Science.gov

Sample records for alcohol-related injury risk

  1. Teens' attention to crime and emergency programs on television as a predictor and mediator of increased risk perceptions regarding alcohol-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Slater, Michael D; Jain, Parul

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the hypotheses that media exposure and attention would predict, and partially mediate, the effects of various individual-difference variables on alcohol-related risk perceptions among teen viewers of crime and emergency (e.g., medical drama) shows on television. Risk perceptions including perceived severity, perceived alcohol-attributable fraction of incidents involving alcohol, controllability, and concern regarding alcohol-related crime, assaults, and other injuries were the outcome measures. Attention to crime and emergency shows was predictive of increased concern and other risk perceptions regarding alcohol-related incidents. Attention also partially mediated the effects of demographic and other individual difference variables on adolescents' risk perceptions regarding alcohol-related injuries. The findings (a) suggest emergency and medical drama television narratives can at times have incidental positive impacts on health-related attitudes and (b) provide further evidence regarding the endogenous nature of media use variables in influencing such attitudes.

  2. Teens’ Attention to Crime and Emergency Programs on Television as a Predictor and Mediator of Increased Risk Perceptions Regarding Alcohol-Related Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Michael D.; Jain, Parul

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the hypotheses that media exposure and attention would predict, and partially mediate, the effects of various individual-difference variables on alcohol-related risk perceptions among teen viewers of crime and emergency (e.g. medical drama) shows on television. Risk perceptions including perceived severity, perceived alcohol-attributable fraction of incidents involving alcohol, controllability, and concern regarding alcohol-related crime, assaults, and other injuries were the outcome measures. Attention to crime and emergency shows was predictive of increased concern and other risk perceptions regarding alcohol-related incidents. Attention also partially mediated the effects of demographic and other individual difference variables on adolescents’ risk perceptions regarding alcohol-related injuries. The findings a) suggest emergency and medical drama television narratives can at times have incidental positive impacts on health-related attitudes and b) provide further evidence regarding the endogenous nature of media use variables in influencing such attitudes. PMID:21240701

  3. Relationship of Usual Volume and Heavy Consumption to Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Four U.S. National Alcohol Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Ye, Yu; Kerr, William

    2016-01-01

    Objective: National population data on racial/ethnic disparities and risk of alcohol-related injury are scarce. Alcohol-related injury and drinking patterns are examined in a sample of respondents from four (1995, 2000, 2005, 2010) U.S. National Alcohol Surveys using risk function analysis. Method: Self-reported consumption of 15,476 current drinkers was assessed as the average number of drinks consumed monthly and, separately, the frequency of consuming five or more drinks in a day (5+ days) in the last year. Alcohol-related injury was defined as drinking within 6 hours before the event. Risk curves were defined, separately for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics, using fractional polynomial regression. Results: Risk was greatest for Hispanics to 110 drinks per month (3–4 drinks per day) and above 240 drinks per month, whereas risk was greatest for Whites between these levels. Blacks were at lower risk at all monthly volume levels when demographic and socioeconomic status characteristics were controlled for. Whites had the highest risk of an alcohol-related injury based on 5+ drinking days at all levels up to nearly daily 5+ drinking, whereas Blacks had the lowest risk at all levels of 5+ drinking. Conclusions: A disparity in alcohol-related injury was found for Hispanics compared with Whites at the same average monthly volume of consumption at lower and higher volume levels, but not at the same number of 5+ drinking days, and a lower risk of alcohol-related injury was found for Blacks for both consumption measures when demographic and socioeconomic status characteristics were taken into account. Although exposure to hazards other than alcohol, which could account for some of the racial/ethnic disparity observed, was not taken into account, these mixed findings suggest this is an important area deserving future research attention. PMID:26751355

  4. Heavy drinking and alcohol-related injuries in college students.

    PubMed

    Moure-Rodríguez, Lucía; Caamaño-Isorna, Francisco; Doallo, Sonia; Juan-Salvadores, Pablo; Corral, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Holguín, Socorro; Cadaveira, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of heavy drinking on alcohol-related injuries. We carried out an open cohort study among university students in Spain (n=1,382). Heavy drinking and alcohol-related injuries were measured by administrating AUDIT questionnaires to every participant at the ages of 18, 20, 22 and 24. For data analysis we used a Multilevel Logistic Regression for repeated measures adjusting for consumption of alcohol and cannabis. The response rate at the beginning of the study was 99.6% (1,369 students). The incidence rate of alcohol-related injuries was 3.2 per 100 students year. After adjusting for alcohol consumption and cannabis use, the multivariate model revealed that a high frequency of heavy drinking was a risk factor for alcohol-related injuries (Odds Ratio=3.89 [95%CI: 2.16 - 6.99]). The proportion of alcohol-related injuries in exposed subjects attributable to heavy drinking was 59.78% [95%CI: 32.75 - 75.94] while the population attributable fraction was 45.48% [95%CI: 24.91 - 57.77]. We can conclude that heavy drinking leads to an increase of alcohol-related injuries. This shows a new dimension on the consequences of this public concern already related with a variety of health and social problems. Furthermore, our results allow us to suggest that about half of alcohol-related injuries could be avoided by removing this consumption pattern. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. The scar on the face of Scotland: deprivation and alcohol-related facial injuries in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Conway, David I; McMahon, Alex D; Graham, Lesley; Snedker, Stephen; McCluskey, Karyn; Devlin, Mark; Goodall, Christine

    2010-03-01

    : Recent media and political attention have focused on a "rising tide" of youth violence and alcohol-related problems in Scotland. Facial injuries in Scotland are most commonly sustained as a result of interpersonal violence, and young men are a high risk group for facial injuries. Facial injuries are known to be associated with alcohol consumption but the sociodemographic determinants are not fully known. : Influences on the incidence of alcohol-related facial injuries were investigated using data on 22,417 patients between 2001 and 2006 from the Scottish Morbidity Records. : Since 2001, the incidence of alcohol-related facial injuries in Scotland has declined, but the nature and scale of the problem remain considerable, with the major burden for such injuries disproportionately affecting young men from socioeconomically deprived areas. : The role of poverty as the major determinant of alcohol-related facial injuries has thus far not been explicitly acknowledged. Interventions to change behavior alone are unlikely to succeed unless they are supported by measures designed to improve socioeconomic circumstances and to reduce socioeconomic inequalities.

  6. Heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related injuries: An open cohort study among college students.

    PubMed

    Caamaño-Isorna, Francisco; Moure-Rodríguez, Lucía; Doallo, Sonia; Corral, Montserrat; Rodriguez Holguín, Socorro; Cadaveira, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effects of Heavy Episodic Drinking (HED) on the incidence of alcohol-related injuries among university students in Spain, taking sex into consideration. We carried out an open cohort study among college students in Spain (992 women and 371 men). HED and alcohol-related injuries were measured by question 3rd and 9th of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test to every participant at the ages of 18, 20, 22, 24 and 27. For data analysis we used a Multilevel Logistic Regression for repeated measures adjusting for alcohol and cannabis use. The incidence rate of alcohol-related injuries was 0.028year(-1) for females and 0.036year(-1) for males. The multivariate analysis showed that among females a high frequency of HED and use of cannabis are risk factors for alcohol-related injuries (Odds Ratio [OR]=2.64 and OR=3.68), while being more than 23 is a protective factor (OR=0.34). For males, bivariate analysis also showed HED like risk factor (OR=4.69 and OR=2.51). Finally, the population attributable fraction for HED among females was 37.12%. HED leads to an increase of alcohol-related injuries in both sexes and being over 23 years old acts as a protective factor among women. Our results suggest that about one third of alcohol-related injuries among women could be avoided by removing HED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the Australian "Alcopops Tax" on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Presentations for Injury in Two States.

    PubMed

    Lensvelt, Eveline; Liang, Wenbin; Gilmore, William; Gordon, Elise; Hobday, Michelle; Chikritzhs, Tanya

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a specific tax increase on ready-to-drink beverages (the "alcopops" tax) on male injuries presenting to emergency departments during times likely to be highly alcohol related in two Australian states. Poisson regression was used to compare annual risk of Western Australian and Victorian male emergency department injuries occurring during high alcohol-related times before and after the implementation of the alcopops tax. A range of age groups was examined. Surrogate methodology was applied to identify numbers of emergency department injuries that occurred during high and low alcohol-related times. Risk of injury during high alcohol-related times (incident rate ratio [IRR]) was lower among Western Australian 12- to 15-year-olds beginning from the year of the tax increase and continued throughout. Lower IRRs were also apparent for 15- to 19-year-olds, although some delay was implicated. There was no change for 12- to 15-year-old Victorians, but immediate declines were evident for 15- to 19-year-olds. To a lesser extent, delayed effects were also indicated for 20- to 29-year-olds in both states. There was no evidence of a change in injury risk during high alcohol-related times among the oldest age group (35-39 years). Previous research on beverage-specific taxes has suggested that they may increase alcohol-related harms among the target group. This study found no evidence of increased injury during high alcohol-related times associated with the alcopops tax in two states. Evidence of reduced harm was apparent, however, and strongest for Western Australian males aged 19 years and younger. These outcomes are consistent with documented national reductions in alcopops sales.

  8. Type and Context of Alcohol-Related Injury among Patients Presenting to Emergency Departments in a Caribbean Country

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Sandra D.; Gentius, Jannel

    2017-01-01

    There is an association between alcohol consumption and injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean. This cross-sectional study explores the socio-contextual factors of alcohol-related injuries in Trinidad and Tobago. Data on drinking patterns, injury type, drinking context prior to injury, and demographics were collected from patients presenting with injuries to the Emergency Departments (ED) of four hospitals. Findings show that 20.6% of patients had consumed alcohol, mainly beer, in the 6 h before injury. More than half were drinking at home (27%), or someone else’s home (27%). Injury most commonly occurred outdoors (36%) while in transit. Alcohol-related injuries occurred mainly because of falling or tripping (31.7%); these patients recorded the highest mean alcohol consumption prior to injury. Most persons who fell (50%) did so at home. Findings highlight the previously unreported significant risk of non-drivers sustaining injures through falling and tripping because of heavy alcohol use. Current interventions to reduce alcohol-related injury have focused on drink driving but there is a need for interventions targeting pedestrians and those who drink at home. A comprehensive multi-component approach including secondary prevention interventions in the medical setting, community educational interventions, enforcement of current legislative policies concerning the sale of alcohol, and policy initiatives surrounding road safety and alcohol outlet density should be implemented. PMID:28777317

  9. Brand preferences of underage drinkers who report alcohol-related fights and injuries

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sarah P.; Siegel, Michael B.; DeJong, William; Naimi, Timothy S.; Jernigan, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant body of research has demonstrated an association between adolescent alcohol consumption and subsequent fights and injuries. To date, however, no research has identified which brands are associated with alcohol-related fights and injuries among underage drinkers. Objectives We aimed to: 1) report the prevalence of alcohol-related fights and injuries among a national sample of underage drinkers in the U.S. and 2) describe the relationship between specific alcohol brand consumption and these alcohol-related negative consequences. Methods We recruited 1,031 self-reported drinkers (ages 13–20 years) via an internet panel maintained by Knowledge Networks to complete an online survey. Respondents reported their past-month overall and brand-specific alcohol consumption, risky drinking behavior, and past-year alcohol-related fights and injuries. Results Over one-quarter of the respondents (26.7%, N=232) reported at least one alcohol-related fight or injury in the past year. Heavy episodic drinkers were over six times more likely to report one of these negative alcohol-related consequences (AOR: 6.4, 95% CI: 4.1–9.9). Respondents of black race and those from higher-income households were also significantly more likely to report that experience (AOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3–3.7; AOR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.0 and 1.1–3.2, respectively). We identified eight alcohol brands that were significantly associated with alcohol-related fights and injuries. Conclusions/Importance Alcohol-related fights and injuries were frequently reported by adolescent respondents. Eight alcohol brands were significantly more popular among drinkers who experienced these adverse consequences. These results point to the need for further research on brand-specific correlates of underage drinking and negative health outcomes. PMID:25612075

  10. Brand preferences of underage drinkers who report alcohol-related fights and injuries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sarah P; Siegel, Michael B; DeJong, William; Naimi, Timothy S; Jernigan, David H

    2015-04-01

    A significant body of research has demonstrated an association between adolescent alcohol consumption and subsequent fights and injuries. To date, however, no research has identified which brands are associated with alcohol-related fights and injuries among underage drinkers. We aimed to: (1) report the prevalence of alcohol-related fights and injuries among a national sample of underage drinkers in the U.S. and (2) describe the relationship between specific alcohol brand consumption and these alcohol-related negative consequences. We recruited 1,031 self-reported drinkers (ages 13-20 years) via an internet panel maintained by Knowledge Networks to complete an online survey. Respondents reported their past-month overall and brand-specific alcohol consumption, risky drinking behavior, and past-year alcohol-related fights and injuries. Over one-quarter of the respondents (26.7%, N = 232) reported at least one alcohol-related fight or injury in the past year. Heavy episodic drinkers were over six times more likely to report one of these negative alcohol-related consequences (AOR: 6.4, 95% CI: 4.1-9.9). Respondents of black race and those from higher-income households were also significantly more likely to report that experience (AOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.7; AOR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0 and 1.1-3.2, respectively). We identified eight alcohol brands that were significantly associated with alcohol-related fights and injuries. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: Alcohol-related fights and injuries were frequently reported by adolescent respondents. Eight alcohol brands were significantly more popular among drinkers who experienced these adverse consequences. These results point to the need for further research on brand-specific correlates of underage drinking and negative health outcomes.

  11. Characteristics of Alcohol-related Injuries in Adolescents Visiting the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hyun; Park, Hye Sook; Cheon, Young Jin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol is frequently a factor affecting emergency department patients, and alcohol consumption is more common among those who are injured. In Korea, the socioeconomic impact of alcohol has been enormous because of traditional permissive attitudes toward alcohol. Juvenile drinking has increased recently; consequently, an increase in alcohol-related injuries is likely in this population. Therefore, we compared the characteristics and severity of alcohol-related injuries in adolescents and adults. All injured patients seen at six EDs throughout 2007 were included. We obtained data from the 'Development of a model for an in-depth injury surveillance system based on the emergency department' surveillance. The proportion of adolescents who drank was 5.0%. No significant alcohol-related difference in injuries was found between male and female adolescents (P = 0.14), whereas in adults, being male was strongly related to alcohol consumption (P < 0.001). Among traffic accidents, motorcycle-related injuries were strongly associated with alcohol use in adolescents (odds ratio [OR] 2.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-5.83). Results also indicated that alcohol-related injuries in adolescents showed poor outcomes (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.47-3.81) as compared with those in adults (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.59). Preventive strategy on alcohol-related injuries in adolescents should focus on reducing motorcycle accidents. PMID:21394314

  12. Energy drinks and alcohol-related risk among young adults.

    PubMed

    Caviness, Celeste M; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2017-06-16

    Energy drink consumption, with or without concurrent alcohol use, is common among young adults. This study sought to clarify risk for negative alcohol outcomes related to the timing of energy drink use. The authors interviewed a community sample of 481 young adults, aged 18-25, who drank alcohol in the last month. Past-30-day energy drink use was operationalized as no-use, use without concurrent alcohol, and concurrent use of energy drinks with alcohol ("within a couple of hours"). Negative alcohol outcomes included past-30-day binge drinking, past-30-day alcohol use disorder, and drinking-related consequences. Just over half (50.5%) reported no use of energy drinks,18.3% reported using energy drinks without concurrent alcohol use, and 31.2% reported concurrent use of energy drinks and alcohol. Relative to those who reported concurrent use of energy drinks with alcohol, and controlling for background characteristics and frequency of alcohol consumption, those who didn't use energy drinks and those who used without concurrent alcohol use had significantly lower binge drinking, negative consequences, and rates of alcohol use disorder (P < .05 for all outcomes). There were no significant differences between the no-use and energy drink without concurrent alcohol groups on any alcohol-related measure (P > .10 for all outcomes). Concurrent energy drink and alcohol use is associated with increased risk for negative alcohol consequences in young adults. Clinicians providing care to young adults could consider asking patients about concurrent energy drink and alcohol use as a way to begin a conversation about risky alcohol consumption while addressing 2 substances commonly used by this population.

  13. Experiences and Attitudes of Collegiate Athletic Trainers Regarding Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, James W.; Metz, Stacie M.; Entriken, Jack; Brenner, Christina J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI) has been an unexamined consequence of alcohol consumption by collegiate athletes. It has a potentially devastating effect on their athletic performances and careers. Awareness of this problem in athletes could have a huge effect on what athletic trainers (ATs) do to recognize, treat, and prevent it in a collegiate athlete population. Objective: To examine the experiences and attitudes among collegiate and university ATs about ARUI in the athletes in their care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1767 e-mail addresses for collegiate and university ATs within National Athletic Trainers' Association Districts 1, 2, 3, and 9. Main Outcome Measure(s): We calculated frequencies, percentages, and attitudes of ATs regarding ARUI in collegiate athletes during the 2010–2011 academic year. Results: The resulting sample size for the analysis was 459 (26.0%) participants of the initial total sample. More than 56% (n = 260) of the ATs reported that they had evaluated, treated, or referred if needed at least 1 ARUI in a collegiate athlete. On average, these ATs had evaluated, treated, or referred if needed 3 alcohol-related unintentional injuries within the 2010–2011academic year. About 73% (n = 331) of ATs agreed that ARUI is a serious problem. Nearly 80% (n = 358) indicated they believe ATs should receive more training to identify student–athletes with alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Alcohol-related unintentional injury is a common and serious consequence of alcohol use among collegiate athletes. Many ATs also view it as a serious problem yet would like more training in how to address it. Alcohol-related unintentional injury may have important negative effects on the careers and athletic performances of athletes. Researchers need to determine how prevalent ARUI is in the collegiate athlete population and what ATs can do to address it. PMID:24377956

  14. Association between firearm ownership, firearm-related risk and risk reduction behaviours and alcohol-related risk behaviours.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J

    2011-12-01

    Alcohol use and firearm ownership are risk factors for violent injury and death. To determine whether firearm ownership and specific firearm-related behaviours are associated with alcohol-related risk behaviours, the author conducted a cross-sectional study using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for eight states in the USA from 1996 to 1997 (the most recent data available). Altogether, 15 474 respondents provided information on firearm exposure. After adjustment for demographics and state of residence, firearm owners were more likely than those with no firearms at home to have ≥5 drinks on one occasion (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.50), to drink and drive (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.34 to 2.39) and to have ≥60 drinks per month (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.83). Heavy alcohol use was most common among firearm owners who also engaged in behaviours such as carrying a firearm for protection against other people and keeping a firearm at home that was both loaded and not locked away. The author concludes that firearm ownership and specific firearm-related behaviours are associated with alcohol-related risk behaviours.

  15. Alcohol-related emergency department injury presentations in Queensland adolescents and young adults over a 13-year period.

    PubMed

    Hides, Leanne; Limbong, Jesani; Vallmuur, Kirsten; Barker, Ruth; Daglish, Mark; Young, Ross McD

    2015-03-01

    The rate of alcohol-related emergency department (ED) presentations in young people has increased dramatically in recent decades. Injuries are the most common type of youth alcohol-related ED presentation, yet little is known about these injuries in young people. This paper describes the characteristics of alcohol-related ED injury presentations in young people over a 13-year period and determines if they differ by gender and/or age group (adolescents: 12-17 years; young adults: 18-24 years). The Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit (QISU) database collects injury surveillance data at triage in participating EDs throughout Queensland, Australia. A total of 4667 cases of alcohol-related injuries in young people (aged 12-24 years) were identified in the QISU database between January 1999 and December 2011, using an injury surveillance code and nursing triage text-based search strategy. Overall, young people accounted for 38% of all QISU alcohol-related ED injury presentations in patients aged 12 years or over. The majority of young adults presented with injuries due to violence and falls, whereas adolescents presented due to self-harm or intoxication without other injury. Males presented with injuries due to violence, whereas females presented with alcohol-related self-harm and intoxication. There is a need for more effective ways of identifying the degree of alcohol involvement in injuries among young people presenting to EDs. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  16. Alcohol-related injury among Greek-letter college students: defining a target population for secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mary Claire; McNamara, Robert S; McCoy, Thomas P; Sutfin, Erin L; Wolfson, Mark; Rhodes, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    Members of Greek-letter societies are the heaviest drinkers on college campuses, and experience more alcohol-related problems than their peers. This study reports the results of a web-based survey administered to stratified random samples of college students from 10 North Carolina universities. Greek-letter status was a significant independent risk factor for increased injury (both experienced and caused to others), even after adjusting for drinking behaviors. Prevention, screening, and intervention strategies are discussed in the context of these results.

  17. Alcohol-related injury among Greek-letter college students: Defining a target population for secondary prevention

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Mary Claire; McNamara, Robert S; McCoy, Thomas P; Sutfin, Erin L; Wolfson, Mark; Rhodes, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Members of Greek-letter societies are the heaviest drinkers on college campuses, and experience more alcohol-related problems than their peers. This study reports the results of a web-based survey administered to stratified random samples of college students from ten North Carolina universities. Greek-letter status was a significant independent risk factor for increased injury (both experienced and caused to others), even after adjusting for drinking behaviors. Prevention, screening, and intervention strategies are discussed in the context of these results. PMID:22689586

  18. Alcohol-related road traffic injuries in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Osman, Ossama T; Abbas, Alaa K; Eid, Hani O; Salem, Mohamed O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to prospectively study the demography, severity of injury and outcome of alcohol-related road traffic collision (RTC) injuries in the United Arab Emirates. Data of RTC Registry of Al-Ain City were prospectively collected from Al-Ain and Tawam hospitals during the period of April 2006 to October 2007. It included all RTC trauma patients who were admitted or those who died after arrival to these hospitals. Car occupants with complete data on alcohol use were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups, those who reported using alcohol and those who did not. Out of the 771 car occupants, sixteen (16) used alcohol (2.1%), 15 (94%) of them were males. The median (range) age of the alcohol group was significantly higher than those without alcohol (35 (15-53) years compared with 26 (1-78) years, p = 0.02). The UAE nationals were significantly more (P = 0.01) and the revised trauma score was significantly less in the alcohol group (P = 0.03). Head/face was the most commonly injured region in the alcohol group (94%). Self reported alcohol-related car collisions in Al-Ain City had a low incidence. It affected older Emirati male nationals and was associated with lower revised trauma score, mainly due to head injury. There is a need for a national registry with data on alcohol abuse so as to assess its effects and strategies for its prevention.

  19. Antidepressant sales and the risk for alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related suicide in Finland--an individual-level population study.

    PubMed

    Moustgaard, Heta; Joutsenniemi, Kaisla; Myrskylä, Mikko; Martikainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    A marked decline in suicide rates has co-occurred with increased antidepressant sales in several countries but the causal connection between the trends remains debated. Most previous studies have focused on overall suicide rates and neglected differential effects in population subgroups. Our objective was to investigate whether increasing sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants have reduced alcohol- and non-alcohol-related suicide risk in different population subgroups. We followed a nationally representative sample of 950,158 Finnish adults in 1995-2007 for alcohol-related (n = 2,859) and non-alcohol-related (n = 8,632) suicides. We assessed suicide risk by gender and social group according to regional sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants, measured by sold doses per capita, prevalence of antidepressant users, and proportion of antidepressant users with doses reflecting minimally adequate treatment. Fixed-effects Poisson regression models controlled for regional differences and time trends that may influence suicide risk irrespective of antidepressant sales. The number of sold antidepressant doses per capita and the prevalence of antidepressant users were unrelated to male suicide risk. However, one percentage point increase in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment reduced non-alcohol-related male suicide risk by one percent (relative risk 0.987, 95% confidence interval 0.976-0.998). This beneficial effect only emerged among men with high education, high income, and employment, among men without a partner, and men not owning their home. Alcohol-related suicides and female suicides were unrelated to all measures of antidepressant sales. We found little evidence that increase in overall sales or in the prevalence of non-tricyclic antidepressant users would have caused the fall in suicide rates in Finland in 1995-2007. However, the rise in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment, possibly

  20. Alcohol-Related Risk of Driver Fatalities: An Update Using 2007 Data

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Robert B.; Torres, Pedro; Romano, Eduardo; Lacey, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the relative risk of being involved in an alcohol-related crash has changed over the decade from 1996 to 2007, a period during which there has been little evidence of a reduction in the percentage of all fatal crashes involving alcohol. Method: We compared blood-alcohol information for the 2006 and 2007 crash cases (N = 6,863, 22.8% of them women) drawn from the U.S. Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) with control blood-alcohol data from participants in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey (N = 6,823). Risk estimates were computed and compared with those previously obtained from the 1996 FARS and roadside survey data. Results: Although the adult relative risk of being involved in a fatal alcohol-related crash apparently did not change from 1996 to 2007, the risk for involvement in an alcohol-related crash for underage women has increased to the point where it has become the same as that for underage men. Further, the risk that sober underage men will become involved in a fatal crash has doubled over the 1996–2007 period. Conclusions: Compared with estimates obtained from a decade earlier, young women in this study are at an increased risk of involvement in alcohol-related crashes. Similarly, underage sober drivers in this study are more at risk of involvement in a crash than they were a decade earlier. PMID:22456239

  1. Exploring the Athletic Trainer's Role in Assisting Student-Athletes Presenting With Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injuries.

    PubMed

    Howell, Steven M; Barry, Adam E; Pitney, William A

    2015-09-01

    Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle. Taken together, these behaviors clearly pose a health risk for student-athletes and increase the likelihood that they will experience an alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI). An ARUI represents a risk not only to the health and well-being of collegiate athletes but also to their athletic performances, collegiate careers, and potential professional opportunities. Therefore, athletic trainers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide face-to-face brief interventions to student-athletes presenting with ARUIs and to evaluate the effect of their involvement. We address potential action items for implementation by athletic trainers.

  2. Exploring the Athletic Trainer's Role in Assisting Student-Athletes Presenting With Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steven M.; Barry, Adam E.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle. Taken together, these behaviors clearly pose a health risk for student-athletes and increase the likelihood that they will experience an alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI). An ARUI represents a risk not only to the health and well-being of collegiate athletes but also to their athletic performances, collegiate careers, and potential professional opportunities. Therefore, athletic trainers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide face-to-face brief interventions to student-athletes presenting with ARUIs and to evaluate the effect of their involvement. We address potential action items for implementation by athletic trainers. PMID:26287493

  3. Hospitalizations for Students with an Alcohol-Related Sanction: Gender and Pregaming as Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Rimsha; Hustad, John T. P.; LaSalle, Linda; Borsari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pregaming (ie, drinking prior to a social event) is a risk factor for hospitalization. Participants: Participants (N = 516) were undergraduate students with an alcohol-related sanction. Methods: Participants completed a survey about alcohol use, as well as behaviors and experiences,…

  4. Hospitalizations for Students with an Alcohol-Related Sanction: Gender and Pregaming as Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Rimsha; Hustad, John T. P.; LaSalle, Linda; Borsari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pregaming (ie, drinking prior to a social event) is a risk factor for hospitalization. Participants: Participants (N = 516) were undergraduate students with an alcohol-related sanction. Methods: Participants completed a survey about alcohol use, as well as behaviors and experiences,…

  5. Antidepressant Sales and the Risk for Alcohol-Related and Non-Alcohol-Related Suicide in Finland—An Individual-Level Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Moustgaard, Heta; Joutsenniemi, Kaisla; Myrskylä, Mikko; Martikainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A marked decline in suicide rates has co-occurred with increased antidepressant sales in several countries but the causal connection between the trends remains debated. Most previous studies have focused on overall suicide rates and neglected differential effects in population subgroups. Our objective was to investigate whether increasing sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants have reduced alcohol- and non-alcohol-related suicide risk in different population subgroups. Methods We followed a nationally representative sample of 950,158 Finnish adults in 1995–2007 for alcohol-related (n = 2,859) and non-alcohol-related (n = 8,632) suicides. We assessed suicide risk by gender and social group according to regional sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants, measured by sold doses per capita, prevalence of antidepressant users, and proportion of antidepressant users with doses reflecting minimally adequate treatment. Fixed-effects Poisson regression models controlled for regional differences and time trends that may influence suicide risk irrespective of antidepressant sales. Results The number of sold antidepressant doses per capita and the prevalence of antidepressant users were unrelated to male suicide risk. However, one percentage point increase in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment reduced non-alcohol-related male suicide risk by one percent (relative risk 0.987, 95% confidence interval 0.976–0.998). This beneficial effect only emerged among men with high education, high income, and employment, among men without a partner, and men not owning their home. Alcohol-related suicides and female suicides were unrelated to all measures of antidepressant sales. Conclusion We found little evidence that increase in overall sales or in the prevalence of non-tricyclic antidepressant users would have caused the fall in suicide rates in Finland in 1995–2007. However, the rise in the proportion of antidepressant

  6. Burden of alcohol-related injuries on radiology services at a level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Bahman; Psoter, Kevin J; Mack, Christopher; Vavilala, Monica S; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the burden of alcohol-related injuries on a radiology department at a level 1 trauma center. We linked the trauma registry (2005-2009) of Harborview Medical Center to billing department data and extracted patient demographic and injury-related characteristics and the radiology services provided. Multivariate negative binomial analysis was used to evaluate the association between blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and CT and MRI utilization rates. A total of 125,776 CT and 4681 MRI examinations were performed on 27,274 patients during the study period. Higher BAC was generally associated with higher utilization rates for all types of CT even after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Compared with patients with a BAC of 0, the greatest increases in utilization were observed in individuals with a BAC of 240 mg/dL or more for head CT (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.43; 95% CI, 1.32-1.54), cervical spine (IRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.32-1.58), and maxillofacial (IRR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.42-1.95), with no increase observed for MRI. This association was more prominent in less severely injured patients with utilization rates for head CT (IRR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.56-2.13), abdomen (IRR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.32-1.63), and thorax (IRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.30-1.89) in individuals with a BAC of 240 mg/dL or more compared with those with a BAC of 0. Higher BAC was associated with increased CT utilization for most body region-specific CT scans and was more strongly associated in patients with less severe injuries. Any guideline that could potentially decrease unnecessary imaging for patients with alcohol-involved injuries would represent a cost-saving strategy.

  7. Demographic and Substance Use Factors Associated with Non-Violent Alcohol-Related Injuries among Patrons of Australian Night-Time Entertainment Districts

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Kerri; Mayshak, Richelle; Hyder, Shannon; Droste, Nicolas; Curtis, Ashlee; Pennay, Amy; Gilmore, William; Lam, Tina; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Miller, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between patron demographics, substance use, and experience of recent alcohol-related accidents and injuries that were not due to interpersonal violence in night-time entertainment districts. Cross-sectional interviews (n = 4016) were conducted around licensed venues in entertainment districts of five Australian cities. Demographic factors associated with non-violent alcohol-related injuries were examined, including gender, age, and occupation. The association between substance use on the night of interview; blood alcohol concentration (BAC), pre-drinking, energy drink consumption, and illicit drug use; and experience of injury was also explored. Thirteen percent of participants reported an alcohol-related injury within the past three months. Respondents aged younger than 25 years were significantly more likely to report an alcohol-related injury. Further, a significant occupation effect was found indicating the rate of alcohol-related injury was lower in managers/professionals compared to non-office workers. The likelihood of prior alcohol-related injury significantly increased with BAC, and self-reported pre-drinking, energy drink, or illicit drug consumption on the night of interview. These findings provide an indication of the demographic and substance use-related associations with alcohol-related injuries and, therefore, potential avenues of population-level policy intervention. Policy responses to alcohol-related harm must also account for an assessment and costing of non-violent injuries. PMID:28085105

  8. Are Women at Greater Risk? An Examination of Alcohol-Related Consequences and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Dawn E.; DeMartini, Kelly S.; Carey, Kate B.

    2010-01-01

    Men typically drink more than women; however, women achieve higher BACs than men at equivalent consumption levels. This study investigated the unique effect of gender on individual alcohol problems by controlling both consumption and intoxication in a sample of 1,331 undergraduate drinkers. Gender independently influenced the risk of experiencing seven of nine negative consequences: (a) being female increased risk for tolerance, blacking out, passing out, drinking after promising not to, and getting injured; (b) being male increased risk for damaging property and going to school drunk. Gender patterns should be explored in a wider set of alcohol-related problems. PMID:19340637

  9. DOES BEVERAGE TYPE AND DRINKING CONTEXT MATTER IN AN ALCOHOL-RELATED INJURY? EVIDENCE FROM EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PATIENTS IN LATIN AMERICA

    PubMed Central

    Andreuccetti, Gabriel; Carvalho, Heraclito B.; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason; Monteiro, Maristela; Borges, Guilherme; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have already substantiated alcohol’s causal role in injuries. Yet the role that alcoholic beverage preferences and the drinking context play in the risk for injury is still under-investigated. In this study a cross-national comparison of the association between alcohol and injury focusing on beverage type preference and the drinking context is reported. Methods Emergency department injured patients were interviewed in eight countries from the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. Data on the type of alcoholic beverage, total alcohol volume, and the place where the injury occurred were obtained from patients who reported any alcohol consumption within 6 hours prior to being injured. Patients who did not drink prior to injury were also asked about their typical drinking pattern and the injury place. Differences within- and between-groups were evaluated regarding patients’ typical drinking and drinking before injury. Results Beer was the most prevalent beverage type usually consumed among injured patients across countries, however, patients who drank before injury had a higher typical consumption of spirits than those not drinking prior to injury. The total alcohol volume typically consumed and drinking in public settings were also found to be positively associated with alcohol-related injury. Conclusions A similar beverage-specific association with alcohol-related injury was found across LAC countries, mainly attributed to beer consumption, and spirits drinkers seem to have a greater chance of becoming involved in injury events. Future prevention strategies should inform the public about harms from drinking associated with the context in which drinking takes place. PMID:24556276

  10. Cost-effectiveness of interventions to prevent alcohol-related disease and injury in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cobiac, Linda; Vos, Theo; Doran, Christopher; Wallace, Angela

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate cost-effectiveness of eight interventions for reducing alcohol-attributable harm and determine the optimal intervention mix. Interventions include volumetric taxation, advertising bans, an increase in minimum legal drinking age, licensing controls on operating hours, brief intervention (with and without general practitioner telemarketing and support), drink driving campaigns, random breath testing and residential treatment for alcohol dependence (with and without naltrexone). Cost-effectiveness is modelled over the life-time of the Australian population in 2003, with all costs and health outcomes evaluated from an Australian health sector perspective. Each intervention is compared with current practice, and the most cost-effective options are then combined to determine the optimal intervention mix. Cost-effectiveness is measured in 2003 Australian dollars per disability adjusted life year averted. Although current alcohol intervention in Australia (random breath testing) is cost-effective, if the current spending of $71 million could be invested in a more cost-effective combination of interventions, more than 10 times the amount of health gain could be achieved. Taken as a package of interventions, all seven preventive interventions would be a cost-effective investment that could lead to substantial improvement in population health; only residential treatment is not cost-effective. Based on current evidence, interventions to reduce harm from alcohol are highly recommended. The potential reduction in costs of treating alcohol-related diseases and injuries mean that substantial improvements in population health can be achieved at a relatively low cost to the health sector. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Trends in alcohol-related traffic risk behaviors among college students

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Kasperski, Sarah J.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Alcohol-impaired driving is a major public health problem. National studies indicate that about 25% of college students have driven while intoxicated in the past month and an even greater percentage drive after drinking any alcohol and/or ride with an intoxicated driver. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the change in these various alcohol-related traffic risk behaviors as students progressed through their college experience. Methods: A cohort of 1,253 first-time first-year students attending a large, mid-Atlantic university were interviewed annually for four years. Repeated measures analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations (GEE) to evaluate age-related changes in prevalence and frequency of each behavior (i.e., ages 19 to 22). Results: At age 19, 17% wt of students drove while intoxicated, 42%wt drove after drinking any alcohol, and 38%wt rode with an intoxicated driver. For all three driving behaviors, prevalence and frequency increased significantly at age 21. Males were more likely to engage in these behaviors than females. To understand the possible relationship of these behaviors to changes in drinking patterns, a post-hoc analysis was conducted and revealed that while drinking frequency increased every year, frequency of drunkenness was stable for females, but increased for males. Conclusions: Alcohol-related traffic risk behaviors are quite common among college students, and take a significant upturn when students reach the age of 21. Prevention strategies targeted to the college population are needed to prevent serious consequences of these alcohol-related traffic risk behaviors. PMID:20528819

  12. Low prefrontal PSA-NCAM confers risk for alcoholism-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Barker, Jacqueline M; Torregrossa, Mary M; Taylor, Jane R

    2012-10-01

    The factors underlying vulnerability to alcoholism are largely unknown. We identified in rodents an innate endophenotype predicting individual risk for alcohol-related behaviors that was associated with decreased expression of the neuroplasticity-related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). Depletion of PSA-NCAM in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was sufficient to render mice unable to extinguish alcohol seeking, indicating a causal role of naturally occurring variation. These data suggest a mechanism of aberrant prefrontal neuroplasticity that underlies enhanced propensity for inflexible addiction-related behavior.

  13. Gender differences for the risk of alcohol-related problems in multiple national contexts.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, K M; Golding, J M; Kniep, S; Leino, E V; Shoemaker, C; Ager, C R; Ferrer, H P; Ahlstrom, S; Allebeck, P; Amundsen, A

    1995-01-01

    The primary research question asked is: After holding alcohol consumption constant, will men and women be at equal risk for a variety of alcohol-related problems? Since women are actually at a higher blood alcohol content at the same consumption levels, a physiological argument would suggest that women are at equal or greater risk for alcohol problems than men. However, variation in societal norms surrounding gender roles and/or societal-level stress may mediate the experience of men and women, regardless of the differences in physiology. Ten cross-sectional general population studies are used. Analyses control for individual-level variables (age, quantity, and frequency of drinking) and societal-level variables (proportion of women in the work force and female suicide rate) that might confound these relationships; cross-study homogeneity is examined.

  14. Hospitalizations for Students With an Alcohol-Related Sanction: Gender and Pregaming as Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rimsha; Hustad, John T.P.; LaSalle, Linda; Borsari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pregaming (i.e., drinking prior to a social event) is a risk factor for hospitalization. Participants Participants (N=516) were undergraduate students with an alcohol-related sanction. Method Participants completed a survey about alcohol use, as well as behaviors and experiences prior to and during the referral event. The dependent variable was whether participants received medical attention at an emergency department during the sanction event. Results Results indicated that older students, females who pregame, students with higher alcohol use screening scores, lighter drinkers, and higher numbers of drinks before the referral event all increased the odds of receiving medical attention. Pregaming alone was not significantly related to receiving medical attention in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Female students who pregame appear to be at risk for requiring hospitalization after drinking when controlling for the number of drinks consumed. PMID:24635415

  15. Alcohol-Related Problems and Risk for Suicide among College Students: The Mediating Roles of Belongingness and Burdensomeness

    PubMed Central

    Lamis, Dorian A.; Malone, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and suicide proneness in undergraduate college students (N = 996). As hypothesized, alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness were all significantly and positively correlated with suicide proneness. The relation between experiencing alcohol-related problems and suicide proneness was, in part, accounted for by perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness. Additionally, the mediation via perceived burdensomeness was significantly stronger than the mediation via thwarted belongingness. Results suggest that it would be advisable for clinicians to be aware of students’ experiences with alcohol-related problems in conjunction with their levels of burdensomeness and belongingness when assessing for suicide risk PMID:21883409

  16. Adolescent alcohol-related risk cognitions: the roles of social norms and social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Litt, Dana M; Stock, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    The present study examined the impact of socially based descriptive norms on willingness to drink alcohol, drinker prototype favorability, affective alcohol attitudes, and perceived vulnerability for alcohol-related consequences within the Prototype Willingness model. Descriptive norms were manipulated by having 189 young adolescents view experimenter-created profile pages from the social networking site Facebook, which either showed older peers drinking or not. The results provided evidence that descriptive norms for alcohol use, as portrayed by Facebook profiles, significantly impact willingness to use, prototypes, attitudes toward use, and perceived vulnerability. A multiple mediation analysis indicated that prototypes, attitudes, and perceptions of use mediated the relationship between the content of the Facebook profile and willingness. These results indicate that adolescents who perceive that alcohol use is normative, as evidenced by Facebook profiles, are at higher risk for cognitions shown to predict alcohol use than adolescents who do not see alcohol use portrayed as frequently on Facebook.

  17. The Comparative Impacts of Risk and Protective Factors on Alcohol-Related Problems in a Sample of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Keith F.; Blackston, Amber; Dowd, Sabrina; Franz, Shalleigh; Eagle, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative influences of various protective and risk factors on the alcohol-related problems of a sample of university students. The conceptualization of these protective and risk factors in the current undertaking was informed by problem behavior theory, and draws heavily on two sociological theories…

  18. The Comparative Impacts of Risk and Protective Factors on Alcohol-Related Problems in a Sample of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Keith F.; Blackston, Amber; Dowd, Sabrina; Franz, Shalleigh; Eagle, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative influences of various protective and risk factors on the alcohol-related problems of a sample of university students. The conceptualization of these protective and risk factors in the current undertaking was informed by problem behavior theory, and draws heavily on two sociological theories…

  19. Alcohol-related hospitalization is associated with increased risk of ischaemic stroke among low-risk patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalili, Faris; Benson, Lina; Friberg, Leif

    2017-02-23

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) under the age of 65 and CHA2DS2-VASc risk score of 0 in men or 1 in women are considered to be at low risk for ischaemic stroke, and therefore without benefit of oral anticoagulation therapy. The objective of this study is to assess the incidence and predictors of ischaemic stroke among low-risk patients with AF identified from a National Patient Register. A retrospective study of 25 252 low-risk AF patients (age 18-64) out of total 345 123 AF patients identified from the Swedish Nationwide Patient Register for the period 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012. During a median follow-up of 5.0 (interquartile range 2.9-6.8) years, ischaemic stroke occurred at an annual rate of 0.34 per 100 patient-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.38]. Significant predictors of stroke were age, hazard ratio (HR) 1.06 (CI 1.05-1.08) per incremental year, and previous alcohol-related hospitalization HR 2.01 (CI 1.45-2.79). Intracerebral bleeding events were rare and not statistically different HR 2.05 (CI 0.76-5.56) between patients with and without alcohol-related hospitalizations. Use of oral anticoagulants was associated with lower risk for ischaemic stroke, HR 0.78 (CI 0.63-0.97). The presence of a previous hospitalization with an alcohol-related disease was associated with a small but significant increase in the risk of stroke among low-risk AF patients. More research about relation between alcohol use and ischaemic stroke in AF patients is warranted.

  20. The effect of alcohol outlets, sales and trading hours on alcohol-related injuries presenting at emergency departments in Perth, Australia, from 2002 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Hobday, Michelle; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Liang, Wenbin; Meuleners, Lynn

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the combined effects of alcohol sales, outlet numbers and trading hours on alcohol-related harms. This study aimed to test whether associations: (i) exist between alcohol-related emergency department (ED) injuries and alcohol sales and counts of outlets; (ii) vary between on- and off-premises outlets; and (iii) vary by trading hours conditions [extended trading permits (ETP) versus standard hours]. Panel study using 117 postcodes over 8 years (2002-10): 936 data points. Perth, Australia. ED injury presentations, aggregated to postcode-level. Alcohol-related injuries were identified using time-based surrogate measures: night injuries (n=51,241) and weekend night injuries (n=30,682). Measures of alcohol availability included number of outlets with standard and extended trading hours and mean sales per postcode. Negative binomial regression modelling with random effects was used to examine associations between availability and alcohol-related injury, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. (i) Night injuries were associated significantly with counts of on-premises outlets [incident rate ratio (IRR)=1.046; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.014-1.078] and sales per off-premises outlet (IRR=1.019; 95% CI=1.004-1.035); (ii) counts of on-premises outlets were positively associated with alcohol-related injury while counts of off-premises outlets indicated a negative association; and (iii) weekend night injuries increased by about 5% per on-premises outlet with an ETP (IRR=1.049; 95% CI=1.015-1.084) and by less than 1% for outlets with standard trading hours (IRR=1.008; 95% CI=1.004-1.013). Regions of Perth, Australia with greater off-premises alcohol sales and counts of on-premises alcohol outlets, particularly those with extended trading hours, appear to have higher levels of alcohol-related injuries. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Delivery of a brief motivational intervention to patients with alcohol-related facial injuries: role for a specialist nurse.

    PubMed

    Oakey, F; Ayoub, A F; Goodall, C A; Crawford, A; Smith, I; Russell, A; Holland, I S

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we focus on providing an alcohol screening and intervention service within maxillofacial surgery. Two trained nurses screened patients with alcohol-related facial injuries who attended maxillofacial outpatient clinics, and gave brief motivational interventions to those who had been drinking to a hazardous level. Patients were followed up at 3 and 12 months after the intervention. 195/249 patients (78%) drank to a hazardous level. One hundred and ninety-five patients received an intervention. Duration of intervention was between 5 and 65 minutes. Reasons for refusal to participate included lack of interest or time, and the main reason for exclusion was length of time since injury. The follow up rate was 103 (53%) at 3 months and 134 (69%) at 12 months. The high level of hazardous drinking among people with facial trauma suggests a clear need for alcohol screening and intervention. It is feasible for nursing staff to deliver brief interventions in a busy maxillofacial trauma clinic.

  2. High risk alcohol-related trauma among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the Northern Territory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High risk drinking is linked with high rates of physical harm. The reported incidence of alcohol - related trauma among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Northern Territory is the highest in the world. Facial fractures are common among young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. They are often linked with misuse of alcohol in the Northern Territory and are frequently secondary to assault. This review focuses on alcohol-related trauma in the Territory and draws attention to an urgent need for preventative health approach to address this critical issue. PMID:22862897

  3. The impact of extended closing times of alcohol outlets on alcohol-related injuries in the nightlife areas of Amsterdam: a controlled before-and-after evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Goeij, Moniek C M; Veldhuizen, Eleonore M; Buster, Marcel C A; Kunst, Anton E

    2015-06-01

    The municipality of Amsterdam implemented a new alcohol policy allowing alcohol outlets in two of the five nightlife areas to extend their closing times from 1 April 2009 onwards. We investigated how levels and trends of alcohol-related injuries changed after implementation of this alcohol policy, by comparing areas with extended closing times to those without. A controlled before-and-after evaluation to compare changes in alcohol-related injuries between intervention and control areas. Central district of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Alcohol-related ambulance attendances for control and intervention areas between 1 April 2006 and 1 April 2009 (respectively, n = 544 and n = 499) and between 1 April 2009 and 1 April 2011 (respectively, n = 357 and n = 480). Alcohol-related injuries were defined as ambulance attendances for people who suffered from direct or indirect consequences of alcohol consumption. Injuries were counted per month in two intervention and three control nightlife areas. We used Poisson regression to assess changes in injuries. After 1 April 2009, intervention areas showed a larger change in the level of alcohol-related injuries than control areas [incidence rate ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12, 1.61], but trends remained stable in all areas. This increase was only statistically significant for the following subgroups: 2.00-5.59 a.m., weekend days, men, individuals aged 25-34 years, and people transported to a hospital. However, the increase did not differ between subgroups with statistical significance. A 1-hour extension of alcohol outlet closing times in some of Amsterdam's nightlife areas was associated with 34% more alcohol-related injuries. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Chronic alcoholism-mediated impairment in the medulla oblongata: a mechanism of alcohol-related mortality in traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-ping; Yu, Xiao-jun; Qian, Hong; Wei, Lai; Lv, Jun-yao; Xu, Xiao-hu

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition in medical and forensic practice, and results in high prehospital mortality. We investigated the mechanism of chronic alcoholism-related mortality by examining the effects of alcohol on the synapses of the medulla oblongata in a rat model of TBI. Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either ethanol (EtOH) group, EtOH-TBI group, or control groups (water group, water-TBI group). To establish chronic alcoholism model, rats in the EtOH group were given EtOH twice daily (4 g/kg for 2 weeks and 6 g/kg for another 2 weeks). The rats also received a minor strike on the occipital tuberosity with an iron pendulum. Histopathologic and ultrastructure changes and the numerical density of the synapses in the medulla oblongata were examined. Expression of postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) in the medulla oblongata was measured by ELISA. Compared with rats in the control group, rats in the chronic alcoholism group showed: (1) minor axonal degeneration; (2) a significant decrease in the numerical density of synapses (p < 0.01); and (3) compensatory increase in PSD-95 expression (p < 0.01). Rats in the EtOH-TBI group showed: (1) high mortality (50%, p < 0.01); (2) inhibited respiration before death; (3) severe axonal injury; and (4) decrease in PSD-95 expression (p < 0.05). Chronic alcoholism induces significant synapse loss and axonal impairment in the medulla oblongata and renders the brain more susceptible to TBI. The combined effects of chronic alcoholism and TBI induce significant synapse and axon impairment and result in high mortality.

  5. Post-deployment screening and referral for risky alcohol use and subsequent alcohol-related and injury diagnoses, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Lee

    2015-07-01

    Risky alcohol use among service members is a threat to both military readiness and the health of service members. This report describes an analysis using the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) to identify all active component service members who returned from deployment and completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) alcohol use screen as part of the Post Deployment Health Assessment (PDHA) and Post Deployment Health Reassessment (PDHRA) during 2008-2014. This analysis identified that 3.4% of PDHA forms and 4.8% of PDHRA forms completed indicated severe risk for alcohol abuse, defined as an AUDIT-C score of 8 or higher. Among those at severe risk on the PDHRA who were not already under care for alcohol abuse, only 37.7% received a referral for treatment: 21.7% to primary care, 13.4% to behavioral health in primary care, 7.5% to mental health specialty care, and 5.6% to a substance abuse program. Referrals for treatment for those at severe risk were lower than their respective counterparts among males, white non-Hispanics, members of the Air Force, junior officers, and pilots/air crew. There were significant trends of increasing frequencies of subsequent injury and alcohol-related conditions as alcohol use levels increased.

  6. Development and Validation of a Video Measure for Assessing Women’s Risk Perception for Alcohol-Related Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Kathleen A.; Levonyan-Radloff, Kristine; Dearing, Ronda L.; Hequembourg, Amy; Testa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective Using an iterative process, a series of three video scenarios were developed for use as a standardized measure for assessing women’s perception of risks for alcohol-related sexual assault (SA). The videos included ambiguous and clear behavioral and environmental risk cues. Method Focus group discussions with young, female heavy drinkers (N = 42) were used to develop three videos at different risk levels (low, moderate, and high) in Study 1. Realism, reliability, and validity of the videos were assessed using multiple methods in Studies 2 and 3. One hundred-four women were used to compare differences in risk perception across the video risk level in Study 2. In Study 3 (N = 60), we assessed women’s perceptions of the low and high risk videos under conditions of no alcohol and alcohol. Results The realism and reliability of the videos were good. Women who viewed the low risk video compared to women who viewed the moderate and high risk videos perceived less risk for SA. We found an interaction between alcohol and risk perception such that, women in the alcohol condition were less likely to perceive risk when watching the high risk video. Conclusions As the video risk level increased, women’s perception of risk increased. These findings provide convergent evidence for the validity of the video measure. Given the limited number of standardized scenarios for assessing risk perception for sexual assault, our findings suggest that these videos may provide a needed standardized measure. PMID:27747131

  7. Alcohol-related mortality risk in natural and non-natural death cases.

    PubMed

    Töro, Klára; Dunay, György; Róna, Kálmán; Klausz, Gabriella; Fehér, Szilvia

    2009-11-01

    Determination of the associations between alcohol influence and sudden natural death represents challenges for medicolegal investigations. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alcohol influence in medicolegal autopsies. In our study of natural and non-natural deaths cases (5496 total: 4045 males, 1451 females) were examined. Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were detected by headspace gas chromatographic method. We investigated the alcohol-related mortality using hierarchical log-linear statistical models. Severe BACs were detected among suicidal victims in the oldest age group (>65 years) (InF = 0.442) and among the homicide victims between the age of 40-65 years (InF = 0.234). Correlations we found between manner-of-death and sex suggested that the rate of males in accidents (lnF = 0.140) and the rate of females in homicides (lnF = 0.193) were higher. It was concluded that the accurate statistical mortality database may provide a huge support for the determination of alcohol effects on human health and mortality.

  8. Impulsivity is an Independent Predictor of 15-Year Mortality Risk among Individuals Seeking Help for Alcohol-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Blonigen, Daniel M.; Timko, Christine; Moos, Bernice S.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although past research has found impulsivity to be a significant predictor of mortality, no studies have tested this association in samples of individuals with alcohol-related problems or examined moderation of this effect via socio-contextual processes. The current study addressed these issues in a mixed-gender sample of individuals seeking help for alcohol-related problems. Methods Using Cox proportional hazard models, variables measured at baseline and Year 1 of a 16-year prospective study were used to predict the probability of death from Years 1 to 16 (i.e., 15-year mortality risk). There were 628 participants at baseline (47.1% women); 515 and 405 participated in the follow-up assessments at Years 1 and 16, respectively. Among Year 1 participants, 93 individuals were known to have died between Years 1 to 16. Results After controlling for age, gender, and marital status, higher impulsivity at baseline was associated with an increased risk of mortality from Years 1 to 16; however, this association was accounted for by the severity of alcohol use at baseline. In contrast, higher impulsivity at Year 1 was associated with an increased risk of mortality from Years 1 to 16, and remained significant when accounting for the severity of alcohol use, as well as physical health problems, emotional discharge coping, and interpersonal stress and support at Year 1. In addition, the association between Year 1 impulsivity and 15-year mortality risk was moderated by interpersonal support at Year 1, such that individuals high on impulsivity had a lower mortality risk when peer/friend support was high than when it was low. Conclusions The findings highlight impulsivity as a robust and independent predictor of mortality, and suggest the need to consider interactions between personality traits and socio-contextual processes in the prediction of health-related outcomes for individuals with alcohol use disorders. PMID:21631544

  9. Behavioral economic decision making and alcohol-related sexual risk behavior.

    PubMed

    MacKillop, James; Celio, Mark A; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Kahler, Christopher W; Operario, Don; Colby, Suzanne M; Barnett, Nancy P; Monti, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    The discipline of behavioral economics integrates principles from psychology and economics to systematically characterize decision-making preferences. Two forms of behavioral economic decision making are of relevance to HIV risk behavior: delay discounting, reflecting preferences for immediate small rewards relative to larger delayed rewards (i.e., immediate gratification), and probability discounting, reflecting preferences for larger probabilistic rewards relative to smaller guaranteed rewards (i.e., risk sensitivity). This study examined questionnaire-based indices of both types of discounting in relation to sexual risk taking in an emergency department sample of hazardous drinkers who engage in risky sexual behavior. More impulsive delay discounting was significantly associated with increased sexual risk-taking during a drinking episode, but not general sexual risk-taking. Probability discounting was not associated with either form of sexual risk-taking. These findings implicate impulsive delay discounting with sexual risk taking during alcohol intoxication and provide further support for applying this approach to HIV risk behavior.

  10. The Inability of Self-affirmations to Decrease Defensive Bias Toward an Alcohol-Related Risk Message Among High-Risk College Students.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ellen; Miller, Mary Beth; Lechner, William V; Lombardi, Nate; Claborn, Kasey R; Leffingwell, Thad R

    2015-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of a self-affirmation task in deterring college alcohol misuse and the importance of preexisting beliefs in predicting subsequent behavior change. Heavy-drinking undergraduates (N = 110) participated during the 2011-2012 academic year. Participants were randomized to complete an affirmation or control task before reading an alcohol risk message. Alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors were assessed. Participants completed a 2-week online follow-up assessing alcohol-related behaviors. Both groups reported increased perceived problem importance, but neither group displayed changes in personal risk. Follow-up assessment revealed similar, significant declines in peak consumption in both groups, with no significant between-group differences. Preexisting beliefs accounted for 5% to 10% of variance in drinking outcomes. An affirmation task does not seem to decrease defensive processing or alter high-risk drinking behaviors among college students and should not be utilized in lieu of more effective strategies.

  11. Behavioral Economic Decision Making and Alcohol-related Sexual Risk Behavior

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Celio, Mark A.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Operario, Don; Colby, Suzanne M.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of behavioral economics integrates principles from psychology and economics to systematically characterize decision-making preferences. Two forms of behavioral economic decision making are of relevance to HIV risk behavior: delay discounting, reflecting preferences for immediate small rewards relative to larger delayed rewards (i.e., immediate gratification), and probability discounting, reflecting preferences for larger probabilistic rewards relative to smaller guaranteed rewards (i.e., risk sensitivity). This study examined questionnaire-based indices of both types of discounting in relation to sexual risk taking in an emergency department sample of hazardous drinkers who engage in risky sexual behavior. More impulsive delay discounting was significantly associated with increased sexual risk-taking during a drinking episode, but not general sexual risk-taking. Probability discounting was not associated with either form of sexual risk-taking. These findings implicate impulsive delay discounting with sexual risk taking during alcohol intoxication and provide further support for applying this approach to HIV risk behavior. PMID:25267115

  12. Population Density and Alcohol-Related Risk Behaviors among US High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greggo, Jennifer; Jones, Sherry Everett; Kann, Laura

    2005-01-01

    By better understanding differences in health-risk behaviors among youth in rural, suburban and urban communities, health educators and other public health practitioners can more appropriately focus prevention and health care programs. In this study, we examined data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) to determine whether…

  13. Intelligence quotient (IQ) in adolescence and later risk of alcohol-related hospital admissions and deaths--37-year follow-up of Swedish conscripts.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Sara; Allebeck, Peter; Hemmingsson, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between intelligence measured at ages 18-19 and later alcohol-related hospital admission and mortality among men, while controlling for possible confounders. Cohort study. A total of 49,321 Swedish men who were conscripted for military training in 1969-70 and followed until 2007. Intelligence quotient (IQ) measured at conscription is the exposure, while alcohol-related hospital admission and death are the two outcomes. Adjustments for following variables were made: early life circumstances [childhood socio-economic position (SEP), father's drinking], mental health, social adjustment and behavioural factors measured at age 18 (psychiatric diagnosis, contact with police and child care, low emotional control, daily smoking, risky use of alcohol) and adult social position (attained education, SEP and income at age 40). IQ had an inverse and graded association with later alcohol-related problems. For alcohol-related hospital admissions the crude hazard ratio (HR) was 1.29 (95% CI = 1.26-1.31) and for alcohol-related mortality it was 1.21 (95% CI = 1.17-1.24) for every one point decrease on the nine-point IQ scale. Adjustment for risk factors measured at age 18 attenuated the association somewhat for both outcomes. After adjustment for social position as adult, the HR was considerably lower resulting in a HR of 1.06 (95% CI = 1.02-1.10) for alcohol-related hospital admissions and 1.01 (95% CI = 0.95-1.08) for alcohol-related mortality. In Swedish men there is an association between IQ in early adulthood and later alcohol-related hospital admission and death. Social position as adult could be an important contributory factor. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Alcohol-Related Problems in High-Risk Groups. EURO Reports and Studies 109. Report on a WHO Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Martin, Ed.

