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Sample records for aldehyde conjugates cytosolic

  1. Synthesis of biotinylated aldehyde polymers for biomolecule conjugation.

    PubMed

    Alconcel, Steevens N S; Kim, Sung Hye; Tao, Lei; Maynard, Heather D

    2013-06-25

    Biotinylated polymers with side-chain aldehydes were prepared for use as multifunctional scaffolds. Two different biotin-containing chain transfer agents (CTAs) and an aldehyde-containing monomer, 6-oxohexyl acrylate (6OHA), are synthesized. Poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) and 6OHA are copolymerized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in the presence of the biotinylated CTAs. The resulting polymers are analyzed by GPC and(1) H NMR spectroscopy. The polymer end groups contained a disulfide bond, which could be readily reduced in solution to remove the biotin. Reactivity of the aldehyde side chains is demonstrated by oxime and hydrazone formation at the polymer side chains, and conjugate formation of fluorescently labeled polymers with streptavidin is investigated by gel electrophoresis.

  2. Reaction of aminals of conjugated omega-dimethylamino aldehydes with indandione

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnaya, Zh.A.; Stytsenko, T.S.; Gusev, D.G.; Prokof'ev, E.P.

    1987-01-20

    Conjugated omega-dimethylamino ..beta..-diketones with two to five double bonds and trimethylidyne- and pentamethylidyneoxanine salts are formed in the condensation of animals of conjugated ..beta..-dimethylamino aldehydes with indandione.

  3. Evaluation of rhesus monkey and guinea pig hepatic cytosol fractions as models for human aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans.

  4. Evaluation of Rhesus Monkey and Guinea Pig Hepatic Cytosol Fractions as Models for Human Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Choughule, Kanika V.; Barr, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans. PMID:23918666

  5. Neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction in mice lacking cytosolic and mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenases: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wey, Margaret Chia-Ying; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Martinez, Paul Anthony; Sullivan, Patricia; Goldstein, David S; Strong, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated levels of biogenic aldehydes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the brain, aldehydes are primarily detoxified by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Reduced ALDH1 expression in surviving midbrain dopamine neurons has been reported in brains of patients who died with PD. In addition, impaired complex I activity, which is well documented in PD, reduces the availability of the NAD(+) co-factor required by multiple ALDH isoforms to catalyze the removal of biogenic aldehydes. We hypothesized that chronically decreased function of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenases consequent to exposure to environmental toxins and/or reduced ALDH expression, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of PD. To address this hypothesis, we generated mice null for Aldh1a1 and Aldh2, the two isoforms known to be expressed in substantia nigra dopamine neurons. Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice exhibited age-dependent deficits in motor performance assessed by gait analysis and by performance on an accelerating rotarod. Intraperitoneal administration of L-DOPA plus benserazide alleviated the deficits in motor performance. We observed a significant loss of neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the substantia nigra and a reduction of dopamine and metabolites in the striatum of Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice. We also observed significant increases in biogenic aldehydes reported to be neurotoxic, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the aldehyde intermediate of dopamine metabolism, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). These results support the hypothesis that impaired detoxification of biogenic aldehydes may be important in the pathophysiology of PD and suggest that Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice may be a useful animal model of PD.

  6. Peptide-Catalyzed Stereoselective Conjugate Addition Reactions of Aldehydes to Maleimide.

    PubMed

    Grünenfelder, Claudio E; Kisunzu, Jessica K; Wennemers, Helma

    2016-07-18

    The tripeptide H-dPro-Pro-Asn-NH2 is presented as a catalyst for asymmetric conjugate addition reactions of aldehydes to maleimide. The peptidic catalyst promotes the reaction between various aldehydes and unprotected maleimide with high stereoselectivities and yields. The obtained products were readily derivatized to the corresponding pyrrolidines, lactams, lactones, and peptide-like compounds. (1) H NMR spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational investigations provided insight into the conformational properties of H-dPro-Pro-Asn-NH2 and revealed the importance of hydrogen bonding between the peptide and maleimide for catalyzing the stereoselective C-C bond formation.

  7. A novel ring oxidation of 4- or 5-substituted 2H-oxazole to corresponding 2-oxazolone catalyzed by cytosolic aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Vinod K; Philip, Thomas; Huang, Stella; Shu, Yue-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The ring oxidation of 2H-oxazole, or C2-unsubstituted oxazole, to 2-oxazolone, a cyclic carbamate, was observed on various 4- or 5-substituted oxazoles. Using 5-(3-bromophenyl)oxazole as a model compound, its 2-oxazolone metabolite M1 was fully characterized by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The reaction mainly occurred in the liver cytosolic fraction without the requirement of cytochrome P450 enzymes and cofactor NADPH. Investigations into the mechanism of formation of 2-oxazolone using various chemical inhibitors indicated that the reaction was primarily catalyzed by aldehyde oxidase and not by xanthine oxidase. In addition, cytosol incubation of 5-(3-bromophenyl)oxazole in the medium containing H₂¹⁸O led to the ¹⁸O incorporation into M1, substantiating the reaction mechanism of a typical molybdenum hydroxylase. The rank order of liver cytosols for the 2-oxazolone formation was mouse > monkey ≫ rat and human liver cytosol, whereas M1 was not formed in dog liver cytosol. Because the reaction was observed with a number of 4- or 5-substituted 2H-oxazoles in mouse liver cytosols, 2H-oxazoles represent a new substrate chemotype for ring oxidation catalyzed by aldehyde oxidase.

  8. Stereoselective sulfate conjugation of racemic 4-hydroxypropranolol by human and rat liver cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Walle, T.; Walle, U.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the stereochemistry of sulfoconjugation of a chiral phenolic amine drug, 4-hydroxypropranolol (HOP), by the human liver. The reaction was catalyzed by the 100,000 g cytosol as the phenolsulfotransferase (PST) enzyme source with PAP35S as the co-substrate. The enantiomers of the intact sulfate conjugate formed, (+)-HOP35S and (-)-HOP35S, were separated by HPLC and measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Complex velocity vs. substrate concentration curves were obtained with two peaks of activity, one at 3 microM (high affinity) and one at 500 microM (low affinity). The high-affinity reaction demonstrated a high degree of stereoselectivity. Whereas the affinity of the enantiomers for this reaction was identical, with a very low apparent KM value of 0.59 microM, the apparent Vmax value for (+)-HOPS formation was 4.6-fold higher than for (-)-HOPS. In sharp contrast, the low-affinity reaction, with an apparent KM of 65 microM, was not stereoselective. Inhibition of the high-affinity reaction by elevated temperature, but not by dichloronitrophenol, indicated that this activity was due to a monoamine form of PST. Inhibition of the low-affinity reaction by dichloronitrophenol, but not by elevated temperature, indicated that this activity was due to a phenol form of PST. As a comparison, experiments with the rat liver cytosol demonstrated only one activity, with apparent KM values of 50 microM for both enantiomers and opposite stereoselectivity in maximum velocity compared to humans, {plus minus}-HOPS ratio 0.72. The results of this study demonstrate stereoselectivity in human hepatic sulfation of a chiral phenolic amine, with clear differences between PST isoenzymes.

  9. Interaction of the electrophilic ketoprofenyl-glucuronide and ketoprofenyl-coenzyme A conjugates with cytosolic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Osbild, Sandra; Bour, Jérome; Maunit, Benoît; Guillaume, Cécile; Asensio, Carine; Muller, Jean-François; Netter, Patrick; Kirsch, Glbert; Bagrel, Denyse; Lapicque, Françoise; Battaglia, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Carboxylic acid-containing drugs are metabolized mainly through the formation of glucuronide and coenzyme A esters. These conjugates have been suspected to be responsible for the toxicity of several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the reactivity of the electrophilic ester bond. In the present study we investigated the reactivity of ketoprofenyl-acylglucuronide (KPF-OG) and ketoprofenyl-acyl-coenzyme A (KPF-SCoA) toward cytosolic rat liver glutathione S-transferases (GST). We observed that KPF-SCoA, but not KPF-OG inhibited the conjugation of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide catalyzed by both purified cytosolic rat liver GST and GST from FAO and H5-6 rat hepatoma cell lines. Photoaffinity labeling with KPF-SCoA suggested that the binding of this metabolite may overlap the binding site of 4-methylumbelliferone sulfate. Furthermore, high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis showed that both hydrolysis and transacylation reactions were observed in the presence of GST and glutathione. The formation of ketoprofenyl-S-acyl-glutathione could be kinetically characterized (apparent K(m) = 196.0 +/- 70.6 microM). It is concluded that KPF-SCoA is both a GST inhibitor and a substrate of a GST-dependent transacylation reaction. The reactivity and inhibitory potency of thioester CoA derivatives toward GST may have potential implications on the reported in vivo toxicity of some carboxylic acid-containing drugs.

  10. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  11. Properties of aldehyde dehydrogenas from chemically-induced rat hepatomas and normal rat liver.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, R

    1980-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and properties of four aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes (I-IV) identified in 2-acetylaminofluorene-induced rat hepatomas and three aldehyde dehydrogenase (I-III) identified in normal rat liver are compared. In normal liver, mitochondria (50%) and microsomes (27%) possess the majority of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (AlDH), with cytosol possessing little activity. Isozymes I-III can be identified in both fractions and can be differentiated on the basis of substrate and coenzyme specificity, substrate Km, inhibition by disulfiram and anti-hepatoma aldehyde dehydrogenase sera, and/or isoelectric point. Hepatomas possess considerable cytosolic AlDH (20%), in addition to mitochondrial (23%) and microsomal (35%) activity. Although isozymes I-III are present in tumor mitochondria and microsomes, little isozyme I or II is found in cytosol. Hepatoma cytosolic AlDH is composed (50%) of a hepatoma-specific isozyme (IV), differing in several properties from isozymes I-III; the remainder of the tumor cytosolic activity is due to isozyme III (48%). The data indicate that expression of the tumor-specific aldehyde dehydrogenase phenotype requires both qualitative and quantitative changes involving cytosolic and microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. The qualitative change requires the derepression of a gene for an aldehyde dehydrogenase expressed in normal liver only following exposure to potentially harmful xenobiotics. The quantitative change involves both an increase in activity and change in subcellular location of a basal, normal liver AlDH isozyme.

  12. Peptide-catalyzed 1,4-addition reactions of aldehydes to nitroolefins.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Robert; Arakawa, Yukihiro; Duschmalé, Jörg; Wiesner, Markus; Wennemers, Helma

    2013-01-01

    Conjugate addition reactions of aldehydes to nitroolefins provide synthetically useful gamma-nitroaldehydes. Here we summarize our research on peptide-catalyzed conjugate addition reactions of aldehydes to differently substituted nitroolefins. We show that peptides of the general type Pro-Pro-Xaa (Xaa = acidic amino acid) are not only highly active, robust and stereoselective catalysts but have also remarkable chemoselectivities.

  13. Individual variation in hepatic aldehyde oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Salmy, H S

    2001-04-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a molybdo-flavo enzyme expressed predominantly in the liver, lung, and kidney. AO plays a major role in oxidation of aldehydes, as well as oxidation of various N-heterocyclic compounds of pharmacological and toxicological importance including antiviral (famciclovir), antimalarial (quinine), antitumour (methotrexate), and nicotine. The aim of this study was to investigate cytosolic aldehyde oxidase activity in human liver. Cytosolic AO was characterised using both the metabolism of N-[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl] acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA) and benzaldehyde to form DACA-9(10H)-acridone (quantified by HPLC with fluorescence detection) and benzoic acid (quantified spectrophotometrically). Thirteen livers (10 female, 3 male) were examined. The intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km) of DACA varied 18-fold (0.03-0.50 m/min/mg). Vmax ranged from 0.20-3.10 nmol/ min/mg, and Km ranged from 3.5-14.2 microM. In the same specimens, the intrinsic clearance for benzaldehyde varied 5-fold (0.40-1.8 ml/min/mg). Vmax ranged from 3.60-12.6 nmol/min/mg and Km ranged from 3.6-14.6 microM. Furthermore, there were no differences in AO activity between male and female human livers, nor was there any relationship to age of donor (range 29-73 years), smoking status, or disease status. In conclusion, our results showed that there are variations in AO activity in human liver. These variations in aldehyde oxidase activity might reflect individual variations or they might be due to AO stability during processing and storage.

  14. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Shearn, Alisabeth H; Saba, Laura M; Mercer, Kelly E; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J; Ronis, Martin J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2016-04-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4(-/-) mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4(-/-) mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4(-)(/-) mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4(-/-) mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4(-/-) PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an important

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Aldehyde Toxicity: A Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are electrophilic compounds to which humans are pervasively exposed. Despite a significant health risk due to exposure, the mechanisms of aldehyde toxicity are poorly understood. This ambiguity is likely due to the structural diversity of aldehyde derivatives and corresponding differences in chemical reactions and biological targets. To gain mechanistic insight, we have used parameters based on the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory to profile the different aldehyde subclasses with respect to electronic character (softness, hardness), electrophilic reactivity (electrophilic index), and biological nucleophilic targets. Our analyses indicate that short chain aldehydes and longer chain saturated alkanals are hard electrophiles that cause toxicity by forming adducts with hard biological nucleophiles, e.g., primary nitrogen groups on lysine residues. In contrast, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives, alkenals, and the α-oxoaldehydes are soft electrophiles that preferentially react with soft nucleophilic thiolate groups on cysteine residues. The aldehydes can therefore be grouped into subclasses according to common electronic characteristics (softness/hardness) and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. As we will discuss, the toxic potencies of these subgroups are generally related to corresponding electrophilicities. For some aldehydes, however, predictions of toxicity based on electrophilicity are less accurate due to inherent physicochemical variables that limit target accessibility, e.g., steric hindrance and solubility. The unsaturated aldehydes are also members of the conjugated type-2 alkene chemical class that includes α,β-unsaturated amide, ketone, and ester derivatives. Type-2 alkenes are electrophiles of varying softness and electrophilicity that share a common mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, exposure to an environmental mixture of unsaturated carbonyl derivatives could cause “type-2 alkene toxicity” through additive interactions

  16. Environmental pollutant and potent mutagen 3-nitrobenzanthrone forms DNA adducts after reduction by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and conjugation by acetyltransferases and sulfotransferases in human hepatic cytosols.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Volker M; Stiborova, Marie; Henderson, Colin J; Osborne, Martin R; Bieler, Christian A; Frei, Eva; Martinek, Vaclav; Sopko, Bruno; Wolf, C Roland; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Phillips, David H

    2005-04-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-nitro-7H-benz[de]anthracen-7-one, 3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust and air pollution. We compared the ability of human hepatic cytosolic samples to catalyze DNA adduct formation by 3-NBA. Using the (32)P-postlabeling method, we found that 12/12 hepatic cytosols activated 3-NBA to form multiple DNA adducts similar to those formed in vivo in rodents. By comparing 3-NBA-DNA adduct formation in the presence of cofactors of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and xanthine oxidase, most of the reductive activation of 3-NBA in human hepatic cytosols was attributed to NQO1. Inhibition of adduct formation by dicoumarol, an NQO1 inhibitor, supported this finding and was confirmed with human recombinant NQO1. When cofactors of N,O-acetyltransferases (NAT) and sulfotransferases (SULT) were added to cytosolic samples, 3-NBA-DNA adduct formation increased 10- to 35-fold. Using human recombinant NQO1 and NATs or SULTs, we found that mainly NAT2, followed by SULT1A2, NAT1, and, to a lesser extent, SULT1A1 activate 3-NBA. We also evaluated the role of hepatic NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) in the activation of 3-NBA in vivo by treating hepatic POR-null mice and wild-type littermates i.p. with 0.2 or 2 mg/kg body weight of 3-NBA. No difference in DNA binding was found in any tissue examined (liver, lung, kidney, bladder, and colon) between null and wild-type mice, indicating that 3-NBA is predominantly activated by cytosolic nitroreductases rather than microsomal POR. Collectively, these results show the role of human hepatic NQO1 to reduce 3-NBA to species being further activated by NATs and SULTs.

  17. Microbial Engineering for Aldehyde Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunjapur, Aditya M.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are a class of chemicals with many industrial uses. Several aldehydes are responsible for flavors and fragrances present in plants, but aldehydes are not known to accumulate in most natural microorganisms. In many cases, microbial production of aldehydes presents an attractive alternative to extraction from plants or chemical synthesis. During the past 2 decades, a variety of aldehyde biosynthetic enzymes have undergone detailed characterization. Although metabolic pathways that result in alcohol synthesis via aldehyde intermediates were long known, only recent investigations in model microbes such as Escherichia coli have succeeded in minimizing the rapid endogenous conversion of aldehydes into their corresponding alcohols. Such efforts have provided a foundation for microbial aldehyde synthesis and broader utilization of aldehydes as intermediates for other synthetically challenging biochemical classes. However, aldehyde toxicity imposes a practical limit on achievable aldehyde titers and remains an issue of academic and commercial interest. In this minireview, we summarize published efforts of microbial engineering for aldehyde synthesis, with an emphasis on de novo synthesis, engineered aldehyde accumulation in E. coli, and the challenge of aldehyde toxicity. PMID:25576610

  18. Aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Robert L; Fahy, Gregory M

    2015-12-01

    We describe here a new cryobiological and neurobiological technique, aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation (ASC), which demonstrates the relevance and utility of advanced cryopreservation science for the neurobiological research community. ASC is a new brain-banking technique designed to facilitate neuroanatomic research such as connectomics research, and has the unique ability to combine stable long term ice-free sample storage with excellent anatomical resolution. To demonstrate the feasibility of ASC, we perfuse-fixed rabbit and pig brains with a glutaraldehyde-based fixative, then slowly perfused increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol over several hours in a manner similar to techniques used for whole organ cryopreservation. Once 65% w/v ethylene glycol was reached, we vitrified brains at -135 °C for indefinite long-term storage. Vitrified brains were rewarmed and the cryoprotectant removed either by perfusion or gradual diffusion from brain slices. We evaluated ASC-processed brains by electron microscopy of multiple regions across the whole brain and by Focused Ion Beam Milling and Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging of selected brain volumes. Preservation was uniformly excellent: processes were easily traceable and synapses were crisp in both species. Aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation has many advantages over other brain-banking techniques: chemicals are delivered via perfusion, which enables easy scaling to brains of any size; vitrification ensures that the ultrastructure of the brain will not degrade even over very long storage times; and the cryoprotectant can be removed, yielding a perfusable aldehyde-preserved brain which is suitable for a wide variety of brain assays.

  19. Metabolism of zaleplon by human liver: evidence for involvement of aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lake, B G; Ball, S E; Kao, J; Renwick, A B; Price, R J; Scatina, J A

    2002-10-01

    1. The metabolism of Zaleplon (CL-284,846; ZAL) has been studied in precision-cut human liver slices and liver cytosol preparations. 2. Human liver slices metabolized ZAL to a number of products including 5-oxo-ZAL (M2), N-desethyl-5-oxo-ZAL (M1) and N-desethyl-ZAL (DZAL), the latter metabolite being known to be formed by CYP3A forms. 3. Human liver cytosol preparations catalysed the metabolism of ZAL to M2. Kinetic analysis of three cytosol preparations revealed mean (+/- SEM) K(m) and V(max) of 93 +/- 18 mm and 317 +/- 241 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. 4. Using 16 individual human liver cytosol preparations a 33-fold variability in the metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 was observed. Correlations were observed between M2 formation and the metabolism of the aldehyde oxidase substrates phenanthridine (r(2) = 0.774) and phthalazine (r(2) = 0.460). 5. The metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 in liver cytosol preparations was markedly inhibited by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitors chlorpromazine, promethazine, hydralazine and menadione. Additional kinetic analysis suggested that chlorpromazine and promethazine were non-competitive inhibitors of M2 formation with K(i) of 2.3 and 1.9 micro M, respectively. ZAL metabolism to M2 was also inhibited by cimetidine. 6. Incubations conducted with human liver cytosol and H(2)(18)O demonstrated that the oxygen atom incorporated into ZAL and DZAL to form M2 and M1, respectively, was derived from water and not from molecular oxygen. 7. In summary, by correlation analysis, chemical inhibition and H(2)(18)O incorporation studies, ZAL metabolism to M2 in human liver appears to be catalysed by aldehyde oxidase. With human liver slices, ZAL was metabolized to products dependent on both aldehyde oxidase and CYP3A forms.

  20. Cytosolic NADPH balancing in Penicillium chrysogenum cultivated on mixtures of glucose and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng; Kuijvenhoven, Karel; van Gulik, Walter M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Winden, Wouter A; Verheijen, Peter J T

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) in Penicillium chrysogenum was determined during growth in glucose/ethanol carbon-limited chemostat cultures, at the same growth rate. Non-stationary (13)C flux analysis was used to measure the oxPPP flux. A nearly constant oxPPP flux was found for all glucose/ethanol ratios studied. This indicates that the cytosolic NADPH supply is independent of the amount of assimilated ethanol. The cofactor assignment in the model of van Gulik et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 68(6):602-618, 2000) was supported using the published genome annotation of P. chrysogenum. Metabolic flux analysis showed that NADPH requirements in the cytosol remain nearly the same in these experiments due to constant biomass growth. Based on the cytosolic NADPH balance, it is known that the cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase in P. chrysogenum is NAD(+) dependent. Metabolic modeling shows that changing the NAD(+)-aldehyde dehydrogenase to NADP(+)-aldehyde dehydrogenase can increase the penicillin yield on substrate.

  1. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  2. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease. PMID:26556381

  3. Ubiquitin-aldehyde: a general inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling processes.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Rose, I A

    1987-01-01

    The generation and characterization of ubiquitin (Ub)-aldehyde, a potent inhibitor of Ub-C-terminal hydrolase, has previously been reported. We now examine the action of this compound on the Ub-mediated proteolytic pathway using the system derived from rabbit reticulocytes. Addition of Ub-aldehyde was found to strongly inhibit breakdown of added 125I-labeled lysozyme, but inhibition was overcome by increasing concentrations of Ub. The following evidence shows the effect of Ub-aldehyde on protein breakdown to be indirectly caused by its interference with the recycling of Ub, leading to exhaustion of the supply of free Ub: Ub-aldehyde markedly increased the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates coincident with a much decreased rate of conjugate breakdown. release of Ub from isolated Ub-protein conjugates in the absence of ATP (and therefore not coupled to protein degradation) is markedly inhibited by Ub-aldehyde. On the other hand, the ATP-dependent degradation of the protein moiety of Ub conjugates, which is an integral part of the proteolytic process, is not inhibited by this agent. Direct measurement of levels of free Ub showed a rapid disappearance caused by the inhibitor. The Ub is found to be distributed in derivatives of a wide range of molecular weight classes. It thus seems that Ub-aldehyde, previously demonstrated to inhibit the hydrolysis of Ub conjugates of small molecules, also inhibits the activity of a series of enzymes that regenerate free Ub from adducts with proteins and intermediates in protein breakdown. Images PMID:3031653

  4. Ubiquitin-aldehyde: a general inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershko, A.; Rose, I.A.

    1987-04-01

    The generation and characterization of ubiquitin (Ub)-aldehyde, a potent inhibitor of Ub-C-terminal hydrolase, has previously been reported. The authors examine the action of this compound on the Ub-mediated proteolytic pathway using the system derived from rabbit reticulocytes. Addition of Ub-aldehyde was found to strongly inhibit breakdown of added /sup 125/I-labeled lysozyme, but inhibition was overcome by increasing concentrations of Ub. The following evidence shows the effect of Ub-aldehyde on protein breakdown to be indirectly caused by its interference with the recycling of Ub, leading to exhaustion of the supply of free Ub: (i) Ub-aldehyde markedly increased the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates coincident with a much decreased rate of conjugate breakdown; (ii) release of Ub from isolated Ub-protein conjugates in the absence of ATP (and therefore not coupled to protein degradation) is markedly inhibited by Ub-aldehyde. On the other hand, the ATP-dependent degradation of the protein moiety of Ub conjugates, which is an integral part of the proteolytic process, is not inhibited by this agent; (iii) direct measurement of levels of free Ub showed a rapid disappearance caused by the inhibitor. The Ub is found to be distributed in derivatives of a wide range of molecular weight classes. It thus seems that Ub-aldehyde, previously demonstrated to inhibit the hydrolysis of Ub conjugates of small molecules, also inhibits the activity of a series of enzymes that regenerate free Ub from adducts with proteins and intermediates in protein breakdown.

