients. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 81% and 66%, respectively. Conclusions: The BCLC system is applied in most cases of NAFLD-related HCC cases. Deviation of BCLC is found more frequently in BCLC C stage patients. PMID:25268068

  13. Non-invasive detection of fatty liver in dairy cows by digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Gerd; Amin, Viren R; Hippen, Arnold R; She, Pengxiang; Young, Jerry W; Beitz, Donald C

    2008-02-01

    During early lactation, many dairy cows develop fatty liver, which is associated with decreased health and reproductive performance. Currently, fatty liver can be detected reliably only by using liver biopsy followed by chemical or histological analysis, which is not practical in most on-farm situations. We tested whether digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms can be used to detect non-invasively fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content. A total of 49 liver biopsies and ultrasonograms were taken from 29 dairy cows within 2 weeks postpartum. The usefulness of 17 first- or second-order parameters from digital analysis of B-mode ultrasonograms were evaluated by discriminant, correlation, and regression analyses. A group of linear combinations of the 17 parameters correctly classified 40 of 49 samples into normal liver as well as mild, moderate and severe fatty liver when cut-off values were 1%, 5% and 10% and correctly classified 45 of 49 samples when cut-off values were 5% and 10% triacylglycerol of wet weight. A linear combination of 16 image parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of 38 of the 39 liver samples below the cut-off value of 10% within 2.5% of liver wet weight, and a linear combination of 3 parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of the 10 liver samples above the cut-off value of 10% within 2% of liver wet weight. Therefore, ultrasound imaging followed by digital analysis of sonograms has potential to non-invasively detect fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content.

  14. Assessment of Liver Viscoelasticity for the Diagnosis of Early Stage Fatty Liver Disease Using Transient Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenieras, Jean-Pierre; Dejobert, Maelle; Bastard, Cécile; Miette, Véronique; Perarnau, Jean-Marc; Patat, Frédéric

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by accumulation of fat within the Liver. The main objective of this work is (1) to evaluate the feasibility of measuring in vivo in the liver the shear wave phase velocity dispersion cs(ω) between 20 Hz and 90 Hz using vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE); (2) to estimate through the rheological Kelvin-Voigt model the shear elastic μ and shear viscosity η modulus; (3) to correlate the evolution of these viscoelastic parameters on two patients at Tours Hospital with the hepatic fat percentage measured with T1-weighted gradient-echo in-and out-phase MRI sequence. For the first volunteer who has 2% of fat in the liver, we obtained μ = 1233 ± 133 Pa and η = 0.5 ± 0.4 Pa.s. For the patient with 22% of fat, we measure μ = 964 ± 91 Pa and η = 1.77 ± 0.3 Pa.s. In conclusion, this novel method showed to be sensitive in characterizing the visco-elastic properties of fatty liver.

  15. Dysregulation of hepatic cAMP levels via altered Pde4b expression plays a critical role in alcohol-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Avila, Diana V; Barker, David F; Zhang, JingWen; McClain, Craig J; Barve, Shirish; Gobejishvili, Leila

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis is a significant risk factor for progressive liver disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling has been shown to significantly regulate lipid metabolism; however, the role of altered cAMP homeostasis in alcohol-mediated hepatic steatosis has never been studied. Our previous work demonstrated that increased expression of hepatic phosphodiesterase 4 (Pde4), which specifically hydrolyses and decreases cAMP levels, plays a pathogenic role in the development of liver inflammation/injury. The aim of this study was to examine the role of PDE4 in alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6 wild-type and Pde4b knockout (Pde4b(-/-) ) mice were pair-fed control or ethanol liquid diets. One group of wild-type mice received rolipram, a PDE4-specific inhibitor, during alcohol feeding. We demonstrate for the first time that an early increase in PDE4 enzyme expression and a resultant decrease in hepatic cAMP levels are associated with the significant reduction in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (Cpt1a) expression. Notably, alcohol-fed (AF) Pde4b(-/-) mice and AF wild-type mice treated with rolipram had significantly lower hepatic free fatty acid content compared with AF wild-type mice. Importantly, PDE4 inhibition in alcohol-fed mice prevented the decrease in hepatic Cpt1a expression via the Pparα/Sirt1/Pgc1α pathway. These results demonstrate that the alcohol- induced increase in hepatic Pde4, specifically Pde4b expression, and compromised cAMP signalling predispose the liver to impaired fatty acid oxidation and the development of steatosis. Moreover, these data also suggest that hepatic PDE4 may be a clinically relevant therapeutic target for the treatment of alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27287961

  16. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  17. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  18. Inhibitory effects of pretreatment with radon on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Teruaki; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibits carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in mice. In addition, it has been reported that reactive oxygen species contribute to alcohol-induced hepatopathy. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effects of radon inhalation on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of 50% alcohol (5 g/kg bodyweight) after inhaling approximately 4000 Bq/m(3) radon for 24 h. Alcohol administration significantly increased the activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) in serum, and the levels of triglyceride and lipid peroxide in the liver, suggesting acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy. Radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver. Furthermore, pretreatment with radon inhibited the depression of hepatic functions and antioxidative functions. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibited acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

  19. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Stål, Per

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD. PMID:26494963

  20. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  1. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harshal; Sheth, Smit; Shah, Purav; Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Limited studies have been undertaken to characterize Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in the Indian population. The main objective of our study was to document the prevalence of NAFLD amongst a cohort of obese Indian patients and demonstrate its relationship with other components of the metabolic syndrome. Methods: A total of 60 adult obese patients were subjected to a detailed history, clinical exam, anthropometric study and laboratory workup. Focus was on liver function and components of the metabolic syndrome like blood pressure, glycemic status and lipid profile. Subjects enrolled were divided into two groups Group A (n=48), with NAFLD and Group B (n=12) without NAFLD. The two groups were then compared amongst themselves as well as with data from previous similar studies. Results: A comparison of the anthropometric measurements revealed a statistically significant difference between the Body mass index (BMI) and Waist Hip Ratio of the two groups and in the mean triglyceride values between the two groups. Although the mean bilirubin levels measured in the serum were not statistically different the mean levels of SGOT and SGPT in the two groups was found to be statistically significant. On the contrary no significant difference in the values of alkaline phosphatase and synthetic liver functions could be discerned. A statistically highly significant difference in the mean liver span is seen. Interpretation and Conclusions: NAFLD is common in Indian obese populations and is associated with significant differences in anthropometric, clinical, laboratory and ultrasonographic aspects as compared with obese individuals not affected with liver disease. PMID:24596725

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF TOXICANT ASSOCIATED FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN RODENTS

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eryani, Laila; Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K.C.; Guardiola, J. J.; Clair, H.B.; Prough, R.A.; Cave, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxicant associated fatty liver disease (TAFLD) is a recently identified form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with exposure to industrial chemicals and environmental pollutants. Numerous studies have been conducted to test the association between industrial chemicals/ environmental pollutants and fatty liver disease both in vivo and in vitro. Objectives The objective of the paper is to report a list of chemicals associated with TAFLD. Methods Two federal databases of rodent toxicology studies– ToxRefDB (Environmental Protection Agency) and Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS, National Toxicology Program) were searched for liver endpoints. Combined, these two databases archive nearly 2000 rodent studies. TASH descriptors including fatty change, fatty necrosis, Oil red O positive staining, steatosis and lipid deposition were queried. Results Using these search terms, 123 chemicals associated with fatty liver were identified. Pesticides and solvents were the most frequently identified chemicals, while PCBs/dioxins were the most potent. About 44% of identified compounds were pesticides or their intermediates, and nearly 10% of pesticide registration studies in ToxRefDB were associated with fatty liver. Fungicides and herbicides were more frequently associated with fatty liver than insecticides. Conclusions More research on pesticides, solvents, metals and PCBs/dioxins in NAFLD/TAFLD is warranted due to their association with liver damage. PMID:25326588

  3. Iron and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence J; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell Hg

    2016-09-28

    The mechanisms that promote liver injury in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are yet to be thoroughly elucidated. As such, effective treatment strategies are lacking and novel therapeutic targets are required. Iron has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and represents a potential target for treatment. Relationships between serum ferritin concentration and NAFLD are noted in a majority of studies, although serum ferritin is an imprecise measure of iron loading. Numerous mechanisms for a pathogenic role of hepatic iron in NAFLD have been demonstrated in animal and cell culture models. However, the human data linking hepatic iron to liver injury in NAFLD is less clear, with seemingly conflicting evidence, supporting either an effect of iron in hepatocytes or within reticulo-endothelial cells. Adipose tissue has emerged as a key site at which iron may have a pathogenic role in NAFLD. Evidence for this comes indirectly from studies that have evaluated the role of adipose tissue iron with respect to insulin resistance. Adding further complexity, multiple strands of evidence support an effect of NAFLD itself on iron metabolism. In this review, we summarise the human and basic science data that has evaluated the role of iron in NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:27688653

  4. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  5. Iron and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Laurence J; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell HG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that promote liver injury in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are yet to be thoroughly elucidated. As such, effective treatment strategies are lacking and novel therapeutic targets are required. Iron has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and represents a potential target for treatment. Relationships between serum ferritin concentration and NAFLD are noted in a majority of studies, although serum ferritin is an imprecise measure of iron loading. Numerous mechanisms for a pathogenic role of hepatic iron in NAFLD have been demonstrated in animal and cell culture models. However, the human data linking hepatic iron to liver injury in NAFLD is less clear, with seemingly conflicting evidence, supporting either an effect of iron in hepatocytes or within reticulo-endothelial cells. Adipose tissue has emerged as a key site at which iron may have a pathogenic role in NAFLD. Evidence for this comes indirectly from studies that have evaluated the role of adipose tissue iron with respect to insulin resistance. Adding further complexity, multiple strands of evidence support an effect of NAFLD itself on iron metabolism. In this review, we summarise the human and basic science data that has evaluated the role of iron in NAFLD pathogenesis.

  6. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  7. Iron and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Laurence J; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell HG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that promote liver injury in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are yet to be thoroughly elucidated. As such, effective treatment strategies are lacking and novel therapeutic targets are required. Iron has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and represents a potential target for treatment. Relationships between serum ferritin concentration and NAFLD are noted in a majority of studies, although serum ferritin is an imprecise measure of iron loading. Numerous mechanisms for a pathogenic role of hepatic iron in NAFLD have been demonstrated in animal and cell culture models. However, the human data linking hepatic iron to liver injury in NAFLD is less clear, with seemingly conflicting evidence, supporting either an effect of iron in hepatocytes or within reticulo-endothelial cells. Adipose tissue has emerged as a key site at which iron may have a pathogenic role in NAFLD. Evidence for this comes indirectly from studies that have evaluated the role of adipose tissue iron with respect to insulin resistance. Adding further complexity, multiple strands of evidence support an effect of NAFLD itself on iron metabolism. In this review, we summarise the human and basic science data that has evaluated the role of iron in NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:27688653

  8. Gut-Liver Axis, Nutrition, and Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirpich, Irina A.; Marsano, Luis S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called ”gut-liver axis”, play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary factors may alter the gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, favoring the occurrence of metabolic endotoxemia and low grade inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of obesity and obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Therapeutic manipulations with prebiotics and probiotics to modulate the gut microbiota and maintain intestinal barrier integrity are potential agents for NAFLD management. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the complex interplay between the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and dietary factors in NAFLD pathogenesis. The concepts addressed in this review have important clinical implications, although more work needs to be done to understand how dietary factors affect the gut barrier and microbiota, and to comprehend how microbe-derived components may interfere with the host’s metabolism contributing to NAFLD development. PMID:26151226

  9. Association between sonographic diagnosis of fatty liver with histopathologic abnormalities and liver biopsy findings in middle age patient with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Hamid; Moradi, Farhad; Hassanzade, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver biopsy is required to diagnose non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to examine the relationship between sonographic diagnosis of fatty liver with histopathologic abnormalities and liver biopsy findings in patient with NAFLD. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 180 patients, with an age range of 18-60 year old, with NAFLD based on ultrasonograghic findings were evaluated. Age, sex, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, family history of liver disease and laboratory parameters recorded for all patients. Hence, grade of steatosis and stage of fibrosis were evaluated by liver biopsy. Results: A total of 220 patients were enrolled. Liver biopsy was performed in 180 patients. Mean age was 43 ± 10.6 years old and 66% were male. Ultrasonograghic findings showed mild, moderate and severe NAFLD was define in 100 (55.5%), 72 (40%) and 8 (4.5%) of patients, respectively. Liver biopsies showed that steatosis scores of <5%, 5-33% and 33-66% was define in 56 (31%), 116 (64%) and 9 (5%) of patients, respectively. Furthermore, fibrosis was defined as follow; none 92 (51%), mild 68 (38%), moderate 11 (6%), bridging 5 (3%) and cirrhosis 3 (2%) patients. There was no statistically significant relationship between ultrasonograghic findings and steatosis scores (P = 0.44), but statistically significant relationship was found between ultrasonograghic findings and fibrosis stage (P = 0.017). Conclusion: Findings revealed that, in patients with NAFLD, ultrasonographic finding were not in associate to steatosis, but were in relation with fibrosis stage. PMID:27563632

  10. Calpain 2-mediated autophagy defect increases susceptibility of fatty livers to ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Guo, Z; Deng, W; Fu, S; Zhang, C; Chen, M; Ju, W; Wang, D; He, X

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality after liver resection and transplantation. This study focuses on the role of autophagy in regulating sensitivity of fatty livers to ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Quantitative immunohistochemistry conducted on human liver allograft biopsies showed that, the reduction of autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin-1 at 1 h after reperfusion, was correlated with hepatic steatosis and poor survival of liver transplant recipients. In animal studies, western blotting and confocal imaging analysis associated the increase in sensitivity to I/R injury with low autophagy activity in fatty livers. Screening of autophagy-related proteins showed that Atg3 and Atg7 expression levels were marked decreased, whereas calpain 2 expression was upregulated during I/R in fatty livers. Calpain 2 inhibition or knockdown enhanced autophagy and suppressed cell death. Further point mutation experiments revealed that calpain 2 cleaved Atg3 and Atg7 at Atg3Δ92–97 and Atg7Δ344–349, respectively. In vivo and in vitro overexpression of Atg3 or Atg7 enhanced autophagy and suppressed cell death after I/R in fatty livers. Collectively, calpain 2-mediated degradation of Atg3 and Atg7 in fatty livers increases their sensitivity to I/R injury. Increasing autophagy may ameliorate fatty liver damage and represent a valuable method to expand the liver donor pool. PMID:27077802

  11. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  12. Effects of animal liver and bile extracts on biochemical values of rat ethanol-induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tien-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tse; Duann, Lan-Tyi; Yu, Kuo-Hui; Chen, Chih-Ming; Lin, Liang-Chuan; Sakata, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the improvement of fatty liver induced by ethanol with animal liver and bile extracts. This research aimed to increase the economic values of animal liver and bile extracts and used these to reduce damage of ethanol-induced fatty liver. Extracts came from animal liver and bile, including pig bile powder, pig liver extract, a mixture of pig bile powder and pig liver extract, chicken bile powder, chicken liver extract, and a mixture of chicken bile powder and chicken liver extract, and these were fed to Long-Evans rats. The results showed that rats fed ethanol for long terms could increase values of aspartate transaminase, cholesterol, γ-glutamy-transferase and alkaline phosphatase. Pig bile powder could decrease the values of aspartate transaminase, cholesterol and γ-glutamy-transferase. The significances also decreased on aspartate transaminase, γ-glutamy-transferase and aspartate transaminase, which were carried out with the pig liver extract treatment. These results suggest pig bile and liver extracts have high potential to improve rats' ethanol-induced fatty liver with serum biochemical parameters.

  13. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-Song; Li, Huan-Zhou; Niu, Cong-Cong; Pan, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  14. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  15. Relationship between ultrasound backscattered statistics and the concentration of fatty droplets in livers: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Lee, Yu-Hsin; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Chang, King-Jen; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound grayscale B-mode imaging is the most frequently used modality for examining fatty liver. Different concentrations and arrangements of fatty droplets in the liver may produce different statistical distributions of ultrasound backscatter signals, which may be treated as a useful clue for assessing the stage of fatty liver. To verify this point, we investigate the relationship between changes in backscattered statistics and the concentration of fatty droplets in the liver. Fatty liver was induced in rats fed a methionine-choline-deficient diet. Livers were excised from rats for in vitro ultrasound scanning using a single-element transducer. The envelopes of the acquired raw ultrasound signals were used for the analysis of the backscattered statistics by ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging, which has been shown as a reliable tool to model the statistical distribution of ultrasound backscatter signals. Histological analyses and the measurements of triglyceride and cholesterol in the rat liver were conducted for comparison with the Nakagami parameter. Results show that the ultrasound Nakagami parameter has an excellent correlation with the concentration of fatty droplets, demonstrating that ultrasound backscatter statistics depend on the degree of fatty liver in rats.

  16. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Maria Chiara; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Businaro, Luca; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA) supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes. Results The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely. Conclusions Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid

  17. Postpartum Acute Liver Dysfunction: A Case of Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy Developing Massive Intrahepatic Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Khalid Javid; Shovkat, Rabia; Samoon, Hamad Jeelani

    2015-01-01

    The function of the liver is particularly affected by the unique physiologic milieu of the pregnancy. Pregnancy-related liver diseases encompass a spectrum of different etiologies that are related to gestation or one of its complications. Hepatic calcification, a rare entity, is usually associated with infectious, vascular, or neoplastic lesions in the liver. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of rapidly occurring pregnancy-related intrahepatic calcification has been documented in a patient with severe eclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Here we present a case of immediate “postpartum” acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) in a 23-year-old hypertensive primigravida, complicated by acute renal dysfunction who developed dense intrahepatic calcification in less than a month after the initial diagnosis. A multidisciplinary approach for the management was used, to which the patient responded aptly. This case illustrates the first description of intrahepatic calcification in AFLP syndrome and highlights some of the challenges met in making the final diagnosis.

  18. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  19. OSAS-related inflammatory mechanisms of liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paschetta, Elena; Belci, Paola; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Cutrera, Renato; Musso, Giovanni; Nobili, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder, affecting over 4% of the general population, and is associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, independent of obesity and traditional risk factors. OSAS has been recently connected to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common chronic liver disease in the world, which can be found in 30% of the general adult population. Several studies suggest that the chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) of OSAS patients may per se trigger liver injury, inflammation, and fibrogenesis, promoting NAFLD development and the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In NAFLD patients, liver disease may be caused by hypoxia both indirectly by promoting inflammation and insulin resistance and directly by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and metabolic dysregulation in liver cells. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms linking OSAS to NAFLD, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), YKL-40, unfolded protein response, and hypoxic adipose tissue inflammation, which all could provide novel potential therapeutic approaches for the management of NAFLD patients with OSAS. PMID:25873773

  20. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: Their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a “low bacterial richness” may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier (“leaky gut”), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy. PMID:25400436

  1. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-11-14

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a "low bacterial richness" may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier ("leaky gut"), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy. PMID:25400436

  2. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  3. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  4. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  5. MicroRNAs in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baffy, György

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder. Strongly linked to obesity and diabetes, NAFLD has the characteristics of complex diseases with substantial heterogeneity. Accordingly, our ability to predict the risk of advanced NAFLD and provide efficient treatment may improve by a better understanding of the relationship between genotype and phenotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major role in the fine-tuning of gene expression and they have recently emerged as novel biomarkers and therapeutic tools in the management of NAFLD. These short non-coding RNA sequences act by partial repression or degradation of targeted mRNAs. Deregulation of miRNAs has been associated with different stages of NAFLD, while their biological role in the pathogenesis remains to be fully understood. Systems biology analyses based on predicted target genes have associated hepatic miRNAs with molecular pathways involved in NAFLD progression such as cholesterol and lipid metabolism, insulin signaling, oxidative stress, inflammation, and pathways of cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, circulating miRNAs have been identified as promising noninvasive biomarkers of NAFLD and linked to disease severity. This rapidly growing field is likely to result in major advances in the pathomechanism, prognostication, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:26690233

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diet and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a severe liver disease that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity and its related insulin-resistance state. Evidence for the role of the gut microbiota in energy storage and the subsequent development of obesity and some of its related diseases is now well established. More recently, a new role of gut microbiota has emerged in NAFLD. The gut microbiota is involved in gut permeability, low-grade inflammation and immune balance, it modulates dietary choline metabolism, regulates bile acid metabolism and produces endogenous ethanol. All of these factors are molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota can induce NAFLD or its progression toward overt non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Modification of the gut microbiota composition and/or its biochemical capacity by specific dietary or pharmacological interventions may advantageously affect host metabolism. Large-scale intervention trials, investigating the potential benefit of prebiotics and probiotics in improving cardiometabolic health in high-risk populations, are fervently awaited.

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diet and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a severe liver disease that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity and its related insulin-resistance state. Evidence for the role of the gut microbiota in energy storage and the subsequent development of obesity and some of its related diseases is now well established. More recently, a new role of gut microbiota has emerged in NAFLD. The gut microbiota is involved in gut permeability, low-grade inflammation and immune balance, it modulates dietary choline metabolism, regulates bile acid metabolism and produces endogenous ethanol. All of these factors are molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota can induce NAFLD or its progression toward overt non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Modification of the gut microbiota composition and/or its biochemical capacity by specific dietary or pharmacological interventions may advantageously affect host metabolism. Large-scale intervention trials, investigating the potential benefit of prebiotics and probiotics in improving cardiometabolic health in high-risk populations, are fervently awaited. PMID:26417275

  8. Autophagy: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuqing; Yu, Fujun; Wang, Jianbo; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has gained importance in recent decades due to drastic changes in diet, especially in Western countries. NAFLD occurs as a spectrum from simple hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD have been intensively investigated, many issues remain to be resolved. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism for disposing of excess or defective organelles, and has become a hot spot for research. Recent studies have revealed that autophagy is linked to the development of NAFLD and regulation of autophagy has therapeutic potential. Autophagy reduces intracellular lipid droplets by enclosing them and fusing with lysosomes for degradation. Furthermore, autophagy is involved in attenuating inflammation and liver injury. However, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword, as it may also affect adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether autophagy protects the body from injury or causes diseases and even death, and the association between autophagy and NAFLD remains controversial. This review is intended to discuss, comment, and outline the progress made in this field and establish the possible molecular mechanism involved. PMID:27099536

  9. The Effect of Bariatric Surgeries on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassanian, Mazen; Al-Mulhim, Amnah; Al-Sabhan, Atheer; Al-Amro, Shaden; Bamehriz, Fahad; Abdo, Ayman; Al Khalidi, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A review of published data addressing hepatic histopathological, metabolical, and functional changes following gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass surgery, and biliopancreatic with duodenal switch surgeries on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is currently the most common chronic liver disease. Owing to the strong relationship between obesity and NAFLD, the idea of weight reduction as a method to treat NAFLD has rapidly emerged. Bariatric surgery has proved to be the most efficient method for weight reduction; hence, their beneficial effects on NAFLD have been evaluated by several studies. A literature review of published data was performed during the years 2012-2014 using PubMed with the following key words: Bariatric, NAFLD, steatosis, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, gastric banding, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). Exclusion criteria were non-English articles and inherited NAFLD, pregnancy-induced NAFLD, and children. The majority of published data are in favor of indicating that bariatric surgeries improve the histologic and metabolic changes associated with NAFLD. The suggested mechanisms are: The reversal of IR, reduction of inflammatory markers, and improved histological features of NAFLD. Accordingly, bariatric surgeries are potentially one of the future methods in treating patients with morbid obesity and NAFLD. However, some questions remain unanswered, such as whether timing of surgery, type of surgery most effective, and whether bariatric surgeries are capable of curing the disease. Long-term and well-designed prospective studies are needed to address these issues. PMID:25253361

  10. Autophagy: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuqing; Yu, Fujun; Wang, Jianbo; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has gained importance in recent decades due to drastic changes in diet, especially in Western countries. NAFLD occurs as a spectrum from simple hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD have been intensively investigated, many issues remain to be resolved. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism for disposing of excess or defective organelles, and has become a hot spot for research. Recent studies have revealed that autophagy is linked to the development of NAFLD and regulation of autophagy has therapeutic potential. Autophagy reduces intracellular lipid droplets by enclosing them and fusing with lysosomes for degradation. Furthermore, autophagy is involved in attenuating inflammation and liver injury. However, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword, as it may also affect adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether autophagy protects the body from injury or causes diseases and even death, and the association between autophagy and NAFLD remains controversial. This review is intended to discuss, comment, and outline the progress made in this field and establish the possible molecular mechanism involved. PMID:27099536

  11. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD.

  12. Ultrasound image texture processing for evaluating fatty liver in peripartal dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Viren R.; Bobe, Gerd; Young, Jerry; Ametaj, Burim; Beitz, Donald

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the liver ultrasound texture as it changes in diffuse disease of fatty liver. This technology could allow non-invasive diagnosis of fatty liver, a major metabolic disorder in early lactation dairy cows. More than 100 liver biopsies were taken from fourteen dairy cows, as a part of the USDA-funded study for effects of glucagon on prevention and treatment of fatty liver. Up to nine liver biopsies were taken from each cow during peripartal period of seven weeks and total lipid content was determined chemically. Just before each liver biopsy was taken, ultrasonic B-mode images were digitally captured using a 3.5 or 5 MHz transducer. Effort was made to capture images that were non-blurred, void of large blood vessels and multiple echoes, and of consistent texture. From each image, a region-of-interest of size 100-by-100 pixels was processed. Texture parameters were calculated using algorithms such as first and second order statistics, 2D Fourier transformation, co-occurrence matrix, and gradient analysis. Many cows had normal liver (3% to 6% total lipid) and a few had developed fatty liver with total lipid up to 15%. The selected texture parameters showed consistent change with changing lipid content and could potentially be used to diagnose early fatty liver non-invasively. The approach of texture analysis algorithms and initial results on their potential in evaluating total lipid percentage is presented here.

  13. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  14. 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-you; Zheng, Jia-san; Wang, Jun-song

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. PMID:26732447

  15. (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-Wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-You; Zheng, Jia-San; Wang, Jun-Song

    2016-02-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows.

  16. Subclassification of fatty liver by its pathogenesis: cIEFing is believing.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Frances L; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2016-05-01

    Fatty liver, also termed hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease, is a condition characterized by excess fat accumulation in the liver. Common causes of fatty liver include obesity, ageing, medications, genetic disorders, viral hepatitis, excess alcohol or toxins. This diversity in pathogenesis is matched by an equally diverse spectrum of consequences, whereby some individuals remain asymptomatic yet others progress through a series of inflammatory, fibrotic and metabolic disorders that can lead to liver failure, cancer or diabetes. Current treatment approaches for fatty liver do not differ by disease aetiology and primarily involve weight loss strategies or management of co-morbidities. In a recent paper published in this journal, Urasaki et al used capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) to create profiles of protein post-translational modifications that distinguish four different models of fatty liver in mice. Importantly, this new cIEF approach has the potential to provide rapid individualized diagnosis of fatty liver pathogenesis that may enable more accurate and personalized treatment strategies. Further testing and optimization of cIEF as a diagnostic screening tool in humans is warranted.