    Alcohol consumption has risen dramatically in many countries since the Second World War. Accompanying this rise has been a rise in alcohol-related problems, including liver cirrhosis mortality, alcohol dependence, and alcohol-related crimes and accidents. Alcohol misuse presents huge health, social, and legal problems throughout most of Europe and…

  15. Alcohol-Related Problems in High-Risk Groups. EURO Reports and Studies 109. Report on a WHO Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Martin, Ed.

    Alcohol consumption has risen dramatically in many countries since the Second World War. Accompanying this rise has been a rise in alcohol-related problems, including liver cirrhosis mortality, alcohol dependence, and alcohol-related crimes and accidents. Alcohol misuse presents huge health, social, and legal problems throughout most of Europe and…

  16. Alcohol-Related Problems and Risk of Suicide among College Students: The Mediating Roles of Belongingness and Burdensomeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamis, Dorian A.; Malone, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship among alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and suicide proneness in undergraduate college students (N = 996) was examined. As hypothesized, alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness were all significantly and positively correlated with suicide proneness.…

  17. Alcohol-Related Problems and Risk of Suicide among College Students: The Mediating Roles of Belongingness and Burdensomeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamis, Dorian A.; Malone, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship among alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and suicide proneness in undergraduate college students (N = 996) was examined. As hypothesized, alcohol-related problems, perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness were all significantly and positively correlated with suicide proneness.…

  18. Pregnancy-specific anxiety: which women are highest and what are the alcohol-related risks?

    PubMed

    Arch, Joanna J

    2013-04-01

    In a national US sample of pregnant women (n=311), we investigated the question of who becomes highly anxious about pregnancy by examining putative sociodemographic, pregnancy- and mental health-related predictors of pregnancy anxiety. We also assessed the contribution of pregnancy anxiety to the risk of significant alcohol consumption during pregnancy. English-speaking pregnant women aged 18+years were recruited online. Results indicated that sociodemographic factors (younger age, white, unmarried, lower education, lower household income, no previous children), feelings about current pregnancy (unwanted), and general anxiety (higher general and state anxiety) predicted higher pregnancy-related anxiety, whereas age, religiosity, number of weeks pregnant, unplanned pregnancy, and maternal depressive symptoms did not. Pregnancy anxiety was the single strongest predictor of alcohol drinking risk during pregnancy (p<.001, ∆R(2)=.10) a relationship that held after controlling for other significant predictors. Pregnancy anxiety also represented the strongest predictor of screening positively for drinking risk during pregnancy at the total T-ACE (an alcohol risk screener for pregnancy) level of 3+ (odds ratio 95% CI=1.61-4.14, p<.001), though not at the level of 2+ (odds ratio 95% CI=0.98-1.68, p=.07). We discuss implications for the link between maternal mental health and birth/ child outcomes.

  19. Associations among depressive symptoms, drinking motives, and risk for alcohol-related problems in veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Diulio, Andrea R; Dutta, Nicole M; Gauthier, Jami M; Witte, Tracy K; Correia, Christopher J; Angarano, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous alcohol consumption among medical students appears to occur at a level comparable to the general population; however, among medical students, it has been found that the motivation to use alcohol partially stems from unique stressors related to their professional training. Although veterinary students may also experience psychological distress in association with their training, little work has focused on the way that these students use alcohol to cope with their distress. The current study sought to examine the severity of depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption among veterinary students as well as students' specific motives for drinking alcohol. The majority of our sample reported experiencing at least one depressive symptom, and a significant proportion engaged in high-risk drinking, with men reporting more harmful alcohol use patterns. Drinking motives related to managing internal bodily and emotional states accounted for variance in drinking patterns. Further, drinking to ameliorate negative emotions partially accounted for the relationship between psychological distress and high-risk drinking. The results of this study suggest that depressive symptoms among veterinary students may be related to harmful drinking patterns, due to alcohol being used as a coping mechanism to regulate emotions. The findings from this study can be used to develop targeted interventions to promote psychological well-being among veterinary students.

  20. A cultural and social cognitive model of differences in acculturation orientations, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol-related risk behaviors among Hispanic college students.

    PubMed

    Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Schwartz, Seth J; Zamboanga, Byron L; Ham, Lindsay S; Huang, Shi

    2013-04-01

    The present study used a cultural and social cognitive conceptual framework to investigate whether alcohol expectancies and valuations would mediate the associations between specific acculturation orientations and alcohol-related risk behaviors. The sample comprised 1,527 Hispanic students attending colleges and universities in diverse regions of the United States. Respondents completed self-report measures of Hispanic and American cultural practices; alcohol expectancies and valuations; and self-reported frequency of hazardous alcohol use, binge drinking, sexual activity under the influence of alcohol, driving under the influence of alcohol, and riding with a drunk driver. Latent class analysis was used to classify participants into acculturation orientations. Results indicated that acculturation orientations were differentially associated with alcohol-related risk outcomes, with separated bicultural and low bicultural orientations inversely related to all of the alcohol-related risk behaviors except for riding with a drunk driver. Negative expectancy valuations were positively associated with endorsement of binge drinking and drunk driving and negative expectancies were negatively associated with binge drinking, drunk driving, and riding with a drunk driver. With the exception of sexual activity under the influence of alcohol, the associations between acculturation orientations and alcohol-related risk behaviors were partially mediated by positive alcohol expectancies. Our findings provided relevant data that are informative for preventing alcohol and related risk behaviors among Hispanic college students. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Impulsive sensation seeking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related consequences: Do protective behavioral strategies help high risk adolescents?

    PubMed

    Doumas, Diana M; Miller, Raissa; Esp, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This study examined protective behavioral strategies (PBS) as a moderator of the relationship between impulsive sensation seeking and binge drinking and alcohol-related consequences in a sample of high school seniors (N=346). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that impulsive sensation seeking was a significant predictor of binge drinking and alcohol-related consequences and that PBS moderated these relationships. Specifically, manner of drinking moderated the relationships such that among students with high impulsive sensation seeking, those using strategies related to how they drink (e.g. avoiding rapid and excessive drinking) reported lower levels of binge drinking and alcohol-related consequences than those using fewer of these strategies. Clinical implications are discussed including using personality-targeted interventions that equip high impulsive sensation seeking adolescents with specific strategies to reduce binge drinking and alcohol-related consequences.

  2. [Vigilance in application of law 125/2001 concerning alcohol and alcohol-related risk assessment in workplaces].

    PubMed

    Cornaggia, Nicoletta; Saretto, G; Tiso, C; Caironi, M

    2007-01-01

    The prohibition of using, dispensing or distributing alcoholic drinks at workplaces involving an elevated risk of accidents (Art. 15 - Law 125/2001 "General policy concerning alcohol and alcohol- related problems") is consistent with the duties of employers and employees regulated by Decree 626/94. The purpose of this rule of law is the health protection of workers and of any third party in the workplace. Alcohol-addiction in workers has to be considered as part of the risk assessment and, in the case of the hazardous activities identified in the law, the increase in risk due to alcohol consumption must also be considered Along with the prohibition of dispensing or distributing alcoholic drinks at the workplace, companies can launch training and information campaigns on the adverse health effects resulting from by harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption in workplaces, which will be all the more effective if addressed to all workers and not only to the more exposed employees. In developing this activity, the company occupational health physician has a central role to play by giving assistance to employees, involving the management and cooperating with public institutions. The controlling body will promote, support and supervise this process. In particular, the local authorities for Occupational Health and Safety (PSAL), together with social partners, will encourage companies to start up projects for health protection, will facilitate cooperation with the Pathological Addiction Services (Ser. T), and will encourage the implementation of a network to facilitate occupational health physicians in analyzing accident risks and solving health problems related to alcohol abuse.

  3. Firearms, alcohol and crime: convictions for driving under the influence (DUI) and other alcohol-related crimes and risk for future criminal activity among authorised purchasers of handguns.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J; Wright, Mona A; Castillo-Carniglia, Alvaro; Shev, Aaron; Cerdá, Magdalena

    2017-01-30

    Firearm violence frequently involves alcohol, but there are no studies of misuse of alcohol and risk for future violence among firearm owners. We examined the association between prior convictions for alcohol-related crimes, chiefly driving under the influence (DUI), and risk of subsequent arrest among 4066 individuals who purchased handguns in California in 1977. During follow-up through 1991, 32.8% of those with prior alcohol-related convictions and 5.7% of those with no prior criminal history were arrested for a violent or firearm-related crime; 15.9% and 2.7%, respectively, were arrested for murder, rape, robbery or aggravated assault. Prior alcohol-related convictions were associated with a fourfold to fivefold increase in risk of incident arrest for a violent or firearm-related crime, a relative increase greater than that seen for age, sex or prior violence. Prior convictions for alcohol-related crime may be an important predictor of risk for future criminal activity among purchasers of firearms.

  4. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M; Keyes, Katherine M; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect and parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes 'maximum drinks in a day' (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n = 1143) evaluated between 2007 and 2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks (mean differences: 1.50; 1.13, respectively) and AUD severity (mean ratios: 0.71; 0.27, respectively). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (P < 0.01) and AUD severity (P < 0.05), in that there was a stronger effect of ADH1B-rs1229984 genotype on Maxdrinks and AUD severity among those who had experienced childhood adversity compared with those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g. those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors.

  5. The Quik Fix study: a randomised controlled trial of brief interventions for young people with alcohol-related injuries and illnesses accessing emergency department and crisis support care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol is a major preventable cause of injury, disability and death in young people. Large numbers of young people with alcohol-related injuries and medical conditions present to hospital emergency departments (EDs). Access to brief, efficacious, accessible and cost effective treatment is an international health priority within this age group. While there is growing evidence for the efficacy of brief motivational interviewing (MI) for reducing alcohol use in young people, there is significant scope to increase its impact, and determine if it is the most efficacious and cost effective type of brief intervention available. The efficacy of personality-targeted interventions (PIs) for alcohol misuse delivered individually to young people is yet to be determined or compared to MI, despite growing evidence for school-based PIs. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of telephone-delivered MI, PI and an Assessment Feedback/Information (AF/I) only control for reducing alcohol use and related harm in young people. Methods/design Participants will be 390 young people aged 16 to 25 years presenting to a crisis support service or ED with alcohol-related injuries and illnesses (including severe alcohol intoxication). This single blinded superiority trial randomized young people to (i) 2 sessions of MI; (ii) 2 sessions of a new PI or (iii) a 1 session AF/I only control. Participants are reassessed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months on the primary outcomes of alcohol use and related problems and secondary outcomes of mental health symptoms, functioning, severity of problematic alcohol use, alcohol injuries, alcohol-related knowledge, coping self-efficacy to resist using alcohol, and cost effectiveness. Discussion This study will identify the most efficacious and cost-effective telephone-delivered brief intervention for reducing alcohol misuse and related problems in young people presenting to crisis support

  6. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community Join the ... Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn more about ...

  7. Mediational relations of substance use risk profiles, alcohol-related outcomes, and drinking motives among young adolescents in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Jeroen; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Engels, Rutger C M E; Wiers, Reinout W; Kleinjan, Marloes

    2013-12-01

    To examine the mediation by drinking motives of the association between personality traits (negative thinking, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) and alcohol frequency, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems using a sample of students (n=3053) aged between 13 and 15, who reported lifetime use of alcohol. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationship between personality traits and alcohol-related outcomes. The Model Indirect approach was used to examine the hypothesized mediation by drinking motives of the association between personality traits and alcohol-related outcomes. In this study among young adolescents, coping motives, social motives and enhancement motives played a prominent mediating role between personality and the alcohol outcomes. Multi-group analyses revealed that the role of drinking motives in the relation between personality and alcohol outcomes were largely similar between the sexes, though there were some differences found for binge drinking. More specifically, for young males, enhancement motives seems to play a more prominent mediation role between personality and binge drinking, while for young females, coping motives play a more mediating role between personality and binge drinking. Few mediation associations were found for conformity motives, and no relationships were found between anxiety sensitivity and drinking motives. Already in early adolescence, personality traits are found to be associated with drinking motives, which in turn are related to alcohol use. This study provides indications that it is important to intervene in early adolescence with interventions focusing on personality traits in combination with drinking motives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of an intervention for patients with alcohol-related injuries: results of a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Whitty, Megan; Nagel, Tricia; Ward, Linda; Jayaraj, Rama; Kavanagh, David

    2015-06-01

    To explore the effect of education and training on the delivery of alcohol screening and brief intervention and referral to high-risk patients in a hospital setting. Main outcome measures included; delivery of training; practice change in relation to staff performing alcohol screening, brief intervention and referrals. Observational study design using mixed methods set in a tertiary referral hospital. Pre-post assessment of medical records and semi-structured interviews with key informants. Routine screening for substance misuse (9% pre / 71.4% post) and wellbeing concerns (6.6% pre / 15 % post) was more frequent following the introduction of resources and staff participation in educational workshops. There was no evidence of a concomitant increase in delivery of brief intervention or referrals to services. Implementation challenges, including time constraints and staff attitudes, and enablers such as collaboration and visible pathways, were identified. Rates of patient screening increased, however barriers to delivery of brief intervention and referrals remained. Implementation strategies targeting specific barriers and enablers to introducing interventions are both required to improve the application of secondary prevention for patients in acute settings. Educational training, formalised liaison between services, systematised early intervention protocols, and continuous quality improvement processes will progress service delivery in this area. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  9. Development and evaluation of training in culturally specific screening and brief intervention for hospital patients with alcohol-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Whitty, Megan; Nagel, Tricia; Jayaraj, Rama; Kavanagh, David

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate health practitioners' confidence and knowledge of alcohol screening, brief intervention and referral after training in a culturally adapted intervention on alcohol misuse and well-being issues for trauma patients. Mixed methods, involving semi-structured interviews at baseline and a post-workshop questionnaire. Targeted acute care within a remote area major tertiary referral hospital. Ten key informants and 69 questionnaire respondents from relevant community services and hospital-based health care professionals. Screening and brief intervention training workshops and resources for 59 hospital staff. Self-reported staff knowledge of alcohol screening, brief intervention and referral, and satisfaction with workshop content and format. After training, 44% of participants reported being motivated to implement alcohol screening and intervention. Satisfaction with training was high, and most participants reported that their knowledge of screening and brief intervention was improved. Targeted educational interventions can improve the knowledge and confidence of inpatient staff who manage patients at high risk of alcohol use disorder. Further research is needed to determine the duration of the effect and influence on practice behaviour. Ongoing integrated training, linked with systemic support and established quality improvement processes, is required to facilitate sustained change and widespread dissemination. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  10. Data sharing for prevention: a case study in the development of a comprehensive emergency department injury surveillance system and its use in preventing violence and alcohol-related harms

    PubMed Central

    Quigg, Zara; Hughes, Karen; Bellis, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine emergency department (ED) data sharing via a local injury surveillance system and assess its contribution to the prevention of violence and alcohol-related harms. Methods 6-year (2004–2010) exploratory study analysing injury attendances to one ED in the North West of England using descriptive and trend analyses. Results Over the 6-year period, there were 242 796 ED injury attendances, including 21 683 for intentional injuries. Compared with unintentional injury patients, intentional injury patients were more likely to be men, aged 18–34 years, live in the most deprived communities, have attended the ED at night/weekends, have been injured in a public place and have consumed alcohol prior to the injury. Detailed data collected on alcohol and violence-related ED attendances were shared with local partners to monitor local trends and inform prevention activity including targeted policing and licensing enforcement. Over the 6-year period, intentional ED injury attendances decreased by 35.6% and alcohol-related assault attendances decreased by 30.3%. Conclusions The collection of additional ED data on assault details and alcohol use prior to injury, and its integration into multi-agency policy and practice, played an important role in driving local violence prevention activity. Further research is needed to assess the direct contribution ED data sharing makes to reductions in violence. PMID:22210640

  11. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Results: Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Conclusion: Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL

  12. Teenage drinking, alcohol availability and pricing: a cross-sectional study of risk and protective factors for alcohol-related harms in school children

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, Mark A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Hughes, Karen; Hughes, Sara; Cook, Penny A; Morleo, Michela; Hannon, Kerin; Smallthwaite, Linda; Jones, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a lack of empirical analyses examining how alcohol consumption patterns in children relate to harms. Such intelligence is required to inform parents, children and policy relating to the provision and use of alcohol during childhood. Here, we examine drinking habits and associated harms in 15-16 year olds and explore how this can inform public health advice on child drinking. Methods An opportunistic survey of 15-16 year olds (n = 9,833) in North West England was undertaken to determine alcohol consumption patterns, drink types consumed, drinking locations, methods of access and harms encountered. Cost per unit of alcohol was estimated based on a second survey of 29 retail outlets. Associations between demographics, drinking behaviours, alcohol pricing and negative outcomes (public drinking, forgetting things after drinking, violence when drunk and alcohol-related regretted sex) were examined. Results Proportions of drinkers having experienced violence when drunk (28.8%), alcohol-related regretted sex (12.5%) and forgetting things (45.3%), or reporting drinking in public places (35.8%), increased with drinking frequency, binge frequency and units consumed per week. At similar levels of consumption, experiencing any negative alcohol-related outcome was lower in those whose parents provided alcohol. Drunken violence was disproportionately associated with being male and greater deprivation while regretted sex and forgetting things after drinking were associated with being female. Independent of drinking behaviours, consuming cheaper alcohol was related to experiencing violence when drunk, forgetting things after drinking and drinking in public places. Conclusion There is no safe level of alcohol consumption for 15-16 year olds. However, while abstinence removes risk of harms from personal alcohol consumption, its promotion may also push children into accessing drink outside family environments and contribute to higher risks of harm. Strategies to

  13. Teenage drinking, alcohol availability and pricing: a cross-sectional study of risk and protective factors for alcohol-related harms in school children.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Mark A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Hughes, Karen; Hughes, Sara; Cook, Penny A; Morleo, Michela; Hannon, Kerin; Smallthwaite, Linda; Jones, Lisa

    2009-10-09

    There is a lack of empirical analyses examining how alcohol consumption patterns in children relate to harms. Such intelligence is required to inform parents, children and policy relating to the provision and use of alcohol during childhood. Here, we examine drinking habits and associated harms in 15-16 year olds and explore how this can inform public health advice on child drinking. An opportunistic survey of 15-16 year olds (n = 9,833) in North West England was undertaken to determine alcohol consumption patterns, drink types consumed, drinking locations, methods of access and harms encountered. Cost per unit of alcohol was estimated based on a second survey of 29 retail outlets. Associations between demographics, drinking behaviours, alcohol pricing and negative outcomes (public drinking, forgetting things after drinking, violence when drunk and alcohol-related regretted sex) were examined. Proportions of drinkers having experienced violence when drunk (28.8%), alcohol-related regretted sex (12.5%) and forgetting things (45.3%), or reporting drinking in public places (35.8%), increased with drinking frequency, binge frequency and units consumed per week. At similar levels of consumption, experiencing any negative alcohol-related outcome was lower in those whose parents provided alcohol. Drunken violence was disproportionately associated with being male and greater deprivation while regretted sex and forgetting things after drinking were associated with being female. Independent of drinking behaviours, consuming cheaper alcohol was related to experiencing violence when drunk, forgetting things after drinking and drinking in public places. There is no safe level of alcohol consumption for 15-16 year olds. However, while abstinence removes risk of harms from personal alcohol consumption, its promotion may also push children into accessing drink outside family environments and contribute to higher risks of harm. Strategies to reduce alcohol-related harms in children

  14. The role of an open-space CCTV system in limiting alcohol-related assault injuries in a late-night entertainment precinct in a tropical Queensland city, Australia.

    PubMed

    Pointing, Shane; Hayes-Jonkers, Charmaine; Bohanna, India; Clough, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) systems which incorporate real-time communication links between camera room operators and on-the-ground security may limit injuries resulting from alcohol-related assault. This pilot study examined CCTV footage and operator records of security responses for two periods totalling 22 days in 2010-2011 when 30 alcohol-related assaults were recorded. Semistructured discussions were conducted with camera room operators during 18 h of observation. Camera operators were proactive, efficiently directing street security to assault incidents. The system intervened in 40% (n=12) of alcohol-related assaults, limiting possible injury. This included three incidents judged as potentially preventable. A further five (17%) assault incidents were also judged as potentially preventable, while 43% (n=13) happened too quickly for intervention. Case studies describe security intervention in each category. Further research is recommended, particularly to evaluate the effects on preventing injuries through targeted awareness training to improve responsiveness and enhance the preventative capacity of similar CCTV systems.

  15. Human alcohol-related neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Kril, Jillian J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related diseases of the nervous system are caused by excessive exposures to alcohol, with or without co-existing nutritional or vitamin deficiencies. Toxic and metabolic effects of alcohol (ethanol) vary with brain region, age/developmental stage, dose, and duration of exposures. In the mature brain, heavy chronic or binge alcohol exposures can cause severe debilitating diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and skeletal muscle. Most commonly, long-standing heavy alcohol abuse leads to disproportionate loss of cerebral white matter and impairments in executive function. The cerebellum (especially the vermis), cortical-limbic circuits, skeletal muscle, and peripheral nerves are also important targets of chronic alcohol-related metabolic injury and degeneration. Although all cell types within the nervous system are vulnerable to the toxic, metabolic, and degenerative effects of alcohol, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and synaptic terminals are major targets, accounting for the white matter atrophy, neural inflammation and toxicity, and impairments in synaptogenesis. Besides chronic degenerative neuropathology, alcoholics are predisposed to develop severe potentially life-threatening acute or subacute symmetrical hemorrhagic injury in the diencephalon and brainstem due to thiamine deficiency, which exerts toxic/metabolic effects on glia, myelin, and the microvasculature. Alcohol also has devastating neurotoxic and teratogenic effects on the developing brain in association with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder/fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcohol impairs function of neurons and glia, disrupting a broad array of functions including neuronal survival, cell migration, and glial cell (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) differentiation. Further progress is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of this exposure-related constellation of nervous system diseases and better correlate the underlying pathology with in vivo imaging and biochemical lesions

  16. Human alcohol-related neuropathology.

    PubMed

    de la Monte, Suzanne M; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-related diseases of the nervous system are caused by excessive exposures to alcohol, with or without co-existing nutritional or vitamin deficiencies. Toxic and metabolic effects of alcohol (ethanol) vary with brain region, age/developmental stage, dose, and duration of exposures. In the mature brain, heavy chronic or binge alcohol exposures can cause severe debilitating diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and skeletal muscle. Most commonly, long-standing heavy alcohol abuse leads to disproportionate loss of cerebral white matter and impairments in executive function. The cerebellum (especially the vermis), cortical-limbic circuits, skeletal muscle, and peripheral nerves are also important targets of chronic alcohol-related metabolic injury and degeneration. Although all cell types within the nervous system are vulnerable to the toxic, metabolic, and degenerative effects of alcohol, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and synaptic terminals are major targets, accounting for the white matter atrophy, neural inflammation and toxicity, and impairments in synaptogenesis. Besides chronic degenerative neuropathology, alcoholics are predisposed to develop severe potentially life-threatening acute or subacute symmetrical hemorrhagic injury in the diencephalon and brainstem due to thiamine deficiency, which exerts toxic/metabolic effects on glia, myelin, and the microvasculature. Alcohol also has devastating neurotoxic and teratogenic effects on the developing brain in association with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder/fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcohol impairs function of neurons and glia, disrupting a broad array of functions including neuronal survival, cell migration, and glial cell (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) differentiation. Further progress is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of this exposure-related constellation of nervous system diseases and better correlate the underlying pathology with in vivo imaging and biochemical lesions.

  17. Pretensioners and Injury Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Pretensioners and Injury Risk John R. Yannaccone, P.E. Forensic Safety Group Hatboro, Pennsylvania Gary R. Whitman and Larry Sicher...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Forensic Safety... Forensic Safety Group has over fifteen years experience in the field of occupant protection. His experience includes extensive research and

  18. Adolescents' sense-making of alcohol-related risks: The role of drinking situations and social settings.

    PubMed

    Katainen, Anu; Lehto, Anna-Sofia; Maunu, Antti

    2015-09-01

    The article explores how young people understand the risks of alcohol use and how these understandings are associated with differing drinking situations and social settings. By taking account of situational factors, the aim is to demonstrate how young people have highly nuanced notions of drinking styles that suit different drinking situations and of associated risks. The data for the research were gathered in 18 group interviews with Finnish ninth graders aged 14-15 years. Short film clips portraying young people in different drinking situations were used as stimulus material for the interviews. Data analysis focussed on the risk factors related to the social situations illustrated in the film clips. The results show that young people's risk assessments are not based on alcohol itself, but the magnitude of risk is estimated in relation to the social setting of the drinking situation. What is relevant for young people is whether the social situation allows them to make choices with which they feel comfortable. At the opposite pole of problem drinking was social drinking for the purpose of having fun together with other people in such a way that one remains in control of the drinking situation. From a prevention point of view, a key implication is that awareness of the risks is closely associated with situational and social factors. However, the awareness of those risks does not necessarily prevent young people from drinking because they may be accepted as part of the drinking experience. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Do Students Use Contextual Protective Behaviors to Reduce Alcohol-Related Sexual Risk? Examination of a Dual-Process Decision-Making Model

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Nichole M.; Hultgren, Brittney A.; Reavy, Racheal; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Turrisi, Rob; Cleveland, Michael J.; Sell, Nichole M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent studies suggest drinking protective behaviors (DPBs) and contextual protective behaviors (CPBs) can uniquely reduce alcohol-related sexual risk in college students. Few studies have examined CPBs independently, and even fewer have utilized theory to examine modifiable psychosocial predictors of students’ decisions to use CPBs. The current study used a prospective design to examine 1) rational and reactive pathways and psychosocial constructs predictive of CPB use, and 2) how gender might moderate these influences in a sample of college students. Method Students (n = 508) completed web-based baseline (mid-spring semester) and 1- and 6-month follow-up assessments of CPB use; psychosocial constructs (expectancies, normative beliefs, attitudes, and self-concept); and rational and reactive pathways (intentions and willingness). Regression was used to examine rational and reactive influences as proximal predictors of CPB use at the 6-month follow-up. Subsequent path analyses examined the effects of psychosocial constructs, as distal predictors of CPB use, mediated through the rational and reactive pathways. Results Both rational (intentions to use CPB) and reactive (willingness to use CPB) influences were significantly associated with increased CPB use. The examined distal predictors were found to effect CPB use differentially through the rational and reactive pathways. Gender did not significantly moderate any relationships within in the model. Discussion Findings suggest potential entry points for increasing CPB use that include both rational and reactive pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates the mechanisms underlying how to increase the use of CPBs in programs designed to reduce alcohol-related sexual consequences and victimization. PMID:26415062

  20. Do students use contextual protective behaviors to reduce alcohol-related sexual risk? Examination of a dual-process decision-making model.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Nichole M; Hultgren, Brittney A; Reavy, Racheal; Mallett, Kimberly A; Turrisi, Rob; Cleveland, Michael J; Sell, Nichole M

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies suggest drinking protective behaviors (DPBs) and contextual protective behaviors (CPBs) can uniquely reduce alcohol-related sexual risk in college students. Few studies have examined CPBs independently, and even fewer have utilized theory to examine modifiable psychosocial predictors of students' decisions to use CPBs. The current study used a prospective design to examine (a) rational and reactive pathways and psychosocial constructs predictive of CPB use and (b) how gender might moderate these influences in a sample of college students. Students (n = 508) completed Web-based baseline (mid-Spring semester) and 1- and 6-month follow-up assessments of CPB use; psychosocial constructs (expectancies, normative beliefs, attitudes, and self-concept); and rational and reactive pathways (intentions and willingness). Regression was used to examine rational and reactive influences as proximal predictors of CPB use at the 6-month follow-up. Subsequent path analyses examined the effects of psychosocial constructs, as distal predictors of CPB use, mediated through the rational and reactive pathways. Both rational (intentions to use CPB) and reactive (willingness to use CPB) influences were significantly associated with increased CPB use. The examined distal predictors were found to effect CPB use differentially through the rational and reactive pathways. Gender did not significantly moderate any relationships within in the model. Findings suggest potential entry points for increasing CPB use that include both rational and reactive pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates the mechanisms underlying how to increase the use of CPBs in programs designed to reduce alcohol-related sexual consequences and victimization. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  2. An Examination of Prepartying and Drinking Game Playing During High School and Their Impact on Alcohol-Related Risk Upon Entrance into College

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Shannon R.; Hummer, Justin F.

    2015-01-01

    Prepartying and drinking game playing are associated with excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences in college populations; however, research exploring the prevalence of these high risk drinking contexts among high school students, and how such engagement may impact both high school and subsequent college drinking risk, is lacking. The current study, which is the first study to assess prepartying during high school, examined how engaging in either prepartying or drinking game playing during high school was associated with risky high school drinking as well asalcohol use and consequences during the transitional first month of college. The study involved 477 first-year college students, the majority of whom were 18 years old (94%), female (66%), and Caucasian (59%). Prepartying was found to be highly prevalent in high school (45%). Further, students who prepartied or played drinking games during high school drank significantly more in high school than students who did not engage in these high risk activities. Finally, prepartying and game playing during high school were associated with greater collegiate alcohol consumption (controlling for high school drinking) and consequences (controlling for both high school and college drinking). This study establishes prepartying and drinking games as common high risk activities among both high school and incoming first-year college students, and addresses implications for prevention and targeted interventions. PMID:19904593

  3. The Influence of Alcohol-Related Cognitions on Personality-Based Risk for Alcohol Use during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekman, Nicole M.; Cummins, Kevin; Brown, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether expectancies about the impact of not drinking or reducing alcohol use and perceptions of peer alcohol use partially mediated risk incurred by sensation seeking for adolescent alcohol involvement. High school drinkers (N = 3,153) completed a survey assessing substance use, sensation seeking, perceived peer alcohol use,…

  4. The Influence of Alcohol-Related Cognitions on Personality-Based Risk for Alcohol Use during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekman, Nicole M.; Cummins, Kevin; Brown, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether expectancies about the impact of not drinking or reducing alcohol use and perceptions of peer alcohol use partially mediated risk incurred by sensation seeking for adolescent alcohol involvement. High school drinkers (N = 3,153) completed a survey assessing substance use, sensation seeking, perceived peer alcohol use,…

  5. Tracking the When, Where, and With Whom of Alcohol Use: Integrating Ecological Momentary Assessment and Geospatial Data to Examine Risk for Alcohol-Related Problems.

    PubMed

    Freisthler, Bridget; Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Bersamin, Melina; Gruenewald, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Prevention researchers have found that drinking in different contexts is related to different alcohol problems. Where and with whom people drink affects the types of alcohol-related problems they experience. Consequently, identifying those contexts that result in the greatest number of problems provides a novel opportunity to target new prevention efforts aimed at those contexts. However, identifying these contexts poses methodological challenges to prevention research. To overcome these challenges, researchers need tools that allow them to gather detailed information about when and where people choose to drink and how contextual factors influence drinking risks. New data collection and analysis techniques, such as activity-space analysis, which examines movement through different contexts, and ecological momentary assessment, which captures microlevel contextual changes as individuals move through their days, can advance the field of alcohol studies by providing detailed information on the use of drinking contexts, particularly when combined. Data acquired through these methods allow researchers to better identify those con-texts where and conditions under which drinking and problems related to drinking occur. Use of these methods will allow prevention practitioners to target prevention efforts to those contexts that place most drinkers at risk and tailor prevention efforts to each context for specific outcomes.

  6. How Social Reactions to Alcohol-Related Facial Flushing Are Affected by Gender, Relationship, and Drinking Purposes: Implications for Education to Reduce Aerodigestive Cancer Risks.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ian M; Ding, Lanyan; Shell, Duane F; Lin, Lida

    2017-06-09

    Alcohol-related facial flushing is a sign of compromised alcohol metabolism and increased risk of certain cancers. This project examined how facial flushing might be used to reduce alcohol use to lower cancer risks. Interviews with Chinese university students identified gender, friendship, and drinking purpose as important variables related to whether someone would encourage a person who flushes when drinking alcohol to stop or reduce their drinking. A questionnaire was developed that incorporated these variables into 24 drinking scenarios in which someone flushed while drinking. Students responded whether they would (a) encourage the flusher to stop or drink less; (b) do nothing while wishing they could; or (c) do nothing because there was no need. Analysis of survey responses from 2912 university students showed a three-way interaction of the variables and implied that the probability students will intervene when a drinker flushes was highest when the flusher was a female, a close friend, and the drinking purpose was for fun and lowest if the flusher was a male, the friendship was general, and the drinking purpose was risky. The results provide important details about the social factors affecting how other people respond to a person who flushes when drinking alcohol. This information is useful for those considering ways to reduce and prevent aerodigestive cancers through education and information programs.

  7. Processing of Alcohol-Related Health Threat in At-Risk Drinkers: An Online Study of Gender-Related Self-Affirmation Effects.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Sunjeev K; Place, Hannah; Barton, Jessica A; Linke, Stuart; Curran, H Valerie; Harris, Peter R

    2016-11-01

    Defensiveness in response to threatening health information related to excessive alcohol consumption prevents appropriate behaviour change. Alternatively, self-affirmation may improve cognitive-affective processing of threatening information, thus contributing to successful self-regulation. Effects of an online self-affirmation procedure were examined in at-risk university student drinkers. Participants were randomly assigned to a self-affirmation (writing about personally relevant values) or control task (writing about values relevant to another person) prior to presentation of alcohol-related threatening information. Assessment of prosocial feelings (e.g. 'love') after the task served as a manipulation check. Generic and personalized information regarding the link between alcohol use and cancer was presented, followed by assessment of perceived threat, message avoidance and derogation. Page dwell-times served as indirect indices of message engagement. Alcohol consumption and intention to drink less were assessed during the first online session and at 1-week and 1-month follow-up. Although self-affirmation resulted in higher levels of prosocial feelings immediately after the task, there was no effect on behaviour in the self-affirmation group. Effects on intention were moderated by gender, such that men showed lower intention immediately after self-affirmation, but this increased at 1-week follow-up. Women's intention to reduce consumption in the self-affirmation group reduced over time. Trend-level effects on indices of derogation and message acceptance were in the predicted direction only in men. It is feasible to perform self-affirmation procedures in an online environment with at-risk drinkers. However, use of internet-based procedures with this population may give rise to (gender-dependent) effects that are substantially diluted compared with lab-based experiments. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Preventing Alcohol-Related Problems Through Health Policy Research

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Robert B.; Fell, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-related health policy research is responsible for guiding the implementation of laws and public health policies that have reduced alcohol-related highway injuries and deaths, as well as other alcohol-related problems over the last 40 years. This research, which tests theories about potential policy changes and responds to specific problems, has examined a vast array of prevention programs. This article briefly identifies 10 program categories and highlights four programs to illustrate the scope and complexity of the individual health policy areas within the categories. PMID:23579933

  9. Reducing alcohol-related harm and social disorder in a university community: a framework for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Kimberly; Connor, Jennie L; Kypri, Kypros

    2010-10-01

    In New Zealand and other middle to high income countries, university student are at high risk of alcohol-related injury and other problems due to their typical pattern of episodic heavy drinking. In 2007, one university implemented Campus Watch, a novel and extensive programme to reduce social disorder, including alcohol-related injury, in the university area. To quantify the effects of this complex intervention. A large public university campus and surrounding community in New Zealand. A health promotion evaluation model was used, examining: (1) how the programme was developed, introduced and received by the community? (process); (2) whether the programme affected behaviour? (impact); and (3) whether the programme reduced social disorder and alcohol-related harm in particular? (outcome). The outcome phase uses a non-equivalent control group design to measure changes occurring in the Campus Watch area compared with other universities, and with a same-city control site. Programme staff, university students and other community members. Interviews with university administrators and Campus Watch staff; surveys of local residents' views; Campus Watch incident data; national surveys of university students in 2005, 2007 and 2009; police data; fire department data. Prevalence of heavy episodic drinking; number of acute alcohol-related harms; incidence of antisocial behaviour, assault and street fires. Regression analyses will be used to examine changes in the intervention site relative to changes in the control areas.

  10. A review of risk factors and patterns of motorcycle injuries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mau-Roung; Kraus, Jess F

    2009-07-01

    Per vehicle mile traveled, motorcycle riders have a 34-fold higher risk of death in a crash than people driving other types of motor vehicles. While lower-extremity injuries most commonly occur in all motorcycle crashes, head injuries are most frequent in fatal crashes. Helmets and helmet use laws have been shown to be effective in reducing head injuries and deaths from motorcycle crashes. Alcohol is the major contributing factor to fatal crashes. Enforcement of legal limits on the blood alcohol concentration is effective in reducing motorcycle deaths, while some alcohol-related interventions such as a minimal legal drinking age, increased alcohol excise taxes, and responsible beverage service specifically for motorcycle riders have not been examined. Other modifiable protective or risk factors comprise inexperience and driver training, conspicuity and daytime headlight laws, motorcycle licensure and ownership, riding speed, and risk-taking behaviors. Features of motorcycle use and potentially effective prevention programs for motorcycle crash injuries in developing countries are discussed. Finally, recommendations for future motorcycle-injury research are made.

  11. Active living and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Natri, A; Lapinleimu, I; Palvanen, M; Heiskanen, M; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to get reliable insight into injury risk in various commuting and lifestyle activities, as well as recreational and competitive sports. A cohort of 3 657 persons was randomly selected from the 15- to 74-year-old Finnish population. Ninety-two percent (n = 3 363) of the subjects accepted to participate the one-year follow-up, record all their physical activities that lasted 15 min or more, and register all acute and overuse injuries that occurred during these activities. To collect the information, the study subjects were interviewed by phone by the trained personnel of the Statistics Finland three times in four-month intervals. The individual injury risk per exposure time was relatively low, ranging from 0.19 to 1.5 per 1 000 hours of participation, in commuting and lifestyle activities including walking and cycling to work, gardening, home repair, hunting and fishing, and, in sports such as golf, dancing, swimming, walking, and rowing. The risk was clearly higher in squash, orienteering, and contact and team sports, such as judo, wrestling, karate, rinkball, floorball, basketball, soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, and Finnish baseball ranging from 6.6 to 18.3 per 1 000 hours of participation. However, the highest absolute number of injuries occurred in low-risk activities, such as gardening, walking, home-repair, and cycling, because they are performed so often. In conclusion, individual injury risk per exposure hours is relatively low in commuting and lifestyle activities compared to many recreational and competitive sports. However, at a population level, these low-to-moderate intensity activities are widely practised producing a rather high absolute number of injuries, and thus, preventive efforts are needed in these activities, too.

  12. Managing alcohol related aggression in the emergency department (Part I).

    PubMed

    Ferns, Terry; Cork, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Internationally, violence in the emergency department (ED) is of a constant concern to emergency practitioners. Frequently, both original research papers and anecdotal reports emphasise the phenomenon of alcohol related aggression in the ED. In this first paper, we highlight the literatures discussion of alcohol related violence in the emergency department and the potential psychological effects of alcohol intoxication. In the second we offer personal and organisational strategies clinical nursing staff may consider appropriate to minimise the risk of assault when caring for service users projecting alcohol related aggression.

  13. Impulsivity and alcohol-related risk among college students: examining urgency, sensation seeking and the moderating influence of beliefs about alcohol's role in the college experience.

    PubMed

    LaBrie, Joseph W; Kenney, Shannon R; Napper, Lucy E; Miller, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The personality trait of impulsivity is predictive of heavy drinking and consequences among college students. The current study examined how impulsivity-measured via positive urgency, negative urgency, and sensation seeking-and a person's beliefs about the role alcohol plays in the college experience relate to drinking and consequences in a sample of 470 college students (mean age=19 years, 61.3% female, 59.8% White). In support of the hypotheses, sensation seeking independently predicted greater drinking, and both positive urgency and negative urgency predicted greater experience of alcohol-related negative consequences after controlling for consumption level. Moreover, alcohol beliefs moderated the relationship between impulsivity types and alcohol outcomes. Among students high (versus low) in sensation seeking, strong beliefs about alcohol's role in college life were related to significantly greater drinking, and among students high (versus low) in negative urgency, endorsing strong beliefs about alcohol's role in college life were related to greater levels of alcohol-related negative consequences. Overall, findings inform college prevention efforts by highlighting the need to distinguish unique facets of impulsivity and examine how they intersect with students' beliefs about alcohol in college.

  14. Managing alcohol related aggression in the emergency department (Part II).

    PubMed

    Cork, Alison; Ferns, Terry

    2008-04-01

    Violence in the emergency department (ED) is a global problem. In our first paper, we highlighted the potential psychological effects of alcohol intoxication, the literatures discussion of alcohol related violence in the emergency department and the importance of developing positive nurse/service user relationships. In this second paper, we discuss personal and organisational strategies clinical nursing staff may consider appropriate to minimise the risk of assault when caring for service users projecting alcohol related aggression.

  15. Correlates of Alcohol-Related Regretted Sex among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Orchowski, Lindsay M.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Borsari, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of alcohol-related regretted sex in college students warrants a better understanding of the characteristics of students who report such experiences. Therefore, the present study examined correlates of regretted sexual experiences involving alcohol use among two specific high-risk college student samples: Students mandated to alcohol intervention (N = 522) and volunteer first-year students transitioning to college (N = 481). Results indicated that alcohol-related regretted sex occurred in similar rates in mandated and volunteer students, with approximately 25% of the students reporting at least one occurrence in the past month. Women were more likely to report alcohol-related regretted sex compared to men. The belief that alcohol use would result in “liquid courage” was associated with alcohol-related regretted sex among college students, even after accounting for greater alcohol use and problem alcohol use behaviors. These findings have significant implications for intervention efforts and future research. PMID:22448762

  16. Correlates of alcohol-related regretted sex among college students.

    PubMed

    Orchowski, Lindsay M; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Borsari, Brian

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of alcohol-related regretted sex in college students warrants a better understanding of the characteristics of students who report such experiences. Therefore, the present study examined correlates of regretted sexual experiences involving alcohol use among 2 specific high-risk college student samples: students mandated to alcohol intervention (n = 522) and volunteer 1st-year students transitioning to college (n = 481). Results indicated that alcohol-related regretted sex occurred at similar rates in mandated and volunteer students, with approximately 25% of the students reporting at least 1 occurrence in the past month. Women were more likely to report alcohol-related regretted sex compared with men. The belief that alcohol use would result in "liquid courage" was associated with alcohol-related regretted sex among college students, even after accounting for greater alcohol use and problem alcohol use behaviors. These findings have significant implications for intervention efforts and future research.

  17. Susceptibility to alcohol-related liver injury.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1994-01-01

    Alcohol affects the liver through metabolic disturbances associated with its oxidation. Redox changes produced by the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase pathway affect lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism. Ethanol is also oxidized in liver microsomes by the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P4502E1, resulting in ethanol tolerance and selective hepatic perivenular damage. Furthermore, P4502E1 activates various xenobiotics, explaining the increased susceptibility of the heavy drinker to the toxicity of anesthetics, commonly used medications (i.e. isoniazid), analgesics (i.e. acetaminophen), and chemical carcinogens. Induction of microsomal enzymes also contributes to vitamin A depletion, enhances its hepatotoxicity and results in increased acetaldehyde generation from ethanol, with formation of protein adducts, glutathione depletion, free-radical-mediated toxicity, and lipid peroxidation. Chronic ethanol consumption strikingly enhances the number of hepatic collagen-producing activated lipocytes. Both in vivo (in our baboon model of alcoholic cirrhosis) and in vitro (in cultured myofibroblasts and activated lipocytes) ethanol and/or its metabolite acetaldehyde increase collagen accumulation and mRNA for collagen. Gender differences are related, in part, to lower gastric ADH activity (with consequent reduction of first pass ethanol metabolism) in young women, decreased hepatic fatty acid binding protein and increased free-fatty acid levels as well as lesser omega-hydroxylation, all of which result in increased vulnerability to ethanol. Elucidation of the biochemical effects of ethanol are now resulting in improved therapy: in baboons, S-adenosyl-L-methionine attenuates the ethanol-induced glutathione depletion and associated mitochondrial lesions, and polyenylphosphatidylcholine opposes the ethanol-induced hepatic phospholipid depletion, the decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity and the activation of hepatic lipocytes, with full prevention of ethanol-induced septal fibrosis and cirrhosis; its dilinoleoyl species also increases collagenase activity in lipocytes. The efficacy of this compound in man is now being studied in randomized multicenter clinical trials.

  18. Chronic Maternal Depression and Children's Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Brezausek, Carl M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective A substantial number of mothers of young children suffer from depression. One understudied consequence of maternal depression is how it affects toddlers’ injury risk. This study examined links between chronic maternal depression and child injury. Methods A national sample of 1,364 American children was studied. Results Chronic levels of severe maternal depression placed children at increased risk of concurrent injury from birth to age 3. The relation between chronic, severe maternal depression and child injury risk held even after controlling for variance from family SES, child sex, child temperament and externalizing behavior, and parenting. Chronic maternal depression during infancy and toddlerhood did not influence children's subsequent risk for injury, between age 3 and first grade. Less severe symptoms of chronic maternal depression were unrelated to concurrent or future child injury. Conclusions Chronic, severe levels of maternal depression are linked to concurrent child injury risk during infancy and toddlerhood. PMID:18474518

  19. [Risk factors for birth injuries].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Rubio-Espíritu, Jorge; Islas-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with birth trauma. Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital General "Dr. Manuel Gea González", Secretaría de Salud. Case-control, prolective study. There were 129 cases and 134 controls. We recorded the following variables: a) maternal and delivery: age, weight, height, prenatal care, pre-existing disease or gestational disease, mode of delivery, anesthetic management during labor, use of external maneuvers or forceps; b) newborn: birth weight, gestational age, academic degree of attendant physician at delivery, and type of birth injury. The independent risk factors associated to birth injury were: for ecchymoses; general anesthesia (OR 13.7, 95% CI = 3 - 62.6), breech presentation (OR 6.4, 95% IC 95% = 1.4 - 27.9) and gestational age < or = 32 weeks (OR 6.4, 95% CI = 1.3 - 31.1); for lacerations, vaginal dystocic delivery or cesarean section (OR 19, 95% CI = 4.4 - 81.1) and use of external maneuvers (OR 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5 - 21.6); for cephalhematoma maternal height < or = 1.54 m (OR 7.4, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7) and external maneuvers (OR 7.2, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7); for caput succedaneum, external maneuvers (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.5-7.7) and maternal age < or = 19 or > or = 36 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4 - 6.4). Risk factors associated with birth injuries identified in this study involved maternal conditions, neonatal conditions and mechanism of delivery.

  20. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  1. Injury risk management plan for volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    James, Lachlan P; Kelly, Vincent G; Beckman, Emma M

    2014-09-01

    Volleyball is an increasingly popular team sport. As with any competitive sport, there is an inherent risk of injury that must be recognized and collaboratively managed. This article provides a practical approach to the management of volleyball injuries within a team or organization. A brief review of the epidemiological data is presented which establishes (i) ankle sprain, (ii) shoulder overuse injury, (iii) patella tendinopathy, and (iv) anterior cruciate ligament injury as the primary injuries to address amongst these athletes. The interaction of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for these injuries are used to classify athletes into high-, medium- and low-risk groups. Targeted training interventions are suggested, based upon the risk level of the athlete, to minimize the occurrence of these injuries. Practical methods for integrating these activities into a training plan are also discussed.

  2. Alcohol intake and risk of injury.

    PubMed

    Cremonte, Mariana; Cherpitel, Cheryl J

    2014-01-01

    Injuries constitute a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, with intentional injuries and those related to traffic most important, due to their social impact and high prevalence. Although alcohol consumption has been identified as a risk factor for injuries, few studies have assessed risk separately for intentional injuries and unintentional injuries caused by traffic, and by other causes. The objective of this paper was to estimate the risk of injuries after acute alcohol consumption for intentional injuries and unintentional traffic and non-traffic injuries, using, alternatively, two exposure measures: self-reported drinking prior to the event and blood alcohol concentration. A probability sample was collected of 540 patients from the emergency department of a hospital in Argentina. Logistic regressions were performed, with and without adjusting for gender, age and drinking pattern. Higher risks were found when blood alcohol concentration was used as a measure of consumption, compared to self-report. The highest risk estimates were obtained for intentional injuries, followed by unintentional traffic and, lastly, by unintentional non-traffic injuries. After controlling for confounders, risks for intentional and unintentional traffic injuries appeared similar for those above and below the legal limit. Results point to a significant involvement of alcohol in the regional context.

  3. ALCOHOL INTAKE AND RISK OF INJURY

    PubMed Central

    CREMONTE, MARIANA; CHERPITEL, CHERYL J.

    2014-01-01

    Injuries constitute a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, with intentional injuries and those related to traffic most important, due to their social impact and high prevalence. Although alcohol consumption has been identified as a risk factor for injuries, few studies have assessed risk separately for intentional injuries and unintentional injuries caused by traffic, and by other causes. The objective of this paper was to estimate the risk of injuries after acute alcohol consumption for intentional injuries and unintentional traffic and non-traffic injuries, using, alternatively, two exposure measures: self-reported drinking prior to the event and blood alcohol concentration. A probability sample was collected of 540 patients from the emergency department of a hospital in Argentina. Logistic regressions were performed, with and without adjusting for gender, age and drinking pattern. Higher risks were found when blood alcohol concentration was used as a measure of consumption, compared to self-report. The highest risk estimates were obtained for intentional injuries, followed by unintentional traffic and, lastly, by unintentional non-traffic injuries. After controlling for confounders, risks for intentional and unintentional traffic injuries appeared similar for those above and below the legal limit. Results point to a significant involvement of alcohol in the regional context. PMID:25188654

  4. [Injuries in France: trends and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Richard, J-B; Thélot, B; Beck, F

    2013-06-01

    Whatever the type of injury considered, prevention requires an improvement in health services' awareness of risk factors. The Health Barometer is a general population survey conducted in France since 1992 to contribute to surveillance in this field. The survey's statistical power and the numerous health topics included in the questionnaire provide accurate information for healthcare professionals and decision-makers. The Health Barometer 2010 was a nationwide telephone survey of 9110 persons representative of the 15-85-year-old population. One part of the questionnaire detailed injuries which had occurred during the past year. The numerous variables recorded enabled application of logistic regression models to explore risk factors related to different types of injury by age group. The findings were compared with the Health Barometer 2005 data to search for temporal trends of injury prevalence. The data analysis showed that 10.3% of the 15-85-year-olds reported an injury during the past year. This rate was higher than recorded in 2005; the increase was mainly due to domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities. Both type of injury and risk factors exhibited age-related variability. Domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities predominated in the older population and were associated with physical or mental health problems (chronic disease, diability, sleep disorders). For younger people, injuries were related to cannabis use, drunkedness, and insufficient sleep. Risk factors were also depended on type of injury: occupational accident-related injuries were linked with social disadvantage (manual worker population) whereas sports injuries were more common in the socially advantaged population. This survey confirms established knowledge and highlights, at different stages of life, new risk factors that contribute to injuries in France. These findings should be helpful for the development of adapted injury

  5. Alcohol-related violence presenting to the emergency department: is 'glassing' the big issue?

    PubMed

    Laing, Anthony J; Sendall, Marguerite C; Barker, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    The study aims to describe the characteristics of patients presenting to EDs within Queensland, Australia with injuries because of assault with a glass implement ('glassing') and to set this within the broader context of presentations because of alcohol-related violence. This is an analysis of prospectively collected ED injury surveillance data collated by the Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit between 1999 and 2011. Cases of injury because of alcohol-related violence were identified and analysed using coded fields supplemented with qualitative data contained within the injury description text. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the characteristics of injury presentations because of alcohol-related violence. Violence included interpersonal violence and aggression (verbal aggression and object violence). A total of 4629 cases were studied. The study population was predominantly men (72%) and aged 18 to 24 (36%), with men in this age group comprising more than a quarter of the study population (28%). Nine per cent of alcohol-related assault injuries were a consequence of 'glassing'. The home was the most common location for alcohol-related violence (31%) and alcohol-related 'glassings' (33%). Overall, the most common glass object involved was a bottle (75%); however, within licensed venues an even mix of a drinking glass (44%) and glass bottle (45%) was identified. Contrary to public perception generated by media, 'glassing' incidents, particularly at licensed venues, constitute a relatively small proportion of all alcohol-related violence. The current study highlights the predominance of young men injured following alcohol-related violence, demonstrating a key focus area within the population for aiming prevention strategies. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  6. Sex and Drugs and Starting School: Differences in Precollege Alcohol-Related Sexual Risk Taking by Gender and Recent Blackout Activity.

    PubMed

    Haas, Amie L; Barthel, Jennifer M; Taylor, Stephanie

    2016-10-07

    Research has demonstrated a link between alcohol use and multiple forms of risky sexual behavior, particularly among college-age individuals. Studies have also linked heavy alcohol use to other problems, such as impaired consciousness resulting from an alcohol-induced blackout, which may impact sexual decision making. However, research has rarely examined sexual risk taking (SRT) in relation to blackouts, nor has it examined this construct during the precollege transition (i.e., the interval of time between high school graduation and college matriculation). This study examined the intersection between alcohol-involved SRT, blackouts, and gender in a sample of precollege individuals with prior alcohol use (N = 229; 54% male, 63% White). Results indicated that, despite drinking less per occasion, women reporting recent blackouts were at increased risk for experiencing unwanted, unsafe, and regretted sexual behaviors compared to men with recent blackouts and their peers with no recent blackouts. Women with recent blackouts also reported differences in alcohol expectancies that may increase their risk for experiencing negative consequences while drinking, including higher social expectancies and lower negative expectancies of danger. Future directions for research and implications for precollege interventions are discussed.

  7. Provincial alcohol index and its relationship to alcohol-related harm in Thailand: implications for subnational alcohol policy development.

    PubMed

    Chaiyasong, Surasak; Thamarangsi, Thaksaphon

    2016-07-11

    The Provincial Alcohol Index (PAI) is one of the efforts to develop a composite measurement to operationalize the situation of alcohol consumption and related risk behaviors. The index offers a means for national and subnational alcohol control committees to address alcohol-related problems in their responsible jurisdiction areas. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between PAI scores and alcohol-related problems using Thailand as an example. Cross-sectional analyses of PAI scores based on the 2007 National Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Drinking Behavior Survey (CSAD) and the National Statistical Office data were conducted. CSAD data were collected from 168,285 Thai residents aged 15 years and above in 76 provinces of Thailand (population range 180,787 to 5,716,248). The PAI scores were generated using three different methods based on five indicators: 1) prevalence of adult (≥15 years) drinkers, 2) prevalence of underage drinkers, 3) proportion of regular drinkers, 4) proportion of binge drinkers and 5) proportion of drink-drivers. Alcohol-related injuries and violent events together with provincial level covariates (age, gender, income and region) were assessed. Correlational and linear regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between PAI scores and alcohol-related problems. The PAI scores generated from the three methods were significantly correlated with one another (r > 0.7, p < 0.05) and significantly related to alcohol-related problems after adjusting for the provincial level covariates. Based on the normalized method, PAI scores had a significant and positive relationship with prevalence of alcohol-related injuries (beta = 562 cases per million population, p = 0.027) and violence (beta = 451 events per million population, p = 0.013). PAI scores were highest in the north and lowest in the south of the country. The findings of this study illustrate the relationship between the PAI and

  8. Brain Injury Risk from Primary Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    combined abdominal and thoracic protection that reduced blast levels to an order of magnitude below pulmonary injury threshold. The results were scaled to... contusions typically on or around the brainstem though there were no skull fractures for any blast intensity. Risk functions were developed that...primary blast exposure to the brain was found to be more than twice the pulmonary fatality injury risk. However, the blast level for 50% risk of mild

  9. [Alcohol-related problems in primary care].

    PubMed

    Ban, Nobutaro

    2015-09-01

    The approach to treating alcohol-related problems in primary care settings needs: 1) to recognize the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care settings; 2) to know the way of screening; 3) to know how to help patients; and 4) to know enough about treating alcoholism to appropriately refer patients for additional help. This article looks research evidence about the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care and recognition of incidence and way of screening of alcohol-related problems by primary care physicians in Japan. Then this article describes evidence-based as well as author's experience-based approach to treat the alcohol-related health problems in primary care settings. In line with the newly introduced law to prevent the alcohol-related health problems and the anticipating introduction of new specialty of general medicine, early intervention to alcohol-related problems in primary care settings will be much appreciated. To do so, enough amounts of education and research are needed.

  10. Could more than three million older people in England be at risk of alcohol-related harm? A cross-sectional analysis of proposed age-specific drinking limits.

    PubMed

    Knott, Craig S; Scholes, Shaun; Shelton, Nicola J

    2013-09-01

    to determine the impact of recently proposed age-specific alcohol consumption limits on the proportion and number of older people classified at risk of alcohol-related harm. nationally representative cross-sectional population data from the Health Survey for England (HSE). adults with valid alcohol consumption data, comprising 14,718 participants from 2003 and 14,939 from 2008. the prevalence of alcohol consumption in excess of existing and recently proposed consumption limits, plus associated population estimates. the number of individuals aged 65 or over and drinking in excess of daily recommended limits would have increased 2.5-fold to over 3 million in 2008 under age-specific recommendations proposed in a report from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, equating to an at-risk population 809,000 individuals greater than found within the 16-24 age group during the same year. Suggested revisions to existing binge drinking classifications would have defined almost 1,200,000 people aged 65 or over as hazardous consumers of alcohol in 2008-a 3.6-fold increase over existing definitions. age-specific drinking recommendations proposed in the Royal College of Psychiatrists Report would increase the number of older drinkers classified as hazardous alcohol consumers to a level greater than found among young adults aged 16-24.

  11. Injury risk evaluation in sport climbing.

    PubMed

    Neuhof, A; Hennig, F F; Schöffl, I; Schöffl, V

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and rate acute sport climbing injuries. Acute sport climbing injuries occurring from 2002 to 2006 were retrospectively assessed with a standardized web based questionnaire. A total number of 1962 climbers reported 699 injuries, which is equivalent to 0.2 injuries per 1 000 h of sport participation. Most (74.4%) of the injuries were of minor severity rated NACA I or NACA II. Injury distribution between the upper (42.6%) and lower extremities (41.3%) was similar, with ligament injuries, contusions and fractures being the most common injury types. Years of climbing experience (p<0.01), difficulty level (p<0.01), climbing time per week during summer (p<0.01) and winter (p<0.01) months were correlated with the injury rate. Age (p<0.05 (p=0.034)), years of climbing experience (p<0.01) and average climbing level (p<0.01) were correlated to the injury severity rated through NACA scores. The risk of acute injuries per 1 000 h of sport participation in sport climbing was lower than in previous studies on general rock climbing and higher than in studies on indoor climbing. In order to perform inter-study comparisons of future studies on climbing injuries, the use of a systematic and standardized scoring system (UIAA score) is essential. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Alcohol-related harm among university students in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Diep, Pham Bich; Knibbe, Ronald A; Giang, Kim Bao; De Vries, Nanne

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the prevalence of and risk factors for alcohol-related harm and types of harm among medical students from Hanoi Medical University (Vietnam). Risk factors include aspects of drinking patterns and relevant socio-demographic variables. A cross-sectional study involving 1st to 6th year students (N=1216; response rate 96.5%). Of these, 210 students from each academic year were randomly selected from a sampling frame covering all students from each academic year. Data were collected using a questionnaire distributed in class by researchers. Drinkers completed 23 questions on alcohol-related harm categorized into: 1) 'negative influence on daily activities'; 2) 'social conflict'; 3) 'loss of control, acute consequences, and withdrawal'; 4) 'mental health conditions'; and 5) 'physical and medical health problems'. Logistic and Poisson regression models were used to identify the predictors of alcohol-related harm and the amount of harm, respectively. The prevalence of alcohol use associated with at least one or more of the five types of harm was higher in men (81.8%) than in women (60.4%). In female and male students, the most common harm category was 'loss of control, acute consequences, and withdrawal' (51.8 and 75.6%, respectively), followed by 'negative influence on daily activities' (29.4 and 55.8%, respectively). Age, living away from home, and average number of standard drinks per occasion among male drinkers, and age and frequency of drinking per week among female drinkers were associated with alcohol-related harm. These data suggest that alcohol-related harm represents a serious public health problem among young educated individuals in Vietnam. The risk factors indicate that prevention should be aimed at aspects of drinking patterns and specific subpopulations defined by gender, age, and (for men only) type of living situation.