  5. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  6. CYTOSOL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: this surface washing agent for oil spill cleanups extracts and recovers weathered petroleum by flotation, remaining residual hydrocarbons are biodegraded. Suitable for sensitive/ high impact sites including fisheries, rip rap.

  7. The Pivotal Role of Aldehyde Toxicity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Therapeutic Potential of Micronutrient Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Jurnak, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by social and communication impairments as well as by restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. Genomic studies have not revealed dominant genetic errors common to all forms of ASD. So ASD is assumed to be a complex disorder due to mutations in hundreds of common variants. Other theories argue that spontaneous DNA mutations and/or environmental factors contribute to as much as 50% of ASD. In reviewing potential genetic linkages between autism and alcoholism, it became apparent that all theories of ASD are consistent with aldehyde toxicity, in which endogenous and exogenous aldehydes accumulate as a consequence of mutations in key enzymes. Aldehyde toxicity is characterized by cell-localized, micronutrient deficiencies in sulfur-containing antioxidants, thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6), folate, Zn2+, possibly Mg2+, and retinoic acid, causing oxidative stress and a cascade of metabolic disturbances. Aldehydes also react with selective cytosolic and membrane proteins in the cell of origin; then some types migrate to damage neighboring cells. Reactive aldehydes also form adducts with DNA, selectively mutating bases and inducing strand breakage. This article reviews the relevant genomic, biochemical, and nutritional literature, which supports the central hypothesis that most ASD symptoms are consistent with symptoms of aldehyde toxicity. The hypothesis represents a paradigm shift in thinking and has profound implications for clinical detection, treatment, and even prevention of ASD. Insight is offered as to which neurologically afflicted children might successfully be treated with micronutrients and which children are unlikely to be helped. The aldehyde toxicity hypothesis likely applies to other neurological disorders. PMID:27330305

  8. Daidzin: a potent, selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-02-15

    Human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-I) is potently, reversibly, and selectively inhibited by an isoflavone isolated from Radix puerariae and identified as daidzin, the 7-glucoside of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone. Kinetic analysis with formaldehyde as substrate reveals that daidzin inhibits ALDH-I competitively with respect to formaldehyde with a Ki of 40 nM, and uncompetitively with respect to the coenzyme NAD+. The human cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme (ALDH-II) is nearly 3 orders of magnitude less sensitive to daidzin inhibition. Daidzin does not inhibit human class I, II, or III alcohol dehydrogenases, nor does it have any significant effect on biological systems that are known to be affected by other isoflavones. Among more than 40 structurally related compounds surveyed, 12 inhibit ALDH-I, but only prunetin and 5-hydroxydaidzin (genistin) combine high selectivity and potency, although they are 7- to 15-fold less potent than daidzin. Structure-function relationships have established a basis for the design and synthesis of additional ALDH inhibitors that could both be yet more potent and specific.

  9. Detoxification of aldehydes by histidine-containing dipeptides: from chemistry to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P.; Sweeney, Brooke R.; Barski, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are generated by oxidized lipids and carbohydrates at increased levels under conditions of metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress during atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebral ischemia, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and trauma. In most tissues, aldehydes are detoxified by oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation or the reduction of aldehydes or enzymatic and nonenzymatic conjugation with low molecular weight thiols and amines, such as glutathione and histidine dipeptides. Histidine dipeptides are present in micromolar to millimolar range in the tissues of vertebrates, where they are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as pH buffering, metal chelation, oxidant and aldehyde scavenging. Histidine dipeptides such as carnosine form Michael adducts with lipid-derived unsaturated aldehydes, and react with carbohydrate-derived oxo- and hydroxy- aldehydes forming products of unknown structure. Although these peptides react with electrophilic molecules at lower rate than glutathione, they can protect glutathione from modification by oxidant and they may be important for aldehyde quenching in glutathione-depleted cells or extracellular space where glutathione is scarce. Consistent with in vitro findings, treatment with carnosine has been shown to diminish ischemic injury, improve glucose control, ameliorate the development of complications in animal models of diabetes and obesity, promote wound healing and decrease atherosclerosis. The protective effects of carnosine have been linked to its anti-oxidant properties, it ability to promote glycolysis, detoxify reactive aldehydes and enhance histamine levels. Thus, treatment with carnosine and related histidine dipeptides may be a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with high carbonyl load. PMID:23313711

  10. Cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylase oxygenation of aldehydes yields n-1 aldehydes and alcohols in addition to alkanes.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Kelly G; Makris, Thomas M; Stoian, Sebastian A; Richman, Jack E; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2013-10-04

    Aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (ADO) catalyzes O2-dependent release of the terminal carbon of a biological substrate, octadecanal, to yield formate and heptadecane in a reaction that requires external reducing equivalents. We show here that ADO also catalyzes incorporation of an oxygen atom from O2 into the alkane product to yield alcohol and aldehyde products. Oxygenation of the alkane product is much more pronounced with C9-10 aldehyde substrates, so that use of nonanal as the substrate yields similar amounts of octane, octanal, and octanol products. When using doubly-labeled [1,2-(13)C]-octanal as the substrate, the heptane, heptanal and heptanol products each contained a single (13)C-label in the C-1 carbons atoms. The only one-carbon product identified was formate. [(18)O]-O2 incorporation studies demonstrated formation of [(18)O]-alcohol product, but rapid solvent exchange prevented similar determination for the aldehyde product. Addition of [1-(13)C]-nonanol with decanal as the substrate at the outset of the reaction resulted in formation of [1-(13)C]-nonanal. No (13)C-product was formed in the absence of decanal. ADO contains an oxygen-bridged dinuclear iron cluster. The observation of alcohol and aldehyde products derived from the initially formed alkane product suggests a reactive species similar to that formed by methane monooxygenase (MMO) and other members of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase family. Accordingly, characterization by EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies shows that the electronic structure of the ADO cluster is similar, but not identical, to that of MMO hydroxylase component. In particular, the two irons of ADO reside in nearly identical environments in both the oxidized and fully reduced states, whereas those of MMOH show distinct differences. These favorable characteristics of the iron sites allow a comprehensive determination of the spin Hamiltonian parameters describing the electronic state of the diferrous cluster for the

  11. Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Evans, R.J.

    1987-04-06

    A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof as disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  12. Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Evans, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  13. Hippocampal cytosolic estrogen receptors regulate fear generalization in females.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph F; Winiecki, Patrick; Vanderhoof, Tyler; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    Generalization of fear responses is a symptom of many anxiety disorders and we have previously demonstrated that female rats generalize fear to a neutral context at a faster rate compared to males. This effect is due in part, to activation of ER and modulation of memory retrieval mechanisms resulting in fear generalization. Given that the effects of estradiol on fear generalization required approximately 24h, our data suggested possible genomic actions on fear generalization. To determine whether these actions were due to cytosolic versus membrane bound receptors, female rats were given infusions of ICI 182,780, a cytosolic estrogen receptor antagonist, into the lateral ventricle or dorsal hippocampus simultaneously with estradiol treatment or with an ER agonist (DPN). Infusions of ICI into the lateral ventricle or the dorsal hippocampus blocked fear generalization induced by peripheral or central treatment with estradiol or DPN, suggesting that estradiol acts through cytosolic ERβ receptors. In further support of these findings, intracerebroventricular or intra-hippocampal infusions of bovine serum conjugated estradiol (E2-BSA), activating membrane-bound estrogen receptors only, did not induce fear generalization. Moreover, rats receiving intra-hippocampal infusions of the ERK/MAPK inhibitor, U0126, continued to display estradiol-induced generalization, again suggesting that membrane-bound estrogen receptors do not contribute to fear generalization. Overall, these data suggest that estradiol-induced enhancements in fear generalization are mediated through activation of cytosolic/nuclear ER within the dorsal hippocampus. This region seems to be an important locus for the effects of estradiol on fear generalization although additional neuroanatomical regions have yet to be identified.

  14. DIFFERENTIATING THE TOXICITY OF CARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES FROM NONCARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES IN THE RAT NOSE USING CDNA ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differentiating the Toxicity of Carcinogenic Aldehydes from Noncarcinogenic Aldehydes in the Rat Nose Using cDNA Arrays.

    Formaldehyde is a widely used aldehyde in many industrial settings, the tanning process, household products, and is a contaminant in cigarette smoke. H...

  15. Remote sulfonamido group enhances reactivity and selectivity for asymmetric Michael addition of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chao; Uang, Biing-Jiun

    2014-09-01

    The pyrrolidine-camphorsulfonamide-based catalyst 1 a catalyzes the enantioselective conjugate addition of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes in the presence of five equivalents of water in iPrOH to give the corresponding chiral Michael adducts in good yields and high enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee) with a catalyst loading as low as 1 mol%.

  16. On the role of microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase in metabolism of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Antonenkov, V D; Pirozhkov, S V; Panchenko, L F

    1987-11-30

    To elucidate a possible role of membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase in the detoxication of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, the substrate specificity of the highly purified microsomal enzyme was investigated. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was active with different aliphatic aldehydes including 4-hydroxyalkenals, but did not react with malonic dialdehyde. When Fe/ADP-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid was carried out in an in vitro system, the formation of products which react with microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed parallel with malonic dialdehyde accumulation.

  17. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  18. Aldehyde Detection in Electronic Cigarette Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Acetaldehyde, acrolein, and formaldehyde are the principal toxic aldehydes present in cigarette smoke and contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease and noncancerous pulmonary disease. The rapid growth of the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has raised concerns over emissions of these harmful aldehydes. This work determines emissions of these aldehydes in both free and bound (aldehyde–hemiacetal) forms and other carbonyls from the use of e-cigarettes. A novel silicon microreactor with a coating phase of 4-(2-aminooxyethyl)-morpholin-4-ium chloride (AMAH) was used to trap carbonyl compounds in the aerosols of e-cigarettes via oximation reactions. AMAH–aldehyde adducts were measured using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to analyze hemiacetals in the aerosols. These aldehydes were detected in the aerosols of all e-cigarettes. Newer-generation e-cigarette devices generated more aldehydes than the first-generation e-cigarettes because of higher battery power output. Formaldehyde–hemiacetal was detected in the aerosols generated from some e-liquids using the newer e-cigarette devices at a battery power output of 11.7 W and above. The emission of these aldehydes from all e-cigarettes, especially higher levels of aldehydes from the newer-generation e-cigarette devices, indicates the risk of using e-cigarettes. PMID:28393137

  19. Life cycle of cytosolic prions.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Julia; Vorberg, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-templating protein aggregates that were originally identified as the causative agent of prion diseases in mammals, but have since been discovered in other kingdoms. Mammalian prions represent a unique class of infectious agents that are composed of misfolded prion protein. Prion proteins usually exist as soluble proteins but can refold and assemble into highly ordered, self-propagating prion polymers. The prion concept is also applicable to a growing number of non-Mendelian elements of inheritance in lower eukaryotes. While prions identified in mammals are clearly pathogens, prions in lower eukaryotes can be either detrimental or beneficial to the host. Prion phenotypes in fungi are transmitted vertically from mother to daughter cells during cell division and horizontally during mating or abortive mating, but extracellular phases have not been reported. Recent findings now demonstrate that in a mammalian cell environment, protein aggregates derived from yeast prion domains exhibit a prion life cycle similar to mammalian prions propagated ex vivo. This life cycle includes a soluble state of the protein, an induction phase by exogenous prion fibrils, stable replication of prion entities, vertical transmission to progeny and natural horizontal transmission to neighboring cells. Our data reveal that mammalian cells contain all co-factors required for cytosolic prion propagation and dissemination. This has important implications for understanding prion-like properties of disease-related protein aggregates. In light of the growing number of identified functional amyloids, cell-to-cell propagation of cytosolic protein conformers might not only be relevant for the spreading of disease-associated proteins, but might also be of more general relevance under non-disease conditions.

  20. Life cycle of cytosolic prions

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia; Vorberg, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-templating protein aggregates that were originally identified as the causative agent of prion diseases in mammals, but have since been discovered in other kingdoms. Mammalian prions represent a unique class of infectious agents that are composed of misfolded prion protein. Prion proteins usually exist as soluble proteins but can refold and assemble into highly ordered, self-propagating prion polymers. The prion concept is also applicable to a growing number of non-Mendelian elements of inheritance in lower eukaryotes. While prions identified in mammals are clearly pathogens, prions in lower eukaryotes can be either detrimental or beneficial to the host. Prion phenotypes in fungi are transmitted vertically from mother to daughter cells during cell division and horizontally during mating or abortive mating, but extracellular phases have not been reported. Recent findings now demonstrate that in a mammalian cell environment, protein aggregates derived from yeast prion domains exhibit a prion life cycle similar to mammalian prions propagated ex vivo. This life cycle includes a soluble state of the protein, an induction phase by exogenous prion fibrils, stable replication of prion entities, vertical transmission to progeny and natural horizontal transmission to neighboring cells. Our data reveal that mammalian cells contain all co-factors required for cytosolic prion propagation and dissemination. This has important implications for understanding prion-like properties of disease-related protein aggregates. In light of the growing number of identified functional amyloids, cell-to-cell propagation of cytosolic protein conformers might not only be relevant for the spreading of disease-associated proteins, but might also be of more general relevance under non-disease conditions. PMID:24021964

  1. Regulation of NF-κB-Induced Inflammatory Signaling by Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh C. S.; Ramana, Kota V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases including cancer. This view has broadened significantly with the recent discoveries that reactive oxygen species initiated lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of potentially toxic lipid aldehyde species such as 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), acrolein, and malondialdehyde which activate various signaling intermediates that regulate cellular activity and dysfunction via a process called redox signaling. The lipid aldehyde species formed during synchronized enzymatic pathways result in the posttranslational modification of proteins and DNA leading to cytotoxicity and genotoxicty. Among the lipid aldehyde species, HNE has been widely accepted as a most toxic and abundant lipid aldehyde generated during lipid peroxidation. HNE and its glutathione conjugates have been shown to regulate redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-κB and AP-1 via signaling through various protein kinase cascades. Activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and their nuclear localization leads to transcriptional induction of several genes responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and death. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which the lipid aldehydes transduce activation of NF-κB signaling pathways that may help to develop therapeutic strategies for the prevention of a number of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23710287

  2. Why do most human liver cytosol preparations lack xanthine oxidase activity?

    PubMed

    Barr, John T; Choughule, Kanika V; Nepal, Sahadev; Wong, Timothy; Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Zientek, Michael; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G; Thummel, Kenneth E; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2014-04-01

    When investigating the potential for xanthine oxidase (XO)-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity in vitro, selective chemical inhibition experiments are typically used. Most commonly, these inhibition experiments are performed using the inhibitor allopurinol (AP) and commercially prepared human liver cytosol (HLC) as the enzyme source. For reasons detailed herein, it is also a common practice to perfuse livers with solutions containing AP prior to liver harvest. The exposure to AP in HLC preparations could obviously pose a problem for measuring in vitro XO activity. To investigate this potential problem, an HPLC-MS/MS assay was developed to determine whether AP and its primary metabolite, oxypurinol, are retained within the cytosol for livers that were treated with AP during liver harvest. Differences in enzymatic activity for XO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) in human cytosol that can be ascribed to AP exposure were also evaluated. The results confirmed the presence of residual AP (some) and oxypurinol (all) human liver cytosol preparations that had been perfused with an AP-containing solution. In every case where oxypurinol was detected, XO activity was not observed. In contrast, the presence of AP and oxypurinol did not appear to have an impact on AO activity. Pooled HLC that was purchased from a commercial source also contained residual oxypurinol and did not show any XO activity. In the future, it is recommended that each HLC batch is screened for oxypurinol and/or XO activity prior to testing for XO-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity.

  3. Similarities between catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Qato, M; Whalen, R; Glomb, S

    1989-01-01

    Cytosolic epoxide hydrolase, measured as trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase activity, was isolated and purified from human and guinea pig liver cytosol. Antiserum to the guinea pig liver preparation reacted strongly with bovine liver catalase. We determined that this lack of selectivity of the antiserum was due to catalase contamination of the epoxide hydrolase preparation. We also determined that several commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with cytosolic epoxide hydrolase. Our human epoxide hydrolase preparation contained no detectable catalase contamination, yet antiserum to this protein also cross-reacted slightly with catalase, indicating some intrinsic similarity between the two enzymes. We conclude that catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase contain some similar immunogenic epitopes, and we surmise that similarities between the subunits of these two enzymes may lead to their partial copurification. Functional similarities between the two enzymes are also demonstrated, as several compounds that inhibit catalase are also shown to inhibit cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activity in the same concentration range and rank order.

  4. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-09-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90-99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2-C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production.

  5. Methods to Design and Synthesize Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Houzong; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have become a promising targeted therapy strategy that combines the specificity, favorable pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antibodies with the destructive potential of highly potent drugs. One of the biggest challenges in the development of ADCs is the application of suitable linkers for conjugating drugs to antibodies. Recently, the design and synthesis of linkers are making great progress. In this review, we present the methods that are currently used to synthesize antibody-drug conjugates by using thiols, amines, alcohols, aldehydes and azides. PMID:26848651

  6. Two-carbon homologation of aldehydes and ketones to a,ß-unsaturated aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes or ketones to unbranched- or methyl-branched a,ß-unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a...

  7. Diphenylprolinol silyl ether as catalyst of an asymmetric, catalytic, and direct Michael reaction of nitroalkanes with alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Hayato; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2007-12-06

    A catalytic enantioselective direct conjugate addition of nitroalkanes to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes using diphenylprolinol silyl ether as an organocatalyst has been developed. Using this methodology as a key step, short syntheses of therapeutically useful compounds have also been accomplished.

  8. Intercalation of Aldehydes into Vanadyl Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík.; Zima, Vítězslav; Votinský, Jiří

    2001-02-01

    Intercalates of VOPO4 with several aliphatic aldehydes, benzaldehyde, and 4-methylbenzaldehyde were prepared and characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, and IR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Aliphatic aldehyde intercalates are unstable and the guests undergo aldol condensation and oxidation. The arrangement of the guest molecules in the interlayer space of the host is discussed. A part of aliphatic aldehydes is anchored to the host layers by coordination of their carbonyl oxygen to the vanadium atom; the rest is probably bonded by weak van der Waals forces. In the benzaldehyde and 4-methylbenzaldehyde intercalates, all guest molecules are coordinated to the vanadium atoms with their benzene rings perpendicular to the sheets of the host.

  9. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  10. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    PubMed

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  11. Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes Using Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhari, Rajani; Maddukuri, Padma P.; Thottumkara, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using water as a solvent for organic reactions which highlights the cost and environmental benefits of its use is presented. The experiment encourages students to think in terms of the reaction mechanism of the oxidation of aldehydes knowing that potassium persulfate is the active oxidant in Oxone…

  12. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  13. Biomimetic flavin-catalyzed aldehyde oxidation.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander T; Matton, Pascal; Fairhurst, Nathan W G; John, Matthew P; Carbery, David R

    2012-07-20

    The oxidation of alkyl and aryl aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids has been achieved through the action of a biomimetic bridged flavin catalyst. The reaction uses readily available 35% aqueous hydrogen peroxide and is operationally simple. The oxidation is a green and sustainable reaction, obviating chlorinated solvents with minimal byproducts.

  14. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  15. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene, and fulvestrant by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs): A systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ying; Luo, Lijun; Zhang, Lingtian; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Zhou, Chunyang; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfate conjugation is involved in the metabolism of three commonly used breast cancer drugs, tamoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. The current study was designed to systematically identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) that are capable of sulfating raloxifene, fulvestrant, and two active metabolites of tamoxifen, afimoxifene and endoxifen. A systematic analysis using 13 known human SULTs revealed SULT1A1 and SULT1C4 as the major SULTs responsible for the sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. Kinetic parameters of these two human SULTs in catalyzing the sulfation of these drug compounds were determined. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant under metabolic conditions was examined using HepG2 human hepatoma cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Moreover, human intestine, kidney, liver, and lung cytosols were examined to verify the presence of afimoxifene/endoxifen/raloxifene/fulvestrant-sulfating activity.

  16. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  1. CD4 Glycoprotein Degradation Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpu Protein Requires the Function of Proteasomes and the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Ulrich; Antón, Luis C.; Bačík, Igor; Cox, Josephine H.; Bour, Stéphane; Bennink, Jack R.; Orlowski, Marian; Strebel, Klaus; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpu gene encodes a type I anchored integral membrane phosphoprotein with two independent functions. First, it regulates virus release from a post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment by an ion channel activity mediated by its transmembrane anchor. Second, it induces the selective down regulation of host cell receptor proteins (CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules) in a process involving its phosphorylated cytoplasmic tail. In the present work, we show that the Vpu-induced proteolysis of nascent CD4 can be completely blocked by peptide aldehydes that act as competitive inhibitors of proteasome function and also by lactacystin, which blocks proteasome activity by covalently binding to the catalytic β subunits of proteasomes. The sensitivity of Vpu-induced CD4 degradation to proteasome inhibitors paralleled the inhibition of proteasome degradation of a model ubiquitinated substrate. Characterization of CD4-associated oligosaccharides indicated that CD4 rescued from Vpu-induced degradation by proteasome inhibitors is exported from the ER to the Golgi complex. This finding suggests that retranslocation of CD4 from the ER to the cytosol may be coupled to its proteasomal degradation. CD4 degradation mediated by Vpu does not require the ER chaperone calnexin and is dependent on an intact ubiquitin-conjugating system. This was demonstrated by inhibition of CD4 degradation (i) in cells expressing a thermally inactivated form of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 or (ii) following expression of a mutant form of ubiquitin (Lys48 mutated to Arg48) known to compromise ubiquitin targeting by interfering with the formation of polyubiquitin complexes. CD4 degradation was also prevented by altering the four Lys residues in its cytosolic domain to Arg, suggesting a role for ubiquitination of one or more of these residues in the process of degradation. The results clearly demonstrate a role for the cytosolic

  2. Aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Henrik J; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2002-12-04

    In the present study, the aldehyde-induced pro-oxidative activity of xanthine oxidase was followed in an accelerated raw milk system using spin-trap electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The aldehydes acetaldehyde, propanal, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, trans-2-heptenal, trans-2-nonenal, and 3-methyl-2-butenal were all found to initiate radical reactions when added to milk. Formation of superoxide through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity is suggested as the initial reaction, as all tested aldehydes were shown to trigger superoxide formation in an ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk model system with added xanthine oxidase. It was found that addition of aldehydes to milk initially increased the ascorbyl radical concentration with a subsequent decay due to ascorbate depletion, which renders the formation of superoxide in milk with added aldehyde. The present study shows for the first time potential acceleration of oxidative events in milk through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity.