  17. Epigenetic Modifications in the Biology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Carlos J.; Scian, Romina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Martino, Julio San; Castaño, Gustavo O.; Sookoian, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is an epigenetic modification whose role in the pathogenesis of metabolic-related complex diseases remains unexplored; 5-hmC appears to be prevalent in the mitochondrial genome. The Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family of proteins is responsible for catalyzing the conversion of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hmC. We hypothesized that epigenetic editing by 5-hmC might be a novel mechanism through which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-associated molecular traits could be explained. Hence, we performed an observational study to explore global levels of 5-hmC in fresh liver samples of patients with NAFLD and controls (n = 90) using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay and immunohistochemistry. We also screened for genetic variation in TET 1–3 loci by next generation sequencing to explore its contribution to the disease biology. The study was conducted in 2 stages (discovery and replication) and included 476 participants. We observed that the amount of 5-hmC in the liver of both NAFLD patients and controls was relatively low (up to 0.1%); a significant association was found with liver mitochondrial DNA copy number (R = 0.50, P = 0.000382) and PPARGC1A-mRNA levels (R = −0.57, P = 0.04). We did not observe any significant difference in the 5-hmC nuclear immunostaining score between NAFLD patients and controls; nevertheless, we found that patients with NAFLD (0.4 ± 0.5) had significantly lower nonnuclear-5-hmC staining compared with controls (1.8 ± 0.8), means ± standard deviation, P = 0.028. The missense p.Ile1123Met variant (TET1-rs3998860) was significantly associated with serum levels of caspase-generated CK-18 fragment-cell death biomarker in the discovery and replication stage, and the disease severity (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.97; P = 0.005). The p.Ile1762Val substitution (TET2-rs2454206) was associated with liver PPARGC1A-methylation and

  18. Liver Toxicity of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Use in an Adolescent with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Awai, Hannah I; Yu, Elizabeth L; Ellis, Linda S; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related morbidities such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is high among adolescents. Current treatment recommendations for NAFLD focus on lifestyle optimization via nutrition and exercise. After encouraging exercise, many adolescents choose to participate in organized sports, which may lead to use of illicit substances such as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) to boost athletic performance. Approximately 3,000,000 individuals use non-therapeutic AAS at supra-physiologic doses in the United States.1 In 2012, 5.9% of adolescent boys reported steroid use in the previous year.2 We anticipate adolescents with pre-existing liver disease are at increased risk for AAS induced hepatotoxicity. We present such a case with IRB approval and written individual patient consent. PMID:23568051

  19. Role of Docosahexaenoic Acid Treatment in Improving Liver Histology in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alisi, Anna; De Vito, Rita; Franchitto, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco; Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality in children. Recently, we have reported the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, in children with NAFLD. DHA exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity through the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)120. Our aim was to investigate in pediatric NAFLD the mechanisms underlying the effects of DHA administration on histo-pathological aspects, GPR120 expression, hepatic progenitor cell activation and macrophage pool. Patients and Methods 20 children with untreated NAFLD were included. Children were treated with DHA for 18 months. Liver biopsies before and after the treatment were analyzed. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage pool and GPR120 expression were evaluated and correlated with clinical and histo-pathological parameters. Results GPR120 was expressed by hepatocytes, liver macrophages, and hepatic progenitor cells. After DHA treatment, the following modifications were present: i) the improvement of histo-pathological parameters such as NAFLD activity score, ballooning, and steatosis; ii) the reduction of hepatic progenitor cell activation in correlation with histo-pathological parameters; iii) the reduction of the number of inflammatory macrophages; iv) the increase of GPR120 expression in hepatocytes; v) the reduction of serine-311-phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation in hepatocytes and macrophages in correlation with serum inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions DHA could modulate hepatic progenitor cell activation, hepatocyte survival and macrophage polarization through the interaction with GPR120 and NF-κB repression. In this scenario, the modulation of GPR120 exploits a novel crucial role in the regulation of the cell-to-cell cross-talk that drives inflammatory response, hepatic progenitor cell activation and hepatocyte survival. PMID

  20. Fatty Liver and Fatty Heart—Where do They Stand in the AMIS Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lautt, W. Wayne; Ming, Zhi; Legare, Dallas J.; Chowdhury, Kawshik K.; Hatch, Grant M.; Wang, Hui Helen

    2015-01-01

    Meal-induced insulin sensitization (MIS) refers to the augmented glucose uptake response to insulin following a meal. Absence of MIS (AMIS) causes significant decrease in post-meal glucose disposal leading to postprandial hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, adiposity, increased free radical stress, and a cluster of progressive metabolic, vascular, and cardiac dysfunctions referred to as the AMIS syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that fat accumulation in the liver and heart is part of the AMIS syndrome. Questions examined in the study: (1) Is prediabetic fat accumulation in the heart and liver a component of the AMIS syndrome? (2) Is fatty liver a cause or consequence of peripheral insulin resistance? (3) Is early cardiac dysfunction in the AMIS syndrome attributable to fat accumulation in the heart? and (4) Can the synergistic antioxidant cocktail SAMEC (S-adenosylmethionine, vitamin E, and vitamin C), known to benefit MIS, affect cardiac and hepatic triglyceride levels? Four animal models of AMIS were used in aged male Sprague-Dawley rats (52 weeks ± sucrose ± SAMEC), compared with young controls (nine weeks). Fat accumulation in the heart was not significant and therefore cannot account for the early cardiac dysfunction. Hepatic triglycerides increased only in the most severe AMIS model but the small changes correlated with the much more rapidly developing peripheral adiposity. Systemic adiposity represents an early stage, whereas accumulation of cardiac and hepatic triglycerides represents a late stage of the prediabetic AMIS syndrome. Fat accumulation in the liver is a consequence, not a cause, of AMIS. SAMEC protected against the sucrose effects on whole body adiposity and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27417789

  1. Fads1 and 2 are promoted to meet instant need for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Zhao, Xing; Wang, Qianqian; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Biao; Zheng, Yun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-07-01

    Global prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) constitutes a threat to human health. Goose is a unique model of NAFLD for discovering therapeutic targets as its liver can develop severe steatosis without overt injury. Fatty acid desaturase (Fads) is a potential therapeutic target as Fads expression and mutations are associated with liver fat. Here, we hypothesized that Fads was promoted to provide a protection for goose fatty liver. To test this, goose Fads1 and Fads2 were sequenced. Fads1/2/6 expression was determined in goose liver and primary hepatocytes by quantitative PCR. Liver fatty acid composition was also analyzed by gas chromatography. Data indicated that hepatic Fads1/2/6 expression was gradually increased with the time of overfeeding. In contrast, trans-C18:1n9 fatty acid (Fads inhibitor) was reduced. However, enhanced Fads capacity for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) synthesis was not sufficient to compensate for the depleted LC-PUFAs in goose fatty liver. Moreover, cell studies showed that Fads1/2/6 expression was regulated by fatty liver-associated factors. Together, these findings suggest Fads1/2 as protective components are promoted to meet instant need for LC-PUFAs in goose fatty liver, and we propose this is required for severe hepatic steatosis without liver injury. PMID:27344166

  2. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on the Spectrum of Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nostedt, Jordan J.; Bailey, Robert J.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming one of the most common causes of liver disease in the western world. The most significant risk factors are obesity and the metabolic syndrome for which bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective treatment. However, the effects of bariatric surgery on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, specifically liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, are not well established. We review published bariatric surgery outcomes with respect to nonalcoholic liver disease. On the basis of this review we suggest that bariatric surgery may provide a viable treatment option for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, including patients with fibrosis and compensated cirrhosis, and that this topic should be a target of future investigation. PMID:27777925

  3. Lipid metabolism during lactation: a review of adipose tissue-liver interactions and the development of fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard G

    2005-11-01

    Fatty acids are the major source of energy for most tissues during periods of negative energy balance; however, fatty acids can, in some circumstances, have pathological effects. Fatty acids are stored as triacylglycerols (TAG), mostly in the various adipose tissue depots of the body. However, if blood unesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels are elevated for prolonged periods, as may occur during lactation or obesity, TAG can accumulate in other tissues including liver and muscle cells (myocytes), and this can have pathological consequences such as the development of ketosis (Grummer, 1993; Drackley et al. 2001) or type 2 diabetes (Boden & Shulman, 2002; McGarry, 2002).

  4. Systemic symptoms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Newton, Julia L

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in the Western world and the incidence of the disease is constantly increasing. Most patients with NAFLD do not present with symptoms directly attributable to their underlying liver disease. It is increasingly recognized, however, that those with NAFLD describe a range of non-specific symptoms, which include fatigue and daytime sleepiness, may be the presenting problem and can impact dramatically upon quality of life in this patient group. The recognition of systemic symptoms in NAFLD has important implications for patients as many are potentially modifiable with targeted interventions. Fatigue appears to be a significant problem in NAFLD and the severity of fatigue is not associated with severity of NAFLD or any parameters of liver damage. Instead, fatigue in these patients shows a strong relationship with the symptom of daytime sleepiness and autonomic dysfunction. Daytime sleepiness can frequently be associated with obstructive sleep apnoea in those with NAFLD and is therefore treatable with evidence-based interventions. Recent studies have confirmed the presence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction in those with early stages of NAFLD. The presence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction leads to symptoms such as postural dizziness and syncope and is also associated with a number of clinical consequences in hepatic and non-hepatic diseases such as cognitive dysfunction, falls and fall-related injuries. On direct questioning, problems with memory and concentration are frequently described by those with NAFLD, with our studies confirming that 50% of NAFLD patients experience mild cognitive symptoms and up to 46% moderate or severe cognitive impairment. There were no positive correlations between cognitive symptoms and biochemical or histological markers of liver damage severity, confirming that cognitive impairment in early-stage NAFLD is not related to hepatic encephalopathy. Falls are

  5. Exercise training reverses endothelial dysfunction in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christopher J A; Spring, Victoria S; Kemp, Graham J; Richardson, Paul; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Umpleby, A Margot; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Jones, Helen; Cuthbertson, Daniel J

    2014-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Endothelial dysfunction is an early manifestation of atherosclerosis and an important prognostic marker for future cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was twofold: to examine 1) the association between liver fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and endothelial dysfunction in obese NAFLD patients and 2) the impact of supervised exercise training on this vascular defect. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in 34 obese NAFLD patients and 20 obese controls of similar age and cardiorespiratory fitness [peak oxygen uptake (V̇o2 peak)] (48 ± 2 vs. 47 ± 2 yr; 27 ± 1 vs. 26 ± 2 ml·kg−1·min−1−1). Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy quantified abdominal and liver fat, respectively. Twenty-one NAFLD patients completed either 16 wk of supervised moderate-intensity exercise training (n = 13) or conventional care (n = 8). Differences between NAFLD and controls were compared using independent t-tests and effects of interventions by analysis of covariance. NAFLD patients had higher liver fat [11.6% (95% CI = 7.4, 18.1), P < 0.0005] and VAT [1.6 liters (95% CI = 1.2, 2.0), P < 0.0001] than controls and exhibited impaired FMD compared with controls [−3.6% (95% CI = −4.9, −2.2), P < 0.0001]. FMD was inversely correlated with VAT (r = −0.54, P = 0.001) in NAFLD, although the impairment in FMD remained following covariate adjustment for VAT [3.1% (95% CI = 1.8, 4.5), P < 0.001]. Exercise training, but not conventional care, significantly improved V̇o2 peak [9.1 ml·kg−1·min−1 (95% CI = 4.1, 14.1); P = 0.001] and FMD [3.6% (95% CI = 1.6, 5.7), P = 0.002]. Endothelial dysfunction in NAFLD cannot be fully explained by excess VAT but can be reversed with exercise training; this has potential implications for the primary prevention of CVD in NAFLD.

  6. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  7. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  8. OXPHOS-Mediated Induction of NAD+ Promotes Complete Oxidation of Fatty Acids and Interdicts Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Akie, Thomas E; Liu, Lijun; Nam, Minwoo; Lei, Shi; Cooper, Marcus P

    2015-01-01

    OXPHOS is believed to play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), however, precise mechanisms whereby OXPHOS influences lipid homeostasis are incompletely understood. We previously reported that ectopic expression of LRPPRC, a protein that increases cristae density and OXPHOS, promoted fatty acid oxidation in cultured primary hepatocytes. To determine the biological significance of that observation and define underlying mechanisms, we have ectopically expressed LRPPRC in mouse liver in the setting of NAFLD. Interestingly, ectopic expression of LRPPRC in mouse liver completely interdicted NAFLD, including inflammation. Consistent with mitigation of NAFLD, two markers of hepatic insulin resistance--ROS and PKCε activity--were both modestly reduced. As reported by others, improvement of NAFLD was associated with improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Regarding hepatic lipid homeostasis, the ratio of NAD+ to NADH was dramatically increased in mouse liver replete with LRPPRC. Pharmacological activators and inhibitors of the cellular respiration respectively increased and decreased the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio, indicating respiration-mediated control of the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio. Supporting a prominent role for NAD+, increasing the concentration of NAD+ stimulated complete oxidation of fatty acids. Importantly, NAD+ rescued impaired fatty acid oxidation in hepatocytes deficient for either OXPHOS or SIRT3. These data are consistent with a model whereby augmented hepatic OXPHOS increases NAD+, which in turn promotes complete oxidation of fatty acids and protects against NAFLD.

  9. Expression of mitochondria-related genes is elevated in overfeeding-induced goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Shao, Dan; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Yun; Wang, Laidi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yihui; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrion, the power house of the cell, is an important organelle involving in energy homeostasis. Change in mitochondrial mass and function may lead to metabolic disorders. Previous studies indicate that mitochondrial mass loss and dysfunction are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial genes are involved in the development of goose fatty liver. To address this, we determined the response of goose mitochondrial genes to overfeeding and other fatty liver-related factors (e.g., hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia). We first employed RNA-seq technology to determine the differentially expressed genes in the livers from normally-fed vs. overfed geese, followed by bioinformatics analysis and quantitative PCR validation. Data indicated that a majority of mitochondrial genes in the liver were induced by overfeeding. To understand how these genes are regulated in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with high levels of glucose, fatty acids and insulin. The results indicated that these factors had an influence on the expression of some mitochondria related genes. Together, these findings suggest that the induction of mitochondrial gene expression by overfeeding is required for the development of goose fatty liver, and this induction is partially attributable to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  10. Resveratrol inhibits nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Hijona, Elizabeth; Larzabal, Mikel; Beraza, Marta; Aldazabal, Pablo; García-Urkia, Nerea; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Cosme, Angel; Irastorza, Belen; González, Alberto; Arenas, Juan I

    2008-01-01

    Background The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is high. NAFLD is linked to obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertriglyceridemia. Approximately 20% of patients with NAFLD will eventually develop cirrhosis. Our purpose was to investigate whether resveratrol decreased hepatic steatosis in an animal model of steatosis, and whether this therapeutic approach resulted in a decrease in tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production, lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Methods Male Wistar CRL: Wi (Han) (225 g) rats were randomized into three groups. A control group (n = 12) was given free access to regular dry rat chow for 4 weeks. The steatosis (n = 12) and resveratrol (n = 12) groups were given free access to feed (a high carbohydrate-fat free modified diet) and water 4 days per week, and fasted for the remaining 3 days for 4 weeks. Rats in the resveratrol group were given resveratrol 10 mg daily by the oral route. All rats were killed at 4 weeks and assessed for fatty infiltration and bacterial translocation. Levels of TNF-α in serum, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and nitric oxide synthase) and biochemical parameters were measured. Results Fat deposition was decreased in the resveratrol group as compared to the steatosis group (Grade 1 vs Grade 3, P < 0.05). TNF-α and MDA levels were significantly increased in the steatosis group (TNF-α; 33.4 ± 5.2 vs 26.24 ± 3.47 pg/ml and MDA; 9.08 ± 0.8 vs 3.17 ± 1.45 μM respectively, P < 0.05). This was accompanied by increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and decreased nitric oxide synthase in the liver of resveratrol group significantly (P < 0.05 vs steatosis group). Bacterial translocation was not found in any of the groups. Glucose levels were decreased in the group of rats given resveratrol (P < 0.05). Conclusion Resveratrol decreased NAFLD severity in rats. This effect was mediated, at least

  11. Nutritional Modulation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFL increases the risk of liver fibrosis. If the liver is fatty due to causes of insulin resistance such as obesity and physical inactivity, it overproduces glucose and triglycerides leading to hyperinsulinemia and a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration. The latter features predispose to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the impact of nutritional modulation of liver fat content and insulin resistance is therefore of interest for prevention and treatment of NAFLD. Hypocaloric, especially low carbohydrate ketogenic diets rapidly decrease liver fat content and associated metabolic abnormalities. However, any type of caloric restriction seems effective long-term. Isocaloric diets containing 16%–23% fat and 57%–65% carbohydrate lower liver fat compared to diets with 43%–55% fat and 27%–38% carbohydrate. Diets rich in saturated (SFA) as compared to monounsaturated (MUFA) or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids appear particularly harmful as they increase both liver fat and insulin resistance. Overfeeding either saturated fat or carbohydrate increases liver fat content. Vitamin E supplementation decreases liver fat content as well as fibrosis but has no effect on features of insulin resistance. PMID:26556368

  12. Quantitative characterization of fatty liver disease using x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, Wafaa B.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2013-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a dynamic condition in which fat abnormally accumulates within the hepatocytes. It is believed to be a marker of risk of later chronic liver diseases, such as liver cirrhosis and carcinoma. The fat content in liver biopsies determines its validity for liver transplantation. Transplantation of livers with severe NAFLD is associated with a high risk of primary non-function. Moreover, NAFLD is recognized as a clinically important feature that influences patient morbidity and mortality after hepatic resection. Unfortunately, there is a lack in a precise, reliable and reproducible method for quantification of NAFLD. This work suggests a method for the quantification of NAFLD. The method is based on the fact that fatty liver tissue would have a characteristic x-ray scattering profile with a relatively intense fat peak at a momentum transfer value of 1.1 nm-1 compared to a soft tissue peak at 1.6 nm-1. The fat content in normal and fatty liver is plotted against three profile characterization parameters (ratio of peak intensities, ratio of area under peaks and ratio of area under fat peak to total profile area) for measured and Monte Carlo simulated x-ray scattering profiles. Results show a high linear dependence (R2>0.9) of the characterization parameters on the liver fat content with a reported high correlation coefficient (>0.9) between measured and simulated data. These results indicate that the current method probably offers reliable quantification of fatty liver disease.

  13. Comparative efficacy of interventions on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Sawangjit, Ratree; Chongmelaxme, Bunchai; Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Saokaew, Surasak; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Kowdley, Kris V.; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has significantly increased over the last decades. Despite existence of several interventions, there remains unclear which interventions work the best. Methods: A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing efficacy of all treatment options in NAFLD were performed to determine comparative efficacy and safety of interventions in the management of NAFLD. Several electronic databases were searched up to Nov 15, 2015. Outcomes include liver histological outcomes (i.e., fibrosis), all-cause mortality, cirrhosis, and safety. A network meta-analysis was applied to estimate pooled risk ratios (RR). Quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. Results: A total of 44 studies (n = 3802) were eligible. When compared with placebo, obeticholic acid (OCA) was the only intervention that significantly improved fibrosis with RR (95% CI) of 1.91 (1.15, 3.16), while pentoxyfylline (PTX) demonstrated improved fibrosis without statistical significance with RR (95% CI) of 2.27 (0.81, 6.36). Only thiazolidinedione (TZD) and vitamin E use resulted in significant increase in resolution of NASH, while OCA, TZD, and vitamin E significantly improved other outcomes including NAS, steatosis, ballooning, and inflammation outcomes. Quality of evidence varied from very low (i.e., metformin, PTX on mean change of ballooning grade) to high (OCA, TZD, vitamin E on improving histological outcomes). Limitations of this study were lack of relevant long-term outcomes (e.g., cirrhosis, death, safety), possible small study effect, and few head-to-head studies. Conclusions: Our study suggests potential efficacy of OCA, TZD, and vitamin E in improving histologic endpoints in NAFLD. These findings are however based on a small number of studies. Additional studies are awaited to strengthen this network meta-analysis. PMID:27512874

  14. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    PubMed Central

    Ipsen, David Højland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC) status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM) affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:25533004

  15. Dietary fatty acids modulate antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong; Webb, Tonya; Potter, James J.; Oelke, Mathias; Li, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids are major contributors to the development and progression of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Dietary fatty acids also alter hepatic NKT cells that are activated by antigens presented by CD1d. In the current study, we examine the mechanism of dietary fatty acid induced hepatic NKT cell deficiency and its causal relationship to insulin resistance and NAFLD. We discover that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but not polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cause hepatic NKT cell depletion with increased apoptosis. Dietary SFA or MUFA also impair hepatocyte presentation of endogenous, but not exogenous, antigen to NKT cells, indicating alterations of the endogenous antigen processing or presenting pathway. In vitro treatment of normal hepatocytes with fatty acids also demonstrates impaired ability of CD1d to present endogenous antigen by dietary fatty acids. Furthermore, dietary SFA and MUFA activate the NFκB signaling pathway and lead to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, both dietary SFA and MUFA alter endogenous antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells and contribute to NKT cell depletion, leading to further activation of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:20185414

  16. [Retinal and carotid changes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Baloşeanu, Cristina; Rogoveanu, I; Mocanu, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on 85 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We evaluate the retinal vascular changes using retinal photography and carotid vascular changes, by ultrasounds, occured in this group of patients.

  17. The genetic epidemiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: toward a personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2012-08-01

    The understanding of the genetic bases of complex diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease opens new opportunities and challenges. This article explores new tools designed toward moving genomic data into clinical medicine, providing putative answers to more practical questions.

  18. Hepatic Deletion of Smad7 in Mouse Leads to Spontaneous Liver Dysfunction and Aggravates Alcoholic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lu; Wang, Lingdi; Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xiaolin; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Rui; Yin, Hongkun; Xie, Dong; Pan, Yi; Chen, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Background TGF-β has been known to play an important role in various liver diseases including fibrosis and alcohol-induced fatty liver. Smad7 is an intracellular negative regulator of TGF-β signaling. It is currently unclear whether endogenous Smad7 has an effect on liver function and alcoholic liver damage. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Cre/loxP system by crossing Alb-Cre mice with Smad7loxP/loxP mice to generate liver-specific deletion of Smad7 with loss of the indispensable MH2 domain. Alcoholic liver injury was achieved by feeding mice with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for 6 weeks, followed by a single dose of ethanol gavage. Deletion of Smad7 in the liver was associated with increased Smad2/3 phosphorylation in the liver or upon TGF-β treatment in primary hepatocytes. The majority of mice with liver specific deletion of Smad7 (Smad7liver-KO) were viable and phenotypically normal, accompanied by only slight or no reduction of Smad7 expression in the liver. However, about 30% of Smad7liver-KO mice with high efficiency of Smad7 deletion had spontaneous liver dysfunction, demonstrated as low body weight, overall deterioration, and increased serum levels of AST and ALT. Degeneration and elevated apoptosis of liver cells were observed with these mice. TGF-β-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was accelerated in Smad7-deleted primary hepatocytes. In addition, alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis were profoundly aggravated in Smad7 deficient mice, associated with upregulation of critical genes involved in lipogenesis and inflammation. Furthermore, alcohol-induced ADH1 expression was significantly abrogated by Smad7 deletion in hepatocytes. Conclusion/Significance In this study, we provided in vivo evidence revealing that endogenous Smad7 plays an important role in liver function and alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:21386907

  19. Intestinal farnesoid X receptor signaling promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Li, Fei; Zhang, Limin; Nichols, Robert G.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Cai, Jingwei; Qi, Yunpeng; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Takahashi, Shogo; Tanaka, Naoki; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G.; Albert, Istvan; Patterson, Andrew D.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major worldwide health problem. Recent studies suggest that the gut microbiota influences NAFLD pathogenesis. Here, a murine model of high-fat diet–induced (HFD-induced) NAFLD was used, and the effects of alterations in the gut microbiota on NAFLD were determined. Mice treated with antibiotics or tempol exhibited altered bile acid composition, with a notable increase in conjugated bile acid metabolites that inhibited intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling. Compared with control mice, animals with intestine-specific Fxr disruption had reduced hepatic triglyceride accumulation in response to a HFD. The decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation was mainly due to fewer circulating ceramides, which was in part the result of lower expression of ceramide synthesis genes. The reduction of ceramide levels in the ileum and serum in tempol- or antibiotic-treated mice fed a HFD resulted in downregulation of hepatic SREBP1C and decreased de novo lipogenesis. Administration of C16:0 ceramide to antibiotic-treated mice fed a HFD reversed hepatic steatosis. These studies demonstrate that inhibition of an intestinal FXR/ceramide axis mediates gut microbiota–associated NAFLD development, linking the microbiome, nuclear receptor signaling, and NAFLD. This work suggests that inhibition of intestinal FXR is a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD treatment. PMID:25500885

  20. Audio-visual aid in teaching "fatty liver".

    PubMed

    Dash, Sambit; Kamath, Ullas; Rao, Guruprasad; Prakash, Jay; Mishra, Snigdha

    2016-05-01

    Use of audio visual tools to aid in medical education is ever on a rise. Our study intends to find the efficacy of a video prepared on "fatty liver," a topic that is often a challenge for pre-clinical teachers, in enhancing cognitive processing and ultimately learning. We prepared a video presentation of 11:36 min, incorporating various concepts of the topic, while keeping in view Mayer's and Ellaway guidelines for multimedia presentation. A pre-post test study on subject knowledge was conducted for 100 students with the video shown as intervention. A retrospective pre study was conducted as a survey which inquired about students understanding of the key concepts of the topic and a feedback on our video was taken. Students performed significantly better in the post test (mean score 8.52 vs. 5.45 in pre-test), positively responded in the retrospective pre-test and gave a positive feedback for our video presentation. Well-designed multimedia tools can aid in cognitive processing and enhance working memory capacity as shown in our study. In times when "smart" device penetration is high, information and communication tools in medical education, which can act as essential aid and not as replacement for traditional curriculums, can be beneficial to the students. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:241-245, 2016. PMID:26625860

  1. Audio-visual aid in teaching "fatty liver".

    PubMed

    Dash, Sambit; Kamath, Ullas; Rao, Guruprasad; Prakash, Jay; Mishra, Snigdha

    2016-05-01

    Use of audio visual tools to aid in medical education is ever on a rise. Our study intends to find the efficacy of a video prepared on "fatty liver," a topic that is often a challenge for pre-clinical teachers, in enhancing cognitive processing and ultimately learning. We prepared a video presentation of 11:36 min, incorporating various concepts of the topic, while keeping in view Mayer's and Ellaway guidelines for multimedia presentation. A pre-post test study on subject knowledge was conducted for 100 students with the video shown as intervention. A retrospective pre study was conducted as a survey which inquired about students understanding of the key concepts of the topic and a feedback on our video was taken. Students performed significantly better in the post test (mean score 8.52 vs. 5.45 in pre-test), positively responded in the retrospective pre-test and gave a positive feedback for our video presentation. Well-designed multimedia tools can aid in cognitive processing and enhance working memory capacity as shown in our study. In times when "smart" device penetration is high, information and communication tools in medical education, which can act as essential aid and not as replacement for traditional curriculums, can be beneficial to the students. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:241-245, 2016.

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and aging: epidemiology to management.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Marco; Lonardo, Amedeo; Mussi, Chiara; Baldelli, Enrica; Pellegrini, Elisa; Ballestri, Stefano; Romagnoli, Dante; Loria, Paola

    2014-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in the elderly, in whom it carries a more substantial burden of hepatic (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic manifestations and complications (cardiovascular disease, extrahepatic neoplasms) than in younger age groups. Therefore, proper identification and management of this condition is a major task for clinical geriatricians and geriatric hepatologists. In this paper, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of this condition are reviewed, and a full discussion of the link between NAFLD and the aspects that are peculiar to elderly individuals is provided; these aspects include frailty, multimorbidity, polypharmacy and dementia. The proper treatment strategy will have to consider the peculiarities of geriatric patients, so a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory. Non-pharmacological treatment (diet and physical exercise) has to be tailored individually considering the physical limitations of most elderly people and the need for an adequate caloric supply. Similarly, the choice of drug treatment must carefully balance the benefits and risks in terms of adverse events and pharmacological interactions in the common context of both multiple health conditions and polypharmacy. In conclusion, further epidemiological and pathophysiological insight is warranted. More accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of geriatric NAFLD will help in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach for individual elderly patients. PMID:25339806

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and aging: Epidemiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Marco; Lonardo, Amedeo; Mussi, Chiara; Baldelli, Enrica; Pellegrini, Elisa; Ballestri, Stefano; Romagnoli, Dante; Loria, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in the elderly, in whom it carries a more substantial burden of hepatic (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic manifestations and complications (cardiovascular disease, extrahepatic neoplasms) than in younger age groups. Therefore, proper identification and management of this condition is a major task for clinical geriatricians and geriatric hepatologists. In this paper, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of this condition are reviewed, and a full discussion of the link between NAFLD and the aspects that are peculiar to elderly individuals is provided; these aspects include frailty, multimorbidity, polypharmacy and dementia. The proper treatment strategy will have to consider the peculiarities of geriatric patients, so a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory. Non-pharmacological treatment (diet and physical exercise) has to be tailored individually considering the physical limitations of most elderly people and the need for an adequate caloric supply. Similarly, the choice of drug treatment must carefully balance the benefits and risks in terms of adverse events and pharmacological interactions in the common context of both multiple health conditions and polypharmacy. In conclusion, further epidemiological and pathophysiological insight is warranted. More accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of geriatric NAFLD will help in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach for individual elderly patients. PMID:25339806

  4. Physical activity as a protective factor for development of non-alcoholic fatty liver in men

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Carla Giuliano de Sá; Marega, Marcio; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; Carmona, Felipe Gambetta; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo Felix; Ceschini, Fabio Luis; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Figueira, Aylton José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of physical activity on the prevalence of fatty liver, metabolic and cardiovascular disease in adult men. Methods This study evaluated 1,399 men (40.7±8.18 years) with body mass index of 26.7kg/m2 (±3.4) who participated in the Protocol of Preventive Health Check-up at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein from January to October 2011. We conducted tests of serum blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, reactive c-protein, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. The statistical analysis comprised in the comparison of mean and standard deviation. The analysis of variance was based in two paths of two way ANOVA, Student’s t-test, Mann Whitney U test, Wald test and χ2. We considered a significance level at p<0.05 and correlation of univariate Poison with 95% confidence interval. Results :Fatty liver was diagnosed in 37.0% of the sample. Triglyceride levels of active men with fatty liver were 148.2±77.6mg/dL while inactive men with fatty liver had 173.4±15.6mg/dL. The remaining serum levels were normal. Inactive individuals showed higher values than active. In addition, inactive individuals have 10.68 times higher risk of developing fatty liver compared with active. Conclusion Physical activity improves metabolic parameters such as triglycerides, weight control, HDL, which interfere in the development of fatty liver. Physically active individuals had lower fatty liver prevalence regardless of values of body composition and lipid profile, leading the conclusion that physical activity has a protective role against development of fatty liver. PMID:25993066

  5. Sex Difference in the Association between Serum Homocysteine Level and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Bo-Youn; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Moon-Jong; Park, Kye-Seon; Kim, Young-Sang; Haam, Ji-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Yuk; Kim, Hye-Jung; Park, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between serum homocysteine levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the sex-specific relationship between serum homocysteine level and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the Korean population. Methods This cross-sectional study included 150 men and 132 women who participated in medical examination programs in Korea from January 2014 to December 2014. Patients were screened for fatty liver by abdominal ultrasound and patient blood samples were collected to measure homocysteine levels. Patients that consumed more than 20 grams of alcohol per day were excluded from this study. Results The homocysteine level (11.56 vs. 8.05 nmol/L) and the proportion of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (60.7% vs. 19.7%) were significantly higher in men than in women. In men, elevated serum homocysteine levels were associated with a greater prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (quartile 1, 43.6%; quartile 4, 80.6%; P=0.01); however, in females, there was no significant association between serum homocysteine levels and the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In the logistic regression model adjusted for age and potential confounding parameters, the odds ratio for men was significantly higher in the uppermost quartile (model 3, quartile 4: odds ratio, 6.78; 95% confidential interval, 1.67 to 27.56); however, serum homocysteine levels in women were not associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the crude model or in models adjusted for confounders. Conclusion Serum homocysteine levels were associated with the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in men. PMID:27468343

  6. Naturally Occurring Stilbenoid TSG Reverses Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases via Gut-Liver Axis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei; Lu, Jianmei; Wang, Yanfang; Gu, Wen; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis is largely involved in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated whether 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxy-stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) could reverse NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and whether it did so via the gut-liver axis. Results showed that TSG could reduce the accumulation of FFA and it did so by reducing the expression of L-FABP and FATP4. TSG regulated gut microbiota balanced and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin, which could improve the function of the intestinal mucosal barrier and reduce serum LPS content by about 25%. TSG reduced TL4 levels by 56% and NF-κB expression by 23% relative to the NAFLD model group. This suggests that prevention of NAFLD by TSG in HFD-fed rats is mediated by modulation of the gut microbiota and TLR4/NF-κB pathway, which may alleviate chronic low-grade inflammation by reducing the exogenous antigen load on the host. PMID:26474417

  7. Naturally Occurring Stilbenoid TSG Reverses Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases via Gut-Liver Axis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei; Lu, Jianmei; Wang, Yanfang; Gu, Wen; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis is largely involved in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated whether 2, 3, 5, 4′-tetrahydroxy-stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) could reverse NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and whether it did so via the gut-liver axis. Results showed that TSG could reduce the accumulation of FFA and it did so by reducing the expression of L-FABP and FATP4. TSG regulated gut microbiota balanced and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin, which could improve the function of the intestinal mucosal barrier and reduce serum LPS content by about 25%. TSG reduced TL4 levels by 56% and NF-κB expression by 23% relative to the NAFLD model group. This suggests that prevention of NAFLD by TSG in HFD-fed rats is mediated by modulation of the gut microbiota and TLR4/NF-κB pathway, which may alleviate chronic low-grade inflammation by reducing the exogenous antigen load on the host. PMID:26474417

  8. Systemic Complications of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: When the Liver Is Not an Innocent Bystander.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Ester; Marengo, Andrea; Mezzabotta, Lavinia; Bugianesi, Elisabetta

    2015-08-01

    The top three leading causes of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in descending order are cardiovascular disease, cancer, and liver disease. It is clear now that the increased risk of metabolic and macro- and microvascular complications in NAFLD stems from the associated features of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD itself may contribute to the spectrum of risk factors associated with insulin resistance. The primary focus of this review is to summarize the main systemic associations of NAFLD, as well as to discuss the mechanisms that link them to NAFLD. Hepatic lipid accumulation in NAFLD impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism further increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of cardiovascular disease, independently of established risk factors. The incidence, prevalence, and severity of these complications are proportional to the histological severity of liver damage suggesting that NAFLD, but particularly nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, can also contribute to the low-grade inflammatory state through the systemic release of several markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and of procoagulant factors. The clinical implication of these findings is that patients with NAFLD require a multidisciplinary evaluation, with a major focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease complications and may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for cardiovascular and kidney complications. PMID:26378641

  9. Alcoholic fatty liver in rats: Role of fat and ethanol intake

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, H.; Deveney, C.W. ); Larkin, E.C.; Rao, G.A. )

    1991-03-11

    The claim that high intake of both ethanol and fat is essential to induce fatty liver and high blood alcohol levels (BAL) was tested. Two groups of rats were fed liquid diets containing 26% and 36% of calories as ethanol respectively. After 4 weeks, all rats were bled for BAL and some were sacrificed to obtain liver morphology. Remaining rats in Group 1 (26% ethanol) were switched to 36% ethanol diet and Group 2 (36% ethanol) to 26% ethanol diet. All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks to obtain blood for BAL and liver morphology. The results indicate that high ethanol intake and high fat ingestion is not the criterion for induction of fatty liver. Inadequate ingestion of macronutrients plays a major role in alcoholic fatty liver and BAL.