  13. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  14. A time series analysis of presentations to Queensland health facilities for alcohol-related conditions, following the increase in 'alcopops' tax.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Crowe, Elizabeth; Lawrence, David; White, Angela; Connor, Jason

    2013-08-01

    In response to concerns about the health consequences of high-risk drinking by young people, the Australian Government increased the tax on pre-mixed alcoholic beverages ('alcopops') favoured by this demographic. We measured changes in admissions for alcohol-related harm to health throughout Queensland, before and after the tax increase in April 2008. We used data from the Queensland Trauma Register, Hospitals Admitted Patients Data Collection, and the Emergency Department Information System to calculate alcohol-related admission rates per 100,000 people, for 15 - 29 year-olds. We analysed data over 3 years (April 2006 - April 2009), using interrupted time-series analyses. This covered 2 years before, and 1 year after, the tax increase. We investigated both mental and behavioural consequences (via F10 codes), and intentional/unintentional injuries (S and T codes). We fitted an auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model, to test for any changes following the increased tax. There was no decrease in alcohol-related admissions in 15 - 29 year-olds. We found similar results for males and females, as well as definitions of alcohol-related harms that were narrow (F10 codes only) and broad (F10, S and T codes). The increased tax on 'alcopops' was not associated with any reduction in hospital admissions for alcohol-related harms in Queensland 15 - 29 year-olds.

  15. Epidemiology of Alcohol-Related Accidents and the Grand Rapids Study.

    PubMed

    Walker, P F

    2000-01-01

    Although it was evident from the early years of this century that alcohol was associated with motor vehicle injury, and although strict laws were enacted in both the U.S. and elsewhere imposing severe penalties for drunken driving, in the U.S. drinking and driving was so widespread that it was generally not viewed as a major offense. Severe penalties were rarely imposed, and the practice of reducing charges was commonplace. Objective data on the relationship between alcohol and crash involvement were not available. The Grand Rapids Study, first published in 1964, clearly documented for the first time the rapid acceleration of crash risk associated with increasing blood alcohol concentration. This study provided the basis for educating the public and enacting stricter laws governing drinking and driving, as well as the basis for much additional research. When the citizen action groups came into being, the solid knowledge foundation that had been established was translated into programs that have greatly reduced alcohol-related injury and death on the highway. In the last two decades unprecedented progress has been made in this regard, with the proportion of fatal crashes that are alcohol-related steadily decreasing in every age group. The Grand Rapids Study remains as a landmark contribution that continues to be used in developing and implementing programs to reduce drunken driving. Copyright © 2000 Central Police University.

  16. The Risk of Opioid Intoxications or Related Events and the Effect of Alcohol-Related Disorders: A Retrospective Cohort Study in German Patients Treated with High-Potency Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jobski, K; Kollhorst, B; Schink, T; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2015-09-01

    Intoxications involving prescription opioids are a major public health problem in many countries. When taken with opioids, alcohol can enhance the effects of opioids, particularly in the central nervous system. However, data quantifying the impact of alcohol involvement in opioid-related intoxications are limited. Using claims data from the German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database (GePaRD), we conducted a retrospective cohort study based on users of high-potency opioid (HPO) analgesics during the years 2005-2009. HPO use was classified as extended-release, immediate-release or both. We calculated incidence rates (IRs) for opioid intoxications or related events as well as adjusted IR ratios (aIRR) comparing HPO-treated patients with alcohol-related disorders (ARDs) to those without ARDs overall and within each HPO category. During the study period, 308,268 HPO users were identified with an overall IR of 340.4 per 100,000 person-years [95 % confidence interval (CI) 325.5-355.7]. The risk was highest when patients received concomitant treatment with extended- and immediate-release HPOs (IR 1093.8; 95 % CI 904.6-1310.9). ARDs increased the risk during HPO use by a factor of 1.7 and the highest aIRR was seen when comparing patients simultaneously exposed to extended- and immediate-release HPOs with ARDs to those without ARD also after excluding patients with potential improper/non-medical HPO use. Physicians should be aware of these elevated risks in HPO patients with ARDs. Active patient education by healthcare providers regarding the risk of opioid intoxications or related events due to alcohol in conjunction with HPOs is warranted.

  17. Sports-related workload and injury risk: simply knowing the risks will not prevent injuries.

    PubMed

    Drew, Michael K; Cook, Jill; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-05-10

    Training loads contribute to sports injury risk but their mitigation has rarely been considered in a sports injury prevention framework. A key concept behind monitoring training loads for injury prevention is to screen for those at increased risk of injury so that workloads can be adjusted to minimise these risks. This review describes how advances in management of workload can be applied as a preventive measure. Primary prevention involves screening for preparticipation load risk factors, such as low training loads, prior to a training period or competition. Secondary prevention involves screening for workloads that are known to precede an injury developing so that modification can be undertaken to mitigate this risk. Tertiary prevention involves rehabilitation practices that include a graded return to training programme to reduce the risk of sustaining a subsequent injury. The association of training loads with injury incidence is now established. Prevention measures such as rule changes that affect the workload of an athlete are universal whereas those that address risk factors of an asymptomatic subgroup are more selective. Prevention measures, when implemented for asymptomatic individuals exhibiting possible injury risk factors, are indicated for an athlete at risk of developing a sports injury. Seven key indicated risks and associated prevention measures are proposed.

  18. Sepsis in alcohol-related liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gustot, Thierry; Fernandez, Javier; Szabo, Gyongyi; Albillos, Agustin; Louvet, Alexandre; Jalan, Rajiv; Moreau, Richard; Moreno, Christophe

    2017-06-22

    Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) remains the most important cause of death due to alcohol. Infections, particularly bacterial infections, are one of the most frequent and severe complications of advanced ALDs, such as alcoholic cirrhosis and severe alcoholic hepatitis (sAH). The specific mechanisms responsible for this altered host defence are yet to be deciphered. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge of infectious complications in ALD and its pathophysiological mechanisms, distinguishing the role of alcohol consumption and the contribution of different forms of ALD. To date, corticosteroids are the only treatment with proven efficacy in sAH, but their impact on the occurrence of infections remains controversial. The combination of an altered host defence and corticosteroid treatment in sAH has been suggested as a cause of opportunistic fungal and viral infections. A high level of suspicion with systematic screening and prompt, adequate treatment are warranted to improve outcomes in these patients. Prophylactic or preemptive strategies in this high-risk population might be a preferable option, because of the high short-term mortality rate despite adequate therapies. However, these strategies should be assessed in well-designed trials before clinical implementation. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Injury risk of nonpowder guns.

    PubMed

    Laraque, Danielle

    2004-11-01

    Nonpowder guns (ball-bearing [BB] guns, pellet guns, air rifles, paintball guns) continue to cause serious injuries to children and adolescents. The muzzle velocity of these guns can range from approximately 150 ft/second to 1200 ft/second (the muzzle velocities of traditional firearm pistols are 750 ft/second to 1450 ft/second). Both low- and high-velocity nonpowder guns are associated with serious injuries, and fatalities can result from high-velocity guns. A persisting problem is the lack of medical recognition of the severity of injuries that can result from these guns, including penetration of the eye, skin, internal organs, and bone. Nationally, in 2000, there were an estimated 21840 (coefficient of variation: 0.0821) injuries related to nonpowder guns, with approximately 4% resulting in hospitalization. Between 1990 and 2000, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 39 nonpowder gun-related deaths, of which 32 were children younger than 15 years. The introduction of high-powered air rifles in the 1970s has been associated with approximately 4 deaths per year. The advent of war games and the use of paintball guns have resulted in a number of reports of injuries, especially to the eye. Injuries associated with nonpowder guns should receive prompt medical management similar to the management of firearm-related injuries, and nonpowder guns should never be characterized as toys.

  20. Risk of needlestick injuries by injection pens.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, G; Miguéres, B; Tarantola, A; Abiteboul, D; Lolom, I; Bouvet, E

    2006-05-01

    Injection pens are used by patients when auto-administering medication (insulin, interferon, apokinon etc.) by the subcutaneous route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of injection pen use by healthcare workers (HCWs) and the associated risk of needlestick injuries to document and compare injury rates between injection pens and subcutaneous syringes. A one-year retrospective study was conducted in 24 sentinel French public hospitals. All needlestick injuries linked to subcutaneous injection procedures, which were voluntarily reported to occupational medicine departments by HCWs between October 1999 and September 2000, were documented using a standardized questionnaire. Additional data (total number of needlestick injuries reported, number of subcutaneous injection devices purchased) were collected over the same period. A total of 144 needlestick injuries associated with subcutaneous injection were reported. The needlestick injury rate for injection pens was six times the rate for disposable syringes. Needlestick injuries with injection pens accounted for 39% of needlestick injuries linked with subcutaneous injection. In all, 60% of needlestick injuries with injection pens were related to disassembly. Injection pens are associated with needlestick injuries six times more often than syringes. Nevertheless, injection pens have been shown to improve the quality of treatment for patients and may improve treatment observance. This study points to the need for safety-engineered injection pens.

  1. Disability and risk of school related injury

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, M; Peek-Asa, C; Kraus, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Approximately six million children with disabilities attend school in the United States. Cognitive and physical limitations may compromise their ability to handle environmental hazards and hence increase their risk for injury. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of school related injury among children enrolled in 17 special education schools in one large, urban school district. Design: Altogether 6769 schoolchildren with disabilities were followed up from 1994–98. Injury and population data were collected from pupil accident reports and existing school records. Associations were estimated through generalized estimating equations. Results: A total of 697 injuries were reported for a rate of 4.7/100 students per year. Children with multiple disabilities had a 70% increased odds of injury compared with the developmentally disabled (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 2.3). The physically disabled (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.9) had a modest increased odds of injury. Cuts, bruises, and abrasions composed almost three fourths of all injuries; almost half of these injuries were to the face. Falls (34%) and insults by other students (31%) were the most common external causes. More than a fourth of injuries were sports related, and 21% occurred on the playground/athletic field. Injury patterns differed across disabilities. Conclusions: Although limited to one school district, the population studied is the largest cohort thus far of schoolchildren with disabilities. With this large study base, potentially high risk groups were identified and circumstances of injury described. This information is imperative for developing and improving school based injury prevention measures. PMID:14760022

  2. Injury Risk in International Rugby Union

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Isabel S.; Ranson, Craig; Mathema, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within international Rugby Union, only injury rates during the Rugby World Cup have been reported. Therefore, injury rates and types during other international tournaments are unknown. Purpose: To assess the 3-year incidence, severity, nature, and causes of match and training injuries sustained during different international tournaments played by the Welsh national Rugby Union team. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data for all players (n = 78) selected for 1 national Rugby Union team over a 3-year period were analyzed using the international consensus statement methods. Player height (cm) and mass (kg) were recorded. Tournaments were grouped for comparisons as: autumn tournaments (2012 and 2013), Rugby World Cup (RWC; 2011), Six Nations (2012, 2013, and 2014), and summer tournaments (2012, 2013, and 2014). Injury incidence (injuries/1000 hours), prevalence (% of players unavailable), and severity (days lost) were calculated for each tournament. Injury location, type, and cause of match and training injuries were analyzed. Results: Match injury incidence was highest during autumn tournaments (262.5/1000 match-hours) and lowest during the RWC (178.6/1000 match-hours). Summer tournaments had the highest training incidence (5.5 injuries/1000 training-hours). Mild injuries were most likely during the RWC (risk ratio [RR], 2.02; 95% CI, 1.26-3.24), while severe injuries were most likely during autumn tournaments (RR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.70-6.29). Quadriceps hematomas (18.8/1000 match-hours; 95% CI, 11.3-31.1) and concussions (13.8/1000 match-hours; 95% CI, 7.6-24.8) were the most common match injuries, with shoulder dislocations being the most severe (111 mean days lost per injury). Conclusion: Injury rates were considerably higher than those previously reported for multiple teams during RWC tournaments. Further investigation of injury rates and risk factors is recommended to accurately gauge their impact within international Rugby

  3. Alcohol-related dementia: an update of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of dementia relating to excessive alcohol use have received increased research interest in recent times. In this paper, the neuropathology, nosology, epidemiology, clinical features, and neuropsychology of alcohol-related dementia (ARD) and alcohol-induced persisting amnestic syndrome (Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, or WKS) are reviewed. Neuropathological and imaging studies suggest that excessive and prolonged use of alcohol may lead to structural and functional damage that is permanent in nature; however, there is debate about the relative contributions of the direct toxic effect of alcohol (neurotoxicity hypothesis), and the impact of thiamine deficiency, to lasting damage. Investigation of alcohol-related cognitive impairment has been further complicated by differing definitions of patterns of alcohol use and associated lifestyle factors related to the abuse of alcohol. Present diagnostic systems identify two main syndromes of alcohol-related cognitive impairment: ARD and WKS. However, 'alcohol-related brain damage' is increasingly used as an umbrella term to encompass the heterogeneity of these disorders. It is unclear what level of drinking may pose a risk for the development of brain damage or, in fact, whether lower levels of alcohol may protect against other forms of dementia. Epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with ARD typically have a younger age of onset than those with other forms of dementia, are more likely to be male, and often are socially isolated. The cognitive profile of ARD appears to involve both cortical and subcortical pathology, and deficits are most frequently observed on tasks of visuospatial function as well as memory and higher-order (executive) tasks. The WKS appears more heterogeneous in nature than originally documented, and deficits on executive tasks commonly are reported in conjunction with characteristic memory deficits. Individuals with alcohol-related disorders have the potential to at least

  4. Implicit and explicit alcohol-related motivations among college binge drinkers.

    PubMed

    Herschl, Laura C; McChargue, Dennis E; MacKillop, James; Stoltenberg, Scott F; Highland, Krista B

    2012-06-01

    Positive alcohol outcome expectancies and behavioral economic indices of alcohol consumption are related to binge drinking among college students and may reflect explicit and implicit motivations that are differentially associated with this behavior. The present study hypothesized that implicit (alcohol purchase task) and explicit (positive expectancy for alcohol's effects) motivations for drinking would not be correlated. It was also hypothesized that greater implicit and explicit motivations would predict alcohol-related risk. Participants were 297 college student binge drinkers (54% female; 88% European-American; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test: M = 9.53, SD = 5.04). Three indices from the alcohol purchase task (APT) were modeled as a latent implicit alcohol-related motivations variable. Explicit alcohol-related motivations were measured using a global positive expectancy subscale from the Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol Questionnaire. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test total, Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index total, and age of drinking onset were modeled as a latent alcohol-related risk variable. Structural equation modeling was used to examine associations amongst implicit motivations, explicit motivations, and alcohol-related risk. Implicit and explicit motivations were not correlated. Partially consistent with the second hypothesis, greater implicit motivations were associated with greater alcohol-related risk. Relations between explicit motivations and alcohol-related risk were marginally significant. Implicit and explicit drinking motivations are differentially associated with problem drinking behaviors. Future research should examine the underlying neurobiological mechanisms associated with these factors.

  5. Alcohol Related Birth Defects: Implications for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamanna, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses background and nature of alcohol-related birth defects. Describes a continuum of impairment to offspring of drinking mothers that is dose-related and produces serious behavioral/learning deficits. The continuum includes young people of normal intelligence who perform below expected levels and find school adjustment difficult. Offers…

  6. Risk factors for perineal injury during delivery.

    PubMed

    Christianson, L M; Bovbjerg, V E; McDavitt, E C; Hullfish, K L

    2003-07-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for anal sphincter injury during vaginal delivery. This was a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 2078 records of vaginal deliveries within a 2-year period from May 1, 1999, through April 30, 2001. Cases (n = 91) during the study period were defined as parturients who had documentation of greater than a second-degree perineal injury. Control subjects (n = 176), who were identified with the use of a blinded protocol, included women who were delivered vaginally with less than or equal to a second-degree perineal injury. For each patient, we reviewed medical and obstetrics records for the following characteristics: maternal age, race, weight, gestational age, parity, tobacco use, duration of first and second stages of labor, use of oxytocin, use of forceps or vacuum, infant birth weight, epidural use, and episiotomy use. Of the 2078 deliveries that were reviewed, we discovered 91 cases (4.4%) of documented anal sphincter injury. The mean maternal age of our sample was 24.9 +/- 5.9 years). Nearly two thirds (63.2%) were white; 26.7% were black, and 10.1% were of other racial backgrounds. Forceps were used in 51.6% of deliveries that resulted in tears (cases), compared to 8.6% of deliveries without significant tears (control subjects, P <.05). Using cases and control subjects with complete data (cases, 82; control subjects, 144), delivery with forceps was associated with a 10-fold increased risk of perineal injury (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 5.2-22.3) compared to noninstrumented deliveries. The association was similar after adjustment for age, race, parity, mode of delivery, tobacco use, episiotomy, duration of labor (stages 1 and 2), infant birth weight, epidural, and oxytocin use (odds ratio, 11.9; 95% CI, 4.7-30.4). Nulliparous women were at increased risk for tears (adjusted odds ratio, 10.0; 95% CI, 3.0-33.3) compared with multiparous patients, but parity did not reduce the association between forceps-assisted deliveries

  7. Accidental injury: risk and preventative interventions

    PubMed Central

    van Weeghel, I.; Kendrick, D.; Marsh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 16 April 1997
 OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the relation between risk factors for childhood unintentional injury and requests for injury prevention interventions as part of the Nottingham Safe at Home project, a primary care based controlled intervention study assessing the effectiveness of a package of injury prevention interventions.
SETTING—17 practices in Nottingham randomly selected from 55 practices volunteering to take part in the study.
METHODS—Postal questionnaire to all parents of children aged 3 to 12 months registered with the intervention practices (n = 1124) to assess risk factors for injury and to elicit requests for three injury prevention interventions: free home safety checks, low cost safety equipment, and free first aid training.
RESULTS—73% of parents responded to the questionnaire. The distribution of sociodemographic variables among responders was similar to that for the population of Nottingham. One third of parents (34%) requested one intervention, 21% requested two interventions, and 10% requested three. Receipt of means tested benefits, ethnicity, and residence in a deprived area were independently associated with requesting home safety checks. Non-owner occupation, lack of access to a car, receipt of means tested benefits, ethnicity, and unemployment were independently associated with requesting low cost safety equipment. Non-owner occupiers were less likely to request first aid training.
CONCLUSIONS—Families with risk factors for childhood unintentional injury do request home safety checks and low cost safety equipment, but they are less likely to request first aid training. Other methods for providing first aid advice may be needed to reach such families.

 PMID:9279147

  8. Effect of Neurocognition and Concussion on Musculoskeletal Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Daniel C.; Zaremski, Jason L.; Vincent, Heather K.; Vincent, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Research regarding musculoskeletal injury risk has focused primarily on anatomical, neuromuscular, hormonal, and environmental risk factors; however, subsequent injury risk screening and intervention programs have been largely limited to neuromuscular factors and have faced challenges in both implementation and efficacy. Recent studies indicate that poor neurocognitive performance, either at baseline or in the aftermath of a concussion, is associated with elevated risk of musculoskeletal injury. Despite the relatively limited current understanding regarding the nature of the relationship between different aspects of neurocognitive performance and musculoskeletal injury risk, this is a promising area of research that may yield significant advances in musculoskeletal injury risk stratification, rehabilitation, and prevention. PMID:25968852

  9. CHANGES IN CLASSES OF INJURY-RELATED RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ALCOHOL MISUSE: A LATENT TRANSITION ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Field, Craig; Caetano, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Risk-level drinking, drinking and driving, and alcohol-related violence are risk factors that result in injuries. The current study sought to identify which subgroups of patients experience the most behavioral change following a brief intervention. A secondary analysis of data from a brief alcohol intervention study was conducted. The sample (N=664) includes at-risk drinkers who experienced an injury and were admitted for care to a Level-1 trauma center. Injury-related items from the Short Inventory of Problems+6 were used to perform a latent transition analysis to describe class transitions participants experienced following discharge. Four classes emerged for the year before and after the current injury. Most individuals transitioned from higher risk classes into those with lower risk. Some participants maintained risky profiles, and others increased risks and consequences. Drinking and driving remained a persistent problem among study participants. Although a large portion of intervention recipients improved risks and consequences of alcohol use following discharge, more intensive intervention services may be needed for a subset of patients who showed little or no improvement. PMID:24259197

  10. Estimated injury risk for specific injuries and body regions in frontal motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Talton, Jennifer W; Barnard, Ryan T; Schoell, Samantha L; Swett, Katrina R; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Injury risk curves estimate motor vehicle crash (MVC) occupant injury risk from vehicle, crash, and/or occupant factors. Many vehicles are equipped with event data recorders (EDRs) that collect data including the crash speed and restraint status during a MVC. This study's goal was to use regulation-required data elements for EDRs to compute occupant injury risk for (1) specific injuries and (2) specific body regions in frontal MVCs from weighted NASS-CDS data. Logistic regression analysis of NASS-CDS single-impact frontal MVCs involving front seat occupants with frontal airbag deployment was used to produce 23 risk curves for specific injuries and 17 risk curves for Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 2+ to 5+ body region injuries. Risk curves were produced for the following body regions: head and thorax (AIS 2+, 3+, 4+, 5+), face (AIS 2+), abdomen, spine, upper extremity, and lower extremity (AIS 2+, 3+). Injury risk with 95% confidence intervals was estimated for 15-105 km/h longitudinal delta-Vs and belt status was adjusted for as a covariate. Overall, belted occupants had lower estimated risks compared to unbelted occupants and the risk of injury increased as longitudinal delta-V increased. Belt status was a significant predictor for 13 specific injuries and all body region injuries with the exception of AIS 2+ and 3+ spine injuries. Specific injuries and body region injuries that occurred more frequently in NASS-CDS also tended to carry higher risks when evaluated at a 56 km/h longitudinal delta-V. In the belted population, injury risks that ranked in the top 33% included 4 upper extremity fractures (ulna, radius, clavicle, carpus/metacarpus), 2 lower extremity fractures (fibula, metatarsal/tarsal), and a knee sprain (2.4-4.6% risk). Unbelted injury risks ranked in the top 33% included 4 lower extremity fractures (femur, fibula, metatarsal/tarsal, patella), 2 head injuries with less than one hour or unspecified prior unconsciousness, and a lung contusion (4

  11. Asian American Women and Alcohol-Related Problems: The Role of Multidimensional Feminine Norms.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Grivel, Margaux; Cheng, Alice; Clinton, Lauren; Kaya, Aylin

    2016-04-01

    Increasing rates of heavy episodic drinking (HED; four or more drinks in one sitting) and alcohol use disorders among young adult Asian American women signify the need to identify the risk and protective factors for HED and alcohol-related problems in this demographic. Multidimensional feminine norms, or the beliefs and expectations of what it means to be a woman, are theoretically relevant factors that may help elucidate within-group variability in HED and alcohol-related problems. The present study examined associations between nine salient feminine norms, HED, and alcohol-related problems among 398 second-generation Asian American college women. Our findings reveal that certain feminine norms are protective of HED and alcohol-related problems, while others are risk factors, even when controlling for well-established correlates of HED and alcohol-related problems, such as perceived peer drinking norms. The results elucidate the importance of multidimensional feminine norms and their relationship to HED and alcohol-related problems among the increasingly at-risk group, Asian American college women.

  12. Toddlers at risk for paper shredder injury in the home: easy access and severe injury.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ramona C; Foltin, George L

    2006-02-01

    A 2-year-old girl sustained severe injury to 2 fingers from a home paper shredder. This case illustrates the risk of injury from paper shredders, which are increasingly common household items. Toddlers are at risk of finger injury and amputation. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission performed an investigation of reported injuries and the characteristics of paper shredders that might have contributed to the injuries, and we summarize their findings.

  13. Analysis of Prior Health System Contacts as a Harbinger of Subsequent Fatal Injury in American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanddal, Teri L.; Upchurch, James; Sanddal, Nels D.; Esposito, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Many American Indian nations, tribes, and bands are at an elevated risk for premature death from unintentional injury. Previous research has documented a relationship between alcohol-related injury and subsequent injury death among predominately urban samples. The presence or nature of such a relationship has not been documented among American…

  14. Analysis of Prior Health System Contacts as a Harbinger of Subsequent Fatal Injury in American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanddal, Teri L.; Upchurch, James; Sanddal, Nels D.; Esposito, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Many American Indian nations, tribes, and bands are at an elevated risk for premature death from unintentional injury. Previous research has documented a relationship between alcohol-related injury and subsequent injury death among predominately urban samples. The presence or nature of such a relationship has not been documented among American…

  15. Do community characteristics predict alcohol-related crime?

    PubMed

    Breen, Courtney; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Slade, Tim; Love, Stephanie; D'Este, Catherine; Mattick, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol-related crime is a substantial community problem. There is evidence to suggest that certain geographic areas experience higher rates of alcohol-related crime and that both individual and community factors are associated with alcohol-related crime. There is limited research at the community level despite communities being the target of interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related harm. This study aims to determine whether there are differences in alcohol-related crime at the community level and examines whether certain community characteristics are associated with increased alcohol-related crime. Routinely collected police data from 20 rural communities in New South Wales, Australia were analysed. The ratio of alcohol to non-alcohol-related criminal incidents was used as a proxy for alcohol-related crime. Predictor variables were population-adjusted community characteristics, including demographic and resource variables. Regression analyses suggest that there are differences between communities in alcohol-related crime. Less socioeconomic disadvantage and more GPs and licensed premises (pubs and clubs) are associated with greater alcohol-related crime at the community level. Decreasing the socioeconomic well-being of a community is not appropriate; however, introducing additional taxes to increase the cost of alcohol may decrease consumption and therefore alcohol-related crime. Reducing or capping the number of licensed premises, specifically the number of pubs and clubs, may be an appropriate strategy to reduce alcohol-related crime in rural communities.

  16. [Risks and injuries of go-karting].

    PubMed

    Bley, T; Gahr, R H

    2002-06-01

    The demands on leisuretime activities are getting more exacting. So trendy sports just like inline-skating, mountain-biking, paragliding, bungee-jumping or driving go karts become increasing popular. On the other side risks and injuries of this fun sports are not enough represented. We observed in a 16 months period 5 serious accidents with go karts. The injuries included bruise of lower leg, a contusion of the stomach with a pancreatic lesion, an instable fracture of the spinal column, a difficult fracture of the knee and upper tibia and a large sized burnwound. The mean hospitalization time was 32,5 days (17-54 days) and the average age of the patients 27,7 years (9-45 years). The lack of safety devices and the subjective inexperience make go kart driving a dangerous fun. The TUV worked out guidelines for security of indoor kart centres but they don't have any legal liability in case of injury. Therefore everyone carrying out fun sports like go kart driving should be aware of the dangers and should gather information whether the accident insurance will help out in case of injury.

  17. Mortality from alcohol related disease in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A; Mezzanotte, G; Cislaghi, C

    1986-01-01

    Trends in death certification rates from the five major alcohol related causes of death in Italy (cancers of the mouth or pharynx, oesophagus, larynx, liver and cirrhosis of the liver) were analysed over a period (1955-79) in which per capita alcohol consumption almost trebled. Age standardised mortality from liver cirrhosis almost doubled in males and increased over 70% in females. In males, mortality from cancers of the upper digestive or respiratory tract showed increases of between 27% and 44%, and liver cancer increased by over 100%. In the late 1970s, the four alcohol related cancer sites accounted for about 12% of all cancer deaths in males and 4.5% in females. Mortality from liver cirrhosis alone accounted for 4.8% of all deaths in males (9.2% of manpower years lost) and 2.3% in females (6.3% manpower years lost) in females. These figures were even higher in selected areas of north eastern Italy, where alcohol consumption is greater. In absolute terms, the upward trends observed correspond to about 10,000 excess deaths per year in the late 1970s compared with rates observed two decades earlier and are thus second only to the increase in tobacco related causes of death over the same calendar period. PMID:3772284

  18. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise: Interdisciplinary Differences in Performance on the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz.

    PubMed

    Petushek, Erich J; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-11-01

    Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. The purpose of this study was to compare various groups' abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL injury risk estimation exist. The relatively profound differences in injury

  19. Interventions in sports settings to reduce risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Melanie; Wiggers, John H; Vashum, Khanrin P; Hodder, Rebecca K; Wolfenden, Luke

    2016-01-21

    Elevated levels of risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm have been reported for sportspeople and supporters compared to non-sporting populations. Limited systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the effect of interventions targeting such behaviours. A review was undertaken to determine if interventions implemented in sports settings decreased alcohol consumption and related harms. Studies were included that implemented interventions within sports settings; measured alcohol consumption or alcohol-related injury or violence and were either randomised controlled trials, staggered enrollment trials, stepped-wedged trials, quasi-randomised trials, quasi-experimental trials or natural experiments. Studies without a parallel comparison group were excluded. Studies from both published and grey literature were included. Two authors independently screened potential studies against the eligibility criteria, and two authors independently extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias. The results of included studies were synthesised narratively. The title and abstract of 6382 papers and the full text of 45 of these papers were screened for eligibility. Three studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. One of the included studies was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a cognitive-behavioural intervention with athletes within an Olympic training facility in the USA. The study reported a significant change in alcohol use between pre-test and follow-up between intervention and control groups. The other two studies were RCTs in community sports clubs in Ireland and Australia. The Australian study found a significant intervention effect for both risky alcohol consumption at sports clubs and overall risk of alcohol-related harm. The Irish study found no significant intervention effect. A limited number of studies have been conducted to assess the effect of interventions implemented in sports settings on alcohol consumption and related

  20. Gender matters: the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol-related consequences.

    PubMed

    Schry, Amie R; Norberg, Melissa M; Maddox, Brenna B; White, Susan W

    2014-01-01

    Identification of risk factors for alcohol-related consequences is an important public health concern. Both gender and social anxiety have been associated with alcohol-related consequences broadly, but it is unknown whether these variables are differentially related to specific types of alcohol-related consequences for American college students. In the present study, 573 undergraduate students (M(age) = 19.86 years, SD = 1.40; range 18 to 25; 68.9% female) completed an on-line assessment of social anxiety, alcohol use, and four types of alcohol-related consequences (personal, social, physical, and role). Poisson regressions were run to examine social anxiety, gender, and the interaction between social anxiety and gender as predictors of each type of alcohol-related consequences. After controlling for alcohol use, social anxiety was positively associated with all four types of consequences, and females endorsed higher rates of physical, personal, and role consequences. The interaction between social anxiety and gender was statistically significant only for physical consequences, with social anxiety having a stronger effect for males. These findings, which diverge somewhat from those of a prior study with Australian college students, are discussed in the context of a biopsychosocial model of social anxiety and substance use problems. This study highlights the importance of further investigating cultural differences in the relationships among social anxiety, gender, and alcohol-related consequences.

  1. Drinking behaviour and alcohol-related harm amongst older adults: analysis of existing UK datasets.

    PubMed

    Wadd, Sarah; Papadopoulos, Chris

    2014-10-20

    Older adults experience age-related physiological changes that increase sensitivity and decrease tolerance to alcohol and there are a number of age-related harms such as falls, social isolation and elder abuse, which are compounded by alcohol misuse. Despite this unique vulnerability and the fact that the number of older adults is increasing, the literature on drinking behaviour and alcohol-related harm in older adults is sparse. This article describes a secondary analysis of UK data to address this knowledge gap. Secondary analysis of national statistics on alcohol-related hospital admissions and alcohol-related deaths, and data on drinking behaviour from the General Lifestyle Survey. Trends were identified by calculating percentage changes between time periods. The association between drinking behaviour and selected age groups was investigated using one way analysis of variance or chi-square tests. Older adults (aged 65 and over) drink less and are less likely to exceed the recommended drink limits than younger adults. However, they are more likely to be admitted to hospital for an alcohol-related condition than younger adults and the most significant increases in alcohol-related hospital admission rates in recent years have occurred in older age groups. Alcohol-related death rates are highest amongst those aged 55-74 years old. Alcohol consumption and the prevalence of exceeding the recommended drink limits has fluctuated but not significantly increased in older adults in recent decades. Older adults experience high and increasing levels of alcohol-related harm and as the population ages, this is likely to put increasing pressure on health and social services. Careful monitoring and age-appropriate strategies to detect and treat older adults at risk of alcohol-related harm are required.

  2. Discrimination and Alcohol-Related Problems among College Students: A Prospective Examination of Mediating Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Corbin, William R.; Fromme, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Background Discrimination is a risk factor for health-risk behaviors, including alcohol abuse. Far less is known about the mechanisms through which discrimination leads to alcohol-related problems, particularly during high-risk developmental periods such as young adulthood. Methods The present study tested a mediation model using prospective data from a large, diverse sample of 1,539 college students. This model hypothesized that discrimination would be associated with established cognitive (positive alcohol expectancies) and affective (negative affect and coping motives) risk factors for alcohol-related problems, which would account for the prospective association between discrimination and alcohol problems. Results Structural Equation Modeling indicated that discrimination was associated cross-sectionally with negative affect and more coping motives for drinking, but not with greater alcohol expectancies. Coping motives mediated the prospective relationship between discrimination and alcohol-related problems. Additionally, results indicated significant indirect effects from discrimination to alcohol-related problems through negative affect and coping motives. These associations were evident for multiple groups confronting status-based discrimination, including women, racial/ethnic minorities, and lesbian/gay/bisexual individuals. Conclusions This study identified potential affective mechanisms linking discrimination to alcohol-related problems. Results suggest several avenues for prevention and intervention efforts with individuals from socially disadvantaged groups. PMID:21145669

  3. Discrimination and alcohol-related problems among college students: a prospective examination of mediating effects.

    PubMed

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Corbin, William R; Fromme, Kim

    2011-06-01

    Discrimination is a risk factor for health-risk behaviors, including alcohol abuse. Far less is known about the mechanisms through which discrimination leads to alcohol-related problems, particularly during high-risk developmental periods such as young adulthood. The present study tested a mediation model using prospective data from a large, diverse sample of 1539 college students. This model hypothesized that discrimination would be associated with established cognitive (positive alcohol expectancies) and affective (negative affect and coping motives) risk factors for alcohol-related problems, which would account for the prospective association between discrimination and alcohol problems. Structural equation modeling indicated that discrimination was associated cross-sectionally with negative affect and more coping motives for drinking, but not with greater alcohol expectancies. Coping motives mediated the prospective relationship between discrimination and alcohol-related problems. Additionally, results indicated significant indirect effects from discrimination to alcohol-related problems through negative affect and coping motives. These associations were evident for multiple groups confronting status-based discrimination, including women, racial/ethnic minorities, and lesbian/gay/bisexual individuals. This study identified potential affective mechanisms linking discrimination to alcohol-related problems. Results suggest several avenues for prevention and intervention efforts with individuals from socially disadvantaged groups. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Car size and injury risk: a model for injury risk in frontal collisions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Denis P; Simms, Ciaran K

    2002-01-01

    Empirical studies have established that when pairs of similar cars collide, the relative injury risk between pairs of different size is inversely related to their mass ratio. Further empirical studies have shown that in frontal collisions between dissimilar cars, relative injury risk is inversely proportional to mass ratio raised to the power of n. The value of the exponent n increases with impact speed, with n approximately 1 at low speeds and n ranging from 2.81 to 3.74 for fatalities. In this paper a theory is derived which explains relative injury risk in terms of three parameters: length (or size) ratio, mass ratio and the ratio of collision energy absorption between the colliding vehicles. It is proposed that the ratio of collision energy absorption between colliding vehicles is a function of the structural collapse forces imposed at maximum dynamic crush. The theory shows that the fundamental factor in collisions between pairs of similar cars is size, i.e. length. For collisions between two dissimilar cars, Monte-Carlo simulations using generalised characterisations for the car population yield theoretical predictions that match empirical findings ranging from minor injuries (AISI +) to fatal (AIS6) injuries.

  5. Sports injuries in high school athletes: a review of injury-risk and injury-prevention research.

    PubMed

    McGuine, Tim

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the available research regarding the risk factors and prevention of injuries in high school athletes (ages 14 to 18 years). Relevant manuscripts were identified by searching six electronic databases with a combination of key words and medical subject headings (high school, adolescent, athletic injury, sports injury, risk factors, prevention, and prospective). Original research that reported prospective data on high school athletes (ages 14 to 18), reported injury and exposure data, and used data collected throughout the entire sport season or school year. Twenty-nine studies that identified injury risk factors or injury prevention strategies were reviewed and summarized. Data extracted from the studies included a) sport(s) or injuries studied, b) year of publication, c) lead author, d) description of the subjects, e) sample-size calculation, f) variables studied (baseline demographic or performance variables), g) whether multivariate analyses were used, h) data reported (injury rates, risk ratios, and 95% CI), and i) results. Studies that introduced an intervention were characterized by the same data as well as the type of intervention employed and randomization procedures used. The quality of each injury-risk and injury-prevention study was assessed, and the results were summarized. The risk factors for injury in several specific sports such as soccer, American football, and basketball have been documented. Other sports are less well represented in the current literature. The risk factors for injuries to the ankle, head, and knee have been identified, to a limited degree. Upper-extremity injury risk factors are less well known. There is a need for high-quality prospective studies to further identify injury risk factors and injury-prevention strategies for high school athletes.

  6. [Population-based studies on alcohol-related harm in Spain].

    PubMed

    Pulido, José; Indave-Ruiz, B Iciar; Colell-Ortega, Esther; Ruiz-García, Mónica; Bartroli, Montserrat; Barrio, Gregorio

    2014-08-01

    Based on the review of scientific papers and institutional reports on the subject and analysis of some secondary data, we assess the alcohol-related harm in Spain between 1990 and 2011. In 2011 they could be attributable to alcohol, 10% of the total mortality of the population aged 15-64, and about 30% of deaths due to traffic accidents. Among the population aged 15-64 years at least 0.8% had alcohol use disorders, an additional 5% could have harmful alcohol consumption that would need clinical evaluation, and about 20% had had some acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) in the last year. The AAI accounted for approximately 0.5-1.1 % of hospital emergency visits. Social costs of alcohol could represent 1% of gross domestic product. The prevalence of alcohol-related harm was significantly higher in men than women, with a male/female ratio greater than three for alcohol-related mortality and serious injuries, and this situation has hardly changed in the last 20 years. Alcohol-related harm has followed a downward trend, except for AAI. In 1990-2011 the standardized mortality rates related to alcohol decreased by half. Large gaps in knowledge and uncertainties on alcohol-related harm in Spanish population, clearly justify the institutional support for the research in this field and the implementation of a comprehensive monitoring system.

  7. Non-contact ACL Injuries: Mechanisms and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Barry P.; Sheehan, Frances T.; Torg, Joseph S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances have recently been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Most ACL injuries involve minimal to no contact. Female athletes sustain a two- to eightfold greater rate of injury than do their male counterparts. Recent videotape analyses demonstrate significant differences in average leg and trunk positions during injury compared with control subjects. These findings as well as those of cadaveric and MRI studies indicate that axial compressive forces are a critical component in noncontact ACL injury. A complete understanding of the forces and risk factors associated with noncontact ACL injury should lead to the development of improved preventive strategiess for this devastating injury. PMID:20810933

  8. [Alcohol-related disorders: etiopathology and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Hein, J; Wrase, J; Heinz, A

    2007-01-01

    The scientific understanding of the neurobiological priniciples of alcoholism has made significant progress in recent years. Especially the effects of ethanol on the neurotransmitter-systems are well studied. Dopaminergic and GABAergic facilitation contribute to the stimulating effects of low doses of alcohol while many of its adverse effects are mediated by glutamatergic inhibition at higher doses. A reduced serotonine-metabolism was shown to be a risk factor for the development of an alcohol dependence. The historic success of absinthe is discussed in this context. Absinthe is a mixture of ethanol and thujone, a substance that leads to a GABAergic inhibition as well as a reduced serotonergic responsiveness. Many studies substantiate the role of cannabinoid as well as striatal opiate-receptors in alcohol-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies could prove the important role of the reward system in this connection. Genetic factors were shown to be predisposing, however biological and environmental factors have a regulatory effect on the gene expression. Disturbances of the hpa-axis (hypothalamus-pituitary gland-adrenal cortex) were also shown to play a role in alcohol dependence. The understanding of these neurobiological principles of alcohol-related disorders should contribute to enhance and improve their therapeutic options.

  9. Study Protocol: Screening and Treatment of Alcohol-Related Trauma (START) – a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of mandibular fractures in the Northern Territory of Australia is very high, especially among Indigenous people. Alcohol intoxication is implicated in the majority of facial injuries, and substance use is therefore an important target for secondary prevention. The current study tests the efficacy of a brief therapy, Motivational Care Planning, in improving wellbeing and substance misuse in youth and adults hospitalised with alcohol-related facial trauma. Methods and design The study is a randomised controlled trial with 6 months of follow-up, to examine the effectiveness of a brief and culturally adapted intervention in improving outcomes for trauma patients with at-risk drinking admitted to the Royal Darwin Hospital maxillofacial surgery unit. Potential participants are identified using AUDIT-C questionnaire. Eligible participants are randomised to either Motivational Care Planning (MCP) or Treatment as Usual (TAU). The outcome measures will include quantity and frequency of alcohol and other substance use by Timeline Followback. The recruitment target is 154 participants, which with 20% dropout, is hoped to provide 124 people receiving treatment and follow-up. Discussion This project introduces screening and brief interventions for high-risk drinkers admitted to the hospital with facial trauma. It introduces a practical approach to integrating brief interventions in the hospital setting, and has potential to demonstrate significant benefits for at-risk drinkers with facial trauma. Trial Registration The trial has been registered in Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) and Trial Registration: ACTRN12611000135910. PMID:23106916

  10. Perception of injury risk among amateur Muay Thai fighters.

    PubMed

    Strotmeyer, Stephen; Lystad, Reidar P

    2017-12-01

    Muay Thai is a style of kickboxing that allows full-contact blows to an unprotected head, torso and legs, and, as in any combat sport, there is an inherent risk of injury. Previous observational studies have shown there is a substantial risk of injury in competitive kickboxing. None of these studies, however, have investigated the potential role of psychological risk factors and, consequently, little is known about the perception of injury risk among these athletes. Notwithstanding the important role risk perception may play in the occurrence and prevention of sports injuries, there is very limited empirical data pertaining to athletes in full-contact combat sports such as Muay Thai. Because the development and successful implementation of effective injury prevention policies for combat sports are likely to benefit from an increased understanding of the perception of injury risk and sport safety attitudes and behavior of its participants, further study is warranted. Muay Thai fighters were invited to complete an online survey in which they rated the perceived risk of injury in a range of different sports, including Muay Thai kickboxing. Perceived comparative risk was obtained indirectly by subtracting perceived risk of injury to oneself from perceived risk of injury to a peer. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, comparison of means, and ordinal logistic regression. Contrary to the best available epidemiological evidence, Muay Thai fighters perceived the risk of injury in their own sport to be average and significantly lower than that in other collision and contact sports, including popular combat sports such as boxing and mixed martial arts. On average, Muay Thai fighters perceived their own risk injury to be significantly lower compared to their peers (p < 0.001). There appears to be a mismatch between injury risk perception and actual risk among Muay Thai fighters. Moreover, these athletes also exhibit a slight degree comparative optimism or

  11. Caffeinated Alcohol, Sensation Seeking, and Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas P.; Egan, Kathleen L.; Goldin, Shoshanna; Rhodes, Scott D.; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background College students who consume caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CaffAlc) are at increased injury risk. This study examines the extent to which a sensation-seeking personality accounts for the relationship between consumption of CaffAlc and negative outcomes. Methods A Web-based survey was administered to stratified random samples of 4907 college students from eight North Carolina universities in Fall 2009. Sensation seeking was assessed using the Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale (BSSS) (α=0.81). Data were analyzed using linear and logistic regression. Results 3390 students (71.2%) reported past 30-day drinking, of whom 786 (23.2%) consumed CaffAlc. CaffAlc past 30-day drinkers had higher BSSS scores (3.8 vs. 3.4; p<0.001), compared to non-CaffAlc drinkers. Consumption of CaffAlc was associated with more frequent binge drinking (p<0.001) and drunken days in a typical week (p<0.001), even after adjusting for the BSSS score. CaffAlc students were more likely to be taken advantage of sexually (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.70, p=0.012), drive under the influence of alcohol (AOR=2.00, p<0.001), and ride with a driver under the influence of alcohol (AOR=1.87, p<0.001). Injury requiring medical treatment was more prevalent among CaffAlc students with higher BSSS-8 scores (interaction p=0.024), even after adjustment for drinking levels and student characteristics. Conclusions Sensation seeking does not fully account for the increase in risky drinking among college students who consume CaffAlc, nor does it moderate the relationship between CaffAlc and drinking behaviors. Sensation seeking moderates the risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment among college students who consume CaffAlc. Those with strong sensation-seeking dispositions are at the highest risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment. PMID:24761275

  12. Risk of cervical injuries in mixed martial arts

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, T; Back, D; Mann, B; Skinner, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mixed martial arts have rapidly succeeded boxing as the world's most popular full contact sport, and the incidence of injury is recognised to be high. Objective: To assess qualitatively and quantitatively the potential risk for participants to sustain cervical spine and associated soft tissue injuries. Methods: Four commonly performed manoeuvres with possible risks to the cervical spine were analysed with respect to their kinematics, and biomechanical models were constructed. Results: Motion analysis of two manoeuvres revealed strong correlations with rear end motor vehicle impact injuries, and kinematics of the remaining two suggested a strong risk of injury. Mathematical models of the biomechanics showed that the forces involved are of the same order as those involved in whiplash injuries and of the same magnitude as compression injuries of the cervical spine. Conclusions: This study shows that there is a significant risk of whiplash injuries in this sport, and there are no safety regulations to address these concerns. PMID:15976168

  13. Occupational injury risk by sex in a manufacturing cohort

    PubMed Central

    Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Slade, Martin D; Taiwo, Oyebode A; Cullen, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study expands previous research comparing injury risk for women and men in a cohort of 24 000 US aluminium manufacturing workers in 15 facilities from 2001 to 2010. Methods We compared injury rates (all injury, first aid, medical treatment, restricted work and lost work time) by sex and by job and sex. Using a mixed effect modelling approach, we calculated ORs and 95% CIs adjusting for age, job tenure, ethnicity and year as fixed effects and person, job and plant as random effects. Additionally, we modelled the data stratified by plant type to examine potential differences in injury risk between smelter (generally recognised as more hazardous) and fabrication production environments. Results Risk of injury was higher for women in four out of the five injury outcomes: all injuries combined (OR: 1.58, CI 1.48 to 1.67), injuries requiring first aid (OR: 1.61, CI 1.54 to 1.70), injuries requiring medical treatment (OR: 1.18, CI 1.03 to 1.36) and injuries requiring restricted work (OR: 1.65, CI 1.46 to 1.87). No difference in the risk of lost time injury by sex was found in this cohort. Analyses stratified by plant type showed similarly elevated injury risk for women, although the risk estimates were higher in smelters than fabrication plants. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the largest single-firm study examining injury risk by sex with sufficient data to appropriately adjust for job. We show a consistently higher injury risk for women compared with men in the smelting and fabrication environments. PMID:24924313

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Delivered Personalized Normative Feedback Intervention to Reduce Alcohol-Related Risky Sexual Behavior among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa A.; Patrick, Megan E.; Litt, Dana. M.; Atkins, David C.; Kim, Theresa; Blayney, Jessica A.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of personalized normative feedback (PNF) on college student alcohol-related risky sexual behavior (RSB). Method In a randomized controlled trial, 480 (57.6% female) sexually-active college students were stratified by gender and level of drinking and randomly assigned to an alcohol only intervention, an alcohol-related RSB only intervention, a combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB intervention, or control. All assessment and intervention procedures were web-based. Results Results indicated a significant reduction in drinking outcomes for the alcohol only and the combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB interventions relative to control. Findings further demonstrated a significant reduction in alcohol-related RSB outcomes for the alcohol-related RSB only and the combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB interventions relative to control. There were no significant intervention effects on alcohol-related negative consequences. These findings demonstrate that the combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB intervention was the only intervention successful at reducing both drinking and alcohol-related RSB outcomes relative to control. There were no significant differences when comparing the combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB intervention to the alcohol only intervention or the alcohol-related RSB only intervention. Finally, results suggested that the intervention effects on high-risk behaviors were mediated by reductions in descriptive normative perceptions. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that PNF specific to drinking in sexual situations was needed to reduce alcohol-related RSB. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential utility of a brief intervention that can be delivered via the Internet to reduce high-risk drinking and alcohol-related RSB among college students. PMID:24491076

  15. Interventions for alcohol-related offending by women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McMurran, Mary; Riemsma, Rob; Manning, Nathan; Misso, Kate; Kleijnen, Jos

    2011-08-01

    Treatment programmes specifically for women offenders are under-developed. A systematic review of studies that could inform interventions for alcohol-related offending by women is reported. Three questions were addressed: 1) What is the most up to date knowledge of 'what works' with females who commit alcohol-related offences? 2) What are the identifiable risk-needs factors for non-alcohol dependent women who commit offences involving alcohol misuse? 3) Are there differences between male and female alcohol-related offending? Four studies addressed the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions; three addressed identifiable risk-needs; and 19 addressed differences between male and female offenders' alcohol-related offending. Heterogeneity of these studies precluded meta-analyses, and so a narrative synthesis method was used. There is insufficient evidence to answer the question of what treatment works with women who commit alcohol-related offences. Drunk-driving is most widely studied, and women offenders appear to have more psychosocial problems than men. Alcohol increases the likelihood of violence for both men and women, and, while the mechanisms whereby alcohol increases the likelihood of violence are likely the same in men and women, the effect may be moderated by gender-associated issues. Again, women offenders appear to have more psychosocial problems than men. Implications for developing interventions are discussed.

  16. Intervention models for mothers and children at risk for injuries.

    PubMed

    Gulotta, C S; Finney, J W

    2000-03-01

    We review risk factors commonly associated with childhood unintentional injuries and highlight adolescent mothers and their young children as a high risk group. Several intervention models of injury, including the epidemiological model, Peterson and Brown's "working model," and the socioecological model have been proposed to explain the events that lead to injuries. Discussion of these models is provided and a synthesis of the adolescent parenting model and the socioecological model of injury is suggested as way to address the complex variables that lead to an injury causing event for adolescent mothers and their young children. Finally, we suggest areas of future investigation and their implications for prevention and treatment.

  17. Early weaning and hospitalization with alcohol-related diagnoses in adult life.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2006-04-01

    This study attempted to determine whether lack of breast-feeding or a short duration of breast-feeding during infancy is associated with an elevated risk of hospitalization with alcohol-related diagnoses in adult life. The study was a prospective longitudinal birth cohort design conducted in a sample of 6,562 men and women, all of whom were born in Copenhagen, Denmark, between October 1959 and December 1961. The sample was divided into two categories based on duration of breast-feeding, as assessed by a physician interview with mothers at a 1-year examination. Psychiatric hospitalizations with alcohol-related diagnoses according to ICD-8 or ICD-10 were identified in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register in 1999. Nine potential confounders were included as covariates: gender of the cohort member, maternal age, parental social status, maternal prenatal smoking, unwanted pregnancy, maternal and paternal psychiatric hospitalization with alcohol-related diagnosis, and maternal and paternal psychiatric hospitalization with other diagnosis. Alcohol-related diagnoses were more frequent in men, but the results were comparable for men and women. The adjusted predictive effect of early weaning was 1.47. Elevated relative risks were also associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy (1.52) and unwanted pregnancy status (1.59). Other independent predictors were male gender, maternal psychiatric hospitalization with alcohol-related diagnosis, and low parental social status. Independent of a number of other risk factors for alcoholism, a significant association between early weaning and elevated risk of hospitalization with alcohol-related diagnoses was observed.

  18. Binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among U.S.-born Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek; Takamatsu, Stephanie; Castellanos, Jeanett

    2012-07-01

    Binge drinking (five drinks or more in a 2-h sitting for men or four or more drinks in a 2-h sitting for women) and alcohol-related problems are a growing problem among Asian American young adults. The current study examines the sociocultural (i.e., generational status and ethnic identity) determinants of binge drinking and alcohol-related problems across U.S.-born, young-adult, Asian American ethnic groups. Data were collected from 1,575 Asian American undergraduates from a public university in Southern California. Chinese Americans consisted of the largest Asian ethnicity in the study, followed by Vietnamese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, Japanese, Multi-Asian, and "other Asian American." Participants completed a web-based assessment of binge drinking, alcohol-related problems, ethnic identity, descriptive norms (i.e., perceived peer drinking norms), and demographic information. An analysis of variance was used to determine potential gender and ethnic differences in binge drinking and alcohol-related problems. Negative binomial regression was selected to examine the relationship between the predictors and outcomes in our model. There were no gender differences between Asian American men and women in regards to binge drinking; however, men reported more alcohol-related problems. Japanese Americans reported the highest number of binge-drinking episodes and alcohol-related problems, followed by Filipino and Multi-Asian Americans (e.g., Chinese and Korean). Living off-campus; higher scores in descriptive norms; Greek status; and belonging to the ethnic groups Japanese, Filipino, Multi-Asian, Korean, and South Asian increased the risk of engaging in binge drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed, Greek status, gender, Filipino, South Asian, other Asian, and lower ethnic identity scores were related to alcohol-related problems. Using one of the largest samples collected to date on sociocultural determinants and drinking among U.S.-born Asian American young adults, the

  19. Expanding pedestrian injury risk to the body region level: how to model passive safety systems in pedestrian injury risk functions.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko; Achmus, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the effectiveness of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) plays a crucial role in accident research. A common way to evaluate the effectiveness of new systems is to determine the potentials for injury severity reduction. Because injury risk functions describe the probability of an injury of a given severity conditional on a technical accident severity (closing speed, delta V, barrier equivalent speed, etc.), they are predestined for such evaluations. Recent work has stated an approach on how to model the pedestrian injury risk in pedestrian-to-passenger car accidents as a family of functions. This approach gave explicit and easily interpretable formulae for the injury risk conditional on the closing speed of the car. These results are extended to injury risk functions for pedestrian body regions. Starting with a double-checked German In-depth Accident Study (GIDAS) pedestrian-to-car accident data set (N = 444) and a functional-anatomical definition of the body regions, investigations on the influence of specific body regions on the overall injury severity will be presented. As the measure of injury severity, the ISSx, a rescaled version of the well-known Injury Severity Score (ISS), was used. Though traditional ISS is computed by summation of the squares of the 3 most severe injured body regions, ISSx is computed by the summation of the exponentials of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) severities of the 3 most severely injured body regions. The exponentials used are scaled to fit the ISS range of values between 0 and 75. Three body regions (head/face/neck, thorax, hip/legs) clearly dominated abdominal and upper extremity injuries; that is, the latter 2 body regions had no influence at all on the overall injury risk over the range of technical accident severities. Thus, the ISSx is well described by use of the injury codes from the same body regions for any pedestrian injury severity. As a mathematical consequence, the ISSx becomes explicitly

  20. Risk factors for acute knee injury in female youth football.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Martin; Waldén, Markus

    2016-03-01

    To prospectively evaluate risk factors for acute time-loss knee injury, in particular ACL injury, in female youth football players. Risk factors were studied in 4556 players aged 12-17 years from a randomised controlled trial during the 2009 season. Covariates were both intrinsic (body mass index, age, relative age effect, onset of menarche, previous acute knee injury or ACL injury, current knee complaints, and familial disposition of ACL injury) and extrinsic (no. of training sessions/week, no. of matches/week, match exposure ratio, match play with other teams, and artificial turf exposure). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from individual variable and multiple Cox regression analyses. Ninety-six acute knee injuries were recorded, 21 of them ACL injuries. Multiple Cox regression showed a fourfold higher ACL injury rate for players with familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 3.57; 95% CI 1.48-8.62). Significant predictor variables for acute knee injury were age >14 years (HR 1.97; 95% CI 1.30-2.97), knee complaints at the start of the season (HR 1.98; 95% CI 1.30-3.02), and familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 1.96; 95% CI 1.22-3.16). No differences in injury rates were seen when playing on artificial turf compared with natural grass. Female youth football players with a familial disposition of ACL injury had an increased risk of ACL injury and acute knee injury. Older players and those with knee complaints at pre-season were more at risk of acute knee injury. Although the predictive values were low, these factors could be used in athlete screening to target preventive interventions. II.

  1. Soccer fatigue, sprinting and hamstring injury risk.

    PubMed

    Small, K; McNaughton, L R; Greig, M; Lohkamp, M; Lovell, R

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a multi-directional soccer-specific fatigue protocol on sprinting kinematics in relation to hamstring injury risk. Nine semi-professional soccer players (Mean +/- SD: Age: 21.3 +/- 2.9 year; Height 185.0 +/- 8.7 cm; Body Mass 81.6 +/- 6.7 kg) completed the SAFT(90); a multi-directional, intermittent 90 min exercise protocol representative of soccer match-play. The 10m sprint times and three-dimensional kinematic data were recorded using a high-speed motion capture system (Qualisys Track Manager) every 15 min during the SAFT(90). A significant time dependent increase was observed in sprint time during the SAFT(90) (P<0.01) with a corresponding significant decrease in stride length (P<0.01). Analysis of the kinematic sprint data revealed significantly reduced combined maximal hip flexion and knee extension angle, indicating reduced hamstring length, between pre-exercise and half-time (P<0.01) and pre-exercise and full-time (P<0.05). These findings revealed that the SAFT(90) produced time dependent impairments in sprinting performance and kinematics of technique which may result from shorter hamstring muscle length. Alterations in sprinting technique may have implications for the increased predisposition to hamstring strain injury during the latter stages of soccer match-play.