  3. Cytosolic selection systems to study protein stability.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Bardwell, James C A

    2014-12-01

    Here we describe biosensors that provide readouts for protein stability in the cytosolic compartment of prokaryotes. These biosensors consist of tripartite sandwich fusions that link the in vitro stability or aggregation susceptibility of guest proteins to the in vivo resistance of host cells to the antibiotics kanamycin, spectinomycin, and nourseothricin. These selectable markers confer antibiotic resistance in a wide range of hosts and are easily quantifiable. We show that mutations within guest proteins that affect their stability alter the antibiotic resistances of the cells expressing the biosensors in a manner that is related to the in vitro stabilities of the mutant guest proteins. In addition, we find that polyglutamine tracts of increasing length are associated with an increased tendency to form amyloids in vivo and, in our sandwich fusion system, with decreased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that our approach allows the in vivo analysis of protein stability in the cytosolic compartment without the need for prior structural and functional knowledge.

  4. Hyaluronate - Peanut Agglutinin Conjugates for Target-Specific Bioimaging of Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beack, Songeun; Cho, Minsoo; Kim, Young-Eun; Ahn, G-One; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-03-27

    Colon cancer is one of the most common death-related cancers in the world. For treating the colon cancer, it is crucial to detect and remove malignant lesions in the early time. Here, we developed hyaluronate (HA) - peanut agglutinin (PNA) conjugates for bioimaging of colon cancer. The HA-PNA conjugates were successfully synthesized by the coupling reaction between aldehyde modified HA and the N-terminal amine group of PNA. For diagnostic imaging, rhodamine B (RhoB) was chemically conjugated onto PNA in HA-PNA conjugates. After intraluminal injection of HA-PNA-RhoB conjugates into tumor-bearing mice, small-sized colon cancers could be effectively visualized by ex vivo IVIS imaging and two-photon microscopy. Taken together, we could confirm the feasibility of HA-PNA-RhoB conjugates as a bioimaging agent for detecting colon cancers. [Keywords] Hyaluronate; Peanut agglutinin; Colon cancer; Two-photon imaging; Diagnostics.

  5. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation.

  6. Myeloperoxidase-dependent Lipid Peroxidation Promotes the Oxidative Modification of Cytosolic Proteins in Phagocytic Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P.; Magon, Nicholas J.; Harwood, D. Tim; Kettle, Anthony J.; Vissers, Margreet C.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Hampton, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  7. An integrated QSAR-PBK/D modelling approach for predicting detoxification and DNA adduct formation of 18 acyclic food-borne α,β-unsaturated aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, R. Spenkelink, A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Punt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Acyclic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes present in food raise a concern because the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety is considered a structural alert for genotoxicity. However, controversy remains on whether in vivo at realistic dietary exposure DNA adduct formation is significant. The aim of the present study was to develop physiologically based kinetic/dynamic (PBK/D) models to examine dose-dependent detoxification and DNA adduct formation of a group of 18 food-borne acyclic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes without 2- or 3-alkylation, and with no more than one conjugated double bond. Parameters for the PBK/D models were obtained using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs) defined with a training set of six selected aldehydes. Using the QSARs, PBK/D models for the other 12 aldehydes were defined. Results revealed that DNA adduct formation in the liver increases with decreasing bulkiness of the molecule especially due to less efficient detoxification. 2-Propenal (acrolein) was identified to induce the highest DNA adduct levels. At realistic dietary intake, the predicted DNA adduct levels for all aldehydes were two orders of magnitude lower than endogenous background levels observed in disease free human liver, suggesting that for all 18 aldehydes DNA adduct formation is negligible at the relevant levels of dietary intake. The present study provides a proof of principle for the use of QSAR-based PBK/D modelling to facilitate group evaluations and read-across in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Physiologically based in silico models were made for 18 α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. • Kinetic parameters were determined by in vitro incubations and a QSAR approach. • DNA adduct formation was negligible at levels relevant for dietary intake. • The use of QSAR-based PBK/D modelling facilitates group evaluations and read-across.

  8. Pathways of trans,trans-muconaldehyde metabolism in mouse liver cytosol: reversibility of monoreductive metabolism and formation of end products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Kline, S A; Kirley, T A; Goldstein, B D; Witz, G

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC), a hematotoxic agent which is a presumed in vivo metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver cytosol. MUC was incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with mouse liver cytosol (from CD-1 mice) supplemented with NAD+ and the products were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Two products were detected in addition to the previously identified acid-aldehyde 6-oxo-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid (COOH-M-CHO) and the diacid trans,trans-muconic acid (COOH-M-COOH). Based on the molecular weight (112) obtained by thermo-spray LC-mass spectrometry and the absorbance maximum (269 nm), one of the products was identified as the aldehyde-alcohol 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienal (CHO-M-OH). The second product was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid (COOH-M-OH) by coelution with authentic standard, the fragmentation pattern obtained by electron impact mass spectrometry and the absorbance maximum (258 nm). Time course and concentration dependency studies indicate that COOH-M-OH and COOH-M-COOH are end products of MUC metabolism while CHO-M-OH, and COOH-M-CHO, the initially formed mono-reduction and mono-oxidation products, respectively, are the intermediates leading to these end products. The metabolite COOH-M-OH is formed mainly by oxidation of CHO-M-OH and to a much lesser extent by reduction of CHO-M-COOH, whereas COOH-M-COOH is formed solely by oxidation of COOH-M-CHO. The reduction of MUC to CHO-M-OH is reversible, whereas oxidation to COOH-M-CHO is not. The compound CHO-M-OH is not only oxidized to COOH-M-OH by oxidation of the aldehyde functional group, but is also converted back to MUC by oxidation of the alcohol functional group.

  9. Aldehyde Oxidase 4 Plays a Critical Role in Delaying Silique Senescence by Catalyzing Aldehyde Detoxification1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Soltabayeva, Aigerim; Samani, Talya

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) aldehyde oxidases are a multigene family of four oxidases (AAO1–AAO4) that oxidize a variety of aldehydes, among them abscisic aldehyde, which is oxidized to the phytohormone abscisic acid. Toxic aldehydes are generated in plants both under normal conditions and in response to stress. The detoxification of such aldehydes by oxidation is attributed to aldehyde dehydrogenases but never to aldehyde oxidases. The feasibility of the detoxification of aldehydes in siliques via oxidation by AAO4 was demonstrated, first, by its ability to efficiently oxidize an array of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, including the reactive carbonyl species (RCS) acrolein, hydroxyl-2-nonenal, and malondialdehyde. Next, exogenous application of several aldehydes to siliques in AAO4 knockout (KO) Arabidopsis plants induced severe tissue damage and enhanced malondialdehyde levels and senescence symptoms, but not in wild-type siliques. Furthermore, abiotic stresses such as dark and ultraviolet C irradiation caused an increase in endogenous RCS and higher expression levels of senescence marker genes, leading to premature senescence of KO siliques, whereas RCS and senescence marker levels in wild-type siliques were hardly affected. Finally, in naturally senesced KO siliques, higher endogenous RCS levels were associated with enhanced senescence molecular markers, chlorophyll degradation, and earlier seed shattering compared with the wild type. The aldehyde-dependent differential generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by AAO4 and the induction of AAO4 expression by hydrogen peroxide shown here suggest a self-amplification mechanism for detoxifying additional reactive aldehydes produced during stress. Taken together, our results indicate that AAO4 plays a critical role in delaying senescence in siliques by catalyzing aldehyde detoxification. PMID:28188272

  10. Daidzin inhibits mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and suppresses ethanol intake of Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Klyosov, A A; Vallee, B L

    1997-03-04

    Daidzin is the major active principle in extracts of radix puerariae, a traditional Chinese medication that suppresses the ethanol intake of Syrian golden hamsters. It is the first isoflavone recognized to have this effect. Daidzin is also a potent and selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). To establish a link between these two activities, we have tested a series of synthetic structural analogs of daidzin. The results demonstrate a direct correlation between ALDH-2 inhibition and ethanol intake suppression and raise the possibility that daidzin may, in fact, suppress ethanol intake of golden hamsters by inhibiting ALDH-2. Hamster liver contains not only mitochondrial ALDH-2 but also high concentrations of a cytosolic form, ALDH-1, which is a very efficient catalyst of acetaldehyde oxidation. Further, the cytosolic isozyme is completely resistant to daidzin inhibition. This unusual property of the hamster ALDH-1 isozyme accounts for the fact we previously observed that daidzin can suppress ethanol intake of this species without blocking acetaldehyde metabolism. Thus, the mechanism by which daidzin suppresses ethanol intake in golden hamsters clearly differs from that proposed for the classic ALDH inhibitor disulfiram. We postulate that a physiological pathway catalyzed by ALDH-2, so far undefined, controls ethanol intake of golden hamsters and mediates the antidipsotropic effect of daidzin.

  11. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Cynomolgus monkey as a surrogate for human aldehyde oxidase metabolism of the EGFR inhibitor BIBX1382.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Cerny, Matthew A; Yang, Young-Sun; Asher, Constance; Wong, Diane; Frederick, Kosea; Gilpin, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    BIBX1382 was an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor under clinical investigation for treatment of cancer. This candidate possessed an attractive preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion profile, yet failed in clinical studies due in part to poor oral exposure, resulting from extensive metabolism by aldehyde oxidase (AO). In vitro metabolism studies were performed in liver cytosol and cryopreserved hepatocytes from multiple species. In addition, a pharmacokinetic study was performed in cynomolgus monkey for comparison with the reported human pharmacokinetics of BIBX1382. Estimated hepatic clearance of BIBX1382 in rhesus (42 ml/min per kg) and cynomolgus monkey (43 ml/min per kg) liver cytosol was comparable to human (≥93% of liver blood flow). Metabolite identification after incubation of BIBX1382 in liver cytosol fortified with the AO inhibitor raloxifene confirmed that AO is involved in the formation of the predominant metabolite (BIBU1476, M1) in cynomolgus monkey. After intravenous and oral administration of BIBX1382 to cynomolgus monkeys, high plasma clearance (118 ml/min per kg) and low oral exposure (C(max) = 12.7 nM and 6% oral bioavailability) was observed, with the exposure of M1 exceeding BIBX1382 after oral dosing. This pharmacokinetic profile compared favorably with the human clinical data of BIBX1382 (plasma clearance 25-55 ml/min per kg and 5% oral bioavailability). Thus, it appears that cynomolgus monkey represents a suitable surrogate for the observed human AO metabolism of BIBX1382. To circumvent clinical failures due to uncharacterized metabolism by AO, in vitro studies in the appropriate subcellular fraction, followed by pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic studies in the appropriately characterized surrogate species should be conducted for substrates of AO.

  13. Interactions of cytosolic sulfotransferases with xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O; Ambadapadi, Sriram

    2013-11-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are a superfamily of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of the sulfonic group from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to hydroxy or amine groups in substrate molecules. The human cytosolic sulfotransferases that have been most studied, namely SULT1A1, SULT1A3, SULT1B1, SULT1E1 and SULT2A1, are expressed in different tissues of the body, including liver, intestine, adrenal, brain and skin. These sulfotransferases play important roles in the sulfonation of endogenous molecules such as steroid hormones and neurotransmitters, and in the elimination of xenobiotic molecules such as drugs, environmental chemicals and natural products. There is often overlapping substrate selectivity among the sulfotransferases, although one isoform may exhibit greater enzyme efficiency than other isoforms. Similarly, inhibitors or enhancers of one isoform often affect other isoforms, but typically with different potency. This means that if the activity of one form of sulfotransferase is altered (either inhibited or enhanced) by the presence of a xenobiotic, the sulfonation of endogenous and xenobiotic substrates for other isoforms may well be affected. There are more examples of inhibitors than enhancers of sulfonation. Modulators of sulfotransferase enzymes include natural products ingested as part of the human diet as well as environmental chemicals and drugs. This review will discuss recent work on such interactions.

  14. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  15. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  16. OLFACTORY RESPONSES OF BLOWFLIES TO ALIPHATIC ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Dethier, V. G.

    1954-01-01

    The response of the blowfly Phormia regina to stimulation by aldehydes in the vapor phase has been studied by means of a specially designed olfactometer. The median rejection threshold and the maximum acceptance threshold were selected as criteria of response. For both acceptance and rejection the distribution of thresholds in the population is normal with respect to the logarithm of concentration. When thresholds are expressed as molar concentrations, the values decrease progressively as chain length is increased. There is no attraction beyond decanal and no rejection beyond dodecanal. When thresholds are expressed as activities, most members of the aldehyde series are approximately equally stimulating at rejection and equally stimulating at acceptance. The relationship is most exact over the middle range of chain lengths. There is a tendency for the terminal members to stimulate at higher activities. These relationships are in close agreement with those which were found earlier to apply to the normal aliphatic alcohols. The similarity between the relative actions of the members of the two series suggests that the relation of equal olfactory stimulation at equal thermodynamic activities by homologous aliphatic compounds at least for homologues of intermediate chain length may be of rather general application in olfaction. PMID:13174780

  17. Group B Streptococcal Type II and III Conjugate Vaccines: Physicochemical Properties That Influence Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Michon, Francis; Uitz, Catherine; Sarkar, Arun; D'Ambra, Anello J.; Laude-Sharp, Maryline; Moore, Samuel; Fusco, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts toward developing vaccines against group B streptococci (GBS) have focused on increasing the immunogenicity of GBS polysaccharides by conjugation to carrier proteins. However, partial depolymerization of GBS polysaccharides for the production of vaccines is a difficult task because of their acid-labile, antigenically critical sialic acids. Here we report a method for the partial depolymerization of type II and III polysaccharides by mild deaminative cleavage to antigenic fragments with reducing-terminal 2,5-anhydro-d-mannose residues. Through the free aldehydes of their newly formed end groups, the fragments were conjugated to tetanus toxoid by reductive amination. The resulting conjugates stimulated the production in animals of high-titer type II- and III-specific antibodies which induced opsonophagocytic killing of type II and III strains of group B streptococci. For the type II conjugates, immunogenicity increased as oligosaccharide size decreased, whereas for type III conjugates, the size of the oligosaccharides did not significantly influence immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides of defined size were conjugated through sialic acid residues, the resulting cross-linkages were shown to affect immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides were conjugated through terminal aldehyde groups generated by deamination, modification of the exocyclic chain of sialic acid did not influence immunogenicity. PMID:16893995

  18. Cytosolic delivery of materials with endosome-disrupting colloids

    DOEpatents

    Helms, Brett A.; Bayles, Andrea R.

    2016-03-15

    A facile procedure to deliver nanocrystals to the cytosol of live cells that is both rapid and general. The technique employs a unique cationic core-shell polymer colloid that directs nanocrystals to the cytosol of living cells within a few hours of incubation. The present methods and compositions enable a host of advanced applications arising from efficient cytosolic delivery of nanocrystal imaging probes: from single particle tracking experiments to monitoring protein-protein interactions in live cells for extended periods.

  19. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  20. The epimerization of peptide aldehydes--a systematic study.

    PubMed

    Ganneau, Cécile; Moulin, Aline; Demange, Luc; Martinez, Jean; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain

    2006-07-01

    Peptide aldehydes are interesting targets as enzyme inhibitors, and can be used for pseudopeptide chemistry or ligation. However, they are known to be subjected to epimerization during synthesis or purification. By (1)H NMR, a model dipeptide aldehyde can be used to check the possible epimerization occurring during synthesis. Various purification methods were investigated, but none was free from epimerization.

  1. Revisiting conjugate schedules.

    PubMed

    MacAleese, Kenneth R; Ghezzi, Patrick M; Rapp, John T

    2015-07-01

    The effects of conjugate reinforcement on the responding of 13 college students were examined in three experiments. Conjugate reinforcement was provided via key presses that changed the clarity of pictures displayed on a computer monitor in a manner proportional to the rate of responding. Experiment 1, which included seven parameters of clarity change per response, revealed that responding decreased as the percentage clarity per response increased for all five participants. These results indicate that each participant's responding was sensitive to intensity change, which is a parameter of conjugate reinforcement schedules. Experiment 2 showed that responding increased during conjugate reinforcement phases and decreased during extinction phases for all four participants. Experiment 3 also showed that responding increased during conjugate reinforcement and further showed that responding decreased during a conjugate negative punishment condition for another four participants. Directions for future research with conjugate schedules are briefly discussed.

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  3. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  4. Protein Aggregation Profile of the Bacterial Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Natalia S.; Ventura, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein misfolding is usually deleterious for the cell, either as a consequence of the loss of protein function or the buildup of insoluble and toxic aggregates. The aggregation behavior of a given polypeptide is strongly influenced by the intrinsic properties encoded in its sequence. This has allowed the development of effective computational methods to predict protein aggregation propensity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to approximate the aggregation profile of an experimental cytosolic Escherichia coli proteome. The analysis indicates that the aggregation propensity of bacterial proteins is associated with their length, conformation, location, function, and abundance. The data are consistent with the predictions of other algorithms on different theoretical proteomes. Conclusions/Significance Overall, the study suggests that the avoidance of protein aggregation in functional environments acts as a strong evolutionary constraint on polypeptide sequences in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:20195530

  5. Reversible, partial inactivation of plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by betaine aldehyde: mechanism and possible physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Murillo-Melo, Darío S; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Montiel, Carmina; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2016-04-01

    In plants, the last step in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB) is the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde (BAL) catalysed by some aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 10 enzymes that exhibit betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity. Given the irreversibility of the reaction, the short-term regulation of these enzymes is of great physiological relevance to avoid adverse decreases in the NAD(+):NADH ratio. In the present study, we report that the Spinacia oleracea BADH (SoBADH) is reversibly and partially inactivated by BAL in the absence of NAD(+)in a time- and concentration-dependent mode. Crystallographic evidence indicates that the non-essential Cys(450)(SoBADH numbering) forms a thiohemiacetal with BAL, totally blocking the productive binding of the aldehyde. It is of interest that, in contrast to Cys(450), the catalytic cysteine (Cys(291)) did not react with BAL in the absence of NAD(+) The trimethylammonium group of BAL binds in the same position in the inactivating or productive modes. Accordingly, BAL does not inactivate the C(450)SSoBADH mutant and the degree of inactivation of the A(441)I and A(441)C mutants corresponds to their very different abilities to bind the trimethylammonium group. Cys(450)and the neighbouring residues that participate in stabilizing the thiohemiacetal are strictly conserved in plant ALDH10 enzymes with proven or predicted BADH activity, suggesting that inactivation by BAL is their common feature. Under osmotic stress conditions, this novel partial and reversible covalent regulatory mechanism may contribute to preventing NAD(+)exhaustion, while still permitting the synthesis of high amounts of GB and avoiding the accumulation of the toxic BAL.

  6. Radical addition-initiated domino reactions of conjugated oxime ethers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The application of conjugated oxime ethers to the synthesis of complex chemical scaffolds using domino radical reactions has been described in detail. The triethylborane-mediated hydroxysulfenylation reaction allows for the regioselective construction of a carbon-sulfur bond and a carbon-oxygen bond in a single operation for the formation of β-hydroxy sulfides. This reaction proceeds via a radical pathway involving regioselective thiyl addition and the subsequent trapping of the resulting α-imino radical with O₂, where the imino group enhances the stability of the intermediate radical. Hydroxyalkylation reactions that occur via a carbon radical addition reaction followed by the hydroxylation of the resulting N-borylenamine with O₂ have also been developed. We investigated sequential radical addition aldol-type reactions in detail to explore the novel domino reactions that occur via the generation of N-borylenamine. The radical reaction of a conjugated oxime ether with triethylborane in the presence of an aldehyde affords γ-butyrolactone via sequential processes including ethyl radical addition, the generation of N-borylenamine, an aldol-type reaction with an aldehyde, and a lactonization reaction. A novel domino reaction has also been developed involving the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of N-boryl-N-phenoxyenamine. The triethylborane-mediated domino reactions of O-phenyl-conjugated oxime ethers afforded the corresponding benzofuro[2,3-b]pyrrol-2-ones via a radical addition/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement/cyclization/lactamization cascade.

  7. Characterization of five fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes from Marinobacter and Acinetobacter: structural insights into the aldehyde binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Jonathan H; Mulliner, Kalene M; Shi, Ke; Plunkett, Mary H; Nixon, Peter; Serratore, Nicholas A; Douglas, Christopher J; Aihara, Hideki; Barney, Brett M

    2017-04-07

    Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism play an important role in energy conversion and storage, and in the function of structural components such as cell membranes. The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAldDH) plays a central function in the metabolism of lipid intermediates, oxidizing fatty aldehydes to the corresponding fatty acid, and competing with pathways that would further reduce the fatty aldehydes to fatty alcohols or require the fatty aldehydes to produce alkanes. In this report, the genes for four putative FAldDH enzymes from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 and an additional enzyme from Acinetobacter baylyi were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to display FAldDH activity. Five enzymes (Maqu_0438, Maqu_3316, Maqu_3410, Maqu_3572 and WP_004927398) were found to act on aldehydes ranging from acetaldehyde to hexadecanal, and also acted on the unsaturated long-chain palmitoleyl and oleyl aldehydes. A comparison of the specificity of these enzymes with various aldehydes is presented. Crystallization trials yielded diffraction quality crystals of one particular FAldDH (Maqu_3316) from M. aquaeolei VT8. Crystals were independently treated with both the NAD(+) cofactor and the aldehyde substrate decanal, revealing specific details of the likely substrate binding pocket for this class of enzymes. A likely model for how the catalysis by the enzyme is accomplished is also provided.Importance: This study provides a comparison of multiple enzymes with the ability to oxidize fatty aldehydes to fatty acids, and provides a likely picture of how the fatty aldehyde and NAD(+) is bound to the enzyme to facilitate catalysis. Based on the information obtained from this structural analysis and the comparisons of specificity for the five enzymes that were characterized, correlations may be drawn to the potential roles played by specific residues within the structure.