  10. Sex impact on the quality of fatty liver and its genetic determinism in mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Marie-Etancelin, C; Retailleau, B; Alinier, A; Vitezica, Z G

    2015-09-01

    Recent changes to French regulations now allow farmers to produce "foie gras" from both male and female mule ducks. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of female fatty liver and to compare, from a phenotypic and genetic point of view, liver quality in males and females. A total of 914 mule ducks (591 males and 323 females), hatched in a single pedigree batch, were reared until 86 d of age and then force-fed for 12 d, before being slaughtered. Carcasses and livers were weighed and liver quality was assessed by grading the extent of liver veining and measuring the liver melting rate, either after sterilization of 60 g of liver or pasteurization of 180 g of liver. Sexual dimorphism was observed in favor of males, with a difference of approximately 10% in carcass and liver weights and up to 54% for the liver melting rate. Moreover, one-third of female livers showed moderate to high veining, whereas this was not the case for male livers. The fatty livers of female mule ducks are, therefore, of poorer quality and could not be transformed into a product with the appellation "100% fatty liver." According to sex and parental line, heritability values ranged from 0.12 ± 0.05 to 0.18 ± 0.07 for fatty liver weight and from 0.09 ± 0.05 to 0.18 ± 0.05 for the 2 melting rate traits. The genetic correlations between the fatty liver weight and both melting rates were high (greater than +0.80) in the Muscovy population, whereas in the Pekin population, the liver weight and melting rates were less strongly correlated (estimates ranging from +0.36 ± 0.30 to +0.45 ± 0.28). Selection for lower liver melting rates without reducing the liver weight would, therefore, be easier to achieve in the Pekin population. Finally, as the 2 melting rate measurements are highly correlated (0.91 and over 0.95 for phenotypic and genetic correlations, respectively), we suggest using the easiest method, that is, sterilization of 60 g of liver.

  11. Exogenous glucagon effects on health and reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows with mild fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Bobe, G; Ametaj, B N; Young, J W; Anderson, L L; Beitz, D C

    2007-12-01

    Severe fatty liver, a metabolic disease of dairy cows in early lactation, results in decreased health and reproductive performance, but can be alleviated by treatment with i.v. injections of glucagon. Mild fatty liver in cows effects on health and reproductive performance were determined by treatment with 14-day s.c. injections of glucagon at 7.5 or 15 mg/day. Multiparous Holstein cows (n=32) were grouped into Normal and Susceptible based on liver triacylglycerol concentrations (>1% liver tissue biopsy wet weight) at day 8 postpartum (day 0=day of parturition). Susceptible cows (n=24) were assigned randomly to three groups and s.c. injected with 0mg glucagon [60 ml 0.15M NaCl] [n=8] (same for Normal cows), 2.5 mg glucagon, or 5 mg glucagon every 8 h for 14 days, beginning day 8 postpartum. Mild fatty liver resulted in an increased number of days with elevated body temperature during the injection period, an increased incidence of mastitis after glucagon treatment, increased days to first estrus and insemination, increased days before conception occurred, and decreased conception rate. In cows with mild fatty liver, glucagon (15 mg/day) decreased the number of days with elevated body temperature and the incidence of mastitis after hormone treatment. From these results, we suggest that mild fatty liver is detrimental to health and reproduction of dairy cows and, furthermore, that exogenous glucagon decreases some of these detrimental effects.

  12. THE ROLE OF MIR-212 AND INOS IN ALCOHOL-INDUCED INTESTINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION AND STEATOHEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Zhang, Lijuan; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Song, Shiwen; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is commonly associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. Alcohol-induced dysregulation of intestinal tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1), plays an important role in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. However, the mechanism of alcohol-induced disruption of TJ proteins is not well established. The goal of this study was to elucidate this mechanism by studying the role of MicroRNA 212 (miR-212) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. Methods The permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and flux of fluorescein sulfonic acid (FSA). miR-212 was measured by real time PCR. The wild type, iNOS knockout, and miR-212 knockdown mice were fed with alcohol diet (29% of total calories, 4.5% v/v) for 8 weeks. The LNA-anti-miR-212 was used to inhibit miR-212 expression in mice. The alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, miR-212 expression and liver injuries in mice were measured. Results Our in vitro monolayer and in vivo mice studies showed that: (1) alcohol-induced over-expression of the intestinal miR-212 and intestinal hyperpermeability is prevented by using miR-212 knock-down techniques; and (2). iNOS is upregulated in the intestine by alcohol and that iNOS signaling is required for alcohol-induced miR-212 over-expression, ZO-1 disruption, gut leakiness and steatohepatis. Conclusions These studies thus support a novel miR-212 mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness and a potential target that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent leaky gut and liver injury in alcoholics. PMID:26207424

  13. Liver-Specific Expression of Transcriptionally Active SREBP-1c Is Associated with Fatty Liver and Increased Visceral Fat Mass

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, Birgit; Haas, Jutta; Hartwig, Sonja; Jacob, Sylvia; Köllmer, Cornelia; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk; Kotzka, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of fatty liver is not understood in detail, but lipid overflow as well as de novo lipogenesis (DNL) seem to be the key points of hepatocyte accumulation of lipids. One key transcription factor in DNL is sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c. We generated mice with liver-specific over-expression of mature human SREBP-1c under control of the albumin promoter and a liver-specific enhancer (alb-SREBP-1c) to analyze systemic perturbations caused by this distinct alteration. SREBP-1c targets specific genes and causes key enzymes in DNL and lipid metabolism to be up-regulated. The alb-SREBP-1c mice developed hepatic lipid accumulation featuring a fatty liver by the age of 24 weeks under normocaloric nutrition. On a molecular level, clinical parameters and lipid-profiles varied according to the fatty liver phenotype. The desaturation index was increased compared to wild type mice. In liver, fatty acids (FA) were increased by 50% (p<0.01) and lipid composition was shifted to mono unsaturated FA, whereas lipid profile in adipose tissue or serum was not altered. Serum analyses revealed a ∼2-fold (p<0.01) increase in triglycerides and free fatty acids, and a ∼3-fold (p<0.01) increase in insulin levels, indicating insulin resistance; however, no significant cytokine profile alterations have been determined. Interestingly and unexpectedly, mice also developed adipositas with considerably increased visceral adipose tissue, although calorie intake was not different compared to control mice. In conclusion, the alb-SREBP-1c mouse model allowed the elucidation of the systemic impact of SREBP-1c as a central regulator of lipid metabolism in vivo and also demonstrated that the liver is a more active player in metabolic diseases such as visceral obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:22363740

  14. Interobserver Agreement on Pathologic Features of Liver Biopsy Tissue in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Lee, Kyoungbun; Yu, Eunsil; Kang, Yun Kyung; Cho, Mee-Yon; Kim, Joon Mee; Moon, Woo Sung; Jeong, Jin Sook; Park, Cheol Keun; Park, Jae-Bok; Kang, Dae Young; Sohn, Jin Hee; Jin, So-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background: The histomorphologic criteria for the pathological features of liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain subjective, causing confusion among pathologists and clinicians. In this report, we studied interobserver agreement of NAFLD pathologic features and analyzed causes of disagreement. Methods: Thirty-one cases of clinicopathologically diagnosed NAFLD from 10 hospitals were selected. One hematoxylin and eosin and one Masson’s trichrome-stained virtual slide from each case were blindly reviewed with regard to 12 histological parameters by 13 pathologists in a gastrointestinal study group of the Korean Society of Pathologists. After the first review, we analyzed the causes of disagreement and defined detailed morphological criteria. The glass slides from each case were reviewed a second time after a consensus meeting. The degree of interobserver agreement was determined by multi-rater kappa statistics. Results: Kappa values of the first review ranged from 0.0091–0.7618. Acidophilic bodies (k = 0.7618) and portal inflammation (k = 0.5914) showed high levels of agreement, whereas microgranuloma (k = 0.0984) and microvesicular fatty change (k = 0.0091) showed low levels of agreement. After the second review, the kappa values of the four major pathological features increased from 0.3830 to 0.5638 for steatosis grade, from 0.1398 to 0.2815 for lobular inflammation, from 0.1923 to 0.3362 for ballooning degeneration, and from 0.3303 to 0.4664 for fibrosis. Conclusions: More detailed histomorphological criteria must be defined for correct diagnosis and high interobserver agreement of NAFLD. PMID:27086596

  15. FGF21 ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shenglong; Wu, Yunzhou; Ye, Xianlong; Ma, Lei; Qi, Jianying; Yu, Dan; Wei, Yuquan; Lin, Guangxiao; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and seek to determine if its therapeutic effect is through induction of autophagy. In this research, Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese mice or normal lean mice were treated with vehicle, Fenofibrate, and recombinant murine FGF21, respectively. After 5 weeks of treatment, metabolic parameters including body weight, blood glucose and lipid levels, hepatic and fat gene expression levels were monitored and analyzed. Also, fat-loaded HepG2 cells were treated with vehicle or recombinant murine FGF21. The expression levels of proteins associated with autophagy were detected by western blot, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Autophagic flux was monitored by laser confocal microscopy and western blot. Results showed that FGF21 significantly reduced body weight (P < 0.01) and serum triglyceride, improved insulin sensitivity, and reversed hepatic steatosis in the MSG model mice. In addition, FGF21 significantly increased the expression of several proteins related to autophagy both in MSG mice and fat-loaded HepG2 cells, such as microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3, Bcl-2-interacting myosin-like coiled-coil protein-1 (Beclin-1), and autophagy-related gene 5. Furthermore, the evidence of TEM revealed an increased number of autophagosomes and lysosomes in the model cells treated with FGF21. In vitro experimental results also showed that FGF21 remarkably increased autophagic flux. Taken together, FGF21 corrects multiple metabolic parameters on NAFLD in vitro and in vivo by inducing autophagy. PMID:27435856

  16. A "systems medicine" approach to the study of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Valenti, Luca; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Targher, Giovanni; Bellentani, Stefano; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of fatty liver (steatosis) in the general population is rapidly increasing worldwide. The progress of knowledge in the physiopathology of fatty liver is based on the systems biology approach to studying the complex interactions among different physiological systems. Similarly, translational and clinical research should address the complex interplay between these systems impacting on fatty liver. The clinical needs drive the applications of systems medicine to re-define clinical phenotypes, assessing the multiple nature of disease susceptibility and progression (e.g. the definition of risk, prognosis, diagnosis criteria, and new endpoints of clinical trials). Based on this premise and in light of recent findings, the complex mechanisms involved in the pathology of fatty liver and their impact on the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of cardiovascular, metabolic liver diseases associated with steatosis are presented in this review using a new "systems medicine" approach. A new data set is proposed for studying the impairments of different physiological systems that have an impact on fatty liver in different subsets of subjects and patients. PMID:26698409

  17. A "systems medicine" approach to the study of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Valenti, Luca; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Targher, Giovanni; Bellentani, Stefano; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of fatty liver (steatosis) in the general population is rapidly increasing worldwide. The progress of knowledge in the physiopathology of fatty liver is based on the systems biology approach to studying the complex interactions among different physiological systems. Similarly, translational and clinical research should address the complex interplay between these systems impacting on fatty liver. The clinical needs drive the applications of systems medicine to re-define clinical phenotypes, assessing the multiple nature of disease susceptibility and progression (e.g. the definition of risk, prognosis, diagnosis criteria, and new endpoints of clinical trials). Based on this premise and in light of recent findings, the complex mechanisms involved in the pathology of fatty liver and their impact on the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of cardiovascular, metabolic liver diseases associated with steatosis are presented in this review using a new "systems medicine" approach. A new data set is proposed for studying the impairments of different physiological systems that have an impact on fatty liver in different subsets of subjects and patients.

  18. The blind men ‘see’ the elephant-the many faces of fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a group of diseases with excess fat in liver in the absence of a poorly defined limit of alcohol consumption. Most common variety, a universal public health problem, is associated with insulin resistance caused by a host of genetic and epigenetic defects modulated by life style and environmental factors. In fact the term NAFLD is loose to incorporate so many etiologies except alcoholism and few other etiologies, presenting as fat in liver. However as a sign fatty liver is very important in predicting the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, cirrhosis and cancer. Abnormal fat accumulation can result from several defects in nuclear receptors associated with lipid sensing, synthesis and oxidation like LXR, FXR, SREBP, ChREBP and PPAR; defects in the lipid influx-efflux channels, insulin signaling, proteins involved in fatty acid catabolism, defects in adipose tissue development and function, inappropriate nutrition and finally defects in neural regulatory mechanisms. The progress of the disease is determined by the basic defects which results in fat accumulation, an individual’s immunological response to the accumulated fat and its derivatives and the oxidant stress response. Congregation of unrelated genetic defects under same diagnosis ‘NAFLD’ can result in inefficient patient management. Further studies are required to understand the molecular basis of fatty liver to enable a personalized management of diseases presenting as fatty liver in the absence of alcohol abuse. PMID:18240340

  19. Prevention of fatty liver in transition dairy cows by subcutaneous injections of glucagon.

    PubMed

    Nafikov, R A; Ametaj, B N; Bobe, G; Koehler, K J; Young, J W; Beitz, D C

    2006-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to test the extent to which injecting glucagon subcutaneously for 14 d beginning at d 2 postpartum would prevent fatty liver development in transition dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows were fed 6 kg of cracked corn in addition to their standard diet during the last 30 d of a dry period to induce postpartum development of fatty liver. Glucagon at either 7.5 or 15 mg/d or saline (control) was injected subcutaneously 3 times daily for 14 d beginning at d 2 postpartum. Glucagon at 15 mg/ d prevented liver triacylglycerol accumulation in postpartum dairy cows. Glucagon at 7.5 mg/d showed potential for fatty liver prevention. Glucagon increased concentration of plasma glucose and insulin and decreased plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. No effects of glucagon were detected on plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Glucagon affected neither feed intake nor milk production. Moreover, milk composition was not altered by glucagon. Milk urea N concentrations decreased, and plasma urea N concentrations tended to decrease during glucagon administration, indicating that glucagon may improve protein use. Liver glycogen concentrations were not affected by glucagon. No significant differences in body condition scores were detected among treatments throughout the study. These results indicate that subcutaneous glucagon injections can prevent fatty liver in transition dairy cows without causing major production and metabolite disturbances.

  20. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  1. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids for treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: design and rationale of randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome since obesity and insulin resistance are the main pathogenic contributors for both conditions. NAFLD carries increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. There is an urgent need to find effective and safe therapy for children and adults with NAFLD. Data from research and clinical studies suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in metabolic syndrome-related conditions and can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods/design We are conducting a randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of treatment with omega-3 fatty acids in children with NAFLD. Patients are randomized to receive either omega-3 fatty acids containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or placebo for 24 weeks. The dose of omega-3 (DHA+ EPA) ranges from 450 to 1300 mg daily. Low calorie diet and increased physical activity are advised and monitored using validated questionnaires. The primary outcome of the trial is the number of patients who decreased ALT activity by ≥ 0,3 of upper limit of normal. The main secondary outcomes are improvement in the laboratory liver tests, liver steatosis on ultrasound, markers of insulin resistance and difference in fat/lean body mass composition after 6 months of intervention. Discussion Potential efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of NAFLD will provide needed rationale for use of this safe diet supplement together with weight reduction therapy in the growing population of children with NAFLD. Trial registration NCT01547910 PMID:23702094

  3. Difference in Hepatic Metabolism of Long- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids: the Role of Fatty Acid Chain Length in the Production of the Alcoholic Fatty Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Charles S.; Lefèvre, André; Spritz, Norton; Feinman, Lawrence; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    1967-01-01

    Replacement of dietary triglycerides containing long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) by triglycerides containing medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) markedly reduced the capacity of alcohol to produce fatty liver in rats. After 24 days of ethanol and MCFA, the increase in hepatic triglycerides was only 3 times that of controls, whereas an 8-fold rise was observed after ethanol and LCFA. The triglyceride fatty acids that accumulated in the liver after feeding of ethanol with MCFA contained only a small percentage of the MCFA; their composition also differed strikingly from that of adipose lipids. To study the mechanism of the reduction in steatosis, we compared oxidation to CO2 and incorporation into esterified lipids of 14C-labeled chylomicrons or palmitate-14C (representing LCFA), and of octanoate-14C (as MCFA) in liver slices and isolated perfused livers, in the presence or absence of ethanol. Ethanol depressed the oxidation of all substrates to CO2; MCFA, however, was much more oxidized and reciprocally much less esterified than LCFA, with a 100-fold difference in the ratio of esterified lipid-14C to 14CO2. Furthermore, in hepatic microsomal fractions incubated with α-glycerophosphate, octanoate was much less esterified than palmitate. This propensity of MCFA to oxidation rather than esterification represents a likely explanation for the reduction in alcoholic steatosis upon replacement of dietary LCFA by MCFA. PMID:6036539

  4. Endogenously elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alleviate acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiangyong; Kang, Jing X

    2015-01-01

    Effective means for the prevention of alcohol-induced liver disease, a global health problem, have yet to be developed. We evaluated whether the high endogenous levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated acids (n-3 PUFA) in fat-1 transgenic mice could protect them against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis. We induced alcoholic liver steatosis in 9-week-old male heterozygous fat-1 mice and their wild-type (WT) male littermates through three oral gavages of 60% ethanol at 4.7 g/kg body weight. Hepatic lipid accumulation was significantly increased in both alcohol treatment groups, but by much less in the fat-1 group compared with the WT group. Fat-1 mice exhibited significantly lower levels of total hepatic/plasma TG and plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Accordingly, hepatic expression of lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, FAS, and SCD-1) and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1) were reduced in the fat-1 mice. Furthermore, decreased hepatic expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and increased hepatic levels of PPAR-α and HO-1 were observed in the fat-1 mice, compared to the WT mice. These findings show that elevated tissue n-3 PUFA protect against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis in fat-1 mice, possibly through the down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress.

  5. Effects of Fatty Liver Induced by Excess Orotic Acid on B-Group Vitamin Concentrations of Liver, Blood, and Urine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Morita, Nobuya; Kawamura, Tomoyo; Tsuji, Ai; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver is caused when rats are given orotic acid of the pyrimidine base in large quantities. The lack of B-group vitamins suppresses the biosynthesis of fatty acids. We investigated how orotic acid-induced fatty liver affects the concentrations of liver, blood, and urine B-group vitamins in rats. The vitamin B6 and B12 concentrations of liver, blood, and urine were not affected by orotic acid-induced fatty liver. Vitamin B2 was measured only in the urine, but was unchanged. The liver, blood, and urine concentrations of niacin and its metabolites fell dramatically. Niacin and its metabolites in the liver, blood, and urine were affected as expected. Although the concentrations of vitamin B1, pantothenic acid, folate, and biotin in liver and blood were decreased by orotic acid-induced fatty liver, these urinary excretion amounts showed a specific pattern toward increase. Generally, as for the typical urinary excretion of B-group vitamins, these are excreted when the body is saturated. However, the ability to sustain vitamin B1, pantothenic acid, folate, and biotin decreased in fatty liver, which is hypothesized as a specific phenomenon. This metabolic response might occur to prevent an abnormally increased biosynthesis of fatty acids by orotic acid.

  6. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  7. Systematic review of genetic association studies involving histologically confirmed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kayleigh L; Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has an increasing prevalence in Western countries, affecting up to 20% of the population. Objective The aim of this project was to systematically review and summarise the genetic association studies that investigate possible genetic influences that confer susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Design The MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched to identify candidate gene studies on histologically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results A total of 85 articles have been summarised and categorised on the basis of the general pathway each candidate gene is involved in, including lipid metabolism, lipoprotein processing, cholesterol synthesis, glucose homoeostasis, inflammatory response, protection against oxidative stress and whole body metabolism. Conclusions The main findings demonstrate a small but consistent association of PNPLA3 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Genetic association studies have investigated general disease susceptibility, histological characteristics, severity and progression. However, further study is required to better elucidate the genetic factors influencing fatty liver disease. PMID:26462272

  8. Insulin resistance and hypothyroidism: a complex relationship in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sanjukta; Singh, Bratati

    2013-05-01

    An association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with insulin resistant metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism has been suggested. Aim of the present study was to explore the above association and also to establish the correlation between hypothyroidism and insulin resistance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Study group comprised 40 cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and 30 healthy controls. Serum samples were analysed for fasting glucose, insulin, lipid profile and thyroid hormones. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostatic model of assessment calculation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients demonstrated significantly higher insulin resistance, TSH values and significantly lower FT4 values as compared to controls, which illustrates the prevalence of insulin resistance and hypothyroidism in patients. A significant positive correlation between TSH and Insulin resistance (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) and a significant negative correlation between FT4 and insulin resistance (r = -0.14, p < 0.001) were established in the cases. Moreover TSH was significantly related to low density lipoprotein cholesterol, independent of insulin resistance. There have been some doubts over the clinical correlation between insulin resistance and hypothyroidism to delineate increased risk of cardiovascular disease. So earlier detection and treatment of risk factors may have a significant impact on progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:24765691

  9. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future. PMID:19923096

  10. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  11. Hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cows with fatty infiltration of the liver.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Endoh, Daiji; Oikawa, Shin

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the apoptotic process of liver cells in dairy cows with fatty infiltration of the liver using indicators of DNA damage and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, sixteen dairy cows with fatty liver were examined. On clinical examination, the physical condition of the animals was fair in nine and poor in seven cows. The most dominant clinical signs were reduced ruminal motility, inappetance and/or anorexia and recumbency. Postmortem examination, in seven cases, revealed enlarged liver (18-33 kg), icteric carcasses and distended gallbladder. Laboratory results included neutrophilia, hypochloraemia, decreased concentrations of total bilirubin and increased concentrations of β-hydroxy butyric acid, non-esterified fatty acids and insulin. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were high. Histopathological examination of hepatic specimen showed lipid drops in cytosol with indistinct cellular membranes. In control hepatic cells, the DNA was tightly compressed and maintained the circular disposition of the normal nucleus. However, in the diseased cows, the damaged DNA migrated from the core toward the anode, forming a tail of a comet. Compared to controls, numerous ssDNA and caspase-3-positive cells were detected in the liver. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to document accelerated apoptosis of hepatocytes in dairy cows with fatty infiltration of the liver.

  12. Activities of the enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis in periparturient dairy cows with induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Murondoti, Absolom; Jorritsma, Ruurd; Beynen, Anton C; Wensing, Theo; Geelen, Math J H

    2004-05-01

    The objective was to measure the activities of all the enzymes essential for hepatic gluconeogenesis in dairy cows with induced fatty liver. We aimed to induce severe fatty liver in ten experimental cows by overfeeding them during the dry period while seven control cows were maintained on a restricted diet. To induce a marked negative energy balance, the experimental cows were deprived of feed for 8 h immediately after parturition. In addition, the experimental cows were given a restricted amount of diet during the first 5 d of lactation. Liver samples were collected 1 week before and 1, 2 and 4 weeks after parturition. Before parturition, liver triacylglycerol concentrations did not differ between the two groups. After parturition, the experimental cows developed marked fatty liver as indicated by a higher level of triacylglycerols in the liver compared with the control cows. Before parturition, all gluconeogenic enzymes in the liver were lower in experimental cows than in control cows. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase were significantly lower and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase tended to be lower in the experimental cows. The activities of two crucial enzymes for gluconeogenesis in ruminants, i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase, remained low throughout the sampling period post partum. Activities of pyruvate carboxylase and glucose 6-phosphatase in the experimental cows post partum were upgraded to values similar to those of the control cows. The results showed that the capacity for hepatic gluconeogenesis before parturition was lower in cows with induced fatty liver than in control cows. After parturition, the low activities of crucial gluconeogenic enzymes indicated insufficient production of glucose. It is suggested that the low gluconeogenic capacity leads successively to low blood glucose concentrations, low insulin levels and high rates of

  13. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: focus on nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-10-28

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD. PMID:25353664

  15. The Role of TCA Cycle Anaplerosis in Ketosis and Fatty Liver in Periparturient Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    White, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    The transition to lactation period in dairy cattle is characterized by metabolic challenges, negative energy balance, and adipose tissue mobilization. Metabolism of mobilized adipose tissue is part of the adaptive response to negative energy balance in dairy cattle; however, the capacity of the liver to completely oxidize nonesterified fatty acids may be limited and is reflective of oxaloacetate pool, the carbon carrier of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Alternative metabolic fates of acetyl-CoA from nonesterified fatty acids include esterification to triacylglycerides and ketogenesis, and when excessive, these pathways lead to fatty liver and ketosis. Examination of the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pull of oxaloacetate by the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis may provide insight into the balance of oxidation and esterification of acetyl-CoA within the liver of periparturient dairy cows. PMID:26479386

  16. The Role of TCA Cycle Anaplerosis in Ketosis and Fatty Liver in Periparturient Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    White, Heather M

    2015-08-18

    The transition to lactation period in dairy cattle is characterized by metabolic challenges, negative energy balance, and adipose tissue mobilization. Metabolism of mobilized adipose tissue is part of the adaptive response to negative energy balance in dairy cattle; however, the capacity of the liver to completely oxidize nonesterified fatty acids may be limited and is reflective of oxaloacetate pool, the carbon carrier of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Alternative metabolic fates of acetyl-CoA from nonesterified fatty acids include esterification to triacylglycerides and ketogenesis, and when excessive, these pathways lead to fatty liver and ketosis. Examination of the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pull of oxaloacetate by the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis may provide insight into the balance of oxidation and esterification of acetyl-CoA within the liver of periparturient dairy cows.

  17. [Prevalence of no alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a population of obese children in Valencia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Pontiles de Sánchez, Milagros; Morón de Salim, Alba; Rodríguez de Perdomo, Henny; Perdomo Oramas, Germán

    2014-06-01

    No Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, without alcohol, where overweight and obesity are determinants. Ecosonografia evaluated the prevalence of fatty liver in obese pediatric patients and its relation to nutritional assessment. The sample consisted of 85 children (51 females, 34 males), age 3-17. The abdominal ecosonography, BMI, waist circumference were performed; Godard Test for physical activity, history of diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity and cardiovascular disease were questioned. Lipid profile, glucose and insulin resistance were determined. Data analyzed from descriptive and comparative tables. We obtained: mean age 9.8 ± 2.7 females and males 9.6 ± 2.7 years. The ecosonography indicated 50% and 50% fatty liver-pancreas fatty liver in children aged 3-6 years; 7-11 years 39.7% fatty liver-pancreas; 12-17yrs 31.6% fatty liver-pancreas (p > 0.05); BMI > 26 kg/m2 42.9% fatty liver-pancreas; 21 to 25 kg/m2 44.7% fatty liver; 15 to 20 kg/m2 60%fatty liver-pancreas (p> 0.05). 97.6% with high CC; 68.2% with inadequate physical activity; high frequency of history of chronic non-communicable diseases. We concluded that this population had predominantly fatty liver fatty replacement of the pancreas (HG-RGP) in the groups with higher BMI, CC and high male unrelated insulin resistance, altered lipid profile and diagnosis HG. We inferred that the anthropometric assessment of waist circumference and abdominal ecosonography indicate the presence of visceral obesity, a condition that predisposes to hepatic steatosis, pancreas and/or liver-pancreas.