  2. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions Using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, V Carol; Crandall, Jeff R; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-08-15

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of 14 existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degrees-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions substantially over predict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  3. High risk of new knee injury in elite footballers with previous anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Waldén, M; Hägglund, M; Ekstrand, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a severe event for a footballer, but it is unclear if the knee injury rate is higher on returning to football after ACL injury. Objective To study the risk of knee injury in elite footballers with a history of ACL injury compared with those without. Method The Swedish male professional league (310 players) was studied during 2001. Players with a history of ACL injury at the study start were identified. Exposure to football and all time loss injuries during the season were recorded prospectively. Results Twenty four players (8%) had a history of 28 ACL injuries in 27 knees (one rerupture). These players had a higher incidence of new knee injury of any type than the players without ACL injury (mean (SD) 4.2 (3.7) v 1.0 (0.7) injuries per 1000 hours, p  =  0.02). The risk of suffering a knee overuse injury was significantly higher regardless of whether the player (relative risk 4.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 11.2) or the knee (relative risk 7.9, 95% confidence interval 3.4 to 18.5) was used as the unit of analysis. No interactive effects of age or any other anthropometric data were seen. Conclusion The risk of new knee injury, especially overuse injury, was significantly increased on return to elite football after ACL injury regardless of whether the player or the knee was used as the unit of analysis. PMID:16432004

  4. Risk of Early Childhood Injuries in Twins and Singletons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roudsari, Bahman S.; Utter, Garth H.; Kernic, Mary A.; Mueller, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of twin births in the United States (US) has increased more than 65 per cent since 1980. However, the risk of injury to multiple-birth children is unknown. We sought to compare the risk of injury-related hospitalization and death between multiples and singletons. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using linked birth…

  5. Risk of Early Childhood Injuries in Twins and Singletons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roudsari, Bahman S.; Utter, Garth H.; Kernic, Mary A.; Mueller, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of twin births in the United States (US) has increased more than 65 per cent since 1980. However, the risk of injury to multiple-birth children is unknown. We sought to compare the risk of injury-related hospitalization and death between multiples and singletons. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using linked birth…

  6. Alpine ski and snowboarding traumatic injuries: incidence, injury patterns, and risk factors for 10 years.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Paul B; Ball, Chad G; Mulloy, Robert H; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-05-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding are popular winter sports in Canada. Every year participation in these activities results in traumatic injury. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and injury patterns, as well as risk factors associated with ski and snowboarding injuries. A comprehensive 10-year retrospective review of Alpine ski and snowboarding injuries from 1996 to 2006 was conducted. The Alberta Trauma Registry was used as the primary source of data. A total of 196 patients (56.6% skiers, 43.4% snowboarders) were identified as having major traumatic injuries (Injury Severity Score, >or=12). Forty-three patients required intensive care unit support. The majority of injuries were related to falls and collisions with natural objects. Head injuries were most common, followed by chest, spinal, and extremity trauma. Seventy-nine patients required emergency surgery. Skiing and snowboarding represent activities with high potential for traumatic injury. Safety initiatives should be developed to target this population.

  7. Risk Factors for Injuries in Professional Football Players.

    PubMed

    Haxhiu, Bekim; Murtezani, Ardiana; Zahiti, Bedri; Shalaj, Ismet; Sllamniku, Sabit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors related to the occurrence of injuries in football players. The study included 216 football players from 12 teams in the elite football league. Football-related injury data were collected prospectively during the 2012/2013 competitive season. At baseline the following information was collected for the players: anthropometric measurements (weight, height, BMI, subcutaneous skinfolds), playing experience, injury history, physical fitness performance test (agility run), peak oxygen uptake. The incidence, type and severity of injuries and training and game exposure times were prospectively documented for each player. Most of the players (n = 155, 71.7%) sustained the injures during the study period. The overall injury incidence during the regular season was 6.3 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (95% confidence interval, 4.31-9.67). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that playing experience (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.32-0.61, p < 0.01), age (OR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.49-2.81, p < 0.01) and a previous injury (OR = 4.4; 95% CI = 2.14-9.07, p < 0.01) were significantly correlated to increased risk of injuries. Body mass index was not associated with risk of injury. Strains (34.19%) and sprains (25.81%) were the major injury types. Twenty-seven percent of injured players were absent from football for more than 1 month, with knee injuries (25.42%) being the most severe type. The risk factors that increase injury rates in football players were previous injury, higher age and years of playing. Future research should include adequate rehabilitation program to reduce the risk of injuries.

  8. Gender Biases in Children's Appraisals of Injury Risk and Other Children's Risk-Taking Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrongiello, Barbara A.; Midgett, Corina; Stanton, Kerri-Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Assessed beliefs of 6-, 8-, and 10-year-olds about the injury risk presented by various play behaviors in stories. Found that children rated boys as having lower likelihood of injury than girls during the same activity. Children were more accurate in identifying the sex of the character in stories of boys' injuries than girls' injuries, and…

  9. Injury risk and noise exposure in firefighter training operations

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, Richard L.; Long, Rachel; Sun, Kan; Sayler, Stephanie; von Thaden, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Firefighters have high rate of injuries and illnesses, as well as exposures to high levels of noise. This study explored the relationship between noise exposure and injury among firefighters. Methods We recruited firefighters undergoing vehicle extrication and structural collapse emergency response training at a highly realistic training facility. Demographics, health status, body mass index, and history of serious injuries (i.e., injuries requiring first aid treatment, treatment in a medical clinic or office, or treatment at a hospital) were assessed at baseline, and daily activities, injury events, and near-misses were assessed daily using surveys. Participants' noise exposures were monitored for one 24-hour period using noise dosimeters. We used a mixed-effects logistic regression model to estimate the odds of injury events and near-misses associated with noise exposure as an independent variable. Results Of 56 subjects, twenty (36%) reported that they had ever suffered a serious injury during firefighting activities, and nine (16%) reported a serious injury within the past year. We estimated rates of 6.6 lifetime serious injuries per 100 FTE 16.1 serious injuries per 100 FTE within the past year. Our models indicated a significant increase in injury events and near misses among those with higher BMI, and as well as a dose-response relationship between near-misses/injuries and increasing noise levels. Noise levels >90 dBA in the 30 min prior to time of injury or near-miss were associated with substantially increased odds ratios for injury or near-miss. Our models further indicated that perceived job demands were significantly associated with increased risk of injury or near-miss. Conclusion Our results suggest that noise exposures may need to be incorporated into injury prevention programs for firefighters to reduce injuries among this high-risk occupational group. PMID:26712895

  10. Social and Environmental Predictors of Alcohol-Related Legal Infractions in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juth, Vanessa; Smyth, Joshua M.; Thompson, Kevin; Nodes, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Research on alcohol consumption among college students is often limited by self-reported outcomes and a narrow focus of predictor factors. This study examined both traditional risk factors for alcohol use as well as broader factors (e.g., weather, seasons) in predicting objective negative outcomes of alcohol use--alcohol-related legal infractions…

  11. Social and Environmental Predictors of Alcohol-Related Legal Infractions in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juth, Vanessa; Smyth, Joshua M.; Thompson, Kevin; Nodes, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Research on alcohol consumption among college students is often limited by self-reported outcomes and a narrow focus of predictor factors. This study examined both traditional risk factors for alcohol use as well as broader factors (e.g., weather, seasons) in predicting objective negative outcomes of alcohol use--alcohol-related legal infractions…

  12. 49 CFR 382.505 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 382.505 Section 382... SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Consequences for Drivers Engaging in Substance Use-Related Conduct § 382.505 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No driver tested under the provisions of subpart C of...

  13. 49 CFR 655.35 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 655.35 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Prohibited Alcohol Use § 655.35 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No employer shall permit...

  14. 49 CFR 655.35 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 655.35 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Prohibited Alcohol Use § 655.35 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No employer shall permit...

  15. 49 CFR 382.505 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 382.505 Section 382... SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Consequences for Drivers Engaging in Substance Use-Related Conduct § 382.505 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No driver tested under the provisions of subpart C of...

  16. 49 CFR 199.237 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 199.237 Section 199... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.237 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No operator...

  17. 49 CFR 382.505 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 382.505 Section 382... SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Consequences for Drivers Engaging in Substance Use-Related Conduct § 382.505 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No driver tested under the provisions of subpart C of...

  18. 49 CFR 655.35 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 655.35 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Prohibited Alcohol Use § 655.35 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No employer shall permit...

  19. 49 CFR 382.505 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 382.505 Section 382... SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Consequences for Drivers Engaging in Substance Use-Related Conduct § 382.505 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No driver tested under the provisions of subpart C of...

  20. 49 CFR 655.35 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 655.35 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Prohibited Alcohol Use § 655.35 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No employer shall permit...

  1. 49 CFR 199.237 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 199.237 Section 199... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.237 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No operator...

  2. 49 CFR 199.237 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 199.237 Section 199... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.237 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No operator...

  3. 49 CFR 382.505 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 382.505 Section 382... SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Consequences for Drivers Engaging in Substance Use-Related Conduct § 382.505 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No driver tested under the provisions of subpart C of...

  4. 49 CFR 199.237 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 199.237 Section 199... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.237 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No operator...

  5. 49 CFR 655.35 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 655.35 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Prohibited Alcohol Use § 655.35 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No employer shall permit...

  6. 49 CFR 199.237 - Other alcohol-related conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other alcohol-related conduct. 199.237 Section 199... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.237 Other alcohol-related conduct. (a) No operator...

  7. Injury rates and injury risk factors among federal bureau of investigation new agent trainees

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A one-year prospective examination of injury rates and injury risk factors was conducted in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) new agent training. Methods Injury incidents were obtained from medical records and injury compensation forms. Potential injury risk factors were acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire and existing data at the FBI Academy. Results A total of 426 men and 105 women participated in the project. Thirty-five percent of men and 42% of women experienced one or more injuries during training. The injury incidence rate was 2.5 and 3.2 injuries/1,000 person-days for men and women, respectively (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-1.7). The activities most commonly associated with injuries (% of total) were defensive tactics training (58%), physical fitness training (20%), physical fitness testing (5%), and firearms training (3%). Among the men, higher injury risk was associated with older age, slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the physical fitness test (PFT), lower self-rated physical activity, lower frequency of aerobic exercise, a prior upper or lower limb injury, and prior foot or knee pain that limited activity. Among the women higher injury risk was associated with slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the PFT, and prior back pain that limited activity. Conclusion The results of this investigation supported those of a previous retrospective investigation emphasizing that lower fitness and self-reported pain limiting activity were associated with higher injury risk among FBI new agents. PMID:22166096

  8. Risk factors of recurrent hamstring injuries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Visser, H M; Reijman, M; Heijboer, M P; Bos, P K

    2012-02-01

    Although recurrent hamstring injury is a frequent problem with a significant impact on athletes, data on factors determining the risk for a recurrent hamstring injury are scarce. To systematically review the literature and provide an overview of risk factors for re-injury of acute hamstring muscle injuries. Prospective studies on risk factors for re-injury following acute hamstring injuries were systematically reviewed. Medical databases and reference lists of the included articles were searched. Two reviewers independently selected potential studies and assessed methodological quality; one reviewer extracted the data. A best-evidence synthesis of all studied risk factors was performed. Of the 131 articles identified, five prospective follow-up studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. These studies reported a recurrence incidence of 13.9-63.3% in the same playing season up to 2 years after initial injury. Limited evidence for three risk factors and one protective factor for recurrent hamstring injury was found; patients with a recurrent hamstring injury had an initial injury with a larger volume size as measured on MRI (47.03 vs 12.42 cm(3)), more often had a Grade 1 initial trauma (Grade 0: 0-30.4%; Grade 1: 60.9-100%; Grade 2: 8.7%) and more often had a previous ipsilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (66.6% vs 17.1%) independent of graft selection. Athletes in a rehabilitation programme with agility/stabilisation exercises rather than strength/stretching exercises had a lower risk for re-injury (7.7% vs 70%). No significant relationship with re-injury was found for 11 related determinants. There was conflicting evidence that a larger cross-sectional area is a risk factor for recurrent hamstring injury. There is limited evidence that athletes with a larger volume size of initial trauma, a Grade 1 hamstring injury and a previous ipsilateral ACL reconstruction are at increased risk for recurrent hamstring injury. Athletes seem to be at lower

  9. Parachute ankle brace and extrinsic injury risk factors during parachuting.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Darakjy, Salima; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the injury prevention effectiveness of the parachute ankle brace (PAB) while controlling for known extrinsic risk factors. Injuries among airborne students who wore the PAB during parachute descents were compared with injuries among those who did not. Injury risk factors from administrative records included wind speed, combat loads, and time of day (day/night). Injuries were collected in the drop zone. A total of 596 injuries occurred in 102,784 parachute descents. In univariate analysis, students not wearing the PAB (Controls) were 2.00 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.32-3.02] times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.83 (95% CI = 1.04-3.24) times more likely to experience an ankle fracture, and 1.92 (95% CI = 1.38-2.67) times more likely to experience an ankle injury of any type. PAB wearers and Controls had a similar incidence of lower body injuries exclusive of the ankle [risk ratio (Control/PAB) = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.65-1.30]. After accounting for known extrinsic injury risk factors, Controls were 1.90 (95% CI = 1.24-2.90) times more likely than PAB wearers to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 (95% CI = 0.82- 2.63) times more likely to experience an ankle fracture, and 1.75 (95% CI = 1.25-2.48) times more likely to experience an ankle injury of any type. The incidence of parachute entanglements that persisted until the jumpers reached the ground were similar among PAB wearers and Controls IRR (Control/PAB) = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.61-2.29]. After controlling for known injury risk factors, the PAB protected against ankle injuries, and especially ankle sprains, while not influencing parachute entanglements or lower body injuries exclusive of the ankle.

  10. Epidemiology of alcohol-related burden of disease among Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Bianca; Doran, Chris M; Vos, Theo; Shakeshaft, Anthony P; Hall, Wayne

    2010-07-01

    To compare the burden of alcohol-related harm and underlying factors of this harm, by age and sex, for Indigenous and general population Australians. Population attributable fractions are used to estimate the disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for alcohol-related disease and injury. The DALYs were converted to rates per 1,000 by age and sex for the Indigenous and general populations. Homicide and violence rates were much higher for Indigenous males: greatest population difference was for 30-44 years, Indigenous rate 8.9 times higher. Rates of suicide were also greater: the largest population difference was for 15-29 years, Indigenous rate 3.9 times higher. Similarly, for Indigenous females, homicide and violence rates were much higher: greatest population difference was for 30-44 years, Indigenous rate 18.1 times higher. Rates of suicide were also greater: the largest population difference was for 15-29 years, Indigenous rate 5.0 times higher. Alcohol consumption and associated harms are of great concern for Indigenous Australians across all ages. Violent alcohol-related harms have been highlighted as a major concern. To reduce the disproportionate burden of alcohol-related harm experienced by Indigenous Australians, targeted interventions should include the impact on families and communities and not just the individual.

  11. Youth Participation and Injury Risk in Martial Arts.

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Koutures, Chris

    2016-12-01

    The martial arts can provide children and adolescents with vigorous levels of physical exercise that can improve overall physical fitness. The various types of martial arts encompass noncontact basic forms and techniques that may have a lower relative risk of injury. Contact-based sparring with competitive training and bouts have a higher risk of injury. This clinical report describes important techniques and movement patterns in several types of martial arts and reviews frequently reported injuries encountered in each discipline, with focused discussions of higher risk activities. Some of these higher risk activities include blows to the head and choking or submission movements that may cause concussions or significant head injuries. The roles of rule changes, documented benefits of protective equipment, and changes in training recommendations in attempts to reduce injury are critically assessed. This information is intended to help pediatric health care providers counsel patients and families in encouraging safe participation in martial arts.

  12. Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics: annual incidence, injury types and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas; Kowalski, Jan; Nilsson, Sverker; Ekberg, Joakim; Dahlström, Örjan; Renström, Per A

    2013-10-01

    To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries. Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period. Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292). 199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury. The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.

  13. Preventing Alcohol-Related Harm in College Students: Alcohol-Related Harm Prevention Program Effects on Hypothesized Mediating Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, J. W.; Tatterson, J. W.; Roberts, M. M.; Johnston, S. E.

    2004-01-01

    The Alcohol-related Harm Prevention (AHP) program is a normative education and skill-acquisition program designed to reduce serious, long-term alcohol-related harm in college students. Without admonishing students not to drink, which is likely to fail in many student populations, the AHP program attempts to give students the necessary perceptions,…

  14. Risk factors for hamstring injuries in community level Australian football

    PubMed Central

    Gabbe, B; Finch, C; Bennell, K; Wajswelner, H

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To identify risk factors for hamstring injury at the community level of Australian football. Methods: A total of 126 community level Australian football players participated in this prospective cohort study. To provide baseline measurements, they completed a questionnaire and had a musculoskeletal screen during the 2000 preseason. All were monitored over the season. Injury surveillance and exposure data were collected for the full season. Survival analysis was used to identify independent predictors of hamstring injury. Results: A hamstring injury was the first injury of the season in 20 players (16%). After adjustment for exposure, increasing age and decreased quadriceps flexibility were identified as significant independent predictors of the time to sustaining a hamstring injury. Older age (⩾23 years) was associated with an increased risk of hamstring injury (RR 3.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 14.0; p = 0.044). Players with increased quadriceps flexibility (as measured by the modified Thomas test) were less likely to sustain a hamstring injury (RR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.8; p = 0.022). Conclusions: The findings of this study can be used in the development of hamstring injury prevention strategies and to identify Australian football players at increased risk of hamstring injury. PMID:15665208

  15. Physical training risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in female soldiers.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanja C; Songer, Thomas; Ye, Feifei; LaPorte, Ronald; Grier, Tyson; Anderson, Morgan; Chervak, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) result in the most medical encounters, lost duty days, and permanent disability. Women are at greater risk of injury than men and physical training is the leading cause of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic, body composition, fitness, and physical training risk factors for injuries in female Soldiers serving in garrison Army units over the past 12 months. Self-report survey was collected from 625 women. The ankle was the most frequently injured body region, 13%. Running was the activity most often associated with injury, 34%. In univariate analysis lower rank, older age, history of deployment, no unit runs, weekly frequency of personal resistance training, and history of injury were all associated with injury. In multivariate analysis rank, history of injury, weekly frequency of unit runs, and weekly frequency of personal resistance training were the best combination of predictors of injury. Running once or twice a week with the unit protected against MSIs, whereas participating in personal resistance training sessions once or twice a week increased the risk of MSIs. With more emphasis on running and resistance training, the U.S. Army could reduce injuries and save billions of dollars in training and health care costs.

  16. Last drinks: A study of rural emergency department data collection to identify and target community alcohol-related violence.

    PubMed

    Miller, Peter; Droste, Nicolas; Baker, Tim; Gervis, Cathreena

    2015-06-01

    The present study summarises the methodology and findings of a pilot project designed to measure the sources and locations of alcohol-related harm by implementing anonymised 'last drinks' questions in the ED of a rural community. 'Last drinks' questions were added to computerised triage systems at South West Healthcare ED in rural Warrnambool, Victoria, from 1 November 2013 to 3 July 2014. For all injury presentations aged 15 years or older, attendees were asked whether alcohol was consumed in the 12 h prior to injury, how many standard drinks were consumed, where they purchased most of the alcohol and where they consumed the last alcoholic drink. From 3692 injury attendances, 10.8% (n = 399) reported consuming alcohol in the 12 h prior to injury. 'Last drinks' data collection was 100% complete for participants who reported alcohol use prior to injury. Approximately two-thirds (60.2%) of all alcohol-related presentations had purchased their alcohol at packaged liquor outlets. During high-alcohol hours, alcohol-related injuries accounted for 36.1% (n = 101) of all ED injury presentations, and in total 41.7% of alcohol-related attendances during these hours reported consuming last drinks at identifiable hotels, bars, nightclubs or restaurants, or identifiable public areas/events. This pilot demonstrates the feasibility and reliability of implementing sustainable 'last drinks' data collection methods in the ED, and the ability to effectively map the source of alcohol-related ED attendances in a rural community. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Risk of blood contamination and injury to operating room personnel.

    PubMed Central

    Quebbeman, E J; Telford, G L; Hubbard, S; Wadsworth, K; Hardman, B; Goodman, H; Gottlieb, M S

    1991-01-01

    The potential for transmission of deadly viral diseases to health care workers exists when contaminated blood is inoculated through injury or when blood comes in contact with nonintact skin. Operating room personnel are at particularly high risk for injury and blood contamination, but data on the specifics of which personnel are at greater risk and which practices change risk in this environment are almost nonexistent. To define these risk factors, experienced operating room nurses were employed solely to observe and record the injuries and blood contaminations that occurred during 234 operations involving 1763 personnel. Overall 118 of the operations (50%) resulted in at least one person becoming contaminated with blood. Cuts or needlestick injuries occurred in 15% of the operations. Several factors were found to significantly alter the risk of blood contamination or injury: surgical specialty, role of each person, duration of the procedure, amount of blood loss, number of needles used, and volume of irrigation fluid used. Risk calculations that use average values to include all personnel in the operating room or all operations performed substantially underestimate risk for surgeons and first assistants, who accounted for 81% of all body contamination and 65% of the injuries. The area of the body contaminated also changed with the surgical specialty. These data should help define more appropriate protection for individuals in the operating room and should allow refinements of practices and techniques to decrease injury. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1953115

  18. The gendered trouble with alcohol: young people managing alcohol related violence.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Jo

    2012-05-01

    Alcohol related violence is a troubling backdrop to the social lives and relationships of many young people in post-industrial societies. The development of the night-time economy where young people are encouraged to drink heavily in entertainment precincts has increased the risk of violence. This paper reports on 60 individual structured in-depth interviews about the drinking biographies of young people (aged 20-24) living in Victoria, Australia. Twenty-six males and 34 females participated in the research. The participants discussed their experiences with alcohol over their life course to date. The material on alcohol related violence is analysed in this paper. Just over half of the participants (33/60) recounted negative experiences with alcohol related violence. The findings demonstrate the continuing gendered nature of experiences of perpetration and victimization. Participants reported that aggression and violence perpetrated by some men was fuelled by alcohol consumption and required ongoing management. Experiences of violence were also spatialized. Men were more likely to report managing and avoiding violence in particular public settings whilst more women than men discussed managing violence in domestic settings. The central argument of this paper is that incidents of alcohol related violence and reactions to it are specific gender performances that occur in specific socio-cultural contexts. In contrast to research which has found some young people enjoy the adventure and excitement of alcohol related violence the mainstream participants in this study saw violence as a negative force to be managed and preferably avoided. Understanding violence as a dynamic gender performance complicates the development of policy measures designed to minimize harm but also offers a more holistic approach to developing effective policy in this domain. There is a need for greater acknowledgement that alcohol related violence in public venues and in families is primarily about

  19. Eye injury risk associated with remote control toy helicopter blades.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Kemper, Andrew R; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2012-01-01

    Eye injuries can be caused by a variety of consumer products and toys. Recently, indoor remote controlled (RC) toy helicopters have become very popular. The purpose of this study is to quantify eye injury risk associated with five commercially available RC toy helicopter blades. An experimental matrix of 25 tests was developed to test five different RC toy helicopter blades at full battery power on six postmortem human eyes. A pressure sensor inserted through the optic nerve measured intraocular pressure. Corneal abrasion was assessed post-impact using fluorescein dye. Intraocular pressure was correlated to injury risk for hyphema, lens damage, retinal damage, and globe rupture using published risk functions. All tests resulted in corneal abrasions; however, no other injuries were observed. The 25 tests produced an increase intraocular pressure between 15.2 kPa and 99.3 kPa (114.3 mmHg and 744.7 mmHg). Calculated blade velocities ranged between 16.0 m/s and 25.4 m/s. Injury risk for hyphema was a maximum of 0.2%. Injury risk for lens damage, retinal damage, and globe rupture was 0.0% for all tests. Blade design parameters such as length and mass did not affect the risk of eye injury. This is the first study to quantify the risk of eye injury from RC toy helicopter blades. While corneal abrasions were observed, more serious eye injuries were neither observed nor predicted to have occurred. Results from this study are critical for establishing safe design thresholds for RC toy helicopter blades so that more serious injuries can be prevented.

  20. Risk factors for injuries during airborne static line operations.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Steelman, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    US Army airborne operations began in World War II. Continuous improvements in parachute technology, aircraft exit procedures, and ground landing techniques have reduced the number of injuries over time from 27 per 1,000 descents to about 6 per 1,000 jumps. Studies have identified a number of factors that put parachutists at higher injury risk, including high wind speeds, night jumps, combat loads, higher temperatures, lower fitness, heavier body weight, and older age. Airborne injuries can be reduced by limiting risker training (higher wind speeds, night jumps, combat load) to the minimum necessary for tactical and operational proficiency. Wearing a parachute ankle brace (PAB) will reduce ankle injuries without increasing other injuries and should be considered by all parachutists, especially those with prior ankle problems. A high level of upper body muscular endurance and aerobic fitness is not only beneficial for general health but also associated with lower injury risk during airborne training. 2014.

  1. Risk for subsequent injuries after spinal cord injury: a 10-year longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Krause, James S

    2010-11-01

    To identify (1) the annual incidence of subsequent injury and injury-related hospitalizations in persons with preexisting spinal cord injury (SCI) and (2) risk and protective behaviors associated with differential risk for injury. Longitudinal mailed survey. Participants were enrolled in 1997 to 1998, with a follow-up conducted 10 years later. Data were collected from participants identified from a specialty hospital and were analyzed at a medical university in the Southeastern United States. Participants (N=1386) during the baseline enrollment, 821 of whom also participated in the 10-year follow-up. Inclusion criteria were (1) traumatic SCI with residual impairment, (2) nonsurgical onset, (3) aged 18 years or older, and (4) a minimum of 12 months post-SCI. Not applicable. Number of injuries severe enough to require treatment in a clinic, emergency department, or hospital in the 12 months before the survey and number of injury-related hospitalizations. Predictor variables included selected items from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, and prescription medication use. More than 23% of participants reported at least 1 injury within the past year, an increase from that reported 10 years earlier by the same participants (19%), and 7% reported at least 1 injury-related hospitalization. Those who reported a subsequent injury during the preliminary baseline data collection were about twice as likely to report at least 1 injury 10 years later. Binge drinking, psychotropic prescription medication use, and several personality characteristics also were related to injuries and/or injury-related hospitalization. Risk for injury continues to be a significant concern in the years and decades after SCI onset. Behavioral and personality factors hold the key to prevention. Copyright © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors associated with risk for subsequent injuries after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Krause, James S

    2004-09-01

    To identify the annual incidence and risk factors for subsequent injury among subjects with preexisting spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional, mailed survey. A specialty hospital in the southeastern United States. Subjects (N=1328) with SCI participated in this study (response rate, 72%), each of whom met the following inclusion criteria: (1) traumatic SCI with residual impairment American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grades A through D, (2) nonsurgical onset, (3) age 18 years or older at the time of the study, and (4) a minimum of 12 months post-SCI. Not applicable. A general health assessment survey was used that required participants to report the number of injuries that were severe enough to require treatment in a clinic, emergency department, or hospital in the past year, as well as whether any injury resulted in hospitalization. Risk measures included the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CAGE, Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale, and prescription medication usage. Nineteen percent of participants reported at least 1 injury within the past year, with an annual incidence of.33 when considering those with multiple injuries. Twenty-seven percent of those with at least 1 injury reported 1 or more injury-related hospitalizations in the past year. Being younger; having an ASIA grade D injury; higher sensation-seeking scores; heavy drinking; and prescription medication use for pain, spasticity, depression, and sleep were associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent injuries. Subsequent injuries impact nearly 20% of people with SCI annually; yet, this problem has received little attention in the literature. Further study is needed to identify the costs, severity, and circumstances surrounding injury to design prevention programs that target risk behaviors.

  3. Risk for Subsequent Injuries After Spinal Cord Injury: A 10-Year Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krause, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify: (a) the annual incidence of subsequent injury and injury related hospitalizations among individuals with pre-existing spinal cord injury (SCI) and (b) risk and protective behaviors associated with differential risk of injury. Design Longitudinal, mailed survey. Participants were enrolled in 1997-1998, with a follow-up conducted 10 years later. Setting Data were collected from participants identified from a specialty hospital and analyzed at a medical university in the Southeastern United States. Participants There were 1386 participants during the baseline enrollment, 821 of whom also participated in the 10-year follow-up. Inclusion criteria were: (1) traumatic SCI with residual impairment A-D, (2) non-surgical onset, (3) age 18 years or older, and (4) a minimum of 12 months post-SCI. Interventions Main Outcome Measures Number of injuries severe enough to require treatment in a clinic, emergency department, or hospital in the 12 months prior to the survey, and number of injury related hospitalizations. Predictor variables included selected items from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, and prescription medication usage. Results Over 23% of participants reported at least 1 injury within the past year, an increase from that reported 10 years earlier by the same participants (19%), and 7% reported at least 1 injury related hospitalization. Those who reported a subsequent injury during the preliminary baseline data collection were about twice as likely to report at least 1 injury 10 years later. Binge drinking, psychotropic prescription medication use, and several personality characteristics were also related to injuries and/or injury hospitalization. Conclusions Risk of injury continues to be a significant concern in the years and decades after SCI onset. Behavioral and personality factors hold the key to prevention. PMID:21044720

  4. Neighbourhood social and socio-economic composition and injury risks.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Anne; Laflamme, Lucie

    2005-10-01

    To investigate whether social and socio-economic characteristics of the population within a parish influence childhood injury. The study encompasses all children aged 0-15 y living in Stockholm County over the 3-y period 1999-2001 (about 360,000 children per year), grouped into parish of residence (138 parishes). The effect of parish attributes on injury rate were analysed based on three indices (deprivation, socio-economic status and social integration) derived by a factor analysis of 11 characteristics of the parishes' population, each index being split into three levels. Childhood injury resulting in at least one night of hospitalization during the period 1999-2001 was considered (n = 5540) by index, and rate ratios were calculated for 12 injury causes using parishes forming the best level of the index as the reference group. Higher levels of deprivation negatively influenced pedestrian injury rates, had a protective effect on other traffic-related injuries, and negatively affected some other types of unintentional injuries. Higher concentrations of people with low socio-economic status did not impact on the risk of traffic and fall injuries, but increased that of burns/scalds and cases of poisoning. Parishes with lower levels of social integration had significantly higher rates of bicycle- and moped-related injuries, and also of self-inflicted ones. Compositional characteristics of the population in a residential area affect injury to varying degrees and direction according to type of injury. The underlying mechanisms are likely to be specific to injury type.

  5. Injuries and injury risk factors among members of the United States Army Band.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Jones, Sarah B; Darakjy, Salima; Hauret, Keith G; Nevin, Remington; Grier, Tyson; Jones, Bruce H

    2007-12-01

    This project documented injuries in the professional musical performers of the US Army Band and used a multivariate approach to determine injury risk factors. Injuries were obtained from a medical surveillance database. Administrative records from the Band provided fitness test scores, physical characteristics, performing unit (Blues, Ceremonial, Chorale, Chorus, Concert, Strings), and functional group (strings, winds, keyboard, vocal, percussion, brass). A questionnaire completed by 95% of the Band (n=205) included queries on practice time, physical activity, tobacco use, and medical care. One or more injuries were diagnosed in 44 and 53% of Band members in the years 2004 and 2005, respectively. In univariate analysis, higher injury risk was associated with higher body mass index (BMI), less physical activity, prior injury, unit, functional group, and practice duration. In multivariate analysis, less self-rated physical activity, a prior injury, and functional group were independent risk factors. In the US Army Band, about half the performers had a medical visit for an injury in a 1-year period and injury risk was associated with identifiable factors.

  6. Effect of the increase in "alcopops" tax on alcohol-related harms in young people: a controlled interrupted time series.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve R; Pais, Joanne; White, Angela; Connor, Jason; Quek, Lake-Hui; Crilly, Julia L; Lawrence, David

    2011-12-19

    To measure alcohol-related harms to the health of young people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) of Gold Coast public hospitals before and after the increase in the federal government "alcopops" tax in 2008. Interrupted time series analysis over 5 years (28 April 2005 to 27 April 2010) of 15-29-year-olds presenting to EDs with alcohol-related harms compared with presentations of selected control groups. Proportion of 15-29-year-olds presenting to EDs with alcohol-related harms compared with (i) 30-49-year-olds with alcohol-related harms, (ii)15-29-year-olds with asthma or appendicitis, and (iii) 15-29-year-olds with any non-alcohol and non-injury related ED presentation. Over a third of 15-29-year-olds presented to ED with alcohol-related conditions, as opposed to around a quarter for all other age groups. There was no significant decrease in alcohol-related ED presentations of 15-29-year-olds compared with any of the control groups after the increase in the tax. We found similar results for males and females, narrow and broad definitions of alcohol-related harms, under-19s, and visitors to and residents of the Gold Coast. The increase in the tax on alcopops was not associated with any reduction in alcohol-related harms in this population in a unique tourist and holiday region. A more comprehensive approach to reducing alcohol harms in young people is needed.

  7. Injury incidence, risk factors and prevention in Australian rules football.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2013-05-01

    Along with the enjoyment and the other positive benefits of sport participation, there is also the risk of injury that is elevated in contact sport. This review provides a summary of injury incidence in Australian rules football (ARF), identifies injury risk factors, assesses the efficacy of interventions to reduce injury risk and makes recommendations for future research. The most common injuries were found to be muscle strains, particularly hamstrings; joint ligament sprains, especially ankle; haematomas and concussion. The most severe joint injury was anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Mouthguards are commonly worn and have been shown to reduce orofacial injury. There is evidence that thigh pads can reduce the incidence of thigh haematomas. There is a reluctance to wear padded headgear and an attempt to assess its effectiveness was unsuccessful due to low compliance. The most readily identified risk factor was a history of that injury. There were conflicting findings as to the influence strength imbalances or deficit has on hamstring injury risk in ARF. Static hamstring flexibility was not related to risk but low hip flexor/quadriceps flexibility increased hamstring injury risk. High lower-limb and high hamstring stiffness were associated with an elevated risk of hamstring injury. Since stiffness can be modulated through strength or flexibility training, this provides an area for future intervention studies. Low postural balance ability was related to a greater risk of ankle injury in ARF, players with poor balance should be targeted for balance training. There are preliminary data signifying a link between deficiencies in hip range of motion and hip adductor strength with groin pain or injury. This provides support for future investigation into the effectiveness of an intervention for high-risk players on groin injury rate. Low cross-sectional area of core-region muscle has been associated with more severe injuries and a motor control exercise intervention

  8. Measuring injury risk factors: question reliability in a statewide sample

    PubMed Central

    Koziol-McLain, J.; Brand, D.; Morgan, D.; Leff, M.; Lowenstein, S.

    2000-01-01

    Background—Recently (1996–98), Colorado added 15 questions pertaining to injury related risks and behaviors to the behavioral risk factor surveillance system (BRFSS). Questions addressed bicycle helmet use, traffic crashes, exposure to violence, suicidal behavior, and gun storage. Objective—To measure the test-retest reliability of these injury related questions. Methods—Of 330 BRFSS participants, 229 (69%) were called a second time and reasked nine selected injury questions. Retests were completed 7–28 days after the original interview. Results—Test-retest agreement was very high (κ >0.80) for bicycle helmet use, domestic police visits, and gun ownership. All other injury risk questions had substantial agreement (κ >0.60). Conclusions—The injury related questions added to the Colorado BRFSS have high test-retest reliability. PMID:10875674

  9. Time of day effects on railroad roadway worker injury risk.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Clark; Mejia, Bianka; McInnis, Catherine A; France, Megan; Nadler, Eric; Raslear, Thomas G

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how time of day affects injury risk of railroad maintenance of way employees and signalmen (roadway workers). Railroads reported 15,654 serious roadway worker injuries between 1997 and 2014. Roadway workers primarily work outdoors on or near railroad tracks and frequently encounter hazardous conditions. To avoid closing an active rail line during peak hours, railroads sometimes require roadway workers to work at night. Previous studies of roadway worker injury have not adequately accounted for exposure to time of day effects, nor have they investigated the human factors issues contributing to roadway worker injury. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) database of injury reports provided data for circadian rhythm models of the odds of fatal and nonfatal injuries. The FRA database and fatal injury investigation reports also permitted an analysis of the circumstances and the human factors issues associated with injuries that occur at different times of day. Odds of injury increased during nighttime work. The odds of nonfatal injury for both roadway worker crafts rose above 9:1 in the early morning hours. The relative odds of a fatal injury also increased significantly at night. A human factors analysis suggested that during all three shifts most nonfatal injuries involve workload, but workload was not identified as a factor in fatal injuries. Nighttime work is more hazardous for roadway workers than daytime work. Several factors related to fatigue and other conditions appear to increase the risk of injury during the outdoor, nighttime work required of roadway workers. For practical reasons, nighttime roadway work is sometimes unavoidable. Therefore, new practices for nighttime work must be developed to adequately address fatigue and protect roadway workers from harm. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries for soldiers deployed to Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanja C; Knapik, Joseph J; Ritland, Bradley M; Murphy, Nicole; Sharp, Marilyn A

    2012-11-01

    This study determined injury incidence and examined the association between musculoskeletal injuries and potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. This retrospective cohort study involved a survey of 593 volunteers from two battalions of a Stryker Brigade Combat Team upon completion of a 12-mo deployment to Afghanistan. The survey included questions on physical characteristics, work duties, equipment worn, fitness training, and injuries experienced during the deployment. Of the surveyed soldiers, 45% sustained an injury during the deployment. Total injuries resulted in 5049 d of limited duty, an average of 8.5 d per injury. The body regions with the largest numbers of injuries were the low back (17.4%), knee (12.7%), and shoulder (10.0%). The majority (65%) of injuries occurred while working. The most frequent activities soldiers reported as the cause of injury were lifting and carrying (9.8%), dismounted patrolling (9.6%), and physical training (8.0%). Older age, higher enlisted rank, female sex, months deployed, more time spent standing, longer strength training sessions, heaviest load worn, and heavier or more frequent lifting tasks were all associated with injury. Tasks requiring physical energy expenditure such as load carriage, lifting, or standing resulted in an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury in this study. Lifting/carrying, dismounted patrols, and physical training were associated with 26% of musculoskeletal injuries. The weight of loads carried and lifting may be exceeding the work capacity of the soldiers, resulting in injury. These injuries in turn limit available work days for military units, reducing combat power.

  11. Alcohol-Related Posts from Young People on Social Networking Sites: Content and Motivations.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hanneke; Gebhardt, Winifred A; van den Putte, Bas

    2017-07-01

    Many young people place alcohol-related posts on social networking sites (SNS) which can result in undesirable effects. Although several recent studies have investigated the occurrence of alcohol-related SNS use, it is neither clear (a) what type of alcohol posts are placed on SNS, (b) the motivations to place alcohol posts, nor (c) which young people are most likely to place alcohol posts. This study addressed these three goals. A large cross-sectional study among young participants (12-30 years; N = 561) assessed the posting of different types of alcohol posts, the motivations to (not) post these posts, and potential differences in posting between subgroups (i.e., in terms of age, gender, and religion). Participants reported that they most often placed moderate, instead of more extreme, alcohol posts, in particular, when alcohol was present in the post "by chance". Furthermore, they indicated to post alcohol-related content mostly for entertainment reasons. Finally, we found differences in self-reported posting and motivations to post according to age, gender, and religion. These findings provide relevant implications for future interventions aiming to decrease alcohol posts, for example, by making participants aware of their posting behavior and by targeting specific at risk groups. Future research should explore the effectiveness of such intervention strategies and should investigate whether alcohol posts lead to an underestimation of alcohol-related risks.

  12. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, RuiJie; Li, Xia; Jiang, YongShuai; Liu, GuiYou; Li, ChuanXing; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Gong, BinSheng

    2009-02-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1 approximately 22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  13. Adolescent protective behavior to reduce drug and alcohol use, alcohol-related harm and interpersonal violence.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lisa; Sheehan, Mary; Chapman, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    Typically adolescents' friends are considered a risk factor for adolescent engagement in risk-taking. This study took a more novel approach, by examining adolescent friendship as a protective factor. In particular it investigated friends' potential to intervene to reduce risk-taking. Five-hundred-forty adolescents (mean age 13.47 years) were asked about their intention to intervene to reduce friends' alcohol, drug and alcohol-related harms and about psychosocial factors potentially associated with intervening. More than half indicated that they would intervene in friends' alcohol, drug use, alcohol-related harms and interpersonal violence. Intervening was associated with being female, having friends engage in overall less risk-taking and having greater school connectedness. The findings provide an important understanding of increasing adolescent protective behavior as a potential strategy to reduce alcohol and drug related harms.

  14. [Occupational injury risk in the shoe industry: frequency, types of injuries and equipment involved, improvement interventions].

    PubMed

    Tognon, Ilaria Desirée

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work has been to evaluate the risk of injuries connected to the use of machinery and work tools in the footwear industry. The analysis of the data related to injuries in the footwear industry, deduced from the registers of injuries collected in the investigated factories, shows that most accidents arise from the contact of the operator's hands with tools and machinery parts during their use. Risk factors generally include the inherent specific danger of some work tools and machines, the lack or inadequacy of safety devices, the obsolescence of the equipment, the imprudence and underestimation of risk.

  15. Teens' Knowledge of Risk Factors for Sports Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Cynthia W.

    2004-01-01

    Youth participation in sports has increased greatly over the past 20 years. Consequently, there has been a rise in the number of sports injuries. A study was conducted to determine teen's level of physical activity, knowledge about risk factors for sports injuries, use of protective equipment, and parental involvement. Two groups of teens, one of…

  16. Childhood Problem Behaviors and Injury Risk over the Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Markus; Power, Chris; Kivimaki, Mika

    2009-01-01

    Background: Childhood externalizing and internalizing behaviors have been associated with injury risk in childhood and adolescence, but it is unknown whether this association continues to hold in adulthood. We examined whether externalizing and internalizing behaviors expressed in childhood predict injuries in childhood, adolescence, and…

  17. Teens' Knowledge of Risk Factors for Sports Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Cynthia W.

    2004-01-01

    Youth participation in sports has increased greatly over the past 20 years. Consequently, there has been a rise in the number of sports injuries. A study was conducted to determine teen's level of physical activity, knowledge about risk factors for sports injuries, use of protective equipment, and parental involvement. Two groups of teens, one of…

  18. Episodic alcohol use and risk of nonfatal injury.

    PubMed

    Borges, G; Cherpitel, C J; Mondragón, L; Poznyak, V; Peden, M; Gutierrez, I

    2004-03-15

    Usual and acute alcohol consumption are important risk factors for injury. Although alcohol-dependent people are thought to be at increased risk of injury, there are few reports suggesting that their risk is greater than that of nondependent alcohol users in a given episode of alcohol use. The authors conducted a case-crossover analysis of data on 705 injury patients from a hospital emergency department in Mexico City, Mexico, collected in 2002. The majority of the sample was male (60%) and over 30 years old (51%). With use of a multiple matching approach that took into account three control time periods (the day prior to the injury, the same day in the previous week, and the same day in the previous month), the estimated relative risk of injury for patients who reported having consumed alcohol within 6 hours prior to injury (17% of the sample) was 3.97 (95% confidence interval: 2.88, 5.48). This increase in the relative risk was concentrated within the first 2 hours after drinking; there was a positive association of increasing risk with increasing number of drinks consumed. These data suggested that relative risk estimates were the same for patients with and without alcohol use disorders.

  19. Nonmodifiable risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Price, Meghan J; Tuca, Maria; Cordasco, Frank A; Green, Daniel W

    2017-02-01

    As anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is becoming increasingly prevalent in the population of active children and young adolescents, it is crucial to be aware of both the modifiable and nonmodifiable factors that place this population at increased ACL injury risk. Historically, there has not been a definitive consensus on all of these risk factors-particularly the nonmodifiable ones. The present review has accumulated the most recent evidence for the nonmodifiable risk factors in ACL injury focusing particularly on female gender, generalized joint laxity, knee recurvatum, increased lateral tibial slope, decreased intercondylar notch width, structural lower extremity valgus, limb length discrepancy, family history, and history of contralateral knee ACL injury. Physicians should be aware of the nonmodifiable risk factors for ACL tears in active children and adolescents and should also encourage avoidance of modifiable risk factors in this population. Young athletes with nonmodifiable risk factors are at a particularly increased risk of recurrent injury following ACL reconstruction (ACLR). We believe that a primary extra-articular augmentation via iliotibial band tenodesis at the same time of ACLR may decrease the rate of reinjury for the high risk athlete with multiple nonmodifiable risk factors.

  20. Autism Greatly Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for Drowning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for Drowning Swimming lessons are essential -- even before other therapies, researcher says ... 2 and 3 years of age -- need swimming lessons as soon as possible, even before they start ...

  1. Alcohol-Related Mortality in Patients With Psoriasis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Rosa; Webb, Roger T; Carr, Matthew J; Moriarty, Kieran J; Kleyn, C Elise; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2017-09-15

    People diagnosed with psoriasis have an increased risk of premature mortality, but the underlying reasons for this mortality gap are unclear. To investigate whether patients with psoriasis have an elevated risk of alcohol-related mortality. An incident cohort of patients with psoriasis aged 18 years and older was delineated for 1998 through 2014 using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and linked to Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and Office for National Statistics (ONS) mortality records. Patients with psoriasis were matched with up to 20 comparison patients without psoriasis on age, sex, and general practice. Alcohol-related deaths were ascertained via the Office for National Statistics mortality records. A stratified Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the cause-specific hazard ratio for alcohol-related death, with adjustment for socioeconomic status. The cohort included 55 537 with psoriasis and 854 314 patients without psoriasis. Median (interquartile) age at index date was 47 (27) years; 408 230 of total patients (44.9%) were men. During a median (IQR) of 4.4 (6.2) years of follow-up, the alcohol-related mortality rate was 4.8 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI, 4.1-5.6; n = 152) for the psoriasis cohort, vs 2.5 per 10 000 (95% CI, 2.4- 2.7; n = 1118) for the comparison cohort. The hazard ratio for alcohol-related death in patients with psoriasis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.31-1.91), and the predominant causes of alcohol-related deaths were alcoholic liver disease (65.1%), fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver (23.7%), and mental and behavioral disorders due to alcohol (7.9%). People with psoriasis have approximately a 60% greater risk of dying due to alcohol-related causes compared with peers of the same age and sex in the general population. This appears to be a key contributor to the premature mortality gap. These findings call for routine screening, identification and treatment, using the Alcohol Use Disorders

  2. Calf muscle strain injuries in sport: a systematic review of risk factors for injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Brady; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the literature to identify risk factors for calf strain injury, and to direct future research into calf muscle injuries. Systematic review DATA SOURCES: Database searches conducted for Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, AUSPORT, SportDiscus, PEDro and Cochrane Library. Manual reference checks, ahead of press searches, citation tracking. From inception to June 2016. Studies evaluating and presenting data related to intrinsic or extrinsic risk factors for sustaining future calf injury. Ten studies were obtained for review. Subjects across football, Australian football, rugby union, basketball and triathlon were reported on, representing 5397 athletes and 518 calf/ lower leg muscle injuries. Best evidence synthesis highlights chronological age and previous history of calf strain are the strongest risk factors for future calf muscle injury. Previous lower limb injuries (hamstring, quadriceps, adductor, knee) show some limited evidence for an association. Numerous factors lack evidence of an association, including height, weight, gender and side dominance. Increasing age and previous calf strain injury are the most predictive of future calf injury. The overall paucity of evidence and the trend for studies of a high risk of bias show that further research needs to be undertaken. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. In vino silentium? Individual, situational, and alcohol-related factors in reporting violence to the police.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Iain R

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies the individual, situational, and alcohol-related factors associated with reporting violent victimization to the police. Factors positively associated with reporting included older age and incident severity (the assailant's use of a weapon, incurring injury that required attendance at an emergency department). Factors negatively associated with reporting included higher educational qualifications, assault in the nighttime economy (NTE), and drinking more than two alcoholic drinks immediately prior to victimization. It is possible that drinkers engage in "moratorium" on reporting violence in the NTE. Recognizing and reducing the acceptability of violence in the NTE may help reduce incidence of alcohol-related violence. Organizations that use police records of violence to inform practice and policy should account for uneven distributions in reporting behavior when analyzing trends in violence.

  4. Pain on Functional Movement Screen Tests and Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Timothy T; Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle C; Anderson, Morgan K; North, William J; Jones, Bruce H

    2015-11-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool intended to evaluate limitations or asymmetries of movement to detect individuals at risk for exercise- and sports-related injury. The purpose was to determine the association and predictive value of specific FMS tests with injury risk in physically active men. Soldiers aged 18-57 years completed the FMS (n = 2,476). Demographic and fitness data were collected by survey. Medical record data for any, overuse, and traumatic injury 6 months after the assessment were obtained. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were calculated along with receiver operator characteristics to determine area under the curve (AUC). Risks, risk ratios, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to assess injury risks. Multivariate logistic regression identified that pain on 5 of the 7 tests was associated with greater risk for any injury (OR = 1.50-3.51): deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability. However, FMS registered low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC for all 7 tests for the 3 injury types (2-24% sensitivity, 16-74% PPV, and 50-58% AUC). Although the presence of pain was associated with a higher risk of injury on 5 tests, a low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC were displayed. Therefore, caution is advised when implementing the FMS as a screening tool in an Army or similarly active population as it could lead to prevention and treatment resources being directed toward individuals who are not at greater risk for injury.

  5. Protective Behavioral Strategies, Social Norms, and Alcohol-Related Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arterberry, Brooke J; Smith, Ashley E; Martens, Matthew P; Cadigan, Jennifer M; Murphy, James G

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the unique contributions of protective behavioral strategies and social norms in predicting alcohol-related outcomes. Participants were 363 students from a large public university in the Midwest who reported at least one binge-drinking episode (5+/4+ drinks for men/women in one sitting) in the past 30 days. Data were collected 1/2010-3/2011. We used SEM to test models where protective behavioral strategies (PBS) and social norms were predictors of both alcohol use and alcohol-related problems, after controlling for the effects of gender. Both PBS and descriptive norms had relationships with alcohol use. PBS also had a relationship with alcohol-related problems. Overall, the findings suggest that PBS and social norms have unique associations with distinct alcohol-related outcomes.

  6. Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems among adolescents in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Deng, Jianxiong; He, Yuan; Deng, Xueqing; Huang, Jinghui; Huang, Guoliang; Gao, Xue; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Lu, Ciyong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol misuse among adolescents is a common issue worldwide and is an emerging problem in China. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of alcohol drinking and alcohol-related problems among Chinese adolescents and to explore their risk factors and connections. A cross-sectional study using an anonymous questionnaire was conducted among junior and senior high school students between 2010 and 2012. Data on self-reported alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, school factors, family factors, and psychosocial factors were collected. Descriptive analyses were made of the proportions of sociodemographics, family, school, and psychosocial factors. Multilevel logistic regression models were conducted to analyze the risk factors for alcohol drinking and alcohol-related problems. Of the 105,752 students who ranged in age from 9 to 21 years, the prevalence of current drinking among students was 7.3%, and 13.2% students reported having alcohol-related problems. Male students were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.69–1.87) times more likely to be involved in current drinking and 1.86 (95% CI = 1.79–1.93) times more likely to have alcohol-related problems. Higher grade level students were at a higher risk of current drinking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.05–1.13) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.42–1.58). Older students were more likely to report current drinking (AOR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.04–1.17) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.82–1.85). Having poor classmate relations (AOR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.03–1.37), having poor relationships with teachers (AOR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.00–1.16), and below average academic achievement (AOR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.41–1.59) were positively associated with current drinking. Moreover, students with suicidal ideation were at a higher risk of current drinking (AOR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.61–1.81) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1

  7. Alcohol-related morbidity and mortality within siblings.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Osler, Merete; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Andersen, Per Kragh; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Mortensen, Laust H

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the association between educational status and alcohol-related somatic and non-somatic morbidity and mortality among full siblings in comparison with non-related individuals. Cohort study. Denmark. Approximately 1.4 million full siblings born in Denmark between 1950 and 1979 were followed from age 28-58 years or censoring due to alcohol-related hospitalization and mortality. Cox regression analyses were used to estimate associations of educational status with alcohol-related outcomes. Results from cohort analyses based on non-related individuals and inter-sibling analyses were compared. A lower educational status was associated with a higher rate of alcohol-related outcomes, especially among the youngest (aged 28-37 years) and individuals born 1970-79. Compared with the cohort analyses, the associations attenuated slightly in the inter-sibling analysis. For example, in the cohort analysis, females with a basic school education born 1970-79 had an increased rate of alcohol-related non-somatic morbidity and mortality [hazard rate ratio (HR) = 4.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.27-5.02] compared to those with a vocational education. In the inter-sibling analysis, the HR attenuated (HR = 2.66, 95% CI = 1.95-3.63). For alcohol-related somatic outcomes the corresponding figures were HR = 3.47 (95% CI = 2.63-4.58) and HR = 3.36 (95% CI = 2.10-5.38), respectively. In general, the associations were stronger among females than males (aged 28-37) in the analyses of alcohol-related non-somatic outcomes. Health conditions earlier in life explained only a minor part of the associations. The association between educational status and alcohol-related somatic and non-somatic morbidity and mortality is only driven by familial factors to a small degree. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Kasapoglu, Taner; Ozdemirci, Safak; Fadıloglu, Erdem; Akyol, Aysegul; Demirdag, Erhan; Yalvac, E Serdar; Kandemir, N Omer

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injuries. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The hospital records of 62,288 vaginal deliveries were evaluated retrospectively. There were 35 cases of brachial plexus injury. Of these patients, nine had brachial plexus injuries with clavicle fracture and 26 without clavicle fracture. The analysed risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury were gestational diabetes, labour induction and augmentation, prolonged second stage of labour, estimated foetal weight above 4000 g, birth weight above 4000 g, risky working hours, and the requirement of manoeuvres to free the impacted shoulder from behind the symphysis pubis. Labour augmentation with oxytocin increased the risk of clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury (OR 6.67; 95% CI 1.26-35.03). A birth weight higher than 4000 g also increased the risk of clavicle fracture. Risky working hours, gestational diabetes, estimated foetal weight higher than 4000 g, and requirement of shoulder dystocia manoeuvres did not increase the risk of clavicle fracture. Labour augmentation and actual birth weight higher than 4000 g were identified as risk factors for clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury.

  9. Unintentional injuries after TBI: Potential risk factors, impacts, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie A; Bellon, Kimberly; Yang, Yvonne

    2016-06-30

    The top three causes of fatal unintentional injuries are falls, motor vehicle crashes, and being struck against or struck by objects or persons. These etiologies also happen to be the leading causes of TBI, a serious public health problem, in the US. Reduced cognitive functioning, poor decision making, increased risk taking, disinhibition, diminished safety skills and substance use, place individuals with TBI at an increased risk for subsequent unintentional injuries. The caregiving, psychological, social and financial burden of initial injuries is enormous. Unintentional injuries post-TBI add to that burden significantly. Many unintentional injuries can be prevented with simple education and environment and lifestyle changes. Injury prevention requires collaboration among many. This literature review will share information regarding potential triggers or causes of unintentional injuries after TBI to identify potential issues. The many impacts of these injuries will be reviewed. Best practices in prevention will be presented. Ultimately, education, discussion, and awareness across multiple stakeholders can aid in preventing unintentional injuries after TBI.

  10. Fatal agricultural injuries in preschool children: risks, injury patterns and strategies for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Brison, Robert J.; Pickett, William; Berg, Richard L.; Linneman, James; Zentner, Jamie; Marlenga, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Background Agricultural injuries are an important health concern for pediatric populations and particularly for children of pre school age. This study was conducted to estimate rates and determine patterns of fatal agricultural injury among young children exposed to agricultural hazards and to identify strategies to prevent such injuries. Methods A national case series was assembled retrospectively for the years 1990–2001. We identified children aged 1–6 years who were fatally injured during the course of agricultural work or through contact with a hazard of an agricultural worksite. Using a standardized survey instrument, we collected data from provincial coroners' and medical examiners' case files. Fatal agricultural injury rates (calculated with denominator data from the Canada Census of Agriculture) were compared with national all-cause, unintentional fatal injury rates in the general population of Canadian children during the same period (calculated with denominator data from the Canada Census of Population). Results The annual rate of fatal agricultural injury was substantially higher than that of all-cause, unintentional fatal injury among Canadian children aged 1–6 years (14.9 v. 8.7 per 100 000 person-years, respectively). Differences in risk were attributed to elevated fatal agricultural injury rates among boys. Most injuries occurred in the agricultural worksite, largely (84/115 [73%]) the result of 3 mechanisms: being run over by agricultural machinery as a bystander (29%) or as an extra rider who fell from the machine (22%), or asphyxia due to drowning (23%). Major crush injuries (of the head, chest and abdomen) and asphyxia from drowning were the most frequent mechanisms of injury. Interpretation: Preschool-aged children exposed to agricultural worksites are at high risk of fatal injuries. Prevention strategies should focus on restricting children's access to these worksites. Physicians and allied health care professionals who care for rural

  11. Motor ability: protective or risk for school injuries?

    PubMed

    Gofin, Rosa; Donchin, Milka; Schulrof, Boaz

    2004-01-01

    The study aims were to assess the independent contribution of motor ability to the incidence of school injuries. The study included 2057 pupils in grades 3-6 of primary schools in a city in the north of Israel. A surveillance system gathered information about injuries that occurred on school premises or during school related activities and required medical treatment or caused limitation of usual activities. Children provided information on sensation seeking, self-appraisal of health, academic performance, physical activity, and dominant hand; anthropometric measurements and motor ability tests were performed. The incidence of injury events was 4% (95% CI=3.2-5.0). Injuries increased with increased balance and agility, but there were no differences according to reaction time. No other study variables were associated with the incidence of injuries. Our findings of an increase in the incidence of injuries with better motor ability may express differences in exposure to risk situations between children with better and poorer motor abilities.

  12. Overuse Injury: Are Students at Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Anne

    1986-01-01

    Use of computer keyboards requires repetitive movements that may cause "overuse injuries" among students. Education on computer literacy must include warning of these negative side effects and must instill safe operating habits among students. (10 references) (CJH)

  13. Predicting head injury risk during International Space Station increments.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Aaron S; Zakrajsek, Anne D; Lewandowski, Beth E; Brooker, John E; Myers, Jerry G

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program is using a probabilistic risk assessment approach to identify acute and chronic medical risks to manned spaceflight. The objective of this project was to estimate the likelihood of a neurological head injury to a crewmember severe enough to require medical assessment, treatment, or evacuation during a typical International Space Station (ISS) increment. A 2 degree-of-freedom analytical model of the human head was created to allow for analysis of the impact response. The output of the model is acceleration of the head, which was used to determine the probability that the simulated impact resulted in a head injury with an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 3 or greater. These data were then integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment, which outputs a likelihood of injury with a representative measure of the uncertainty. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to vary input parameters over their defined distributions. The mean probability of a moderate neurological injury (AIS 3 or greater) occurring due to a head impact by a crewmember translating through the ISS is 1.16 x 10(-4) per 6-mo mission increment (2.32 x 10(-4) per year). Our head injury prediction model has shown that there is a low, yet not insignificant, probability of neurological head injury of AIS score 3 or greater. The results from this simulation will be input into the parent Integrated Medical Model, which incorporates the risks of over 80 different medical events in order to inform mission planning scenarios.