  8. Human liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase: three-dimensional structure and the restoration of solubility and activity of chimeric forms.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L.; Zhou, J.; Hurley, T. D.; Weiner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Human liver cytosolic and mitochondrial isozymes of aldehyde dehydrogenase share 70% sequence identity. However, the first 21 residues are not conserved between the human isozymes (15% identity). The three-dimensional structures of the beef mitochondrial and sheep cytosolic forms have virtually identical three-dimensional structures. Here, we solved the structure of the human mitochondrial enzyme and found it to be identical to the beef enzyme. The first 21 residues are found on the surface of the enzyme and make no contact with other subunits in the tetramer. A pair of chimeric enzymes between the human isozymes was made. Each chimera had the first 21 residues from one isozyme and the remaining 479 from the other. When the first 21 residues were from the mitochondrial isozyme, an enzyme with cytosolic-like properties was produced. The other was expressed but was insoluble. It was possible to restore solubility and activity to the chimera that had the first 21 cytosolic residues fused to the mitochondrial ones by making point mutations to residues at the N-terminal end. When residue 19 was changed from tyrosine to a cysteine, the residue found in the mitochondrial form, an active enzyme could be made though the Km for NAD+ was 35 times higher than the native mitochondrial isozyme and the specific activity was reduced by 75%. This residue interacts with residue 203, a nonconserved, nonactive site residue. A mutation of residue 18, which also interacts with 203, restored solubility, but not activity. Mutation to residue 15, which interacts with 104, also restored solubility but not activity. It appears that to have a soluble or active enzyme a favorable interaction must occur between a residue in a surface loop and a residue elsewhere in the molecule even though neither make contact with the active site region of the enzyme. PMID:10631996

  9. Phase-Conjugated Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number)FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP PHASE-CONJUGATED FLUORESCENCE EMITTED POWER FOUR -WAVE MIXING THREE CONTRIBUTIONS...atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave mixing is studied from first principles. The MaxwellLeisenberg equations are solved for the...Fronczak Hall State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14260 Fluorescent emission by an atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave

  10. Evidence for Substrate-Dependent Inhibition Profiles for Human Liver Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Barr, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a reasonable assessment of how probe substrate selection may impact the results of in vitro aldehyde oxidase (AO) inhibition experiments. Here, we used a previously studied set of seven known AO inhibitors to probe the inhibition profile of a pharmacologically relevant substrate N-[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA). DACA oxidation in human liver cytosol was characterized with a measured Vmax of 2.3 ± 0.08 nmol product · min−1 · mg−1 and a Km of 6.3 ± 0.8 µM. The Kii and Kis values describing the inhibition of DACA oxidation by the panel of seven inhibitors were tabulated and compared with previous findings with phthalazine as the substrate. In every case, the inhibition profile shifted to a much less uncompetitive mode of inhibition for DACA relative to phthalazine. With the exception of one inhibitor, raloxifene, this change in inhibition profile seems to be a result of a decrease in the uncompetitive mode of inhibition (an affected Kii value), whereas the competitive mode (Kis) seems to be relatively consistent between substrates. Raloxifene was found to inhibit competitively when using DACA as a probe, and a previous report showed that raloxifene inhibited uncompetitively with other substrates. The relevance of these data to the mechanistic understanding of aldehyde oxidase inhibition and potential implications on drug-drug interactions is discussed. Overall, it appears that the choice in substrate may be critical when conducting mechanistic inhibition or in vitro drug-drug interactions prediction studies with AO PMID:22996261

  11. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  12. Differentially expressed cytosolic proteins in human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines correlate with lineages and functions.

    PubMed

    Gez, Swetlana; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-09-01

    Identification of cytosolic proteins differentially expressed between types of leukemia and lymphoma may provide a molecular basis for classification and understanding their cellular properties. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry have been used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in cytosolic extracts from four human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines: HL-60 (acute promyelocytic leukemia), MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia), CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) and Raji (B-cell Burkitt's lymphoma). A total of 247 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the four cell lines. Analysis of the data by principal component analysis identified 22 protein spots (17 different protein species) differentially expressed at more than a 95% variance level between these cell lines. Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in only one cell line: HL-60 (myeloperoxidase, phosphoprotein 32 family member A, ras related protein Rab-11B, protein disulfide-isomerase, ran-specific GTPase-activating protein, nucleophosmin and S-100 calcium binding protein A4), and Raji (ezrin). Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in two cell lines: Raji and MEC1 (C-1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, elongation factor 2, alpha- and beta-tubulin, transgelin-2 and stathmin). MEC1 and CCRF-CEM (gamma-enolase), HL-60 and CCRF-CEM (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N). The differentially expressed proteins identified in these four cell lines correlate with cellular properties and provide insights into the molecular basis of these malignancies.

  13. Molecular Structure and Reactivity in the Pyrolysis of Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Eric; Cole, Sarah; Sowards, John; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; McCunn, Laura R.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of alkyl chain structure on pyrolysis mechanisms has been investigated in a series of aldehydes. Isovaleraldehyde, CH_3CH(CH_3)CH_2CHO, and pivaldehyde, (CH_3)_3CCHO, were subject to thermal decomposition in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor at 800-1200 °C. Matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify pyrolysis products. Carbon monoxide and isobutene were major products from each of the aldehydes, which is consistent with what is known from previous studies of unbranched alkyl-chain aldehydes. Other products observed include vinyl alcohol, propene, acetylene, and ethylene, revealing complexities to be considered in the pyrolysis of large, branched-chain aldehydes.

  14. A kinetic estimate of the free aldehyde content of aldoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The relative free aldehyde content of eight hexoses and four pentoses has been estimated within about 10% from the rate constants for their reaction with urazole (1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione). These values of the percent free aldehyde are in agreement with those estimated from CD measurements, but are more accurate. The relative free aldehyde contents for the aldoses were then correlated to various literature NMR measurements to obtain the absolute values. This procedure was also done for three deoxyaldoses, which react much more rapidly than can be accounted for by the free aldehyde content. This difference in reactivity between aldoses and deoxyaldoses is due to the inductive effect of the H versus the OH on C-2'. This may help explain why deoxyribonucleosides hydrolyze much more rapidly than ribonucleosides.

  15. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  16. Expression of a gene encoding mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice increases under submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, M; Tsuji, H; Li, Y; Saisho, D; Arimura, S; Tsutsumi, N; Hirai, A

    2000-10-01

    It is known that alcoholic fermentation is important for survival of plants under anaerobic conditions. Acetaldehyde, one of the intermediates of alcoholic fermentation, is not only reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase but also can be oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). To determine whether ALDH plays a role in anaerobic metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Nipponbare), we characterized a cDNA clone encoding mitochondrial ALDH from rice (Aldh2a). Analysis of sub-cellular localization of ALDH2a protein using green fluorescent protein and an in vitro ALDH assay using protein extracts from Escherichia coli cells that overexpressed ALDH2a indicated that ALDH2a functions in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in mitochondria. A Southern-blot analysis indicated that mitochondrial ALDH is encoded by at least two genes in rice. We found that the Aldh2a mRNA was present at high levels in leaves of dark-grown seedlings, mature leaf sheaths, and panicles. It is interesting that expression of the rice Aldh2a gene, unlike the expression of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Aldh2a gene, was induced in rice seedlings by submergence. Experiments with ruthenium red, which is a blocker of Ca(2+) fluxes in rice as well as maize (Zea mays), suggest that the induction of expression of Adh1 and Pdc1 by low oxygen stress is regulated by elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. However, the induction of Aldh2a gene expression may not be controlled by the cytosolic Ca(2+) level elevation. A possible involvement of ALDH2a in the submergence tolerance of rice is discussed.

  17. A Novel Reaction Mediated by Human Aldehyde Oxidase: Amide Hydrolysis of GDC-0834

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Susan; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Liu, Lichuan; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Halladay, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    GDC-0834, a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor investigated as a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was previously reported to be extensively metabolized by amide hydrolysis such that no measurable levels of this compound were detected in human circulation after oral administration. In vitro studies in human liver cytosol determined that GDC-0834 (R)-N-(3-(6-(4-(1,4-dimethyl-3-oxopiperazin-2-yl)phenylamino)-4-methyl-5-oxo- 4,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl)-2-methylphenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b] thiophene-2-carboxamide) was rapidly hydrolyzed with a CLint of 0.511 ml/min per milligram of protein. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) and carboxylesterase (CES) were putatively identified as the enzymes responsible after cytosolic fractionation and mass spectrometry-proteomics analysis of the enzymatically active fractions. Results were confirmed by a series of kinetic experiments with inhibitors of AO, CES, and xanthine oxidase (XO), which implicated AO and CES, but not XO, as mediating GDC-0834 amide hydrolysis. Further supporting the interaction between GDC-0834 and AO, GDC-0834 was shown to be a potent reversible inhibitor of six known AO substrates with IC50 values ranging from 0.86 to 1.87 μM. Additionally, in silico modeling studies suggest that GDC-0834 is capable of binding in the active site of AO with the amide bond of GDC-0834 near the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo), orientated in such a way to enable potential nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl of the amide bond by the hydroxyl of MoCo. Together, the in vitro and in silico results suggest the involvement of AO in the amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834. PMID:25845827

  18. Clicking Hydrazine and Aldehyde: The Way to Labeling of Viruses with Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Lv, Cheng; Liu, An-An; Liu, Shu-Lin; Sun, En-Ze; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Lei, Ai-Wen; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-12-22

    Real-time tracking of fluorophore-tagged viruses in living cells can help uncover virus infection mechanisms. Certainly, the indispensable prerequisite for virus-tracking is to label viruses with some bright and photostable beacons such as quantum dots (QDs) via an appropriate labeling strategy. Herein, we devise a convenient hydrazine-aldehyde based strategy to label viruses with QDs through the conjugation of 4-formylbenzoate (4FB) modified QDs to 6-hydrazinonicotinate acetone hydrazone (HyNic) modified viruses under mild conditions. On the basis of this strategy, viruses can be successfully labeled with QDs with high selectivity, stable conjugation, good reproducibility, high labeling efficiency of 92-93% and maximum retention of both fluorescence properties of QDs and infectivity of viruses, which is very meaningful to tracking and statistical analysis of virus infection processes. By further comparing with the most widely used labeling strategy based on the Biotin-SA system, this new strategy has advantages of both high labeling efficiency and good retention of virus infectivity, thus offering a promising alternative for virus-labeling. Moreover, due to the ubiquitous presence of exposed amino groups on the surface of various viruses, this selective, efficient, reproducible and biofriendly strategy should have good universality for labeling both enveloped and nonenveloped viruses.

  19. Cytosolic Innate Immune Sensing and Signaling upon Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Dussurget, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic sensing of pathogens is essential to a productive immune response. Recent reports have emphasized the importance of signaling platforms emanating from organelles and cytosolic sensors, particularly during the response to intracellular pathogens. Here, we highlight recent discoveries identifying the key mediators of nucleic acid and cyclic nucleotide sensing and discuss their importance in host defense. This review will also cover strategies evolved by pathogens to manipulate these pathways. PMID:27014235

  20. Cytochrome P450 3A Conjugation to Ubiquitin in a Process Distinct from Classical Ubiquitination Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kimzey, Amy L.; Okita, Janice R.; Wunschel, David S. ); Edwards, Robert J.; Kim, Hyesook; Okita, Richard T.

    2001-12-01

    We characterize a novel microsome system that forms high-molecular-mass (HMM) CYP3A, CYP2E1, and ubiquitin conjugates, but does not alter CYP4A or most other microsomal proteins. The formation of the HMM bands was observed in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats treated 1 week or more with high doses (50 mg/kg/day) of nicardipine, clotrimazole, or pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, but not microsomes from control, dexamethasone-, nifedipine-, or diltiazem-treated rats. Extensive washing of the microsomes to remove loosely attached proteins or cytosolic contaminants did not prevent the conjugation reaction. In contrast to prototypical ubiquitination pathways, this reaction did not require addition of ubiquitin, ATP, Mg(2+), or cytosol. Addition of cytosol did result in the degradation of the HMM CYP3A bands in a process that was not blocked by proteasome inhibitors. Immunoprecipitated CYP3A contained HMM ubiquitin. Even so, mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides indicated that the HMM CYP3A was in molar excess to ubiquitin, suggesting that the formation of the HMM CYP3A may have resulted from conjugation to itself or a diffuse pool of ubiquitinated proteins already present in the microsomes. Addition of CYP3A substrates inhibited the formation of the HMM CYP3A and the cytosol-dependent degradation of HMM CYP3A. These results suggest that after extended periods of elevated CYP3A expression, microsomal factors are induced that catalyze the formation of HMM CYP3A conjugates that contain ubiquitin. This conjugation reaction, however, seems to be distinct from the classical ubiquitination pathway but may be related to the substrate-dependent stabilization of CYP3A observed in vivo.

  1. Human cytosolic sulfotransferase SULT1C4 mediates the sulfation of doxorubicin and epirubicin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lijun; Zhou, Chunyang; Hui, Ying; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2016-04-01

    Doxorubicin, an anthracycline, has been reported to be excreted in sulfate conjugated form. The current study aimed to identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferase(s) (SULT(s)) that is(are) capable of sulfating doxorubicin and its analog epirubicin, and to verify whether sulfation of doxorubicin and epirubicin may occur under metabolic conditions. A systematic analysis of thirteen known human SULTs, previously cloned, expressed, and purified, revealed SULT1C4 as the only human SULT capable of sulfating doxorubicin and epirubicin. Cultured HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells were labeled with [(35)S]sulfate in the presence of different concentrations of doxorubicin or epirubicin. Analysis of spent labeling media showed the generation and release of [(35)S]sulfated doxorubicin and epirubicin by HepG2 cells and Caco-2 cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed the expression of SULT1C4 in both HepG2 cells and Caco-2 cells. These results provided a molecular basis underlying the previous finding that sulfate-conjugated doxorubicin was excreted in the urine of patients treated with doxorubicin.

  2. Identification of a suitable and selective inhibitor towards aldehyde oxidase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Kanamarlapudi, Vijaya Bhargava; Ponnamaneni, Ranjith Kumar; Manoharan, Arun Kumar

    2014-03-01

    1. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a liver cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein enzyme whose importance in drug metabolism is gaining in the recent. The objective of this work is to find a potent and selective inhibitor for AO activity using phthalazine oxidation as a marker reaction. 2. Among organic solvents tested, it was identified that methanol was not a suitable choice for AO activity even at concentrations less than 0.2% v/v. Acetonitrile and DMSO did not show any effect till 0.5% v/v but thereafter activites tend to decrease. 3. For selectivity, 23 compounds were selected and evaluated for their effects on AO and nine CYP450 enzymes. Among the tested compounds chlorpromazine, estradiol, hydralazine, quetiapine and raloxifene were selected based on their potency of inhibition towards AO activity. 4. Raloxifene was found to be a non-specific inhibitor of all major tested CYP450 enzymes and was excluded as a selective inhibitor for AO. Quetiapine also showed a degree of inhibition towards the major CYP450 tested. Hydralazine used as a specific inhibitor during the past for AO activity demonstrated a stimulation of AO activity at high and low concentrations respectively and the inhibition noted to be time dependent while inhibiting other enzymes like monoamine oxidase. 5. Estradiol showed no inhibition towards the tested CYP450 enzymes and thus proved to be a selective and specific inhibitor for AO activity with an uncompetitive mode of inhibition.

  3. Inhibition of human liver aldehyde oxidase: implications for potential drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2011-12-01

    During the course of our research efforts to understand the kinetics of human aldehyde oxidase as a xenobiotic-clearing enzyme, we investigated the effect of eight different inhibitors on the oxidation of the probe substrate phthalazine. Saturation kinetic parameters for phthalazine oxidation in human liver cytosol were found to be the following: K(m) = 8.0 ± 0.4 μM and V(max) = 4.3 ± 0.1 nmol · min(-1) · mg protein(-1). Inhibitory potency of the inhibitors tested ranged from 0.1 to 5 μM. Of the eight different inhibitor compounds tested, seven were observed to inhibit through a mixed mode and one through a strictly competitive mode. A ratio of the K(ii) and K(is) values was used to assess the relative competitiveness of each inhibitor. For the mixed inhibitors, the mode of inhibition varied from mostly uncompetitive to predominantly competitive (K(ii)/K(is) values ranging from 0.1 to 15). The implications for potential drug-drug interactions and inhibition mechanism are discussed. We found two inhibitors, clozapine and chlorpromazine, that have a moderate predicted risk of drug-drug interactions based on the K(i) value relative to the inhibitor concentration in human plasma, having a calculated [I]/K(i) value of 0.4 and 0.8, respectively.

  4. Interspecies differences in the metabolism of methotrexate: An insight into the active site differences between human and rabbit aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2015-08-01

    Several drug compounds have failed in clinical trials due to extensive biotransformation by aldehyde oxidase (AOX) (EC 1.2.3.1). One of the main reasons is the difficulty in scaling clearance for drugs metabolised by AOX, from preclinical species to human. Using methotrexate as a probe substrate, we evaluated AOX metabolism in liver cytosol from human and commonly used laboratory species namely guinea pig, monkey, rat and rabbit. We found that the metabolism of methotrexate in rabbit liver cytosol was several orders of magnitude higher than any of the other species tested. The results of protein quantitation revealed that the amount of AOX1 in human liver was similar to rabbit liver. To understand if the observed differences in activity were due to structural differences, we modelled rabbit AOX1 using the previously generated human AOX1 homology model. Molecular docking of methotrexate into the active site of the enzyme led to the identification of important residues that could potentially be involved in substrate binding and account for the observed differences. In order to study the impact of these residue changes on enzyme activity, we used site directed mutagenesis to construct mutant AOX1 cDNAs by substituting nucleotides of human AOX1 with relevant ones of rabbit AOX1. AOX1 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Differences in the kinetic properties of these mutants have been presented in this study.

  5. Conjugal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dewitt, John D.; Kwon, Julia; Burton, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. The incidence of sporadic ALS is 1.5 to 2.7 in 100,000, and the prevalence is 5.2 to 6.0 in 100,000. Conjugal ALS is even rarer than sporadic ALS. We report a case of conjugal ALS encountered in our outpatient neurology clinic. PMID:22275781

  6. Novel Aldehyde-Terminated Dendrimers; Synthesis and Cytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Aliasghar; Sharifi, Simin; Davaran, Soodabeh; Ghasemi, Saeed; Omidi, Yadollah; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are a unique family of dendritic polymers with numerous pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. One major problem with these polymers is their cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize novel dendrimers with aldehyde terminal groups and compare their cytotoxicity with that of dendri¬mers containing amine-terminated groups. Methods G1(first generation) and G2 (second generation) dendrimers with amine-terminated groups were synthesized by divergent method and then the amine-terminated groups were converted to the aldehyde groups using surface modification of the functional group inversion (FGI) method. The cytotoxicity of the novel G1 and G2 polyamidoaldehyde (PAMAL) dendrimers together with that of G1 and G2 PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers was investigated by MTT assay using MCF-7 cell line. Results The results showed that cytotoxicity of dendrimers with aldehyde-terminated groups is much lower than that of G1 and G2 PAMAM-NH2 dendri¬mers. Conclusion Dendrimers with aldehyde-terminated groups could be used as novel and convenient carriers for drug delivery with low cytotoxic effect compared with the amine-terminated dendrimers. The results revealed that the same generations of the dendri¬mers with aldehyde-terminated groups are far less toxic than the corresponding amine-terminated dendrimers. PMID:23678447

  7. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenases of the rat colon: comparison with other tissues of the alimentary tract and the liver.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, T; Salaspuro, M

    1996-05-01

    Intracolonic bacteria have previously been shown to produce substantial amounts of acetaldehyde during ethanol oxidation, and it has been suggested that this acetaldehyde might be associated with alcohol-related colonic disorders, as well as other alcohol-induced organ injuries. The capacity of colonic mucosa to remove this bacterial acetaldehyde by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is, however, poorly known. We therefore measured ALDH activities and determined ALDH isoenzyme profiles from different subcellular fractions of rat colonic mucosa. For comparison, hepatic, gastric, and small intestinal samples were studied similarly. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were also measured from all of these tissues. Rat colonic mucosa was found to possess detectable amounts of ALDH activity with both micromolar and millimolar acetaldehyde concentrations and in all subcellular fractions. The ALDH activities of colonic mucosa were, however, generally low when compared with the liver and stomach, and they also tended to be lower than in small intestine. Mitochondrial low K(m) ALDH2 and cytosolic ALDH with low K(m) for acetaldehyde were expressed in the colonic mucosa, whereas some cytosolic high K(m) isoenzymes found in the small intestine and stomach were not detectable in colonic samples. Cytosolic ADH activity corresponded well to ALDH activity in different tissues: in colonic mucosa, it was approximately 6 times lower than in the liver and about one-half of gastric ADH activity. ALDH activity of the colonic mucosa should, thus, be sufficient for the removal of acetaldehyde produced by colonic mucosal ADH during ethanol oxidation. It may, however, be insufficient for the removal of the acetaldehyde produced by intracolonic bacteria. This may lead to the accumulation of acetaldehyde in the colon and colonic mucosa after ingestion of ethanol that might, at least after chronic heavy alcohol consumption, contribute to the development of alcohol-related colonic morbidity

  9. Polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked with two aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Rieker, L. L.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A film forming polyvinyl alcohol resin is admixed, in aqueous solution, with a dialdehyde crosslinking agent which is capable of crosslinking the polyvinyl alcohol resin and a water soluble acid aldehyde containing a reactive aldehyde group capable of reacting with hydroxyl groups in the polyvinyl alcohol resin and an ionizable acid hydrogen atom. The dialdehyde is present in an amount sufficient to react with from 1 to 20% by weight of the theoretical amount required to react with all of the hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol. The amount of acid aldehyde is from 1 to 50% by weight, same basis, and is sufficient to reduce the pH of the aqueous admixture to 5 or less. The admixture is then formed into a desired physical shape, such as by casting a sheet or film, and the shaped material is then heated to simultaneously dry and crosslink the article.

  10. Preparation of 1-C-glycosyl aldehydes by reductive hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Szabolcs; Jablonkai, István

    2011-09-06

    Reductive hydrolysis of various protected glycosyl cyanides was carried out using DIBAL-H to form aldimine alane intermediates which were then hydrolyzed under mildly acidic condition to provide the corresponding aldehyde derivatives. While 1-C-formyl glycal and 2-deoxy glycosyl derivatives were stable during isolation and storage 1-C-glycosyl formaldehydes in the gluco, galacto and manno series were sensitive and decomposition occurred by 2-alkyloxy elimination. A one-pot method using N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine to trap these aldehydes in stable form was developed. Reductive hydrolysis of glycosyl cyanides offers valuable aldehyde building blocks in a convenient way which can be applied in the synthesis of complex C-glycosides.

  11. In vivo absorption, metabolism, and urinary excretion of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes in experimental animals. Relevance to the development of cardiovascular diseases by the dietary ingestion of thermally stressed polyunsaturate-rich culinary oils.