  18. Interleukin-34 as a fibroblast-derived marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Mano, Yohei; Kumagai, Erina; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Nozaki, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi; Fukai, Moto; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Taketomi, Akinobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. Activation of macrophages and hepatic stellate cells is a critical step that promotes liver fibrosis. We aimed to explore the feasibility of interleukin-34 (IL-34), a key regulator of macrophages, as a fibrosis marker in patients with NAFLD. We enrolled 197 liver biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. We evaluated the serum levels of IL-34, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), soluble CD163 (sCD163), 40 cytokines/chemokines, hyaluronic acid, type IV collagen 7s, and clinically-approved fibrosis scores. IL-34 increased with the progression of fibrosis and was an independent marker for liver fibrosis. Immunostaining experiments, using resected liver specimens from NAFLD patients, revealed that IL-34 was mainly expressed on liver fibroblasts. IL-34 based fibrosis score (0.0387*IL-34 (pg/ml) + 0.3623*type IV collagen 7s (ng/ml) + 0.0184*age (year)–1.1850) was a practical predictive model of liver fibrosis. Using receiver-operating characteristic analyses, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of IL-34 based fibrosis score were superior or comparable to the other fibrosis biomarkers and scores. In conclusion, the IL-34 based fibrosis score, including serum IL-34, type IV collagen 7s and age, is a feasible diagnostic marker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27363523

  19. Defining Hepatic Dysfunction Parameters in Two Models of Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzombtps1 mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  20. Defining hepatic dysfunction parameters in two models of fatty liver disease in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzo(mbtps1) mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  1. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation. PMID:25755423

  2. Altered Fatty Acid Metabolism-Related Gene Expression in Liver from Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis. PMID:25474087

  3. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. |; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K.; Slavin, B.G.

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  4. Mechanisms of hepatic triglyceride accumulation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuki; Cohen, David E

    2013-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation in the absence of excess alcohol intake. NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease, and ongoing research efforts are focused on understanding the underlying pathobiology of hepatic steatosis with the anticipation that these efforts will identify novel therapeutic targets. Under physiological conditions, the low steady-state triglyceride concentrations in the liver are attributable to a precise balance between acquisition by uptake of non-esterified fatty acids from the plasma and by de novo lipogenesis, versus triglyceride disposal by fatty acid oxidation and by the secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In NAFLD patients, insulin resistance leads to hepatic steatosis by multiple mechanisms. Greater uptake rates of plasma non-esterified fatty acids are attributable to increased release from an expanded mass of adipose tissue as a consequence of diminished insulin responsiveness. Hyperinsulinemia promotes the transcriptional upregulation of genes that promote de novo lipogenesis in the liver. Increased hepatic lipid accumulation is not offset by fatty acid oxidation or by increased secretion rates of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hepatic triglyceride homeostasis is achieved under normal conditions, as well as the metabolic alterations that occur in the setting of insulin resistance and contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:23397118

  5. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and obesity: Biochemical, metabolic and clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Sandra; Lulić, Davorka; Štimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world. Presentation of the disease ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that includes central abdominal obesity along with other components. Up to 80% of patients with NAFLD are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2. However, the distribution of fat tissue plays a greater role in insulin resistance than the BMI. The large amount of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in morbidly obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2) individuals contributes to a high prevalence of NAFLD. Free fatty acids derived from VAT tissue, as well as from dietary sources and de novo lipogenesis, are released to the portal venous system. Excess free fatty acids and chronic low-grade inflammation from VAT are considered to be two of the most important factors contributing to liver injury progression in NAFLD. In addition, secretion of adipokines from VAT as well as lipid accumulation in the liver further promotes inflammation through nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, which are also activated by free fatty acids, and contribute to insulin resistance. Most NAFLD patients are asymptomatic on clinical presentation, even though some may present with fatigue, dyspepsia, dull pain in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly. Treatment for NAFLD and NASH involves weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, anti-obesity medication and bariatric surgery. This article reviews the available information on the biochemical and metabolic phenotypes associated with obesity and fatty liver disease. The relative contribution of visceral and liver fat to insulin resistance is discussed, and recommendations for clinical evaluation of affected individuals is provided. PMID:25071327

  7. Supplementing dietary sugar promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent insulin resistance and fatty liver in goose.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Zhao, Xing; Xia, Lili; Liu, Long; Li, Fuyuan; Yang, Biao; Wang, Qianqian; Montgomery, Sean; Cui, Hengmi; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-08-01

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) contributes to insulin resistance (IR) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in mammals. However, we recently demonstrated that overfeeding with a traditional diet (mainly consisting of cooked maize) does not induce ERS in goose. As cellular studies show that high glucose and palmitate can trigger ERS in mammalian cells, we hypothesized that supplementing sugar to the traditional diet could induce ERS, thus promoting insulin resistance and fatty liver. To test the hypothesis, we first treated goose primary hepatocytes with high glucose (25 mM and 50 mM) and palmitate (0.5 mM) supplemented with or without 0.25 mM oleate. Data indicated that, as in mammalian cells, high glucose and palmitate indeed induced ERS in goose primary hepatocytes, and palmitate-induced ERS was suppressed by supplemental 0.25 mM oleate. We then tested the hypothesis with an in vivo study, in which Landes geese overfed with traditional or novel diets (i.e., the traditional diet supplemented with sugar) were compared with control geese (normally fed with cooked maize) for ERS, IR and fatty liver. The differences in glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and postprandial blood glucose between the geese overfed with traditional and novel diets suggested that supplementing dietary sugar promoted IR. This promotion was accompanied with an increasing trend of liver weight and abdominal fat weight relative to body weight. Surprisingly, compared to overfeeding with the traditional diet, overfeeding with the novel diet did not induce ERS, even further suppressed ERS in goose fatty liver. Together, our findings suggest that supplementing dietary sugar promotes ERS-independent IR and fatty liver in goose. It is intriguing to discover the factor(s) protecting goose liver from ERS as well as the non-ERS mechanism underlying IR. PMID:27246737

  8. The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance in the occurrence of goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Xia, Lili; Li, Fuyuan; Xia, Jing; Zhang, Yihui; Wang, Qianqian; Yang, Biao; Montgomery, Sean; Cui, Hengmi; Gong, Daoqing

    2015-09-11

    In mammals, insulin resistance (IR) is required for the occurrence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) contributes to IR. As geese have physiological and metabolic characteristics different from mammals, it is unclear whether these mechanisms also underlie the occurrence of goose fatty liver. To address this, 70-day-old geese were treated with an ERS inducer or overfed, and variables associated with ERS or IR were subsequently determined. The data indicated that the group of geese treated with the ERS inducer for 20d appeared to be more intolerant to blood glucose than the control group, and their livers showed features of hepatic steatosis, suggesting ERS can induce IR and hepatic steatosis in geese. In contrast, overfeeding did not induce ERS, probably due to the upregulated expression of fatty acid desaturases, but induced higher fasting/postprandial blood glucose as well as glucose intolerance in geese, which was accompanied by a dramatic increase of liver weight. Taken together, these findings delineated the role of ERS and IR in the occurrence of goose fatty liver.

  9. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Pachunka, Joseph M; Mott, Justin L

    2015-11-20

    Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.

  10. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Pachunka, Joseph M.; Mott, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption. PMID:26610589

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The liver disease of our age?

    PubMed Central

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients. PMID:25083080

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    PubMed

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  13. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: a new complication of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bocca, G; Stolk, R P; Scheenstra, R; Sauer, P J J

    2008-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a range of chronic liver diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis with liver failure. In children, NAFLD is mainly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, the results of an unhealthy lifestyle. Insulin resistance and free fatty acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. NAFLD can therefore be seen as a metabolic complication of obesity. Since the prevalence of obesity in Dutch children is increasing, the prevalence of NAFLD in children is expected to increase as well. Prevention of obesity and identification of children with an increased risk of NAFLD are important steps in preventing irreversible liver damage. Lifestyle changes aimed at improving insulin sensitivity through healthy food and sufficient physical activity are essential in the treatment of NAFLD. Pharmacological treatment may have additional value.

  14. Purple potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) anthocyanins attenuate alcohol-induced hepatic injury by enhancing antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihui; Chen, Chen; Wang, Jian; Xie, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Li, Xinsheng; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious and challenging health issue. In the past decade, natural components possessing hepatoprotective properties have gained more attention for ALD intervention. In this study, the phytochemical components of anthocyanins from purple potato were assessed using UPLC-MS/MS, and the hepatoprotective effects of purple potato anthocyanins (PPAs) were investigated in the ALD mouse model. Serum and liver biochemical parameters were determined, along with histopathological changes in liver tissue. In addition, the major contributors to alcohol-induced oxidative stress were assessed. The results indicated that the levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were lower in the serum of the PPA-treated group than the alcohol-treated group. PPAs significantly inhibited the reduction of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher levels of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione enzymes as well as a reduction in the formation of malondialdehyde occurred in mice fed with PPAs. In addition, PPAs protected against increased alcohol-induced levels and activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which demonstrates the effects of PPAs against alcohol-induced oxidative stress and liver injury. This study suggests that PPAs could be an effective therapeutic agent in alcohol-induced liver injuries by inhibiting CYP2E1 expression and thereby strengthening antioxidant defenses. PMID:26481011

  15. Purple potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) anthocyanins attenuate alcohol-induced hepatic injury by enhancing antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihui; Chen, Chen; Wang, Jian; Xie, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Li, Xinsheng; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious and challenging health issue. In the past decade, natural components possessing hepatoprotective properties have gained more attention for ALD intervention. In this study, the phytochemical components of anthocyanins from purple potato were assessed using UPLC-MS/MS, and the hepatoprotective effects of purple potato anthocyanins (PPAs) were investigated in the ALD mouse model. Serum and liver biochemical parameters were determined, along with histopathological changes in liver tissue. In addition, the major contributors to alcohol-induced oxidative stress were assessed. The results indicated that the levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were lower in the serum of the PPA-treated group than the alcohol-treated group. PPAs significantly inhibited the reduction of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher levels of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione enzymes as well as a reduction in the formation of malondialdehyde occurred in mice fed with PPAs. In addition, PPAs protected against increased alcohol-induced levels and activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which demonstrates the effects of PPAs against alcohol-induced oxidative stress and liver injury. This study suggests that PPAs could be an effective therapeutic agent in alcohol-induced liver injuries by inhibiting CYP2E1 expression and thereby strengthening antioxidant defenses.

  16. Supplemental choline for prevention and alleviation of fatty liver in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Cooke, R F; Silva Del Río, N; Caraviello, D Z; Bertics, S J; Ramos, M H; Grummer, R R

    2007-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate if supplementing rumen-protected choline (RPC; Reashure, Balchem Encapsulates, Slate Hill, NY) could prevent or alleviate fatty liver in dairy cattle. The first experiment evaluated the effect of supplementing RPC on hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation during fatty liver induction. Twenty-four dry cows between 45 to 60 d prepartum were paired by body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) and randomly assigned to control or supplementation with 15 g of choline as RPC/d. From d 0 to 6, before treatment application, all cows were fed 1.4 kg/d of concentrate and forage ad libitum. Samples of blood and liver, obtained during the pretreatment period, were used for covariate adjustment of blood metabolites and liver composition data. During fatty liver induction (d 7 to 17), cows were fed 1.4 kg/d of concentrate with or without supplementation with RPC, and forage intake was restricted, so cows consumed 30% of the total energy requirements for pregnancy and maintenance. Supplementation with RPC during fatty liver induction did not affect plasma glucose and plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentration but did decrease plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA; 703 vs. 562 microEq/L, SE = 40) and liver TAG accumulation (16.7 vs. 9.3 microg/microg of DNA, SE = 2.0). In the second experiment, we evaluated the effect of supplementing RPC on the clearance of liver TAG when cows were fed ad libitum after the induction of fatty liver by feed restriction. Twenty-eight cows between 45 and 60 d prepartum were paired according to BCS and BW and assigned to treatments. Fatty liver was induced by feeding 1.4 kg/d of concentrate (without RPC) and restricting forage intake, so cows consumed 30% of maintenance and pregnancy energy requirements for 10 d. From d 11 to 16, after feed restriction, cows were fed forage ad libitum and 1.4 kg/d of concentrate with or without RPC. Treatments were not applied during fatty liver induction

  17. The endoplasmic reticulum as a potential therapeutic target in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Christopher L; Pagliassotti, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a key to understanding the development and consequences of hepatic fat accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). An essential function of this organelle is the proper assembly of proteins that are destined for intracellular organelles and the cell surface. Recent evidence suggests that chemical chaperones that enhance the functional capacity of the ER improve liver function in obesity and NAFLD. These chaperones may therefore provide a novel potential therapeutic strategy in NAFLD. PMID:18821470

  18. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis. PMID:27128907

  19. Serum YKL-40 as a marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Erina; Mano, Yohei; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Nozaki, Yuichi; Watanabe, Sumio; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. YKL-40, chitinase-like protein expressed in multiple tissues including liver, is involved in cell proliferation, inflammation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum YKL-40 levels are associated with liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Serum YKL-40 levels were quantified in 111 NAFLD patients and 23 HCC patients with NAFLD. To identify the source of YKL-40, immunofluorescence staining of liver specimens from NAFLD patients was performed. Serum YKL-40 levels in NAFLD patients increased in accordance with the progression of liver fibrosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that YKL-40 was one of the independent factors significantly associated with severe fibrosis (F3-4). We established a new predictive model for fibrosis of NAFLD, using logistic regression analysis: YKL-40 based fibrosis score = −0.0545 + type IV collagen 7s * 0.3456 + YKL-40 * 0.0024. Serum YKL-40 levels of HCC patients with non-cirrhotic NAFLD were significantly higher than those without HCC. Immunofluorescence staining showed that YKL-40 was expressed by macrophages in liver tissue of NAFLD patients. In conclusion, macrophage-derived YKL-40 is a feasible biomarker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27739482

  20. Induction of CYP2E1 in non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Aljomah, Ghanim; Baker, Susan S; Liu, Wensheng; Kozielski, Rafal; Oluwole, Janet; Lupu, Benita; Baker, Robert D; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports a contribution of endogenous alcohol metabolism in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, it is not known whether the expression of alcohol metabolism genes is altered in the livers of simple steatosis. There is also a current debate on whether fatty acids induce CYP2E1 in fatty livers. In this study, expression of alcohol metabolizing genes in the liver biopsies of simple steatosis patients was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), in comparison to biopsies of NASH livers and normal controls. Induction of alcohol metabolizing genes was also examined in cultured HepG2 cells treated with ethanol or oleic acid, by qRT-PCR and Western blots. We found that the mRNA expression of alcohol metabolizing genes including ADH1C, ADH4, ADH6, catalase and CYP2E1 was elevated in the livers of simple steatosis, to similar levels found in NASH livers. In cultured HepG2 cells, ethanol induced the expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein, but not ADH4 or ADH6; oleic acid did not induce any of these genes. These results suggest that elevated alcohol metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD at the stage of simple steatosis as well as more severe stages. Our in vitro data support that CYP2E1 is induced by endogenous alcohol but not by fatty acids.

  1. Oxidative stress: New insights on the association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Polimeni, Licia; Del Ben, Maria; Baratta, Francesco; Perri, Ludovica; Albanese, Fabiana; Pastori, Daniele; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common and emerging chronic liver disease worldwide. It includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to fibrosis and more severe liver complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver mortality. NAFLD is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, and is now regarded as the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The increased mortality of patients with NAFLD is primarily a result of cardiovascular disease and, to a lesser extent, to liver related diseases. Increased oxidative stress has been reported in both patients with NAFLD and patient with cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, oxidative stress represents a shared pathophysiological disorder between the two conditions. Several therapeutic strategies targeting oxidative stress reduction in patients with NAFLD have been proposed, with conflicting results. In particular, vitamin E supplementation has been suggested for the treatment of non-diabetic, non-cirrhotic adults with active NASH, although this recommendation is based only on the results of a single randomized controlled trial. Other antioxidant treatments suggested are resveratrol, silybin, L-carnitine and pentoxiphylline. No trial so far, has evaluated the cardiovascular effects of antioxidant treatment in patients with NAFLD. New, large-scale studies including as end-point also the assessment of the atherosclerosis markers are needed. PMID:26052378

  2. Molecular characterization, tissue expression, and polymorphism analysis of liver-type fatty acid binding protein in Landes geese.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Shao, D; Sun, X X; Niu, J W; Gong, D Q

    2015-01-01

    Liver weight is an important economic trait in the fatty goose liver industry. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is involved in the formation and metabolism of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesized that sequence polymorphisms in L-FABP were associated with fatty liver weight in goose. We first isolated, sequenced, and characterized the goose L-FABP gene, which had not been previously reported. The goose L-FABP gene was 2490 bp and included 4 exons coding for a 126-amino acid protein. Analysis of expression levels of the goose L-FABP gene in different tissues showed that the expression level in the liver tissue was higher than in other tissues, and was significantly higher in the liver tissue of overfed geese than in control geese. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism located at 774 bp in the gene was identified in a Landes goose population. To test whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with fatty liver production, liver weight and the ratio of liver to carcass weights were determined for the 3 genotypes with this single nucleotide polymorphism (TT, TG, GG) in overfed Landes geese. Our data indicate that individuals with the GG genotype had higher values for the variables measured than those with the other 2 genotypes, suggesting that L-FABP can be a selection marker for the trait of fatty liver production in goose. PMID:25729971

  3. Molecular characterization, tissue expression, and polymorphism analysis of liver-type fatty acid binding protein in Landes geese.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Shao, D; Sun, X X; Niu, J W; Gong, D Q

    2015-01-23

    Liver weight is an important economic trait in the fatty goose liver industry. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is involved in the formation and metabolism of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesized that sequence polymorphisms in L-FABP were associated with fatty liver weight in goose. We first isolated, sequenced, and characterized the goose L-FABP gene, which had not been previously reported. The goose L-FABP gene was 2490 bp and included 4 exons coding for a 126-amino acid protein. Analysis of expression levels of the goose L-FABP gene in different tissues showed that the expression level in the liver tissue was higher than in other tissues, and was significantly higher in the liver tissue of overfed geese than in control geese. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism located at 774 bp in the gene was identified in a Landes goose population. To test whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with fatty liver production, liver weight and the ratio of liver to carcass weights were determined for the 3 genotypes with this single nucleotide polymorphism (TT, TG, GG) in overfed Landes geese. Our data indicate that individuals with the GG genotype had higher values for the variables measured than those with the other 2 genotypes, suggesting that L-FABP can be a selection marker for the trait of fatty liver production in goose.

  4. Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT) Thickness Is Associated with Cardiovascular and Liver Damage in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Giuseppina; Consonni, Dario; Tiraboschi, Silvia; Baragetti, Andrea; Bertelli, Cristina; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca; Grigore, Liliana; Tonella, Tatiana; Catapano, Alberico; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been proposed as a cardiometabolic and hepatic fibrosis risk factor in patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EAT in NAFLD by analyzing 1) the association between EAT, the other metabolic parameters and the severity of steatosis 2) the relationship between cardiovascular (cIMT, cplaques, E/A), liver (presence of NASH and significant fibrosis) damage and metabolic risk factors including EAT 3) the relationship between EAT and genetic factors strongly influencing liver steatosis. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we considered 512 consecutive patients with NAFLD (confirmed by biopsy in 100). EAT, severity of steatosis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography and results analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression models. Variables independently associated with EAT (mm) were female gender (p = 0.003), age (p = 0.001), BMI (p = 0.01), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), steatosis grade 2 (p = 0.01) and 3 (p = 0.04), fatty liver index (p = 0.001) and statin use (p = 0.03). Variables independently associated with carotid IMT were age (p = 0.0001), hypertension (p = 0.009), diabetes (p = 0.04), smoking habits (p = 0.04) and fatty liver index (p = 0.02), with carotid plaques age (p = 0.0001), BMI (p = 0.03), EAT (p = 0.02),) and hypertension (p = 0.02), and with E/A age (p = 0.0001), diabetes (p = 0.005), hypertension (p = 0.04) and fatty liver index (p = 0.004). In the 100 patients with available liver histology non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was independently associated with EAT (p = 0.04) and diabetes (p = 0.054) while significant fibrosis with EAT (p = 0.02), diabetes (p = 0.01) and waist circumference (p = 0.05). No association between EAT and PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 polymorphisms was found. Conclusion In patients with NAFLD, EAT is associated with the severity of liver and vascular damage

  5. Diets containing traditional and novel green leafy vegetables improve liver fatty acid profiles of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The consumption of green leafy vegetables (GLVs) has been demonstrated to reduce the risks associated with cardiovascular and other diseases. However, no literature exists that examines the influence of traditional and novel GLVs on the liver fatty acid profile of an animal model genetically predisposed to developing hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of diets containing 4% collard greens, purslane or sweet potato greens on the liver fatty acid profiles of four-week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs, N = 44). Following four weeks consumption of the diets, liver fatty acid profiles were determined by gas–liquid chromatography of transesterified fatty acid methyl esters. Results SHRs consuming the control diet had greater percentages of liver saturated fatty acid and less omega-3 fatty acid percentages. SHRs consuming the diets containing vegetables had significantly greater liver concentrations of γ- linolenic, docosahexaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, as well as lower levels of lauric, palmitic and arachidonic acids. SHRs consuming the control diet had significantly greater percentages (p < 0.05) of oleic; significantly less γ-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids. Conclusions This study demonstrates the ability of GLVs to modulate liver fatty acid composition, thus providing protection against elevations in atherogenic fatty acids, which may be involved in CVD pathogenesis. Consequently, dietary recommendations for the prevention of CVD should consider the possible cardioprotective benefits and the subsequent alterations in fatty acid profiles afforded by diets containing collard greens, purslane and sweet potato greens. PMID:24192144

  6. Brain and Liver Headspace Aldehyde Concentration Following Dietary Supplementation with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Ross, Brian M; Babay, Slim; Malik, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species react with unsaturated fatty acids to form a variety of metabolites including aldehydes. Many aldehydes are volatile enough to be detected in headspace gases of blood or cultured cells and in exhaled breath, in particular propanal and hexanal which are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Aldehydes are therefore potential non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress and of various diseases in which oxidative stress is thought to play a role including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is unclear, however, how changes in the abundance of the fatty acid precursors, for example by altered dietary intake, affect aldehyde concentrations. We therefore fed male Wistar rats diets supplemented with either palm oil or a combination of palm oil plus an n-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, or docosahexaenoic acids) for 4 weeks. Fatty acid analysis revealed large changes in the abundance of both n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in the liver with smaller changes observed in the brain. Despite the altered fatty acid abundance, headspace concentrations of C1-C8 aldehydes, and tissue concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, did not differ between the 4 dietary groups. Our data suggest that tissue aldehyde concentrations are independent of fatty acid abundance, and further support their use as volatile biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  7. Fatty liver produced by dietary deficiencies: its pathogenesis and potentiation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S; Spritz, N; DeCarli, L M

    1969-05-01

    In a study of the pathogenesis of hepatic fat accumulation under experimental conditions mimicking chronic alcoholism, rats were fed a low-fat diet, deficient in amino acids and choline, containing either ethanol or isocaloric amounts of carbohydrate. Dietary deficiencies alone produced a moderately fatty liver after 24 days. The combination of ethanol and dietary deficiencies resulted in enhanced lipid accumulation, which was apparent after only 11 days. In an investigation of the origin of hepatic triglyceride fatty acids, the experiment was repeated after the adipose lipids had been marked by the feeding of oils containing characteristic fatty acids (linseed oil, containing linolenate, or coconut oil, containing laurate and myristate). In all animals, the fatty acid composition of the hepatic triglycerides differed markedly from that of adipose tissue; it had a larger percentage of endogenously synthesized fatty acids and a five times smaller percentage of the marker fatty acids. In addition, ethanol feeding resulted in a greater retention of the marker fatty acids in the adipose tissue. Thus, the deposition of hepatic triglycerides produced by the feeding of deficient diets is markedly potentiated by ethanol; the triglyceride fatty acids accumulated under these conditions appear to originate, for the most part, not from mobilization of depot fat, but from endogenous synthesis.

  8. Getting the Skinny on CD4(+) T Cell Survival in Fatty Livers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Lemon, Stanley M

    2016-04-19

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. In the March 10 issue of Nature, Greten and colleagues report that this metabolic disruption affects tumor surveillance by depleting CD4+ T helper cells through lipotoxic mechanisms associated with NAFLD.

  9. Novel insights into the mechanisms whereby isoflavones protect against fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Long-Xin; Chen, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver disease (FLD) is a growing public health problem worldwide. There is an urgent requirement for alternative and natural medicine to treat this disease. As phytochemicals, isoflavones have attracted considerable attention for the prevention of FLD. Numerous studies have revealed that isoflavones protect against FLD through various pathways which modulate fatty acid β-oxidation, lipid synthesis, and oxidative stress. Recently, the aldose reductase (AR)/polyol pathway has been reported to be involved in the development of FLD by modulating hepatic fructose production, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α activity, cytochrome P450 (CYP)2E1 expression, and gut bacterial endotoxin-induced cytokine release. It has been reported that some isoflavones are potent AR inhibitors. Here, we review the anti-FLD actions of isoflavones and the proposed mechanism whereby isoflavones protect against FLD, with regard to the AR/polyol pathway. We propose that isoflavones block the AR/polyol pathway and in turn reduce fructose production and subsequent fat accumulation in the liver in diabetic or high-glucose-diet mice. In addition, in rodents with alcoholic liver disease or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, inhibition of AR by isoflavones may improve PPARα-mediated fatty acid oxidation, reduce hepatic steatosis, and attenuate CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress or AR/gut bacterial endotoxin-mediated cytokine overproduction, to alleviate progression of FLD. PMID:25632182

  10. Developmental Programming of Pediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Redefining the ‘First-Hit’

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael S.; Heerwagen, Margaret J.R.; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has increased dramatically, and growing evidence indicates that the pathophysiology may be unique from the adult form, suggesting a role for early-life events. Recent radiologic techniques have now demonstrated that maternal obesity contributes to hepatic fat storage in newborn infants. In this review, we will explore how maternal obesity and a hyperlipidemic environment can initiate liver histopathogenesis in utero, including steatosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory priming. Thus, early exposure to excess lipids may represent the 'first hit' for the fetal liver, placing it on a trajectory towards future metabolic disease. PMID:23835912

  11. Editorial: Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Time for an Upgrade?

    PubMed

    Flores, Avegail; Asrani, Sumeet K

    2016-07-01

    Elastography techniques, such as two-dimensional magnetic resonance elastography (2D-MRE) are increasingly used for the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with nonalchoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Loomba et al. demonstrate that 3D-MRE (shear wave frequency 40 Hz) had even greater diagnostic accuracy than the commercially available 2D-MRE (shear wave frequency 60 Hz) in diagnosing advanced fibrosis (area under the receiver operator curve, AUROC 0.981 vs. 0.921, P<0. 05) using liver biopsy as reference standard. Despite limitations, MRE serves as an important tool in risk stratification for patients with NAFLD.

  12. Potential for dietary ω-3 fatty acids to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and reduce the risk of primary liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Jump, Donald B; Depner, Christopher M; Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased in parallel with central obesity, and its prevalence is anticipated to increase as the obesity epidemic remains unabated. NAFLD is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is defined as excessive lipid accumulation in the liver, that is, hepatosteatosis. NAFLD ranges in severity from benign fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and NASH is characterized by hepatic injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. NASH can progress to cirrhosis, and cirrhosis is a risk factor for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevention of NASH will lower the risk of cirrhosis and NASH-associated HCC. Our studies have focused on NASH prevention. We developed a model of NASH by using mice with the LDL cholesterol receptor gene ablated fed the Western diet (WD). The WD induces a NASH phenotype in these mice that is similar to that seen in humans and includes robust induction of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. With the use of transcriptomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic approaches, we examined the capacity of 2 dietary ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5ω-3; EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6ω-3; DHA), to prevent WD-induced NASH. Dietary DHA was superior to EPA at attenuating WD-induced changes in plasma lipids and hepatic injury and at reversing WD effects on hepatic metabolism, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. The outcome of these studies suggests that DHA may be useful in preventing NASH and reducing the risk of HCC. PMID:26567194

  13. Potential for Dietary ω-3 Fatty Acids to Prevent Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Reduce the Risk of Primary Liver Cancer123

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B; Depner, Christopher M; Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased in parallel with central obesity, and its prevalence is anticipated to increase as the obesity epidemic remains unabated. NAFLD is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is defined as excessive lipid accumulation in the liver, that is, hepatosteatosis. NAFLD ranges in severity from benign fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and NASH is characterized by hepatic injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. NASH can progress to cirrhosis, and cirrhosis is a risk factor for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevention of NASH will lower the risk of cirrhosis and NASH-associated HCC. Our studies have focused on NASH prevention. We developed a model of NASH by using mice with the LDL cholesterol receptor gene ablated fed the Western diet (WD). The WD induces a NASH phenotype in these mice that is similar to that seen in humans and includes robust induction of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. With the use of transcriptomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic approaches, we examined the capacity of 2 dietary ω-3 (n–3) polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5ω-3; EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6ω-3; DHA), to prevent WD-induced NASH. Dietary DHA was superior to EPA at attenuating WD-induced changes in plasma lipids and hepatic injury and at reversing WD effects on hepatic metabolism, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. The outcome of these studies suggests that DHA may be useful in preventing NASH and reducing the risk of HCC. PMID:26567194

  14. Fatty acid binding protein 7 regulates phagocytosis and cytokine production in Kupffer cells during liver injury.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Sawada, Tomoo; Kiyohira, Miwa; Yu, Zhiqian; Nakamura, Keiji; Yasumoto, Yuki; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Islam, Ariful; Sharifi, Kazem; Kawamura, Saki; Kodama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Yui; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Nobuko; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao; Ishikawa, Toshizo; Owada, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are involved in the progression of liver diseases such as hepatitis and liver cancer. Several members of the fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed by tissue macrophages, and FABP7 is localized only in KCs. To clarify the role of FABP7 in the regulation of KC function, we evaluated pathological changes of Fabp7 knockout mice during carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. During liver injury in Fabp7 knockout mice, serum liver enzymes were increased, cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β) was decreased in the liver, and the number of KCs in the liver necrotic area was significantly decreased. Interestingly, in the FABP7-deficient KCs, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was impaired, and expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was markedly decreased. In chronic liver injury, Fabp7 knockout mice showed less fibrogenic response to carbon tetrachloride compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, FABP7 is involved in the liver injury process through its regulation of KC phagocytic activity and cytokine production. Such modulation of KC function by FABP7 may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver diseases.