  14. Nonbenzodiazepine Sedative Hypnotics and Risk of Fall-Related Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Sarah E.; Wickwire, Emerson M.; Park, Yujin; Albrecht, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, and zaleplon would be associated with increased risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hip fracture. Methods: We conducted a case-crossover study on a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 y or older hospitalized with either TBI (n = 15,031) or hip fracture (n = 37,833) during 2007–2009. Use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, or zaleplon during the 30-day period prior to injury hospitalization was compared to use during four control periods at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo prior to injury. The primary outcome was hospitalization for TBI or hip fracture. Results: Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR] 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56, 2.25); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.40, 1.13). Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of hip fracture (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.41, 1.79); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.83, 1.50). Analysis of zaleplon use in the month prior to injury was limited by low drug utilization but was not associated with increased risk of TBI (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.21, 3.34) or hip fracture (OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.40, 2.13) in this study. Conclusions: For the treatment of insomnia in older adults, eszopiclone may present a safer alternative to zolpidem, in terms of fall-related injuries. Citation: Tom SE, Wickwire EM, Park Y, Albrecht JS. Nonbenzodiazepine sedative hypnotics and risk of fall-related injury. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1009–1014. PMID:26943470

  15. Accounting for sampling variability, injury under-reporting, and sensor error in concussion injury risk curves.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Michael R; Margulies, Susan S; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2015-09-18

    There has been recent dramatic increase in the use of sensors affixed to the heads or helmets of athletes to measure the biomechanics of head impacts that lead to concussion. The relationship between injury and linear or rotational head acceleration measured by such sensors can be quantified with an injury risk curve. The utility of the injury risk curve relies on the accuracy of both the clinical diagnosis and the biomechanical measure. The focus of our analysis was to demonstrate the influence of three sources of error on the shape and interpretation of concussion injury risk curves: sampling variability associated with a rare event, concussion under-reporting, and sensor measurement error. We utilized Bayesian statistical methods to generate synthetic data from previously published concussion injury risk curves developed using data from helmet-based sensors on collegiate football players and assessed the effect of the three sources of error on the risk relationship. Accounting for sampling variability adds uncertainty or width to the injury risk curve. Assuming a variety of rates of unreported concussions in the non-concussed group, we found that accounting for under-reporting lowers the rotational acceleration required for a given concussion risk. Lastly, after accounting for sensor error, we find strengthened relationships between rotational acceleration and injury risk, further lowering the magnitude of rotational acceleration needed for a given risk of concussion. As more accurate sensors are designed and more sensitive and specific clinical diagnostic tools are introduced, our analysis provides guidance for the future development of comprehensive concussion risk curves.

  16. Characteristics of Crashes that Increase the Risk of Serious Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Augenstein, Jeffrey; Perdeck, Elana; Stratton, James; Digges, Kennerly; Bahouth, George

    2003-01-01

    The advent of Automatic Crash Notification Systems (ACN) offers the possibility of immediately locating crashes and of determining the crash characteristics by analyzing the data transmitted from the vehicle. A challenge to EMS decision makers is to identify those crashes with serious injuries and deploy the appropriate rescue and treatment capabilities. The objective of this paper is to determine the crash characteristics that increase the risk of serious injury. Within this paper, regression models are presented which relate occupant, vehicle and impact characteristics to the probability of serious injury using the Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale Level (MAIS). The accuracy of proposed models were evaluated using National Automotive Sampling System/Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS) and Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) case data. Cumulatively, the positive prediction rate of models identifying the likelihood of MAIS3 and higher injuries was 74.2%. Crash mode has a significant influence of injury risk. For crashes with 30 mph deltaV, the risk of MAIS3+ injury for each mode is 38.9%, 83.8%, 47.8% and 19.9% for frontal, near side, far side and rear impact crashes, respectively. In addition to deltaV, a number of crash variables were identified that assist in the accurate prediction of the probability of MAIS 3+ injury. These variables include occupant age, partial ejection, safety belt usage, intrusion near the occupant, and crashes with a narrow object. For frontal crashes, added crash variables include air bag deployment, steering wheel deformation, and multiple impact crashes. The quantitative relationship between each of these crash variables and injury risk has been determined and validated by regression analysis based on NASS/CDS and CIREN data. PMID:12941251

  17. Alcohol-Related Dementia and Neurocognitive Impairment: A Review Study.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina; Choudhary, Mona; Dayal, Prabhoo; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol consumption has escalated rapidly in many countries over the past decade. Evidence suggests a correlation between alcohol use and cognitive decline. We have systematically reviewed the concept and controversies, epidemiology, nosology, neuropathology and neurobiology, neuropsychology and management updates of alcohol-related dementia (ARD) in this paper. We retrieved papers for this review by searching the PubMed database for terms "alcohol and dementia", "alcohol and cognitive impairment", and "alcohol and wernicke-korsakoff" mentioned in the title of the published papers. A total of 131 studies showed up. Appropriate studies were shortlisted and included (n = 72). Cross-references if relevant were considered from the selected studies. Eligible articles were fully read by the authors and the results were compiled. The prolonged and excessive use of alcohol may lead to structural and functional brain damage, leading to ARD. The cognitive deficits are most frequently observed in domains of visuospatial functions, memory and executive tasks, with a potential of partial recovery if abstinence is maintained. However, there are doubts regarding the etiopathogenesis, nosological status, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for ARD, due to difficulty in assessment and various confounding factors. With growing cohort of young and middle-aged people, there is a probable risk of upsurge of ARD. Presently, there are dilemmas over the diagnosis of independent ARD. Thus, there is a need to develop evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management of ARD through further systematic studies.

  18. Alcohol-Related Dementia and Neurocognitive Impairment: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina; Choudhary, Mona; Dayal, Prabhoo; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Context Alcohol consumption has escalated rapidly in many countries over the past decade. Evidence suggests a correlation between alcohol use and cognitive decline. We have systematically reviewed the concept and controversies, epidemiology, nosology, neuropathology and neurobiology, neuropsychology and management updates of alcohol-related dementia (ARD) in this paper. Evidence Acquisition We retrieved papers for this review by searching the PubMed database for terms “alcohol and dementia”, “alcohol and cognitive impairment”, and “alcohol and wernicke-korsakoff” mentioned in the title of the published papers. A total of 131 studies showed up. Appropriate studies were shortlisted and included (n = 72). Cross-references if relevant were considered from the selected studies. Eligible articles were fully read by the authors and the results were compiled. Results The prolonged and excessive use of alcohol may lead to structural and functional brain damage, leading to ARD. The cognitive deficits are most frequently observed in domains of visuospatial functions, memory and executive tasks, with a potential of partial recovery if abstinence is maintained. However, there are doubts regarding the etiopathogenesis, nosological status, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for ARD, due to difficulty in assessment and various confounding factors. Conclusions With growing cohort of young and middle-aged people, there is a probable risk of upsurge of ARD. Presently, there are dilemmas over the diagnosis of independent ARD. Thus, there is a need to develop evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management of ARD through further systematic studies. PMID:27818965

  19. Safety walkarounds predict injury risk and reduce injury rates in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, K L; Spangenberg, S; Kines, P

    2010-06-01

    "Safe Workplace"-a simplified and educational version of the Finnish building construction methodology involving safety walkarounds where a number of safety indicators are inspected and evaluated-is in widespread use in the Danish construction sector to evaluate physical safety standards proactively at construction work sites. Data from the construction of the Copenhagen Metro were analyzed to determine the method's ability to predict injury risk related to joint responsibilities and individual worker responsibilities. A statistically significant association between the risk level as measured by the Safe Workplace methodology and injury risk was found. The relative risk of injury increased with the number of safety indicators violated and was elevated for safety indicators reflecting both individual and joint safety responsibility. The observed injury risk was not elevated in the post-safety walkaround period for safety indicators of individual responsibility, but the joint responsibility indicators retained an elevated injury risk level. The data support the hypothesis that safety walkarounds both predict and prevent injuries. Safety indicators of individual responsibility are more likely to be corrected than those of joint responsibility. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Analysis of injury criteria to assess chest and abdominal injury risks in blunt and ballistic impacts.

    PubMed

    Sturdivan, Larry M; Viano, David C; Champion, Howard R

    2004-03-01

    The Viscous Criterion (VC) is an experimental measure developed by the automotive industry to assess injury risks for high-speed impacts. The Blunt Criterion (BC) is a prospective measure developed by the Department of Defense to predict injury from blunt projectiles. The range of applicability of BC was extended and compared with VC for its ability to assess injury risk using published cadaver and animal data. Department of Defense projectiles were 0.05 to 0.43 kg mass at velocities up to 86 m/s. VC data were generated from impacts with 1.75 to 23.4 kg at 3.6 to 10.2 m/s. Chest and abdominal injuries ranged from Abbreviated Injury Scale scores of 1 to 6. Both criteria correlated very well with the experimental data, demonstrating correlation coefficients of R = 0.84 to 0.96. The correlation between VC and BC was R = 0.99. Logistic probability curves were derived to predict blunt impact injuries of Abbreviated Injury Scale scores of 1 to 6 for the chest and abdomen. BC and VC are virtually identical in their ability to assess blunt and ballistic impact injury risks. They are different measures of impact energy absorbed by the body. One is predictive using input parameters, and the other measures the impact response of the body.

  1. Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems among adolescents in China: A large-scale cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan; Deng, Jianxiong; He, Yuan; Deng, Xueqing; Huang, Jinghui; Huang, Guoliang; Gao, Xue; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Lu, Ciyong

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol misuse among adolescents is a common issue worldwide and is an emerging problem in China. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of alcohol drinking and alcohol-related problems among Chinese adolescents and to explore their risk factors and connections.A cross-sectional study using an anonymous questionnaire was conducted among junior and senior high school students between 2010 and 2012. Data on self-reported alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, school factors, family factors, and psychosocial factors were collected. Descriptive analyses were made of the proportions of sociodemographics, family, school, and psychosocial factors. Multilevel logistic regression models were conducted to analyze the risk factors for alcohol drinking and alcohol-related problems.Of the 105,752 students who ranged in age from 9 to 21 years, the prevalence of current drinking among students was 7.3%, and 13.2% students reported having alcohol-related problems. Male students were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.69-1.87) times more likely to be involved in current drinking and 1.86 (95% CI = 1.79-1.93) times more likely to have alcohol-related problems. Higher grade level students were at a higher risk of current drinking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.05-1.13) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.42-1.58). Older students were more likely to report current drinking (AOR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.04-1.17) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.82-1.85). Having poor classmate relations (AOR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.03-1.37), having poor relationships with teachers (AOR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.00-1.16), and below average academic achievement (AOR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.41-1.59) were positively associated with current drinking. Moreover, students with suicidal ideation were at a higher risk of current drinking (AOR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.61-1.81) and having alcohol-related problems (AOR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.98-2.16). Having higher Center

  2. Head injury and Parkinson's disease risk in twins.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Samuel M; Tanner, Caroline M; Oakes, David; Bhudhikanok, Grace S; Gupta, Anjali; Langston, J William

    2006-07-01

    Head injury is an inconsistently reported risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Many related variables might confound this association, such as differences in childhood and adolescent lifestyles or genetically determined risk-taking behaviors. Twin studies circumvent some of these problems, because twins are genetically and environmentally much more similar than typical cases and control subjects. We conducted a case-control study in 93 twin pairs discordant for PD ascertained from the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council World War II Veteran Twins Cohort. A prior head injury with amnesia or loss of consciousness was associated with an increased risk for PD (odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-11; p = 0.014). Truncating observations 10 years before PD onset enhanced the association. Though less precise, the association was somewhat stronger in monozygotic than in dizygotic pairs. Risk increased further with a subsequent head injury (p trend = 0.022) and with head injuries requiring hospitalization. Duration of unconsciousness was not associated. In a subanalysis of 18 pairs concordant for PD, the twin with younger onset PD was more likely to have sustained a head injury, although numbers were small. Our results suggest that mild-to-moderate closed head injury may increase PD risk decades later.

  3. Multivariate injury risk criteria and injury probability scores for fractures to the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a multivariate distal radius injury risk prediction model that incorporates dynamic loading variables in multiple directions, and interpret the distal radius failure data in order to establish injury probability thresholds. Repeated impacts with increasing intensity were applied to the distal third of eight human cadaveric radius specimens (mean (SD) age=61.9 (9.7)) until injury occurred. Crack (non-propagating damage) and fracture (specimen separated into at least two fragments) injury events were recorded. Best subsets analysis was performed to find the best multivariate injury risk model. Force-only risk models were also determined for comparison. Cumulative distribution functions were developed from the parameters of a Weibull analysis and the forces and risk scores (i.e., values calculated from the injury risk models) from 10% to 90% probability were calculated. According to the adjusted R(2), variance inflation factor and p-values, the model that best predicted the crack event included medial/lateral impulse, Fz load rate, impact velocity and the natural logarithm of Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.698), while the best predictive model of the fracture event included medial/lateral impulse, impact velocity and peak Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.845). The multivariate models predicted injury risk better than both the Fz-only crack (Adj. R(2)=0.551) and fracture (Adj. R(2)=0.293) models. Risk scores of 0.5 and 0.6 corresponded to 10% failure probability for the crack and fracture events, respectively. The inclusion of medial/lateral impulse and impact velocity in both crack and fracture models, and Fz load rate in the crack model, underscores the dynamic nature of these events. This study presents a method capable of developing a set of distal radius fracture prediction models that can be used in the assessment and development of distal radius injury prevention interventions.

  4. Controlling alcohol-related global health problems.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tai Hing; Chim, David

    2010-07-01

    Alcohol's adverse public health impact includes disease, injury, violence, disability, social problems, psychiatric illness, drunk driving, drug use, unsafe sex, and premature death. Furthermore, alcohol is a confirmed human carcinogen. The International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that alcohol causes cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon-rectum, and breast. World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research concluded that the evidence justifies recommending avoidance of consuming any alcohol, even in small quantities. Despite being responsible for 3.8% of global deaths (2,255,000 deaths) and 4.6% of global disability-adjusted life years in 2004, alcohol consumption is increasing rapidly in China and Asia. Contrary to the World Health Assembly's call for global control action, Hong Kong has reduced wine and beer taxes to zero since 2008. An International Framework Convention on Alcohol Control is urgently needed. Increasing alcohol taxation and banning alcohol advertisement and promotion are among the most effective policies.

  5. Injuries in professional modern dancers: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    PubMed

    Shah, Selina; Weiss, David S; Burchette, Raoul J

    2012-03-01

    Modern (or contemporary) dance has become increasingly popular, yet little has been reported with respect to modern dance injuries and their consequences. The purpose of this study is to define the incidence, risk factors, and management of musculoskeletal injuries in professional modern dancers. A total of 184 dancers in the United States completed an anonymous 17-page questionnaire on their injuries, including extensive details regarding the two most severe injuries that had occurred in the prior 12 months. According to their self-reports, a total of 82% of the dancers had suffered between one and seven injuries. The foot and ankle (40%) was the most common site of injury, followed by the lower back (17%) and the knee (16%). The rate of injuries was 0.59 per 1,000 hours of class and rehearsal. Injured male dancers returned to full dancing after a median of 21 days, while females returned after a median of 18 days. Most dancers missed no performances due to injury. Of the medical consultations sought by dancers for their injuries, 47% were made to physicians, 41% to physical therapists, and 34% to chiropractors. The majority of dancers adhered to the advice given them by consultants (87% of males and 78% of females for the most severe injury). While the majority of injuries were considered work-related (61% of the most severe injury and 69% of the second most severe), few were covered by Workers' Compensation insurance (12% and 5% respectively). These professional modern dancers suffer from a rate of injury similar to other groups of professional dancers. Most dancers return to a partial level of dancing several weeks before attempting full-capacity dancing.

  6. Investigation of risk factors and characteristics of dance injuries.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Fernanda Assen Soares; Coelho, Lara Raquel de Oliveira; Bastos, Fabio Nascimento; Netto Júnior, Jayme; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for the occurrence of sport injuries in dancers related to anthropometric variables, training, and specific dance characteristics. One-year, retrospective, cross-sectional study. 26th Dance Festival of Joinville (Brazil), 2008. Five hundred dancers (409 women and 91 men) with a mean age of 18.26 ± 4.55 years. Dancers participating in the 26th Dance Festival of Joinville (Brazil) were interviewed using the Reported Condition Inquiry, which was previously validated and modified for dance. This questionnaire contains questions addressing the anthropometric data of the volunteers and characteristics of injuries that occurred in the past 12 months. The data were collected through interviews addressing the occurrence of injuries and respective characteristics. Injury was considered any pain or musculoskeletal condition resulting from training and competition sufficient to alter the normal training routine in terms of form, duration, intensity, or frequency. A total of 377 injuries (75.40%) of the interviewees reported injuries in the past 12 months. The most affected anatomic segments were the ankle/foot (92 injuries; 28.75%) and thigh/leg (88 injuries; 27.50%) in classical ballet, the thigh/leg (43 injuries; 27.92%) in jazz/contemporary dance, and the knee (22 injuries; 43.14%) in tap/folk dance. The most reported causal mechanisms were dynamic overload and excessive use. Age and body weight were associated with injury in jazz/contemporary dance. Height was associated with injury in classical ballet and tap/folk dance. Duration of practice was associated with injury in classical ballet and jazz/contemporary dance.

  7. Supervision and Risk of Unintentional Injury in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Patricia G.; Dowd, M. Denise; Kruse, Robin L.; Morrongiello, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the association between caregiver supervision and acute unintentional injury in young children; evaluate whether lower levels of supervision result in more severe injury. Methods A case-crossover study was conducted. Parents of children ≤ age 4 whose injuries required Emergency Department (ED sample) treatment or admission to the hospital (inpatient sample) were interviewed. Information on supervision (3 dimensions: proximity, attention, continuity) at the time of injury and 1 hour before the injury (control time) was collected. An overall supervision score was created; a higher score indicates closer supervision. Hospital admission served as a proxy for injury severity. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results Interviews were completed by 222 participants; 50 (23%) were in the inpatient sample. For each supervision dimension the inpatient sample had higher odds of injury, indicating effect modification requiring separate analyses for inpatient and ED samples. For both samples, proximity “beyond reach” was associated with the highest odds of injury; compared to 1 hour before injury, children were more likely to be beyond reach of their caregiver at the time of injury (inpatient sample: OR 11.5, 95% CI 2.7-48.8; ED sample: OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.8-4.9). Children with lower supervision scores had the greatest odds of injury (Inpatient sample: OR 8.0, 95% CI 2.4-26.6; ED sample: OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.9-5.6). Conclusions Lower levels of adult supervision are associated with higher odds of more severe injury in young children. Proximity is the most important supervision dimension for reducing injury risk. PMID:24848998

  8. Arterial injuries after penetrating brain injury in civilians: risk factors on admission head computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Aarabi, Bizhan; Roy, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the specific CT findings of the injury profile in penetrating brain injury (PBI) that are risk factors related to intracranial arterial injuries. The authors retrospectively evaluated admission head CTs and accompanying digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies from patients with penetrating trauma to the head in the period between January 2005 and December 2012. Two authors reviewed the CT images to determine the presence or absence of 30 injury profile variables and quantified selected variables. The CT characteristics in patients with and without arterial injuries were compared using univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the respective risk factors, independent predictors, and optimal threshold values for the continuous variables. Fifty-five patients were eligible for study inclusion. The risk factors for an intracranial arterial injury on univariate analysis were an entry wound over the frontobasal-temporal regions, a bihemispheric wound trajectory, a wound trajectory in proximity to the circle of Willis (COW), a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a higher SAH score, an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and a higher IVH score. A trajectory in proximity to the COW was the best predictor of injury (OR 6.8 and p = 0.005 for all penetrating brain injuries [PBIs]; OR 13.3 and p = 0.001 for gunshot wounds [GSWs]). Significant quantitative variables were higher SAH and IVH scores. An SAH score of 3 (area under the ROC curve [AUC] for all PBIs 0.72; AUC for GSWs 0.71) and an IVH score of 3 (AUC for all PBIs 0.65; AUC for GSWs 0.65) could be used as threshold values to suggest an arterial injury. The risk factors identified may help radiologists suggest the possibility of arterial injury and prioritize neurointerventional consultation and potential DSA studies.

  9. Injury risk is different in team and individual youth sport.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Daniel; Frisch, Anne; Malisoux, Laurent; Urhausen, Axel; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Seil, Romain

    2013-05-01

    This study compared sports injury incidence in young high-level athletes from various team and individual sports and investigated if sport participation patterns are linked to injuries. Prospective cohort follow-up. Pupils from a public sports school (12-19 years) were recruited over two separate school years (2008-2009: 42 weeks, n=199 athletes; 2009-2010: 40 weeks, n=89 athletes). Training and competition volume and intensity were recorded via a personal sports diary. Sports injuries (time-loss definition) were registered by medical staff members using a standardized questionnaire. Injury incidence was significantly higher in team compared with individual sports (6.16 versus 2.88 injuries/1000h, respectively), as a result of a higher incidence of both traumatic (RR=2.17; CI95%=1.75-2.70; p<0.001), and overuse injuries (RR=2.06; CI95%=1.46-2.91; p<0.001). A Cox proportional hazards regression revealed that team sports participation had a hazard ratio of 2.00 (CI95%=1.49-2.68; p<0.001) compared to individual sports, with additionally previous injury being a risk and age a protective factor. The number of competitions per 100 days was significantly higher in team sports, whereas the number of intense training sessions per 100 days was significantly lower. In team sports, the number of competitions per 100 days was positively associated with injuries (HR=1.072; CI95% [1.033; 1.113]; p<0.001), while in individual sports the number of competitions per 100 days had a protective effect (HR=0.940; CI95% [0.893; 0.989]; p=0.017). Team sports participation entailed a higher injury risk, whatever the injury category. Further research should elucidate the role of characteristics related to sport participation in injury causation. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring of sport participation and injury risk in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Malisoux, Laurent; Frisch, Anne; Urhausen, Axel; Seil, Romain; Theisen, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Careful modulation of training characteristics in high-level sports optimizes performance and avoids inappropriate workloads and associated sports injury risk. The aims of this study were to compare sport participation characteristics in different youth sport categories and to investigate their relationship with injury. Prospective cohort follow-up. Young (12-19 years) high-level athletes (n=154) from a regional sport school were followed during 41 weeks regarding sport participation characteristics and traumatic and overuse sports injuries (time-loss definition). All data were self-recorded by the athletes in an electronic system "TIPPS" (Training and Injury Prevention Platform for Sports) and subject to a systematic data quality control. Volume and intensity (self-rated perceived exertion) of each sport session were used to compute weekly load, monotony and strain. Sport categories were defined as team, racket, and individual sports. All sport participation characteristics were dependent on sport category (p<0.05). Weekly intensity, load and strain were dependent on age (p<0.05). Racket and individual sports were associated with lower injury risk (HR=0.37 and 0.34, p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) compared to team sports. Average sport participation characteristics were not related to injury according to the survival analysis. However, intensity during the week prior to injury was significantly higher (p<0.01) compared to that of the 4 preceding weeks. This study investigated for the first time the relationship between sport participation pattern and injury risk in young athletes. The monitoring method was sensitive to variations according to pertinent variables and might help identify athletes with increased sports injury risk. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. "Let's get Wasted!" and Other Apps: Characteristics, Acceptability, and Use of Alcohol-Related Smartphone Applications.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Emma R; Horyniak, Danielle R; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Dietze, Paul; Lim, Megan Sc

    2013-06-25

    Smartphone applications ("apps") offer a number of possibilities for health promotion activities. However, young people may also be exposed to apps with incorrect or poor quality information, since, like the Internet, apps are mostly unregulated. Little is known about the quality of alcohol-related apps or what influence they may have on young people's behavior. To critically review popular alcohol-related smartphone apps and to explore young people's opinions of these apps, their acceptability, and use for alcohol-related health promotion. First, a content analysis of 500 smartphone apps available via Apple iTunes and Android Google Play stores was conducted. Second, all available blood alcohol concentration (BAC) apps were tested against four individual case profiles of known BAC from a previous study. Third, two focus group discussions explored how young people use alcohol-related apps, particularly BAC apps. 384 apps were included; 50% (192) were entertainment apps, 39% (148) were BAC apps, and 11% (44) were health promotion and/or stop drinking-related apps. When testing the BAC apps, there was wide variation in results, with apps tending to overestimate BAC scores compared with recorded scores. Participants were skeptical of the accuracy of BAC apps, and there was an overall concern that these apps would be used as a form of entertainment, further encouraging young people to drink, rather than reduce their drinking and risk taking. The majority of popular alcohol-related apps encouraged alcohol consumption. Apps estimating blood alcohol concentration were widely available but were highly unreliable. Health departments and prominent health organizations need to endorse alcohol smartphone apps that are accurate and evidence-based to give specific apps credibility in the ever-expanding market of unregulated apps.

  12. Diabetes and Risk of Hospitalized Fall Injury Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Rebecca K.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Resnick, Helaine E.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Cauley, Jane A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Cummings, Steven R.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether older adults with diabetes are at increased risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The longitudinal Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study included 3,075 adults aged 70–79 years at baseline. Hospitalizations that included ICD-9-Clinical Modification codes for a fall and an injury were identified. The effect of diabetes with and without insulin use on the rate of first fall-related injury hospitalization was assessed using proportional hazards models. RESULTS At baseline, 719 participants had diabetes, and 117 of them were using insulin. Of the 293 participants who were hospitalized for a fall-related injury, 71 had diabetes, and 16 were using insulin. Diabetes was associated with a higher rate of injurious fall requiring hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.48 [95% CI 1.12–1.95]) in models adjusted for age, race, sex, BMI, and education. In those participants using insulin, compared with participants without diabetes, the HR was 3.00 (1.78–5.07). Additional adjustment for potential intermediaries, such as fainting in the past year, standing balance score, cystatin C level, and number of prescription medications, accounted for some of the increased risk associated with diabetes (1.41 [1.05–1.88]) and insulin-treated diabetes (2.24 [1.24–4.03]). Among participants with diabetes, a history of falling, poor standing balance score, and A1C level ≥8% were risk factors for an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Older adults with diabetes, in particular those using insulin, are at greater risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, poor glycemic control may increase the risk of an injurious fall. PMID:24130352

  13. Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Alicia M; Shaefer, Hilary; Rodriguez, Belinda; Li, Tan; Epnere, Katrina; Myer, Gregory D

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002) and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.001) than non-competitors. Athletes who reported injury also reported significantly higher values for the following risk factors: years of participation (2.7 ± 1.8 v 1.8 ± 1.5, p = 0.001), weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 3.8 v 4.9 ± 2.1, p = 0.020), weekly athlete-exposures (6.4 ± 3.8 v 4.7 ± 2.1, p = 0.003), height (1.72 ± 0.09 m v 1.68 ± 0.01 m, p = 0.011), and body mass (78.24 ± 16.86 kg v 72.91 ± 14.77 kg, p = 0.037). Injury rates during CrossFit and location of injuries were similar to those previously reported. Injury incidence was similar to related sports, including gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce the increase

  14. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed

    Volans, A P

    1998-05-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted.

  15. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed Central

    Volans, A P

    1998-01-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted. PMID:9639176

  16. Upper extremity sports injury: risk factors in comparison to lower extremity injury in more than 25 000 cases.

    PubMed

    Sytema, Renee; Dekker, Rienk; Dijkstra, Pieter U; ten Duis, Hendrik J; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2010-07-01

    To analyze differences in sports injury characteristics of the upper and lower extremity and to identify factors that contribute to the risk of sustaining an upper extremity injury compared with the risk of sustaining a lower extremity injury. Retrospective cohort study. An emergency department of a large European level I trauma center. A total of 25 120 patients with a simple sports injury, attending during 1990-2005. Independent variables used to assess risk factors were extracted from a local database. These include age, sex, type of injury, site and side of the injury, type of sport, injury mechanism, and data on admission. Main outcome measure was the relation of various risk factors to the occurrence of either upper or lower extremity injury. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors for upper extremity injury. Thirty-five percent upper and 53% lower extremity injuries were recorded. Most injuries were sustained when playing soccer (36%). Fractures were more frequently diagnosed in the upper than in the lower extremities (44% and 14%, respectively), especially in children. Falling was the main cause of upper extremity injury. Further risk factors were young age and playing individual sports, no-contact sports, or no-ball sports. Women were at risk in speed skating, inline skating, and basketball, whereas men mostly got injured during skiing and snowboarding. A high percentage of sports injuries are sustained to the upper extremity. Different risk factors were identified for both sexes. These risk factors should be taken into account when designing preventive measures.

  17. Training loads and injury risk in Australian football—differing acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David L; Blanch, Peter; Ong, Kok-Leong; Crossley, Kay M; Crow, Justin; Morris, Meg E

    2017-01-01

    Aims (1) To investigate whether a daily acute:chronic workload ratio informs injury risk in Australian football players; (2) to identify which combination of workload variable, acute and chronic time window best explains injury likelihood. Methods Workload and injury data were collected from 53 athletes over 2 seasons in a professional Australian football club. Acute:chronic workload ratios were calculated daily for each athlete, and modelled against non-contact injury likelihood using a quadratic relationship. 6 workload variables, 8 acute time windows (2–9 days) and 7 chronic time windows (14–35 days) were considered (336 combinations). Each parameter combination was compared for injury likelihood fit (using R2). Results The ratio of moderate speed running workload (18–24 km/h) in the previous 3 days (acute time window) compared with the previous 21 days (chronic time window) best explained the injury likelihood in matches (R2=0.79) and in the immediate 2 or 5 days following matches (R2=0.76–0.82). The 3:21 acute:chronic workload ratio discriminated between high-risk and low-risk athletes (relative risk=1.98–2.43). Using the previous 6 days to calculate the acute workload time window yielded similar results. The choice of acute time window significantly influenced model performance and appeared to reflect the competition and training schedule. Conclusions Daily workload ratios can inform injury risk in Australian football. Clinicians and conditioning coaches should consider the sport-specific schedule of competition and training when choosing acute and chronic time windows. For Australian football, the ratio of moderate speed running in a 3-day or 6-day acute time window and a 21-day chronic time window best explained injury risk. PMID:27789430

  18. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and increased risk of injury.

    PubMed

    Merrill, R M; Lyon, J L; Baker, R K; Gren, L H

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the influence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the incidence rates of selected injuries. A retrospective cohort study design was employed using medical claims data from the Deseret Mutual Benefit Administrators (DMBA), a health insurance company for employees of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) and their spouses and dependent children. ADHD diagnosis, injury, medication, and demographic data were extracted from claims files during 1998-2005 for all enrollees aged 0-64 years. Incidence rates of ADHD were 1.83 (95% CI 1.68-2.00) times greater in males than females and highest in the age group 5-9 years and income group $80,000 or greater. ADHD increased the risk of selected injuries. The most common injuries involved sprains and strains of joints, then open wounds of the head, neck and trunk, and upper/lower limb, and then fractures of the upper/lower limb. Medication did not significantly protect against injury in ADHD patients. The rate of severe injury (i.e., fracture of skull, neck and trunk; intracranial injury excluding those with skull fracture; and injuries to nerves and spinal cord) was 3.07 (95% CI 2.37-3.98) times more common in ADHD enrollees compared with non-ADHD enrollees. Those with 1, 2, 3, or 4 or more injuries were 1.67 (1.50-1.86), 2.11 (1.75-2.56), 2.63 (1.80-3.84), and 2.94 (1.47-5.87) times more likely to have ADHD, respectively. ADHD is positively associated with injuries. More severe injuries have a significantly stronger associated with ADHD than less severe injuries.

  19. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Alcohol-related Problems: Differences by Gender and Level of Heavy Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Witbrodt, Jane; Mulia, Nina; Zemore, Sarah E.; Kerr, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While prior studies have reported racial/ethnic disparities in alcohol-related problems at a given level of heavy drinking, particularly lower levels, it is unclear whether these occur in both genders and are an artifact of racial/ethnic differences in drink alcohol content. Such information is important to understanding disparities and developing specific, targeted interventions. This study addresses these questions and examines disparities in specific types of alcohol problems across racial-gender groups. Method Using 2005 and 2010 National Alcohol Survey data (N=7,249 current drinkers), gender-stratified regression analyses were conducted to assess black-white and Hispanic-white disparities in alcohol dependence and negative drinking consequences at equivalent levels of heavy drinking. Heavy drinking was measured using a gender-specific, composite drinking-patterns variable derived through factor analysis. Analyses were replicated using adjusted-alcohol consumption variables that account for group differences in drink alcohol content based on race/ethnicity, gender, age and alcoholic beverage. Results Compared to white men, black and Hispanic men had higher rates of injuries/accidents/health and social consequences, and marginally greater work/legal consequences (p< .10). Hispanic women had marginally higher rates of social consequences. In main effects models controlling for demographics, light drinking and heavy drinking, only black women and men had greater odds of alcohol-related problems relative to whites. Interaction models indicated that compared to whites, black women had greater odds of dependence at all levels of heavy drinking, while both black and Hispanic men had elevated risk of alcohol problems only at lower levels of heavy drinking. Drink alcohol content adjustments did not significantly alter findings for either gender. Conclusions This study highlights the gender-specific nature of racial/ethnic disparities. Interventions focused on

  20. Nonbenzodiazepine Sedative Hypnotics and Risk of Fall-Related Injury.

    PubMed

    Tom, Sarah E; Wickwire, Emerson M; Park, Yujin; Albrecht, Jennifer S

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, and zaleplon would be associated with increased risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hip fracture. We conducted a case-crossover study on a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 y or older hospitalized with either TBI (n = 15,031) or hip fracture (n = 37,833) during 2007-2009. Use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, or zaleplon during the 30-day period prior to injury hospitalization was compared to use during four control periods at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo prior to injury. The primary outcome was hospitalization for TBI or hip fracture. Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR] 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56, 2.25); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.40, 1.13). Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of hip fracture (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.41, 1.79); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.83, 1.50). Analysis of zaleplon use in the month prior to injury was limited by low drug utilization but was not associated with increased risk of TBI (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.21, 3.34) or hip fracture (OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.40, 2.13) in this study. For the treatment of insomnia in older adults, eszopiclone may present a safer alternative to zolpidem, in terms of fall-related injuries. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. Normative perceptions of alcohol-related consequences among college students.

    PubMed

    Brett, Emma I; Leavens, Eleanor L; Miller, Mary Beth; Lombardi, Nathaniel; Leffingwell, Thad R

    2016-07-01

    College students in the U.S. continue to drink in hazardous ways and experience a range of alcohol-related consequences. Personalized feedback interventions (PFIs), which often include normative components comparing personal drinking to that of similar peers, have been effective in reducing alcohol outcomes among college students. Though normative perceptions of the quantity and frequency of alcohol use have been examined in many studies, norms for alcohol-related consequences have received less attention. The current study examined self-other discrepancies (SODs) for alcohol-related consequences among college students. Participants overestimated how often alcohol-related consequences are experienced by other same-sex students on campus and rated consequences as more acceptable for others to experience than themselves. No differences in SODs were found between those who did and did not report alcohol use. Future studies should examine the efficacy of PFIs that incorporate normative feedback on alcohol-related consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Alcohol-related cognitive impairment and the DSM-5].

    PubMed

    Walvoort, S J W; Wester, A J; Doorakkers, M C; Kessels, R P C; Egger, J I M

    2016-01-01

    It is evident from the dsm-iv-tr that alcohol-related impairment is extremely difficult to classify accurately. As a result, cognitive deficits can easily be overlooked. The dsm-5, however, incorporates a new category, namely 'neurocognitive disorders', which may lead to significant improvements in clinical practice. To compare the classification of alcohol-related cognitive dysfunction in dsm-iv-tr and dsm-5 and to discuss the clinical relevance of the revised classification in the dsm-5. We compare the chapters of the dsm-iv-tr and the dsm-5 concerning alcohol-related cognitive impairment and describe the changes that have been made. The dsm-5 puts greater emphasis on alcohol-related neurocognitive impairment. Not only does dsm-5 distinguish between the degree of severity (major or minor neurocognitive disorder), it also distinguishes between the type of impairment (non-amnestic-type versus confabulating-amnestic type). It also makes a distinction between the durations of impairment (behavioural and/or persistent disorders). The dsm-5 gives a clearer description of alcohol-related neurocognitive dysfunction than does dsm-iv-tr and it stresses the essential role of neuropsychological assessment in the classification, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocognitive disorders.

  3. Can child injury prevention include healthy risk promotion?

    PubMed Central

    Brussoni, Mariana; Brunelle, Sara; Pike, Ian; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Herrington, Susan; Turner, Heather; Belair, Scott; Logan, Louise; Fuselli, Pamela; Ball, David J

    2015-01-01

    To reflect on the role of risk-taking and risky play in child development and consider recommendations for the injury prevention field, a symposium was held prior to the November 2013 Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference. Delegates heard from Canadian and international researchers, practitioners and play safety experts on child development, play space design and playground safety, provision of recreation, and legal and societal perceptions of risk and hazard. The presenters provided multidisciplinary evidence and perspectives indicating the potential negative effect on children's development of approaches to injury prevention that prioritise safety and limit children's opportunities for risky play. Delegates considered the state of the field of injury prevention and whether alternative approaches were warranted. Each presenter prepared a discussion paper to provide the opportunity for dialogue beyond attendees at the symposium. The resulting discussion papers provide a unique opportunity to consider and learn from multiple perspectives in order to develop a path forward. PMID:25535208

  4. Minimizing Liability Risks of Head and Neck Injuries in Football

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jonathan F.; Weis, Michael P.; Gartland, James M.; Weis, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    Although catastrophic head and neck injuries in football occur infrequently, their occurrence is almost always followed by litigation. The athletic trainer has to be sure he/she has adequate liability insurance to cover the costs of a defense and a possible judgment. General claims filed against athletic staffs usually deal with instruction, equipment, matching of participants, supervision, and/or postinjury care. The defenses to these claims include: statutory immunity, assumption of risk, releases or waivers, and the reckless disregard standard. The athletic trainer plays a key role in head and neck injury prevention and care, and must be aware of litigation possibilities, along with methods of risk management. We present recommendations aimed at minimizing the risk of head and neck injuries and the risk of liability. The areas covered are: preparing for head and neck lawsuits, preventing head and neck injuries, and postcatastrophic injury care. We base these recommendations on principles that the athletic trainer can easily apply to other areas, broadening the risk management concept presented. ImagesFig 1.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558275

  5. Injury in the first year of life: risk factors and solutions for high-risk families.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Marie; Chiu, Bill; Sheehan, Karen

    2006-06-01

    Injury is one of the leading causes of death for infants younger than 1 year of age. We investigated potential contributing factors for injury among children born to high-risk families. The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study is a longitudinal cohort of approximately 5000 children from mostly unwed parents across the United States. Data from interviews with mothers conducted shortly after birth and follow-up surveys at 1 year were used for this analysis. Injuries sustained in the first year of life that required medical attention were studied. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for injury in this population. A total of 13.7% of mothers reported that their child had sustained an injury in the first year of life. We identified 17 potential maternal, paternal, and environmental risk factors for injury, including socioeconomic, mental health, relationship violence, criminal justice system involvement, and substance abuse challenges. Multivariate regression analyses revealed two significant independent risk factors, maternal alcohol use (odds ratio 2.15, P = 0.044) and mother spanking child in the previous month (odds ration 2.32, P = 0.027). Among this higher-risk group, injury in the first year of life is more than twice the national incidence. Predisposing factors to injury often are complex and interrelated, but with focused education and prevention efforts, including discussions of maternal alcohol use and attitudes toward physical discipline, we may decrease the burden of infant injury in this vulnerable population.

  6. Preventing alcohol related birth damage: a review.

    PubMed

    Waterson, E J; Murray-Lyon, I M

    1990-01-01

    , targeting of risk populations, the venue for intervention, and media and the actual mechanisms involved in implementing the programme. We conclude that women should be advised to limit their alcohol consumption to no more than one unit a day when they are either pregnant or planning a pregnancy. We recommend that pregnant women should be asked about their alcohol and given appropriate advice during routine antenatal clinic visits. We suggest that the form of advice should be designed with the characteristics of the risk population in mind.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Demographic and Predeparture Factors Associated with Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences for College Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Aresi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Study abroad students are at risk for increased and problematic drinking behavior. As few efforts have been made to examine this at-risk population, the authors predicted drinking and alcohol-related consequences abroad from predeparture and site-specific factors. Participants: The sample consisted of 339 students completing study…

  8. Factors Associated with General and Sexual Alcohol-Related Consequences: An Examination of College Students Studying Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Justin F.; Pedersen, Eric R.; Mirza, Tehniat; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    This study contributes to the scarce research on U.S. college students studying abroad by documenting general and sexual negative alcohol-related risks and factors associated with such risk. The manner of drinking (quantity vs. frequency), pre-departure expectations surrounding alcohol use while abroad, culture-related social anxiety, and…

  9. Demographic and Predeparture Factors Associated with Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences for College Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Aresi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Study abroad students are at risk for increased and problematic drinking behavior. As few efforts have been made to examine this at-risk population, the authors predicted drinking and alcohol-related consequences abroad from predeparture and site-specific factors. Participants: The sample consisted of 339 students completing study…

  10. Effects of Recent Concussion and Injury History on Instantaneous Relative Risk of Lower Extremity Injury in Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Fino, Peter C; Becker, Lauren N; Fino, Nora F; Griesemer, Brett; Goforth, Michael; Brolinson, Per Gunnar

    2017-08-16

    Growing evidence suggests that concussion increases the risk of lower extremity (LE) musculoskeletal injury. However, it is unclear to how the effect of concussion on LE injury risk may be influenced by previous injuries. This study sought to examine the association between concussion, previous LE injuries, and the risk LE injury to the same previously injured limb (ipsilateral) or the opposite limb (contralateral). This retrospective study examined medical records from 110 concussed athletes and 110 matched controls for LE injuries in the 365 days before and after the concussion event. The effect of concussion on time to injury was assessed with a Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for injury history. Fine and Gray subdistribution models assessed the cumulative risk of ipsilateral and contralateral injury by group. Concussion was associated with an increased instantaneous relative risk of LE injury when adjusting for LE injury history [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-2.53], agreeing with previous results. Among individuals who had a history of LE injuries before the concussion event, a nonsignificant yet moderate effect of concussion on the instantaneous relative risk of ipsilateral injuries was found after adjusting for the competing risk of contralateral injuries and censored values (HR = 1.85, 95% CI = 0.76-4.46). This study provides independent confirmation of previous studies, reporting an association between concussion and LE injury risk. Furthermore, this study suggests that future large-scale studies should consider the competing risk of ipsilateral, contralateral, and new injuries in populations with an injury history.

  11. Scrum injury risk in English professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Aileen E; Kemp, Simon; Trewartha, Grant; Stokes, Keith A

    2014-07-01

    To assess and evaluate the injury risk associated with the scrum in English professional rugby union in the 2011-2012 season. Prospective, cohort. Players at English Premiership rugby union clubs. Frequency of team scrum-events per match; incidence (injuries per 1000 player-hours; propensity (injuries/1000 events); risk (days absence per 1000 player-hours and days absence per 1000 events). 31% of scrums in competitive matches resulted in collapse. Injury incidence associated with collapsed scrum-events (incidence: 8.6 injuries/1000 scrum-events) was significantly higher than those scrums that did not collapse (incidence: 4.1/1000 scrum-events). The injury risk associated with collapsed scrum supports the continued focus on reducing scrum collapse through changes in, and strict application of, the laws surrounding the scrum. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Risk factors for water sports-related cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Tominaga, Gail T; Wong, Jan H; Weldon, Edward J; Kaan, Kenneth T

    2006-05-01

    To examine risk factors associated with water sports-related cervical spine injuries (WSCSI). A retrospective analysis of all patients admitted for WSCSI from 1993 to 1997 was performed. The severity of cervical spine injury was assessed by review of medical records and imaging studies. Mechanisms of injury and activities at the time of injury were noted to determine risk factors for cervical spine injuries caused by wave forced impacts (WFI) from activities such as bodysurfing and body boarding. These risks were compared with injuries incurred by shallow water dives (SWD). One hundred patients were analyzed (mean age, 36 years old); 89% were male, 62% were nonresidents of Hawaii, and 75% had a large build. Patients without radiographic evidence of fractures, subluxations, and/or dislocations (n = 26) were significantly older (48 versus 32 years old, p < 0.0001) with a higher rate of pre-existing cervical spine abnormalities (65% versus 15%, p < 0.0001) compared with the remainder of patients (n = 74). Seventy-seven percent of WFI involved nonresidents. The mean age of WFI patients was significantly older than patients involved in SWD (42 versus 25 years). Ninety-six percent of wave-related accidents occurred at moderately to severely rated shorebreak beaches. Wave forced impacts of the head with the ocean bottom typically occurred at moderate to severe shorebreaks, and involved inexperienced, large-build males in their 40s. Spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylosis may increase the risk of cervical spine injury associated with WFI due to the increased risk of neck hyperextension and hyperflexion impacts inherent to this activity.

  13. Identifying and mitigating risks for agricultural injury associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    King, Nathan; Janssen, Ian; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James; Lawson, Joshua; Trask, Catherine; Pickett, William

    2016-12-01

    In some occupational contexts overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for injury. The purpose of this study was to examine this hypothesis within farm work environments and then to identify specific opportunities for environmental modification as a preventive strategy. Data on farm-related injuries, height and weight used to calculate body mass index (BMI), and demographic characteristics were from the Phase 2 baseline survey of the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort; a large cross-sectional mail-based survey conducted in Saskatchewan, Canada from January through May 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and injury. Injury narratives were explored qualitatively. Findings were inconsistent and differed according to gender. Among women (n = 927), having overweight (adjusted OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.29 to 6.70) but not obesity (1.10; 95% CI: 0.35 to 3.43) was associated with an increased odds of incurring a farm-related injury. No strong or statistically significant effects were observed for men (n = 1406) with overweight or obesity. While injury-related challenges associated with obesity have been addressed in other occupational settings via modification of the worksite, such strategies are challenging to implement in farm settings because of the diversity of work tasks and associated hazards. We conclude that the acute effects of overweight in terms of injury do require consideration in agricultural populations, but these should also be viewed with a differentiation based on gender.

  14. Foot Marching, Load Carriage, and Injury Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    tasks such as patrolling that require Soldiers to carry heavy loads of equipment and supplies. These are often referred to as “load-carriage” injuries...3 Heavy loads carried or worn on the body have been shown to increase the energy cost of locomotion, lead to more rapid fatigue, alter the mechanics...In combination with lifting, wearing heavy gear, including armor, has even been identified as one of the most frequent causes of non-battle

  15. Characteristics of alcohol-related fatal general aviation crashes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Baker, Susan P; Lamb, Margaret W; Qiang, Yandong; McCarthy, Melissa L

    2005-01-01

    The effects of alcohol on piloting performance have been studied extensively. Information describing alcohol-related aviation crashes, however, is scant. We developed a data system for fatally injured pilots in Maryland, New Mexico, and North Carolina by linking autopsy data from the state medical examiner offices and crash investigation reports from the National Transportation Safety Board. Alcohol-related crashes are defined as those in which the pilot had a blood alcohol concentration of 20 mg/dL or greater. Differences between alcohol- and non-alcohol-related crashes were assessed with regard to pilot characteristics, crash circumstances, and human factors. The National Transportation Safety Board recorded 313 general aviation crashes fatal to the pilot in the three states between 1985 and 2000. Of these crashes, 255 (81%) were matched successfully with medical examiner records. Alcohol testing results were available for 233 of the fatally injured pilots. Of those tested for alcohol, 25 (11%) had blood alcohol concentrations > or =20 mg/dL (mean=75 +/- 64 mg/dL). The majority of alcohol-related crashes (52%) occurred at night (7p.m. to 6a.m.), compared with 28% of other crashes (P < 0.01). Alcohol-related crashes were significantly more likely than other crashes to have involved continued flight under visual flight rules (VFR) into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) (32% versus 12%, P < 0.01), and flawed decisions (64% versus 41%, P = 0.03). Distinctive epidemiological patterns are exhibited in alcohol-related fatal general aviation crashes. Alcohol appears to play a particularly important role in crashes involving flight under VFR into IMC.

  16. School performance and alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood: a Swedish national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gauffin, Karl; Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse is an important global health determinant and a major contributor to health inequalities. We aimed to investigate the association between school performance and alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood in a longitudinal register-based national cohort study. Methods We followed a register-based national cohort of Swedish citizens born 1973–1984 (N = 948 440) from compulsory school graduation at age 15–16 to 2009. We divided the population into five groups: high school marks (> mean + 1 SD); high average (between mean and mean + 1 SD); low average (between mean and mean − 1 SD); low (< mean – 1SD); and missing. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the relation between school marks at time of graduation and hospital care for alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood. Results There was a steep gradient in the risk of alcohol-related disorders related to school performance. In comparison with peers in the top category of school marks, students with low marks had adjusted hazard ratios of 8.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.20 to 8.91], low average 3.02 (2.72 to 3.35) and high average 1.55 (1.39 to 1.73). The risk associated with low school marks was stronger in the male population and in the group from high socioeconomic background. Conclusions The study demonstrated a strong graded relation between low school performance and alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood. School performance should be taken into account when developing prevention programmes/policies targeting alcohol misuse among teenagers and young adults, especially if the aim is to reach high-risk groups. PMID:25797580

  17. Biomechanical Risk Estimates for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Funk, J. R.; Duma, S. M.; Manoogian, S. J.; Rowson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the risk of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in living humans based on a large set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. Real-time head accelerations were recorded from helmet-mounted accelerometers designed to stay in contact with the player’s head. Over 27,000 head impacts were recorded, including four impacts resulting in MTBI. Parametric risk curves were developed by normalizing MTBI incidence data by head impact exposure data. An important finding of this research is that living humans, at least in the setting of collegiate football, sustain much more significant head impacts without apparent injury than previously thought. The following preliminary nominal injury assessment reference values associated with a 10% risk of MTBI are proposed: a peak linear head acceleration of 165 g, a HIC of 400, and a peak angular head acceleration of 9000 rad/s2. PMID:18184501

  18. Polo pony injuries: player-owner reported risk, perception, mitigation and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Inness, C M; Morgan, K L

    2015-07-01

    Polo, one of the world's oldest sports, is unique in merging human skill and balance with animal agility and performance in a contact sport. These modern-day 'centaurs' offer medical, dental and veterinary scientists an unrivalled, if quirky, opportunity to collaborate. Collection of epidemiological data on injuries to UK polo riders and ponies is the first step. To measure the reported risk and risk factors for injuries to UK polo ponies, their perception and mitigation by player-owners. A retrospective cohort design and telephone interviews were used. Data on equine injuries, preseason training and risk perception were collected from a random sample of player-owners using a structured questionnaire. Injuries were defined as requiring veterinary treatment. Frequencies were represented as percentages and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Risk factors for injuries were identified by univariable and multivariable analyses. The cumulative incidence of player-owner-reported injury was 10.6% (95% CI 8.4-12.7). Tendon injuries were most common (4.3%; 95% CI 2.9-5.7), followed by wounds and splints. The only risk factor was stabling all season (odds ratio 4.79; 95% CI 1.46-15.73). Tendon injuries were perceived as the major risk and hard ground the most important risk factor. Risk mitigation practices were bandaging before exercise (45.7%; 95% CI 34.8-56.5), checking tendons (84.0%; 95% CI 76.0-91.9), cold hosing (40.7%; 95% CI 30.0-51.4), bandaging (38.3%; 95% CI 27.7-48.9) and using clays and coolants after exercise (24.7%; 15.3-34.1). Cuts and wounds were considered most frequent by only 2.5% (95% CI 0.0-3.6) of players but were the second most common injury, accounting for 21.6% of veterinary treatments. Splints accounted for 12.5% of injuries. The risk of injury to polo ponies is similar to that in the general horse population; musculoskeletal injuries, particularly tendon injuries, are most common, followed by wounds and splints. The association between stabling and

  19. Alcohol Use and Alcohol-Related Problems Before and After Military Combat Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Isabel G.; Ryan, Margaret A. K.; Hooper, Tomoko I.; Smith, Tyler C.; Amoroso, Paul J.; Boyko, Edward J.; Gackstetter, Gary D.; Wells, Timothy S.; Bell, Nicole S.

    2009-01-01

    Context High rates of alcohol misuse after deployment have been reported among personnel returning from past conflicts, yet investigations of alcohol misuse after return from the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are lacking. Objectives To determine whether deployment with combat exposures was associated with new-onset or continued alcohol consumption, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems. Design, Setting, and Participants Data were from Millennium Cohort Study participants who completed both a baseline (July 2001 to June 2003; n=77 047) and follow-up (June 2004 to February 2006; n=55 021) questionnaire (follow-up response rate=71.4%). After we applied exclusion criteria, our analyses included 48 481 participants (active duty, n=26 613; Reserve or National Guard, n=21 868). Of these, 5510 deployed with combat exposures, 5661 deployed without combat exposures, and 37 310 did not deploy. Main Outcome Measures New-onset and continued heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems at follow-up. Results Baseline prevalence of heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems among Reserve or National Guard personnel who deployed with combat exposures was 9.0%, 53.6%, and 15.2%, respectively; follow-up prevalence was 12.5%, 53.0%, and 11.9%, respectively; and new-onset rates were 8.8%, 25.6%, and 7.1%, respectively. Among active-duty personnel, new-onset rates were 6.0%, 26.6%, and 4.8%, respectively. Reserve and National Guard personnel who deployed and reported combat exposures were significantly more likely to experience new-onset heavy weekly drinking (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–1.96), binge drinking (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.24–1.71), and alcohol-related problems (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.33–2.01) compared with nondeployed personnel. The youngest members of the cohort were at highest risk for all alcohol-related outcomes. Conclusion Reserve and National Guard personnel and younger service

  20. Does Drinking Location Matter? Profiles of Risky Single-Occasion Drinking by Location and Alcohol-Related Harm among Young Men.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Caroline; Dey, Michelle; Dermota, Petra; Foster, Simon; Gmel, Gerhard; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun

    2014-01-01

    In adolescents and young adults, acute consequences like injuries account for a substantial proportion of alcohol-related harm, especially in risky single-occasion (RSO) drinkers. The primary aim of the study was to characterize different drinking profiles in RSO drinkers according to drinking locations and their relationship to negative, alcohol-related consequences. The sample consisted of 2746 young men from the Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors who had reported drinking six or more drinks on a single-occasion at least monthly over the preceding 12 months. Principal component analysis on the frequency and amount of drinking at 11 different locations was conducted, and 2 distinguishable components emerged: a non-party-dimension (loading high on theater/cinema, sport clubs, other clubs/societies, restaurants, and sport events) and a party-dimension (loading high on someone else's home, pubs/bars, discos/nightclubs, outdoor public places, special events, and home). Differential impacts of drinking location profiles were observed on severe negative alcohol-related consequences (SAC). Relative to those classified as low or intermediate in both dimensions, no significant difference experiencing SAC was found among those who were classified as high in the non-party-dimension only. However, those who were classified as high in the party-dimension alone or in both dimensions were more likely to experience SAC. These differential effects remained after adjusting for alcohol consumption (volume and risky single-occasion drinking), personality traits, and peer-influence [adjusted OR = 0.83 (0.68-1.02), 1.57 (1.27-1.96), and 1.72 (1.23-2.41), respectively], indicating independent effects of drinking location on SAC. The inclusion of sociodemographic factors did not alter this association. The fact that this cluster of party-dimension locations seems to predispose young men to experiencing SAC has important implications for alcohol control policies.

  1. Flat, hurdle and steeple racing: risk factors for musculoskeletal injury.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C J; Reid, S W; Hodgson, D R; Bourke, J M; Rose, R J

    1998-11-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify and quantify risk factors for serious musculoskeletal injury sustained at 4 Australian metropolitan racetracks. During the period of study (August 1988-July 1995) there were 196 cases from flat racing, 52 cases from hurdle racing and 53 cases from steeplechases. The incidences of fatal musculoskeletal injuries per start for flat, hurdle and steeple races were 0.06, 0.63 and 1.43% respectively. Logistic regression identified harder track surfaces, horses being older than age 3 years, one racecourse (Flemington) and jumping races as significant risk factors which increased the risk of musculoskeletal breakdown. The incidence of fatal musculoskeletal injuries for flat races at the 4 study tracks was similar to that reported in the UK but less than the USA. Death rates for hurdle and steeple races in the study population were higher than in the UK. Strategies to reduce the incidence of serious musculoskeletal injuries may include avoidance of excessively hard track surfaces through closer regulation of track moisture content; implementation of more rigorous prerace lameness examinations of horses, particularly older horses; and altering the design and number of jumps in hurdle and steeple races. The quantification of risk, as we have reported here, is the first step towards addressing the causes of musculoskeletal breakdown and should help in applying a reasoned approach to intervention measures that may be effective in reducing racing injuries.

  2. Heavy drinking and the risk of occupational injury.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D A

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluated the association between the frequency of heavy drinking and the risk of occupational injury, using nationally representative data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The sample consisted of 29,192 adults who were employed at some time during the year preceding the NHIS interview. Overall, 7.2% reported an on-the-job injury during the preceding year, but the rates were higher--about 13%--for those employed as skilled or unskilled laborers or who reported engaging in repeated strenuous physical activity at work. Slightly more than one-fourth of the employed adults reported at least one occasion of drinking five or more drinks during the preceding year. After adjusting for the effects of age, gender, education, occupation, and strenuous job activity, the odds of occupational injury increased with frequency of heavy drinking, with odds ratios varying from 1.08 (one occasion of heavy drinking) to 1.74 (daily heavy drinking). Odds ratios were decreased slightly by the inclusion of smoking as a control variable, indicating that some of the excess risk of injury among heavy drinkers may reflect their greater propensity to take health-related risks rather than direct effects of ethanol. The odds ratios also were slightly lower when the analysis was restricted to current drinkers, suggesting that the risk of work injury was increased by light or moderate as well as heavy drinking.

  3. Vehicle year and the risk of car crash injury

    PubMed Central

    Blows, S; Ivers, R; Woodward, M; Connor, J; Ameratunga, S; Norton, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the association between vehicle age and risk of car crash injury. Design and setting: Data from a population based case-control study conducted in the Auckland region in 1998/99 was used to examine the adjusted risk of car crash injury or death due to vehicle age, after controlling for a range of known confounders. Cases were all cars involved in crashes in which at least one occupant was hospitalized or killed anywhere in the Auckland region, and controls were randomly selected cars on Auckland roads. The drivers of the 571 case vehicles and 588 control vehicles completed a structured interview. Main outcome measure: Hospitalisation or death of a vehicle occupant due to car crash injury. Results: Vehicles constructed before 1984 had significantly greater chance of being involved in an injury crash than those constructed after 1994 (odds ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20 to 6.91), after adjustment for potential confounders. There was also a trend for increasing crash risk with each one year increase in vehicle age after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio 1.05, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.11; p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study quantifies the increased risk of car crash injury associated with older vehicle year and confirms this as an important public health issue. PMID:14693899

  4. Vehicle year and the risk of car crash injury.

    PubMed

    Blows, S; Ivers, R Q; Woodward, M; Connor, J; Ameratunga, S; Norton, R

    2003-12-01

    To quantify the association between vehicle age and risk of car crash injury. Data from a population based case-control study conducted in the Auckland region in 1998/99 was used to examine the adjusted risk of car crash injury or death due to vehicle age, after controlling for a range of known confounders. Cases were all cars involved in crashes in which at least one occupant was hospitalized or killed anywhere in the Auckland region, and controls were randomly selected cars on Auckland roads. The drivers of the 571 case vehicles and 588 control vehicles completed a structured interview. Hospitalisation or death of a vehicle occupant due to car crash injury. Vehicles constructed before 1984 had significantly greater chance of being involved in an injury crash than those constructed after 1994 (odds ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20 to 6.91), after adjustment for potential confounders. There was also a trend for increasing crash risk with each one year increase in vehicle age after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio 1.05, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.11; p = 0.09). This study quantifies the increased risk of car crash injury associated with older vehicle year and confirms this as an important public health issue.