    PubMed Central

    Grootveld, M; Atherton, M D; Sheerin, A N; Hawkes, J; Blake, D R; Richens, T E; Silwood, C J; Lynch, E; Claxson, A W

    1998-01-01

    Thermal stressing of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)- rich culinary oils according to routine frying or cooking practices generates high levels of cytotoxic aldehydic products (predominantly trans-2-alkenals, trans,trans-alka-2,4-dienals, cis,trans-alka-2, 4-dienals, and n-alkanals), species arising from the fragmentation of conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors. In this investigation we demonstrate that typical trans-2-alkenal compounds known to be produced from the thermally induced autoxidation of PUFAs are readily absorbed from the gut into the systemic circulation in vivo, metabolized (primarily via the addition of glutathione across their electrophilic carbon-carbon double bonds), and excreted in the urine as C-3 mercapturate conjugates in rats. Since such aldehydic products are damaging to human health, the results obtained from our investigations indicate that the dietary ingestion of thermally, autoxidatively stressed PUFA-rich culinary oils promotes the induction, development, and progression of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:9502761

  12. Cytosolic DNA triggers inflammasome activation in keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Yvonne; Peric, Mark; Koglin, Sarah; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Göss, Christine; Anz, David; Simanski, Maren; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen; Hornung, Veit; Gallo, Richard L; Ruzicka, Thomas; Besch, Robert; Schauber, Jürgen

    2011-05-11

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in the pathogenesis and the course of inflammatory skin diseases, including psoriasis. Posttranscriptional activation of IL-1β is mediated by inflammasomes; however, the mechanisms triggering IL-1β processing remain unknown. Recently, cytosolic DNA has been identified as a danger signal that activates inflammasomes containing the DNA sensor AIM2. In this study, we detected abundant cytosolic DNA and increased AIM2 expression in keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions but not in healthy skin. In cultured keratinocytes, interferon-γ induced AIM2, and cytosolic DNA triggered the release of IL-1β via the AIM2 inflammasome. Moreover, the antimicrobial cathelicidin peptide LL-37, which can interact with DNA in psoriatic skin, neutralized cytosolic DNA in keratinocytes and blocked AIM2 inflammasome activation. Together, these data suggest that cytosolic DNA is an important disease-associated molecular pattern that can trigger AIM2 inflammasome and IL-1β activation in psoriasis. Furthermore, cathelicidin LL-37 interfered with DNA-sensing inflammasomes, which thereby suggests an anti-inflammatory function for this peptide. Thus, our data reveal a link between the AIM2 inflammasome, cathelicidin LL-37, and autoinflammation in psoriasis, providing new potential targets for the treatment of this chronic skin disease.

  13. Cytosolic proteostasis through importing of misfolded proteins into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Linhao; Zhou, Chuankai; Jin, Erli; Kucharavy, Andrei; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhihui; Florens, Laurence; Li, Rong

    2017-03-16

    Loss of proteostasis underlies ageing and neurodegeneration characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although many neurodegenerative-disease-associated proteins can be found in mitochondria, it remains unclear how mitochondrial dysfunction and protein aggregation could be related. In dividing yeast cells, protein aggregates that form under stress or during ageing are preferentially retained by the mother cell, in part through tethering to mitochondria, while the disaggregase Hsp104 helps to dissociate aggregates and thereby enables refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins. Here we show that, in yeast, cytosolic proteins prone to aggregation are imported into mitochondria for degradation. Protein aggregates that form under heat shock contain both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins and interact with the mitochondrial import complex. Many aggregation-prone proteins enter the mitochondrial intermembrane space and matrix after heat shock, and some do so even without stress. Timely dissolution of cytosolic aggregates requires the mitochondrial import machinery and proteases. Blocking mitochondrial import but not proteasome activity causes a marked delay in the degradation of aggregated proteins. Defects in cytosolic Hsp70s leads to enhanced entry of misfolded proteins into mitochondria and elevated mitochondrial stress. We term this mitochondria-mediated proteostasis mechanism MAGIC (mitochondria as guardian in cytosol) and provide evidence that it may exist in human cells.

  14. Direct β-Alkylation of Aldehydes via Photoredox Organocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Direct β-alkylation of saturated aldehydes has been accomplished by synergistically combining photoredox catalysis and organocatalysis. Photon-induced enamine oxidation provides an activated β-enaminyl radical intermediate, which readily combines with a wide range of Michael acceptors to produce β-alkyl aldehydes in a highly efficient manner. Furthermore, this redox-neutral, atom-economical C–H functionalization protocol can be achieved both inter- and intramolecularly. Mechanistic studies by various spectroscopic methods suggest that a reductive quenching pathway is operable. PMID:24754456

  15. Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates as anti-adhesive and antibacterial bifunctional polymers for surface coating.

    PubMed

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K; Busscher, Henk J; Herrmann, Andreas; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of polymer-protein conjugates composed of a synthetic triblock copolymer with a central polypropylene oxide (PPO) block and two terminal polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments, Pluronic F-127, and the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme attached to the telechelic groups of the PEO chains. Covalent conjugation of lysozyme proceeded via reductive amination of aldehyde functionalized PEO blocks (CHO-Pluronic) and the amine groups of the lysine residues in the protein. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis together with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed formation of conjugates of one or two lysozyme molecules per Pluronic polymer chain. The conjugated lysozyme showed antibacterial activity towards Bacillus subtilis. Analysis with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation revealed that Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates adsorb in a brush conformation on a hydrophobic gold-coated quartz surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated surface coverage of 32% by lysozyme when adsorbed from a mixture of unconjugated Pluronic and Pluronic-lysozyme conjugate (ratio 99:1) and of 47% after adsorption of 100% Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates. Thus, bifunctional brushes were created, possessing both anti-adhesive activity due to the polymer brush, combined with the antibacterial activity of lysozyme. The coating having a lower degree of lysozyme coverage proved to be more bactericidal.

  16. Lipid Biosynthesis Coordinates a Mitochondrial-to-Cytosolic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Eui; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Simic, Milos S; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Nomura, Daniel K; Durieux, Jenni; Riera, Celine E; Sanchez, Melissa; Kapernick, Erik; Wolff, Suzanne; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-09-08

    Defects in mitochondrial metabolism have been increasingly linked with age-onset protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's. In response to protein-folding stress, compartment-specific unfolded protein responses (UPRs) within the ER, mitochondria, and cytosol work in parallel to ensure cellular protein homeostasis. While perturbation of individual compartments can make other compartments more susceptible to protein stress, the cellular conditions that trigger cross-communication between the individual UPRs remain poorly understood. We have uncovered a conserved, robust mechanism linking mitochondrial protein homeostasis and the cytosolic folding environment through changes in lipid homeostasis. Metabolic restructuring caused by mitochondrial stress or small-molecule activators trigger changes in gene expression coordinated uniquely by both the mitochondrial and cytosolic UPRs, protecting the cell from disease-associated proteins. Our data suggest an intricate and unique system of communication between UPRs in response to metabolic changes that could unveil new targets for diseases of protein misfolding.

  17. Aldehydic load and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 profile during the progression of post-myocardial infarction cardiomyopathy: benefits of Alda-1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ribeiro, Márcio A.C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We previously demonstrated that reducing cardiac aldehydic load by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for metabolizing the major lipid peroxidation product, protects against acute ischemia/reperfusion injury and chronic heart failure. However, time-dependent changes in ALDH2 profile, aldehydic load and mitochondrial bioenergetics during progression of post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) cardiomyopathy is unknown and should be established to determine the optimal time window for drug treatment. Methods Here we characterized cardiac ALDH2 activity and expression, lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) adduct formation, glutathione pool and mitochondrial energy metabolism and H2O2 release during the 4 weeks after permanent left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion in rats. Results We observed a sustained disruption of cardiac mitochondrial function during the progression of post-MI cardiomyopathy, characterized by >50% reduced mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and up to 2 fold increase in H2O2 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction was accompanied by accumulation of cardiac and circulating lipid peroxides and 4-HNE protein adducts and down-regulation of electron transport chain complexes I and V. Moreover, increased aldehydic load was associated with a 90% reduction in cardiac ALDH2 activity and increased glutathione pool. Further supporting an ALDH2 mechanism, sustained Alda-1 treatment (starting 24hrs after permanent LAD occlusion surgery) prevented aldehydic overload, mitochondrial dysfunction and improved ventricular function in post-MI cardiomyopathy rats. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate a disrupted mitochondrial metabolism along with an insufficient cardiac ALDH2-mediated aldehyde clearance during the progression of ventricular dysfunction, suggesting a potential therapeutic value of ALDH2 activators during the progression of post-myocardial infarction

  18. Direct oligonucleotide-photosensitizer conjugates for photochemical delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ahu; Laing, Brian; Hu, Yiqiao; Ming, Xin

    2015-04-18

    Activation of photosensitizers in endosomes enables release of therapeutic macromolecules into the cytosol of the target cells for pharmacological actions. In this study, we demonstrate that direct conjugation of photosensitizers to oligonucleotides (ONs) allows spatial and temporal co-localization of the two modalities in the target cells, and thus leads to superior functional delivery of ONs. Further, light-activated delivery of an anticancer ON caused cancer cell killing via modulation of an oncogene and photodynamic therapy.

  19. Direct Oligonucleotide-Photosensitizer Conjugates for Photochemical Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ahu; Laing, Brian; Hu, Yiqiao

    2015-01-01

    Activation of photosensitizers in endosomes enables release of therapeutic macromolecules into cytosol of the target cells for pharmacological actions. In this study, we demonstrate that direct conjugation of photosensitizer to oligonucleotides (ONs) allows spatial and temporal co-localization of the two modalities in the target cells, and thus leads to superior functional delivery of ONs. Further, light-activated delivery of an anticancer ON caused cancer cell killing via modulation of an oncogene and photodynamic therapy. PMID:25786195

  20. Polyamine conjugates of stigmasterol.

    PubMed

    Vida, Norbert; Svobodová, Hana; Rárová, Lucie; Drašar, Pavel; Saman, David; Cvačka, Josef; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2012-10-01

    Three new polyamine conjugates with stigmasterol [(3β,22E)-stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-ol] were synthesized and subjected to basic antimicrobial and cytotoxic tests. The conjugate derived from spermine, (3β,22E)-stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-yl 4(12-amino-4,9-diaza-dodecylamino)-4-oxobutanoate (5c), displayed considerable antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus at low concentration (50 μg mL(-1)). The cytotoxic activity was tested on cells of human T-lymfoblastic leukemia (IC(50)=35.8 ± 10.3 μM (5c) and IC(50)=35.9 ± 5.7 μM (5b)) and normal human fibroblasts (IC(50)=38.0 ± 2.8 μM (5c) and IC(50)=45.5 ± 1.9 μM (5b)). Conjugate 5a displayed no activity in both tests.

  1. Triggering the approach of an arene or heteroarene towards an aldehyde via Lewis acid-aldehyde communication.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Sanjay

    2016-03-14

    The present work reports a combined experimental/computational study of the Lewis acid promoted hydroxyalkylation reaction involving aldehyde and arene/heteroarene and reveals a mechanism in which the rate determining aldehyde to alcohol formation via a four-member cyclic transition state (TS) involves a transfer of hydrogen from arene/heteroarene C-H to aldehyde oxygen with the breaking of the C-H bond and formation of C-C and O-H bonds. The effect of different Sn(iv) derivatives on the hydroxyalkylation reaction from different in situ NMR and computational studies reveals that although the exergonic formation of the intermediate and its gained electrophilicity at the carbonyl carbon drive the reaction in SnCl4 compared to other Sn(iv) derivatives, the overall reaction is low yielding because of its stable intermediate. With respect to different aldehydes, LA promoted hydroxylation was found to be more feasible for an electron withdrawing aldehyde compared to electron rich aldehyde because of lower stability, enhanced electrophilicity gained at the aldehyde center, and a lower activation barrier between its intermediate and TS in the former as compared to the latter. The relative stability of the LA-aldehyde adduct decreases in the order SnCl4 > AlCl3 > InCl3 > BF3 > ZnCl2 > TiCl4 > SiCl4, while the activation barrier (ΔG(#)) between intermediate and transition states increases in the order AlCl3 < SnCl4 < InCl3 < BF3 < TiCl4 < ZnCl2 < SiCl4. On the other hand, the activation barriers in the case of different arenes/heteroarenes are in the order of indole < furan < anisole < thiophene < toluene < benzene < chlorobenzene < cyanobenzene, which suggests a facile reaction in the case of indole and the most difficult reaction in the case of cyanobenzene. The ease of formation of the corresponding diaryl methyl carbocation from the alcohol-LA intermediate is responsible for the determination of the undesired product and is found to be more viable in the case of strong

  2. Focal calcium monitoring with targeted nanosensors at the cytosolic side of endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanyan; Arai, Satoshi; Takei, Yoshiaki; Murata, Atsushi; Takeoka, Shinji; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ca2+ distribution is spatially and temporally non-uniform inside cells due to cellular compartmentalization. However, Ca2+ sensing with small organic dyes, such as fura-2 and fluo-4, has been practically applied at a single cell level where the averaged signal from freely diffusing dye molecules is acquired. In this study, we aimed to target azide-functionalized fura-2 (N3-fura-2) to a specific site of subcellular compartments to realize focal Ca2+ sensing. Using scAVD (single-chain avidin)–biotin interaction and a copper-free click reaction system, we linked N3-fura-2 to specifically-targeted scAVD protein fused with a red fluorescent protein mCherry, so that Ca2+ sensors conjugated with four N3-fura-2 dyes with dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-PEG4-biotin as a linker were generated at subcellular compartments in living cells. In cytoplasm, N3-fura-2 showed a prolonged retention period after binding to scAVD. Furthermore, the reacted N3-fura-2 was retained inside cells even after free dyes were washed out by methanol fixation. When scAVD was overexpressed on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, N3-fura-2 was accumulated on ER membranes. Upon histamine stimulation, which increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, ER-localized N3-fura-2 successfully sensed the Ca2+ level changes at the cytosolic side of ER membrane. Our study demonstrated specific targeting of N3-fura-2 to subcellular compartments and the ability of sensing focal Ca2+ level changes with the specifically targeted Ca2+ sensors. PMID:27877882

  3. Focal calcium monitoring with targeted nanosensors at the cytosolic side of endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanyan; Arai, Satoshi; Takei, Yoshiaki; Murata, Atsushi; Takeoka, Shinji; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) distribution is spatially and temporally non-uniform inside cells due to cellular compartmentalization. However, Ca(2+) sensing with small organic dyes, such as fura-2 and fluo-4, has been practically applied at a single cell level where the averaged signal from freely diffusing dye molecules is acquired. In this study, we aimed to target azide-functionalized fura-2 (N3-fura-2) to a specific site of subcellular compartments to realize focal Ca(2+) sensing. Using scAVD (single-chain avidin)-biotin interaction and a copper-free click reaction system, we linked N3-fura-2 to specifically-targeted scAVD protein fused with a red fluorescent protein mCherry, so that Ca(2+) sensors conjugated with four N3-fura-2 dyes with dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-PEG4-biotin as a linker were generated at subcellular compartments in living cells. In cytoplasm, N3-fura-2 showed a prolonged retention period after binding to scAVD. Furthermore, the reacted N3-fura-2 was retained inside cells even after free dyes were washed out by methanol fixation. When scAVD was overexpressed on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, N3-fura-2 was accumulated on ER membranes. Upon histamine stimulation, which increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, ER-localized N3-fura-2 successfully sensed the Ca(2+) level changes at the cytosolic side of ER membrane. Our study demonstrated specific targeting of N3-fura-2 to subcellular compartments and the ability of sensing focal Ca(2+) level changes with the specifically targeted Ca(2+) sensors.

  4. Effects of aldehydes on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Hong; Liu, Qiu-ping; Li, Yuan-yuan; Zong, Min-hua

    2011-05-11

    The effects of five representative aldehydes in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the growth and the lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans were investigated for the first time. There was no relationship between the hydrophobicity and the toxicity of aldehyde, and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was less toxic than aromatic aldehydes and furfural. Binary combination of aromatic aldehydes caused a synergistic inhibitory effect, but combination of furan and aromatic aldehydes reduced the inhibition instead. A longer lag phase was found due to the presence of aldehydes and the decrease of sugar consumption rate, but more xylose was utilized by T. fermentans in the presence of aldehydes, especially at their low concentrations. The variation of malic enzyme activity was not related to the delay of lipid accumulation. Furthermore, the inhibition of aldehydes on cell growth was more dependent on inoculum size, temperature, and initial pH than that on lipid content.

  5. A versatile and green mechanochemical route for aldehyde-oxime conversions.

    PubMed

    Aakeröy, Christer B; Sinha, Abhijeet S; Epa, Kanishka N; Spartz, Christine L; Desper, John

    2012-11-28

    A robust, facile and solvent-free mechanochemical path for aldehyde-oxime transformations using hydroxylamine and NaOH is explored; the method is suitable for aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes decorated with a range of substituents.

  6. Applicability of the theory of thermodynamic similarity to predict the enthalpies of vaporization of aliphatic aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esina, Z. N.; Korchuganova, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    The theory of thermodynamic similarity is used to predict the enthalpies of vaporization of aliphatic aldehydes. The predicted data allow us to calculate the phase diagrams of liquid-vapor equilibrium in a binary water-aliphatic aldehyde system.

  7. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are received... AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Wine § 24.183 Use...

  8. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are received... AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Wine § 24.183 Use...

  9. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are received... AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Wine § 24.183 Use...

  10. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are received... AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Wine § 24.183 Use...

  11. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are received... AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Wine § 24.183 Use...

  12. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  13. Reaction of benzoxasilocines with aromatic aldehydes: Synthesis of homopterocarpans

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Corral, Míriam; López-Sánchez, Cristóbal; Jiménez-González, Leticia; Rosales, Antonio; Muñoz-Dorado, Manuel; Rodríguez-García, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Condensation of 2H-benzo[g][1,2]oxasilocines with aromatic aldehydes in the presence of boron trifluoride affords mixtures of cis/trans 2-phenyl-3-vinylchromans with moderate yields. These can be transformed into homopterocarpans, a synthetic group of substances homologous to the natural isoflavonoid pterocarpans. PMID:17288601

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: Application in cream cheese to reduce aldehyde in alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the metabolic capability of colonic microflora may be at least as high as that of the liver or higher than that of the whole human body. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is an enzyme produced by these bacteria that can metabolize acetaldehyde, produce from ethanol to acetate. Lactococcus species, which is commonly used as a starter in dairy products, was recently found to possess the ALDH gene, and the activity of this enzyme was determined. In this study, the ALDH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 other type strains in the genus Lactococcus was studied. Only 5 species, 3 of dairy origin (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T)) and 2 of nondairy origin (Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and L. chungangensis CAU 28(T)), showed ALDH activity and possessed a gene encoding ALDH. All of these strains were capable of making cream cheese. Among the strains, L. chungangensis produced cream cheese that contained the highest level of ALDH and was found to reduce the level of acetaldehyde in the serum of mice. These results predict a promising role for L. chungangensis CAU28(T) to be used in cheese that can be developed as functional food.

  15. Antibiotics from basidiomycetes. 26. Phlebiakauranol aldehyde an antifungal and cytotoxic metabolite from Punctularia atropurpurascens.

    PubMed

    Anke, H; Casser, I; Steglich, W; Pommer, E H

    1987-04-01

    Phlebiakauranol aldehyde and the corresponding alcohol were isolated from cultures of Punctularia atropurpurascens. The aldehyde but not the alcohol exhibited strong antifungal activity against several phytopathogens as well as antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Two acetylated derivatives prepared from the aldehyde showed only very weak antifungal and antibacterial and moderate cytotoxic activities. We therefore assume, that the aldehyde group together with the high number of hydroxyl groups are responsible for the biological activity of the compound.

  16. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1996-02-20

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 16 figs.

  17. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stabile in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  18. Oxidative metabolic pathway of lenvatinib mediated by aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazuko; Mizuo, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Shinki; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Kusano, Kazutomi; Yoshimura, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    Lenvatinib is a multityrosine kinase inhibitor that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and is being developed as an anticancer drug. P450s are involved in one of the elimination pathways of lenvatinib, and mono-oxidized metabolites, such as N-oxide (M3) and desmethylated metabolite (M2), form in rats, dogs, monkeys, and humans. Meanwhile, two other oxidative metabolites are produced only in monkey and human liver S9 fractions, and their structures have been identified using high-resolution mass spectrometry as a quinolinone form of lenvatinib (M3') and a quinolinone form of desmethylated lenvatinib (M2'). The formation of M3' from lenvatinib occurred independently of NADPH and was effectively inhibited by typical inhibitors of aldehyde oxidase, indicating the involvement of aldehyde oxidase, but not P450s, in this pathway. M2' was a dioxidized metabolite arising from a combination of mono-oxidation and desmethylation and could only be produced from M2 in a NADPH-independent manner; M2' could not be generated from M3 or M3'. These results suggested that M2' is formed from lenvatinib by a unique two-step pathway through M2. Although both lenvatinib and M2 were substrates for aldehyde oxidase, an enzyme kinetic study indicated that M2 was a much more favorable substrate than lenvatinib. No inhibitory activities of lenvatinib, M2', or M3' and no significant inhibitory activities of M2 or M3 on aldehyde oxidase were observed, suggesting a low possibility of drug-drug interactions in combination therapy with substrates of aldehyde oxidase.

  19. New preparation of diethyl methylformylphosphonate dimethylhydrazone: A reagent for aldehyde homologation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phosphonate reagent, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone contains a protected aldehyde group instead of the usual ester group. It can be used for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to a, ß-unsaturated aldehydes. The reagent can be prepared in good overall yield (82%) and...

  20. Synthesis of conjugated bile acids/azastilbenes as potential antioxidant and photoprotective agents.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Juliana Alves; Polonini, Hudson Caetano; Suzuki, Érika Yoko; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Adilson David

    2015-06-01

    A series of 14 bile acids/azastilbenes conjugates (1a-g and 2a-g) was prepared through the condensation of bile amides (1 and 2) and aromatic aldehydes. The newly synthesized conjugates were evaluated in vitro for their antioxidant and photoprotective activities. Six compounds (1, 1a, 1b, 2, 2a and 2b) showed promising antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 19.60-31.83 μg mL(-1). The synthesized compounds presented a varied photoprotection profile, with the SPF ranging from 2 to 9. Among the 16 compounds tested for the protection against UVB sunrays, 3 compounds (2c, 2e and 2g) presented more significant protection than resveratrol and the free azastilbene 3; while the UVAPF increased from 2 in resveratrol and 5 in 3 to 5-11 in the majority of the conjugates.

  1. An all-or-nothing rise in cytosolic

    PubMed

    Katoh; Kikuyama

    1997-01-01

    The peritrich ciliate Vorticella sp. exhibits cellular contraction of an all-or-nothing type in response to a mechanical stimulus. Many authors have suggested that the contraction may be controlled by the cytosolic level of Ca2+, since glycerol-extracted Vorticella contracts when Ca2+ is added to the external solution. However, no direct evidence for the increase in cytosolic [Ca2+] has yet been obtained in living Vorticella. In the present study, by injecting a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator into living Vorticella and monitoring the cytosolic [Ca2+] with a confocal microscope, we have demonstrated that a mechanical stimulus evoked an all-or-nothing rise in cytosolic [Ca2+] (Ca2+ 'spike'). The onset of the Ca2+ spike was similar in its time course to that of cellular contraction. Since the Ca2+ spike was recorded in a Ca2+-deprived solution containing 1 mmol l-1 EGTA, we concluded that release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ storage site(s) is responsible for the Ca2+ spike.