  15. Pentoxifylline ameliorates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jia-Hung; Chao, Jung; Chang, Ming-Ling; Peng, Wen-Huang; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, is characterised by abnormal fat accumulation in the liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake. In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), concurrent NAFLD might increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and the mortality rate. Although several studies have examined the effectiveness of pentoxifylline (PTX) in NAFLD treatment, no results are available to verify the effectiveness of PTX in treating T2D associated with NAFLD. In this study, we developed a combined high-fat diet-induced obesity and low-dose streptozocin-induced hyperglycaemia mouse model to mimic the concurrent NAFLD and T2D pathological condition. By combining physiological assessments, pathological examinations, metabolomics studies on blood, urine, and liver, and measurements of gene and protein expression, we elucidated the effectiveness and the underlying mechanism of action of PTX in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice. Our results revealed that PTX ameliorated NAFLD in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Furthermore, the glycolysis pathway and branched-chain amino acid-related pathways in these mice were restored by PTX.

  16. Pentoxifylline ameliorates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jia-Hung; Chao, Jung; Chang, Ming-Ling; Peng, Wen-Huang; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, is characterised by abnormal fat accumulation in the liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake. In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), concurrent NAFLD might increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and the mortality rate. Although several studies have examined the effectiveness of pentoxifylline (PTX) in NAFLD treatment, no results are available to verify the effectiveness of PTX in treating T2D associated with NAFLD. In this study, we developed a combined high-fat diet-induced obesity and low-dose streptozocin-induced hyperglycaemia mouse model to mimic the concurrent NAFLD and T2D pathological condition. By combining physiological assessments, pathological examinations, metabolomics studies on blood, urine, and liver, and measurements of gene and protein expression, we elucidated the effectiveness and the underlying mechanism of action of PTX in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice. Our results revealed that PTX ameliorated NAFLD in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Furthermore, the glycolysis pathway and branched-chain amino acid-related pathways in these mice were restored by PTX. PMID:27612024

  17. Pentoxifylline ameliorates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jia-Hung; Chao, Jung; Chang, Ming-Ling; Peng, Wen-Huang; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, is characterised by abnormal fat accumulation in the liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake. In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), concurrent NAFLD might increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and the mortality rate. Although several studies have examined the effectiveness of pentoxifylline (PTX) in NAFLD treatment, no results are available to verify the effectiveness of PTX in treating T2D associated with NAFLD. In this study, we developed a combined high-fat diet-induced obesity and low-dose streptozocin-induced hyperglycaemia mouse model to mimic the concurrent NAFLD and T2D pathological condition. By combining physiological assessments, pathological examinations, metabolomics studies on blood, urine, and liver, and measurements of gene and protein expression, we elucidated the effectiveness and the underlying mechanism of action of PTX in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice. Our results revealed that PTX ameliorated NAFLD in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Furthermore, the glycolysis pathway and branched-chain amino acid-related pathways in these mice were restored by PTX. PMID:27612024

  18. Fatty acid synthase-positive hepatocytes and subsequent steatosis in rat livers by irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    SAWANO, TAKEYUKI; SHIMIZU, TAKESHI; YAMADA, TOSHIYUKI; NANASHIMA, NAOKI; MIURA, TAKUYA; MOROHASHI, SATOKO; KUDO, DAISUKE; HUI, FENG MAO; KIJIMA, HIROSHI; HAKAMADA, KENICHI; TSUCHIDA, SHIGEKI

    2015-01-01

    Using a rat model, we investigated factors contributing to the pathogenesis of irinotecan-associated fatty liver disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 200 mg/kg irinotecan by intraperitoneal injection on days 1–4, but not on days 5–7. This schedule was repeated 3 times. Rats were sacrificed 4, 18 and 25 days after the last injection, and liver steatosis was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry. Panacinar intrahepatocyte vacuoles were absent on days 4 and 25, but present on day 18, and this alteration was more prominent around the bile ducts than the central veins. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids was upregulated on day 4. Immunohistochemistry detected fatty acid synthase (Fasn)-strongly positive hepatocytes as well as the activation of liver progenitor cells on day 4, whereas intracellular vacuoles were evident in carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3)-positive hepatocytes on day 18. Thus, irinotecan-induced liver steatosis was preceded by Fasn-strongly-positive hepatocytes and liver progenitor cell activation. The magnitude of the decrease in the number of Fasn-strongly positive hepatocytes between days 4 and 18 was similar to that of the increase in the number of CA3-positive hepatocytes accompanying vacuoles. PMID:25708528

  19. Animal model of margosa oil ingestion with Reye-like syndrome. Pathogenesis of microvesicular fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, R; Sinniah, D; Chia, L S; Baskaran, G

    1989-11-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome (RS) are incompletely understood. A number of environmental toxins and biological agents, including viruses, have been postulated to cause RS, either acting alone or synergistically. Most investigations have suggested that the primary insult is in the liver mitochondria, leading to a complex biochemical catastrophe, with death from encephalopathy. Margosa oil (MO), a long-chain fatty acid compound, has been shown to cause a Reye-like syndrome with death from hepatoencephalopathy, in children in Malaysia and India. The present time-course study performed in MO-administered mice showed the development of hepatic lesions with many features of RS. MO acts rapidly, within 30 min, on the nuclei of hepatocytes inducing mitoses and binucleated cells. This is followed by mitochondrial injury, with swelling, rarefaction of matrix, loss of dense bodies, pleomorphism, and loss of ribosomes starting at 60 min. There is loss of liver glycogen, and proliferation and hypertrophy of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), followed by the presence of lipid droplets in the hyaloplasm, and globules within dilated cisterns of the ER. Additional fatty acids from lipolysis of body adipocytes, and fat globules from intestinal MO ingestion further aggravate the liver fatty change. There is evidence of fat globule ingestion by endocytosis into hepatocytes at the level of the sinusoids. The development of microvesicular liver steatosis and glycogen depletion due to involvement of liver cell organelles occur rapidly as in RS. PMID:2593049

  20. Multifocal Nodular Fatty Infiltration of the Liver: A Case Report of a Challenging Diagnostic Problem

    PubMed Central

    Tebala, Giovanni Domenico; Jwad, Anees; Khan, Abdul Quyyum; Long, Ervine; Sissons, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Multifocal nodular fatty infiltration of the liver Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Fatty infiltration of the liver usually has a diffuse pattern, but in very rare cases it presents as multiple focal lesions of the liver, mimicking metastases. A correct diagnosis is crucial to address prognosis and eventual treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a completely fit and asymptomatic patient referred for multiple bilateral liver metastases of unknown origin. She had no previous history of malignancy. She was extensively investigated with all locally available methods, including ultrasound scan, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, and diagnostic laparoscopy. Imaging-guided biopsy and laparoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of multifocal fatty infiltration of the liver. Conclusions: The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging and an accurate initial clinical history must be part of a thorough clinical examination. Multimodal imaging is mandatory, but diagnostic laparoscopy with direct macrobiopsy may be necessary to clear all doubts. PMID:27017525

  1. Protective effect of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the schistosomiasis liver fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Liang, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Gao, Yongqiang; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yukuai; Yin, Weiguo; Li, Yingju; Wang, Kegeng; Xiao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to observe the effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on initiation and elimination of the schistosomiasis inflammatory response and liver fibrosis. The mice infected with the cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum (20 ± cercarie per mice) were separated randomly into several groups. After 60 days, liver tissue samples of all mice were sectioned. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, Masson staining, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and flow cytometry (FCM) were performed. Through HE and Masson staining, the size of egg (ovum) granuloma and the collagen deposited in mice's livers in ω-3 PUFAs and praziquantel mixed groups were less than that of model group and praziquantel treated group. The serum level of IL-13 and TNF-α were lower than that of model group and praziquantel treated group. The indicators of liver fibrosis, such as HA and LN in the group treated with ω-3 PUFAs and praziquantel before the release of soluble eggs antigen (SEA) into blood, were lower than that of model group and praziquantel treated group, respectively. The combined treatment of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and praziquantel conducted before the release of soluble eggs antigens into the blood decreases liver ovum granulomatous inflammation and fibrosis degree in the schistosomiasis. The mechanism of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may be related to the adjustment of the anti-inflammatory and immune responses.

  2. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  3. Murine Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    In 1980, Ludwig et al. first reported patients of steatohepatitis who lacked a history of excessive alcohol consumption but showed liver histology resembling alcoholic hepatitis and progression to cirrhosis of the liver accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis. The development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. However, the pathogenesis of NASH remains incomplete. A “multiple-hit” hypothesis for the pathogenesis of NASH based on an animal model has been proposed and remains a foundation for research in this field. We review the important dietary and genetic animal models and discuss the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:27335818

  4. Murine Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    In 1980, Ludwig et al. first reported patients of steatohepatitis who lacked a history of excessive alcohol consumption but showed liver histology resembling alcoholic hepatitis and progression to cirrhosis of the liver accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis. The development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. However, the pathogenesis of NASH remains incomplete. A "multiple-hit" hypothesis for the pathogenesis of NASH based on an animal model has been proposed and remains a foundation for research in this field. We review the important dietary and genetic animal models and discuss the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:27335818

  5. Chronic Uridine Administration Induces Fatty Liver and Pre-Diabetic Conditions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Le, Thuc T.

    2016-01-01

    Uridine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that exerts restorative functions in tissues under stress. Short-term co-administration of uridine with multiple unrelated drugs prevents drug-induced liver lipid accumulation. Uridine has the ability to modulate liver metabolism; however, the precise mechanism has not been delineated. In this study, long-term effects of uridine on liver metabolism were examined in both HepG2 cell cultures and C57BL/6J mice. We report that uridine administration was associated with O-GlcNAc modification of FOXO1, increased gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin signaling activity, and reduced expression of a liver-specific fatty acid binding protein FABP1. Long-term uridine feeding induced systemic glucose intolerance and severe liver lipid accumulation in mice. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic potentials of uridine should be designed for short-term acute administration. PMID:26789264

  6. In vivo incorporation of labeled fatty acids in rat liver lipids after oral administration

    SciTech Connect

    Leyton, J.; Drury, P.J.; Crawford, M.A.

    1987-08-01

    Striking differences were found in the compartmentalization of fatty acids into liver lipid fractions. The saturated fatty acids--lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic--were incorporated into phosphoglycerides at faster rates with increasing chain lengths, while triglyceride incorporation was almost uniform. The degree of incorporation of the unsaturated fatty acids into phosphoglycerides (structural) compared to triglyceride (storage and energy) was the converse of their oxidation rates. The incorporation of oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids was mainly into triglyceride, whereas dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were preferentially incorporated into phosphoglycerides. The data suggest that distribution of each fatty acid is different depending on its destination for structural or energy function.

  7. Pharmacological ceramide reduction alleviates alcohol-induced steatosis and hepatomegaly in adiponectin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Correnti, Jason M.; Juskeviciute, Egle; Swarup, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis, the ectopic accumulation of lipid in the liver, is one of the earliest clinical signs of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Alcohol-dependent deregulation of liver ceramide levels as well as inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) activity are thought to contribute to hepatosteatosis development. Adiponectin can regulate lipid handling in the liver and has been shown to reduce ceramide levels and activate AMPK and PPAR-α. However, the mechanisms by which adiponectin prevents alcoholic hepatosteatosis remain incompletely characterized. To address this question, we assessed ALD progression in wild-type (WT) and adiponectin knockout (KO) mice fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet or isocaloric control diet. Adiponectin KO mice relative to WT had increased alcohol-induced hepatosteatosis and hepatomegaly, similar modest increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, and reduced liver TNF. Restoring circulating adiponectin levels using recombinant adiponectin ameliorated alcohol-induced hepatosteatosis and hepatomegaly in adiponectin KO mice. Alcohol-fed WT and adiponectin KO animals had equivalent reductions in AMPK protein and PPAR-α DNA binding activity compared with control-fed animals. No difference in P-AMPK/AMPK ratio was detected, suggesting that alcohol-dependent deregulation of AMPK and PPAR-α in the absence of adiponectin are not primary causes of the observed increase in hepatosteatosis in these animals. By contrast, alcohol treatment increased liver ceramide levels in adiponectin KO but not WT mice. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis in adiponectin KO mice abrogated alcohol-mediated increases in liver ceramides, steatosis, and hepatomegaly. These data suggest that adiponectin reduces alcohol-induced steatosis and hepatomegaly through regulation of liver ceramides, but its absence does not exacerbate alcohol-induced liver damage. PMID

  8. Oxysterols induce mitochondrial impairment and hepatocellular toxicity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bellanti, Francesco; Mitarotonda, Domenica; Tamborra, Rosanna; Blonda, Maria; Iannelli, Giuseppina; Petrella, Antonio; Sanginario, Vittorio; Iuliano, Luigi; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Serviddio, Gaetano

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic hepatic disorder affecting up to 25% of the general population. Several intracellular events leading to NAFLD and progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been identified, including lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Emerging evidence links both hepatic free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol (FC) accumulation in NAFLD development; in particular oxysterols, the oxidative products of cholesterol, may contribute to liver injury. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of oxysterols in the liver of male Wistar rats fed a high-fat (HF), high-cholesterol (HC) or high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC) diet. Both HF and HC diets caused liver steatosis, but the HF/HC diet resulted in steatohepatitis with associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Above all, the oxysterol cholestane-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol (triol) was particularly increased in the liver of rats fed diets rich in cholesterol. To verify the molecular mechanism involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatocellular toxicity, Huh7 and primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or oleic acid (OA), with or without triol. This compound induced apoptosis in cells co-exposed to both PA and OA, and this was associated with impaired mitochondrial respiration as well as down-regulation of PGC1-alpha, mTFA and NRF1.In conclusion, our data show that hepatic free fatty acid or oxysterols accumulation per se induce low hepatocellular toxicity. On the contrary, hepatic accumulation of both fatty acids and toxic oxysterols such as triol are determinant in the impairment of mitochondrial function and biogenesis, contributing to liver pathology in NAFLD. PMID:26461297

  9. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Connie; Rountree, Carl B.; Methratta, Sosamma; LaRusso, Salvatore; Kunselman, Allen R.; Spanier, Adam J.

    2014-07-15

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed the ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor.

  10. A Comparison of the Abdominal Fat Distribution and Coronary Risk Markers in Body Mass Index-matched Subjects with and without Fatty Liver.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Yutaka; Homma, Koichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Joe; Kobayashi, Takako; Igarashi, Mihoko; Aikawa, Minoru; Shibata, Takeo; Homma, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective The close relationship between fatty liver and metabolic syndrome suggests that individuals with fatty liver may have multiple coronary risk factors. In the present study, we investigated the relationships among fatty liver, abdominal fat distribution, and coronary risk markers. Methods and Results Eighty-seven pairs of men and 42 pairs of women who were matched for age and body mass index were enrolled in the present study. The obesity-related markers, abdominal fat distribution (examined by CT), and coronary risk markers were compared in subjects with and without fatty liver. The visceral fat area was significantly larger in the men with fatty liver than in the men without fatty liver. The plasma levels of triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), as well as the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance level, were higher in both males and females with fatty liver than in those without fatty liver, while the plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and adiponectin were lower in the males and females with fatty liver. The plasma levels of apolipoprotein B, remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C), and oxidized LDL were higher in men with fatty liver, but not in women with fatty liver. Conclusion Both males and females with fatty liver had lower insulin sensitivity, lower plasma levels of HDL-C and adiponectin, and higher triglyceride and LDL-C levels. However, the plasma levels of apolipoprotein B, RLP-C, and oxidized LDL were only higher and closely associated with fatty liver in men. Men with fatty liver had a higher risk of coronary disease than women with fatty liver. PMID:27629946

  11. Large-scale analysis of factors influencing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its relationship with liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bi, W R; Yang, C Q; Shi, Q; Xu, Y; Cao, C P; Ling, J; Wang, X Y

    2014-01-01

    Serum liver enzyme levels are often used effectively for the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to investigate the associations between serum liver enzyme levels and risks for NAFLD in over 8000 cases in a large-scale analysis. A cross-sectional survey with multiple stages and random samplings was performed from May 2007 to May 2009 on 8102 workers at Tongji University. A questionnaire was given, assessments of physical measurements, plasma glucose, lipid profiles, and liver enzymes were made, and real-time liver ultrasounds conducted. The prevalence of NAFLD in Tongji University was 22.2%. It was higher in males than in females (P = 0.0023). The body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, serum total triglycerides, serum total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) values were all higher in the NAFLD group than in the control group. For moderate and severe NAFLD patients, the ALT, AST and GGT values were significantly increased, high density lipoprotein cholesterol was decreased, and drinking much, heavy entertainment and less exercise were more prevalent (P < 0.001). There were strong correlations between serum liver enzyme levels and NAFLD (P < 0.001), with GGT being a more sensitive marker for NAFLD than ALT or AST. ALT and GGT were independent predictors for NAFLD, and GGT was a better predictor than ALT for NAFLD. PMID:25117346

  12. Biomarkers in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-the emperor has no clothes?

    PubMed

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-03-21

    Fatty liver is present in over ten percentage of the world population and it is a growing public health problem. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not a single disease, but encompasses a spectrum of diseases of different etiologies. It is difficult to find highly specific and sensitive diagnostic biomarkers when a disease is very complex. Therefore, we should aim to find relevant prognostic markers rather than accurate diagnostic markers which will help to minimize the frequency of liver biopsies to evaluate disease progression. There are several biomarker panels commercially available, however, there is no clear evidence that more sophisticated panels are better compared to simple criteria such as, presence of diabetes over five years, metabolic syndrome, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, aspartate transaminase/alanine transaminase (ALT) ratio > 0.8 or ferritin levels > 1.5 times normal in patients with over six month history of raised ALT and/or ultrasonological evidence of fat in the liver. Currently the biomarker panels are not a replacement for a liver biopsy. However the need and benefit of liver biopsy in NAFLD is questionable because there is no convincing evidence that biopsy and detailed staging of NAFLD improves the management of NAFLD and benefits the patient. After all there is no evidence based treatment for NAFLD other than management of lifestyle and components of "metabolic syndrome". PMID:25805928

  13. Hepatoprotective Effect of Herb Formula KIOM2012H against Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hwayong; Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Gun; Jeon, Jongwook; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic ailment with a rapidly increasing incidence due to dietary hypernutrition and subsequent obesity. Fatty liver disease can lead to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even cancer, which is associated with various complications. Discovering effective natural materials and herbs can provide alternative and complementary medical treatments to current chemical pharmaceuticals. To develop an effective natural agent for NAFLD, we formulated a combination of four herb mixtures (KIOM2012H) and observed lipid-lowering efficacy. The inhibitory effects of KIOM2012H on free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation, triglyceride contents, and gene expressions were analyzed in HepG2 cells. Using high fat diet-fed mice, body weight changes, gross liver appearances, hepatic triglyceride contents, and gene expressions were evaluated. KIOM2012H dose-dependently inhibited lipid accumulation and gene expressions involved in lipogenesis and related regulators. Experimental animals also showed a decrease in body weight changes and lipid-associated physiological parameters. This study shows that KIOM2012H has an alleviating effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation, and therefore can be applied for development of new therapeutic pharmaceuticals for treatment of NAFLD using natural products and herbs. PMID:25849950

  14. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kanth, Vishnubhotla Venkata; Sasikala, Mitnala; Sharma, Mithun; Rao, Padaki Nagaraja; Reddy, Duvvuru Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD. PMID:27458502

  15. Autophagy in Alcohol-Induced Multiorgan Injury: Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Huang, Heqing

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a genetically programmed, evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation pathway involved in the trafficking of long-lived proteins and cellular organelles to the lysosome for degradation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Alcohol consumption leads to injury in various tissues and organs including liver, pancreas, heart, brain, and muscle. Emerging evidence suggests that autophagy is involved in alcohol-induced tissue injury. Autophagy serves as a cellular protective mechanism against alcohol-induced tissue injury in most tissues but could be detrimental in heart and muscle. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of autophagy in alcohol-induced injury in different tissues/organs and its potential molecular mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic targets based on modulation of autophagy. PMID:25140315

  16. Topical Formulation Comprising Fatty Acid Extract from Cod Liver Oil: Development, Evaluation and Stability Studies.

    PubMed

    Ilievska, Biljana; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Hjalmarsdottir, Martha Asdis; Asgrimsdottir, Gudrun Marta

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a pharmaceutical formulation containing fatty acid extract rich in free omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid for topical use. Although the health benefits of cod liver oil and other fish oils taken orally as a dietary supplement have been acknowledged and exploited, it is clear that their use can be extended further to cover their antibacterial properties. In vitro evaluation showed that 20% (v/v) fatty acid extract exhibits good activity against strains of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptoccoccus pyogenes and Streptoccoccus pneumonia. Therefore, free polyunsaturated fatty acids from cod liver oil or other fish oils can be used as safe and natural antibacterial agents. In this study, ointment compositions containing free fatty acids as active antibacterial agents were prepared by using various natural waxes and characterized. The effects of different waxes, such as carnauba wax, ozokerite wax, laurel wax, beeswax, rice bran wax, candelilla wax and microcrystalline wax, in the concentration range of 1% to 5% (w/w) on the ointment texture, consistency and stability were evaluated. The results showed significant variations in texture, sensory and rheological profiles. This was attributed to the wax's nature and chain composition. Microcrystalline wax gave the best results but laurel wax, beeswax and rice bran wax exhibited excellent texturing, similar sensory profiles and well-balanced rheological properties.

  17. Topical Formulation Comprising Fatty Acid Extract from Cod Liver Oil: Development, Evaluation and Stability Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ilievska, Biljana; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Hjalmarsdottir, Martha Asdis; Asgrimsdottir, Gudrun Marta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a pharmaceutical formulation containing fatty acid extract rich in free omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid for topical use. Although the health benefits of cod liver oil and other fish oils taken orally as a dietary supplement have been acknowledged and exploited, it is clear that their use can be extended further to cover their antibacterial properties. In vitro evaluation showed that 20% (v/v) fatty acid extract exhibits good activity against strains of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptoccoccus pyogenes and Streptoccoccus pneumonia. Therefore, free polyunsaturated fatty acids from cod liver oil or other fish oils can be used as safe and natural antibacterial agents. In this study, ointment compositions containing free fatty acids as active antibacterial agents were prepared by using various natural waxes and characterized. The effects of different waxes, such as carnauba wax, ozokerite wax, laurel wax, beeswax, rice bran wax, candelilla wax and microcrystalline wax, in the concentration range of 1% to 5% (w/w) on the ointment texture, consistency and stability were evaluated. The results showed significant variations in texture, sensory and rheological profiles. This was attributed to the wax’s nature and chain composition. Microcrystalline wax gave the best results but laurel wax, beeswax and rice bran wax exhibited excellent texturing, similar sensory profiles and well-balanced rheological properties. PMID:27258290

  18. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald G; Reily, Michael D; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Vaillancourt, Richard R; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a globally widespread disease of increasing clinical significance. The pathological progression of the disease from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been well defined, however, the contribution of altered branched chain amino acid metabolomic profiles to the progression of NAFLD is not known. The three BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine and valine are known to mediate activation of several important hepatic metabolic signaling pathways ranging from insulin signaling to glucose regulation. The purpose of this study is to profile changes in hepatic BCAA metabolite levels with transcriptomic changes in the progression of human NAFLD to discover novel mechanisms of disease progression. Metabolomic and transcriptomic data sets representing the spectrum of human NAFLD (normal, steatosis, NASH fatty, and NASH not fatty livers) were utilized for this study. During the transition from steatosis to NASH, increases in the levels of leucine (127% of normal), isoleucine (139%), and valine (147%) were observed. Carnitine metabolites also exhibited significantly elevated profiles in NASH fatty and NASH not fatty samples and included propionyl, hexanoyl, lauryl, acetyl and butyryl carnitine. Amino acid and BCAA metabolism gene sets were significantly enriched among downregulated genes during NASH. These cumulative alterations in BCAA metabolite and amino acid metabolism gene profiles represent adaptive physiological responses to disease-induced hepatic stress in NASH patients.

  19. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  20. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  1. Knowing What’s Out There: Awareness of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghevariya, Vishal; Sandar, Nan; Patel, Kishor; Ghevariya, Nehal; Shah, Ruchit; Aron, Joshua; Anand, Sury

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common hepatic disorder, which poses a significant health burden in the western countries. As the epidemic of obesity slides health downward, the incidence of NAFLD is evidently increasing. Aim: We aimed to ascertain the awareness of NAFLD and its risk factors in the general population, which may be helpful in designing educational tools to promote prevention, early detection, and treatment of this disorder. Methods: A survey of 5000 non-institutionalized residents of Brooklyn, NY, USA was conducted. Sixteen items were included in the survey questionnaire including awareness of fatty liver, predisposing factors of NAFLD, awareness of cirrhosis, and conditions that advance to cirrhosis. The questionnaire also addressed awareness of prevention, diagnostic methods and treatment of NAFLD, and education of physicians to their patients about NAFLD. Results: Overwhelming majority of the subjects was not aware of NAFLD and stated that their physicians did not have a discussion about NAFLD. Conclusion: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a preventable liver disorder with limited treatment options. Thorough counseling by primary care physicians can be of paramount importance in preventive strategy for NAFLD. We should target our teenage population in an era of obesity epidemics of all times. PMID:25798442

  2. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis. PMID:26602919

  3. Application of hepatic tolerance tests to the functional reserve assessment in rat models of fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, K; Yabe, K

    1998-05-01

    The present study was designed to define whether maximal removal rate of indocyanine green (ICG Rmax), plasma cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response to exogenous glucagon (peak to basal ratio of cAMP level: P/B cAMP) and plasma half-life of galactose (t1/2 galactose) can measure the hepatic functional reserve of fatty liver prepared in rats fed choline-deficient (9 weeks), 2% cholesterol (2 weeks) or 0.25% DL-ethionine (2 weeks) diet. Although changes in cholesterol and phospholipid values in serum during feeding periods differed among the models, histopathologic examinations in the liver of almost all animals revealed intermediate to severe fatty liver with or without fibrosis at each termination. ICG Rmax and P/B cAMP were significantly decreased in rats fed choline-deficient or DL-ethionine diet, implying reductions in hepatic functional mass and disturbances in hepatic cAMP production. Meanwhile, t1/2 galactose showed no change in any of the models, suggesting that glucose metabolisms in the models used may be preserved. These findings demonstrate that ICG Rmax and P/B cAMP can apply to measurement of hepatic surviving reserve of fatty liver with fibrosis.

  4. Modeling the relationships between quality and biochemical composition of fatty liver in mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Theron, L; Cullere, M; Bouillier-Oudot, M; Manse, H; Dalle Zotte, A; Molette, C; Fernandez, X; Vitezica, Z G

    2012-09-01

    The fatty liver of mule ducks (i.e., French "foie gras") is the most valuable product in duck production systems. Its quality is measured by the technological yield, which is the opposite of the fat loss during cooking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether biochemical measures of fatty liver could be used to accurately predict the technological yield (TY). Ninety-one male mule ducks were bred, overfed, and slaughtered under commercial conditions. Fatty liver weight (FLW) and biochemical variables, such as DM, lipid (LIP), and protein content (PROT), were collected. To evaluate evidence for nonlinear fat loss during cooking, we compared regression models describing linear and nonlinear relations between biochemical measures and TY. We detected significantly greater (P = 0.02) linear relation between DM and TY. Our results indicate that LIP and PROT follow a different pattern (linear) than DM and showed that LIP and PROT are nonexclusive contributing factors to TY. Other components, such as carbohydrates, other than those measured in this study, could contribute to DM. Stepwise regression for TY was performed. The traditional model with FLW was tested. The results showed that the weight of the liver is of limited value in the determination of fat loss during cooking (R(2) = 0.14). The most accurate TY prediction equation included DM (in linear and quadratic terms), FLW, and PROT (R(2) = 0.43). Biochemical measures in the fatty liver were more accurate predictors of TY than FLW. The model is useful in commercial conditions because DM, PROT, and FLW are noninvasive measures.

  5. Alterations of fatty acid β-oxidation capability in the liver of ketotic cows.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Li, X B; Fu, S X; Wu, C C; Wang, X X; Yu, G J; Long, M; Wang, Z; Liu, G W

    2012-04-01

    Dairy cows are highly susceptible to ketosis after parturition. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of fatty acid β-oxidation-related enzymes in the liver of ketotic (n=6) and nonketotic (n=6) cows. Serum levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), and glucose were determined by using standard biochemical techniques. The mRNA abundance and protein content of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain (ACSL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II), acyl-CoA dehydrogenase long chain (ACADL), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA. We found that serum glucose levels were lower in ketotic cows than in nonketotic cows, but serum BHBA and NEFA concentrations were higher. Messenger RNA and protein levels of ACSL were significantly higher in livers of ketotic cows than those in nonketotic cows. In contrast, mRNA levels of CPT I and mRNA and protein levels of CPT II, ACADL, HMGCS, and ACC were decreased in the liver of ketotic cows. Serum NEFA concentration positively correlated with ACSL protein levels and negatively correlated with protein levels of CPT II, HMGCS, ACADL, and ACC. In addition, serum BHBA concentration negatively correlated with protein levels of CPT II, HMGCS, and ACADL. Overall, fatty acid β-oxidation capability was altered in the liver of ketotic compared with nonketotic cows. Furthermore, high serum NEFA and BHBA concentrations play key roles in affecting pathways of fatty acid metabolism in the liver.