  5. The impact of policies regulating alcohol trading hours and days on specific alcohol-related harms: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; Voaklander, Donald

    2017-06-24

    Evidence supports the expectation that changes in time of alcohol sales associate with changes in alcohol-related harm in both directions. However, to the best of our knowledge, no comprehensive systematic reviews had examined the effect of policies restricting time of alcohol trading on specific alcohol-related harms. To compile existing evidence related to the impact of policies regulating alcohol trading hours/days of on specific harm outcomes such as: assault/violence, motor vehicle crashes/fatalities, injury, visits to the emergency department/hospital, murder/homicides and crime. Systematic review of literature studying the impact of policies regulation alcohol trading times in alcohol-related harm, published between January 2000 and October 2016 in English language. Results support the premise that policies regulating times of alcohol trading and consumption can contribute to reduce injuries, alcohol-related hospitalisations/emergency department visits, homicides and crime. Although the impact of alcohol trading policies in assault/violence and motor vehicle crashes/fatalities is also positive, these associations seem to be more complex and require further study. Evidence suggests a potential direct effect of policies that regulate alcohol trading times in the prevention of injuries, alcohol-related hospitalisations, homicides and crime. The impact of these alcohol trading policies in assault/violence and motor vehicle crashes/fatalities is less compelling. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Functional Movement ScreenTM and history of injury in assessment of potential risk of injury among team handball players.

    PubMed

    Slodownik, Robert; Ogonowska-Slodownik, Anna; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia

    2017-09-29

    Handball is known to be one of the team sports representing the highest risk of injury. Several investigators have tried to identify injury risk factors in team sports including handball and suggested the need to develop an optimal tool to capture and quantify the potential risk of injury. The aim of the study was to evaluate potential risk of injury among handball players. It was a mixed design study. Handball players from 1st and 2nd division were evaluated (n = 30) using the Functional Movement ScreenTM (FMSTM). Additionally, self-reported history of injury was collected during FMSTM evaluation and after 6 months. Competitive level, training experience, playing position, anthropometric features, symmetry of movement patterns and history of previous injury were analysed while assessing the potential risk of injury. Significant difference between the right and left side (upper limb) was revealed for Shoulder Mobility Test (U = 308.5, p = 0.014). Odds Ratio analysis revealed that having previous injury in the last 12 months is the only statistically significant injury risk factor (OR = 13.71, p = 0.02). Based on this study we can assume that previous injury history reports are crucial in predicting injuries. FMSTM can help in identifying a typical adaptation in throwing shoulder among handball players, but should not be used alone to assess injury risk.

  7. General Risk of Signficant Injury Implementation Guidance Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-16

    TX 78234 JNLWD JNLW14-067 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release. The RSI Technical Working Group (TWG) developed a recommendation for a general... RSI equation that is consistent with the language and intent of DoD Instruction 3200.19. Non-lethal, risk of significant injury, human effects, RSI ...assessing the reversibility of non‐lethal  weapons by determining the risk of significant injury ( RSI ).1 Further, it establishes the health care  capability

  8. Association Between Alcohol Intoxication and Alcohol-Related Problems: An Event-level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Dan J.; Carey, Kate B.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy drinking students experience a myriad of alcohol-related negative consequences. Use of event-level data permits predictions to be made regarding (a) the likelihood of alcohol-related consequences occurring after specific drinking events, and (b) moderators of the association between intoxication and consequences. College students (N = 183, 64% female) completed four consecutive 7-day drinking diaries and turned them in weekly. The diaries yielded prospective event-level data on daily drinks, time spent drinking, and negative consequences related to each drinking event. Alcohol intoxication on a given day was significantly associated with increased levels of risk, although this association was moderated by average level of intoxication. Furthermore, self-control was associated with increased likelihood of negative consequences at all levels of intoxication, and self-regulation and impulsivity moderated the event-level association between daily intoxication and likelihood of negative consequences. Results suggest that self-regulation subsumes impulsivity and self-control. PMID:17563139

  9. Harmful drinking and experiences of alcohol-related violence in Australian male construction industry apprentices.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Karin; Corney, Tim; Burnside, Lewis

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to understand the prevalence of harmful alcohol use in a sample of Australian male construction industry apprentices and also examine alcohol-related violence. Although previous Australian research indicated that 45% of construction industry apprentices had Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores indicative of harmful drinking, the current study identified that 66% of construction industry apprentices were drinking at harmful levels. It also identified positive correlations between harmful drinking behavior and alcohol-related violence (and precursors of violence such as verbal abuse). The article notes the role of masculine identity in alcohol consumption, particularly as it relates to the male-dominated construction industry. The article concludes by making recommendations for implementation of preventative education campaigns in apprentices' workplaces (or in training colleges), as it provides opportune settings to focus on high-risk groups, which are otherwise often difficult to access.

  10. Exploring college students' use of general and alcohol-related social media and their associations with alcohol-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric W; Pinkleton, Bruce E; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors. Public and private university students (N = 637) participated November and December 2011 and April 2012. College students completed online surveys to measure their exposure to social and online media generally, as well as their alcohol-related digital media use and alcohol use. Use of social media related to alcohol marketing predicted alcohol consumption and engaging in risky behaviors, whereas the use of social media more generally did not. Students' use of alcohol-related social media-marketing content associates with their problem drinking. Results have implications for alcohol abuse reduction efforts targeted at college students and suggest the importance of considering social, cultural, and cognitive factors in campaign planning and design.

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Alcohol-Related Outcomes Among Municipal Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Tomaka, Joe; Magoc, Dejan; Morales-Monks, Stormy M; Reyes, Anabel C

    2017-08-01

    This study examined levels of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and relationships between PTSS and alcohol-related outcomes in a near census of municipal firefighters. The study also assessed substance-use coping and drinking to cope as potential mediators of such outcomes. Firefighters (N = 740) completed measures that assessed PTSS, alcohol risk behaviors, alcohol problems, drinking motives, and coping with stress. Results showed that 32.4% of firefighters reported significant levels of PTSS using National Center for PTSD (2014) screening cutoff scores. Correlational analysis showed that PTSS was related to at-risk drinking (r = .18) and alcohol-related problems (r = .33), as well as use of maladaptive coping strategies (r = .58) and substance use coping (r = .40). Structural analyses comparing multiple alternative models suggested that a model that included substance use coping and drinking to cope as mediators of the association between PTSS and problem drinking provided the best fit to the data. Tests of multigroup invariance confirmed this model. Overall, PTSS were common in this population and they predicted maladaptive coping patterns and alcohol-related consequences. One implication of these findings is that fire departments might consider adding or enhancing screening and treatment options for PTS, alcohol misuse, or both. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  12. [Risk factors of suppurative complications in case of thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Danielian, Sh N; Abakumov, M M; Vil'k, A P; Saprin, A A; Tatarinova, E V

    2015-01-01

    It was performed retrospective analysis of 463 cases of suppurative thoracic complications after injury (232) and closed thoracic trauma (231) for 20-year period. Incidence of purulent complications was 3.2% and 1.6% in case of injury and closed thoracic trauma respectively including pleural empyema in 1.5 and 1.3%, pulmonary abscess in 0.3 and 0.4%, mediastinitis in 0.35 and 0.12%, pericarditis in 1.5 and 0.26%, osteomyelitis in 0.4 and 0.18% respectively. Factors preceding suppurative complications in case of injuries and closed trauma have been considered as predictors. Multivariant regression analysis established significant risk factors of suppurative thoracic complications. Clotted hemothorax, mediastinal hemorrhage, heart injury, late appeal for medical assistance and mechanical ventilation over 5 days were identified irrespective of character of trauma. In case of thoracic injury there were damage of osteochondrous frame, hollow thoracic and abdominal organs, gunshot wound of lung, delirium and injuries severity over 20 scores according to ISS scale. Pulmonary bleeding, sternal fracture and Glasgow Coma Scale rate<12 scores were identified as risk factors in case of closed trauma.

  13. The effect of previous traumatic injury on homicide risk.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Russell L; Davis, Gregory G; Levitan, Emily B; MacLennan, Paul A; Redden, David T; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Research has reported that a strong risk factor for traumatic injury is having a previous injury (i.e., recidivism). To date, the only study examining the relationship between recidivism and homicide reported strong associations, but was limited by possible selection bias. The current matched case-control study utilized coroner's data from 2004 to 2008. Subjects were linked to trauma registry data to determine whether the person had a previous traumatic injury. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between homicide and recidivism. Homicide risk was increased for those having a previous traumatic injury (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.09-2.99) or a previous intentional injury (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.24-5.17). These results suggest an association between homicide and injury recidivism, and that trauma centers may be an effective setting for screening individuals for secondary prevention efforts of homicide through violence prevention programs. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Defining Risk Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts to prevent alcohol-related harm are aimed at reducing risk drinking. This article outlines the many conceptual and methodological challenges to defining risk drinking. It summarizes recent evidence regarding associations of various aspects of alcohol consumption with chronic and acute alcohol-related harms, including mortality, morbidity, injury, and alcohol use disorders, and summarizes the study designs most appropriate to defining risk thresholds for these types of harm. In addition, it presents an international overview of low-risk drinking guidelines from more than 20 countries, illustrating the wide range of interpretations of the scientific evidence related to risk drinking. This article also explores the impact of drink size on defining risk drinking and describes variation in what is considered to be a standard drink across populations. Actual and standard drink sizes differ in the United States, and this discrepancy affects definitions of risk drinking and prevention efforts. PMID:22330212

  15. An Update of Research Examining College Student Alcohol-Related Consequences: New Perspectives and Implications for Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Mallett, Kimberly A.; Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Borsari, Brian; Read, Jennifer P.; Neighbors, Clayton; White, Helene R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review is to provide an update on existing research examining alcohol-related consequences among college students with relevance for individual-based interventions. While alcohol-related consequences have been a focus of study for several decades, the literature has evolved into an increasingly nuanced understanding of individual and environmental circumstances that contribute to risk for experiencing consequences. A number of risk factors for experiencing alcohol-related consequences have been identified, including belonging to specific student subgroups (e.g., Greek organizations) or drinking during high-risk periods, such as spring break. In addition, the relationship between students’ evaluations of both negative and positive consequences and their future drinking behavior has become a focus of research. The current review provides an overview of high-risk student subpopulations, high-risk windows and activities, and college students’ subjective evaluations of alcohol related consequences. Future directions for research are discussed and include determining how students’ orientations toward consequences change over time, identifying predictors of membership in high-risk consequence subgroups, and refining existing measures of consequences to address evolving research questions. PMID:23241024

  16. Perineal skin injury: extrinsic environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Faria, D T; Shwayder, T; Krull, E A

    1996-08-01

    Little research has been performed to evaluate factors that may exacerbate perineal skin injury in the adult population. But extensive research has been done and knowledge has been gained from studies with diaper dermatitis in infants. Our objectives in writing this article are to define the anatomical area affected, the terms used, and to review the available literature for diaper dermatitis in infants, elucidating the similarities and differences between diaper dermatitis in infants and perineal dermatitis in adults. The six extrinsic environmental factors that have been identified and extensively studied in diaper dermatitis are skin wetness, urine, ammonia, feces, local skin pH and microorganisms. Although the complex interactions of the six factors are still not totally defined, we do know that to prevent perineal skin injury, it is helpful to prevent excessive skin hydration, minimize the interaction of urine and feces, minimize local microorganisms, and maintain skin near its physiologic pH. In general, the six extrinsic factors can be extrapolated and applied to the care of adults. Further research in adult fecal enzymes and pH is still necessary.

  17. Applying Personal Genetic Data to Injury Risk Assessment in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Roos, Andrew K.; Roos, Thomas R.; Hawkins, Claire; Beache, Sydney; Baur, Stephen; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genetic markers associated with risk for certain sports-related injuries and performance-related conditions, with the hope that these markers could be used by individual athletes to personalize their training and diet regimens. We found that we could greatly expand the knowledge base of sports genetic information by using published data originally found in health and disease studies. For example, the results from large genome-wide association studies for low bone mineral density in elderly women can be re-purposed for low bone mineral density in young endurance athletes. In total, we found 124 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with: anterior cruciate ligament tear, Achilles tendon injury, low bone mineral density and stress fracture, osteoarthritis, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and sickle cell trait. Of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, 91% have not previously been used in sports genetics. We conducted a pilot program on fourteen triathletes using this expanded knowledge base of genetic variants associated with sports injury. These athletes were genotyped and educated about how their individual genetic make-up affected their personal risk profile during an hour-long personal consultation. Overall, participants were favorable of the program, found it informative, and most acted upon their genetic results. This pilot program shows that recent genetic research provides valuable information to help reduce sports injuries and to optimize nutrition. There are many genetic studies for health and disease that can be mined to provide useful information to athletes about their individual risk for relevant injuries. PMID:25919592

  18. Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit

    PubMed Central

    Montalvo, Alicia M.; Shaefer, Hilary; Rodriguez, Belinda; Li, Tan; Epnere, Katrina; Myer, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002) and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.001) than non-competitors. Athletes who reported injury also reported significantly higher values for the following risk factors: years of participation (2.7 ± 1.8 v 1.8 ± 1.5, p = 0.001), weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 3.8 v 4.9 ± 2.1, p = 0.020), weekly athlete-exposures (6.4 ± 3.8 v 4.7 ± 2.1, p = 0.003), height (1.72 ± 0.09 m v 1.68 ± 0.01 m, p = 0.011), and body mass (78.24 ± 16.86 kg v 72.91 ± 14.77 kg, p = 0.037). Injury rates during CrossFit and location of injuries were similar to those previously reported. Injury incidence was similar to related sports, including gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce the increase

  19. Alcohol-Related Content of Animated Cartoons: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hugh; Shiffman, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    This study, based on a stratified (by decade of production) random sample of 1,221 animated cartoons and 4,201 characters appearing in those cartoons, seeks to determine the prevalence of alcohol-related content; how, if at all, the prevalence changed between 1930 and 1996 (the years spanned by this research); and the types of messages that animated cartoons convey about beverage alcohol and drinking in terms of the characteristics that are associated with alcohol use, the contexts in which alcohol is used in cartoons, and the reasons why cartoon characters purportedly consume alcohol. Approximately 1 cartoon in 11 was found to contain alcohol-related content, indicating that the average child or adolescent viewer is exposed to approximately 24 alcohol-related messages each week just from the cartoons that he/she watches. Data indicated that the prevalence of alcohol-related content declined significantly over the years. Quite often, alcohol consumption was shown to result in no effects whatsoever for the drinker, and alcohol use often occurred when characters were alone. Overall, mixed, ambivalent messages were provided about drinking and the types of characters that did/not consume alcoholic beverages. PMID:24350176

  20. Alcohol-related content of animated cartoons: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh; Shiffman, Kenneth S

    2013-01-01

    This study, based on a stratified (by decade of production) random sample of 1,221 animated cartoons and 4,201 characters appearing in those cartoons, seeks to determine the prevalence of alcohol-related content; how, if at all, the prevalence changed between 1930 and 1996 (the years spanned by this research); and the types of messages that animated cartoons convey about beverage alcohol and drinking in terms of the characteristics that are associated with alcohol use, the contexts in which alcohol is used in cartoons, and the reasons why cartoon characters purportedly consume alcohol. Approximately 1 cartoon in 11 was found to contain alcohol-related content, indicating that the average child or adolescent viewer is exposed to approximately 24 alcohol-related messages each week just from the cartoons that he/she watches. Data indicated that the prevalence of alcohol-related content declined significantly over the years. Quite often, alcohol consumption was shown to result in no effects whatsoever for the drinker, and alcohol use often occurred when characters were alone. Overall, mixed, ambivalent messages were provided about drinking and the types of characters that did/not consume alcoholic beverages.

  1. Implicit Alcohol-Related Expectancies and the Effect of Context.

    PubMed

    Monk, Rebecca L; Pennington, Charlotte R; Campbell, Claire; Price, Alan; Heim, Derek

    2016-09-01

    The current study examined the impact of varying pictorial cues and testing contexts on implicit alcohol-related expectancies. Seventy-six participants were assigned randomly to complete an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) in either a pub or lecture context. The IRAP exposed participants to pictorial cues that depicted an alcoholic beverage in the foreground of a pub (alcohol-congruent stimuli) or university lecture theater (alcohol-incongruent stimuli), and participants were required to match both positive and negative alcohol-related outcome expectancies to these stimuli. Corresponding to a 4 × 2 design, IRAP trial types were included in the analysis as repeated-measure variables, whereas testing environment was input as a between-participants variable. Participants more readily endorsed that drinking alcohol was related to positive expectancies when responding to alcohol-congruent stimuli, and this was strengthened when participants completed the task in a pub. Moreover, they more readily confirmed that alcohol was related to negative expectancies when responding to alcohol-incongruent stimuli. These findings suggest that alcohol-related cues and environmental contexts may be a significant driver of positive alcohol-related cognitions, which may have implications for the design of interventions. They emphasize further the importance of examining implicit cognitions in ecologically valid testing contexts.

  2. Family Supports for Children Who Have Alcohol-Related Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Since the first publication on fetal alcohol syndrome appeared in the scientific literature over 30 years ago, there has been a great deal of research interest in the topic. This paper reviews findings within the past 10 years related to causes, frequency, and diagnosis of alcohol-related disabilities, before turning to the impact these…

  3. Pedestrian Injury Patterns and Risk in Minibus Collisions in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Fan, Xiaoxiang; Yin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Background The minibus, with a nearly flat front, is widely used in China, especially in the underdeveloped regions, and results in large numbers of pedestrian injuries and deaths. The purpose of this study was to determine the injury patterns and risk for pedestrians involved in these crashes. Material/Methods We conducted an in-depth investigation of minibus/pedestrian accidents in Chongqing, China, occurring between September 2000 and April 2014. The enrolled pedestrians was classified into 3 groups: young (aged 14–44 years), middle-aged (aged 45–59 years), and elderly (aged over 60 years). Pedestrian injuries were coded according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Results A total of 109 pedestrians, with an average age of 55.7±16.2 years, were injured or killed – 30.3% were young, 23.9% were middle-aged, and 45.9% were elderly. Pedestrians hit by a minibus had a high proportion of head, chest, and extremity injuries – 84.4%, 50.5%, and 52.3%, respectively. In addition, impact speeds in excess of 75 km/h all ultimately resulted in fatalities. At an impact speed of 30 km/h, the risk of pedestrian fatality and AIS3+ injury are approximately 12.0% and 37.2%, respectively. At 50 km/h the risks are 65.2% and 96.9%, respectively, and at 70 km/h the risks are 96.3% and 99.9%, respectively. Conclusions A higher likelihood of chest injury was associated with being older and impact speed of over 40 km/h in minibus/pedestrian collision. Our data suggest that the injury patterns of pedestrians in minibus collisions differ from that in other vehicle/pedestrian collisions. These findings could contribute to better understanding of the injury patterns and risk of pedestrian in minibus collisions in China, which may play an important role in developing measures to improve traffic safety. PMID:25754962

  4. Mortality risk after head injury increases at 30 years.

    PubMed

    Harris, Colin; DiRusso, Stephen; Sullivan, Tom; Benzil, Deborah L

    2003-11-01

    Age has long been recognized as a critical factor in predicting outcomes after head injury, with individuals older than 60 years predicted to have a worse outcome than those younger than 60. The object of this study was to determine the effect of age by decade of life beginning at birth in patients with head injuries of all levels of severity. The New York State Trauma Registry was searched for head injuries from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1995; the 13,908 cases found were placed into age groups by decade. Data were sought for each patient on demographics, Glasgow Coma Score, ICD-9 injury code, New Injury Severity Score (NISS), and mechanism of injury. These data were analyzed with chi-square and one-way ANOVA tests, with significance set at p < 0.05. The risk of dying was significantly increased in patients beginning at 30 years of age compared with those in the younger age groups, with the greatest increases occurring after age 60 (p < 0.001). For the population with available Glasgow Coma Score data (n = 12,844), the mortality rate for patients ages 0 to 30 was 10.9%, and for patients ages 31 to 50 was 12.4%. The mean Glasgow Coma Score for nonsurvivors ages 0 to 20 (3.9) and for nonsurvivors ages 31 to 50 (5.1) were significantly different, with a risk ratio of 1.3 (p < 0.001). The risk of dying for patients suffering head injuries increases as early as 30 years of age, making it necessary for health-care providers to consider increased monitoring and treatment for patients in this younger age group.

  5. Risk factors affecting injury severity determined by the MAIS score.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sara; Amorim, Marco; Couto, Antonio

    2017-07-04

    . This study showed the impact of variables, such as the presence of blood alcohol, the use of protection devices, the type of crash, and the site characteristics, on the injury severity classified according to the MAIS score. Additionally, the sex and age of the victims were analyzed as risk factors, showing that elderly and male road users are highly associated with MAIS 3+ injuries. The comparison between the marginal effects of the variables estimated by the MAIS and LHS models showed significant differences. In addition to the differences in the magnitude of impact of each variable, we found that the impact of the road environment variable was dependent on the injury severity classification. The differences in the effects of risk factors between the classifications highlight the importance of using a reliable classification of injury severity. Additionally, the relationship between LHS and MAIS levels is quite different among countries, supporting the previous conclusion that bias is expected in the assessment of risk factors if an injury severity classification other than MAIS is used.

  6. Increased Risk of Injury in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Li-Ching; Harrington, Rebecca A.; Chang, Jen Jen; Connors, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine injury risk in children with autism, ADD/ADD, learning disability, psychopathology, or other medical conditions. Children aged 3-5 years who participated in the National Survey of Children's Health were included. Six study groups were analyzed in this report: autism (n=82), ADD/ADHD (n=191), learning…

  7. Father-Child Interactions and Children's Risk of Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    StGeorge, Jennifer; Fletcher, Richard; Freeman, Emily; Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers' parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in…

  8. Father-Child Interactions and Children's Risk of Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    StGeorge, Jennifer; Fletcher, Richard; Freeman, Emily; Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers' parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in…

  9. Constraints influencing sports wheelchair propulsion performance and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. A potential issue for many wheelchair athletes is how to train hard to maximise performance while also reducing the risk of injuries, particularly to the shoulder due to the accumulation of stress placed on this joint during activities of daily living, training and competition. The overall purpose of this narrative review was to use the constraints-led approach of dynamical systems theory to examine how various constraints acting upon the wheelchair-user interface may alter hand rim wheelchair performance during sporting activities, and to a lesser extent, their injury risk. As we found no studies involving Paralympic athletes that have directly utilised the dynamical systems approach to interpret their data, we have used this approach to select some potential constraints and discussed how they may alter wheelchair performance and/or injury risk. Organism constraints examined included player classifications, wheelchair setup, training and intrinsic injury risk factors. Task constraints examined the influence of velocity and types of locomotion (court sports vs racing) in wheelchair propulsion, while environmental constraints focused on forces that tend to oppose motion such as friction and surface inclination. Finally, the ecological validity of the research studies assessing wheelchair propulsion was critiqued prior to recommendations for practice and future research being given. PMID:23557065

  10. Injuries and injury risk factors among men and women in U.S. Army Combat Medic Advanced individual training.

    PubMed

    Henderson, N E; Knapik, J J; Shaffer, S W; McKenzie, T H; Schneider, G M

    2000-09-01

    No previous reports have evaluated injuries or injury risk factors during the advanced individual training (AIT) that follows the Army's initial or basic combat training (BCT). This study examined injuries and injury risk factors among 439 men and 287 women participating in combat medic AIT. A questionnaire addressing demographic and lifestyle characteristics (age, race, tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, etc.) was administered to all subjects. Stature and body mass were obtained from battalion records. Injuries occurring during both BCT and AIT were transcribed from subject medical records. Results indicated that cumulative injury incidence (subjects with one or more injuries) in BCT was 26% for men and 52% for women (p < 0.01), in consonance with previous investigations. In AIT, injury incidence was 24% for men and 30% for women (p = 0.08). In both BCT and AIT, overuse injuries and lower body injuries accounted for the largest proportions of injuries by diagnosis and anatomical location. Logistic regression revealed that older age (> 25 years), split option (a break in service between BCT and AIT), and higher body mass were independent risk factors for AIT injuries among women. None of the examined variables were independent risk factors for AIT injuries among men.

  11. Physical environment of the home and adolescent injury risk.

    PubMed

    Schwebel, David C; Janice Gilliland, M; Moore, Jeffrey G

    2009-01-01

    The home environment is one of the most significant contextual factors that contributes to young children's unintentional injury risk, but there are very limited data concerning risks present in the homes of adolescents. This study was designed to offer descriptive data on aspects of the home physical environment that might contribute to adolescent injury risk in the United States. A diverse sample of 42 adolescents ages 14-16 participated. Researchers completed an inspection of the adolescents' home, searching for various safety-related hazards. Homes tended to be safe in some domains (e.g., presence of smoke detectors), but had substantial risk in other domains. For example, over 90% of homes were without functioning carbon monoxide detectors; 29% had unlocked firearms present; 21% had exposed electrical cords; and 31% had alcohol present and unlocked. Although residential environment risks are viewed to be most concerning for very young children, over 30% of fatal adolescent injuries occur in the home. Results suggest there are substantial risks to adolescent safety in the home environment.

  12. Civil engineering airman at increased risk for injuries and injury-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Webb, Timothy S; Wells, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    With the advent of electronic records, the opportunity to conduct research on workplace-related injuries and musculoskeletal disorders has increased dramatically. The purpose of this study was to examine the United States Air Force Civil Engineering career field to determine if they are negatively impacted by their work environment. Specifically, the objective of this study was to determine if enlisted Civil Engineering Airmen (n = 25,385) were at increased risk for injury or injury-related musculoskeletal disorders compared to enlisted Information Management/Communications Airmen (n = 28,947). Using an historical prospective design, electronic data were assembled and analyzed using Cox's proportional hazards modeling. Models were stratified by gender and adjusted for race/ethnicity, marital status, birth year, and deployment status. Male Civil Engineers were observed to be at greater risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.54-2.26) and injuries (HR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.48-2.11), while female Civil Engineers were more than double the risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.28-3.73) and injuries (HR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.27-3.88) compared to Information Management/Communications Airmen. Although analyses do not allow exploration of specific causes, they highlight the utility of using electronic data to identify occupations for further evaluation. Based on these results, additional resources were allocated to survey Civil Engineers on their physical work demands and job requirements to identify key problem areas for further study and mitigation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Geographic variability in alcohol-related crashes in response to legalized Sunday packaged alcohol sales in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Garnett P; Hanson, Timothy E; Lapham, Sandra C

    2007-03-01

    On July 1, 1995 the state of New Mexico lifted its ban on Sunday packaged alcohol sales. Legislation lifting the ban included a local option allowing individual communities within the state to hold an election to reinstitute the ban on Sunday packaged alcohol sales. Previous research has shown a clear statewide increase in alcohol-related crash and crash fatality rates after the ban was lifted. The goal of this study is to measure county-level variability in changes in alcohol-related crash rates while adjusting for county socio-demographic characteristics, spatial patterns in crash rates and temporal trends in alcohol-related crash rates. Bayesian hierarchical binomial regression models were fit to the observed quarterly crash counts for all counties between July 1, 1990 and June 30, 2000. Results show marked variability in the impact of legalized Sunday packaged alcohol sales on alcohol-related crash rates. Relative risks of an alcohol-related crash for the post-repeal versus pre-repeal period vary across counties from 1.04 to 1.90. Counties with older population suffered a greater negative impact of legalized Sunday packaged alcohol sales. Counties with communities that quickly passed the local option to re-ban packaged sales on Sundays were able to mitigate most of the deleterious impact of increased alcohol availability that was observed across the state.

  14. Prospective Effects of Family Cohesion on Alcohol-Related Problems in Adolescence: Similarities and Differences by Race/Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Ben T; Chan, Sut Yee Shirley; Conger, Katherine J; Martin, Monica J; Hollis, Nicole D; Serido, Joyce; Russell, Stephen T

    2015-10-01

    Research increasingly finds that race/ethnicity needs to be taken into account in the modelling of associations between protective factors and adolescent drinking behaviors in order to understand family effects and promote positive youth development. The current study examined racial/ethnic variation in the prospective effects of family cohesion on adolescent alcohol-related problems using a nationally representative sample. Data were drawn from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health and included 10,992 (50% female) non-Hispanic Asian, non-Hispanic Black, Latino, and non-Hispanic White 7th-12th graders. Consistent with Hirschi's social control theory of youth delinquency, higher levels of family cohesion predicted lower levels of future adolescent alcohol-related problems, independent of race/ethnicity, sex, age, baseline alcohol-related problems, and family socioeconomic status. Findings from moderation analyses indicated that the magnitude of associations differed across groups such that the protective effect of family cohesion was strongest among White adolescents. For Latino adolescents, family cohesion was not associated with alcohol-related problems. Future longitudinal cross-racial/ethnic research is needed on common and unique mechanisms underlying differential associations between family processes and adolescent high-risk drinking. Understanding these processes could help improve preventive interventions, identify vulnerable subgroups, and inform health policy aimed at reducing alcohol-related health disparities.

  15. Exploring College Students' Use of General and Alcohol-Related Social Media and Their Associations with Alcohol-Related Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eric W.; Pinkleton, Bruce E.; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors.…

  16. Exploring College Students' Use of General and Alcohol-Related Social Media and Their Associations with Alcohol-Related Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eric W.; Pinkleton, Bruce E.; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors.…

  17. Does the year-end decline in injury risk reflect reporting error?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brooks

    2015-05-01

    Relatively little is known about seasonal patterns in occupational injury risk. Injury risk may vary seasonally due to weather-related factors or changing work exposure. Employer confusion about recordkeeping rules and injury occurrence near year end may also lead to an undercount of year-end injuries. Case records from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries were used to determine seasonality for a variety of injury types. Reported injury rates were higher in summer and lower at year end. Difficult-to-identify injuries showed greater year-end incidence declines. End-of-year injury declines may have reflected reporting errors for some injury types. The summertime increase in injury risk was broad-based and presumably reflected real seasonal factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Alcohol-Related Antigay Aggression: Theoretical Considerations for Individual-and Societal-Level Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Dominic J.; Miller, Cameron A.

    2008-01-01

    A substantial literature has identified risk factors for intoxicated aggression and the mechanisms by which these effects are exerted. This theoretical and empirical foundation is a valuable resource for the development of treatment inventions. In contrast, a comparable literature is not available to guide development of clinical interventions for intoxicated antigay aggression. To address this gap in the literature, the present article 1) identifies risk factors and mechanisms pertinent to alcohol-related antigay aggression, 2) advances predictions regarding how alcohol will increase antigay aggression, and 3) reviews societal- and individual-level considerations for intervention based upon these hypotheses. PMID:19938923

  19. Development of thoracic injury risk functions for the THOR ATD.

    PubMed

    Poplin, Gerald S; McMurry, Timothy L; Forman, Jason L; Ash, Joseph; Parent, Daniel P; Craig, Matthew J; Song, Eric; Kent, Richard; Shaw, Greg; Crandall, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    The Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) aims to improve the ability to predict the risk of chest injury to restrained automobile occupants by measuring dynamic chest deflection at multiple locations. This research aimed to describe the methods for developing a thoracic injury risk function (IRF) using the multi-point chest deflection metrics from the 50th percentile male THOR Metric ATD with the SD-3 shoulder and associating to post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) outcomes that were matched on identical frontal and frontal-oblique impact sled testing conditions. Several deflection metrics were assessed as potential predictor variables for AIS 3+ injury risk, including a combined metric, called PC Score, which was generated from a principal component analysis. A parametric survival analysis (specifically, accelerated failure time (AFT) with Weibull distribution) was assessed in the development of the IRF. Model fit was assessed using various modeling diagnostics, including the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Models based on resultant deflection consistently exhibited improved fit compared to models based on x-axis deflection or chord deflection. Risk functions for the THOR PC Score and Cmax (maximum resultant deflection) were qualitatively equivalent, producing AUCs of 0.857 and 0.861, respectively. Adjusting for the potential confounding effects of age, AFT survival models with Cmax or PC Score as the primary deflection metric resulted in the THOR injury risk models with the best combination of biomechanical appropriateness, potential utility and model fit, and may be recommended as injury predictors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Injury risk due to collisions in Major League Baseball.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, D A; Davis, S W

    2014-07-01

    Purpose is to determine if Major League Baseball plays at risk for collisions have higher injury rates than typical base running plays. 2002-2011 Major League Baseball play data was obtained: non-force putouts by catcher at home plate (Catcher Tag Out), groundball force outs at 2(nd) base with less than 2 outs (Double Play Attempt), and the control play, outfield assisted non-force putouts of runners attempting to advance to 2(nd) or 3(rd) base (Outfield Assist 2(nd)/3(rd)). This list was cross-referenced with 2002-2011 disabled lists to see if an involved player went on the disabled list the day of or day after the play. An on-line search for each match determined if the injury was attributable to that play. Rate calculated per 1 000 plays, severity in days on disabled list. Injury rate and severity for Catcher Tag Out was 6.98 and 45.6 respectively, Double Play Attempt 0.42 and 41.3, Outfield Assist 2(nd/)3(rd) 1.56 and 47.0. Injury rate for Catcher Tag Out was higher (P = 0.03) than the control while Double Play Attempt trended lower (P = 0.05). There was no difference in severity. Catcher Tag Outs carry greater injury risk than typical base running plays. Major League Baseball should consider prohibiting base path collisions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Diffuse Axonal Injury: Epidemiology, Outcome and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rita de Cássia Almeida; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; de Oliveira, Daniel Vieira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; de Sousa, Regina Márcia Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI), a type of traumatic injury, is known for its severe consequences. However, there are few studies describing the outcomes of DAI and the risk factors associated with it. This study aimed to describe the outcome for patients with a primary diagnosis of DAI 6 months after trauma and to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with mortality and dependence at this time point. Seventy-eight patients with DAI were recruited from July 2013 to February 2014 in a prospective cohort study. Patient outcome was analyzed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E) within 6 months of the traumatic injury. The mean Injury Severity Score was 35.0 (SD = 11.9), and the mean New Injury Severity Score (NISS) was 46.2 (SD = 15.9). Mild DAI was observed in 44.9% of the patients and severe DAI in 35.9%. Six months after trauma, 30.8% of the patients had died, and 45.1% had shown full recovery according to the GOS-E. In the logistic regression model, the severity variables – DAI with hypoxia, as measured by peripheral oxygen saturation, and hypotension with NISS value – had a statistically significant association with patient mortality; on the other hand, severity of DAI and length of hospital stay were the only significant predictors for dependence. Therefore, severity of DAI emerged as a risk factor for both mortality and dependence. PMID:27812349

  2. ALDH2 polymorphism and alcohol-related cancers in Asians: a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Chen, Che-Hong

    2017-03-03

    The occurrence of more than 200 diseases, including cancer, can be attributed to alcohol drinking. The global cancer deaths attributed to alcohol-consumption rose from 243,000 in 1990 to 337,400 in 2010. In 2010, cancer deaths due to alcohol consumption accounted for 4.2% of all cancer deaths. Strong epidemiological evidence has established the causal role of alcohol in the development of various cancers, including esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer. The evidence for the association between alcohol and other cancers is inconclusive. Because of the high prevalence of ALDH2*2 allele among East Asian populations, East Asians may be more susceptible to the carcinogenic effect of alcohol, with most evidence coming from studies of esophageal cancer and head and neck cancer, while data for other cancers are more limited. The high prevalence of ALDH2*2 allele in East Asian populations may have important public health implications and may be utilized to reduce the occurrence of alcohol-related cancers among East Asians, including: 1) Identification of individuals at high risk of developing alcohol-related cancers by screening for ALDH2 polymorphism; 2) Incorporation of ALDH2 polymorphism screening into behavioral intervention program for promoting alcohol abstinence or reducing alcohol consumption; 3) Using ALDH2 polymorphism as a prognostic indicator for alcohol-related cancers; 4) Targeting ALDH2 for chemoprevention; and 5) Setting guidelines for alcohol consumption among ALDH2 deficient individuals. Future studies should evaluate whether these strategies are effective for preventing the occurrence of alcohol-related cancers.

  3. Training loads and injury risk in Australian football-differing acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk.

    PubMed

    Carey, David L; Blanch, Peter; Ong, Kok-Leong; Crossley, Kay M; Crow, Justin; Morris, Meg E

    2017-08-01

    (1) To investigate whether a daily acute:chronic workload ratio informs injury risk in Australian football players; (2) to identify which combination of workload variable, acute and chronic time window best explains injury likelihood. Workload and injury data were collected from 53 athletes over 2 seasons in a professional Australian football club. Acute:chronic workload ratios were calculated daily for each athlete, and modelled against non-contact injury likelihood using a quadratic relationship. 6 workload variables, 8 acute time windows (2-9 days) and 7 chronic time windows (14-35 days) were considered (336 combinations). Each parameter combination was compared for injury likelihood fit (using R(2)). The ratio of moderate speed running workload (18-24 km/h) in the previous 3 days (acute time window) compared with the previous 21 days (chronic time window) best explained the injury likelihood in matches (R(2)=0.79) and in the immediate 2 or 5 days following matches (R(2)=0.76-0.82). The 3:21 acute:chronic workload ratio discriminated between high-risk and low-risk athletes (relative risk=1.98-2.43). Using the previous 6 days to calculate the acute workload time window yielded similar results. The choice of acute time window significantly influenced model performance and appeared to reflect the competition and training schedule. Daily workload ratios can inform injury risk in Australian football. Clinicians and conditioning coaches should consider the sport-specific schedule of competition and training when choosing acute and chronic time windows. For Australian football, the ratio of moderate speed running in a 3-day or 6-day acute time window and a 21-day chronic time window best explained injury risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. The Curveball as a Risk Factor for Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, W. Jeffrey; Iyengar, Jaicharan J.; Byram, Ian R.; Ahmad, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The curveball is regarded by many as a potential risk factor for injury in youth baseball pitchers. Objective: To critically evaluate the scientific evidence regarding the curveball and its impact on pitching biomechanics and the overall risk of arm injuries in baseball pitchers. Study Type: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE from 1946 to 2012. Study Selection: Ten biomechanical studies on kinematic or electromyographic analysis of pitching a curveball were included, as well as 5 epidemiologic studies that assessed pain or injury incidence in pitchers throwing the curveball. Data Extraction: When possible, demographic, methodology, kinetics, and kinematics variables and pain/injury incidence were compiled. Results: Two biomechanical studies found greater horizontal adduction of the shoulder at ball release and less shoulder internal torque during the curveball pitching motion. Two studies demonstrated less proximal force and less torque at the elbow as the arm accelerated when throwing a curveball compared with a fastball, as well as greater supination of the forearm and less wrist extension. Electromyographic data suggested increased activity of extensor and supinator muscles for curveballs. No studies found increased force or torque about the elbow or shoulder. Three epidemiologic studies showed no significant association between pitching a curveball and upper extremity pain or injury. One retrospective epidemiologic study reported a 52% increase in shoulder pain in pitchers throwing a curveball, although this may have been due to confounders. Conclusion: Despite much debate in the baseball community about the curveball’s safety in youth pitchers, limited biomechanical and most epidemiologic data do not indicate an increased risk of injury when compared with the fastball. PMID:25553209

  5. Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Other Alcohol-Related Birth Defects: Teacher's Manual and Student Text. High School Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth; And Others

    This teacher's manual presents lesson plans for a high-school instructional unit on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and its less severe manifestations, Alcohol-Related Birth Defects. The lessons cover alcohol's effects during pregnancy, the history of concern about alcohol's effects, consequences of alcohol use in pregnancy, lifestyle risk reduction, and…

  6. Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Other Alcohol-Related Birth Defects: Teacher's Manual and Student Text. High School Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth; And Others

    This teacher's manual presents lesson plans for a high-school instructional unit on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and its less severe manifestations, Alcohol-Related Birth Defects. The lessons cover alcohol's effects during pregnancy, the history of concern about alcohol's effects, consequences of alcohol use in pregnancy, lifestyle risk reduction, and…

  7. Injury risk associated with ground hardness in junior cricket.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Dara M; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2012-03-01

    To establish if there is an association between ground hardness and injury risk in junior cricket. Nested case-series of players who played matches on specific grounds with objective ground hardness measures, within a prospective cohort study of junior community club cricket players. Monitoring of injuries and playing exposure occurred during 434 matches over the 2007/2008 playing season. Objective assessment of the hardness of 38 grounds was undertaken using a Clegg hammer at 13 sites on 19 different junior cricket grounds on the match eve across the season. Hardness readings were classified from unacceptably low (<30 g) to unacceptably high (>120 g) and two independent raters assessed the likelihood of each injury being related to ground hardness. Injuries sustained on tested grounds were related to the ground hardness measures. Overall, 31 match injuries were reported; 6.5% were rated as likely to be related to ground hardness, 16.1% as possibly related and 74.2% as unlikely to be related and 3.2% unknown. The two injuries likely to be related to ground hardness were sustained whilst diving to catch a ball resulting, in a graze/laceration from contact with hard ground. Overall, 31/38 (82%) ground assessments were rated as having 'unacceptably high' hardness and all others as 'high/normal' hardness. Only one injury occurred on an objectively tested ground. It remains unclear if ground hardness is a contributing factor to the most common injury mechanism of being struck by the ball, and needs to be confirmed in future larger-scale studies. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Maxillofacial injuries sustained during soccer: incidence, severity and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Papakosta, Veronica; Koumoura, Fanny; Mourouzis, Constantinos

    2008-04-01

    A very popular sport worldwide, soccer generates a great number of maxillofacial injuries, mainly fractures, resulting in esthetic or functional problems. The aim of this retrospective study was to contribute to the knowledge of soccer-related maxillofacial injuries, and call attention to the risk factors that favor these injuries. A total of 108 patients, who attended hospital because of maxillofacial injuries during soccer within a period of 8 years, were included in this study. The relationship of the patients with soccer, the type, the site, the severity, the mechanism of the injuries and the applied treatment were analyzed. The injured were all males, and were principally amateurs. Around 89.8% of the patients suffered maxillofacial fractures while 10.2% presented only soft tissue injuries; 13.9% had multiple fractures; 50% of the maxillofacial fractures concerned the zygomatic complex and 38.2% the mandible where the majority occurred at the angle. The prevailing mechanism was the direct impact of players. Head to head impact outnumbered. Elbow to head impact caused contusions of the temporomandibular joint. Kick to head impact was the main cause of multiple fractures. The treatment of fractures was mainly surgical (68.2%). These findings support the fact that maxillofacial injuries sustained during soccer tend to be severe, demanding surgical treatment. The mandibular angle is in danger due to the usual existence of impacted and semi-impacted third molars. There should be a preventive intervention on the above contributors, and mainly coaches and sports physicians should be properly informed about the specificity of the maxillofacial injuries.

  9. The Injury Risk to Wheelchair Occupants Using Motor Vehicle Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Songer, Thomas J.; Fitzgerald, Shirley G.; Rotko, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    The transportation safety experience for persons using wheelchairs is largely unknown. Motor vehicle crash involvement and injury frequency was examined in a telephone interview completed by 596 wheelchair users. Overall, 42% were drivers. Most subjects also rode as passengers in private vehicles (87%) and public vehicles (61%). Wheelchair use as a seat in the vehicle was higher among passengers than drivers. Crash involvement was highest among drivers and lower in passengers. Reported injuries from non-crash scenarios, though, were higher in passengers compared to drivers. Persons seated in wheelchairs in vehicles appear to be at a greater safety risk. PMID:15319121

  10. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries in severe traumatic brain injury: incidence, risk factors, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Pierre; Cardinale, Mickaël; Boret, Henry; D'Aranda, Erwan; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bordes, Julien; Prunet, Bertrand; Joubert, Christophe; Dagain, Arnaud; Goutorbe, Philippe; Kaiser, Eric; Meaudre, Eric

    2016-07-29

    OBJECTIVE Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVIs) affect approximately 1% of patients with blunt trauma. An antithrombotic or anticoagulation therapy is recommended to prevent the occurrence or recurrence of neurovascular events. This treatment has to be carefully considered after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), due to the risk of intracranial hemorrhage expansion. Thus, the physician in charge of the patient is confronted with a hemorrhagic and ischemic risk. The main objective of this study was to determine the incidence of BCVI after severe TBI. METHODS The authors conducted a prospective, observational, single-center study including all patients with severe TBI admitted in the trauma center. Diagnosis of BCVI was performed using a 64-channel multidetector CT. Characteristics of the patients, CT scan results, and outcomes were collected. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed to determine the risk factors of BCVI. Patients in whom BCVI was diagnosed were treated with systemic anticoagulation. RESULTS In total, 228 patients with severe TBI who were treated over a period of 7 years were included. The incidence of BCVI was 9.2%. The main risk factors were as follows: motorcycle crash (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.9-34.8), fracture involving the carotid canal (OR 11.7, 95% CI 1.7-80.9), cervical spine injury (OR 13.5, 95% CI 3.1-59.4), thoracic trauma (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.1-51.2), and hepatic lesion (OR 13.3, 95% CI 2.1-84.5). Among survivors, 82% of patients with BCVI received systemic anticoagulation therapy, beginning at a median of Day 1.5. The overall stroke rate was 19%. One patient had an intracranial hemorrhagic complication. CONCLUSIONS Blunt cerebrovascular injuries are frequent after severe TBI (incidence 9.2%). The main risk factors are high-velocity lesions and injuries near cervical arteries.

  11. IQ and alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among Swedish men and women: the importance of socioeconomic position.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Sara; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric; Allebeck, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the association between intelligence in childhood and later risk of alcohol-related disease and death by examining (1) the mediating effect of social position as an adult and (2) gender as a possible moderator. Cohort study. 21 809 Swedish men and women, born in 1948 and 1953, from the Swedish "Evaluation Through Follow-up" database were followed until 2006/2007. IQ was measured in school at the age of 13 and alcohol-related disease and death (International Classification of Disease codes) were followed from 1971 and onwards. We found an increased crude HR of 1.23 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.29) for every decrease in group of IQ test results for alcohol-related admissions and 1.14 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.24) for alcohol-related death. Social position as an adult was found to mediate both outcomes. Gender was not found to moderate the association. However, adjusting for socioeconomic position lowered the risk more among men than among women. There was an inverse, graded association between IQ and alcohol-related disease and death, which at least partially was mediated by social position as an adult. For alcohol-related death, complete mediation by socioeconomic position as an adult was found. Gender does not moderate this association. The role of socioeconomic position may differ between the genders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Eccentric hamstring strength and hamstring injury risk in Australian footballers.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Timmins, Ryan G; Hickey, Jack; Duhig, Steven J; Shield, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Are eccentric hamstring strength and between-limb imbalance in eccentric strength, measured during the Nordic hamstring exercise, risk factors for hamstring strain injury (HSI)? Elite Australian footballers (n = 210) from five different teams participated. Eccentric hamstring strength during the Nordic exercise was obtained at the commencement and conclusion of preseason training and at the midpoint of the season. Injury history and demographic data were also collected. Reports on prospectively occurring HSI were completed by the team medical staff. Relative risk (RR) was determined for univariate data, and logistic regression was employed for multivariate data. Twenty-eight new HSI were recorded. Eccentric hamstring strength below 256 N at the start of the preseason and 279 N at the end of the preseason increased the risk of future HSI 2.7-fold (RR, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 5.5; P = 0.006) and 4.3-fold (RR, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 11.0; P = 0.002), respectively. Between-limb imbalance in strength of greater than 10% did not increase the risk of future HSI. Univariate analysis did not reveal a significantly greater RR for future HSI in athletes who had sustained a lower limb injury of any kind within the last 12 months. Logistic regression revealed interactions between both athlete age and history of HSI with eccentric hamstring strength, whereby the likelihood of future HSI in older athletes or athletes with a history of HSI was reduced if an athlete had high levels of eccentric strength. Low levels of eccentric hamstring strength increased the risk of future HSI. Interaction effects suggest that the additional risk of future HSI associated with advancing age or previous injury was mitigated by higher levels of eccentric hamstring strength.

  13. Patterns of drinking four weeks prior to an alcohol-related vehicular crash.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Marilyn S; Howe, Steven R; Dyehouse, Janice M; Fleming, Michael; Fargo, Jamison D; Schafer, John C

    2005-06-01

    The primary objective of the study was to determine if drinking patterns on the days immediately prior to an alcohol-related motor vehicle crash (ARMVC) were significantly different than drinking patterns in the weeks prior to the crash. Following ARMVC, 187 hospitalized non-alcohol dependent young-adults (43 females, 144 males) were enrolled. Mean age was 29.03 years, mean blood alcohol level was 165.18 mg/dL, and mean injury severity score was 10.50. When alcohol-free, subjects were interviewed by nurse clinicians to determine the quantity/frequency of alcohol consumption during the 28 days prior to the crash. Subjects reported the number of standard drinks using the Timeline Followback procedure. Total drinks/day were determined, with day 1 considered 4 weeks prior to the crash and day 28 the day of the crash. A random-intercepts general linear mixed model (GLMM) was used to test the effect of several covariates (segment 1 [days 1-26], segment 2 [days 27-28], age, sex, race, holiday/non-holiday period, driver/passenger status, and weekend/weekday crash) on the amount of standard drinks/day. There was no significant interaction among the covariates. The only significant predictors of drinks/day were segment 2 (b = .322, p < .0001) and gender (b = -.221, p = .016). The positive, statistically significant slope for segment 2 indicated an increase in consumption of drinks/day in the two-day period prior to the ARMVC and the negative slope for gender indicated greater consumption of drinks/day for men than women. Persons injured in an ARMVC had a significant increase in alcohol consumption on the day before and the day of vehicular crashes (days 27 and 28) as compared to the first 26 days in the 28-day period preceding the crash. When non-alcohol-dependent subjects are counseled to reduce their risk of traffic crashes, they should be alerted that when their patterns of drinking change, they are at higher risk than usual for a crash.

  14. Injury related risk behavior--a study of Australian skydivers.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Turner, C; Purdie, D M; McClure, R

    2003-06-01

    Risk taking behaviour has been identified as an important host-related determinant of injury in young adults. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationship between the two key elements of risk taking behaviour--ie, risk assessment and risk acceptance--in participants of a high risk sporting activity. Skydivers registered with the Australian Parachute Federation were sampled at several jump meetings held at three 'drop-zones' in North Eastern Australia. A cross sectional survey of 215 skydivers ascertained each subject's risk assessment of each of nine hypothetical sky diving scenes and whether or not they would jump in the described conditions. Variables which independently predicted an individual's risk assessment were age group (p < 0.05). gender (p < 0.05) and scene details (p < 0.001). Risk assessment was found to be a statistically significant predictor of the decision to jump, with a 22% decrease in the odds of jumping with every unit increase in risk assessment (OR = 0.78: 95% CI: 0.76, 0.80). Gender was also found to be a statistically significant predictor of the decision to jump, with males being 19% more likely to jump than females, after controlling for age, experience, currency and risk assessment (OR = 1. 19: 95% CI; 1.04, 1.38). The importance of these results is that, by quantifying the relationship between two key elements of risk taking behaviour and several important host factor determinants, they facilitate more informed discussion about the possible role of risk taking behaviour in the causation of injury.

  15. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and injury risk factors among army recruits in military police training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army military police (MP) training is a 19-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering skills, Army values and lifestyle, and law enforcement skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in MP training. Methods At the start of training, 1,838 male and 553 female MP recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, injury history, and menstrual history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Results Successfully graduating from the course were 94.3% of the men and 83.7% of the women. Experiencing at least one injury during training were 34.2% of the men and 66.7% of the women (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval = 1.79-2.13). Recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had smoked in the past, or had performed less frequent exercise or sports prior to MP training. Men were at higher injury risk if they reported a prior injury and women were at higher risk if they reported missing at least six menstrual cycles in the last year or had previously been pregnant. Conclusion The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during MP training. PMID:23327563

  16. Research Note: Patterns of Alcohol-Related Mortality in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Pridemore, William Alex; Kim, Sang-Weon

    2006-01-01

    The level of alcohol consumption in Russia is among the highest in the world and is often associated with a variety of problems in the country. Until recently, however, it was impossible to examine the health and social burdens associated with consumption in Russia due to Soviet secrecy surrounding vital statistics and health data related to alcohol and other topics. This study employed newly available mortality data to describe the demographic, temporal, and spatial patterns of mortality resulting directly from chronic and acute alcohol consumption in the country. The data reveal that in spite of high overall rates of alcohol-related mortality in Russia, levels of mortality vary considerably along these dimensions. Although descriptive in nature, the patterns of alcohol-related mortality in Russia presented here should provide initial observations with which to generate and test hypotheses concerning the causes and consequences of these patterns. PMID:16900263

  17. Personal strivings, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jeffrey S; Christopher, Michael S; McLaury, Ann E

    2004-06-01

    This study examined relations between personal strivings and alcohol use among college students. Personal strivings are ongoing goals that individuals are characteristically trying to achieve through their behavior. Participants generated lists of personal strivings following standard instructions and then completed an assessment of alcohol use and related problems. Participants returned to complete a follow-up assessment of drinking behavior after 30 days. Personal strivings were coded into content categories by trained raters using a coding manual. Four content categories were examined for this study: achievement, affiliation, health, and self-presentation. A series of t tests revealed that participants endorsing achievement strivings reported less alcohol-related problems and marginally fewer instances of binge drinking during the 30-day follow-up period. In contrast, participants endorsing self-presentation strivings reported more alcohol-related problems during the follow-up period.

  18. Overuse injury and growing bones: the young athlete at risk.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, D F

    1993-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children are becoming involved in competitive sport. International trends in pre-adolescent sports participation are mirrored in New Zealand, where promising young athletes are being exposed to high-intensity training from an earlier age. As a consequence, overuse injuries which were traditionally described in more mature athletes are now becoming recognized in pre-adolescents. The immature musculoskeletal system is less able to cope with repetitive biomechanical stress. Sites of overuse injury reflect the sites of rapid musculoskeletal development. It therefore behoves all medical practitioners, but particularly those in primary care, to be aware of the young athlete at risk. Inherent in the presentation of such musculoskeletal insult there often lurks an over-enthusiastic parent. We are all well reminded of the covert pressures adults may bring to bear upon children. Psychological, as well as physical injury often results. Images p14-a p16-a p16-b PMID:8457805

  19. The role of tourism in alcohol-related highway fatalities.

    PubMed

    Colón, I

    1985-04-01

    Tourism and fatal single motor vehicle accidents, an index of alcohol-related motor accidents, are examined in a cross-sectional analysis of the 50 states of the Union and the District of Columbia. A multiple regression model is employed in which average mileage driven, percent of metropolitan residents, and number of licensed drivers are statistically controlled. Tourism is found to be positively associated with the single motor vehicle fatality rate. Further research and policy implications are discussed.

  20. Rectus femoris muscle injuries in football: a clinically relevant review of mechanisms of injury, risk factors and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Idoate, Fernando; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Quadriceps muscle strains frequently occur in sports that require repetitive kicking and sprinting, and are common in football in its different forms around the world. This paper is a review of aetiology, mechanism of injury and the natural history of rectus femoris injury. Investigating the mechanism and risk factors for rectus femoris muscle injury aims to allow the development of a framework for future initiatives to prevent quadriceps injury in football players.

  1. Alcohol-Related Violence among the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders of the Northern Territory: Prioritizing an Agenda for Prevention-Narrative Review Article.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Ramya; Jayaraj, Rama; Notaras, Leonard; Thomas, Mahiban

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol - related violence among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (also called as "Indigenous") is a major public health concern in Northern Territory of Australia. There is dearth of epidemiological data that link three contributing epidemics: alcohol misuse, violence, and trauma in the Northern Territory. In this review, we aimed to concentrate on how these epidemics intersect among the Indigenous people in the Northern Territory. In our descriptive review, we have searched published papers, publicly available government and health department reports web sites reporting relevant data on these three risk factors in the Northern Territory. The high rate of family and domestic violence and assaults in the Australian Territory indicates an increased correlation with high risk alcohol use compared to unintentional injuries. Heavy drinking pattern and harmful use of alcohol among Indigenous people are more likely to be associated with the incidence of violent assaults and physical injuries in the Northern Territory. We are trying to emphasize our understanding of co-occurring risk factors on the alcohol - violence relationship and urging a need for interventional approaches to reduce the public health issues in the Northern Territory.

  2. Injury risk prediction from computational simulations of ocular blast loading.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Sarah M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2017-04-01

    A predictive Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element eye model was used to analyze 2.27 and 0.45 kg trinitrotoluene equivalent blasts detonated from 24 different locations. Free air and ground level blasts were simulated directly in front of the eye and at lateral offset locations with box, average, less protective, and more protective orbital anthropometries, resulting in 96 simulations. Injury risk curves were developed for hyphema, lens dislocation, retinal damage, and globe rupture from experimental and computational data to compute risk from corneoscleral stress and intra-ocular pressure computational outputs. Corneoscleral stress, intra-ocular pressure, and injury risks increased when the blast size was larger and located nearer to the eye. Risks ranged from 20-100 % for hyphema, 1-100 % for lens dislocation, 2-100 % for retinal damage, and 0-98 % for globe rupture depending on the blast condition. Orbital geometry affected the stresses, pressures, and associated ocular injury risks of the blast conditions simulated. Orbital geometries that more fully surrounded the eye such as the more protective orbit tended to produce higher corneoscleral stresses and compression of the eye against the surrounding rigid orbit contributing to high stresses as the blast wave propagated. However, the more protective orbit tended to produce lower intra-ocular pressures in comparison with the other three orbital geometries which may indicate that the more protective orbit inhibits propagation of the blast wave and reduces ocular loading. Results of this parametric computational study of ocular blast loading are valuable to the design of eye protection equipment and the mitigation of blast-related eye injuries.

  3. Risk factors and mechanisms of knee injury in runners.

    PubMed

    Messier, Stephen P; Legault, Claudine; Schoenlank, Casey R; Newman, Jovita Jolla; Martin, David F; DeVita, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Approximately 36 million Americans participate in running each year, with 10.5 million running at least 100 d x yr(-1). Although running injuries are well understood medically, their potential risk factors are not. Thus, we presently have limited ability to identify individuals at high risk for overuse injuries. This study aimed to identify behavioral and physiological risk factors that influenced potential knee injury mechanisms, including knee joint forces and knee moments. Participants included 20 adults ranging in age from 20 to 55 yr (n = 7 males and n = 13 females). During the first screening visit, quadriceps and hamstring flexibility was assessed, and Q-angle, height, and weight were measured. During the second screening visit, participants completed a series of questionnaires and a gait analysis to calculate knee joint loads. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to measure eccentric and concentric knee extension strength. Body weight (r = 0.48, P = 0.03), weekly mileage (r = 0.62, P = 0.005), and concentric knee extension strength (r=0.68, P = 0.0001) were significantly correlated with tibiofemoral compressive force. Knee extension moment displayed a negative correlation with hamstring flexibility (r = -0.47, P = 0.04). Both weekly mileage (r = 0.50, P = 0.03) and concentric knee extension strength (r = 0.60, P = 0.01) had significant positive correlations with patellofemoral force. The results of this study relate larger knee joint loads to poor hamstring flexibility, greater body weight, greater weekly mileage, and greater muscular strength. Most of these risk factors could potentially be modified to reduce joint loads to lower the risk of injury.