  2. Shared and Distinct Mechanisms of Compartmentalized and Cytosolic Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Leroux, Michel R

    2015-12-07

    Most motile and all non-motile (also known as primary) eukaryotic cilia possess microtubule-based axonemes that are assembled at the cell surface to form hair-like or more elaborate compartments endowed with motility and/or signaling functions. Such compartmentalized ciliogenesis depends on the core intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery and the associated Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) for dynamic delivery of ciliary components. The transition zone (TZ), an ultrastructurally complex barrier or 'gate' at the base of cilia, also contributes to the formation of compartmentalized cilia. Yet, some ciliated protists do not have IFT components and, like some metazoan spermatozoa, use IFT-independent mechanisms to build axonemes exposed to the cytosol. Moreover, various ciliated protists lack TZ components, whereas Drosophila sperm surprisingly requires the activity of dynamically localized TZ proteins for cytosolic ciliogenesis. Here, we discuss the various ways eukaryotes use IFT and/or TZ proteins to generate the wide assortment of compartmentalized and cytosolic cilia observed in nature. Consideration of the different ciliogenesis pathways allows us to propose how three types of cytosol-exposed cilia (primary, secondary and tertiary), including cilia found in the human sperm proximal segment, are likely generated by evolutionary derivations of compartmentalized ciliogenesis.

  3. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  4. Covalent polymer-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Carlos; Gallardo, Alberto; Roman, Julio San; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2005-01-31

    In this work, polymer-drugs conjugates used as drug delivery systems (DDS) are revised attending to their chemical conjugation. Namely, the classification of this type of DDS is based on the conjugation sites of the reactive groups (i.e., via end groups or pendant polymer groups). Advantages and limitations of these types of DDS are discussed through representative examples of polymer-drugs and polymer-proteins conjugates recently developed.

  5. Conjugation in "Escherichia coli"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phornphisutthimas, Somkiat; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is a genetic transfer that involves cell-to-cell between donor and recipient cells. With the current method used to teach students in genetic courses at the undergraduate level, the transconjugants are identified using bacterial physiology and/or antibiotic resistance. Using physiology, however, is difficult for both…

  6. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  7. Conjugate Silhouette Nets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    19) dv vEI 2 . Calling these curves the projective hodographs of p and q respectively, we can state Corollary. The Laplace transforms of a conjugate...silhouette net £ are the projective hodographs of the generating curves C1, C2 of L (considered as a projective translation surface). §3. Axial

  8. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  9. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors [such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)] to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the...

  10. The ATG12-Conjugating Enzyme ATG10 Is Essential for Autophagic Vesicle Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Allison R.; Suttangkakul, Anongpat; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular recycling system in eukaryotes that utilizes small vesicles to traffic cytosolic proteins and organelles to the vacuole for breakdown. Vesicle formation requires the conjugation of the two ubiquitin-fold polypeptides ATG8 and ATG12 to phosphatidylethanolamine and the ATG5 protein, respectively. Using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants affecting the ATG5 target or the ATG7 E1 required to initiate ligation of both ATG8 and ATG12, we previously showed that the ATG8/12 conjugation pathways together are important when plants encounter nutrient stress and during senescence. To characterize the ATG12 conjugation pathway specifically, we characterized a null mutant eliminating the E2-conjugating enzyme ATG10 that, similar to plants missing ATG5 or ATG7, cannot form the ATG12-ATG5 conjugate. atg10-1 plants are hypersensitive to nitrogen and carbon starvation and initiate senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) more quickly than wild type, as indicated by elevated levels of senescence- and PCD-related mRNAs and proteins during carbon starvation. As detected with a GFP-ATG8a reporter, atg10-1 and atg5-1 mutant plants fail to accumulate autophagic bodies inside the vacuole. These results indicate that ATG10 is essential for ATG12 conjugation and that the ATG12-ATG5 conjugate is necessary to form autophagic vesicles and for the timely progression of senescence and PCD in plants. PMID:18245858

  11. Starch-related cytosolic heteroglycans in roots from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Irina; Steup, Martin; Fettke, Joerg

    2011-08-15

    Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic plant cells are capable of accumulating starch inside the plastid. However, depending on the metabolic state of the respective cell the starch-related carbon fluxes are different. The vast majority of the transitory starch biosynthesis relies on the hexose phosphate pools derived from the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and, therefore, is restricted to ongoing photosynthesis. Transitory starch is usually degraded in the subsequent dark period and mainly results in the formation of neutral sugars, such as glucose and maltose, that both are exported into the cytosol. The cytosolic metabolism of the two carbohydrates includes reversible glucosyl transfer reactions to a heteroglycan that are mediated by two glucosyl transferases, DPE2 and PHS2 (or, in all other species, Pho2). In heterotrophic cells, accumulation of starch mostly depends on the long distance transport of reduced carbon compounds from source to sink organs and, therefore, includes as an essential step the import of carbohydrates from the cytosol into the starch forming plastids. In this communication, we focus on starch metabolism in heterotrophic tissues from Arabidopsis thaliana wild type plants (and in various starch-related mutants as well). By using hydroponically grown A. thaliana plants, we were able to analyse starch-related biochemical processes in leaves and roots from the same plants. Within the roots we determined starch levels and the morphology of native starch granules. Cytosolic and apoplastic heteroglycans were analysed in roots and compared with those from leaves of the same plants. A. thaliana mutants lacking functional enzymes either inside the plastid (such as phosphoglucomutase) or in the cytosol (disproportionating isoenzyme 2 or the phosphorylase isozyme, PHS2) were included in this study. In roots and leaves from the three mutants (and from the respective wild type organ as well), starch and heteroglycans as well as enzyme patterns were

  12. Conjugation of glutathione and other thiols with bioreductively activated mitomycin C. Effect of thiols on the reductive activation rate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Tomasz, M

    1994-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MC), a clinically used natural antitumor agent, was shown to form three monoconjugates (11a-13a) and two bisconjugates (14a, 15a) with GSH upon reductive activation by rat liver microsomes, purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, or NADH-cytochrome c reductase or chemical reduction using H2/PtO2. Rat liver cytosol/NADH activated MC only at acidic pH (5.8), resulting in the formation of a single GSH-MC monoconjugate, 13a. The reductase responsible for cytosolic activation of MC to form this conjugate was DT-diaphorase. GSH itself did not reduce MC, and unreduced MC did not form conjugates with GSH. A moderate catalytic effect by glutathione S-transferase was demonstrated on the cytosol-activated reaction. Mercaptoethanol and N-acetylcysteine gave analogous sets of five MC-thiol conjugates under cytochrome c reductase or H2/PtO2 activation conditions. The structures of all 15 MC-thiol conjugates (five each with GSH, mercaptoethanol, and N-acetylcysteine, respectively) were determined, using 1H-NMR, UV, and mass spectroscopies, combined with analytical chemical and radiolabeling methods. The mechanism of formation of the conjugates features SN2 displacement of the carbamate of the reduced MC by GS-. The MC-GSH conjugates were noncytotoxic to the tumor cells tested. The conjugation of GSH with activated MC is likely to represent detoxication in mammalian cells. As another effect, GSH accelerates the rate of reduction of MC by "slow" reducing agents such as cytochrome c reductases and H2/PtO2. A mechanism is proposed to explain this effect, which involves further reduction of the initially formed MC semiquinone free radical by GSH.

  13. Identification of glutathione and related cysteine conjugates derived from reactive metabolites of methyleugenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huina; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-06-25

    Methyleugenol (ME), an alkenylbenzene compound, is a constituent of many foods and is used as flavoring agent in foodstuffs and as fragrance in cosmetics. It has been reported that exposure to ME can cause carcinogenicity, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Metabolic activation is suggested to play an important role in ME-induced toxicities. Electrophilic metabolites of ME have been reported to covalently bind to proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of this study was to identify GSH and related cysteine conjugates derived from these reactive metabolites in vivo. Five biliary GSH (M1-M5) and four urinary cysteine conjugates (M6-M9) were detected in rats given ME. M1 and M2 were GSH conjugates derived from the epoxide of ME. M3, M4, and M5 were GSH conjugates possibly generated from the corresponding α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, carbonium ion, and quinone methide, respectively. The structures of the GSH conjugates were verified by chemical synthesis. Cysteine conjugates M6, M7, M8, and M9 were found to correspond to the respective M1/M2, M3, M4, and M5. The data obtained from the present in vivo work facilitate the understanding of mechanism action of ME toxicities and may provide information suitable for use as biomarkers of exposure to ME.

  14. Selective Target Protein Degradation via Phthalimide Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Georg E.; Buckley, Dennis L.; Paulk, Joshiawa; Roberts, Justin M.; Souza, Amanda; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Bradner, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule antagonists disable discrete biochemical properties of protein targets. For multi-domain protein targets, the pharmacologic consequence of drug action is limited by selective disruption of one domain-specific activity. More broadly, target inhibition is kinetically limited by the durability and degree of target engagement. These features of traditional drug molecules are challenging to the development of inhibitors targeting transcription factors and chromatin-associated epigenetic proteins, which function as multi-domain biomolecular scaffolds and generally feature rapid association and dissociation kinetics. We therefore devised a chemical strategy to prompt ligand-dependent target protein degradation, via chemical conjugation with derivatized phthalimides that hijack the function of the Cereblon E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Using this approach, we converted an acetyl-lysine competitive antagonist that displaces BET bromodomains from chromatin (JQ1) to a phthalimide-conjugated ligand that prompts immediate Cereblon-dependent BET protein degradation (dBET1). Expression proteomics confirms high specificity for BET family members BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 among 7429 proteins detected. Degradation of BET bromodomains is associated with a more rapid and robust apoptotic response compared to bromodomain inhibition in primary human leukemic blasts, and dBET1 exhibits in vivo efficacy in a human leukemia xenograft. The reach of this approach is illustrated by a second series of probes that degrade the cytosolic signaling protein, FKBP12. Together, these findings identify a facile and general new strategy to control target protein stability, with implications for approaching previously intractable protein targets. PMID:25999370

  15. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by cimetidine and assessment of its effects on ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Long; Li, Yeung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Hsieh, Hsiu-Shan; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-02-25

    Previous studies have reported that cimetidine, an H2-receptor antagonist used to treat gastric and duodenal ulcers, can inhibit alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and ethanol metabolism. Human alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), the principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition by cimetidine of alcohol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and aldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at pH 7.5 and a cytosolic NAD(+) concentration. Cimetidine acted as competitive or noncompetitive inhibitors for the ADH and ALDH isozymes/allozymes with near mM inhibition constants. The metabolic interactions between cimetidine and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using the inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic drug levels (0.015 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μM) in target tissues, cimetidine could weakly inhibit (<5%) the activities of ADH1B2 and ADH1B3 in liver, ADH2 in liver and small intestine, ADH4 in stomach, and ALDH1A1 in the three tissues, but not significantly affect ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1C1/2, or ALDH2. At higher drug levels, which may accumulate in cells (0.2 mM), the activities of the weakly-inhibited enzymes may be decreased more significantly. The quantitative effects of cimetidine on metabolism of ethanol and other physiological substrates of ADHs need further investigation.

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is used by cancer cells for energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Hee; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Hong, Dongwan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Seong, Tae Wha; Lee, Chang-Hun; Jang, Hyonchol; Hong, Kyeong Man; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    We found that non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells express high levels of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isoforms via an informatics analysis of metabolic enzymes in NSCLC and immunohistochemical staining of NSCLC clinical tumor samples. Using a multiple reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis, we found that multiple ALDH isozymes were generally abundant in NSCLC cells compared with their levels in normal IMR-90 human lung cells. As a result of the catalytic reaction mediated by ALDH, NADH is produced as a by-product from the conversion of aldehyde to carboxylic acid. We hypothesized that the NADH produced by ALDH may be a reliable energy source for ATP production in NSCLC. This study revealed that NADH production by ALDH contributes significantly to ATP production in NSCLC. Furthermore, gossypol, a pan-ALDH inhibitor, markedly reduced the level of ATP. Gossypol combined with phenformin synergistically reduced the ATP levels, which efficiently induced cell death following cell cycle arrest. PMID:27885254

  17. An Overview of the Chemistry and Biology of Reactive Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    The non-enzymatic free radical generation of reactive aldehydes is known to contribute to diseases of sustained oxidative stress including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative and a number of liver diseases. At the same time, the accumulation of lipid electrophiles has been demonstrated to play a role in cell signaling events through modification of proteins critical for cellular homeostasis. Given the broad scope of reactivity profiles and the ability to modify numerous proteomic and genomic processes, new emphasis is being placed on a systems-based analysis of the consequences of electrophilic adduction. This review focuses on the generation and chemical reactivity of lipid-derived aldehydes with a special focus on the homeostatic responses to electrophilic stress. PMID:22750507

  18. Phase Conjugate Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    multimode fibers. We have developed a detailed model of the photorefractive effect which will be used as a basis for comparing photorefractive materials...of our system. The preliminary results indicate that a resolution of 5 lines/mm was obtained ( compared with a resolution without the fiber of "u20...for comparing photorefractive materials for nonlinear phase conjugation. Preliminary results of four materials surveyed indicate that KNbO3 and BaTiO3

  19. Dual localization of glutathione S-transferase in the cytosol and mitochondria: implications in oxidative stress, toxicity and disease.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider

    2011-11-01

    Glutathione (GSH) conjugating enzymes, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are present in different subcellular compartments including cytosol, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and plasma membrane. The regulation and function of GSTs have implications in cell growth, oxidative stress as well as disease progression and prevention. Of the several mitochondria localized forms, GSTK (GST kappa) is mitochondria-specific since it contains N-terminal canonical and cleavable mitochondria targeting signals. Other forms like GST alpha, mu and pi purified from mitochondria are similar to the cytosolic molecular forms or 'echoproteins'. Altered GST expression has been implicated in hepatic, cardiac and neurological diseases. Mitochondria-specific GSTK has also been implicated in obesity, diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Studies have shown that silencing the GSTA4 (GST alpha) gene resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, as was also seen in GSTA4 null mice, which could contribute to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. This review highlights the significance of the mitochondrial GST pool, particularly the mechanism and significance of dual targeting of GSTA4-4 under in vitro and in vivo conditions. GSTA4-4 is targeted in the mitochondria by activation of the internal cryptic signal present at the C-terminus of the protein by protein-kinase-dependent phosphorylation and cytosolic heat shock protein (Hsp70) chaperone. Mitochondrial GST pi, on the other hand, has been shown to have two uncleaved cryptic signals rich in positively charged amino acids at the N-terminal region. Both physiological and pathophysiological implications of GST translocation to mitochondria are discussed in the review.

  20. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  1. Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling of Alkenes, Aldehydes, and Silyl Triflates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-sze; Ho, Chun-Yu; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    A full account of two recently developed nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions of alkenes, aldehydes and silyl triflates is presented. These reactions provide either allylic alcohol or homoallylic alcohol derivatives selectively, depending on the ligand employed. These processes are believed to be mechanistically distinct from Lewis acid-catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions, and several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis are discussed. PMID:16939275

  2. Conjugate flow action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  3. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  4. Prediction of human drug clearance by multiple metabolic pathways: integration of hepatic and intestinal microsomal and cytosolic data.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Helen E; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    The current study assesses hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, sulfation, and cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism of raloxifene, quercetin, salbutamol, and troglitazone using different in vitro systems. The fraction metabolized by conjugation and P450 metabolism was estimated in liver and intestine, and the importance of multiple metabolic pathways on accuracy of clearance prediction was assessed. In vitro intrinsic sulfation clearance (CL(int, SULT)) was determined in human intestinal and hepatic cytosol and compared with hepatic and intestinal microsomal glucuronidation (CL(int, UGT)) and P450 clearance (CL(int, CYP)) expressed per gram of tissue. Hepatic and intestinal cytosolic scaling factors of 80.7 mg/g liver and 18 mg/g intestine were estimated from published data. Scaled CL(int, SULT) ranged between 0.7 and 11.4 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) liver and 0.1 and 3.3 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) intestine (salbutamol and quercetin were the extremes). Salbutamol was the only compound with a high extent of sulfation (51 and 28% of total CL(int) for liver and intestine, respectively) and also significant renal clearance (26-57% of observed plasma clearance). In contrast, the clearance of quercetin was largely accounted for by glucuronidation. Drugs metabolized by multiple pathways (raloxifene and troglitazone) demonstrated improved prediction of intravenous clearance using data from all hepatic pathways (44-86% of observed clearance) compared with predictions based only on the primary pathway (22-36%). The assumption of no intestinal first pass resulted in underprediction of oral clearance for raloxifene, troglitazone, and quercetin (3-22% of observed, respectively). Accounting for the intestinal contribution to oral clearance via estimated intestinal availability improved prediction accuracy for raloxifene and troglitazone (within 2.5-fold of observed). Current findings emphasize the importance of both hepatic and intestinal conjugation for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation

  5. Site-Specific Tandem Knoevenagel Condensation-Michael Addition To Generate Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kudirka, Romas A; Barfield, Robyn M; McFarland, Jesse M; Drake, Penelope M; Carlson, Adam; Bañas, Stefanie; Zmolek, Wes; Garofalo, Albert W; Rabuka, David

    2016-11-10

    Expanded ligation techniques are sorely needed to generate unique linkages for the growing field of functionally enhanced proteins. To address this need, we present a unique chemical ligation that involves the double addition of a pyrazolone moiety with an aldehyde-labeled protein. This ligation occurs via a tandem Knoevenagel condensation-Michael addition. A pyrazolone reacts with an aldehyde to generate an enone, which undergoes subsequent attack by a second pyrazolone to generate a bis-pyrazolone species. This rapid and facile ligation technique is performed under mild conditions in the absence of catalyst to generate new architectures that were previously inaccessible via conventional ligation reactions. Using this unique ligation, we generated three site-specifically labeled antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) with an average of four drugs to one antibody. The in vitro and in vivo efficacies along with pharmacokinetic data of the site-specific ADCs are reported.

  6. Henry's law constants of some environmentally important aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1988-12-01

    The Henry's law constants of seven aldehydes have been determined as a function of temperature by bubble-column and by head-space techniques. The compounds were chosen for their potential importance in the polluted troposphere and to allow structure-reactivity patterns to be investigated. The results (at 25/degree/C) are as follows (in units of M atm/sup /minus/1/): chloral, 3.44 /times/ 10/sup 5/; glyoxal, greater than or equal to3 /times/ 10/sup 5/; methylglyoxal, 3.71 /times/ 10/sup 3/; formaldehyde, 2.97 /times/ 10/sup 3/; benzaldehyde, 3.74 /times/ 10/sup 1/; hydroxyacetaldehyde, 4.14 /times/ 10/sup 4/; acetaldehyde, 1.14 /times/ 10/sup 1/. A plot of Taft's parameter, ..sigma..sigma*, vs log H* (the apparent Henry's law constant) gives a straight line with a slope of 1.72. H* for formaldehyde is anomalously high, as expected, but the extremely high value for hydroxyacetaldehyde was unexpected and may indicate that ..cap alpha..-hydroxy-substituted aldehydes could have an usually high affinity for the aqueous phase. The intrinsic Henry's law constants, H, corrected for hydration, do not show a clear structure-reactivity pattern for this series of aldehydes.

  7. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Lowe, C; Shechosky, S; McKay, R T; Yang, C C; Shah, V J; Simon, R J; Vederas, J C; Santi, D V

    1995-06-27

    Picornaviral 3C proteinases are a group of closely related thiol proteinases responsible for processing of the viral polyprotein into its component proteins. These proteinases adopt a chymotrypsin-like fold [Allaire et al. (1994) Nature 369, 72-77; Matthews et al. (1994) Cell 77, 761-771] and a display an active-site configuration like those of the serine proteinases. Peptide-aldehydes based on the preferred peptide substrates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase were synthesized by reduction of a thioester precursor. Acetyl-Leu-Ala-Ala-(N,N'-dimethylglutaminal) was found to be a reversible, slow-binding inhibitor for HAV 3C with a Ki* of (4.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(-8) M. This inhibitor showed 50-fold less activity against the highly homologous human rhinovirus (strain 14) 3C proteinase, whose peptide substrate specificity is slightly different, suggesting a high degree of selectivity. NMR spectrometry of the adduct of the 13C-labeled inhibitor with the HAV-3C proteinase indicate that a thiohemiacetal is formed between the enzyme and the aldehyde carbon as previously noted for peptide-aldehyde inhibitors of papain [Lewis & Wolfenden (1977) Biochemistry 16,4890-4894; Gamcsik et al. (1983) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 6324-6325]. The adduct can also be observed by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  8. The serotonin aldehyde, 5-HIAL, oligomerizes alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Cooney, Adele; Sullivan, Patricia; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2015-03-17

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) alpha-synuclein oligomers are thought to be pathogenic, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), an obligate aldehyde intermediate in neuronal dopamine metabolism, potently oligomerizes alpha-synuclein. PD involves alpha-synuclein deposition in brainstem raphe nuclei; however, whether 5-hydroxyindoleacetaldehyde (5-HIAL), the aldehyde of serotonin, oligomerizes alpha-synuclein has been unknown. In this study we tested whether 5-HIAL oligomerizes alpha-synuclein in vitro and in PC12 cells conditionally over-expressing alpha-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein oligomers were quantified by western blotting after incubation of alpha-synuclein with serotonin and monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) to generate 5-HIAL or dopamine to generate DOPAL. Oligomerization of alpha-synuclein in PC12 cells over-expressing the protein was compared between vehicle-treated cells and cells incubated with levodopa to generate DOPAL or 5-hydroxytryptophan to generate 5-HIAL. Monoamine aldehyde mediation of the oligomerization was assessed using the MAO inhibitor, pargyline. Dopamine and serotonin incubated with MAO-A both strongly oligomerized alpha-synuclein (more than 10 times control); pargyline blocked the oligomerization. In synuclein overexpressing PC12 cells, levodopa and 5-hydroxytryptophan elicited pargyline-sensitive alpha-synuclein oligomerization. 5-HIAL oligomerizes alpha-synuclein both in vitro and in synuclein-overexpressing PC12 cells, in a manner similar to DOPAL. The findings may help explain loss of serotonergic neurons in PD.