  6. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  7. Risk factors and ultrasound can predict chronic hepatitis caused by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas R; Kahn, Amin

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is under-recognized. The aim of this study was to develop a scoring system that separates NAFLD diagnosis as a cause of chronic hepatitis from controls by using clinical features and liver ultrasound. A retrospective review of consecutive NAFLD cases and other liver disease controls was undertaken selecting patients from an abnormal liver function test code. To qualify for analysis all patients had to have elevated liver injury tests for more then 6 months, a biopsy-confirmed diagnosis, and an ultrasound as part of the evaluation. There were 84 cases of NAFLD and 75 liver disease controls. The NAFLD group had a larger body mass index (BMI) (34.9 versus 26.1; P < or = 0.0001), a larger liver span (9.8 versus 8.1 cm; P < or = 0.0001), and higher triglycerides (252 versus 142.6; P < or = 0.0001). The ultrasound reports recorded features consistent with fatty infiltration in 65.5% of NAFLD cases, compared to 5.3% of other liver diseases (P < or = 0.0001). Diabetes mellitus was found in 35% of NAFLD and 6.7% of other cases (P < or = 0.0001). The BMI was >30 in 79.8% of NAFLD cases and 22.7% of other liver disease cases (P < or = 0.0001). The liver span was >8 cm in 78.6% of NAFLD cases and in only 16% of controls (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis using logistic regression, the odds ratio of having ultrasound report findings suggestive of fatty infiltration was 15.9 (CI, 4.1-60). The odds ratio was 9.4 (CI, 2.3-37.9) for diabetes, 5.0 (CI, 1.7-14.6) for BMI >30, and 2.3 for liver span >8 cm (CI, 1.36-3.90). A scoring system using clinical features and ultrasound was shown to reliably separate NAFLD from other cases of chronic hepatitis. PMID:16416209

  8. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Fibrosis Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Aguilar Olivos, Nancy E.; Barranco-Fragoso, Beatriz; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of pathologies, from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation to fibrosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD progression has not been completely elucidated, and different liver cells could be implicated. This review focuses on the current evidence of the role of liver dendritic cells (DCs) in the progression from NAFLD to fibrosis. Liver DCs are a heterogeneous population of hepatic antigen-presenting cells; their main function is to induce T-cell mediated immunity by antigen processing and presentation to T cells. During the steady state liver DCs are immature and tolerogenic. However, in an environment of chronic inflammation, DCs are transformed to potent inducers of immune responses. There is evidence about the role of DC in liver fibrosis, but it is not clearly understood. Interestingly, there might be a link between lipid metabolism and DC function, suggesting that immunogenic DCs are associated with liver lipid storage, representing a possible pathophysiological mechanism in NAFLD development. A better understanding of the interaction between inflammatory pathways and the different cell types and the effect on the progression of NAFLD is of great relevance. PMID:26339640

  9. Genetic Factors in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Romeo, Stefano; Valenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Liver fat accumulation generally related to systemic insulin resistance characterizes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which in the presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can progress towards cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to the epidemic of obesity, NAFLD is now the most frequent liver disease in Western countries. Epidemiological, familial, and twin studies provide evidence for a strong genetic component of NAFLD susceptibility. Recently, genome-wide association studies led to the identification of the major inherited determinants of hepatic fat accumulation: patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) I148M gene and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K gene variants, involved in lipid droplets remodelling and very low-density lipoproteins secretion, are the major determinants of interindividual differences in liver steatosis, and susceptibility to progressive NASH. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of recent insights into the genetics of hepatic fat accumulation and steatohepatitis. PMID:26273621

  10. The generation of carcinogenic etheno-DNA adducts in the liver of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, Kirsten-Berit; Glassen, Katharina; Peccerella, Teresa; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Linhart, Heinz; Bartsch, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in particular its more aggressive form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasingly observed as a cause of end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important factor in the pathogenesis of HCC. ROS can react with polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from membrane phospholipids resulting in the production of reactive aldehydes as lipid oxidation (LPO) byproducts, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4 HNE). 4 HNE can react with DNA to form mutagenic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts. ROS is induced by inflammatory processes, but also by induction of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), as seen with chronic alcohol consumption. Methods Immunohistochemical detection of CYP2E1, 4 HNE and hepatic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts was performed on liver sections from 39 patients with NFLD. Spearman rank correlation was calculated to examine possible correlations. Results Exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts were detected and correlated significantly with 4 HNE, but not with CYP2E1. Conclusions This is the first description of highly carcinogenic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts in NAFLD patients. We could show that exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts significantly correlated with lipid peroxidation product 4 HNE, but not with CYP2E1, implying that in NAFLD ROS generation with consecutive DNA damage is rather inflammation driven through various cytokines than by induction of CYP2E1. PMID:26005678

  11. A high omega 3 fatty acid diet alters fatty acid composition of heart, liver, kidney, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in swine.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Wirth, C; Iaizzo, P A; Eichinger, H M

    1993-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles and total lipid contents of two skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, heart, liver and kidney of swine fed a diet rich in omega 3 (n-3) fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) was investigated. These values were compared to those determined for animals which were fed an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All supplementations were given over a 13-week period. The lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol, trans-esterified and the relative fatty acid methyl-esters concentrations were determined using capillary gas chromatography. The fish oil diet significantly enhanced the relative amounts of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) in all tissues examined. In the heart, liver and kidney, the increases in n-3 fatty acids were compensated by decreases primarily in arachidonic acid, but in the other tissues the contents of lauric and myristic acids were also reduced. In general, the n-3 fatty acid contents were 40-165% higher in the animals fed the fish oil. Supplementation of n-3 fatty acids in swine induced a significant incorporation of these fatty acids throughout the body, however the extent of this incorporation differed between tissues perhaps due to tissue-specific metabolic pathways. PMID:8373137

  12. The Gut Microbiota and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M; Monsour, Howard P

    2015-08-01

    With the recognition of the various metabolic functions of the gut microbiome and of its putative role in obesity, an investigation of the contribution of the bacterial populations of the gastrointestinal tract to the metabolic syndrome and its hepatic manifestation-nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLD)-became inevitable. Furthermore, the central role of an altered microbiome in the precipitation of infectious and noninfectious complications of liver disease was described decades ago. The contribution of the microbiome to the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been extensively studied in animal models. Convincing evidence for a central role for an altered microbiome (through multiple mechanisms), coupled with such phenomena as impaired gut barrier function and an aberrant host immune response, has been amply demonstrated. The accumulation of a similar level of evidence from human studies has proven more challenging; however, incriminating data accumulate. Although animal studies have demonstrated the benefits of interventions that modulate the microbiome and of probiotics, in particular, in reducing steatosis and preventing progression to steatohepatitis, data in man are scanty and high-quality clinical trials of probiotics and other strategies are needed. PMID:26378643

  13. Alcohol-Induced miR-27a Regulates Differentiation and M2 Macrophage Polarization of Normal Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Bruneau, Johanna C.; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver disease characterized by liver inflammation, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, or liver cirrhosis. Immunomodulatory effects of alcohol on monocytes and macrophages contribute to alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol use, an independent risk factor for progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection–mediated liver disease, impairs host defense and alters cytokine production and monocyte/macrophage activation. We hypothesized that alcohol and HCV have synergistic effects on the phenotype and function of monocytes. Our data show that acute alcohol binge drinking in healthy volunteers results in increased frequency of CD16+ and CD68+ and M2-type (CD206+, dendritic cell [DC]-SIGN+–expressing and IL-10–secreting) circulating CD14+ monocytes. Expression of HCV-induced CD68 and M2 markers (CD206 and DC-SIGN) in normal monocytes was further enhanced in the presence of alcohol. The levels of microRNA (miR)-27a was significantly upregulated in monocytes cultured in the presence of alcohol or alcohol and HCV as compared with HCV alone. The functional role of miR-27a in macrophage polarization was demonstrated by transfecting monocytes with an miR-27a inhibitor that resulted in reduced alcohol- and HCV- mediated monocyte activation (CD14 and CD68 expression), polarization (CD206 and DC-SIGN expression), and IL-10 secretion. Over-expression of miR-27a in monocytes enhanced IL-10 secretion via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We found that miR-27a promoted ERK phosphorylation by downregulating the expression of ERK inhibitor sprouty2 in monocytes. Thus, we identified that sprouty2 is a target of miR-27a in human monocytes. In summary, our study demonstrates the regulatory role of miR-27a in alcohol-induced monocyte activation and polarization. PMID:25716995

  14. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  15. Effect of different chilling rates on the quality parameters of mule duck fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Awde, S; Marty-Gasset, N; Sandri, G; Zotte, A Dalle; Rémignon, H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of chilling rates on the quality features of fatty livers. Three different chilling rates were applied: ultra-fast (UF), fast (FA), and slow (SL). Technological and proteomic results were compared at time T1 when the internal temperature of livers reached 10°C and at time T2=24 h post mortem. Samples from the UF group reached the T1 temperature at 50 min post mortem and had the least hard livers and the lowest cooking loss percentage (25±9%) at time T2=24 h post mortem (P-value of <0.01). The FA and SL groups reached the T1 temperature after 120 and 210 min post mortem and presented higher melting (36±9 and 41±9%, respectively, at time T2) and harder livers compared to the UF group. In parallel, we conducted semi-quantifications of proteins by electrophoresis and proteolytic activities by mono-dimensional zymography for three families of proteases: Matrix metalloproteases (MMP), Cathepsins, and Calpains. The proteomic assays revealed less modified proteolytic activities in samples from the UF group, and less associated proteins degradations than in samples from the FA and the SL groups. Effects of the different chilling rates were mainly significant at time T2 (24 h post mortem). As a conclusion we were able to highlight an indirect positive relation between proteolysis and melting yield in ducks' fatty liver.

  16. The Detrimental Role Played by Lipocalin-2 in Alcoholic Fatty Liver in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Jogasuria, Alvin; Yin, Huquan; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Hu, Xudong; Wang, Jiayou; Kim, Chunki; Wu, Jiashin; Lee, Kwangwon; Gao, Bin; You, Min

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that the ethanol-mediated elevation of lipocaline-2 (LCN2) is closely associated with the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) in mice. Herein, we aimed to understand the functional significance of LCN2 induction by ethanol and to explore its underlying mechanisms. We evaluated the effects of LCN2 in an in vitro cellular alcoholic steatosis model and in an animal study using wild-type and LCN2 knockout mice fed for 4 weeks with an ethanol-supplemented Lieber-DeCarli diet. In the cellular model of alcoholic steatosis, recombinant LCN2 or overexpression of LCN2 exacerbated ethanol-induced fat accumulation, whereas knocking down LCN2 prevented steatosis in hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Consistently, removal of LCN2 partially but significantly alleviated alcoholic fatty liver injury in mice. Mechanistically, LCN2 mediates detrimental effects of ethanol in the liver via disrupted multiple signaling pathways, including aberrant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase-sirtuin 1 axis, perturbed endocrine metabolic regulatory fibroblast growth factor 15/19 signaling, and impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy. Finally, compared with healthy human livers, liver samples from patients with AFLD had lower gene expression of several LCN2-regualted molecules. Our study demonstrated a pivotal and causal role of LCN2 in the development of AFLD and suggested that targeting the LCN2 could be of great value for the treatment of human AFLD. PMID:27427417

  17. Understanding nutritional interventions and physical exercise in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, R; Carbajo-Pescador, S; Mauriz, J L; Gonzalez-Gallego, J

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in adults and its prevalence is rising around the world. This pathology is characterized by accumulation of liver fat, which exceeds 5% of liver weight in absence of alcohol consumption, viral infection or other hepatic etiology. Since NAFLD has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes or alteration of lipid profiles, it is considered as the liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Pathogenic mechanisms of NAFLD have not been clearly elucidated, but different events such as lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are involved. Modifications in lifestyle constitute the first line for the management of NAFLD. Nutritional interventions include low fat and carbohydrate diet with higher polyunsaturated fatty acids ingestion. Moreover, supplementation with antioxidant and cytoprotective agents could be useful to decrease oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Physical activity enables to reduce the expression of lipogenic genes, fat accumulation, or insulin resistance and improves cardiorespiratory fitness. Benefits have been found following both aerobic exercise and resistance training, and remain even after exercise cessation. However, more studies are required to analyze the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in nutritional and physical intervention, and to define the volume of activity required and its association with weight loss. In this paper, we offer an updated overview of the mechanisms implicated in the progression of NAFLD, and analyze the beneficial effects of nutritional interventions and physical exercise in the prevention and treatment of this condition. PMID:25601465

  18. Reduced mitochondrial function in obesity-associated fatty liver: SIRT3 takes on the fat.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Mahua; Jonscher, Karen R; Friedman, Jacob E

    2011-02-01

    Aging is associated with various metabolic disorders that may have their origin in the liver, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis. Although well-characterized in models of caloric restriction, relatively little is known about the role of sirtuins and acetylation under conditions of caloric excess. Sirtuins are NAD (+)-dependent protein deacetylases that mediate adaptive responses to a variety of stresses, including calorie restriction and metabolic stress. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is localized within the mitochondrial matrix, where it regulates acetylation levels of a diverse set of metabolic enzymes. When normal mice are fed a high fat diet they demonstrate reduced SIRT3 activity, impaired mitochondrial function, and hyperacetylation of a diverse set of proteins in their livers. Furthermore, SIRT3 knockout mice have signs of accelerated aging and cancer. Understanding SIRT3?s biochemical function and regulation in the liver under conditions of caloric excess may potentially increase our understanding of the normal aging process and diseases associated with aging, such as diabetes, fatty liver disease, or cancer.

  19. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: age peculiarities, breakthrough in pathogenetic therapy].

    PubMed

    Pal'tsev, A I; Sharapov, I V; Gorbunova, E N; Khomchenko, T N; Kurganova, I V; Soldatova, G S; Eremina, A A; Nikolaev, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatosis (NSH) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is considered to be a wide spread disease. Such reasons as metabolic, toxic, infections, alimentary and cryptogenic cause this disease. Pathogenesis of the disease is complex. If the necessary medical preventive measures are absent the disease develops as follows, first steatosis, then steatohepatitis, fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocarcinoma. The aim of the investigation was to study influence of Metadoxil in patients with NSH and NASH. The conducted investigation have shown high efficiency of the drug at combined treatment of a patient. PMID:20469674

  20. Liver glycerol permeability and aquaporin-9 are dysregulated in a murine model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Gena, Patrizia; Mastrodonato, Maria; Portincasa, Piero; Fanelli, Elena; Mentino, Donatella; Rodríguez, Amaia; Marinelli, Raúl A; Brenner, Catherine; Frühbeck, Gema; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    One form of liver steatosis, namely Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), is a worrisome health problem worldwide characterized by intrahepatic triacylglycerol (TG) overaccumulation. NAFLD is a common feature of metabolic syndrome being often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes and mostly closely linked to insulin resistance. The mechanism of NAFLD pathogenesis is object of intense investigation especially regarding complex systems ultimately resulting in excessive TG deposition in hepatocytes. However, scarce is the attention about the relevance of hepatic import of glycerol, the other primary source (as glycerol-3-phosphate) of increased TG in hepatocytes. Obese leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice, an animal model of NAFLD, were used to evaluate the functional involvement of Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), the major pathway of liver glycerol entry, in hepatosteatosis. By RT-PCR and qPCR, the level of Aqp9 mRNA in the liver of starved obese mice was comparable with the corresponding control lean littermates. By immunoblotting, the AQP9 protein at the hepatocyte sinusoidal plasma membrane of obese mice was markedly lower (33%) than lean mice, a finding fully confirmed by immunohistochemistry. By stopped-flow light scattering, the liver glycerol permeability of ob/ob mice was significantly lower (53%) than lean mice, a finding consistent with both the observed down-regulation of AQP9 protein and increased level of plasma glycerol characterizing obese mice. In summary, our results suggest implication of AQP9 in liver steatosis. The reduction of hepatocyte AQP9 and, consequently, glycerol permeability might be a defensive mechanism to counteract further fat infiltration in liver parenchyma. PMID:24205128

  1. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  2. Ameliorative potential of Tamarindus indica on high fat diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Suja Rani; Joseph, Joshua Allan; Anandakumar, Senthilkumar; Venkatesan, Vijayabalaji; Madhavan, Chandrasekharan Nair Ariyattu; Agarwal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the prevalence of which is rising globally with current upsurge in obesity, is one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver diseases. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Tamarindus indica seed coat (ETS) on high fat diet (HFD) induced NAFLD, after daily administration at 45, 90, and 180 mg/kg body weight dose levels for a period of 6 weeks, in albino Wistar rats. Treatment with ETS at all tested dose levels significantly attenuated the pathological alterations associated with HFD induced NAFLD viz. hepatomegaly, elevated hepatic lipid and lipid peroxides, serum alanine aminotransferase, and free fatty acid levels as well as micro-/macrohepatic steatosis. Moreover, extract treatment markedly reduced body weight and adiposity along with an improvement in insulin resistance index. The study findings, therefore suggested the therapeutic potential of ETS against NAFLD, acting in part through antiobesity, insulin sensitizing, and antioxidant mechanisms.

  3. Ameliorative potential of Tamarindus indica on high fat diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Suja Rani; Joseph, Joshua Allan; Anandakumar, Senthilkumar; Venkatesan, Vijayabalaji; Madhavan, Chandrasekharan Nair Ariyattu; Agarwal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the prevalence of which is rising globally with current upsurge in obesity, is one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver diseases. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Tamarindus indica seed coat (ETS) on high fat diet (HFD) induced NAFLD, after daily administration at 45, 90, and 180 mg/kg body weight dose levels for a period of 6 weeks, in albino Wistar rats. Treatment with ETS at all tested dose levels significantly attenuated the pathological alterations associated with HFD induced NAFLD viz. hepatomegaly, elevated hepatic lipid and lipid peroxides, serum alanine aminotransferase, and free fatty acid levels as well as micro-/macrohepatic steatosis. Moreover, extract treatment markedly reduced body weight and adiposity along with an improvement in insulin resistance index. The study findings, therefore suggested the therapeutic potential of ETS against NAFLD, acting in part through antiobesity, insulin sensitizing, and antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:24688399

  4. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-07-27

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  5. Ameliorative Potential of Tamarindus indica on High Fat Diet Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Suja Rani; Anandakumar, Senthilkumar; Venkatesan, Vijayabalaji; Ariyattu Madhavan, Chandrasekharan Nair; Agarwal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the prevalence of which is rising globally with current upsurge in obesity, is one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver diseases. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Tamarindus indica seed coat (ETS) on high fat diet (HFD) induced NAFLD, after daily administration at 45, 90, and 180 mg/kg body weight dose levels for a period of 6 weeks, in albino Wistar rats. Treatment with ETS at all tested dose levels significantly attenuated the pathological alterations associated with HFD induced NAFLD viz. hepatomegaly, elevated hepatic lipid and lipid peroxides, serum alanine aminotransferase, and free fatty acid levels as well as micro-/macrohepatic steatosis. Moreover, extract treatment markedly reduced body weight and adiposity along with an improvement in insulin resistance index. The study findings, therefore suggested the therapeutic potential of ETS against NAFLD, acting in part through antiobesity, insulin sensitizing, and antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:24688399

  6. S-Allyl cysteine improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats via regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Kodai, Shintaro; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Tsukioka, Takuma; Okada, Shigeru; Azuma, Hideki; Kubo, Shoji

    2013-09-01

    It is important to prevent and improve diabetes mellitus and its complications in a safe and low-cost manner. S-Allyl cysteine, an aged garlic extract with antioxidant activity, was investigated to determine whether S-allyl cysteine can improve type 2 diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats were used and were divided into two groups at 29 weeks of age. S-Allyl cysteine (0.45% diet) was administered to rats for 13 weeks. Rats were killed at 43 weeks of age, and detailed analyses were performed. S-Allyl cysteine improved hemoglobinA1c, blood glucose, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Furthermore, S-allyl cysteine normalized plasma insulin levels. S-Allyl cysteine activated the mRNA and protein expression of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ, as well as inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and forkhead box O1 proteins were normalized by S-allyl cysteine in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. In conclusions, these findings support the hypothesis that S-allyl cysteine has diabetic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapeutic potential as a potent regulating agent against lipogenesis and glucose metabolism. PMID:24062606

  7. Intestinal CYP2E1: A mediator of alcohol-induced gut leakiness

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use can result in many pathological effects including alcoholic liver disease (ALD). While alcohol is necessary for the development of ALD, only 20–30% of alcoholics develop alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) with progressive liver disease leading to cirrhosis and liver failure (ALD). This suggests that while chronic alcohol consumption is necessary it is not sufficient to induce clinically relevant liver damage in the absence of a secondary risk factor. Studies in rodent models and alcoholic patients show that increased intestinal permeability to microbial products like endotoxin play a critical role in promoting liver inflammation in ALD pathogenesis. Therefore identifying mechanisms of alcohol-induced intestinal permeability is important in identifying mechanisms of ALD and for designing new avenues for therapy. Cyp2e1 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme that metabolizes alcohol has been shown to be upregulated by chronic alcohol use and to be a major source of oxidative stress and liver injury in alcoholics and in animal and in vitro models of chronic alcohol use. Because Cyp2e1 is also expressed in the intestine and is upregulated by chronic alcohol use, we hypothesized it could play a role in alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability. Our in vitro studies with intestinal Caco-2 cells and in mice fed alcohol showed that circadian clock proteins CLOCK and PER2 are required for alcohol-induced permeability. We also showed that alcohol increases Cyp2e1 protein and activity but not mRNA in Caco-2 cells and that an inhibitor of oxidative stress or siRNA knockdown of Cyp2e1 prevents the increase in CLOCK or PER2 proteins and prevents alcohol-induced hyperpermeability. With our collaborators we have also shown that Cyp2e1 knockout mice are resistant to alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver inflammation. Taken together our data support a novel Cyp2e1-circadian clock protein mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness that could provide new avenues for

  8. Intestinal CYP2E1: A mediator of alcohol-induced gut leakiness.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use can result in many pathological effects including alcoholic liver disease (ALD). While alcohol is necessary for the development of ALD, only 20-30% of alcoholics develop alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) with progressive liver disease leading to cirrhosis and liver failure (ALD). This suggests that while chronic alcohol consumption is necessary it is not sufficient to induce clinically relevant liver damage in the absence of a secondary risk factor. Studies in rodent models and alcoholic patients show that increased intestinal permeability to microbial products like endotoxin play a critical role in promoting liver inflammation in ALD pathogenesis. Therefore identifying mechanisms of alcohol-induced intestinal permeability is important in identifying mechanisms of ALD and for designing new avenues for therapy. Cyp2e1 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme that metabolizes alcohol has been shown to be upregulated by chronic alcohol use and to be a major source of oxidative stress and liver injury in alcoholics and in animal and in vitro models of chronic alcohol use. Because Cyp2e1 is also expressed in the intestine and is upregulated by chronic alcohol use, we hypothesized it could play a role in alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability. Our in vitro studies with intestinal Caco-2 cells and in mice fed alcohol showed that circadian clock proteins CLOCK and PER2 are required for alcohol-induced permeability. We also showed that alcohol increases Cyp2e1 protein and activity but not mRNA in Caco-2 cells and that an inhibitor of oxidative stress or siRNA knockdown of Cyp2e1 prevents the increase in CLOCK or PER2 proteins and prevents alcohol-induced hyperpermeability. With our collaborators we have also shown that Cyp2e1 knockout mice are resistant to alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver inflammation. Taken together our data support a novel Cyp2e1-circadian clock protein mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness that could provide new avenues for

  9. Clinical assessment of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paglialunga, Sabina; Dehn, Clayton A

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is heralded as the next big global epidemic. Hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL), the synthesis of new fatty acids from non-lipid sources, is thought to play a pivotal role in the development of NAFLD. While there is currently no NAFLD-specific therapeutic agent available, pharmaceutical drugs aimed at reducing hepatic fat accretion may prove to be a powerful ally in the treatment and management of this disease. With a focus on NAFLD, the present review summarizes current techniques examining DNL from a clinical perspective, and describes the merits and limitations of three commonly used assays; stable-label isotope tracer studies, fatty acid indexes and indirect calorimetry as non-invasive measures of hepatic DNL. Finally, the application of DNL assessments in the pharmacological and nutraceutical treatment of NAFLD/NASH is summarized. In a clinical research setting, measures of DNL are an important marker in the development of anti-NAFLD treatments.

  10. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  11. Gut Microbiota and Clinical Disease: Obesity and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide. Obesity can cause hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Many environmental or genetic factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but there is no satisfactory explanation for its increased prevalence. This review discusses the latest updates on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and NAFLD. PMID:24010102

  12. [Genomic, proteomic and metabolomic predictors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease development in obese patients. Part I].

    PubMed

    Chernyak, O O; Sentsova, T B; Vorozhko, I V; Tutelyan, V A; Gapparova, K M; Isakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases associated to obesity require a qualitative increase of efficiency. There are still disputable questions about diagnostic significance of some molecules, including genomic, proteomic and metabolomic biomarkers. We observed 72 obese patients (20 men and 52 women, mean age--41.3 +/- 2.5) and performed ultrasound elastography and ultrasound of liver. We have identified two groups of patients: Group 1 consisted of 50 obese patients without complications (BMI 43.2 +/- 0.6), group 2 consisted of 22 patients with obesity complicated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (BMI 45.8 +/- 2.3). Determination of the adipokines (adiponectin, ghrelin, resistin, visfatin, and apelin), cytokine (interleukin--6, TNFalpha) oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL), adhesion molecule sICAM (soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule), fatty acid transporter L-FABP in serum was performed by ELISA. The study of the lipid metabolism involved determination of the concentration of total cholesterols, triglycerides, low and high density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL) by turbidimetry and spectrophotometry by analyzer. In addition, we conducted analysis of polymorphic alleles epsilon2, epsilon3, episolon4 of ApoE gene using polymerase chain reaction. Our data indicate that reducing the concentration of adiponectin (0.46-1.71 mcg/ml), increasing the level of glucose (5.57-6.25 mmol/l), triglycerides (2.06-3.94 mmol/l), TNFalpha (5.07-16.68 pg/ml) and L-FABP (11.62-23.76 pg/ml) are predictors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese patients, and the presence of genotype epsilon3/epsilon4 of ApoE gene is a poor prognostic marker of severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26852528

  13. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression. PMID:26254248

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): a tale of fat and sugar?

    PubMed

    Longato, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The global diffusion of the so-called Western diet, which is enriched in fat and carbohydrates, such as fructose, has been proposed to be an underlying cause of the increased prevalence of metabolic conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This Smart Card summarizes the main metabolic and hepatic histological features of rodent models fed with diets combining high fat and fructose. PMID:23866299

  15. [The assessment of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Chubirko, K I; Ivachevs'ka, V V; Hechko, M M; Chopeĭ, I V; Stan, M P; Koshelia, I I

    2014-01-01

    Article presents the result of assessmaent of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The results show the presence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with NAFLD, namely the increase of waist and hip circumferences compared with patients of the control group, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, decrease in apolipoprotein A1 (AroA1) compared to practically healthy people. PMID:25796862

  16. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression.

  17. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  18. Lipid-lowering agents in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed countries and is associated not only with increased risk for liver disease-related complications but also with higher cardiovascular morbidity. Accordingly, lipid-lowering agents are frequently considered in these patients to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, there have been concerns regarding the safety of these agents in patients with chronic liver diseases. In the present review, we discuss the safety of lipid-lowering agents in patients with NAFLD as well as their effects on both cardiovascular and liver disease in this population. Accumulating data suggest that statins are safe in patients with NAFLD and that they reduce the increased cardiovascular morbidity of this population. However, it is still unclear whether statins are also useful as a treatment for NAFLD per se, since there are very limited and conflicting data on their effects on liver histology. There is also very scarce evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of other lipid-lowering agents in patients with NAFLD. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate the role of lipid-lowering agents and particularly statins for the prevention of both cardiovascular and liver disease-related complications in this high-risk population. PMID:25349644

  19. Ameliorative Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract against Dietary-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver in Rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaaibi, Siham N K; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Subhi, Lyutha; Tageldin, Mohamed H; Al-Balushi, Nada M; Rahman, Mohammad S

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by fat accumulation and is associated with oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel extract (PPE) against oxidative stress in the liver of rats with NAFLD. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD), 20% corn oil, or palm oil for 8 weeks in the presence or absence of PPE. The control group was fed a basal diet. The progression of NAFLD was evaluated histologically and by measuring liver enzymes (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase), serum lipids (triglycerides and total cholesterol), and oxidative stress markers. The HFD feeding increased the body weight and caused NAFLD, liver steatosis, hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, and elevated liver enzymes. Administration of PPE ameliorated the hepatic morphology, reduced body weight, improved liver enzymes, and inhibited lipogenesis. Furthermore, PPE enhanced the cellular redox status in the liver tissue of rats with NAFLD. Our findings suggest that PPE could improve HFD-induced NAFLD via abolishment of hepatic oxidative damage and hyperlipidemia. PPE might be considered as a potential lead material in the treatment of NAFLD and obesity through the modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:27069901

  20. Ameliorative Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract against Dietary-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaaibi, Siham N. K.; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Subhi, Lyutha; Tageldin, Mohamed H.; Al-Balushi, Nada M.; Rahman, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by fat accumulation and is associated with oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel extract (PPE) against oxidative stress in the liver of rats with NAFLD. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD), 20% corn oil, or palm oil for 8 weeks in the presence or absence of PPE. The control group was fed a basal diet. The progression of NAFLD was evaluated histologically and by measuring liver enzymes (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase), serum lipids (triglycerides and total cholesterol), and oxidative stress markers. The HFD feeding increased the body weight and caused NAFLD, liver steatosis, hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, and elevated liver enzymes. Administration of PPE ameliorated the hepatic morphology, reduced body weight, improved liver enzymes, and inhibited lipogenesis. Furthermore, PPE enhanced the cellular redox status in the liver tissue of rats with NAFLD. Our findings suggest that PPE could improve HFD-induced NAFLD via abolishment of hepatic oxidative damage and hyperlipidemia. PPE might be considered as a potential lead material in the treatment of NAFLD and obesity through the modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:27069901

  1. Interleukin-15-mediated inflammation promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Lacraz, Grégory; Ghobadi, Farnaz; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Orkhis, Sakina; Mayhue, Marian; Chen, Yi-Guang; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Menendez, Alfredo; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is essential for the homeostasis of lymphoid cells particularly memory CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. These cells are abundant in the liver, and are implicated in obesity-associated pathogenic processes. Here we characterized obesity-associated metabolic and cellular changes in the liver of mice lacking IL-15 or IL-15Rα. High fat diet-induced accumulation of lipids was diminished in the livers of mice deficient for IL-15 or IL-15Rα. Expression of enzymes involved in the transport of lipids in the liver showed modest differences. More strikingly, the liver tissues of IL15-KO and IL15Rα-KO mice showed decreased expression of chemokines CCl2, CCL5 and CXCL10 and reduced infiltration of mononuclear cells. In vitro, IL-15 stimulation induced chemokine gene expression in wildtype hepatocytes, but not in IL15Rα-deficient hepatocytes. Our results show that IL-15 is implicated in the high fat diet-induced lipid accumulation and inflammation in the liver, leading to fatty liver disease.