  4. Risk of injury during alpine and telemark skiing and snowboarding. The equipment-specific distance-correlated injury index.

    PubMed

    Rønning, R; Gerner, T; Engebretsen, L

    2000-01-01

    Estimation of injury risk in alpine sports is difficult. We present a new method of calculating an injury index related to the distance traveled on ski or snowboard. The distance-correlated injury index equals the number of injuries per 100,000 km traveled distance. This injury index can also be correlated to the type of equipment used. The equipment-specific distance-correlated injury index is the same as the distance-correlated injury index, but it is sport-specific. We found the distance-correlated injury index for alpine skiing to be 3.9 (95% Cl = 2.8 to 5.4); for snowboarding, 13.5 (95% Cl = 8.3 to 22.0); and for telemark skiing, 3.0 (95% Cl = 1.0 to 9.4), suggesting a three- to four-times higher incidence of injuries requiring hospital treatment among snowboarders than among alpine and telemark skiers.

  5. Increased risk of brain injury in IVF babies.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Bagnoli, F; Tei, M; De Filippo, M; Perrone, S; Buonocore, G

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess brain injury occurrence among in vitro fertilization (IVF) babies. We examined all babies born in our hospital in the triennium 2004-2006, comparing the presence of brain injuries between IVF babies and the rest of the population. In IVF group (180 babies), brain injury was present in 4 babies, while in the rest of population (n=3602) it was present in 23 babies (P=0.042, RR: 3.18). IVF babies have a higher risk of being born with a birthweight less than 2 500 grams (P<0.0001; RR: 5.133). When we considered only babies born with a birth weight less than 2 500 grams, the difference of brain injury between the two groups was not significant. In IVF babies, brain injury occurred more frequently than in the rest of population. This is probably due to a higher rate of premature births and low birth weight in IVF population. Anyway, this data should be disclosed to future parents to make an informed decision.

  6. Motorcycle helmet type and the risk of head injury and neck injury during motorcycle collisions in California.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Taryn; Rice, Thomas; Troszak, Lara; Zhu, Motao

    2016-01-01

    The use of novelty motorcycle helmets is often prompted by beliefs that wearing a standard helmet can contribute to neck injury during traffic collisions. The goal of this analysis was to examine the association between helmet type and neck injury risk and the association between helmet type and head injury. Data were collected during the investigation of motorcycle collisions of any injury severity by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and 83 local law enforcement agencies in California between June 2012 and July 2013. We estimated head injury and neck injury risk ratios from data on 7051 collision-involved motorcyclists using log-binomial regression. Helmet type was strongly associated with head injury occurrence but was not associated with the occurrence of neck injury. Rider age, rider alcohol use, and motorcycle speed were strong, positive predictors of both head and neck injury. Interventions to improve motorcycle helmet choice and to counteract misplaced concerns surrounding neck injury risk are likely to lead to reductions in head injury, brain injury, and death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk of injury to restrained children from passenger air bags.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R; Kallan, Michael; Elliott, Michael; Cornejo, Rebecca A; Arbogast, Kristy B; Winston, Flaura K

    2003-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of children's exposure to passenger air bag (PAB) deployments and to determine the relative risk of both minor and more serious nonfatal injuries to restrained children exposed to PABs in frontal impact collisions. Data were collected from 1 December 1998 to 30 November 2001 from a large-scale, child-specific crash surveillance system based on insurance claims, a telephone survey, and on-site crash investigations. Vehicles qualifying for inclusion were State Farm-insured, model year 1990 or newer, and involved in a crash with at least one child occupant < or =15 years of age. Qualifying crashes were limited to those that occurred in 15 states and the District of Columbia. A stratified cluster sample was designed in order to select vehicles (the unit of sampling) for the conduction of a telephone survey with the driver. For cases in which child occupants were seriously injured or killed, in-depth crash investigations were performed. The prevalence of exposure to PABs was calculated as the number of children occupying the right front seat in a PAB deployment crash among all children occupying the right front seat in vehicles equipped with PABs. Complete interview data were obtained on 9,779 vehicles involving 15,341 children. Among PAB-exposed children, 175 (14%) suffered serious injuries versus 41 (7.5%) of those in the comparison group (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7). The overall risk of any injury (both minor and serious) was 86% among children exposed to PABs, compared to 55% among the comparison group (OR 5.3; 95% CI, 2.1-13.4). Exposure to PABs increased the risk of both minor injuries, including facial and chest abrasions, and more serious injuries, particularly upper extremity fractures.

  8. Anthropometric Injury Risk Factors in Elite-standard Youth Soccer.

    PubMed

    Kemper, G L J; van der Sluis, A; Brink, M S; Visscher, C; Frencken, W G P; Elferink-Gemser, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether an increased risk of injury occurrence can be determined through frequent anthropometric measurements in elite-standard youth soccer players. Over the course of one season, we followed 101 male elite-standard youth soccer players between 11 and 19 years of age. Height and body mass were monitored at monthly measurement intervals and fat percentage was assessed every 3 months by use of the sum of skinfold method. Growth in height (cm), alternations in body mass index (kg/m(2)), fat percentage and fat-free mass index (kg/m(2)) were calculated. Injuries were recorded in accordance with the recommendations of the FIFA Consensus Model for Injury Registration. Odds ratio scores and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using binary logistic regression analyses. The following anthropometric injury risk factors were identified: ≥ 0.6 centimeter growth per month (p=0.03; OR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.06-2.52), ≥ 0.3 kg/m(2) increase of body mass index value per month (p=0.03; OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.04-2.49) and low fat percentage; i. e., < 7% for players aged 11-16 and < 5% for players over 16 years (p=0.01; OR=1.81; 95% CI: 1.18-2.76). Individual monitoring of anthropometrics provides useful information to determine increased risk of injury occurrence in elite-standard youth soccer.

  9. Risk Factors for Knee Injuries in Children 8 to 15 Years: The CHAMPS Study DK.

    PubMed

    Junge, Tina; Runge, Lisbeth; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Knee injuries are frequent in children, with most studies reporting traumatic knee injuries. Evidence of risk factors for knee injuries in children is sparse. The purpose of this study was to report the extent of traumatic and overuse knee injuries in children and to evaluate intrinsic and extrinsic factors for risk of these injuries. Weekly musculoskeletal pain, sport participation, and sports type were reported by 1326 school children (8-15 yr). Knee injuries were classified as traumatic or overuse. Multinomial logistic regression was used for analyses. During the study period, 952 (15% traumatic and 85% overuse) knee injuries were diagnosed. Period prevalence for traumatic and overuse knee injuries were 0.8/1000 and 5.4/1000 sport participations, respectively. Participation in tumbling gymnastics was a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries (OR, 2.14). For overuse knee injuries, intrinsic risk factors were sex (girls OR, 1.38) and previous knee injury (OR, 1.78), whereas participation in soccer (OR, 1.64), handball (OR, 1.95), basket (OR, 2.07), rhythmic (OR, 1.98), and tumbling gymnastics (OR, 1.74) were additional risk factors. For both injury types, sport participation above two times per week increased odds (OR, 1.46-2.40). Overuse knee injuries were the most frequent injury type. For traumatic knee injuries, participation in tumbling gymnastics was a risk factor. Risk factors for overuse knee injuries were being a girl; previous knee injury; and participation in soccer, handball, basket, and rhythmic and tumbling gymnastics. Further risk factors for both types of injury were participation in sports above two times per week. Although growth-related overuse knee injuries are a self-limiting condition, a major part of children are affected by these injuries with unknown short- and long-term consequences.

  10. Can child injury prevention include healthy risk promotion?

    PubMed

    Brussoni, Mariana; Brunelle, Sara; Pike, Ian; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Herrington, Susan; Turner, Heather; Belair, Scott; Logan, Louise; Fuselli, Pamela; Ball, David J

    2015-10-01

    To reflect on the role of risk-taking and risky play in child development and consider recommendations for the injury prevention field, a symposium was held prior to the November 2013 Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference. Delegates heard from Canadian and international researchers, practitioners and play safety experts on child development, play space design and playground safety, provision of recreation, and legal and societal perceptions of risk and hazard. The presenters provided multidisciplinary evidence and perspectives indicating the potential negative effect on children's development of approaches to injury prevention that prioritise safety and limit children's opportunities for risky play. Delegates considered the state of the field of injury prevention and whether alternative approaches were warranted. Each presenter prepared a discussion paper to provide the opportunity for dialogue beyond attendees at the symposium. The resulting discussion papers provide a unique opportunity to consider and learn from multiple perspectives in order to develop a path forward. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. The Adolescent Athlete: A Developmental Approach to Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    McKay, Damien; Broderick, Carolyn; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of long-term athlete development programs and early sport specialization, the training of elite athletes now spans the period of adolescence. Adolescence represents a period of physical, psychosocial and cognitive development, but also a time of physical and psychological vulnerability. Changes in skeletal and physiological attributes coincide with an increased risk of sport related injury. A window of vulnerability is shaped by the properties of the musculoskeletal system, the influence of pubertal hormones and the lag time between physical and cognitive development. This article aims to challenge the assumption of adolescence as a time of increased vigor alone, by highlighting the presence of specific vulnerabilities, and proposing that the hormonal, musculoskeletal, and neurocognitive changes of adolescence may represent intrinsic risk factors for sport related injury.

  12. Self-regulation as a buffer of the relationship between parental alcohol misuse and alcohol-related outcomes in first-year college students.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Matthew R; D'Lima, Gabrielle M; Kelley, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    Alcohol misuse among college students is a large public health concern, thus, it is imperative to identify factors that reduce this risk. One risk factor associated with developing alcohol-related problems is meeting criteria for being an adult child of an alcoholic (ACOA). Conversely, self-regulation has been identified as a protective factor that is inversely associated with drinking-related outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-regulation buffers the risk associated with ACOA status on alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences. In a sample of 195 first-year college students, we found that ACOA status had a unique effect on both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. Self-regulation was unrelated to alcohol use but inversely associated with alcohol-related consequences. Notably, self-regulation moderated the effect of ACOA status on alcohol-related problems (but not alcohol consumption) such that self-regulation was most strongly related to alcohol-related problems among ACOAs. Our results suggest that self-regulation helps explain the resilience of many ACOAs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Snowboarding injuries in Australia: investigating risk factors in wrist fractures to enhance injury prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Tracey J; Terwiel, F Anne

    2011-09-01

    To investigate risk factors associated with wrist fractures in snowboarders to inform future snowsport safety strategies. A prospective case-control study using a nonprobability convenience sample was conducted with data collected via a respondent-completed questionnaire. Subjects consisted of snowboarders with a snowboard-related injury who presented to one of 10 medical centers and physiotherapy clinics in resort medical centers and gateway communities across the Australian snowsport season in 2007. Those presenting with injuries other than wrist fractures acted as the control. The 611 respondents reported 802 injuries (61.3% were males and 51.5% were aged 16-25 years). Protective equipment was worn by 57.0% of respondents. The main reason for not wearing a wrist guard was that they did not see the need; of these, 12.9% experienced a wrist fracture. Most injuries occurred on-piste, in a terrain park, or in a lesson. The main mechanism of injury was falling. The major risk factors for wrist fractures were being less than 16 years of age (OR 3.97, CI 2.54-6.22), being in the alpine area for a holiday (OR 2.77, CI 1.47-5.21), and being a first-day snowboard participant (OR 2.02, CI 1.15-3.64). A direct logistic regression indicated that 3 variables had a statistically significant contribution to the model (being less than 16 years old, being on holidays in the region, and not wearing a wrist guard). The key risk factors in this Australian study reflect other international studies, providing a clear market segment for targeted snowsport safety messages: those less than 16 years old, visitors to the alpine regions, and those not wearing wrist guards. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Caregiver perspectives on unintentional injury risk in children with an autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Cavalari, Rachel N S; Romanczyk, Raymond G

    2012-12-01

    Unintentional injury risk research for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is currently limited. This article presents findings from a two-phase investigation of caregiver perspectives regarding unintentional injury risk in children with an ASD. Results indicate that children with an ASD exhibit elevated rates of risk-taking behaviors compared with peers, which increases the likelihood of more frequent and severe injuries. In addition, although ASD symptom severity positively correlated with risk-taking behavior and frequency of injury, children with an ASD were rarely rated as high risks for injury by caregivers. Implications are discussed in the context of pediatric health service provision.

  15. Therapeutic reversal of chronic alcohol-related steatohepatitis with the ceramide inhibitor myriocin

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ming; Longato, Lisa; Ramirez, Teresa; Zabala, Valerie; Wands, Jack R; Monte, Suzanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is associated with steatohepatitis and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance impairs growth and disrupts lipid metabolism in hepatocytes. Dysregulated lipid metabolism promotes ceramide accumulation and oxidative stress, leading to lipotoxic states that activate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways and worsen inflammation and insulin resistance. In a rat model of chronic alcohol feeding, we characterized the effects of a ceramide inhibitor, myriocin, on the histopathological and ultrastructural features of steatohepatitis, and the biochemical and molecular indices of hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and ER stress. Myriocin reduced the severity of alcohol-related steatohepatitis including the abundance and sizes of lipid droplets and mitochondria, inflammation and architectural disruption of the ER. In addition, myriocin-mediated reductions in hepatic lipid and ceramide levels were associated with constitutive enhancement of insulin signalling through the insulin receptor and IRS-2, reduced hepatic oxidative stress and modulation of ER stress signalling mechanisms. In conclusion, ceramide accumulation in liver mediates tissue injury, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in ALD. Reducing hepatic ceramide levels can help restore the structural and functional integrity of the liver in chronic ALD due to amelioration of insulin resistance and ER stress. However, additional measures are needed to protect the liver from alcohol-induced necroinflammatory responses vis-à-vis continued alcohol abuse. PMID:24456332

  16. Driver Injury Risk Variability in Finite Element Reconstructions of Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) Frontal Motor Vehicle Crashes.

    PubMed

    Gaewsky, James P; Weaver, Ashley A; Koya, Bharath; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    A 3-phase real-world motor vehicle crash (MVC) reconstruction method was developed to analyze injury variability as a function of precrash occupant position for 2 full-frontal Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) cases. Phase I: A finite element (FE) simplified vehicle model (SVM) was developed and tuned to mimic the frontal crash characteristics of the CIREN case vehicle (Camry or Cobalt) using frontal New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) crash test data. Phase II: The Toyota HUman Model for Safety (THUMS) v4.01 was positioned in 120 precrash configurations per case within the SVM. Five occupant positioning variables were varied using a Latin hypercube design of experiments: seat track position, seat back angle, D-ring height, steering column angle, and steering column telescoping position. An additional baseline simulation was performed that aimed to match the precrash occupant position documented in CIREN for each case. Phase III: FE simulations were then performed using kinematic boundary conditions from each vehicle's event data recorder (EDR). HIC15, combined thoracic index (CTI), femur forces, and strain-based injury metrics in the lung and lumbar vertebrae were evaluated to predict injury. Tuning the SVM to specific vehicle models resulted in close matches between simulated and test injury metric data, allowing the tuned SVM to be used in each case reconstruction with EDR-derived boundary conditions. Simulations with the most rearward seats and reclined seat backs had the greatest HIC15, head injury risk, CTI, and chest injury risk. Calculated injury risks for the head, chest, and femur closely correlated to the CIREN occupant injury patterns. CTI in the Camry case yielded a 54% probability of Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 2+ chest injury in the baseline case simulation and ranged from 34 to 88% (mean = 61%) risk in the least and most dangerous occupant positions. The greater than 50% probability was consistent with the case occupant's AIS 2

  17. Alcohol-related harm to others in New Zealand: evidence of the burden and gaps in knowledge.

    PubMed

    Connor, Jennie; Casswell, Sally

    2012-08-24

    To identify and summarise existing New Zealand data quantifying any aspects of harm experienced from the drinking of others. Surveys, research data, and administrative databases were identified through literature searching, examination of websites of relevant agencies, and direct enquiry among those working in research, government agencies and relevant NGOs. Accessible data were analysed, and published or collated data were summarised. The prevalence of self-reported harm from others' drinking was higher than harm from own drinking (18% vs 12% in the past year) and was higher in women and young people. Most available data described aggression and crime, and unintentional injury due to traffic crashes and fires. No useable data were obtained on harm to children. Police records suggested that a third to a half of offences involved someone who had been drinking, and alcohol involvement increased with seriousness. Self-reported violence involved a drinking perpetrator in about half of cases; more likely in stranger violence than family violence, but common in both. About 40% of those injured in alcohol-related traffic crashes were not the drinker responsible, and this represented about one in eight of all traffic injuries. Approximately one in eight unintentional residential fire deaths were innocent victims of alcohol-related fires. The range and magnitude of harms from others' drinking are substantial, but not well described. Shortcomings in the data systems of agencies dealing with people harmed by the drinking of others hamper surveillance, monitoring of effectiveness of interventions and advocacy for policy to reduce alcohol-related harm.

  18. Family characteristics and pedestrian injury risk in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    Celis, A; Gomez, Z; Martinez-Sotomayo..., A; Arcila, L; Villasenor, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Family characteristics have been described as risk factors for child pedestrian and motor vehicle collision. Research results come mainly from developed countries, where family relationships could be different than in developing ones. Objective: To examine family characteristics as risk factors for pedestrian injury in children living in Guadalajara City, Mexico. Methods: Case-control study of injuries among children 1–14 years of age involved in pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions. Cases resulting in death or injuries that required hospitalization or medical attention were included and identified through police reports and/or emergency room registries. Two neighborhood matched controls were selected randomly and compared with cases to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Significant risk factors were: male (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.4), number of siblings in household (two siblings, OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.6; three siblings, OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 11.0; four or more siblings, OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.9), and number of non-siblings/non-parents in household (four or more, OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 26.6). Children of a sole mother, working mother, or grandmother living in house did not show increased risk after adjusting for socioeconomic conditions. Conclusion: Household size has implications for child pedestrian and motor vehicle collision prevention efforts and is relatively easy to identify. Also, the lack of risk association with working mothers may indicate that grandmothers are not part of the social support network that cares for children of working mothers. PMID:12642561

  19. Family characteristics and pedestrian injury risk in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Celis, A; Gomez, Z; Martinez-Sotomayor, A; Arcila, L; Villaseñor, M

    2003-03-01

    Family characteristics have been described as risk factors for child pedestrian and motor vehicle collision. Research results come mainly from developed countries, where family relationships could be different than in developing ones. To examine family characteristics as risk factors for pedestrian injury in children living in Guadalajara City, Mexico. Case-control study of injuries among children 1-14 years of age involved in pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions. Cases resulting in death or injuries that required hospitalization or medical attention were included and identified through police reports and/or emergency room registries. Two neighborhood matched controls were selected randomly and compared with cases to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Significant risk factors were: male (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.4), number of siblings in household (two siblings, OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.6; three siblings, OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 11.0; four or more siblings, OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.9), and number of non-siblings/non-parents in household (four or more, OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 26.6). Children of a sole mother, working mother, or grandmother living in house did not show increased risk after adjusting for socioeconomic conditions. Household size has implications for child pedestrian and motor vehicle collision prevention efforts and is relatively easy to identify. Also, the lack of risk association with working mothers may indicate that grandmothers are not part of the social support network that cares for children of working mothers.

  20. Obstetric anal sphincter injury: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    PubMed

    Dudding, Thomas C; Vaizey, Carolynne J; Kamm, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Obstetric sphincter damage is the most common cause of fecal incontinence in women. This review aimed to survey the literature, and reach a consensus, on its incidence, risk factors, and management. This systematic review identified relevant studies from the following sources: Medline, Cochrane database, cross referencing from identified articles, conference abstracts and proceedings, and guidelines published by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (United Kingdom), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (United Kingdom), and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. A total of 451 articles and abstracts were reviewed. There was a wide variation in the reported incidence of anal sphincter muscle injury from childbirth, with the true incidence likely to be approximately 11% of postpartum women. Risk factors for injury included instrumental delivery, prolonged second stage of labor, birth weight greater than 4 kg, fetal occipitoposterior presentation, and episiotomy. First vaginal delivery, induction of labor, epidural anesthesia, early pushing, and active restraint of the fetal head during delivery may be associated with an increased risk of sphincter trauma. The majority of sphincter tears can be identified clinically by a suitably trained clinician. In those with recognized tears at the time of delivery repair should be performed using long-term absorbable sutures. Patients presenting later with fecal incontinence may be managed successfully using antidiarrheal drugs and biofeedback. In those who fail conservative treatment, and who have a substantial sphincter disruption, elective repair may be attempted. The results of primary and elective repair may deteriorate with time. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an appropriate alternative treatment modality. Obstetric anal sphincter damage, and related fecal incontinence, are common. Risk factors for such trauma are well recognized, and should allow for reduction of injury by proactive

  1. [Risk factors for bladder injuries during cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Alcocer Urueta, Jaime; Bonilla Mares, Marcela; Gorbea Chávez, Viridiana; Velázquez Valassi, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean delivery, to let patients and doctors know them and their importance. We conducted a case-control study of women undergoing cesarean delivery at the Instituto Nacional de PerinatologíaIsidro Espinosa de los Reyes between January 2001 and December 2007. Cases were women with bladder injuries at the time of cesarean section. Two controls per case were selected randomly. Medical records were reviewed for clinical and demographic data to compare them. Twenty-one bladder injuries were identified among 24, 057 cesarean sections, (incidence 0.087%), only 19 were analized. Prior cesarean section was more prevalent among cases than controls (63% vs 42% p 0.134), with an OR of 2.35 (95% CI 0.759-7.319), when we take only patients with one cesarea in contrast with no cesarea the OR is 3.75 (95% CI 1.002- 14.07). Statistically significant differences (P values < .05) between cases and controls were found in gestacional age (38.16 vs 37.35 weeks), prior cesareans (42% vs 18%), adhesions (79% vs 5%), Odds ratio of 67.5 (95% CI 11.14- 408), VBAC (31.5 vs 3%), median skin incisión (16% vs 68%), Pfannenstiel (84% vs 32%), blood loss (744cc vs 509cc) and length of surgery 135 vs 58 minutes). No differences were found among age, BMI, prior surgery, labor, premature rupture of membranes, station, chorioamnioitis, induction, uterine incision, timing of delivery, uterine rupture. Prior cesarean section and adhesions are risk factors for bladder injury at the time of repeat cesarean delivery. Elective cesarean delivery is valid but it is duty of physicians to inform patients the risks of it.

  2. Examining the effect of the injury definition on risk factor analysis in circus artists.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G M; Meeuwisse, W H; Emery, C A; Shrier, I

    2012-06-01

    A secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study was conducted to explore how different definitions of injury affect the results of risk factor analyses. Modern circus artists (n=1281) were followed for 828,547 performances over a period of 49 months (2004-2008). A univariate risk factor analysis (age, sex, nationality, artist role) estimating incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) was conducted using three injury definitions: (1) medical attention injuries, (2) time-loss injuries resulting in ≥1 missed performances (TL-1) and (3) time-loss injuries resulting in >15 missed performances (TL-15). Results of the risk factor analysis were dependent on the injury definition. Sex (females to male; IRR=1.13, 95% CI; 1.02-1.25) and age over 30 (<20 years to >30 years; IRR=1.37, 95% CI; 1.07-1.79) were risk factors for medical attention injuries only. Risk of injury for Europeans compared with North Americans was higher for TL-1 and TL-15 injuries compared with medical attention injuries. Finally, non-sudden load artists (low-impact acts) were less likely than sudden load artists (high-impact acts) to have TL-1 injuries, but the risk of medical attention injuries was similar. The choice of injury definition can have effects on the magnitude and direction of risk factor analyses. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Inappropriate use of infant seating devices increases risks of injury.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Marianne; Maugans, Todd; St-Vil, Dickens; Falcone, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the epidemiology and resulting injuries following falls sustained by infants seated in a variety of seating devices. A retrospective chart review of a cohort of infants less than 12 months old who presented to our institution from 1991 to 2010 after a fall from various seating devices was performed. Two hundred five infants were identified, including 146 patients who were admitted to our institution (1991-2010) and 59 patients who were seen and discharged from the ED (2008-2010). Mean age of admitted infants was younger (3.5 vs. 5.3 months). Two patients (1%) required surgery for a depressed skull fracture. Overall, 18% had an intra-cranial hemorrhage. More patients requiring an admission secondary to their injuries fell from a table or counter (42% vs. 27%). Falls sustained by children seated in a variety of devices are frequent. Failure to restrain children in seating devices or improperly placing them on a table/counter is associated with more significant injuries. In order to minimize such injuries, it is important to educate caregivers of the risk in utilizing such seating devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coprophagia and Entomophagia in a Patient with Alcohol Related Dementia.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João B; Morgado, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Coprophagia and entomophagia are two phenomena not commonly reported in the medical literature and their occurrence is usually associated with mental disorders. We present the case of a 59-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse who was evaluated due to cognitive deterioration and disturbed eating habits including feces and living insects. Organic causes were ruled out and an important cognitive impairment became evident on neuropsychological formal test. The behavior remitted after antipsychotic pharmacologic therapy and alcohol detoxification, leaving the diagnostic impression of alcohol related dementia. This report shows a rare association of these two conditions in a patient with dementia.

  5. Coprophagia and Entomophagia in a Patient with Alcohol Related Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, João B.

    2017-01-01

    Coprophagia and entomophagia are two phenomena not commonly reported in the medical literature and their occurrence is usually associated with mental disorders. We present the case of a 59-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse who was evaluated due to cognitive deterioration and disturbed eating habits including feces and living insects. Organic causes were ruled out and an important cognitive impairment became evident on neuropsychological formal test. The behavior remitted after antipsychotic pharmacologic therapy and alcohol detoxification, leaving the diagnostic impression of alcohol related dementia. This report shows a rare association of these two conditions in a patient with dementia. PMID:28912995

  6. Risk factors for football injuries in young players aged 7 to 12 years.

    PubMed

    Rössler, R; Junge, A; Chomiak, J; Němec, K; Dvorak, J; Lichtenstein, E; Faude, O

    2017-09-18

    Football (soccer) is very popular among children. Little is known about risk factors for football injuries in children. The aim was to analyze potential injury risk factors in 7- to 12-year-old players. We collected prospective data in Switzerland and the Czech Republic over two seasons. Coaches reported exposure of players (in hours), absence, and injury data via an Internet-based registration system. We analyzed time-to-injury data with extended Cox models accounting for correlations on team- and intra-person levels. We analyzed injury risk in relation to age, sex, playing position, preferred foot, and regarding age-independent body height, body mass, and BMI. Further, we analyzed injury risk in relation to playing surface. In total, 6038 player seasons with 395 295 hours of football exposure were recorded and 417 injuries occurred. Injury risk increased by 46% (Hazard Ratio 1.46 [1.35; 1.58]; P < .001) per year of life. Left-footed players had a higher injury risk (Hazard Ratio 1.53 [1.07; 2.19]; P = .02) for training injuries compared to right-footed players. Injury risk was increased in age-adjusted taller players (higher percentile rank). Higher match-training ratios were associated with a lower risk of match injuries. Injury risk was increased on artificial turf (Rate Ratio 1.39 [1.12; 1.73]; P < .001) and lower during indoor sessions (Rate Ratio 0.68 [0.52; 0.88]; P < .001) compared to natural grass. Age is known as a risk factor in older players and was confirmed to be a risk factor in children's football. Playing surface and leg dominance have also been discussed previously as risk factors. Differences in injury risks in relation to sex should be investigated in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury in football players: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Piero; Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Chamari, Karim; Cena, Emanuela; Carimati, Giulia; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The ACL lesion represents one of the most dramatic injuries in a sportsman’s career. There are many injury risk factors related to intrinsic, or non-modifiable, and extrinsic, or modifiable, factors. In literature at today current evidence suggests that ACL injury risk is multifactorial and involves biomechanical, anatomical, hormonal and neuromuscular factors. Purpose To perform a systematic review of the literature concerning the ACL injury risk factors in soccer. Conclusion The injury risk factors show a low level of evidence, further studies in the field are needed. Study design Systematic review. PMID:28217570

  8. Shoulder strength imbalances as injury risk in handball.

    PubMed

    Edouard, P; Degache, F; Oullion, R; Plessis, J-Y; Gleizes-Cervera, S; Calmels, P

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to analyze whether internal (IR) and external (ER) rotator shoulder muscles weakness and/or imbalance collected through a preseason assessment could be predictors of subsequent shoulder injury during a season in handball players. In preseason, 16 female elite handball players (HPG) and 14 healthy female nonathletes (CG) underwent isokinetic IR and ER strength test with use of a Con-Trex® dynamometer in a seated position with 45° shoulder abduction in scapular plane, at 60, 120 and 240°/s in concentric and at 60°/s in eccentric, for both sides. An imbalanced muscular strength profile was determined using -statistically selected cut-offs from CG values. For HPG, all newly incurred shoulder injuries were reported during the season. There were significant differences between HPG and CG only for dominant eccentric IR strength, ER/IR ratio at 240°/s and for IRecc/ERcon ratio. In HPG, IR and ER strength was higher, and ER/IR ratios lower for dominant than for nondominant side. The relative risk was 2.57 (95%CI: 1.60-3.54; P<0.05) if handball players had an imbalanced muscular strength profile. In youth female handball players IR and ER muscle strength increases on the dominant side without ER/IR imbalances; and higher injury risk was associated with imbalanced muscular strength profile.

  9. Risk of injurious road traffic crash after prescription of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Queinec, Raphaëlle; Philip, Pierre; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Delorme, Bernard; Moore, Nicholas; Suissa, Samy; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2012-08-01

    To estimate the risk of road traffic crash associated with prescription of antidepressants. Data were extracted and matched from 3 French national databases: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. A case-control analysis comparing 34,896 responsible versus 37,789 nonresponsible drivers was conducted. Case-crossover analysis was performed to investigate the acute effect of medicine exposure. 72,685 drivers, identified by their national health care number, involved in an injurious crash in France from July 2005 to May 2008 were included. 2,936 drivers (4.0%) were exposed to at least 1 antidepressant on the day of the crash. The results showed a significant association between the risk of being responsible for a crash and prescription of antidepressants (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.22-1.47). The case-crossover analysis showed no association with treatment prescription, but the risk of road traffic crash increased after an initiation of antidepressant treatment (OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24-1.79) and after a change in antidepressant treatment (OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.09-1.60). Patients and prescribers should be warned about the risk of crash during periods of treatment with antidepressant medication and about particularly high vulnerability periods such as those when a treatment is initiated or modified. © Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. "I will take a shot for every 'like' I get on this status": posting alcohol-related Facebook content is linked to drinking outcomes.

    PubMed

    Westgate, Erin C; Neighbors, Clayton; Heppner, Hannes; Jahn, Susanna; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reports of alcohol-related postings on Facebook by oneself or one's Facebook friends were related to common motives for drinking and were uniquely predictive of self-reported alcohol outcomes (alcohol consumption, problems, and cravings). Pacific Northwest undergraduates completed a survey of alcohol outcomes, drinking motives, and alcohol-related Facebook postings. Participants completed the survey online as part of a larger study on alcohol use and cognitive associations. Participants were randomly selected through the university registrar's office and consisted of 1,106 undergraduates (449 men, 654 women, 2 transgender, 1 declined to answer) between the ages of 18 and 25 years (M = 20.40, SD = 1.60) at a large university in the Pacific Northwest. Seven participants were excluded from analyses because of missing or suspect data. Alcohol-related postings on Facebook were significantly correlated with social, enhancement, conformity, and coping motives for drinking (all ps < .001). After drinking motives were controlled for, self-alcohol-related postings independently and positively predicted the number of drinks per week, alcohol-related problems, risk of alcohol use disorders, and alcohol cravings (all ps < .001). In contrast, friends' alcohol-related postings only predicted the risk of alcohol use disorders (p < .05) and marginally predicted alcohol-related problems (p = .07). Posting alcohol-related content on social media platforms such as Facebook is associated with common motivations for drinking and is, in itself, a strong predictive indicator of drinking outcomes independent of drinking motives. Moreover, self-related posting activity appears to be more predictive than Facebook friends' activity. These findings suggest that social media platforms may be a useful target for future preventative and intervention efforts.

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of violence-related and accident-related injuries among state prisoners.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hung-En

    2010-07-01

    This study assessed the prevalence, nature, and risk factors of violence- and accident-related injuries among inmates in state prisons. Data from the 2004 Survey of Inmates in State Correctional Facilities (N = 14,499) were analyzed. More than 32% of inmates reported having been injured since their admission. History of violent offenses, violent victimization, and psychiatric treatment powerfully increased the risk of both types of injuries. Work assignments reduced the risk of violence-related injuries but increased the risk of accident-related injuries. Having received one type of injury raised the risk of the other type of injury. Unlike preexisting health conditions, injury can be proactively and effectively prevented. Coordination of prison services to address risk factors and implementation of prevention strategies can yield important benefits.

  12. University men's ice hockey: rates and risk of injuries over 6-years.

    PubMed

    Rishiraj, N; Lloyd-Smith, R; Lorenz, T; Niven, B; Michel, M

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the injury rates of a Men's Varsity Ice Hockey team over six-years. Data on ice hockey injury rates and profile continue to increase in the hope of assisting with injury prevention. The University of British Columbia Men's Varsity team has been followed prospectively over a six-year period. All student-athletes completed a preseason medical examinations and physiological assessments. The team physician evaluated each injury and the team therapist completed the injury report forms and the attendance records for each player. A total of 46215 player exposures were recorded. The combined injury rate was 3.70 injuries/1000 player game and practice exposures. A statistically significantly higher risk of injury was observed during games and the greatest risk of injury was observed during the second period. Forwards sustained greater percentage of injuries compared to defensemen and goalies. Sprains and strains accounted for 40% of all injuries, followed by concussions (13%). Non-contact injuries were most common, while the anatomy sustaining the most injuries was the head/neck/face region. A high percentage of the recorded injuries required less than seven days to return to full activity. The risk of injury for university ice hockey players is greater during games and is dependant on playing position. Players are prone to sprains and strains, which may not involve any contact. Concussion and knee joint injury rates continue to cause concern.

  13. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Acculturation, Birthplace and Alcohol-Related Social Problems Across Hispanic National Groups.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Raul; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between acculturation, birthplace, and alcohol-related social problems across Hispanic national groups. METHOD: 5,224 Hispanic adults (18+ years) were interviewed using a multistage cluster sample design in Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis shows no association between acculturation and problems among men or women. Birthplace is a risk factor for social problems among both genders. Among men, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and South/Central Americans are more likely to report social problems than Cuban Americans. Other risk factors for men are unemployment, a higher volume of drinking, and a higher frequency of binge drinking. Among women, Mexican American origin and binge drinking are also risk factors for reporting problems. CONCLUSIONS: U.S.-born Hispanics may experience stress and other detrimental effects to health because of their minority status, which may increase the likelihood of more drinking and the development of alcohol-related problems.

  14. Race and the risk of fatal injury at work.

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, D; Richardson, D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:This study examined employment patterns of African-American and White workers and rates of unintentional fatal injuries, METHODS: Medical examiner and census data were used to compare occupational fatality rates for African Americans and Whites in North Carolina and to adjust for racial differences in employment patterns. RESULTS: African Americans' occupational fatality rate was higher by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5. Differences in employment structure appear to explain much of this disparity. However, the fatality rate for African-American men would have been elevated even if they had had the same employment patterns as White men. CONCLUSIONS: inequalities in access to the labor market, unequal distribution of risk within jobs, and explicit discrimination are all potential explanations for racial disparities in occupational injury mortality. These conditions can be addressed through a combination of social and workplace interventions, including efforts to improve conditions for the most disadvantaged workers. PMID:9584031

  15. Rate and Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Among Sportswomen in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Vauhnik, Renata; Morrissey, Matthew C.; Rutherford, Olga M.; Turk, Zmago; Pilih, Iztok A.; Perme, Maja Pohar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injury rate is greater among female athletes than among male athletes. Objective: To investigate the rate and risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen playing professional basketball, team handball, or volleyball. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: The Slovenian National Organizations of basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Patients or Other Participants: During the 2003–2004 season, we prospectively followed 585 Slovenian sportswomen registered in the Slovenian National Organizations of basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Main Outcome Measure(s): We asked sportswomen and coaches to document the occurrence of every significant traumatic knee injury requiring medical attention. Injury rate and injury risk were calculated for sportswomen in each sport group. To calculate injury rate, we estimated the average exposure of each sportswoman during the research period. Results: During the 2003–2004 season, 585 Slovenian sportswomen sustained 12 ACL injuries. The ACL-injury risk was different in athletes participating in the various sports, with basketball players having the greatest ACL-injury risk and volleyball players having the lowest ACL-injury risk (P  =  .04). The risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen was 2.1 per 100 athletes (95% confidence interval  =  0.9, 3.2), whereas the rate of ACL injury was 0.037 per 1000 exposure hours (95% confidence interval  =  0.016, 0.06). Conclusions: Overall differences in injury risk were found among sports, but no differences were noted among divisions within sports. No differences for injury rate were observed between or within sports. The rate and risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen are high, with basketball players having the greatest ACL-injury risk. PMID:21214356

  16. Exposure to traffic and risk of hospitalization due to injuries.

    PubMed

    Segui-Gomez, Maria; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Guillen-Grima, Francisco; Smyth, Ernesto; Llorca, Javier; de Irala, Jokin

    2011-03-01

    Research on the risk of motor vehicle injuries and their relationship with the amount of travel has been only partially analyzed. The few individual exposure assessments are related to very specific subsets of the driving and traveling populations. This study analyzes the relationship between kilometers traveled and hospitalization due to motor vehicle injuries. Twelve thousand three hundred and sixty nine Spanish university graduates from the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra multipurpose cohort study were evaluated. They had not been hospitalized due to motor vehicle injuries at baseline and were followed up to eight years. Biannual questionnaires allowed for self-reporting of kilometers traveled in motor vehicles, together with incidence of hospitalization. Covariates in the Cox regression models included age and gender and baseline use of safety belt while driving, driving a vehicle with driver-side airbag, driving a motorcycle, and drinking and driving. There were 49,766 participant-years with an average yearly travel of 7,828 km per person-year. Thirty-six subjects reported a first hospitalization event during this time. The adjusted hazard ratio per additional kilometer traveled was 1.00005 (95% confidence interval 1.000013 to 1.000086). Even the smallest of reductions in the amount of kilometers traveled (from an average of 3,250 km per year to 1,000) has a statistically significant protective effect on the likelihood of sustaining hospitalization due to motor vehicle injury (aHR 0.9, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.98). In light of current policies aimed to reduce motorized traffic due to environmental concerns, it may be appropriate to consider the additional health benefit related to reductions in injuries.

  17. A Longitudinal Examination of the Associations between Shyness, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Alcohol-related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Young, Chelsie M.; DiBello, Angelo M.; Traylor, Zachary K.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study evaluated the roles of drinking motives and shyness in predicting problem alcohol use over two years. Methods First-year college student drinkers (N=818) completed assessments of alcohol use and related problems, shyness, and drinking motives every six months over a two year period. Results Generalized linear mixed models indicated that shyness was associated with less drinking, but more alcohol-related problems. Further, shyness was associated with coping, conformity, and enhancement drinking motives, but was not associated with social drinking motives. However, when examining coping motives, moderation analyses revealed that social drinking motives were more strongly associated with coping motives among individuals higher in shyness. In addition, coping, conformity, and enhancement motives, but not social motives, mediated associations between shyness and alcohol-related problems over time. Finally, coping motives mediated the association between the interaction of shyness and social motives and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that shy individuals may drink to reduce negative affect, increase positive affect, and fit in with others in social situations, which may then contribute to greater risk for subsequent alcohol-related problems. PMID:26207856

  18. A Longitudinal Examination of the Associations Between Shyness, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Alcohol-Related Problems.

    PubMed

    Young, Chelsie M; DiBello, Angelo M; Traylor, Zachary K; Zvolensky, Michael J; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-09-01

    The current study evaluated the roles of drinking motives and shyness in predicting problem alcohol use over 2 years. First-year college student drinkers (n = 818) completed assessments of alcohol use and related problems, shyness, and drinking motives every 6 months over a 2-year period. Generalized linear mixed models indicated that shyness was associated with less drinking, but more alcohol-related problems. Further, shyness was associated with coping, conformity, and enhancement drinking motives, but was not associated with social drinking motives. However, when examining coping motives, moderation analyses revealed that social drinking motives were more strongly associated with coping motives among individuals higher in shyness. In addition, coping, conformity, and enhancement motives, but not social motives, mediated associations between shyness and alcohol-related problems over time. Finally, coping motives mediated the association between the interaction of shyness and social motives and alcohol-related problems. Together, the results suggest that shy individuals may drink to reduce negative affect, increase positive affect, and fit in with others in social situations, which may then contribute to greater risk for subsequent alcohol-related problems. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal injuries in Australian thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C J; Reid, S W; Hodgson, D R; Suann, C J; Rose, R J

    1997-09-01

    Risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in racing Thoroughbreds were investigated in a case-control study conducted at racetracks administered by the Australian Jockey Club. Univariable analysis of 137 cases from the official Veterinary Surgeon's reports and an equal number of randomly selected controls from the Australian Race Results identified field size, barrier position and class of race as being significantly associated with breakdown (P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression was then used to investigate the effect of each putative risk factor whilst controlling for all others. Horses at greater risk were older, started from a wider barrier position, ran at the same distance as their previous race and raced in the highest class of race. There was no significant difference between tracks or significant association with track condition. The incidence of fatalities in the study population was less than that reported in the UK and USA.

  20. Head injuries and the risk of concurrent cervical spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Thesleff, Tuomo; Kataja, Anneli; Öhman, Juha; Luoto, Teemu M

    2017-05-01

    Cervical spine injuries of variable severity are common among patients with an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesised that TBI patients with positive head computed tomography (CT) scans would have a significantly higher risk of having an associated cervical spine fracture compared to patients with negative head CT scans. This widely generalisable retrospective sample was derived from 3,023 consecutive patients, who, due to an acute head injury (HI), underwent head CT at the Emergency Department of Tampere University Hospital (August 2010-July 2012). Medical records were reviewed to identify the individuals whose cervical spine was CT-imaged within 1 week after primary head CT due to a clinical suspicion of a cervical spine injury (CSI) (n = 1,091). Of the whole cranio-cervically CT-imaged sample (n = 1,091), 24.7% (n = 269) had an acute CT-positive TBI. Car accidents 22.4% (n = 244) and falls 47.8% (n = 521) were the most frequent injury mechanisms. On cervical CT, any type of fracture was found in 6.6% (n = 72) and dislocation and/or subluxation in 2.8% (n = 31) of the patients. The patients with acute traumatic intracranial lesions had significantly (p = 0.04; OR = 1.689) more cervical spine fractures (9.3%, n = 25) compared to head CT-negative patients (5.7%, n = 47). On an individual cervical column level, head CT positivity was especially related to C6 fractures (p = 0.031, OR = 2.769). Patients with cervical spine fractures (n = 72) had altogether 101 fractured vertebrae, which were most often C2 (22.8, n = 23), C7 (19.8%, n = 20) and C6 (16.8%, n = 17). Head trauma patients with acute intracranial lesions on CT have a higher risk for cervical spine fractures in comparison to patients with a CT-negative head injury. Although statistically significant, the difference in fracture rate was small. However, based on these results, we suggest that cervical spine fractures should be

  1. Clinical and pathological features of alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Natalie M; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Harper, Clive G

    2011-05-01

    One of the sequelae of chronic alcohol abuse is malnutrition. Importantly, a deficiency in thiamine (vitamin B(1)) can result in the acute, potentially reversible neurological disorder Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). When WE is recognized, thiamine treatment can elicit a rapid clinical recovery. If WE is left untreated, however, patients can develop Korsakoff syndrome (KS), a severe neurological disorder characterized by anterograde amnesia. Alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) describes the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on human brain structure and function in the absence of more discrete and well-characterized neurological concomitants of alcoholism such as WE and KS. Through knowledge of both the well-described changes in brain structure and function that are evident in alcohol-related disorders such as WE and KS and the clinical outcomes associated with these changes, researchers have begun to gain a better understanding of ARBD. This Review examines ARBD from the perspective of WE and KS, exploring the clinical presentations, postmortem brain pathology, in vivo MRI findings and potential molecular mechanisms associated with these conditions. An awareness of the consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on human behavior and brain structure can enable clinicians to improve detection and treatment of ARBD.

  2. Alcohol-related aggression-social and neurobiological factors.

    PubMed

    Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Alcohol-related aggression and violence are a widespread cause of personal suffering with high socioeconomic costs. In 2011, nearly one in three violent acts in Germany was committed under the influence of alcohol (31.8%). The link between alcohol consumption and aggression is promoted by various interacting factors. In this review, based on a selective search for pertinent literature in PubMed, we analyze and summarize information from original articles, reviews, and book chapters about alcohol and aggression and discuss the neurobiological basis of aggressive behavior. Aggression is promoted both by the cognitive deficits arising in connection with acute or chronic alcohol use and by prior experience of violence in particular situations where alcohol was drunk. Only a minority of persons who drink alcohol become aggressive. On the other hand, alcohol abuse and dependence together constitute the second most commonly diagnosed cause of suicide (15-43%). Current research indicates that the individual tendency toward alcohol-induced aggression depends not just on neurobiological factors, but also on personal expectations of the effects of alcohol, on prior experience of violent conflicts, and on the environmental conditions of early childhood, especially social exclusion and discrimination. Gene-environment interactions affecting the serotonergic and other neurotransmitter systems play an important role. Potential (but not yet adequately validated) therapeutic approaches involve reinforcing cognitive processes or pharmacologically modulating serotonergic neurotransmission (and other target processes). Alcohol-related aggression has manifold social and neurobiological causes. Specific treatments must be tested in controlled trials.

  3. Risk of Acute Kidney Injury After Intravenous Contrast Media Administration.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Jeremiah S; Ehmann, Michael R; Fine, Derek M; Fishman, Elliot K; Toerper, Matthew F; Rothman, Richard E; Klein, Eili Y

    2017-05-01

    The study objective was to determine whether intravenous contrast administration for computed tomography (CT) is independently associated with increased risk for acute kidney injury and adverse clinical outcomes. This single-center retrospective cohort analysis was performed in a large, urban, academic emergency department with an average census of 62,179 visits per year; 17,934 ED visits for patients who underwent contrast-enhanced, unenhanced, or no CT during a 5-year period (2009 to 2014) were included. The intervention was CT scan with or without intravenous contrast administration. The primary outcome was incidence of acute kidney injury. Secondary outcomes included new chronic kidney disease, dialysis, and renal transplantation at 6 months. Logistic regression modeling and between-groups odds ratios with and without propensity-score matching were used to test for an independent association between contrast administration and primary and secondary outcomes. Treatment decisions, including administration of contrast and intravenous fluids, were examined. Rates of acute kidney injury were similar among all groups. Contrast administration was not associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury (contrast-induced nephropathy criteria odds ratio=0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.08; and Acute Kidney Injury Network/Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria odds ratio=1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 1.16). This was true in all subgroup analyses regardless of baseline renal function and whether comparisons were made directly or after propensity matching. Contrast administration was not associated with increased incidence of chronic kidney disease, dialysis, or renal transplant at 6 months. Clinicians were less likely to prescribe contrast to patients with decreased renal function and more likely to prescribe intravenous fluids if contrast was administered. In the largest well-controlled study of acute kidney injury following contrast

  4. Help-seeking for alcohol-related problems in college students: correlates and preferred resources.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Joanna; Murphy, James G; Martens, Matthew P; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Dennhardt, Ashley A; Skidmore, Jessica R

    2010-12-01

    Despite the development of a variety of efficacious alcohol intervention approaches for college students, few student drinkers seek help. The present study assessed students' history of help-seeking for alcohol problems, as well as their estimates of how likely they would be to use various help-seeking resources, should they wish to change their drinking. Participants were 197 college students who reported recent heavy drinking (46% male, 68.5% White, 27.4% African-American). Participants completed measures related to their drinking and their use (both past use and likelihood of future use) of 14 different alcohol help-seeking options. Repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed that students preferred informal help-seeking (e.g., talking to friends and family) over formal (e.g., talking with a counselor or medical provider) and anonymous resources (e.g., internet- or computer-based programs). Higher self-ideal discrepancy, greater depressive symptoms, and more alcohol-related consequences were positively associated with actual past help-seeking. Alcohol-related problems and normative discrepancy were negatively associated with hypothetical likelihood of utilizing all three help-seeking resources. These results suggest that heavy drinking college students prefer low-threshold intervention options including peer, family, computerized, and brief motivational interventions. Only 36 participants (18.3% of the sample) reported that they had utilized any of the help-seeking options queried, suggesting that campus prevention efforts should include both promoting low-threshold interventions and attempting to increase the salience of alcohol-related risk and the potential utility of changing drinking patterns. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Help-Seeking for Alcohol-Related Problems in College Students: Correlates and Preferred Resources

    PubMed Central

    Buscemi, Joanna; Murphy, James G.; Martens, Matthew P.; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Pederson, Ashley A.; Skidmore, Jessica R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of a variety of efficacious alcohol intervention approaches for college students, few student drinkers seek help. The present study assessed students’ history of help-seeking for alcohol problems as well as their estimates of how likely they would be to use various help-seeking resources, should they wish to change their drinking. Participants were 197 college students who reported recent heavy drinking (46% male, 68.5% White, 27.4% African-American). Participants completed measures related to their drinking and their use (both past use and likelihood of future use) of 14 different alcohol help-seeking options. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that students preferred informal help-seeking (e.g., talking to friends and family) over formal (e.g., talking with a counselor or medical provider) and anonymous resources (e.g., internet- or computer-based programs). Higher self-ideal discrepancy, greater depressive symptoms, and more alcohol-related consequences were positively associated with actual past help-seeking. Alcohol-related problems and normative discrepancy were negatively associated with hypothetical likelihood of utilizing all three help-seeking resources. These results suggest that heavy drinking college students prefer low-threshold intervention options including peer, family, computerized, and brief motivational interventions. Only 36 participants (18.3% of the sample) reported that they had utilized any of the help-seeking options queried, suggesting that campus prevention efforts should include both promoting low-threshold interventions and attempting to increase the salience of alcohol-related risk and the potential utility of changing drinking patterns. PMID:21198220

  6. Injury risk and severity in a sample of Maryland residents with serious mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma Elizabeth; Baker, Susan; Steinwachs, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Adults with serious mental illness experience premature mortality and heightened risk for medical disease, but little is known about the burden of injuries in this population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 6234 Maryland Medicaid recipients with serious mental illness from 1994–2001. Injuries were classified using the Barell Matrix. Relative risks were calculated to compare injury rates among the study cohort with injury rates in the United States population. Cox proportional hazards modeling with time dependent covariates was used to assess factors related to risk of injury and injury-related death. Forty-three percent of the Maryland Medicaid cohort had any injury diagnosis. Of the 7298 injuries incurred, the most common categories were systemic injuries due to poisoning (10.4%), open wounds to the head/face (8.9%), and superficial injuries, fractures, and sprains of the extremities (8.6%, 8.5%, and 8.4%, respectively). Injury incidence was 80% higher and risk for fatal injury was more than four and a half times higher among the cohort with serious mental illness compared to the general population. Alcohol and drug abuse were associated with both risk of injury and risk of injury-related death with hazard ratios of 1.87 and 4.76 at the P<.05 significance level, respectively. The superficial, minor nature of the majority of injuries is consistent with acts of minor victimization and violence or falls. High risk of fatal and non-fatal injury among this group indicates need for increased injury prevention efforts targeting persons with serious mental illness and their caregivers. PMID:22661205

  7. A case-crossover study of risk factors for occupational eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Justin; Levitan, Emily B; MacLennan, Paul A; Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    To study transient risk factors for occupational eye injuries. A case-crossover study was conducted among patients treated for occupational eye injuries in the emergency department at an eye hospital in Alabama. A questionnaire was administered to collect information regarding risk factors at the time of and prior to eye treatment. Incidence rate ratios were used to measure the relationship between each risk factor and injury occurrence. Protective eyewear reduced the risk of occupational eye injury, while increased risk was observed for the following: being distracted, use of tools, tool malfunction, performing an unfamiliar task, being rushed, working overtime, and feeling fatigued. Although use of protective eyewear can significantly reduce the risk of an eye injury, other factors are important contributors. Identification of potentially modifiable transient risk factors can be used to prevent occupational eye injuries.

  8. Influence of Injury Risk Thresholds on the Performance of an Algorithm to Predict Crashes with Serious Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bahouth, George; Digges, Kennerly; Schulman, Carl

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents methods to estimate crash injury risk based on crash characteristics captured by some passenger vehicles equipped with Advanced Automatic Crash Notification technology. The resulting injury risk estimates could be used within an algorithm to optimize rescue care. Regression analysis was applied to the National Automotive Sampling System / Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS) to determine how variations in a specific injury risk threshold would influence the accuracy of predicting crashes with serious injuries. The recommended thresholds for classifying crashes with severe injuries are 0.10 for frontal crashes and 0.05 for side crashes. The regression analysis of NASS/CDS indicates that these thresholds will provide sensitivity above 0.67 while maintaining a positive predictive value in the range of 0.20. PMID:23169132

  9. Rock climbing injury rates and associated risk factors in a general climbing population.

    PubMed

    Backe, S; Ericson, L; Janson, S; Timpka, T

    2009-12-01

    The objective was to examine injury rates and associated risk factors in a representative sample of climbers. A random sample (n=606) of the Swedish Climbing Association members was sent a postal survey, with an effective response rate of 63%. Self-reported data regarding climbing history, safety practices and retrospective accounts of injury events (recall period 1.5 years) were obtained. Descriptive statistical methods were used to calculate injury incidences, and a two-step method including zero-inflated Poisson's regression analysis of re-injuries was used to determine the combination of risk factors that best explained individual injury rates. Overall, 4.2 injuries per 1000 climbing hours were reported, overuse injuries accounting for 93% of all injuries. Inflammatory tissue damages to fingers and wrists were the most common injury types. The multivariate analysis showed that overweight and practicing bouldering generally implied an increased primary injury risk, while there was a higher re-injury risk among male climbers and a lower risk among the older climbers. The high percentage of overuse injuries implies that climbing hours and loads should be gradually and systematically increased, and climbers regularly controlled for signs and symptoms of overuse. Further study of the association between body mass index and climbing injury is warranted.

  10. Injury risk factors in junior tennis players: a prospective 2-year study.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, N; Werner, S; Renstrom, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim was to investigate injury risk factors in junior tennis players. Fifty-five players, 35 boys and 20 girls, answered a questionnaire about training habits, time of exposure, previous injuries and equipment factors. A battery of clinical tests and functional performance tests were also carried out. All tennis-related injuries that occurred during a 2-year period were identified and recorded. An injury was defined as an injury if it was impossible to participate in regular tennis training or playing matches during at least one occasion, a time loss injury. Potential injury risk factors were tested in a forward stepwise logistic regression model for injury. Thirty-nine players sustained totally 100 new and recurrent injuries. Injuries to the lower extremity were the most common ones (51%) followed by the upper extremity (24%) and the trunk (24%). Injured players performed more singles per week (P<0.0001) and played more tennis hours per year (P=0.016) than the uninjured players. Playing tennis more than 6 h/week was found to be a risk factor for back pain. A previous injury regardless of location was identified as an injury risk factor, and a previous injury to the back was a risk factor for back pain.

  11. Cricket fast bowling workload patterns as risk factors for tendon, muscle, bone and joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Orchard, John W; Blanch, Peter; Paoloni, Justin; Kountouris, Alex; Sims, Kevin; Orchard, Jessica J; Brukner, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To assess workload-related risk factors for injuries to particular tissue types in cricket fast bowlers. 235 fast bowlers who bowled in 14600 player innings over a period of 15 years were followed in a prospective cohort risk factor study to compare overs bowled in each match (including preceding workload patterns) and injury risk in the 3-4 weeks subsequent to the match. Injuries were categorised according to the affected tissue type as either: bone stress, tendon injuries, muscle strain or joint injuries. Workload risk factors were examined using binomial logistic regression multivariate analysis, with a forward stepwise procedure requiring a significance of <0.05. High acute match workload and high previous season workload were risk factors for tendon injuries, but high medium term (3-month workload) was protective. For bone stress injuries, high medium term workload and low career workload were risk factors. For joint injuries, high previous season and career workload were risk factors. There was little relationship between muscle injury and workload although high previous season workload was slightly protective. The level of injury risk for some tissue types varies in response to preceding fast bowling workload, with tendon injuries most affected by workload patterns. Workload planning may need to be individualised, depending on individual susceptibility to various injury types. This study supports the theory that tendons are at lowest risk with consistent workloads and susceptible to injury with sudden upgrades in workload. Gradual upgrades are recommended, particularly at the start of a bowler's career to reduce the risk of bone stress injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. The prognostic value of MRI in determining reinjury risk following acute hamstring injury: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Heumen, Moniek; Tol, Johannes L; de Vos, Robert-Jan; Moen, Maarten H; Weir, Adam; Orchard, John; Reurink, Gustaaf

    2017-09-01

    A challenge for sports physicians is to estimate the risk of a hamstring re-injury, but the current evidence for MRI variables as a risk factor is unknown. To systematically review the literature on the prognostic value of MRI findings at index injury and/or return to play for acute hamstring re-injuries. Databases of PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Google Scholar, Web of Science, LILACS, SciELO, ScienceDirect, ProQuest, SPORTDiscus and Cochrane Library were searched until 20 June 2016. Studies evaluating MRI as a prognostic tool for determining the risk of re-injury for athletes with acute hamstring injuries were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently screened the search results and assessed risk of bias using standardised criteria from a consensus statement. A best-evidence synthesis was used to identify the level of evidence. Post hoc analysis included correction for insufficient sample size. Of the 11 studies included, 7 had a low and 4 had a high risk of bias. No strong evidence for any MRI finding as a risk factor for hamstring re-injury was found. There was moderate evidence that intratendinous injuries were associated with increased re-injury risk. Post hoc analysis showed moderate evidence that injury to the biceps femoris was a moderate to strong risk factor for re-injury. There is currently no strong evidence for any MRI finding in predicting hamstring re-injury risk. Intratendinous injuries and biceps femoris injuries showed moderate evidence for association with a higher re-injury risk. Registration in the PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews was performed prior to study initiation (registration number CRD42015024620). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. [What are the physician's role and responsibility in the law named "Basic Act on Measures against Alcohol-related Health Harm"?].

    PubMed

    Io, Aro; Yoshimoto, Hisashi

    2015-09-01

    Japan passed the national law "Basic Act on Measures against Alcohol-related Health Harm" on December 2013. This law is expected to prevent inappropriate drinking that leads to alcohol-related problems such as physical and mental disorder, drunk driving, suicide, domestic violence, child abuse, and poor work performance. The physician's responsibilities under this law are described as follows: i) to provide high quality and appropriate medical care concerning alcohol-related health harm; ii) to reduce or eliminate the consumption of alcohol, thus preventing the progression of alcohol-related health harm; and iii) to coordinate these efforts amongst medical institutions. Based on this law, we believe that Japanese physicians will have essential roles in achieving the goals of this law and that we can fulfill our responsibilities by observing the following aspects: a) changing our message to the patients from "drink sensibly and moderately" to "low-risk drinking; but any drinking has a risk of harm and low-risk drinking is not risk-free"; b) encouraging the spread and use of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT); and c) establishing community healthcare systems for alcohol-related problems, including dementia in the elderly and during alcohol emergencies.