  9. Oxidative damage in keratinocytes exposed to cigarette smoke and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Avezov, Katia; Reznick, Abraham Z; Aizenbud, Dror

    2014-06-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a significant environmental source of human exposure to chemically active saturated (acetaldehyde) and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein) inducing protein carbonylation and dysfunction. The exposure of oral tissues to environmental hazards is immense, especially in smokers. The objectives of the current study were to examine the effect of aldehydes originating from CS on intracellular proteins of oral keratinocytes and to observe the antioxidant response in these cells. Intracellular protein carbonyl modification under CS, acrolein and acetaldehyde exposure in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line, representing oral keratinocytes was examined by Western blot. Possible intracellular enzymatic dysfunction under the above conditions was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. Oxidative stress response was investigated, by DCF (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein) assay and GSH (glutathione) oxidation. Intracellular protein carbonyls increased 5.2 times after CS exposure and 2.7 times after exposure to 1 μmol of acrolein. DCF assay revealed an increase of fluorescence intensity 3.2 and 3.1 times after CS and acrolein exposure, respectively. CS caused a 72.5% decrease in intracellular GSH levels compared to controls. Activity of intracellular LDH was preserved. α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes from CS are capable of intracellular protein carbonylation and have a role in intracellular oxidative stress elevation in keratinocytes, probably due to the reduction in GSH levels.

  10. Flagellin Polymerisation Control by a Cytosolic Export Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Auvray, Frédéric; Thomas, Joanne; Fraser, Gillian M.; Hughes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Assembly of the long helical filament of the bacterial flagellum requires polymerisation of ca 20,000 flagellin (FliC) monomeric subunits into the growing structure extending from the cell surface. Here, we show that export of Salmonella flagellin is facilitated specifically by a cytosolic protein, FliS, and that FliS binds to the FliC C-terminal helical domain, which contributes to stabilisation of flagellin subunit interactions during polymerisation. Stable complexes of FliS with flagellin were assembled efficiently in vitro, apparently by FliS homodimers binding to FliC monomers. The data suggest that FliS acts as a substrate-specific chaperone, preventing premature interaction of newly synthesised flagellin subunits in the cytosol. Compatible with this view, FliS was able to prevent in vitro polymerisation of FliC into filaments. PMID:11327763

  11. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  12. A New View of the Bacterial Cytosol Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cossins, Benjamin P.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Guallar, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The cytosol is the major environment in all bacterial cells. The true physical and dynamical nature of the cytosol solution is not fully understood and here a modeling approach is applied. Using recent and detailed data on metabolite concentrations, we have created a molecular mechanical model of the prokaryotic cytosol environment of Escherichia coli, containing proteins, metabolites and monatomic ions. We use 200 ns molecular dynamics simulations to compute diffusion rates, the extent of contact between molecules and dielectric constants. Large metabolites spend ∼80% of their time in contact with other molecules while small metabolites vary with some only spending 20% of time in contact. Large non-covalently interacting metabolite structures mediated by hydrogen-bonds, ionic and π stacking interactions are common and often associate with proteins. Mg2+ ions were prominent in NIMS and almost absent free in solution. Κ+ is generally not involved in NIMSs and populates the solvent fairly uniformly, hence its important role as an osmolyte. In simulations containing ubiquitin, to represent a protein component, metabolite diffusion was reduced owing to long lasting protein-metabolite interactions. Hence, it is likely that with larger proteins metabolites would diffuse even more slowly. The dielectric constant of these simulations was found to differ from that of pure water only through a large contribution from ubiquitin as metabolite and monatomic ion effects cancel. These findings suggest regions of influence specific to particular proteins affecting metabolite diffusion and electrostatics. Also some proteins may have a higher propensity for associations with metabolites owing to their larger electrostatic fields. We hope that future studies may be able to accurately predict how binding interactions differ in the cytosol relative to dilute aqueous solution. PMID:21695225

  13. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance.

  14. Eukaryotic starch degradation: integration of plastidial and cytosolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Hejazi, Mahdi; Smirnova, Julia; Höchel, Erik; Stage, Marion; Steup, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Starch is an important plant product widely used as a nutrient, as a source of renewable energy, and for many technological applications. In plants, starch is the almost ubiquitous storage carbohydrate whereas most heterotrophic prokaryotes and eukaryotes rely on glycogen. Despite close similarities in basic chemical features, starch and glycogen differ in both structural and physicochemical properties. Glycogen is a hydrosoluble macromolecule with evenly distributed branching points. Starch exists as a water-insoluble particle having a defined (and evolutionary conserved) internal structure. The biochemistry of starch requires the co-operation of up to 40 distinct (iso)enzymes whilst approximately 10 (iso)enzymes permit glycogen metabolism. The biosynthesis and degradation of native starch include the transition of carbohydrates from the soluble to the solid phase and vice versa. In this review, two novel aspects of the eukaryotic plastidial starch degradation are discussed: Firstly, biochemical reactions that take place at the surface of particulate glucans and mediate the phase transition of carbohydrates. Secondly, processes that occur downstream of the export of starch-derived sugars into the cytosol. Degradation of transitory starch mainly results in the formation of neutral sugars, such as glucose and maltose, that are transported into the cytosol via the respective translocators. The cytosolic metabolism of the neutral sugars includes the action of a hexokinase, a phosphoglucomutase, and a transglucosidase that utilizes high molecular weight glycans as a transient glucosyl acceptor or donor. Data are included on the transglucosidase (disproportionating isozyme 2) in Cyanophora paradoxa that accumulates storage carbohydrates in the cytosol rather than in the plastid.

  15. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels.

  16. Cytosolic Replication of Group A Streptococcus in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Alan M.; Thurston, Teresa L. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As key components of innate immune defense, macrophages are essential in controlling bacterial pathogens, including group A Streptococcus (GAS). Despite this, only a limited number of studies have analyzed the recovery of GAS from within human neutrophils and macrophages. Here, we determined the intracellular fate of GAS in human macrophages by using several quantitative approaches. In both U937 and primary human macrophages, the appearance over time of long GAS chains revealed that despite GAS-mediated cytotoxicity, replication occurred in viable, propidium iodide-negative macrophages. Whereas the major virulence factor M1 did not contribute to bacterial growth, a GAS mutant strain deficient in streptolysin O (SLO) was impaired for intracellular replication. SLO promoted bacterial escape from the GAS-containing vacuole (GCV) into the macrophage cytosol. Up to half of the cytosolic GAS colocalized with ubiquitin and p62, suggesting that the bacteria were targeted by the autophagy machinery. Despite this, live imaging of U937 macrophages revealed proficient replication of GAS after GCV rupture, indicating that escape from the GCV is important for growth of GAS in macrophages. Our results reveal that GAS can replicate within viable human macrophages, with SLO promoting GCV escape and cytosolic growth, despite the recruitment of autophagy receptors to bacteria. PMID:27073088

  17. Growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; Xing, Da; Wu, Shengnan; Huang, Lei

    2010-02-01

    Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases, plays a critical role in cellular senescence, aging and longevity. In general, SIRT1 is localized in nucleus and is believed as a nuclear protein. Though overexpression of SIRT1 delays senescence, SIRT1-protein levels decline naturally in thymus and heart during aging. In the present studies, we investigated the subcellular localization of SIRT1 in response to growth factor deprivation in African green monkey SV40-transformed kidney fibroblast cells (COS-7). Using SIRT1-EGFP fluorescence reporter, we found that SIRT1 localized to nucleus in physiological conditions. We devised a model enabling cell senescence via growth factor deprivation, and we found that SIRT1 partially translocated to cytosol under the treatment, suggesting a reduced level of SIRT1's activity. We found PI3K/Akt pathway was involved in the inhibition of SIRT1's cytosolic translocation, because inhibition of these kinases significantly decreased the amount of SIRT1 maintained in nucleus. Taken together, we demonstrated that growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1, which suggesting a possible connection between cytoplasm-localized SIRT1 and the aging process.

  18. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with novel Schiff bases: identification of selective inhibitors for the tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Busra; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-11-01

    A series of new Schiff bases was obtained from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes incorporating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. The obtained sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic CA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII. Most derivatives were medium potency or weak hCA I/II inhibitors, but several of them showed nanomolar affinity for CA IX and/or XII, making them an interesting example of isoform-selective compounds. The nature of the aryl/hetaryl moiety present in the initial aldehyde was the main factor influencing potency and isoform selectivity. The best and most CA IX-selective compounds incorporated moieties such as 4-methylthiophenyl, 4-cyanophenyl-, 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl and the 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide scaffold. The best hCA XII inhibitors, also showing selectivity for this isoform, incorporated 2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl and 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl functionalities and were also derivatives of 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide. The sulfanilamide and 3-fluorosulfanilamide derived Schiff bases were less active compared to the corresponding 4-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonamide derivatives. As hCA IX/XII selective inhibition is attractive for obtaining antitumor agents/diagnostic tools with a new mechanism of action, compounds of the type described here may be considered interesting preclinical candidates.

  19. Metabolic engineering of glycine betaine synthesis: plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases lacking typical transit peptides are targeted to tobacco chloroplasts where they confer betaine aldehyde resistance.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, B; McCue, K F; Gage, D A; Hanson, A D

    1994-01-01

    Certain higher plants synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine, a compound with osmoprotectant properties. Biosynthesis of glycine betaine proceeds via the pathway choline-->betaine aldehyde-->glycine betaine. Plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) which do not accumulate glycine betaine lack the enzymes catalyzing both reactions. As a step towards engineering glycine betaine accumulation into a non-accumulator, spinach and sugar beet complementary-DNA sequences encoding the second enzyme of glycine-betaine synthesis (betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) were expressed in tobacco. Despite the absence of a typical transit peptide, BADH was targeted to the chloroplast in leaves of transgenic plants. Levels of extractable BADH were comparable to those in spinach and sugar beet, and the molecular weight, isoenzyme profile and Km for betaine aldehyde of the BADH enzymes from transgenic plants were the same as for native spinach or sugar beet BADH. Transgenic plants converted supplied betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine at high rates, demonstrating that they were able to transport betaine aldehyde across both the plasma membrane and the chloroplast envelope. The glycine betaine produced in this way was not further metabolized and reached concentrations similar to those in plants which accumulate glycine betaine naturally. Betaine aldehyde was toxic to non-transformed tobacco tissues whereas transgenic tissues were resistant due to detoxification of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. Betaine aldehyded ehydrogenase is therefore of interest as a potential selectable marker, as well as in the metabolic engineering of osmoprotectant biosynthesis.

  20. Salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase - temporal and population variability, correlations with drinking and smoking habits and activity towards aldehydes contained in food.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Dziadek, Marta; Wroczyński, Piotr; Woźnicka, Katarzyna; Wojno, Barbara; Pietrzak, Monika; Wierzchowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Fluorimetric method based on oxidation of the fluorogenic 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde was applied to evaluate temporal and population variability of the specific activity of salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and the degree of its inactivation in healthy human population. Analyzed was also its dependence on drinking and smoking habits, coffee consumption, and its sensitivity to N-acetylcysteine. Both the specific activity of salivary ALDH and the degree of its inactivation were highly variable during the day, with the highest activities recorded in the morning hours. The activities were also highly variable both intra- and interpersonally, and negatively correlated with age, and this correlation was stronger for the subgroup of volunteers declaring abstinence from alcohol and tobacco. Moderately positive correlations of salivary ALDH specific activity with alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking were also recorded (r(s) ~0.27; p=0.004 and r(s) =0.30; p=0.001, respectively). Moderate coffee consumption correlated positively with the inactivation of salivary ALDH, particularly in the subgroup of non-drinking and non-smoking volunteers. It was found that mechanical stimulation of the saliva flow increases the specific activity of salivary ALDH. The specific activity of the salivary ALDH was strongly and positively correlated with that of superoxide dismutase, and somewhat less with salivary peroxidase. The antioxidant-containing drug N-acetylcysteine increased activity of salivary ALDH presumably by preventing its inactivation in the oral cavity. Some food-related aldehydes, mainly cinnamic aldehyde and anisaldehyde, were excellent substrates of the salivary ALDH3A1 enzyme, while alkenals, particularly those with short chain, were characterized by lower affinity towards this enzyme but high catalytic constants. The protective role of salivary ALDH against aldehydes in food and those found in the cigarette smoke is discussed, as well as its participation in

  1. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Menggen; Liu, Z Lewis; Xiang, Quanju; Li, Xi; Liu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors (such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the reduction enzymes involved in this reaction remain largely unknown. In this study, we reported that an uncharacterized open reading frame PICST_72153 (putative GRE2) from S. stipitis was highly induced in response to furfural and HMF stresses. Overexpression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae improved yeast tolerance to furfural and HMF. GRE2 was identified as an aldehyde reductase which can reduce furfural to FM with either NADH or NADPH as the co-factor and reduce HMF to FDM with NADPH as the co-factor. This enzyme can also reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that it is a member of the subclass "intermediate" of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Although GRE2 from S. stipitis is similar to GRE2 from S. cerevisiae in a three-dimensional structure, some differences were predicted. GRE2 from S. stipitis forms loops at D133-E137 and T143-N145 locations with two α-helices at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations, different GRE2 from S. cerevisiae with an α-helix at D133-E137 and a β-sheet at T143-N145 locations, and two loops at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations. This research provided guidelines for the study of other SDR enzymes from S. stipitis and other yeasts on tolerant mechanisms to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

  2. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes: DISCOVERY OF P450-TYPE HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE ACTIVITY IN A CATALASE.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E; Calcutt, Wade M; Brash, Alan R; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-08-07

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled substrate and incubations in H2(18)O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom.

  3. Dominant factors controlling concentrations of aldehydes in rain, fog, dew water, and in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Shunji; Igawa, Manabu

    Low-molecular weight aldehyde compounds in rain, fog, dew water, and in the gas phase were measured at urban and suburban mountain sites, to characterize the chemical composition of aldehydes in liquid droplets and in the gas phase in the ambient atmosphere, and discuss the factors controlling wet removal processes of aldehydes. Higher concentrations of total aldehydes were found in dew water than in rain and fog water due to the small amount of water volume. Both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were detected as dominant aldehydes in the gas phase. Secondary formation processes are dominant sources for both aldehydes in the suburban site, whereas primary sources are relatively important for the urban atmosphere. In rainwater, by contrast, formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde, followed by glyoxal. Glyoxal was detected as the most dominant aldehyde in fog and dew water. Acetaldehyde was not detected as a main component in liquid droplets in spite of its abundance in the gas phase. Water solubility of each aldehyde compound and dilution effect by water are critical factors that control the compositions and concentrations of these aldehydes in ambient liquid droplets.

  4. Interactions of Nitroxide-Conjugated and Non-Conjugated Glycodendrimers with Normal and Cancer Cells and Biocompatibility Studies.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Antonelli, Antonella; Cangiotti, Michela; Canonico, Barbara; Sfara, Carla; Pianetti, Anna; Bruscolini, Francesca; Sahre, Karin; Appelhans, Dietmar; Papa, Stefano; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2017-02-15

    Poly(propyleneimine) glycodendrimers fully modified with maltose units were administered to different cancer cell lines and their effect on cell viability was evaluated by using MTS assay and flow cytometry. The mechanism of dendrimer-cell interactions was investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique by using a new nitroxide-conjugated glycodendrimer. The nitroxide groups did not modify both the biological properties (cell viability and apoptosis degree) of the dendrimers in the presence of the cells and the dendrimer-cell interactions. Since this class of dendrimers is already known to be biocompatible for human healthy cells, noncancer cells such as human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and macrophages were also treated with the glycodendrimer, and EPR spectra of the nitroxide-conjugated glycodendrimer were compared for cancer and noncancer cells. It was found that this dendrimer selectively affects the cell viability of tumor cells, while, surprisingly, PBMC proliferation is induced. Moreover, H-bond-active glycodendrimer-cell interactions were different for the different cancer cell lines and noncancer cells. The nitroxide-conjugated glycodendrimer was able to interact with the cell membrane and eventually cross it, getting in contact with cytosol antioxidants. This study helps to clarify the potential anticancer effect of this class of dendrimers opening to future applications of these macromolecules as new antitumor agents.

  5. Yeast and Mammals Utilize Similar Cytosolic Components to Drive Protein Transport through the Golgi Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunphy, William G.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.; Clary, Douglas O.; Wattenberg, Binks W.; Glick, Benjamin S.; Rothman, James E.

    1986-03-01

    Vesicular transport between successive compartments of the mammalian Golgi apparatus has recently been reconstituted in a cell-free system. In addition to ATP, transport requires both membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins. Here we report that the cytosol fraction from yeast will efficiently substitute for mammalian cytosol. Mammalian cytosol contains several distinct transport factors, which we have distinguished on the basis of gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. Yeast cytosol appears to contain the same collection of transport factors. Resolved cytosol factors from yeast and mammals complement each other in a synergistic manner. These findings suggest that the molecular mechanisms of intracellular protein transport have been conserved throughout evolution. Moreover, this hybrid cell-free system will enable the application of yeast genetics to the identification and isolation of cytosolic proteins that sustain intracellular protein transport.

  6. Conjugate and method for forming aminomethyl phosphorus conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Berning, Douglas E.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Churchill, Robert

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming phosphine-amine conjugates includes reacting a hydroxymethyl phosphine group of an amine-free first molecule with at least one free amine group of a second molecule to covalently bond the first molecule with the second molecule through an aminomethyl phosphorus linkage and the conjugates formed thereby.

  7. Conjugate and method for forming aminomethyl phosphorus conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Katti, K.V.; Berning, D.E.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Churchill, R.

    1999-09-07

    A method of forming phosphine-amine conjugates includes reacting a hydroxymethyl phosphine group of an amine-free first molecule with at least one free amine group of a second molecule to covalently bond the first molecule with the second molecule through an aminomethyl phosphorus linkage and the conjugates formed thereby.

  8. Chiral Conjugated Corrals.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Fowler, Brandon; Li, Panpan; Joyce, Leo A; Li, Fang; Liu, Taifeng; Paley, Daniel; Zhong, Yu; Li, Hexing; Xiao, Shengxiong; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-08-12

    We present here a new design motif for strained, conjugated macrocycles that incorporates two different aromatics into the cycle with an -A-B-A-B- pattern. In this study, we demonstrate the concept by alternating electron donors and acceptors in a conjugated cycle. The donor is a bithiophene, and the acceptor is a perylene diimide derivative. The macrocycle formed has a persistent elliptiform cavity that is lined with the sulfur atoms of the thiophenes and the π-faces of the perylene diimide. Due to the linkage of the perylene diimide subunits, the macrocycles exist in both chiral and achiral forms. We separate the three stereoisomers using chiral high-performance liquid chromatography and study their interconversion. The mechanism for interconversion involves an "intramolecular somersault" in which one of the PDIs rotates around its transverse axis, thereby moving one of its diimide heads through the plane of the cavity. These unusual macrocycles are black in color with an absorption spectrum that spans the visible range. Density functional theory calculations reveal a photoinduced electron transfer from the bithiophene to the perylene diimide.

  9. Interstellar Aldehydes and their corresponding Reduced Alcohols: Interstellar Propanol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    There is a well-defined trend of aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols among the known interstellar molecules; methanal (CH_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH); ethenone (C_2H_2O) and vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH); ethanal (C_2H_4O) and ethanol(C_2H_5OH); glycolaldehyde (C_2H_4O_2) and ethylene glycol(C_2H_6O_2). The reduced alcohol of propanal (CH_3CH_2CHO) which is propanol (CH_3CH_2CH_2OH) has not yet been observed but its isomer; ethyl methyl ether (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) is a known interstellar molecule. In this article, different studies are carried out in investigating the trend between aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols and the deviation from the trend. Kinetically and with respect to the formation route, alcohols could have been produced from their corresponding reduced aldehydes via two successive hydrogen additions. This is plausible because of (a) the unquestionable high abundance of hydrogen, (b) presence of energy sources within some of the molecular clouds and (c) the ease at which successive hydrogen addition reaction occurs. In terms of stability, the observed alcohols are thermodynamically favorable as compared to their isomers. Regarding the formation process, the hydrogen addition reactions are believed to proceed on the surface of the interstellar grains which leads to the effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding. From the studies, propanol and propan-2-ol are found to be more strongly attached to the surface of the interstellar dust grains which affects its overall gas phase abundance as compared to its isomer ethyl methyl ether which has been observed.

  10. N-Heterocyclic carbene-mediated oxidative esterification of aldehydes: ester formation and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Maji, Biswajit; Vedachalan, Seenuvasan; Ge, Xin; Cai, Shuting; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2011-05-06

    An unexpected N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed esterification of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes including aromatic aldehydes with reactive cinnamyl bromides in the presence of air oxygen or MnO(2) as an oxidant is described. In the presence of oxygen, halogenated and electron-deficient aldehydes react smoothly to furnish esters in good yields. Great efforts have been made on mechanistic studies to deduce a plausible mechanism, based on the experimental results and isotopic labeling experiment.

  11. Solution-phase automated synthesis of an α-amino aldehyde as a versatile intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Hisashi; Yosugi, Sae; Fuse, Shinichiro

    2017-01-01

    A solution-phase automated synthesis of the versatile synthetic intermediate, Garner’s aldehyde, was demonstrated. tert-Butoxycarbonyl (Boc) protection, acetal formation, and reduction of the ester to the corresponding aldehyde were performed utilizing our originally developed automated synthesizer, ChemKonzert. The developed procedure was also useful for the synthesis of Garner’s aldehyde analogues possessing fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) or benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz) protection. PMID:28228851

  12. Electron transmission through a class of anthracene aldehyde molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreska, Irina; Ohanesjan, Vladimir; Pejov, Ljupco; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-03-01

    Transmission of electrons via metal-molecule-metal junctions, involving rotor-stator anthracene aldehyde molecules is investigated. Two model barriers having input parameters evaluated from accurate ab initio calculations are proposed and the transmission coefficients are obtained by using the quasiclassical approximation. Transmission coefficients further enter in the integral for the net current, utilizing Simmons' method. Conformational dependence of the tunneling processes is evident and the presence of the side groups enhances the functionality of the future single-molecule based electronic devices.

  13. A Simple Litmus Test for Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolism of Heteroarenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bioavailability of aromatic azaheterocyclic drugs can be affected by the activity of aldehyde oxidase (AO). Susceptibility to AO metabolism is difficult to predict computationally and can be complicated in vivo by differences between species. Here we report the use of bis(((difluoromethyl)sulfinyl)oxy)zinc (DFMS) as a source of CF2H radical for a rapid and inexpensive chemical “litmus test” for the early identification of heteroaromatic drug candidates that have a high probability of metabolism by AO. PMID:24472070

  14. Nuclear alkylated pyridine aldehyde polymers and conductive compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Singer, S. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A thermally stable, relatively conductive polymer was disclosed. The polymer was synthesized by condensing in the presence of catalyst a 2, 4, or 6 nuclear alklylated 2, 3, or 4 pyridine aldehyde or quaternary derivatives thereof to form a polymer. The pyridine groups were liked by olefinic groups between 2-4, 2-6, 2-3, 3-4, 3-6 or 4-6 positions. Conductive compositions were prepared by dissolving the quaternary polymer and an organic charge transfer complexing agent such as TCNQ in a mutual solvent such as methanol.