  2. Interleukin-15-mediated inflammation promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Lacraz, Grégory; Ghobadi, Farnaz; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Orkhis, Sakina; Mayhue, Marian; Chen, Yi-Guang; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Menendez, Alfredo; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is essential for the homeostasis of lymphoid cells particularly memory CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. These cells are abundant in the liver, and are implicated in obesity-associated pathogenic processes. Here we characterized obesity-associated metabolic and cellular changes in the liver of mice lacking IL-15 or IL-15Rα. High fat diet-induced accumulation of lipids was diminished in the livers of mice deficient for IL-15 or IL-15Rα. Expression of enzymes involved in the transport of lipids in the liver showed modest differences. More strikingly, the liver tissues of IL15-KO and IL15Rα-KO mice showed decreased expression of chemokines CCl2, CCL5 and CXCL10 and reduced infiltration of mononuclear cells. In vitro, IL-15 stimulation induced chemokine gene expression in wildtype hepatocytes, but not in IL15Rα-deficient hepatocytes. Our results show that IL-15 is implicated in the high fat diet-induced lipid accumulation and inflammation in the liver, leading to fatty liver disease. PMID:26868085

  3. The role of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid composition in liver pathophysiology associated with NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Gentile, C L; Weir, T L; Cox-York, K A; Wei, Y; Wang, D; Reese, L; Moran, G; Estrada, A; Mulligan, C; Pagliassotti, M J; Foster, M T

    2015-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is associated with type-2-diabetes, inflammation, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), whereas subcutaneous adiposity is not. We hypothesized that the link between visceral adiposity and liver pathophysiology involves inherent or diet-derived differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue to store and mobilize saturated fatty acids. The goal of the present study was to characterize the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglyceride and portal vein fatty acids in relation to indices of liver dysregulation. For 8 weeks rats had free access to control (CON; 12.9% corn/safflower oil; 3.6 Kcal/g), high saturated fat (SAT; 45.2% cocoa butter; 4.5 Kcal/g) or high polyunsaturated fat (PUFA; 45.2% safflower oil; 4.5 Kcal/g) diets. Outcome measures included glucose tolerance, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue triglyceride, liver phospholipids and plasma (portal and systemic) free fatty acid composition, indices of inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver and adipose tissue depots and circulating adipo/cytokines. Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased in both high fat diet groups compared to control and were significantly higher in PUFA compared to SAT. Although glucose tolerance was not different among diet groups, SAT increased markers of inflammation and ER stress in the liver and both adipose tissue depots. Fatty acid composition did not differ among adipose depots or portal blood in any dietary group. Overall, these data suggest that diets enriched in saturated fatty acids are associated with liver inflammation, ER stress and injury, but that any link between visceral adipose tissue and these liver indices does not involve selective changes to fatty acid composition in this depot or the portal vein. PMID:26167414

  4. The role of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid composition in liver pathophysiology associated with NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, CL; Weir, TL; Cox-York, KA; Wei, Y; Wang, D; Reese, L; Moran, G; Estrada, A; Mulligan, C; Pagliassotti, MJ; Foster, MT

    2015-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is associated with type-2-diabetes, inflammation, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), whereas subcutaneous adiposity is not. We hypothesized that the link between visceral adiposity and liver pathophysiology involves inherent or diet-derived differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue to store and mobilize saturated fatty acids. The goal of the present study was to characterize the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglyceride and portal vein fatty acids in relation to indices of liver dysregulation. For 8 weeks rats had free access to control (CON; 12.9% corn/safflower oil; 3.6 Kcal/g), high saturated fat (SAT; 45.2% cocoa butter; 4.5 Kcal/g) or high polyunsaturated fat (PUFA; 45.2% safflower oil; 4.5 Kcal/g) diets. Outcome measures included glucose tolerance, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue triglyceride, liver phospholipids and plasma (portal and systemic) free fatty acid composition, indices of inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver and adipose tissue depots and circulating adipo/cytokines. Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased in both high fat diet groups compared to control and were significantly higher in PUFA compared to SAT. Although glucose tolerance was not different among diet groups, SAT increased markers of inflammation and ER stress in the liver and both adipose tissue depots. Fatty acid composition did not differ among adipose depots or portal blood in any dietary group. Overall, these data suggest that diets enriched in saturated fatty acids are associated with liver inflammation, ER stress and injury, but that any link between visceral adipose tissue and these liver indices does not involve selective changes to fatty acid composition in this depot or the portal vein. PMID:26167414

  5. Ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis is modulated by glycogen level in the liver.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jin; Zhang, Yongxian; Xu, Daqian; Zhao, Zilong; Zhang, Yuxue; Pan, Yi; Cao, Peijuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major health problem worldwide and hepatic steatosis is an early response to alcohol consumption. Fat and glycogen are two major forms of energy storage in the liver; however, whether glycogen metabolism in the liver impacts alcohol-induced steatosis has been elusive. In this study, we used a mouse model with overexpression of PPP1R3G in the liver to dissect the potential role of glycogen on alcohol-induced fatty liver formation. PPP1R3G is a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 and stimulates glycogenesis in the liver. Chronic and binge ethanol (EtOH) feeding reduced glycogen level in the mouse liver and such inhibitory effect of EtOH was reversed by PPP1R3G overexpression. In addition, PPP1R3G overexpression abrogated EtOH-induced elevation of serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, increase in liver triglyceride concentration, and lipid deposition in the liver. EtOH-stimulated sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c, a master regulator of lipogenesis, was also reduced by PPP1R3G overexpression in vivo. In AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, PPP1R3G overexpression could relieve EtOH-induced lipid accumulation and SREBP-1c stimulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that glycogen metabolism is closely linked to EtOH-induced liver injury and fatty liver formation.

  6. Clinical significance of serum alanine aminotransferase and lifestyle intervention in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kyoung Ah; Chun, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the effect of lifestyle intervention on NAFLD. Methods The clinical data of 86 children diagnosed with NAFLD were reviewed retrospectively. Forty-six patients belonged to the elevated ALT group and 40 to the normal ALT group. The clinical parameters of patients with NAFLD were also compared based on the status of ALT levels after lifestyle intervention. Results Patients with elevated ALT had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) scores than those with normal ALT (P<0.05). Of all the patients with elevated ALT, 89% exhibited moderate or severe degree of fatty change in the liver on ultrasonographic examination, whereas most patients with normal ALT exhibited mild or moderate degree changes. Liver biopsy was performed in 15 children with elevated ALT and all showed mild histological changes. Of all patients with elevated ALT, 49% achieved normal ALT levels after lifestyle intervention. Those with more severe histological changes tended to have continuously increasing ALT levels. There was no correlation between the normalization of posttreatment ALT level and BMI, as well as ultrasonographic findings at diagnosis. Conclusion ALT elevation in NAFLD is highly associated with higher BMI scores and more severe degree of fatty changes on ultrasonographic examination. Lifestyle intervention can significantly improve ALT in children with NAFLD. The degree of histologic changes appears to be a predictor of the treatment response to NAFLD. PMID:27721840

  7. Increasing Whole Grain Intake as Part of Prevention and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alastair B.; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Minehira, Kaori; Kirwan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    In conjunction with the rise in rates of obesity, there has been an increase in the rate of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). While NAFLD at least partially originates from poor diet, there is a lack of nutritional recommendations for patients with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of NAFLD, beyond eating a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and emphasising weight loss. The limited current literature suggests that there may be opportunities to provide more tailored dietary advice for people diagnosed with or at risk of NAFLD. Epidemiological studies consistently find associations between whole grain intake and a reduced risk of obesity and related diseases, yet no work has been done on the potential of whole grains to prevent and/or be a part of the treatment for fatty liver diseases. In this review, we examine the potential and the current evidence for whole grains having an impact on NAFLD. Due to their nutrient and phytochemical composition, switching from consuming mainly refined grains to whole grains should be considered as part of the nutritional guidelines for patients diagnosed with or at risk for fatty liver disease. PMID:23762052

  8. Analysis of hepatic gene expression during fatty liver change due to chronic ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, H.-Q.; Je, Young-Tae; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-03-15

    Chronic consumption of ethanol can cause cumulative liver damage that can ultimately lead to cirrhosis. To explore the mechanisms of alcoholic steatosis, we investigated the global intrahepatic gene expression profiles of livers from mice administered alcohol. Ethanol was administered by feeding the standard Lieber-DeCarli diet, of which 36% (high dose) and 3.6% (low dose) of the total calories were supplied from ethanol for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Histopathological evaluation of the liver samples revealed fatty changes and punctate necrosis in the high-dose group and ballooning degeneration in the low-dose group. In total, 292 genes were identified as ethanol responsive, and several of these differed significantly in expression compared to those of control mice (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05). Specifically, the expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid transport and metabolism were examined. An overall net increase in gene expression was observed for genes involved in (i) glucose transport and glycolysis, (ii) fatty acid influx and de novo synthesis, (iii) fatty acid esterification to triglycerides, and (iv) cholesterol transport, de novo cholesterol synthesis, and bile acid synthesis. Collectively, these data provide useful information concerning the global gene expression changes that occur due to alcohol intake and provide important insights into the comprehensive mechanisms of chronic alcoholic steatosis.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Pengtao; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Hong; Wei, Taotao

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Free fatty acids exposure induces elevated autophagy. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits autophagic flux through impairing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. •Inhibition of autophagy potentiates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TNF-α, two typical “second hit” factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  10. The Effect of Weight Reduction on Ultrasonographic Findings of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, SA; Sedighi, N; Derogar, R; Aslani, A; Malekzadeh, R; Merat, S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) includes a spectrum of diseases ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFL is typically seen in association with obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridaemia. In order to seek the role of diet therapy in treatment of NAFL, we compared the ultrasonographic findings of patients with fatty liver disease before and after standard diet therapy. METHODS Twenty-three overweight or obese subjects with incidental fatty liver discovered during ultrasonography were included. Subjects underwent 3 months of diet therapy, and anthropometric data including weight, height, BMI, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured. Ultrasonographic findings were graded from 0 to 3. Changes in ultrasonographic findings and anthropometric data were studied. RESULTS After three months of dieting, the ultrasonographic grade of all patients decreased by one or two grades. Fifteen patients decreased one grade while 8 others decreased by 2 grades. We observed a significant correlation between the decrease in ultrasonographic grade and the decrease in weight and BMI. CONCLUSION Our study indicates that standard diet therapy could be used as an effective treatment for NAFL patients. PMID:25197505

  11. Simple Resistance Exercise helps Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Abe, K; Usami, K; Imaizumi, H; Hayashi, M; Okai, K; Kanno, Y; Tanji, N; Watanabe, H; Ohira, H

    2015-10-01

    To date, only limited evidence has supported the notion that resistance exercise positively impacts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We evaluated the effects of resistance exercise on the metabolic parameters of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 53 patients who were assigned to either a group that performed push-ups and squats 3 times weekly for 12 weeks (exercise group; n=31) or a group that did not (control; n=22). Patients in the control group proceeded with regular physical activities under a restricted diet throughout the study. The effects of the exercise were compared between the 2 groups after 12 weeks. Fat-free mass and muscle mass significantly increased, whereas hepatic steatosis grade, mean insulin and ferritin levels, and the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index were significantly decreased in the exercise group. Compliance with the resistance exercise program did not significantly correlate with patient background characteristics such as age, sex, BMI and metabolic complications. These findings show that resistance exercise comprising squats and push-ups helps to improve the characteristics of metabolic syndrome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  12. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  13. Non invasive indexes for the assessment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Handberg, Aase; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects about 20%-30% of the general population, and its clinical relevance arises from the fact that 20%-30% of these subjects develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition at risk of cirrhosis progression. In addition NAFLD, and in particular NASH patients, are also at high risk of cardiovascular alterations, suffering overall from an increased liver and no liver-related events of risk and death. At the moment liver biopsy is the gold standard for a correct evaluation of NASH and fibrosis among NAFLD patients. However, the high and increasing prevalence of NAFLD has triggered an intensive search for alternative and non-invasive methods for evaluating disease severity. Specifically we can distinguish two main groups of non-invasive methodologies, namely 'serum markers' that use clinical and/or biochemical variables, and methodologies derived from elaboration of parameters arising from liver imaging techniques. All these tools showed encouraging results, even though their utility in clinical practice in the individual patients is still under debate. Therefore further efforts are needed in order to generate non-invasive algorithms that correctly assess liver damage in NAFLD patients. In particular, it should be interesting to perform gender-specific analysis, by combining old and new tools, with the aim to generate more accurate scores. Finally we think that non-invasive scores should not only be able to correctly classify the severity of liver disease in NAFLD patients, but also predict liver and non-liver related morbidity and mortality, further acting as time-dependent markers of liver and systemic disease activity. This review summarizes the present knowledge on noninvasive diagnosis in NAFLD patients, and suggest future directions for this complex research area. PMID:23394090

  14. Acetylation of Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein α-Subunit Enhances Its Stability To Promote Fatty Acid Oxidation and Is Decreased in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Zhou, Shui-Rong; Wei, Xiang-Bo; Liu, Yuan; Chang, Xin-Xia; Liu, Yang; Ge, Xin; Dou, Xin; Huang, Hai-Yan; Qian, Shu-Wen; Li, Xi; Lei, Qun-Ying; Gao, Xin; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2016-10-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disease, and decreased fatty acid oxidation is one of the important contributors to NAFLD. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein α-subunit (MTPα) functions as a critical enzyme for fatty acid β-oxidation, but whether dysregulation of MTPα is pathogenically connected to NAFLD is poorly understood. We show that MTPα is acetylated at lysine residues 350, 383, and 406 (MTPα-3K), which promotes its protein stability by antagonizing its ubiquitylation on the same three lysines (MTPα-3K) and blocking its subsequent degradation. Sirtuin 4 (SIRT4) has been identified as the deacetylase, deacetylating and destabilizing MTPα. Replacement of MTPα-3K with either MTPα-3KR or MTPα-3KQ inhibits cellular lipid accumulation both in free fatty acid (FFA)-treated alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells and primary hepatocytes and in the livers of high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet-fed mice. Moreover, knockdown of SIRT4 could phenocopy the effects of MTPα-3K mutant expression in mouse livers, and MTPα-3K mutants more efficiently attenuate SIRT4-mediated hepatic steatosis in HF/HS diet-fed mice. Importantly, acetylation of both MTPα and MTPα-3K is decreased while SIRT4 is increased in the livers of mice and humans with NAFLD. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of MTPα regulation by acetylation and ubiquitylation and a direct functional link of this regulation to NAFLD. PMID:27457618

  15. The Effect of Green Tea Extract Supplementation on Liver Enzymes in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Ali; Safi, Sara; Feizi, Awat; Askari, Gholamreza; Karami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. It is believed to have beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of many diseases, one of which is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The present study investigated the effects of consumption of green tea in NAFLD patients. Methods: This study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Ultrasonography was used to diagnose fatty liver in patients with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) >31 mg/dl and 41 mg/dl and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) >31 mg/dl and 47 g/dl in women and men, respectively and without other hepatic diseases. A total of 80 participants (20–50 years) with NAFLD were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either green tea extract (GTE) supplement (500 mg GTE tablet per day) or placebo for 90 days. At baseline and at the end of the intervention weight, serum ALT, AST, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in fasting state, and dietary data were collected at baseline and end of the study. Results: Green tea group showed significant reductions in ALT and AST levels after 12 weeks period (P < 0.001). The placebo group showed a reduction in ALT and AST levels at the end of the study, but it was no significant. ALP levels showed significant reductions in both groups after 12 weeks period (P < 0.001). Conclusions: According to the findings of this study, GTE supplementation decrease liver enzymes in patients with NAFLD. It can be claimed that GTE prescribed can be considered as a treatment to improve serum levels of liver enzymes in NAFLD patients. PMID:26955458

  16. Effects of sodium arsenate exposure on liver fatty acid profiles and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Wafa; Dhibi, Madiha; Haouas, Zohra; Chreif, Imed; Neffati, Fadoua; Hammami, Mohamed; Sakly, Rachid

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of arsenic on liver fatty acids (FA) composition, hepatotoxicity and oxidative status markers in rats. Male rats were randomly devised to six groups (n=10 per group) and exposed to sodium arsenate at a dose of 1 and 10 mg/l for 45 and 90 days. Arsenate exposure is associated with significant changes in the FA composition in liver. A significant increase of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in all treated groups (p<0.01) and trans unsaturated fatty acids (trans UFA) in rats exposed both for short term for 10 mg/l (p<0.05) and long term for 1 and 10 mg/l (p<0.001) was observed. However, the cis UFA were significantly decreased in these groups (p<0.05). A markedly increase of indicator in cell membrane viscosity expressed as SFA/UFA was reported in the treated groups (p<0.001). A significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde by 38.3 % after 90 days of exposure at 10 mg/l was observed. Compared to control rats, significant liver damage was observed at 10 mg/l of arsenate by increasing plasma marker enzymes after 90 days. It is through the histological investigations in hepatic tissues of exposed rats that these damage effects of arsenate were confirmed. The antioxidant perturbations were observed to be more important at groups treated by the high dose (p<0.05). An increase in the level of protein carbonyls was observed in all treated groups (p<0.05). The present study provides evidence for a direct effect of arsenite on FA composition disturbance causing an increase of SFA and TFAs isomers, liver dysfunction and oxidative stress. Therefore, arsenate can lead to hepatic damage and propensity towards liver cancer. PMID:23949113

  17. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression in Rats is Accelerated by Splenic Regulation of Liver PTEN/AKT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziming; Li, Naishu; Wang, Biao; Lin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The spleen has been reported to participate in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanism has not been fully characterized. This study aims to elucidate how the spleen affects the development of NAFLD in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Following either splenectomy or sham operation, male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were fed a high-fat diet to drive the development of NAFLD; animals fed a normal diet were used as controls. Two months after surgery, livers and blood samples were collected. Serum lipids were measured; liver histology, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene expression, and the ratio of pAkt/Akt were determined. Results: Splenectomy increased serum lipids, except triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in animals fed either a high-fat or normal diet. Furthermore, splenectomy significantly accelerated hepatic steatosis. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed splenectomy induced significant downregulation of PTEN expression and a high ratio of pAkt/Akt in the livers. Conclusions: The spleen appears to play a role in the development of NAFLD, via a mechanism involving downregulation of hepatic PTEN expression. PMID:26228367

  18. Liver transcriptome profile in pigs with extreme phenotypes of intramuscular fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background New advances in high-throughput technologies have allowed for the massive analysis of genomic data, providing new opportunities for the characterization of the transcriptome architectures. Recent studies in pigs have employed RNA-Seq to explore the transcriptome of different tissues in a reduced number of animals. The main goal of this study was the identification of differentially-expressed genes in the liver of Iberian x Landrace crossbred pigs showing extreme phenotypes for intramuscular fatty acid composition using RNA-Seq. Results The liver transcriptomes of two female groups (H and L) with phenotypically extreme intramuscular fatty acid composition were sequenced using RNA-Seq. A total of 146 and 180 unannotated protein-coding genes were identified in intergenic regions for the L and H groups, respectively. In addition, a range of 5.8 to 7.3% of repetitive elements was found, with SINEs being the most abundant elements. The expression in liver of 186 (L) and 270 (H) lncRNAs was also detected. The higher reproducibility of the RNA-Seq data was validated by RT-qPCR and porcine expression microarrays, therefore showing a strong correlation between RT-qPCR and RNA-Seq data (ranking from 0.79 to 0.96), as well as between microarrays and RNA-Seq (r=0.72). A differential expression analysis between H and L animals identified 55 genes differentially-expressed between groups. Pathways analysis revealed that these genes belong to biological functions, canonical pathways and three gene networks related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism. In concordance with the phenotypic classification, the pathways analysis inferred that linolenic and arachidonic acids metabolism was altered between extreme individuals. In addition, a connection was observed among the top three networks, hence suggesting that these genes are interconnected and play an important role in lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Conclusions In the present study RNA-Seq was used as a tool to explore

  19. Fatty liver disease induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate: Novel insight from transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Fai Tse, William Ka; Li, Jing Woei; Kwan Tse, Anna Chung; Chan, Ting Fung; Hin Ho, Jeff Cheuk; Sun Wu, Rudolf Shiu; Chu Wong, Chris Kong; Lai, Keng Po

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a hepato-toxicant and potential non-genotoxic carcinogen, was widely used in industrial and commercial products. Recent studies have revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of PFOS in the environment and in humans worldwide. The widespread contamination of PFOS in human serum raised concerns about its long-term toxic effects and its potential risks to human health. Using fatty liver mutant foie gras (fgr(-/-))/transport protein particle complex 11 (trappc11(-/-)) and PFOS-exposed wild-type zebrafish embryos as the study model, together with RNA sequencing and comparative transcriptomic analysis, we identified 499 and 1414 differential expressed genes (DEGs) in PFOS-exposed wild-type and trappc11 mutant zebrafish, respectively. Also, the gene ontology analysis on common deregulated genes was found to be associated with different metabolic processes such as the carbohydrate metabolic process, glycerol ether metabolic process, mannose biosynthetic process, de novo' (Guanosine diphosphate) GDP-l-fucose biosynthetic process, GDP-mannose metabolic process and galactose metabolic process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis further highlighted that these deregulated gene clusters are closely related to hepatitis, inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis of liver cells, suggesting that PFOS can cause liver pathogenesis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in zebrafish. The transcriptomic alterations revealed may serve as biomarkers for the hepatotoxic effect of PFOS.

  20. Proton conductance and fatty acyl composition of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in birds.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Martin D; Turner, Nigel; Ocloo, Augustine; Else, Paul L; Hulbert, A J

    2003-01-01

    The proton conductance of isolated liver mitochondria correlates significantly with body mass in mammals, but not in ectotherms. To establish whether the correlation in mammals is general for endotherms or mammal-specific, we measured proton conductance in mitochondria from birds, the other main group of endotherms, using birds varying in mass over a wide range (nearly 3000-fold), from 13 g zebra finches to 35 kg emus. Respiratory control ratios were higher in mitochondria from larger birds. Mitochondrial proton conductance in liver mitochondria from birds correlated strongly with body mass [respiration rate per mg of protein driving proton leak at 170 mV being 44.7 times (body mass in g)(-0.19)], thus suggesting a general relationship between body mass and proton conductance in endotherms. Mitochondria from larger birds had the same or perhaps greater surface area per mg of protein than mitochondria from smaller birds. Hence, the lower proton conductance was caused not by surface area changes but by some change in the properties of the inner membrane. Liver mitochondria from larger birds had phospholipid fatty acyl chains that were less polyunsaturated and more monounsaturated when compared with those from smaller birds. Phospholipid fatty acyl polyunsaturation correlated positively and monounsaturation correlated negatively with proton conductance. These correlations echo those seen in mammalian liver mitochondria, suggesting that they too are general for endotherms. PMID:12943530

  1. Calcium channel blockers as potential therapeutics for obesity-associated autophagy defects and fatty liver pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hwan-Woo; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), typically associated with overnutrition and obesity, is one of the most common liver diseases both in the US and worldwide. During obesity and NAFLD, lipotoxic injuries to hepatocytes can provoke formation of protein inclusions consisting of SQSTM1/p62 and ubiquitinated proteins. It has been suggested that autophagy deregulation during obesity contributes to protein inclusion formation and progression of other liver pathologies including insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. To examine how lipotoxicity and obesity affect autophagy, we established an in vitro system where cultured HepG2 cells exhibit prominent accumulation of SQSTM1 and ubiquitinated proteins in insoluble inclusion bodies upon treatment with saturated fatty acids. Using this system and a mouse model of obesity, we have determined that obesity induces chronic elevation of cytosolic calcium levels in hepatocytes, which interferes with the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. Intriguingly, pharmacological inhibition of calcium channels using the FDA-approved drug verapamil successfully restores autophagic flux and suppresses protein inclusions, not only in HepG2 cells but also in mouse liver. Verapamil also reduces hepatic lipid droplet accumulation, insulin resistance and steatohepatitis, suggesting that calcium channel blockers can be used for correction of general NAFLD pathologies. Indeed, there have been a number of clinical observations in which beneficial effects of calcium channel blockers against obesity-associated metabolic pathologies are observed in humans and animal models. PMID:25484079

  2. Fatty liver disease induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate: Novel insight from transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Fai Tse, William Ka; Li, Jing Woei; Kwan Tse, Anna Chung; Chan, Ting Fung; Hin Ho, Jeff Cheuk; Sun Wu, Rudolf Shiu; Chu Wong, Chris Kong; Lai, Keng Po

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a hepato-toxicant and potential non-genotoxic carcinogen, was widely used in industrial and commercial products. Recent studies have revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of PFOS in the environment and in humans worldwide. The widespread contamination of PFOS in human serum raised concerns about its long-term toxic effects and its potential risks to human health. Using fatty liver mutant foie gras (fgr(-/-))/transport protein particle complex 11 (trappc11(-/-)) and PFOS-exposed wild-type zebrafish embryos as the study model, together with RNA sequencing and comparative transcriptomic analysis, we identified 499 and 1414 differential expressed genes (DEGs) in PFOS-exposed wild-type and trappc11 mutant zebrafish, respectively. Also, the gene ontology analysis on common deregulated genes was found to be associated with different metabolic processes such as the carbohydrate metabolic process, glycerol ether metabolic process, mannose biosynthetic process, de novo' (Guanosine diphosphate) GDP-l-fucose biosynthetic process, GDP-mannose metabolic process and galactose metabolic process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis further highlighted that these deregulated gene clusters are closely related to hepatitis, inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis of liver cells, suggesting that PFOS can cause liver pathogenesis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in zebrafish. The transcriptomic alterations revealed may serve as biomarkers for the hepatotoxic effect of PFOS. PMID:27289203

  3. Experimental models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Otto; Cervinkova, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and it persists at a high prevalence. NAFLD is characterised by the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and includes a spectrum of histopathological findings, ranging from simple fatty liver through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is closely related to the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAFLD in humans has currently been limited by the lack of satisfactory animal models. The ideal animal model for NAFLD should reflect all aspects of the intricate etiopathogenesis of human NAFLD and the typical histological findings of its different stages. Within the past several years, great emphasis has been placed on the development of an appropriate model for human NASH. This paper reviews the widely used experimental models of NAFLD in rats. We discuss nutritional, genetic and combined models of NAFLD and their pros and cons. The choice of a suitable animal model for this disease while respecting its limitations may help to improve the understanding of its complex pathogenesis and to discover appropriate therapeutic strategies. Considering the legislative, ethical, economical and health factors of NAFLD, animal models are essential tools for the research of this disease. PMID:25024595

  4. Assessment of Fatty Liver Syndrome and Its Predisposing Factors in a Dairy Herd from Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Clara I.

    2013-01-01

    The present on-farm research evaluated the occurrence of fatty liver syndrome and its predisposing risk factors for multiparous dairy cows from a commercial herd in Venezuela. Liver biopsy samples were collected at 35 days (d) prepartum (Holstein, n = 14; Holstein × Carora crossbred, n = 17) as well as 1 to 7 d (Holstein, n = 8; Holstein × Carora crossbred, n = 11) and 28 to 35 d (Holstein, n = 6; Holstein × Carora crossbred, n = 14) postpartum in order to analyse hepatic triacylglycerols (TAG, % wet basis) and glycogen concentrations. At postpartum, an occurrence of 72.0% for severe fatty liver along with 73.5% of subclinical ketosis (SCK) was found. The multiple regression model that best explained the association between milk production in the previous lactation (MYP) and TAG at first week postpartum was as follows: TAG, % = −11.2 + 3.16 (prepartum body condition) + 0.0009176 (MYP) (R² = 0.36, P < 0.05). Logistic regression indicated that Holstein × Carora crossbred cows tended to have 27% higher relative risk than Holstein to experience SCK, whereas prepartum liver TAG greater than 3% tended to be associated with a higher relative risk for SCK compared to cows with TAG ≤3%. PMID:23738138

  5. Experimental models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Otto; Cervinkova, Zuzana

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and it persists at a high prevalence. NAFLD is characterised by the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and includes a spectrum of histopathological findings, ranging from simple fatty liver through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is closely related to the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAFLD in humans has currently been limited by the lack of satisfactory animal models. The ideal animal model for NAFLD should reflect all aspects of the intricate etiopathogenesis of human NAFLD and the typical histological findings of its different stages. Within the past several years, great emphasis has been placed on the development of an appropriate model for human NASH. This paper reviews the widely used experimental models of NAFLD in rats. We discuss nutritional, genetic and combined models of NAFLD and their pros and cons. The choice of a suitable animal model for this disease while respecting its limitations may help to improve the understanding of its complex pathogenesis and to discover appropriate therapeutic strategies. Considering the legislative, ethical, economical and health factors of NAFLD, animal models are essential tools for the research of this disease.