  14. Evaluation of drinking patterns and their impact on alcohol-related aggression: a national survey of adolescent behaviours

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    , can: 1) explain drinking habits better than commonly used indicators of alcohol use and 2) provide a better understanding of behavioural risks such as alcohol-related aggression. Environmental background also appears to strongly associate with this type of aggressive behaviour. PMID:24112134

  15. The Angel and the Devil on Your Shoulder: Friends Mitigate and Exacerbate 21st Birthday Alcohol-Related Consequences.

    PubMed

    Fillo, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Lindsey M; Anthenien, Amber M; Neighbors, Clayton; Lee, Christine M

    2017-09-18

    Twenty-first birthdays are associated with heavier drinking and more negative consequences than any other high-risk drinking event. Friends are the strongest social influence on young adult drinking; however, previous research on college students' drinking has often only examined individuals' perceptions of "friends" generally. Unfortunately, this may obscure the positive influence of some friends and the negative influence of others. Using data drawn from a larger intervention study aimed at reducing 21st birthday drinking, this research examined how specific friends (N = 166) who were present at 21st birthday celebrations may have exacerbated or mitigated celebrants' (N = 166) experience of alcohol-related consequences, as well as how characteristics of that friendship moderate these effects. Controlling for sex, alcohol consumption, and friend prointoxication intentions for the celebrants' 21st birthday drinking, higher friend prosafety/support intentions predicted the celebrants experiencing fewer alcohol-related consequences. Higher prosafety/support intentions also buffered participants from the negative influence of friend prointoxication intentions. Furthermore, the closeness of the friendship moderated this effect. At high levels of closeness, having a friend with lower prosafety/support intentions was associated with more alcohol-related consequences for the celebrant. Post hoc analyses revealed that this effect may have been driven by discrepancies between celebrants' and friends' reports of friendship closeness; celebrants' perception of closeness that was higher than the friends' perception was associated with the celebrant experiencing more alcohol-related consequences. Results demonstrate the ways that specific friends can both mitigate and exacerbate 21st birthday alcohol-related consequences. The implications of the present findings for incorporating specific friends into drinking-related interventions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c

  16. The association between multidimensional feminine norms, binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among young adult college women.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Corbin, William; Takamatsu, Stephanie; Castellanos, Jeanett

    2017-08-24

    Alcohol consumption among women has steadily increased over the past 30years, and women's drinking behavior is now similar to that of men's. The escalation of alcohol use among women highlights the critical need to examine gender issues and motivational factors that contribute to binge drinking and related problems within this population. Feminine norms or the socially constructed beliefs, messages and attitudes about what it means to be a woman may contribute to within-group differences in drinking patterns among women. The current study examined the relationship between multidimensional feminine norms and binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among 1910 college women. Participants completed a self-report measure of binge drinking, alcohol-related problems, conformity to feminine norms, alcohol expectancies and descriptive norms. Controlling for the covariates descriptive norms, positive alcohol expectancies, and sorority membership, adherence to feminine norms related to sexual fidelity and belief that one needs to be sweet and nice were negatively associated to binge drinking, while adhering to investment in appearance was positively associated to binge drinking and alcohol-related problems. Distinct feminine norms also had a significant indirect effect on alcohol-related problems through binge drinking. This study significant contributes to the literature by elucidating the theoretically gender-relevant risk and protective aspects of feminine norms in relation to binge drinking and related problems, and provides important information that might be used in clinical and prevention efforts to reduce alcohol-related harm among a vulnerable group: college women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Does employee resistance during a robbery increase the risk of customer injury?

    PubMed

    Yau, Rebecca K; Casteel, Carri; Nocera, Maryalice; Bishop, Stephanie F; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2015-04-01

    Retail business robberies can lead to employee and customer injury. Previous work demonstrates that employee resistance increases employee injury risk; limited research has investigated customer injuries. This study examines associations between employee resistance against perpetrators and the risk of customer injury. Retail and service robbery reports were obtained from a metropolitan police department. Generalized estimating equations estimated risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Customers were injured in 75 out of 697 robberies. Employees resisted the perpetrator in 32 out of 697 robberies. Customers had higher injury risk when employees resisted the perpetrator, compared with robberies where employees did not resist (adjusted risk ratio [95% CI], 2.6 [1.5 to 4.5]). Employee resistance against a perpetrator during a robbery increased customer injury risk. Businesses can train employees to not resist during a robbery, providing benefits for both customers and the business itself.

  18. [Multicentre study on risk factors of injuries in car crashes].

    PubMed

    Panzino, F; Pizà Oliveras, A; Pociello Almiñana, N; García García, J J; Luaces Cubells, C; Pou Fernández, J

    2009-07-01

    Traffic accidents are the main cause of death in children between 2 and 14 years in developed countries. We analysed their clinical repercussions, epidemiological characteristics, use and suitability of Child Restraint Systems (CRS) and its correlation with the type of injuries in children less than 12 years old. Multicentre descriptive prospective study. The following data was collected: personal details of the victims and the type of accident, use and suitability of the CRS, classification of injuries according to location and severity, need for hospitalisation, medical treatment received, use of Emergency Services and final destination of the injured. A total of 366 patients were studied, with a sex ratio of 1:1 and a mean age of 6 years. Of these, 69.7% had some injury (slight 92.3%). A total of 81.1% affected the head and neck, and 77.9% used some type of CRS (suitable only in 55.7%). CRS were used more in >6 year olds (27.1%-P<0.001). Driving long distances (odds ratio 6.7) and not using a suitable CRS (odds ratio 3.7) were associated with the severity of the injuries. The age of the patients and the position within the automobile were not related. All the patients with a Glasgow less than 8 and all the deceased were using an unsuitable CRS. The hospitalization rate was 8.7% and the mortality rate at 24h was 0.8%. An important percentage of the injured children do not use suitable child restraint systems. Non-use of a CRS or its inadequate use is a risk factor of morbidity in the traffic accidents in childhood.

  19. Unintentional Injury Risk in School-Age Children: Examining Interrelations between Parent and Child Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Melissa; Morrongiello, Barbara A.; Kane, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Research on children's risk of injury reveals that parent and child factors are often interrelated. This study examined relations between children's risk taking, parent appraisal of this risk taking, and children's rate of injury in youth 8 and 9 years old. Methods: Responses to questionnaires and laboratory tasks were used to examine…

  20. Acknowledging the Risk for Traumatic Brain Injury in Women Veterans.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Timothy; Iverson, Katherine M

    2017-04-01

    Since the Iraq and Afghanistan wars began, an unprecedented number of women have been engaging in combat operations. Likewise, the number of women using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) services has doubled since 2001. Military service, and deployment to combat in particular, poses certain risks for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-for all service members. However, women may have additional military and nondeployment risk factors such as intimate partner violence (IPV). We briefly review the definition and classification issues related to TBI, as well as common acute and chronic health symptoms after TBI. Specific sex differences in prognosis after TBI, in particular the neurobehavioral symptoms, are also reviewed. We then focus on the emerging literature regarding TBI in women veterans including the etiologies, outcomes, and unique challenges this population faces. The article concludes with suggestions for enhanced screening by VA and non-VA providers alike, as well as directions for future research and clinical inquiry.

  1. Mild traumatic brain injury: a risk factor for neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that head trauma can lead to a progressive neurodegeneration known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Although the medical literature also implicates head trauma as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, these findings are predominantly based on clinical diagnostic criteria that lack specificity. The dementia that follows head injuries or repetitive mild trauma may be caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy, alone or in conjunction with other neurodegenerations (for example, Alzheimer's disease). Prospective longitudinal studies of head-injured individuals, with neuropathological verification, will not only improve understanding of head trauma as a risk factor for dementia but will also enhance treatment and prevention of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20587081

  2. Risk factors for lower extremity injury: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D; Connolly, D; Beynnon, B

    2003-01-01

    Prospective studies on risk factors for lower extremity injury are reviewed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors have been implicated; however, there is little agreement with respect to the findings. Future prospective studies are needed using sufficient sample sizes of males and females, including collection of exposure data, and using established methods for identifying and classifying injury severity to conclusively determine addtional risk factors for lower extremity injury. PMID:12547739

  3. Social-cognitive correlates of protective drinking behaviors and alcohol-related consequences in college students.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anne E; Turrisi, Rob; Abar, Beau; Peters, Katherine E

    2009-11-01

    Although heavy episodic drinkers are at risk to experience alcohol-related consequences, studies show that a large percentage of student drinkers do not experience problems as a result of their drinking. The present study was a more in-depth examination of factors beyond just drinking quantity and frequency to explain why students experience consequences. The current research examined the relationship between the use of protective behaviors, alcohol use, and alcohol related consequences, as well as the relationship between attitudinal and cognitive predictors of engaging in protective behaviors when drinking. We hypothesized there would be a significant direct effect of protective behaviors on consequences after taking into account the effect of alcohol use and that cognitive predictors, including perceived self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness, and subjective norm, would be associated with the attitude and frequency of engaging in protective behaviors. Results supported both hypotheses, indicating good model fit for all models and significant paths between constructs (p's<.05). These findings extend the literature on protective behaviors by providing insight as to their utility in preventing harm and why students choose to engage in these behaviors. Implications for interventions are also discussed.

  4. Prevalence of major depressive disorder in Nigerian college students with alcohol-related problems.

    PubMed

    Adewuya, Abiodun O

    2006-01-01

    The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) among Nigerian college students with alcohol-related problems (ARP) and compare the estimated prevalence with their counterparts without ARP. A cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of students (n=2658) in six colleges in Osun state, Western Nigeria. The students were independently assessed for ARP and MDD with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The current (2 weeks) prevalence of MDD in college students with alcohol dependence is 23.8%; alcohol abuse 17.2% and hazardous use 12.4%. Compared with total abstainers, major depressive disorder is significantly more likely to be associated with diagnosis of alcohol dependence (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.42-6.96), alcohol abuse (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.38-3.72) and hazardous use (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.12-2.38), but less associated with alcohol users without ARP (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.69-1.25). Nigerian college students with ARP are significantly more at risk of depressive disorders than those without ARP. Early recognition and treatment of depression are important considerations when planning preventive strategies for alcohol-related problems in college students.

  5. Social impressions while drinking account for the relationship between alcohol-related problems and social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Matthews, Russell A

    2012-04-01

    Individuals with elevated social anxiety appear particularly vulnerable to experiencing alcohol-related problems; yet we know little about factors that may account for this relationship. One possibility is that socially anxious individuals hold beliefs about the impressions they make on others while drinking and these beliefs play an important role in their drinking behaviors. The present study used exploratory factor analysis among participants with clinically elevated social anxiety (n=166) to develop a measure, the Social Impressions while Drinking Scale (SIDS), to assess beliefs regarding others' impressions of drinking behaviors that may be particularly relevant to socially anxious individuals. A valuations scale was also developed to assess the importance of each belief. Empirically-derived subscales were identified with adequate reliability. Among socially anxious participants, the Gregarious and Sexual Facilitation subscales were uniquely related to drinking problems and frequency respectively. Individuals with clinically meaningful social anxiety achieved higher scores on all SIDS subscales compared to those with lower social anxiety (n=166). Several SIDS scales mediated the relations between social anxiety group status and drinking problems (Interaction Fears, Observation Fears, Aggression, Gregariousness). Results highlight the importance of examining beliefs specific to high-risk populations in assessing their alcohol-related behaviors.

  6. Baseball pitching biomechanics in relation to injury risk and performance.

    PubMed

    Fortenbaugh, Dave; Fleisig, Glenn S; Andrews, James R

    2009-07-01

    Baseball pitching kinematics, kinetics, ball velocity, and injuries at the shoulder and elbow are related. PubMed and Sport Discus were searched for original studies published between 1994 and 2008. Relevant references in these studies were retrieved. Inferential studies that tested relationships between kinematics and kinetics were included, as were studies that tested relationships between kinematics and ball velocity. Descriptive studies that simply quantified kinematics and/or kinetics were excluded. SEVERAL KINEMATIC PARAMETERS AT THE INSTANT OF FOOT CONTACT WERE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED UPPER EXTREMITY KINETICS: front foot position, front foot orientation, shoulder abduction, and shoulder horizontal adduction. The timing of shoulder external rotation, pelvis rotation, and upper trunk rotation was associated with increased kinetics and decreased ball velocity. Low braking force of the lead leg and a short stride were associated with decreased ball velocity. Decreased maximum shoulder external rotation, shoulder abduction, knee extension, and trunk tilt were also associated with decreased ball velocity. As pitchers develop, kinematic values remain similar, their variability reduces, and kinetic values gradually increase. Slight kinematic variations were seen among pitch types, although the kinetics of fastballs and curveballs were relatively the same; changeup kinetics were the lowest. As pitchers fatigued, kinetic values remained constant, but increases in arm pain were reported. Several kinematic parameters were related to joint kinetics and ball velocity. To enhance performance and reduce injury risk, pitchers need to learn proper fastball mechanics at an early age. A changeup is recommended as a safe secondary pitch to complement the fastball; the curveball can be added after fastball and changeup mechanics are mastered. Avoiding overuse and pitching while fatigued is necessary to minimize the risk of arm injury.

  7. Baseball Pitching Biomechanics in Relation to Injury Risk and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fortenbaugh, Dave; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Baseball pitching kinematics, kinetics, ball velocity, and injuries at the shoulder and elbow are related. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and Sport Discus were searched for original studies published between 1994 and 2008. Relevant references in these studies were retrieved. Inferential studies that tested relationships between kinematics and kinetics were included, as were studies that tested relationships between kinematics and ball velocity. Descriptive studies that simply quantified kinematics and/or kinetics were excluded. Results: Several kinematic parameters at the instant of foot contact were associated with increased upper extremity kinetics: front foot position, front foot orientation, shoulder abduction, and shoulder horizontal adduction. The timing of shoulder external rotation, pelvis rotation, and upper trunk rotation was associated with increased kinetics and decreased ball velocity. Low braking force of the lead leg and a short stride were associated with decreased ball velocity. Decreased maximum shoulder external rotation, shoulder abduction, knee extension, and trunk tilt were also associated with decreased ball velocity. As pitchers develop, kinematic values remain similar, their variability reduces, and kinetic values gradually increase. Slight kinematic variations were seen among pitch types, although the kinetics of fastballs and curveballs were relatively the same; changeup kinetics were the lowest. As pitchers fatigued, kinetic values remained constant, but increases in arm pain were reported. Conclusions: Several kinematic parameters were related to joint kinetics and ball velocity. To enhance performance and reduce injury risk, pitchers need to learn proper fastball mechanics at an early age. A changeup is recommended as a safe secondary pitch to complement the fastball; the curveball can be added after fastball and changeup mechanics are mastered. Avoiding overuse and pitching while fatigued is necessary to minimize the risk of

  8. Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol-related aggression.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Adrienne J; Beck, Anne; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Sterzer, Philipp; Heinz, Andreas

    2011-06-02

    Alcohol-related violence is a serious and common social problem. Moreover, violent behaviour is much more common in alcohol-dependent individuals. Animal experiments and human studies have provided insights into the acute effect of alcohol on aggressive behaviour and into common factors underlying acute and chronic alcohol intake and aggression. These studies have shown that environmental factors, such as early-life stress, interact with genetic variations in serotonin-related genes that affect serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. This leads to increased amygdala activity and impaired prefrontal function that, together, predispose to both increased alcohol intake and impulsive aggression. In addition, acute and chronic alcohol intake can further impair executive control and thereby facilitate aggressive behaviour.

  9. Alcohol-related Cues Promote Automatic Racial Bias

    PubMed Central

    Stepanova, Elena V.; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Saults, J. Scott; Friedman, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that alcohol consumption can increase the expression of race bias by impairing control-related processes. The current study tested whether simple exposure to alcohol-related images can also increase bias, but via a different mechanism. Participants viewed magazine ads for either alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages prior to completing Payne’s (2001) Weapons Identification Task (WIT). As predicted, participants primed with alcohol ads exhibited greater race bias in the WIT than participants primed with neutral beverages. Process dissociation analyses indicated that these effects were due to automatic (relative to controlled) processes having a larger influence on behavior among alcohol-primed relative to neutral-primed participants. Structural equation modeling further showed that the alcohol-priming effect was mediated by increases in the influence of automatic associations on behavior. These data suggest an additional pathway by which alcohol can potentially harm inter-racial interactions, even when no beverage is consumed. PMID:22798699

  10. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF ALCOHOL-RELATED PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    MELLION, MICHELLE L.; NGUYEN, VANANH; TONG, MING; GILCHRIST, JAMES; DE LA MONTE, SUZANNE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this work was to determine the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on peripheral nerves in a nutritionally balanced rat model of alcoholism. Methods Three different strains of adult male rats were pair-fed for 8 weeks with isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed. Peripheral nerve and muscle were examined histologically with morphometrics. Results Ethanol exposure significantly slowed velocity in tibial and fibular nerves, but not in the plantar nerve in all 3 strains. Studies of the sciatic nerve revealed decreased fiber diameters and increased regenerative sprouts in peripheral nerves. There was muscle denervation of ethanol-exposed rats in all 3 strains. Conclusions Chronic ethanol exposure caused a polyneuropathy characterized by axonal degeneration despite adequate nutrition. These results suggest that ethanol exposure has direct neurotoxic effects on peripheral nerves. This model may be useful in understanding the underlying mechanism(s) of alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy. PMID:23761140

  11. Risk factors for acute kidney injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bredt, Luis Cesar; Peres, Luis Alberto Batista

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify risk factors for the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the postoperative period of partial hepatectomies. METHODS Retrospective analysis of 446 consecutive resections in 405 patients, analyzing clinical characteristics, preoperative laboratory data, intraoperative data, and postoperative laboratory data and clinical evolution. Adopting the International Club of Ascites criteria for the definition of AKI, potential predictors of AKI by logistic regression were identified. RESULTS Of the total 446 partial liver resections, postoperative AKI occurred in 80 cases (17.9%). Identified predictors of AKI were: Non-dialytic chronic kidney injury (CKI), biliary obstruction, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, the extent of hepatic resection, the occurrence of intraoperative hemodynamic instability, post-hepatectomy haemorrhage, and postoperative sepsis. CONCLUSION The MELD score, the presence of non-dialytic CKI and biliary obstruction in the preoperative period, and perioperative hemodynamics instability, bleeding, and sepsis are risk factors for the occurrence of AKI in patients that underwent partial hepatectomy. PMID:28706580

  12. Epidemiology of Spinal Cord Injuries and Risk Factors for Complete Injuries in Guangdong, China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Huang, Lin; Tang, Yong; Wang, Wenhao; Chen, Keng; Ye, Jichao; Lu, Ciyong; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injuries are highly disabling and deadly injuries. Currently, few studies focus on non-traumatic spinal cord injuries, and there is little information regarding the risk factors for complete injuries. This study aims to describe the demographics and the injury characteristics for both traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injuries and to explore the risk factors for complete spinal cord injuries. Methods A retrospective study was performed by reviewing the medical records of 3,832 patients with spinal cord injuries who were first admitted to the sampled hospitals in Guangdong, China. The demographics and injury characteristics of the patients were described and compared between the different groups using the chi-square test. Logistic regression was conducted to analyze the risk factors for complete spinal cord injuries. Results The proportion of patients increased from 7.0% to 14.0% from 2003 to 2011. The male-to-female ratio was 3.0∶1. The major cause of spinal cord injuries was traffic accidents (21.7%). Many of the injured were workers (36.2%), peasants (22.8%), and unemployed people (13.9%); these occupations accounted for 72.9% of the total sample. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the OR (95% CI) for male gender compared to female gender was 1.25 (1.07–1.89), the OR (95%CI) for having a spinal fracture was 1.56 (1.35–2.60), the OR (95%CI) for having a thoracic injury was 1.23 (1.10–2.00), and the OR (95%CI) for having complications was 2.47 (1.96–3.13). Conclusion The proportion of males was higher than the proportion of females. Workers, peasants and the unemployed comprised the high-risk occupational categories. Male gender, having a spinal fracture, having a thoracic injury, and having complications were the major risk factors for a complete injury. We recommend that preventive measures should focus on high-risk populations, such as young males. PMID:24489652

  13. The educational potential of alcohol-related flushing among Chinese young people

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Duane F.; Huang, Zhaoqing; Qian, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This paper describes Chinese university students' understanding of the meaning of the alcohol-related flushing response and how they reacted to their own and someone else's flushing in a group drinking situation. Method: The researcher surveyed 530 Chinese university students about their understanding of flushing and their perception of how people respond to a person who visibly flushes while drinking alcohol. Findings: Most students did not know about the physiological cause of flushing. There were significant gender differences in both reactions to and perception of responses to a person who flushes. There was no direct relationship between flushing and drinking behaviour. Conclusions: This description of flushing behaviour and responses to a flushing person is discussed in terms of educational opportunities to change behaviours that could reduce the cancer related risks of this visibly at-risk group. PMID:25983401

  14. Age-Infusion Approach to Derive Injury Risk Curves for Dummies from Human Cadaver Tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Pintar, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves (IARCs)/dummy injury assessment risk values (IARVs). This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not directly account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations) are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data were based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus "infusing" age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests, and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs.

  15. Age-Infusion Approach to Derive Injury Risk Curves for Dummies from Human Cadaver Tests

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Pintar, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves (IARCs)/dummy injury assessment risk values (IARVs). This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not directly account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations) are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data were based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus “infusing” age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests, and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs. PMID:26697422

  16. Injury risk during different physical activity behaviours in children: a systematic review with bias assessment.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Joske; Martin-Diener, Eva; Martin, Brian W; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2015-03-01

    The current focus on a physically active lifestyle in children puts children at increased physical activity-related injury risk. To summarise, in a systematic review, the evidence for the injury risk of several physical activity behaviours in 6- to 12-year-old children. An electronic search was performed in three databases (Embase, PubMed and SPORTDiscus). Inclusion criteria were: age 6-12 years; report on injuries related to overall physical activity, active commuting, unorganised leisure time physical activity, physical education and/or organised sports; incidence rates expressed as injuries per hours of physical activity; and published after January 1st 2000. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies included. Eight studies were included. The risk of bias assessment resulted in two studies with a score that was higher than 75 %; risk bias of those two studies was considered low. The medically treated, injury incidence rate was reported to be between 0.15 and 0.27 injuries per 1,000 h of physical activity. The absolute number of injuries related to unorganised leisure time physical activity was higher than the absolute number of injuries reported in organised sports. The respective injury incidence rate expressed per 1,000 h exposure was, however, generally lower during unorganised leisure time than during organised sports. Reported injury incidence rates related to active commuting were comparable to those for unorganised leisure time physical activity. Conflicting injury incidence rates were reported for physical education. Subgroup analysis suggested that girls and children with low habitual levels of physical activity are at increased injury risk. A limitation of the review is that no standard bias assessment was available for this specific context. Children are at an inherent injury risk while participating in physical activities. Most injury prevention efforts have focussed on the sports setting, but our results suggest that many children sustain an injury

  17. [Climatic risk zoning for banana and litchi's chilling injury in South China].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Huo, Zhi-guo; He, Nan; Xiao, Jing-jing; Wen, Quan-pei

    2010-05-01

    Based on the 1951-2006 climatic observation data from 224 meteorological stations in South China (Guangdong Province, Guangxi Autonomous Region, and Fujian Province) and the historical information about the chilling injury losses of banana and litchi, the accumulated harmful chilling for the processes with minimum daily temperature < or = 5.0 degrees C and more than 3 days was used to indicate the climatic risk of chilling injury during the whole growth season, and an integrated climatic index with the background of climate change was constructed. The maps of geographical distribution of climatic risk probability for each grade chilling injury, and of integrated climatic risk zoning for banana and litchi's chilling injury were drawn, and the spatial variation of climatic risk for banana and litchi's chilling injury was commented. The results indicated that in the study area, climate warming might lead to the decrease of cold resistance of banana and litchi, which could increase the disaster risk of chilling injury. The geographical distribution of climatic risk probability for banana and litchi's chilling injury showed a zonal pattern. According to the integrated climatic risk index, the banana and litchi's chilling injury region was divided into three risk types, i.e., high risk, moderate risk, and low risk, which provided an important basis for the adjustment of agricultural production structure.

  18. Association between ambient noise exposure, hearing acuity, and risk of acute occupational injury

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Rabinowitz, Peter M; Neitzel, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the associations between acute workplace injury risk, ambient noise exposure, and hearing acuity, adjusting for reported hearing protection use. Methods In a cohort of 9220 aluminum manufacturing workers studied over six years (33 300 person-years, 13 323 person-jobs), multivariate mixed effects models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of all injuries as well as serious injuries by noise exposure category and hearing threshold level (HTL) adjusting for recognized and potential confounders. Results Compared to noise <82 dBA, higher exposure was associated with elevated risk in a monotonic and statistically significant exposure–response pattern for all injuries and serious injuries with higher risk estimates observed for serious injuries [82–84.99 dBA: RR 1.26, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.96–1.64; 85–87.99 dBA: RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05–1.85; ≥88 dBA: RR 2.29, 95% CI 1.52–3.47]. Hearing loss was associated with increased risk for all injuries, but was not a significant predictor of risk for the subset of more serious injuries. Compared to those without hearing loss, workers with HTL ≥25 dB had 21% increased all injury risk (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.09–1.33) while those with HTL 10–24.99 dB had 6% increased risk (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00–1.13). Reported hearing protection type did not predict injury risk. Conclusion Noise exposure levels as low as 85 dBA may increase workplace injury risk. HTL was associated with increased risk for all, but not the subset of serious, injuries. Additional study is needed both to confirm the observed associations and explore causal pathways. PMID:25137556

  19. Associations between depression, distress tolerance, delay discounting, and alcohol-related problems in European American and African American college students.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Ashley A; Murphy, James G

    2011-12-01

    Although levels of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems are high in college students, there is significant variability in the number and type of problems experienced, even among students who drink heavily. African American students drink less and experience fewer alcohol-related problems than European American students, but are still at risk, and little research has investigated the potentially unique patterns and predictors of problems among these students. Depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting have been implicated in adult substance abuse and may be important predictors of alcohol problem severity among college students. We examined the relationship between these variables and alcohol-related problems among African American and European American students (N = 206; 53% female; 68% European American; 28% African American) who reported recent heavy drinking. In regression models that controlled for drinking level, depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting were associated with alcohol problems among African American students, but only depression was associated with alcohol problems among European American students. These results suggest that negative affect is a key risk factor for alcohol problems among college student drinkers. For African American students, the inability to tolerate negative emotions and to organize their behavior around future outcomes may also be especially relevant risk factors.

  20. “Man-ing” up and Getting Drunk: The Role of Masculine Norms, Alcohol Intoxication and Alcohol-Related Problems among College Men

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Cheng, Alice; Lee, Christina S.; Takamatsu, Stephanie; Gordon, Derrick

    2011-01-01

    Compared to college women, college men face elevated risks for problematic drinking and negative alcohol-related consequences. These risks highlight the critical need to investigate gender issues and risk factors contributing to intoxication and related problems among men. Theoretical models suggest that conforming to masculine norms or the beliefs and expectations of what it means to be a man, may help explain patterns of problematic drinking among men. The current study advances the literature by investigating the association between masculine norms, drinking to intoxication, and alcohol-related consequences among 776 undergraduate males after taking into account the importance of fraternity status and perceived peer norms. Results indicate that fraternity status and higher perceived peer norms regarding drinking increased the risks of getting drunk and experiencing alcohol-related consequences. Specifically, the masculine norms of being a “playboy”, risk-taking, and winning were risk factors of drinking to intoxication; while, being a “playboy”, risk-taking, and self-reliance increased the risks of alcohol-related problems. Primacy of work and heterosexual presentation were two masculine norms that were protective of drinking to intoxication. Our findings contribute to important future considerations for prevention, clinical interventions, and public-health implications in college settings. PMID:21620570

  1. Interventions in sports settings to reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wiggers, John; Wolfenden, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol consumption is a primary cause of physical, psychological and social harm to both the user and others. At both the professional and non-professional level, sports players and fans report consuming alcohol at greater levels than people not involved in sports. Limited systematic reviews have been conducted assessing interventions targeting alcohol consumption behaviour and related harms in the sporting context. Methods and analysis The review aims to determine if interventions implemented in the sport setting decrease alcohol consumption and related harms. Participants may include all persons regardless of age or other characteristics. Studies will be included which have implemented interventions within the sport setting and have either measured: alcohol consumption, excessive alcohol consumption or intoxication or alcohol-related injury or violence. Randomised controlled trials, staggered enrolment trials, stepped-wedged trials, quasi-randomised trials, quasi-experimental trials and natural experiments will be included. Studies without a parallel comparison group will be excluded. Data will be sourced from a range of electronic databases and sources of grey literature. Two authors will independently screen all titles and abstracts of papers identified through the search strategy. Two authors will independently examine the full text of all remaining papers to determine eligibility. Two authors will independently extract data from eligible studies and independently assess risk of bias by assessing the adequacy of study characteristics. Where studies are sufficiently homogeneous, trial results will be synthesised using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. Standardised mean differences will be used for continuous outcomes and RRs will be used for binary outcomes. Dissemination The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through mechanisms including peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. PMID:22492431

  2. “I Will Take a Shot for Every ‘Like’ I Get on This Status”: Posting Alcohol-Related Facebook Content Is Linked to Drinking Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Westgate, Erin C; Neighbors, Clayton; Heppner, Hannes; Jahn, Susanna; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated whether self-reports of alcohol-related postings on Facebook by oneself or one’s Facebook friends were related to common motives for drinking and were uniquely predictive of self-reported alcohol outcomes (alcohol consumption, problems, and cravings). Method: Pacific Northwest undergraduates completed a survey of alcohol outcomes, drinking motives, and alcoholrelated Facebook postings. Participants completed the survey online as part of a larger study on alcohol use and cognitive associations. Participants were randomly selected through the university registrar’s office and consisted of 1,106 undergraduates (449 men, 654 women, 2 transgender, 1 declined to answer) between the ages of 18 and 25 years (M = 20.40, SD = 1.60) at a large university in the Pacific Northwest. Seven participants were excluded from analyses because of missing or suspect data. Results: Alcohol-related postings on Facebook were significantly correlated with social, enhancement, conformity, and coping motives for drinking (all ps < .001). After drinking motives were controlled for, self–alcohol-related postings independently and positively predicted the number of drinks per week, alcohol-related problems, risk of alcohol use disorders, and alcohol cravings (all ps < .001). In contrast, friends’ alcohol-related postings only predicted the risk of alcohol use disorders (p < .05) and marginally predicted alcohol-related problems (p = .07). Conclusions: Posting alcohol-related content on social media platforms such as Facebook is associated with common motivations for drinking and is, in itself, a strong predictive indicator of drinking outcomes independent of drinking motives. Moreover, self-related posting activity appears to be more predictive than Facebook friends’ activity. These findings suggest that social media platforms may be a useful target for future preventative and intervention efforts. PMID:24766750

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behavior among a National Sample of Undergraduate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidality among undergraduates represent important public health issues. This analysis identified risk factors that distinguished 3 groups, those who reported no history of self-harm; self-injury, but no suicide attempts (NSSI only); and self-injury and a suicide attempt (NSSI + SA) in the past year.…

  4. Risk Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behavior among a National Sample of Undergraduate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidality among undergraduates represent important public health issues. This analysis identified risk factors that distinguished 3 groups, those who reported no history of self-harm; self-injury, but no suicide attempts (NSSI only); and self-injury and a suicide attempt (NSSI + SA) in the past year.…

  5. Parent Health Literacy, Depression, and Risk for Pediatric Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Erika R; Bauer, Nerissa S; Downs, Stephen M; Sanders, Lee M

    2016-07-01

    Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged ≤7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5% of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. From risk for trauma to unintentional injury risk: falls--a concept analysis. Nursing Diagnosis Extension and Classification Research Team.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, D P; Crowell, C M

    1999-01-01

    Concept analysis of the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma. To examine the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma and to specify the risk factors for falling. Research and informational articles on falling, and NANDA Nursing Diagnoses: Definitions and Classification, 1999-2000. Replace the current nursing diagnosis risk for trauma with the more specific nursing diagnosis unintentional injury risk: falls. The other risks included in risk for trauma (e.g., burns) also will need to be developed.

  7. Nonapnea Sleep Disorders and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Chang, Kai-Ting; Chang, Yu-Han; Lu, Tzongshi; Liang, Chan-Jung; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Hung, Chi-Chih; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chang-Shen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonapnea sleep disorders (NASDs) and associated problems, which are highly prevalent in patients with kidney diseases, are associated with unfavorable medical sequelae. Nonetheless, whether NASDs are associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) development has not been thoroughly analyzed. We examined the association between NASD and AKI. We conducted a population-based study by using 1,000,000 representative data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. We studied the incidence and risk of AKI in 9178 newly diagnosed NASD patients compared with 27,534 people without NASD matched according to age, sex, index year, urbanization level, region of residence, and monthly income at a 1:3 ratio. The NASD cohort had an adjusted hazard ratio (hazard ratio [HR]; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–2.63) of subsequent AKI 1.74-fold higher than that of the control cohort. Older age and type 2 diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with an increased risk of AKI (P < 0.05). Among different types of NASDs, patients with insomnia had a 120% increased risk of developing AKI (95% CI = 1.38–3.51; P = 0.001), whereas patients with other sleep disorders had a 127% increased risk of subsequent AKI (95% CI = 1.07–4.80; P = 0.033). Men with NASDs were at a high risk of AKI (P < 0.05). This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that patients with NASDs are at higher risk of developing AKI than people without NASDs. PMID:26986132

  8. Older siblings as potential supervisors of younger siblings: sibling supervisors' recognition of injury-risk behaviours and beliefs about supervisee risk taking and potential injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morrongiello, B A; Schell, S L; Stewart, J

    2015-07-01

    Past research has shown that increased injury risk for supervisees during sibling supervision is in part due to the supervision practices of older siblings. The current study used a photo sorting task to examine older siblings' recognition of injury-risk behaviours, their perceived likelihood of supervisees engaging in, or being injured while engaging in, these behaviours, and awareness of past risk-taking behaviours of supervisees. Mothers completed the same measures and an interview about sibling supervision in the home. Mothers reported that sibling supervision occurred most frequently in the kitchen, living room, and children's bedrooms, for approximately 39 min/day, and that the more time the children spent together in a room, the more frequently the older sibling supervised the younger one. The most common reasons mothers gave for why sibling supervision was allowed included beliefs that the older child knows about hazards and unsafe behaviours and that the child could provide adequate supervision. Photo sort results revealed that older siblings were able to correctly identify about 98% of risk behaviours, with these scores significantly higher than what mothers expected (79%). However, compared with mothers, older siblings were less aware of risk behaviours that their younger siblings had engaged in previously. In addition, mothers rated supervisees as 'fairly likely' both to engage in risk behaviours and to experience an injury if they tried these behaviours, whereas sibling supervisors rated both supervisee risk behaviour and injury outcomes as 'not likely' to occur. Older siblings showed good knowledge of hazards but failed to realize that younger children often engage in injury-risk behaviours. Efforts to improve the supervision practices of sibling supervisors need to include changing their perception of supervisees' injury vulnerability and potential injury severity, rather than targeting to increase knowledge of injury-risk behaviours per se.

  9. Analysis of sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors in young high-level athletes.

    PubMed

    Frisch, A; Seil, R; Urhausen, A; Croisier, J L; Lair, M L; Theisen, D

    2009-12-01

    This study analyzed sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors in young athletes (n=256) from 12 sport disciplines practicing at the national or the international level in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. Injury occurrence as a result of sport practice was analyzed retrospectively over the year 2006 using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Overall incidence was not different between girls and boys (1.20 and 1.21 injuries/1000 athlete-hours, respectively), but in the context of team sport competition girls tended to be at a greater risk (rate ratio 2.05, P=0.053). Girls had a higher proportion of injuries in the ankle/foot region compared with boys (34.8% vs 16.8%). No sex-related differences were found regarding injury severity. Multivariate logistic regression (controlling for age and practice volume) revealed that girls' team sports were associated with a greater injury risk compared with individual sports [odds ratio (OR) of 4.76], while in boys this was observed for racket sports (OR=3.31). Furthermore, physical or emotional stress tended to be a specific risk factor in girls. There was a tendency for injury outside sports to be coupled to a higher injury risk in girls and boys. Consideration of sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors could be of importance for effective injury prevention.

  10. A systematic and methodological review of interventions for young people experiencing alcohol-related harm.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Bianca; Shakeshaft, Anthony P; Havard, Alys

    2011-08-01

    This review identified published studies evaluating interventions delivered outside educational settings, designed for young people with existing alcohol use problems, or who participate in behaviour that places them at high risk of alcohol-related harm, critiqued their methodology and identified opportunities for new interventions. A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature interrogated 10 electronic databases using specific search strings, limited to 2005-09. No additional studies were found by a librarian searching other collections and clearing-houses, or by hand-searching review paper reference lists. The 1697 articles identified were reviewed against criteria from the Dictionary for the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. The methodological quality of existing studies is variable, and needs to be both more rigorous and more consistent. Particular problems include the lack of blinding outcome assessors, a reliance solely on self-report measures, highly variable consent and follow-up rates, infrequent use of intention-to-treat analyses and the absence of any economic or cost analyses. The range of interventions evaluated is currently limited to individually focused approaches, almost exclusively implemented in the United States. There is a great need for more intervention trials for young people at high risk of experiencing alcohol-related harm that are both methodologically rigorous and have a broader community focus, to complement the psychological interventions that currently dominate the relevant literature. Such trials would improve outcomes for high-risk young people themselves and would improve the evidence base, both in their own right and by facilitating future meta-analyses. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Understanding children's injury-risk behavior: wearing safety gear can lead to increased risk taking.

    PubMed

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Walpole, Beverly; Lasenby, Jennifer

    2007-05-01

    The present study examined whether school-age children show risk compensation and engage in greater risk taking when wearing safety gear compared to when not doing so when running an obstacle course containing hazards that could lead to physical injury. Because sensation seeking has been shown to influence risk taking, this child attribute was also assessed and related to risk compensation. Children 7-12 years of age were videotaped navigating the obstacle course twice, once wearing safety gear and once without safety gear, with reverse directions used to minimize possible practice effects. The time it took the child to run through the course and the number of reckless behaviors (e.g., falls, trips, bumping into things) that the child made while running the course were compared for the gear and no-gear conditions. Results indicated that children went more quickly and behaved more recklessly when wearing safety gear than when not wearing gear, providing evidence of risk compensation. Moreover, those high in sensation seeking showed greater risk compensation compared with other children. Implications for childhood injury prevention are discussed.

  12. Injury Risk Functions in Frontal Impacts Using Data from Crash Pulse Recorders

    PubMed Central

    Stigson, Helena; Kullgren, Anders; Rosén, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of how crash severity influences injury risk in car crashes is essential in order to create a safe road transport system. Analyses of real-world crashes increase the ability to obtain such knowledge. The aim of this study was to present injury risk functions based on real-world frontal crashes where crash severity was measured with on-board crash pulse recorders. Results from 489 frontal car crashes (26 models of four car makes) with recorded acceleration-time history were analysed. Injury risk functions for restrained front seat occupants were generated for maximum AIS value of two or greater (MAIS2+) using multiple logistic regression. Analytical as well as empirical injury risk was plotted for several crash severity parameters; change of velocity, mean acceleration and peak acceleration. In addition to crash severity, the influence of occupant age and gender was investigated. A strong dependence between injury risk and crash severity was found. The risk curves reflect that small changes in crash severity may have a considerable influence on the risk of injury. Mean acceleration, followed by change of velocity, was found to be the single variable that best explained the risk of being injured (MAIS2+) in a crash. Furthermore, all three crash severity parameters were found to predict injury better than age and gender. However, age was an important factor. The very best model describing MAIS2+ injury risk included delta V supplemented by an interaction term of peak acceleration and age. PMID:23169136

  13. Risk factors that predict severe injuries in university rugby sevens players.

    PubMed

    Mirsafaei Rizi, Rezvan; Yeung, Simon S; Stewart, Nathan J; Yeung, Ella W

    2017-07-01

    To investigate injury incidence and the influence of physical fitness parameters on the risk of severe injuries in players on rugby sevens university teams. Prospective cohort study. Rugby players from three universities (N=104; 90M:14F; 20.6±1.9years) were recruited before the beginning of the season. Players underwent pre-season assessments of power, strength, speed, agility, endurance, stability, and flexibility. Throughout the season, rugby-related injury and exposure data were collected. Potential predictor variables were analyzed using Cox proportional regression model to identify risk factors associated with severe injuries (time loss>28days). Thirty-one injuries occurred during the rugby season. The match and training injury incidence rates were 59.3 injuries and 3.3 injuries per 1000 player-hours, respectively. Lower limb injuries were most common and most severe. The ankle joint was the most prevalent site of injury, and ligamentous injury was most common (48.4%). Nine severe injuries were sustained resulting in an average time loss of 51.3±14.6days. Female (hazard ratio [HR]=8.35; 95% confidence intervals [CI]=2.01-34.8), slower (HR=3.51; 95% CI=1.17-10.5), and less agile (HR=2.22; 95% CI=1.26-3.92) players as well as those with hip flexors tightness (HR=1.12; 95% CI=1.00-1.25) were at significantly greater risk for sustaining severe injuries. Limited studies are available on risk factors associated with amateur rugby players in the Sevens version. The development of gender-specific injury prevention measures that emphasize speed and agility training, and improve hip flexor extensibility may be important to reduce the risk of severe injuries. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom severity with severity of alcohol-related problems in a sample of inpatients with alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Muge; Evren, Cuneyt; Umut, Gokhan; Evren, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been shown to be related to a higher risk of developing psychiatric problems such as depressive disorders, substance use disorder, and impulsivity. Adults who have comorbid ADHD and alcohol use disorder (AUD) are at greater risk of negative outcomes. Thus, it is important to evaluate the relationship of ADHD symptoms and the severity of alcohol-related problems among patients with AUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ADHD symptoms on severity of alcohol-related problems, while controlling the effects of depression and impulsivity in a sample of inpatients with AUD. Patients and methods Participants (n=190) were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Short Form Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test, and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale. Results Severity of the scale scores was positively correlated with each other. Although severity of depression and impulsivity (particularly non-planning impulsivity) predicted the severity of alcohol-related problems in a linear regression model, when severity of ADHD symptoms was included in the analysis, the inattentive subscale score, in particular, predicted the severity of alcohol-related problems together with non-planning impulsivity, whereas depression was no longer a predictor. Conclusion These findings suggest that, together with non-planning impulsivity, symptoms of ADHD (particularly inattentive factor) are an important factor that predict alcohol-related problems, while controlling the severity of depressive symptoms among inpatients with AUD. PMID:27462159

  15. Potential risk factors for prolonged recovery following whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Osti, Orso L; Gun, Richard T; Abraham, George; Pratt, Nicole L; Eckerwall, Goran; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2005-02-01

    A retrospective analysis of insurance data was made of 600 individuals claiming compensation for whiplash following motor vehicle accidents. Three hundred randomly selected claimants who had settled their injury claims within 9 months of the accident were compared with 300 who had settled more than 24 months after the accident. We compared the two groups to identify possible risk factors for prolonged recovery, for which settlement time greater than 24 months was a marker. Variables considered included demographic factors, type of collision, degree of vehicle damage, workers compensation, prior claim or neck disability, treatment and time to settlement. Consulting a solicitor was associated with a highly significant, four-fold increase of late settlement of the claim. A concurrent workers' compensation claim, prior neck disability and undergoing physiotherapy or chiropractic treatment were weakly associated with late settlement. The degree of damage to the vehicle (as indicated by cost of repairs) was not a significant predictor of late settlement. Late settlement may be the direct effect of legal intervention, independent of the severity of the injury. Whilst the financial benefit to the claimant of consulting a solicitor is apparent, the benefit of prolonged disability is not. It may be to the advantage of both insurers and claimants if those likely to proceed to late settlement could be recognised early and their claims settled expeditiously.

  16. The risk of severity of limb injuries in racing thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, H O; Hill, T; Lowe, J

    1992-07-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to identify factors which predisposed Thoroughbred horses to severe injuries, as compared to less severe injuries, while racing on New York Racing Association (NYRA) tracks during the period of January 1986 to June 1988. A severe injury was defined as an injury which led to humane destruction of the horse. A less severe injury was defined as a horse which didn't race within 6 months following a muscular, ligament, tendon, or skeletal injury on the racetrack. The data were obtained from the Horse Identification Department records kept by the Chief Examining Veterinarian of NYRA and included 55 severely injured horses and 245 less severely injured horses. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the risk of severe injuries compared to less severe injuries in those horses. There was a significant association between track and the risk of severe injury (horses raced on Belmont and Saratoga were more likely to develop a severe injury compared to horses raced on Aqueduct Main). The track surface was also associated with the risk of severe injury (horses raced on a firm turf had a significantly lower risk of severe injury associated with the track was significantly modified by the track condition (horses raced at Belmont when it was muddy had a significantly increased risk compared to Aqueduct dirt). Horses were more likely to experience severe injury in the early part of the race (less than or equal to 6 furlongs) than the latter part of the race (greater than 6 furlongs). The risk of severe injury decreased with the age of the horse.

  17. Evaluation of injury and fatality risk in rock and ice climbing.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Morrison, Audry; Schwarz, Ulrich; Schöffl, Isabelle; Küpper, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Rock and ice climbing are widely considered to be 'high-risk' sporting activities that are associated with a high incidence of severe injury and even death, compared with more mainstream sports. However, objective scientific data to support this perception are questionable. Accordingly, >400 sport-specific injury studies were analysed and compared by quantifying the injury incidence and objectively grading the injury severity (using the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics score) per 1000 hours of sporting participation. Fatalities were also analysed. The analysis revealed that fatalities occurred in all sports, but it was not always clear whether the sport itself or pre-existing health conditions contributed or caused the deaths. Bouldering (ropeless climbing to low heights), sport climbing (mostly bolt protected lead climbing with little objective danger) and indoor climbing (climbing indoors on artificial rock structures), showed a small injury rate, minor injury severity and few fatalities. As more objective/external dangers exist for alpine and ice climbing, the injury rate, injury severity and fatality were all higher. Overall, climbing sports had a lower injury incidence and severity score than many popular sports, including basketball, sailing or soccer; indoor climbing ranked the lowest in terms of injuries of all sports assessed. Nevertheless, a fatality risk remains, especially in alpine and ice climbing. In the absence of a standard definition for a 'high-risk' sport, categorizing climbing as a high-risk sport was found to be either subjective or dependent on the definition used. In conclusion, this analysis showed that retrospective data on sport-specific injuries and fatalities are not reported in a standardized manner. To improve preventative injury measures for climbing sports, it is recommended that a standardized, robust and comprehensive sport-specific scoring model should be developed to report and fully evaluate the injury risk, severity

  18. The relationship between license type and alcohol-related problems attributed to licensed premises in Perth, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, T; Somerford, P; Lang, E

    1992-09-01

    Drink-driving offenses, alcohol-related traffic accidents and number of assault charges were used as indicators of the degree of alcohol-related problems associated with individual licensed premises in the Perth Traffic Police region of Western Australia. These indicators were used to rank five main categories of licensed premises according to the levels of harm experienced by their customers while controlling for the amounts of alcohol sold in each category. Nightclubs, taverns and hotels emerged as "high-risk" in comparison with clubs and restaurants. The role of such factors as different customer characteristics, opening hours, types of entertainment, restrictions on clientele and provision of meals are discussed as possible explanations underlying this finding.

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury risk mitigation: an update.

    PubMed

    Otrock, Z K; Liu, C; Grossman, B J

    2017-09-25

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of transfusion. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome has much improved during the last two decades. Plasma-containing components from female donors with leucocyte antibodies were responsible for the majority of TRALI fatalities before mitigation strategies were implemented. Over the past 15 years, measures to mitigate risk for TRALI have been implemented worldwide and they continued to evolve with time. The AABB requires that all plasma containing components and whole blood for transfusion must be collected from men, women who have not been pregnant, or women who have tested negative for human leucocyte antigen antibodies. Although the incidence of TRALI has decreased following the institution of TRALI mitigation strategies, TRALI is still the most common cause of transfusion-associated death in the United States. In this review, we focus on TRALI risk mitigation strategies. We describe the measures taken by blood collection facilities to reduce the risk of TRALI in the United States, Canada and European countries. We also review the literature for the effectiveness of these measures. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Monitoring of newborns at high risk for brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-05-14

    Due to the increasing number of surviving preterm newborns and to the recognition of therapeutic hypothermia as the current gold standard in newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, there has been a growing interest in the implementation of brain monitoring tools in newborns at high risk for neurological disorders.Among the most frequent neurological conditions and presentations in the neonatal period, neonatal seizures and neonatal status epilepticus, paroxysmal non-epileptic motor phenomena, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, white matter injury of prematurity and stroke require specific approaches to diagnosis. In this review we will describe the characteristics, aims, indications and limitations of routinely available diagnostic techniques such as conventional and amplitude-integrated EEG, evoked potentials, cranial ultrasound and brain MRI. We will conclude by briefly outlining potential future perspectives from research studies.

  1. Cerebrovascular injury as a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin R; Goldacre, Raph; Talbot, Kevin; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use an unbiased method to test a previously reported association between cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embolisation and the subsequent development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods A hospital record linkage database was used to create cohorts of individuals coded as having cerebral and peripheral vessel AVMs, stroke (separately for haemorrhagic and ischaemic), transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The rate ratio for subsequent ALS was compared to a reference cohort. Results An increased rate ratio for ALS was found in relation to prior AVM (2.69; p=0.005), all strokes (1.38; p<0.001), and TIA (1.47; p<0.001). Conclusions Cerebrovascular injury from a variety of causes, rather than the presence of AVM or the associated embolisation procedure per se, may be a risk factor for ALS within the context of a more complex multiple-hit model of pathogenesis. PMID:26260352

  2. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia: among trauma patients with and without brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gianakis, Anastasia; McNett, Molly; Belle, Josie; Moran, Cristina; Grimm, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates remain highest among trauma and brain injured patients; yet, no research compares VAP risk factors between the 2 groups. This retrospective, case-controlled study identified risk factors for VAP among critically ill trauma patients with and without brain injury. Data were abstracted on trauma patients with (cases) and without (controls) brain injury. Data gathered on n = 157 subjects. Trauma patients with brain injury had more emergent and field intubations. Age was strongest predictor of VAP in cases, and ventilator days predicted VAP in controls. Trauma patients with brain injury may be at higher risk for VAP.

  3. Why are older Australian football players at greater risk of hamstring injury?

    PubMed

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Bennell, Kim L; Finch, Caroline F

    2006-08-01

    Increasing age is a commonly identified predictor of hamstring injury but is not modifiable to reduce injury risk. Why increasing age is a risk factor for hamstring injuries in athletes has not been studied to date. This study aimed to identify potentially modifiable age-related changes that predict hamstring injury in a population of Australian football players. One hundred and one young (< or =20 years), and 73 older (> or =25 years), Australian football players, without a history of hamstring injury in the past 12 months were studied prospectively. Players underwent screening of anthropometric, flexibility and lower extremity range of movement tests during the pre-season period and were followed-up for a full season with respect to injury and match participation. Comparisons of the age groups were performed to identify differences related to age. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine whether the observed differences were predictors of hamstring injury. There were significant differences between the age groups with respect to body weight, body mass index, hip flexor flexibility, hip internal rotation and ankle dorsiflexion range of movement. Body weight and hip flexor flexibility were significant independent predictors of hamstring injury in players aged > or =25 years. None of the observed differences were predictors of injury in the younger age group. There are age-related changes that are potentially modifiable to reduce injury risk in older athletes and these factors should be considered in the development of hamstring injury prevention programs for this high risk group.

  4. Injuries and risk factors in an 18-day Marine winter mountain training exercise.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, K; Williams, J; Miller, C; Mathis, A; Dettori, J

    2000-12-01

    This study determined the incidence of and risk factors for injuries among 356 Marines during a winter mountain training exercise. Marines received a podiatry screening and completed a questionnaire on race, education, tobacco use, height, weight, and fitness (4.8-km run, sit-ups, pull-ups). Forty-five Marines (12.6%) reported at least one injury each, 68.9% of which were traumatic injuries. Total injuries resulted in 114 days of limited duty time. A final foot examination (N = 141) revealed 118 injuries (82.2% blisters and abrasions, 11.9% frostnip). White ethnicity was a risk factor for overall injuries, and forefoot varus alignment was a risk factor for traumatic injuries. Lower education and rank and smokeless tobacco use were associated with foot injuries. The Marine ski-march leather boot and smoking were related to foot cold injuries. Military winter training is associated with injuries and lost training time. Risk factors were identified, suggesting that these injuries may be preventable.

  5. Depressive symptoms as a risk factor for unintentional injury: a cohort study in a rural county

    PubMed Central

    Tiesman, H M; Peek‐Asa, C; Whitten, P; Sprince, N L; Stromquist, A; Zwerling, C

    2006-01-01

    Objective The authors used data from a population based prospective cohort study to determine if depressive symptoms predicted incidence of unintentional injury. Methods The Keokuk County Rural Health Study, based in Iowa, is a prospective cohort study of health status that includes injury outcomes. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 11‐item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at the beginning of the study on 1493 participants. Quarterly follow up phone calls were made to measure injury incidence. Results 471 injuries were reported for an overall injury rate of 9.8 per 100 person‐years. Crude injury rates were significantly higher for those with depressive symptoms (p = 0.0003). Those with depressive symptoms had a 41% increased risk for injury after controlling for antidepressant medication use, gender, prior injury, income, and sleepiness (RR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.80). Depressive symptoms remained a risk factor for injury regardless of current antidepressant medication use (no medication use, RR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.88; medication use, RR = 1.31, 95% CI 0.76 to 2.26). Conclusions Depressive symptoms were found to be risk factors for unintentional injury. Medical practitioners should consider talking about safety with their patients, especially those reporting symptoms of depression, and recognize that an increased risk for injury remains until the depressive symptoms subside. PMID:16751447

  6. Risk Factors for Non-Contact Injury in Adolescent Cricket Pace Bowlers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Mitchell R L; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Scott, Brendan R; Brini, Stefano; Dempsey, Alasdair R

    2017-09-06

    Adolescent cricket pace bowlers are prone to injury. Recognising the risk factors for non-contact injury in this population will aid future injury prevention strategies. To identify the risk factors for non-contact injury in adolescent cricket pace bowlers. We systematically searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Embase, and the South African Journal of Sports Medicine to identify all experimental and observational studies reporting risk factors for non-contact injuries in pace bowlers (aged 12-19 years). The search syntax included terms relevant to cricket bowling, injury, and known risk factors for injury. The Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale and a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale were used to assess the risk of bias in the cohort and cross-sectional studies, respectively. Sixteen studies (five cross-sectional studies, 11 cohort studies) comprising 687 participants (96% male, 75% playing cricket in Australia) met the selection criteria and were included for qualitative synthesis. Three cross-sectional studies were rated as high risk of bias and two as very high risk of bias. For the cohort studies, three were rated as low risk of bias, and eight as high risk of bias. Injury was associated with bowling biomechanics (excessive lateral trunk flexion and pelvis/hip kinematics), reduced trunk endurance, poor lumbo-pelvic-hip movement control, and early signs of lumbar bone stress. Conflicting results were found by studies examining the mixed technique, bowling workload and quadratus lumborum asymmetry. The current systematic review identified a number bowling biomechanics and various neuromuscular deficiencies as risk factors for non-contact injury in adolescent pace bowlers. These factors may provide a useful target for future interventional research aiming to prevent injury in this population. Future studies should utilise prospective cohort designs, and ensure that participants are injury-free at baseline, confounding

  7. Falls and injuries to Polo players: risk perception, mitigation and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Inness, C M; Morgan, K L

    2015-12-01

    Polo, one of the world's oldest sports, is played in over 80 countries. It is unique in combining the skills of a person with the agility and performance of an animal in a contact sport. There is only one report of the frequency and type of injuries in this population. Here we report risk perception, mitigation and risk factors for injuries and falls in UK polo players. Data were collected retrospectively from a random sample of 112 UK polo players by telephone questionnaire. Injuries (commonly to a shoulder or wrist) requiring a hospital visit were sustained by 17.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.1-25.5) of players. Falls (odds ratio [OR] 6.6, 95% CI 1.4-31.9) and higher self-assessed fitness levels increased the risk (OR 1.7, CI 1.2-2.4). Use of wrist supports (OR 0.2, CI 0.03-0.9) and gym exercise (OR 0.1, CI 0.02-0.9) reduced it. Falls were reported by 58% (CI 47.3-68.8) of players. Women were less at risk than men (OR 0.3, CI 0.1-0.9). Aiming for a better handicap increased the risk (OR 8.4, CI 1.2-57.0). Pre-season rider and horse training were also risk factors. Helmets are compulsory, but players reported that safety certification was not their most important criterion for helmet selection; 49.4% (CI 38.5-60.3) chose appearance. Attendance of a doctor at polo games was not considered important by 65.4% (CI 55.1-75.8) of players; attendance of paramedics and ambulances was volunteered as being of greater consequence. The findings of this study suggest that the protective effect of wrist supports needs testing, helmet manufacturers should incorporate both style and safety into their designs, and paramedics and ambulances should attend polo games.

  8. Men at higher risk of groin injuries in elite team sports: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Orchard, John William

    2015-06-01

    Groin injuries are common in sports, particularly multidirectional team sports, but incidence rates across sports other than football (soccer) have been poorly documented. A systematic review (initially using PubMed and SportDiscus databases) was performed to record incidence of groin and groin region injuries in sports. Inclusion criteria included presentation of groin injury incidence data for at least 10 team/squad seasons. Data from 31 studies were included. These used varying injury definitions and also considered varying injury categories from general to specific (all groin/hip region injuries, groin injuries, adductor muscle strains, intra-articular hip injuries). When playing the same sport, men had greater injury incidence of groin injury than women (relative risk, RR 2.45, 95% CI 2.06 to 2.92). Sports with high incidences of groin injury included ice hockey and the football codes. There is variation by player position for rate of groin injury in many sports. Hip injuries have become more commonly diagnosed over the past decade in Australian football (p=0.001) and other sports. There is moderate evidence that men have a higher risk of groin injury than women when playing the same sport. There is some evidence that hip injuries are being increasingly diagnosed in the subset of 'groin injuries' in recent years. It is recommended that injury epidemiology consensus statements aim to include a number of relevant sports to improve injury incidence comparisons among different sports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and risk factors among army recruits in combat engineer training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army combat engineer (ENG) training is an intense 14-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering activities, Army values and lifestyle, and engineering skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in ENG training. Methods At the start of their training, 1,633 male ENG recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, and injury history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Risk factors were identified using Cox regression. Results Ninety-two percent of the recruits successfully graduated from the course and 47% of the recruits experienced one or more injuries during training. Univariate Cox regression demonstrated that recruits were at higher injury risk if they reporte