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the heart in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Lucia; Chiesa, Claudio; Anania, Caterina; De Merulis, Antonio; Osborn, John Frederick; Romaggioli, Sara; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-07-21

    Over the last two decades, the rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity explains the emergence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. As described in adults, children and adolescents with fatty liver display insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. Thus NAFLD has emerged as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and a strong cardiovascular risk factor even at a very early age. Several studies, including pediatric populations, have reported independent associations between NAFLD and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis including impaired flow-mediated vasodilation, increased carotid artery intima-media thickness, and arterial stiffness, after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Also, it has been shown that NAFLD is associated with cardiac alterations, including abnormal left ventricular structure and impaired diastolic function. The duration of these subclinical abnormalities may be important, because treatment to reverse the process is most likely to be effective earlier in the disease. In the present review, we examine the current evidence on the association between NAFLD and atherosclerosis as well as between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction in the pediatric population, and discuss briefly the possible biological mechanisms linking NAFLD and cardiovascular changes. We also address the approach to treatment for this increasingly prevalent disease, which is likely to have an important future global impact on the burden of ill health, to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also cardiovascular disease. PMID:25083079

  7. Type II fatty acid synthesis is essential only for malaria parasite late liver stage development

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Ashley M; O'Neill, Matthew T; Tarun, Alice S; Camargo, Nelly; Phuong, Thuan M; Aly, Ahmed S I; Cowman, Alan F; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular malaria parasites require lipids for growth and replication. They possess a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS II) pathway that localizes to the apicoplast plastid organelle and is assumed to be necessary for pathogenic blood stage replication. However, the importance of FAS II throughout the complex parasite life cycle remains unknown. We show in a rodent malaria model that FAS II enzymes localize to the sporozoite and liver stage apicoplast. Targeted deletion of FabB/F, a critical enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, did not affect parasite blood stage replication, mosquito stage development and initial infection in the liver. This was confirmed by knockout of FabZ, another critical FAS II enzyme. However, FAS II-deficient Plasmodium yoelii liver stages failed to form exo-erythrocytic merozoites, the invasive stage that first initiates blood stage infection. Furthermore, deletion of FabI in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum did not show a reduction in asexual blood stage replication in vitro. Malaria parasites therefore depend on the intrinsic FAS II pathway only at one specific life cycle transition point, from liver to blood. PMID:19068099

  8. Sex Differences in Long Chain Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Burnett, David A.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.

    1979-01-01

    those of male FABP. In contrast, the concentration of FABP, per milligram cytosolic protein, was 44% greater in female liver than in male, as indicated by measurement of [14C]oleate binding and of 280 nm OD in the FABP fraction of 105,000 g supernate after gel filtration chromatography. These experiments demonstrate profound sex differences in hepatocyte utilization of long chain fatty acids at concentrations within and below the physiological range, and suggest that these are attributable at least in part to corresponding differences in cytosolic FABP concentration. At higher FFA concentrations, sex differences in hepatocyte FFA utilization are virtually eliminated, suggesting that under these conditions, differences in FABP concentration are not rate determining. Sex differences in hepatic lipoprotein production may largely reflect these important differences in the initial stages of hepatocyte FFA utilization. PMID:447853

  9. Phosphatase and tensin homolog is a differential diagnostic marker between nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Clément, Sophie; Peyrou, Marion; Spahr, Laurent; Negro, Francesco; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Foti, Michelangelo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protein expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in human liver biopsies of patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: PTEN protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver sections of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 44) or alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 25). Liver resections obtained from 3 healthy subjects candidate for partial liver donation served as controls. Histological evaluations were performed by two experienced pathologists, and diagnoses established based on international criteria. The intensity of the PTEN staining in nuclei was compared between steatotic and non-steatotic areas of each liver fragment analyzed. For each liver specimen, the antibody-stained sections were examined and scored blindly by three independent observers, who were unaware of the patients’ clinical history. RESULTS: In healthy individuals, PTEN immunostaining was intense in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of all hepatocytes. However, PTEN was strongly downregulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from steatotic areas in patients with NAFLD, independently of the disease stage. In contrast, no changes in PTEN protein expression were observed in patients with ALD, regardless of the presence of steatosis or the stage of the disease. The degree of PTEN downregulation in hepatocytes of patients with NAFLD correlated with the percentage of steatosis (r = 0.3061, P = 0.0459) and the BMI (r = 0.4268, P = 0.0043). Hovewer, in patients with ALD, PTEN expression was not correlated with the percentage of steatosis with or without obesity as a confounding factor (P = 0.5574). Finally, PTEN expression level in steatotic areas of ALD patients was significantly different from that seen in steatotic areas of NAFLD patients (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: PTEN protein expression is downregulated early in NAFLD, but not in ALD. PTEN

  10. Low-Dose Cadmium Causes Metabolic and Genetic Dysregulation Associated With Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Sutliff, Roy L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Khalidur, Rahman; Kang, Bum-Yong; Anania, Frank A.; Orr, Michael; Hao, Li; Fowler, Bruce A.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is present in food at low levels and accumulates in humans throughout life because it is not effectively excreted. Cd from smoking or occupational exposure shows adverse effects on health, but the mechanistic effect of Cd at low dietary intake levels is poorly studied. Epidemiology studies found that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), common in U.S. adults, is associated with Cd burden. In cell studies, we found that environmental low-dose Cd oxidized proteins and stimulated inflammatory signaling. However, little is known about low-dose Cd effects on liver function and associated metabolic pathways in vivo. We investigated effects of low-level Cd exposure on liver gene transcripts, metabolites, and associated metabolic pathways and function after challenging mice with Cd (10 mg/l) by drinking water. Results showed liver Cd in treated mice was similar to adult humans without occupational or smoking exposures and 10-fold higher than control mouse values. Pathway analysis of significantly altered liver genes and metabolites mapped to functional pathways of lipid metabolism, cell death and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These are well-recognized pathways associated with NAFLD. Cd–treated mice had higher liver enzymes in plasma and a trend toward fat accumulation in liver. To verify low-dose Cd-induced stimulation of cell death pathways, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was examined in cultured hepatic cells. Consistent with mouse liver data, low-dose Cd stimulated JNK activation. Together, the results show that low-dose Cd exposure causes liver function changes consistent with a role in NAFLD and possibly also nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26187450

  11. Low-Dose Cadmium Causes Metabolic and Genetic Dysregulation Associated With Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Go, Young-Mi; Sutliff, Roy L; Chandler, Joshua D; Khalidur, Rahman; Kang, Bum-Yong; Anania, Frank A; Orr, Michael; Hao, Li; Fowler, Bruce A; Jones, Dean P

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is present in food at low levels and accumulates in humans throughout life because it is not effectively excreted. Cd from smoking or occupational exposure shows adverse effects on health, but the mechanistic effect of Cd at low dietary intake levels is poorly studied. Epidemiology studies found that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), common in U.S. adults, is associated with Cd burden. In cell studies, we found that environmental low-dose Cd oxidized proteins and stimulated inflammatory signaling. However, little is known about low-dose Cd effects on liver function and associated metabolic pathways in vivo. We investigated effects of low-level Cd exposure on liver gene transcripts, metabolites, and associated metabolic pathways and function after challenging mice with Cd (10 mg/l) by drinking water. Results showed liver Cd in treated mice was similar to adult humans without occupational or smoking exposures and 10-fold higher than control mouse values. Pathway analysis of significantly altered liver genes and metabolites mapped to functional pathways of lipid metabolism, cell death and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These are well-recognized pathways associated with NAFLD. Cd-treated mice had higher liver enzymes in plasma and a trend toward fat accumulation in liver. To verify low-dose Cd-induced stimulation of cell death pathways, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was examined in cultured hepatic cells. Consistent with mouse liver data, low-dose Cd stimulated JNK activation. Together, the results show that low-dose Cd exposure causes liver function changes consistent with a role in NAFLD and possibly also nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  12. Peroxisomal beta-oxidation of branched chain fatty acids in rat liver. Evidence that carnitine palmitoyltransferase I prevents transport of branched chain fatty acids into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Beckman, K; Poulos, A

    1994-04-01

    Fatty acid beta-oxidation was investigated in highly purified mitochondrial and peroxisomal preparations from rat liver. Under isotonic conditions, pristanic and homophytanic acid beta-oxidation in purified peroxisomes was severalfold greater compared to the oxidation in purified mitochondria. Branched chain fatty acid beta-oxidation in purified mitochondria was very low, and the oxidation was not stimulated by exogenous L-carnitine or L-malate. In contrast, stearic acid beta-oxidation by purified mitochondria depended upon exogenous L-carnitine, and the oxidation was stimulated by L-malate. Both mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation of branched chain fatty acids was strongly inhibited by fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin, whereas stearic acid oxidation was either unaffected or slightly inhibited by bovine serum albumin. The results presented clearly indicate that branched chain fatty acids are mainly degraded in peroxisomes in rat liver. Branched chain fatty acids were efficiently converted to coenzyme A thioesters by purified mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. Although pristanic and phytanic acids were rapidly converted to pristanoyl-CoA and phytanoyl-CoA, respectively, they were not converted to carnitine esters by mitochondrial outer membranes. The results indicate that acyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acyltransferase located at the mitochondrial outer membranes regulate entry of branched chain fatty acids into mitochondria. Mitochondrial carnitine acyltransferase I appears to be highly specific for straight chain fatty acids and restricts entry of branched chain fatty acids into mitochondria. Thus, branched chain fatty acids which cannot be transported across the mitochondrial membranes via the carnitine acyltransferase system are directed to peroxisomes for beta-oxidation. The results reported indicate that phytanic acid, the fatty acid which can be initially degraded by alpha-oxidation due to the presence of a beta-methyl group in the

  13. Obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Disparate associations among Asian populations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic contributing to an increasing prevalence of obesity-related systemic disorders, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The rising prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) will in the near future lead to end-stage liver disease in a large cohort of patients with NASH-related cirrhosis and NASH is predicted to be a leading indication for liver transplantation in the coming decade. However, the prevalence of obesity and the progression of hepatic histological damage associated with NASH exhibit significant ethnic disparities. Despite a significantly lower body mass index and lower rates of obesity compared to other ethnic groups, Asians continue to demonstrate a significant prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and NASH. Ethnic disparities in central adiposity and visceral fat distribution have been hypothesized to contribute to these ethnic disparities. The current review focuses on the epidemiology of obesity and NASH among Asian populations. PMID:24868320

  14. Role of Gut Barrier Function in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Wang, Bangmao

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common forms of chronic liver disease, and its incidence is increasing year by year. Many efforts have been made to investigate the pathogenesis of this disease. Since 1998 when Marshall proposed the conception of “gut-liver axis,” more and more researchers have paid close attention to the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The four aspects of gut barrier function, including physical, chemical, biological, and immunological barriers, are interrelated closely and related to NAFLD. In this paper, we present a summary of research findings on the relationship between gut barrier dysfunction and the development of NAFLD, aiming at illustrating the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25945084

  15. Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Vander Naalt, Steven J; Gurria, Juan P; Holterman, AiXuan L

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a multi-organ system disease with underlying metabolic abnormalities and chronic systemic inflammation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of obesity metabolic dysfunction and its associated cardiovascular- and liver-related morbidities and mortality. Our current understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis, disease characteristics, the role of insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, gut–liver and gut–brain crosstalk and the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is still evolving. Bariatric surgery significantly improves metabolic and NAFLD histology in severely obese patients, although its positive effects on fibrosis are not universal. Bariatric surgery benefits NAFLD through its metabolic effect on insulin resistance, inflammation, and insulinotropic and anorexinogenic gastrointestinal hormones. Further studies are needed to understand the natural course of NAFLD in severely obese patients and the role of weight loss surgery as a primary treatment for NAFLD. PMID:25378958

  16. Late nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with cirrhosis: a pathologic case of lost or mistaken identity.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitch, Jay H; Morawski, John L

    2012-02-01

    Late-stage nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may present clinically and/or pathologically as cryptogenic cirrhosis. The subject of this report, a middle-aged obese man with diabetes, underwent liver biopsy at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy because the liver surface appeared nodular and thickened. The biopsy showed relatively nondescript cirrhosis at initial low-power microscopic inspection, but glycogenated hepatocyte nuclei (consistent with diabetes), sparse macrovesicular fat, and very rare foci of residual mild steatohepatitis were later found. Slender fibrous septa (without significant inflammation and often enclosing microvessels) were present and interconnected to portal tracts. Immunostains for cytokeratin 7, ubiquitin, and glutamine synthetase provided additional histologic data supporting NAFLD as the cause of the cirrhosis in this case. A strategic pathologic approach is discussed, which can be utilized for the pathologic assessment of cirrhosis of unknown cause, particularly when late NAFLD is suspected.

  17. Management of Dyslipidemia as a Cardiovascular Risk Factor in Individuals with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Kathleen E.; Chalasani, Naga

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the United States and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CVD is one of the most common causes of death among individuals with NAFLD and management of NAFLD must extend beyond liver disease to include CVD risk modification. Clinicians should assess CVD risk with the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and screen for CVD risk factors including dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, tobacco use and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). CVD risk factors, particularly dyslipidemia, require aggressive medical management to reduce the high risk of CVD events and death in individuals with NAFLD. PMID:23962548

  18. Management of dyslipidemia as a cardiovascular risk factor in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Corey, Kathleen E; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the United States and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CVD is one of the most common causes of death among individuals with NAFLD and management of NAFLD must extend beyond liver disease to include CVD risk modification. Clinicians should assess CVD risk with the Framingham Risk Score and screen for CVD risk factors including dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, tobacco use, and the metabolic syndrome. CVD risk factors, particularly dyslipidemia, require aggressive medical management to reduce the high risk of CVD events and death in individuals with NAFLD.

  19. 4Ps medicine of the fatty liver: the research model of predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine-recommendations for facing obesity, fatty liver and fibrosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca Maria; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between adipose tissue and fatty liver, and its possible evolution in fibrosis, is supported by clinical and research experience. Given the multifactorial pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatments for various contributory risk factors have been proposed; however, there is no single validated therapy or drug association recommended for all cases which can stand alone. Mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment of obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance are displayed along with recommendations and position points. Evidences and practice can get sustainable and cost-benefit valuable outcomes by participatory interventions. These recommendations can be enhanced by comprehensive research projects, addressed to societal issues and innovation, market appeal and industry development, cultural acceptance and sustainability. The basis of participatory medicine is a greater widespread awareness of a condition which is both a disease and an easy documented and inclusive clue for associated diseases and unhealthy lifestyle. This model is suitable for addressing prevention and useful for monitoring improvement, worsening and adherence with non-invasive imaging tools which allow targeted approaches. The latter include health psychology and nutritional and physical exercise prescription expertise disseminated by continuous medical education but, more important, by concrete curricula for training undergraduate and postgraduate students. It is possible and recommended to do it by early formal teaching of ultrasound imaging procedures and of practical lifestyle intervention strategies, including approaches aimed to healthier fashion suggestions. Guidelines and requirements of research project funding calls should be addressed also to NAFLD and allied conditions and should encompass the goal of training by research and the inclusion of participatory medicine topics. A deeper awareness of ethics of competences in health professionals

  20. 4Ps medicine of the fatty liver: the research model of predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine-recommendations for facing obesity, fatty liver and fibrosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca Maria; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between adipose tissue and fatty liver, and its possible evolution in fibrosis, is supported by clinical and research experience. Given the multifactorial pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatments for various contributory risk factors have been proposed; however, there is no single validated therapy or drug association recommended for all cases which can stand alone. Mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment of obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance are displayed along with recommendations and position points. Evidences and practice can get sustainable and cost-benefit valuable outcomes by participatory interventions. These recommendations can be enhanced by comprehensive research projects, addressed to societal issues and innovation, market appeal and industry development, cultural acceptance and sustainability. The basis of participatory medicine is a greater widespread awareness of a condition which is both a disease and an easy documented and inclusive clue for associated diseases and unhealthy lifestyle. This model is suitable for addressing prevention and useful for monitoring improvement, worsening and adherence with non-invasive imaging tools which allow targeted approaches. The latter include health psychology and nutritional and physical exercise prescription expertise disseminated by continuous medical education but, more important, by concrete curricula for training undergraduate and postgraduate students. It is possible and recommended to do it by early formal teaching of ultrasound imaging procedures and of practical lifestyle intervention strategies, including approaches aimed to healthier fashion suggestions. Guidelines and requirements of research project funding calls should be addressed also to NAFLD and allied conditions and should encompass the goal of training by research and the inclusion of participatory medicine topics. A deeper awareness of ethics of competences in health professionals

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization of the lungfish (Lepidosiren paradoxa) liver basic fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, S M; Santomé, J A

    2001-04-01

    Only one fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) from the liver of the lungfish (Lepidosiren paradoxa) was isolated and characterized. The sequence comparison of lungfish FABP with that of the known members of the liver FABP (L-FABP) and liver basic FABP (Lb-FABP) subfamilies indicates that it is more closely related to chicken, iguana, frog, axolotl, catfish, and shark Lb-FABPs than to mammalian and axolotl L-FABPs. Lungfish liver expression of this single Lb-FABP contrasts with the other fish studied so far which coexpress an Lb-FABP with heart-adipocyte and/or intestinal FABP types. The lungfish liver FABP expression pattern resembles that of tetrapods, which only expresses liver type FABPs. Lungfish Lb-FABP is one of the two FABPs reported to have a disulfide bridge. The molecular modeling of lungfish Lb-FABP predicts that nine of the conserved residues of Lb-FABPs are oriented toward the binding cavity, thus suggesting they are related to the protein binding characteristics.

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: non-invasive investigation and risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Dyson, J K; McPherson, S; Anstee, Q M

    2013-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a histological spectrum of liver disease, from simple steatosis through to cirrhosis. As the worldwide rates of obesity have increased, NAFLD has become the commonest cause of liver disease in many developed countries, affecting up to a third of the population. The majority of patients have simple steatosis that carries a relatively benign prognosis. However, a significant minority have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and have increased liver related and cardiovascular mortality. Identifying those at risk of progressive disease is crucial. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard investigation for assessing stage of disease but its invasive nature makes it impractical for widespread use as a prognostic tool. Non-invasive tools for diagnosis and disease staging are required, reserving liver biopsy for those patients where it offers clinically relevant additional information. This review discusses the non-invasive modalities available for assessing steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis. We propose a pragmatic approach for the assessment of patients with NAFLD to identify those at high risk of progressive disease who require referral to specialist services. PMID:23940130

  3. Hawthorn leaf flavonoids alleviate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongping; Xu, Jiaoya; Zheng, Peiyong; Xing, Lianjun; Shen, Hongyi; Yang, Lili; Zhang, Li; Ji, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataeguspinnatifida) belongs to the genus Rosaceae family of plants. The hawthorn leaf, Crataeguspinnatifida Bunge, is used for both condiment and medicinal purposes to prevent and treat metabolic dysfunctions, such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in traditional Chinese medicine. However, its effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain obscure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of hawthorn leaf flavonoids (HLF), the dominant bioactive extracts of hawthorn leaves, on high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. HLF supplementation significantly lowered body weight, liver weight, liver/body weight ratio, improved serum parameters and liver dysfunction and markedly decreased hepatic lipid accumulation in HFD-fed rats. In addition, HLF intervention dramatically increased circulating adiponectin levels and up-regulated the expression of adiponectin receptors, particularly adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in the liver. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated, as well as AMPK-mediated alteration of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and their downstream targets. Taken together, our data suggest that HLF ameliorates hepatic steatosis by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway in the liver of HFD-induced NAFLD rats. PMID:26770322

  4. Fructose as a key player in the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Sentürk, Hakan

    2013-02-28

    We aimed to investigate whether increased consumption of fructose is linked to the increased prevalence of fatty liver. The prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is 3% and 20% in nonobese and obese subjects, respectively. Obesity is a low-grade chronic inflammatory condition and obesity-related cytokines such as interleukin-6, adiponectin, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor-α may play important roles in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Additionally, the prevalence of NASH associated with both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma was reported to be high among patients with type 2 diabetes with or without obesity. Our research group previously showed that consumption of fructose is associated with adverse alterations of plasma lipid profiles and metabolic changes in mice, the American Lifestyle-Induced Obesity Syndrome model, which included consumption of a high-fructose corn syrup in amounts relevant to that consumed by some Americans. The observation reinforces the concerns about the role of fructose in the obesity epidemic. Increased availability of fructose (e.g., high-fructose corn syrup) increases not only abnormal glucose flux but also fructose metabolism in the hepatocyte. Thus, the anatomic position of the liver places it in a strategic buffering position for absorbed carbohydrates and amino acids. Fructose was previously accepted as a beneficial dietary component because it does not stimulate insulin secretion. However, since insulin signaling plays an important role in central mechanisms of NAFLD, this property of fructose may be undesirable. Fructose has a selective hepatic metabolism, and provokes a hepatic stress response involving activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases and subsequent reduced hepatic insulin signaling. As high fat diet alone produces obesity, insulin resistance, and some degree of fatty liver with minimal inflammation and no fibrosis, the fast food diet which includes fructose and fats produces

  5. Fructose as a key player in the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Sentürk, Hakan

    2013-02-28

    We aimed to investigate whether increased consumption of fructose is linked to the increased prevalence of fatty liver. The prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is 3% and 20% in nonobese and obese subjects, respectively. Obesity is a low-grade chronic inflammatory condition and obesity-related cytokines such as interleukin-6, adiponectin, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor-α may play important roles in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Additionally, the prevalence of NASH associated with both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma was reported to be high among patients with type 2 diabetes with or without obesity. Our research group previously showed that consumption of fructose is associated with adverse alterations of plasma lipid profiles and metabolic changes in mice, the American Lifestyle-Induced Obesity Syndrome model, which included consumption of a high-fructose corn syrup in amounts relevant to that consumed by some Americans. The observation reinforces the concerns about the role of fructose in the obesity epidemic. Increased availability of fructose (e.g., high-fructose corn syrup) increases not only abnormal glucose flux but also fructose metabolism in the hepatocyte. Thus, the anatomic position of the liver places it in a strategic buffering position for absorbed carbohydrates and amino acids. Fructose was previously accepted as a beneficial dietary component because it does not stimulate insulin secretion. However, since insulin signaling plays an important role in central mechanisms of NAFLD, this property of fructose may be undesirable. Fructose has a selective hepatic metabolism, and provokes a hepatic stress response involving activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases and subsequent reduced hepatic insulin signaling. As high fat diet alone produces obesity, insulin resistance, and some degree of fatty liver with minimal inflammation and no fibrosis, the fast food diet which includes fructose and fats produces

  6. Interleukin-17 exacerbates hepatic steatosis and inflammation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Y; Bian, Z; Zhao, L; Liu, Y; Liang, S; Wang, Q; Han, X; Peng, Y; Chen, X; Shen, L; Qiu, D; Li, Z; Ma, X

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms associated with the progression of simple steatosis to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain undefined. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in regulating inflammatory processes in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and because T helper type 17 (Th17) functionally oppose Treg-mediated responses, this study focused on characterizing the role of Th17 cells using a NAFLD mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a normal diet (ND) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Mice in the HF group had a significantly higher frequency of liver Th17 cells compared to ND-fed mice. Neutralization of interleukin (IL)-17 in HF mice ameliorated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury reflected by decreased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and reduced inflammatory cell infiltrates in the liver. In vitro, HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of free fatty acids (FFA; oleic acid and palmitic acid) for 24 h and IL-17 developed steatosis via insulin-signalling pathway interference. IL-17 and FFAs synergized to induce IL-6 production by HepG2 cells and murine primary hepatocytes which, in combination with transforming growth factor (TGF-β), expanded Th17 cells. It is likely that a similar process occurs in NASH patients, as there were significant levels of IL-17+ cell infiltrates in NASH patient livers. The hepatic expression of Th17 cell-related genes [retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR)γt, IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23] was also increased significantly in NASH patients compared to healthy controls. Th17 cells and IL-17 were associated with hepatic steatosis and proinflammatory response in NAFLD and facilitated the transition from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis. Strategies designed to alter the balance between Th17 cells and Tregs should be explored as a means of preventing progression to NASH and advanced liver diseases in NAFLD patients. PMID:21985374

  7. Cholesterol-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Atherosclerosis Aggravated by Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hong Seog; Lee, Yong Jik; Kim, Hyun Hee; Son, Hyun-Hwa; Choi, Man Ho

    2014-01-01

    Although triglyceride accumulation in the liver causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), hypercholesterolemia is also a main cause of NAFLD as well as atherosclerosis. However, NAFLD and atherosclerosis have not been investigated simultaneously in animal models fed a high-cholesterol diet. Moreover, it is unclear whether systemic inflammation can exacerbate both pathologies in the same model. Accordingly, this study investigated the effect of additional systemic inflammation on NAFLD and atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol overload in wild animals. New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 4 groups: groups I (control) and II received normal chow, and groups III and IV received a 1% cholesterol diet. To induce inflammation via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 signaling, groups II and IV received subcutaneous injections of 0.5 mL of 1% carrageenan every 3 weeks. After 3 months, total cholesterol markedly increased in groups III and IV, and the serum expressions of systemic inflammatory markers were elevated in the groups II–IV. Early NAFLD lesions (e.g., mild fatty changes in the liver with sporadic fibrosis) and atherosclerosis (e.g., intimal hyperplasia composed of foam cells) were observed in both the liver and aorta specimens from group III, and advanced lesions were observed in group IV. The expressions of inflammatory cellular receptors, TLR-2 and TLR-4, in the aorta gradually increased from group I to IV but were similar in the liver in groups II–IV. Cholesteryl ester (CE) levels were higher in group IV than in group III, although the difference was not significant. CE levels in the aorta were similar between groups III and IV. Systemic inflammation can simultaneously exacerbate existing early lesions due to cholesterol overload in both the liver and aorta of rabbits. However, the cellular response of inflammatory receptors and expression of cholesterol metabolites differ between these organs. PMID:24901254

  8. Association between serum free fatty acid levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanwen; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Chengfu; Hong, Yani; Lu, Huanle; Wu, Jianping; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    High serum free fatty acid (FFA) levels are associated with metabolic syndrome (MS). This study aimed to assess the association of fasting serum FFAs with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a Chinese population. A total of 840 subjects fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of NAFLD and 331 healthy control participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Fasting serum FFA levels and other clinical and laboratory parameters were measured. NAFLD patients had significantly higher serum FFA levels than controls (P < 0.001). Serum FFA levels were significantly and positively correlated with parameters of MS, inflammation indexes, and markers of hepatocellular damage. Elevated serum FFA levels were found in NAFLD subjects with individual components of MS (obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia, and hyperglycaemia). Stepwise regression showed that serum FFA levels were an independent factor predicting advanced fibrosis (FIB-4 ≥ 1.3) in NAFLD patients. Serum FFA levels correlated with NAFLD and could be used as an indicator for predicting advanced fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:25060337

  9. Effect of maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids on liver fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Nisha S; Manglekar, Rupali R; Dangat, Kamini D; Kulkarni, Asmita V; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2012-01-01

    A disturbed fatty acid metabolism increases the risk of adult non-communicable diseases. This study examines the effect of maternal micronutrients on the fatty acid composition, desaturase activity, mRNA levels of fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in the liver. Pregnant female rats were divided into 6 groups at 2 levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B(12). The vitamin B(12) deficient groups were supplemented with omega 3 fatty acid. An imbalance of maternal micronutrients reduces liver docosahexaenoic acid, increases Δ5 desaturase activity but decreases mRNA levels, decreases Δ6 desaturase activity but not mRNA levels as compared to control. mRNA level of Δ5 desaturase reverts back to the levels of the control group as a result of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation. Our data for the first time indicates that maternal micronutrients differentially alter the activity and expression of fatty acid desaturases in the liver.

  10. Effects of abomasal lipid infusion on liver triglyceride accumulation and adipose lipolysis during fatty liver induction in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Brickner, A E; Pires, J A A; Gressley, T F; Grummer, R R

    2009-10-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of abomasal infusion of linseed oil on liver triglyceride (TG) accumulation and adipose tissue lipolysis during an experimental protocol for induction of fatty liver. Eight nonpregnant, nonlactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design. Treatments were abomasal infusion of water (W), tallow (T), linseed oil (LO), or half linseed oil and half tallow (LOT) at a rate of 0.56 g/kg of body weight per day. Each experimental period consisted of a 4-d fast concurrent with administration of treatments into the abomasum in 6 equal doses per day (every 4 h). Cows were fed ad libitum for 24 d between periods of fasting and lipid infusion. Infusion of linseed oil (LO and LOT) increased alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) content in serum (12.2, 10.4, 4.2, and 4.6 g/100 g of fatty acids for LO, LOT, T, and W, respectively), but not in the nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) fraction of plasma. Treatments had no effect on plasma NEFA concentrations. Abomasal infusion of lipid increased in vitro stimulated lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue, compared with W (4,294, 3,809, 4,231, and 3,293 nmol of glycerol released x g(-1) tissue x 2 h(-1) for LO, LOT, T, and W, respectively), but there was no difference between fat sources. Hepatic TG accumulation over 4-d fast was 2.52, 2.60, 2.64, and 2.09 +/- 0.75 microg of TG/microg of DNA for W, LO, LOT, and T, respectively, which did not differ. Abomasal infusion of LO did not reduce liver TG accumulation, plasma NEFA concentration, or alter in vitro adipose tissue lipolysis when compared with T. These results contrast with a previous study involving i.v. infusion of lipid emulsion derived from LO. Discrepancies might be explained by the use of different administration routes and a relatively modest induction of liver TG accumulation in the current experiment.

  11. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis. PMID:27049380

  12. Role of Dietary Fructose and Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Softic, Samir; Cohen, David E; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Overconsumption of high-fat diet (HFD) and increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages are major risk factors for development of NAFLD. Today the most commonly consumed sugar is high fructose corn syrup. Hepatic lipids may be derived from dietary intake, esterification of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) or hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL). A central abnormality in NAFLD is enhanced DNL. Hepatic DNL is increased in individuals with NAFLD, while the contribution of dietary fat and plasma FFA to hepatic lipids is not significantly altered. The importance of DNL in NAFLD is further established in mouse studies with knockout of genes involved in this process. Dietary fructose increases levels of enzymes involved in DNL even more strongly than HFD. Several properties of fructose metabolism make it particularly lipogenic. Fructose is absorbed via portal vein and delivered to the liver in much higher concentrations as compared to other tissues. Fructose increases protein levels of all DNL enzymes during its conversion into triglycerides. Additionally, fructose supports lipogenesis in the setting of insulin resistance as fructose does not require insulin for its metabolism, and it directly stimulates SREBP1c, a major transcriptional regulator of DNL. Fructose also leads to ATP depletion and suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, resulting in increased production of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, fructose promotes ER stress and uric acid formation, additional insulin independent pathways leading to DNL. In summary, fructose metabolism supports DNL more strongly than HFD and hepatic DNL is a central abnormality in NAFLD. Disrupting fructose metabolism in the liver may provide a new therapeutic option for the treatment of NAFLD.

  13. Role of Dietary Fructose and Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Softic, Samir; Cohen, David E; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a li