  15. Polyetherurethane oligomers with aldehyde groups as additives for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, V.N.; Abramov, E.G.; Tenyushev, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Polyetherurethane oligomers with aldehyde groups, which we synthesized from polyoxypropylene diols (molecular weight 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, or 3000) with toluene diisocyanate and salicylaldehyde, are of interest as additives for lubricating oils. The effects of these oligomers on the service properties and physicochemical characteristics of lubricating oils were investigated by methods prreviously described. As the lube base stocks we used castor oil, a polyoxypropylene diol and a polyethoxysiloxane. The oligomers are readily soluble in organic solvents and in the lube base stocks, and their solutions are stable during storage and use. We found that the optimal concentration of oligomers is 5%, providing the best lubricating properties, in particular the best antiwear properties.

  16. A novel 4 S [3H]beta-naphthoflavone-binding protein in liver cytosol of female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Brauze, D; Malejka-Giganti, D

    2000-01-01

    -induced 4 S protein, whereas several PAHs including B[a]P and benzo[e]pyrene were only weak competitors. The increased [(3)H]beta-NF binding was not associated with glycine N-methyltransferase activity. Hence, the 4 S [(3)H]beta-NF-binding protein described herein differs from the constitutive 4 S PAH-binding protein of rat liver cytosols in the inducibility by beta-NF and 3-MC, ligand-binding characteristics, and lack of glycine N-methyltransferase activity. Gel filtration on Sephacryl of liver cytosols from beta-NF-treated rats indicated a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa for [(3)H]beta-NF-bound protein and suggested that it was derived from a large mass component that before the radioligand binding was eluted with the void volume of the gel and sedimented in a 7 S fraction of the sucrose gradient. The [(3)H]beta-NF binding activity was not eluted with glutathione S-transferase Ya, aldehyde-3-dehydrogenase or DT-diaphorase [NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase] activities, which are AhR-controlled and beta-NF-inducible. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and function of this novel protein which may be involved either directly or indirectly (as a carrier protein) in xenobiotic metabolism in vivo. PMID:10769184

  17. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  18. Intrinsic cytosolic calcium buffering properties of single rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, J R; Bassani, J W; Bers, D M

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular passive Ca2+, buffering was measured in voltage-clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Cells were loaded with indo-1 (K+ salt) to an estimated cytosolic concentration of 44 +/- 5 microM (Mean +/- SEM, n = 5), and accessible cell volume was estimated to be 24.5 +/- 3.6 pl. Ca2+ transport by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase and sarcolemmal Na-Ca exchange was inhibited by treatment with thapsigargin and Na-free solutions, respectively. Extracellular [Ca2+] was maintained at 10 mM and, in some experiments, the mitochondrial uncoupler "1799" was used to assess the degree of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. To perform single cell titrations, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) was increased progressively by a train of depolarizing voltage clamp pulses from -40 to +10 mV. The total Ca2+ gain with each pulse was calculated by integration of the Ca current and then analyzed as a function of the rapid change in [Ca2+]i during the pulse. In the range of [Ca2+]i from 0.1 to 2 microM, overall cell buffering was well described as a single lumped Michaelis-Menten type species with an apparent dissociation constant, KD, of of 0.63 +/- 0.07 microM (n = 5) and a binding capacity, Bmax, of 162 +/- 15 mumol/l cell H2O. Correction for buffering attributable to cytosolic indo-1 gives intrinsic cytosolic Ca2+ buffering parameters of KD = 0.96 +/- 0.18 microM and Bmax = 123 +/- 18 mumol/l cell H2O. The fast Ca2+ buffering measured in this manner agrees reasonably with the characteristics of known rapid Ca buffers (e.g., troponin C, calmodulin, and SR Ca-ATPase), but is only about half of the total Ca2+ buffering measured at equilibrium. Inclusion of slow Ca buffers such as the Ca/Mg sites on troponin C and myosin can account for the differences between fast Ca2+ buffering in phase with the Ca current measured in the present experiments and equilibrium Ca2+ buffering. The present data indicate that a rapid rise of [Ca2+]i from 0.1 to 1 microM during a contraction requires

  19. [Pollution Characteristics of Aldehydes and Ketones Compounds in the Exhaust of Beijing Typical Restaurants].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-chen; Cui, Tong; He, Wan-qing; Nie, Lei; Wang, Jun-ling; Pan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Aldehydes and ketones compounds, as one of the components in the exhaust of restaurants, are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with strong chemical reactivity. However, there is no systematic study on aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of restaurants. To further clarify the food source emission levels of aldehydes and ketones compounds and controlling measures, to access city group catering VOCs emissions control decision-making basis, this study selected 8 Beijing restaurants with different types. The aldehydes and ketones compounds were sampled using DNPH-silica tube, and then ultra performance liquid chromatography was used for quantitative measurement. The aldehydes and ketones concentrations of reference volume condition from 8 restaurants in descending order were Roasted Duck restaurant, Chinese Style Barbecue, Home Dishes, Western Fast-food, School Canteen, Chinese Style Fast-food, Sichuan Cuisine, Huaiyang Cuisine. The results showed that the range of aldehydes and ketones compounds (C1-C9) concentrations of reference volume condition in the exhaust of restaurants was 115.47-1035.99 microg x m(-3). The composition of aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of sampled restaurants was obviously different. The percentages of C1-C3 were above 40% in the exhaust from Chinese style restaurants. Fast food might emit more C4-C9 aldehydes and ketones compounds. From the current situation of existing aldehydes and ketones compounds control, the removal efficiency of high voltage electrostatic purifiers widely used in Beijing is limited.

  20. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  1. Glutathione conjugation and contaminant transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Jennifer A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The recent identification of a novel sulfonated metabolite of alachlor in groundwater and metolachlor in soil is likely the result of glutathione conjugation. Glutathione conjugation is an important biochemical reaction that leads, in the case of alachlor, to the formation of a rather difficult to detect, water-soluble, and therefore highly mobile, sulfonated metabolite. Research from weed science, toxicology, and biochemistry is discussed to support the hypothesis that glutathione conjugation is a potentially important detoxification pathway carried out by aquatic and terrestrial plants and soil microorganisms. A brief review of the biochemical basis for glutathione conjugation is presented. We recommend that multidisciplinary research focus on the occurrence and expression of glutathione and its attendant enzymes in plants and microorganisms, relationships between electrophilic substrate structure and enzyme activity, and the potential exploitation of plants and microorganisms that are competent in glutathione conjugation for phytoremediation and bioremediation.

  2. Metabolic basis of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (2-butoxyethanol) toxicity: role of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Burka, L.T.; Matthews, H.B.

    1987-07-01

    2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is a massively produced glycol ether of which more than 230 million pounds was produced in the United States in 1983. It is extensively used in aerosols and cleaning agents intended for household use. This creates a high potential for human exposure during its manufacturing and use. A single exposure of rats to BE causes severe hemolytic anemia accompanied by secondary hemoglobinuria as well as liver and kidney damage. Butoxyacetic acid (BAA) was earlier identified as a urinary metabolite of BE. In addition, we have recently identified two additional urinary metabolites of BE, namely, BE-glucuronide and BE-sulfate conjugates. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the metabolic basis of BE-induced hematotoxicity in male F344 rats. Treatment of rats with pyrazole (alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor) protected rats against BE-induced hematotoxicity and inhibited BE metabolism to BAA. Pyrazole inhibition of BE metabolism to BAA was accompanied by increased BE metabolism to BE-glucuronide and BE-sulfate as determined by quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of BE metabolites in urine. There was approximately a 10-fold decrease in the ratio of BAA to BE-glucuronide + BE-sulfate in the urine of rats treated with pyrazole + BE compared to rats treated with BE alone. Pretreatment of rats with cyanamide (aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) also significantly protected rats against BE-induced hematotoxicity and modified BE metabolism in a manner similar to that caused by pyrazole. Administration of equimolar doses of BE, the metabolic intermediate butoxyacetaldehyde, or the ultimate metabolite BAA caused similar hematotoxic effects. Cyanamide also protected rats against butoxyacetaldehyde-induced hematotoxicity.

  3. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria. The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.

  4. The Complete Molecular Geometry of Salicyl Aldehyde from Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorosh, O.; Bialkowska-Jaworska, E.; Kisiel, Z.; Pszczolkowski, L.; Kanska, M.; Krygowski, T. M.; Maeder, H.

    2013-06-01

    Salicyl aldehyde is a well known planar molecule containing an internal hydrogen bond. In preparing the publication of our previous report of the study of its rotational spectrum we have taken the opportunity to update the structure determination of this molecule to the complete r_e^{SE} geometry. The molecule contains 15 atoms and we have used supersonic expansion FTMW spectroscopy to obtain rotational constants for a total 26 different isotopic species, including all singly substitued species relative to the parent molecule. The ^{13}C and ^{18}O substitutions were measured in natural abundance, while deuterium substitutions were carried out synthetically. The r_e^{SE} determination requires the calculation of vibration-rotation changes in rotational constants from an ab initio anharmonic force field, which necessitates some compromises in the level of calculation for a molecule of the size of salicyl aldehyde. For this reason we studied the five lowest vibrationally excited states, by using the combination of room-temperature mm-wave spectroscopy and waveguide Fourier transform cm-wave spectroscopy. The experimental excited state rotational constants were then used to calibrate the anharmonic force field calculation. The resulting r_e^{SE} geometry is compared with other types of geometry determination possible from this data, with emphasis on the effect of the near zero principal coordinate of the important C_2 atom. Z.Kisiel et al., 61^{st} OSU Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, The Ohio State University, Ohio 2006, RI-12.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  6. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins

    PubMed Central

    Varrella, Stefano; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G.; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  7. Fluorescein Tri-Aldehyde Promotes the Selective Detection of Homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Barve, Aabha; Lowry, Mark; Escobedo, Jorge O; Thainashmuthu, Josephrajan; Strongin, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Elevated homocysteine levels are a well-known independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To date, relatively few selective fluorescent probes for homocysteine detection have been reported. The lack of sensing reagents and remaining challenges largely derive from issues of sensitivity and/or selectivity. For example, homocysteine is a structural homologue of the more abundant (ca, 20-25 fold) aminothiol cysteine, differing only by an additional methylene group side chain. Fluorescein tri-aldehyde, described herein, has been designed and synthesized as a sensitive and selective fluorophore for the detection of homocysteine in human plasma samples. It responds to analytes selectively via a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) inhibition process that is modulated by predictable analyte-dye product hybridization and ionization states. Mulliken population analysis of fluorescein tri-aldehyde and its reaction products reveals that the characteristic formation of multiple cationic of homocysteine-derived heterocycles leads to enhanced relative negative charge build up on the proximal phenolate oxygen of the fluorophore as a contributing factor to selective emission enhancement.

  8. Modulation of therapy-induced senescence by reactive lipid aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Flor, A C; Doshi, A P; Kron, S J

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding points to unrepairable chromosomal damage as the critical determinant of accelerated senescence in cancer cells treated with radiation or chemotherapy. Nonetheless, the potent senescence inducer etoposide not only targets topoisomerase II to induce DNA damage but also produces abundant free radicals, increasing cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Toward examining roles for DNA damage and oxidative stress in therapy-induced senescence, we developed a quantitative flow cytometric senescence assay and screened 36 redox-active agents as enhancers of an otherwise ineffective dose of radiation. While senescence failed to correlate with total ROS, the radiation enhancers, etoposide and the other effective topoisomerase inhibitors each produced high levels of lipid peroxidation. The reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product, was sufficient to induce senescence in irradiated cells. In turn, sequestering aldehydes with hydralazine blocked effects of etoposide and other senescence inducers. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation potentiates DNA damage from radiation and chemotherapy to drive therapy-induced senescence. PMID:27453792

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in cardiac protection: a new therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Budas, Grant R; Disatnik, Marie- Hélène; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is emerging as a key enzyme involved in cytoprotection in the heart. ALDH2 mediates both the detoxification of reactive aldehydes such as acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO). In addition, chronic nitrate treatment results in ALDH2 inhibition and contributes to nitrate tolerance. Our lab recently identified ALDH2 to be a key mediator of endogenous cytoprotection. We reported that ALDH2 is phosphorylated and activated by the survival kinase protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) and found a strong inverse correlation between ALDH2 activity and infarct size. We also identified a small molecule ALDH2 activator (Alda-1) which reduces myocardial infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in vivo. In this review, we discuss evidence that ALDH2 is a key mediator of endogenous survival signaling in the heart, suggest possible cardioprotective mechanisms mediated by ALDH2, and discuss potential clinical implications of these findings. PMID:20005475

  10. Single amino acid polymorphism in aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini Christy, J; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily comprises of 19 genes and 3 pseudogenes. These superfamily genes play a vital role in the formation of molecules that are involved in life processes, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. ALDH superfamily genes associated mutations are implicated in various diseases, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria, type II Hyperprolinemia, Sjogren-Larsson syndrome including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Accumulation of large DNA variations data especially Single Amino acid Polymorphisms (SAPs) in public databases related to ALDH superfamily genes insisted us to conduct a survey on the disease associated mutations and predict their function impact on protein structure and function. Overall this study provides an update and highlights the importance of pathogenic mutations in associated diseases. Using KD4v and Project HOPE a computational based platform, we summarized all the deleterious properties of SAPs in ALDH superfamily genes by the providing valuable insight into structural alteration rendered due to mutation. We hope this review might provide a way to define the deleteriousness of a SAP and helps to understand the molecular basis of the associated disease and also permits precise diagnosis and treatment in the near future.

  11. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  12. Sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyounga; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Davidson, Garrett; Liu, Ming-Yih; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2012-09-01

    Feed additives such as ractopamine and salbutamol are pharmacologically active compounds, acting primarily as β-adrenergic agonists. This study was designed to investigate whether the sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol may occur under the metabolic conditions and to identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) that are capable of sulfating two major feed additive compounds, ractopamine and salbutamol. A metabolic labelling study showed the generation and release of [(35)S]sulfated ractopamine and salbutamol by HepG2 human hepatoma cells labelled with [(35)S]sulfate in the presence of these two compounds. A systematic analysis using 11 purified human SULTs revealed SULT1A3 as the major SULT responsible for the sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol. The pH dependence and kinetic parameters were analyzed. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of ractopamine and salbutamol on SULT1A3-mediated dopamine sulfation were investigated. Cytosol or S9 fractions of human lung, liver, kidney and small intestine were examined to verify the presence of ractopamine-/salbutamol-sulfating activity in vivo. Of the four human organs, the small intestine displayed the highest activity towards both compounds. Collectively, these results imply that the sulfation mediated by SULT1A3 may play an important role in the metabolism and detoxification of ractopamine and salbutamol.

  13. Altered Activity and Expression of Cytosolic Peptidases in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Itxaro; Blanco, Lorena; Sanz, Begoña; Errarte, Peio; Ariz, Usue; Beitia, Maider; Fernández, Ainhoa; Loizate, Alberto; Candenas, M Luz; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; López, José I.; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The role of peptidases in carcinogenic processes and their potential usefulness as tumor markers in colorectal cancer (CRC) have been classically attributed to cell-surface enzymes. The objective of the present study was to analyze the activity and mRNA expression of three cytosolic peptidases in the CRC and to correlate the obtained results with classic histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis and survival. Methods: The activity and mRNA levels of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA), aminopeptidase B (APB) and pyroglutamyl-peptidase I (PGI) were measured by fluorimetric and quantitative RT-PCR methods in colorectal mucosa and tumor tissues and plasma samples from CRC patients (n=81). Results: 1) PSA and APB activity was higher in adenomas and carcinomas than in the uninvolved mucosa. 2) mRNA levels of PSA and PGI was lower in tumors. 3) PGI activity in CRC tissue correlated negatively with histological grade, tumor size and 5-year overall suvival of CRC patients. 4) Higher plasmatic APB activity was independently associated with better 5-year overall survival. Conclusions: Data suggest that cytosolic peptidases may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis and point to the determination of this enzymes as a valuable method in the determination of CRC prognosis. PMID:26078706

  14. Arenavirus Infection Induces Discrete Cytosolic Structures for RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Nicholas L.; York, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses are responsible for acute hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality and pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. These enveloped negative-sense RNA viruses replicate in the cell cytoplasm and express four proteins. To better understand how these proteins insinuate themselves into cellular processes to orchestrate productive viral replication, we have identified and characterized novel cytosolic structures involved in arenavirus replication and transcription. In cells infected with the nonpathogenic Tacaribe virus or the attenuated Candid#1 strain of Junín virus, we find that newly synthesized viral RNAs localize to cytosolic puncta containing the nucleoprotein (N) of the virus. Density gradient centrifugation studies reveal that these replication-transcription complexes (RTCs) are associated with cellular membranes and contain full-length genomic- and antigenomic-sense RNAs. Viral mRNAs segregate at a higher buoyant density and are likewise scant in immunopurified RTCs, consistent with their translation on bulk cellular ribosomes. In addition, confocal microscopy analysis reveals that RTCs contain the lipid phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate and proteins involved in cellular mRNA metabolism, including the large and small ribosomal subunit proteins L10a and S6, the stress granule protein G3BP1, and a subset of translation initiation factors. Elucidating the structure and function of RTCs will enhance our understanding of virus-cell interactions that promote arenavirus replication and mitigate against host cell immunity. This knowledge may lead to novel intervention strategies to limit viral virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:22875974

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Ingests and Digests Host Cytosolic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zhicheng; McGovern, Olivia L.; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii resides within a nonfusogenic vacuole during intracellular replication. Although the limiting membrane of this vacuole provides a protective barrier to acidification and degradation by lysosomal hydrolases, it also physically segregates the parasite from the host cytosol. Accordingly, it has been suggested that T. gondii acquires material from the host via membrane channels or transporters. The ability of the parasite to internalize macromolecules via endocytosis during intracellular replication has not been tested. Here, we show that Toxoplasma ingests host cytosolic proteins and digests them using cathepsin L and other proteases within its endolysosomal system. Ingestion was reduced in mutant parasites lacking an intravacuolar network of tubular membranes, implicating this apparatus as a possible conduit for trafficking to the parasite. Genetic ablation of proteins involved in the pathway is associated with diminished parasite replication and virulence attenuation. We show that both virulent type I and avirulent type II strain parasites ingest and digest host-derived protein, indicating that the pathway is not restricted to highly virulent strains. The findings provide the first definitive evidence that T. gondii internalizes proteins from the host during intracellular residence and suggest that protein digestion within the endolysosomal system of the parasite contributes to toxoplasmosis. PMID:25028423

  16. Mechanism of aldehyde oxidation catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Olson, L P; Luo, J; Almarsson, O; Bruice, T C

    1996-07-30

    The mechanism of oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) has been investigated using the HLADH structure at 2.1 A resolution with NAD+ and pentafluorobenzyl alcohol in the active site [Ramaswamy et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33,5230-5237]. Constructs for molecular dynamics (MD) investigations with HLADH were obtained by a best-fit superimposition of benzaldehyde or its hydrate on the pentafluorobenzyl alcohol bound to the active site Zn(II)ion. Equilibrium bond lengths, angles, and dihedral parameters for Zn(II) bonding residues His67, Cys46, and Cys174 were obtained from small-molecule X-ray crystal structures and an ab initio-derived parameterization of zinc in HLADH [Ryde, U. (1995) Proteins: Struct., Funct., Genet. 21,40-56]. Dynamic simulations in CHARMM were carried out on the following three constructs to 100 ps: (MD1) enzyme with NAD+, benzaldehyde, and zinc-ligated HO-in the active site; (MD2) enzyme with NAD+ and hydrated benzaldehyde monoanion bound to zinc via the pro-R oxygen, with a proton residing on the pro-S oxygen; and (MD3) enzyme with NAD+ and hydrated benzaldehyde monoanion bound to zinc via the pro-S oxygen, with a proton residing on the pro-R oxygen. Analyses were done of 800 sample conformations taken in the last 40 ps of dynamics. Structures from MD1 and MD3 were used to define the initial spatial arrangements of reactive functionalities for semiempirical PM3 calculations. Using PM3, model systems were calculated of ground states and some transition states for aldehyde hydration, hydride transfer, and subsequent proton shuttling. With benzaldehyde and zinc-bound hydroxide ion in the active site, the oxygen of Zn(II)-OH resided at a distance of 2.8-5.5 A from the aldehyde carbonyl carbon during the dynamics simulation. This may be compared to the PM3 transition state for attack of the Zn(II)-OH oxygen on the benzaldehyde carbonyl carbon, which has an O...C distance of 1.877 A. HLADH

  17. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  18. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  19. Phase-II conjugation ability for PAH metabolism in amphibians: characteristics and inter-species differences.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines amphibian metabolic activity - particularly conjugation - by analysis of pyrene (a four ring, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FD), a mass spectrometry detector (MS) system and kinetic analysis of conjugation enzymes. Six amphibian species were exposed to pyrene (dissolved in water): African claw frog (Xenopus laevis); Tago's brown frog (Rana tagoi); Montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris); Wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa); Japanese newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster); and Clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus); plus one fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes); and a fresh water snail (Clithon retropictus), and the resultant metabolites were collected. Identification of pyrene metabolites by HPLC and ion-trap MS system indicated that medaka mainly excreted pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG), while pyrene-1-sulfate (PYOS) was the main metabolite in all amphibian species. Pyrene metabolites in amphibians were different from those in invertebrate fresh water snails. Inter-species differences were also observed in pyrene metabolism among amphibians. Metabolite analysis showed that frogs relied more strongly on sulfate conjugation than did Japanese newts and clouded salamanders. Furthermore, urodelan amphibians, newts and salamanders, excreted glucose conjugates of pyrene that were not detected in the anuran amphibians. Kinetic analysis of conjugation by hepatic microsomes and cytosols indicated that differences in excreted metabolites reflected differences in enzymatic activities. Furthermore, pyrenediol (PYDOH) glucoside sulfate was detected in the Japanese newt sample. This novel metabolite has not been reported previously to this report, in which we have identified unique characteristics of amphibians in phase II pyrene metabolism.

  20. A Novel NADPH-Dependent Aldehyde Reductase Gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-12632 Involved in the Detoxification of Aldehyde Inhibitors Derived from Lignocellulosic Biomass Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and phenylaldehyde are commonly generated during lignocellulosic biomass conversion process for low-cost cellulosic ethanol production that interferes with subsequent microbial growth and...

  1. Biogenic aldehyde(s) derived from the action of monoamine oxidase may mediate the antidipsotropic effect of daidzin.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M

    2001-01-30

    Daidzin, a major active principle of an ancient herbal treatment for 'alcohol addiction', was first shown to suppress ethanol intake in Syrian golden hamsters. Since then this activity has been confirmed in Wistar rats, Fawn hooded rats, genetically bred alcohol preferring P rats and African green moneys under various experimental conditions, including two-level operant, two-bottle free-choice, limited access, and alcohol-deprivation paradigms. In vitro, daidzin is a potent and selective inhibitor of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). However, in vivo, it does not affect overall acetaldehyde metabolism in golden hamsters. Using isolated hamster liver mitochondria and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) as the substrates, we demonstrated that daidzin inhibits the second but not the first step of the MAO/ALDH-2 pathway, the major pathway that catalyzes monoamine metabolism in mitochondria. Correlation studies using structural analogs of daidzin led to the hypothesis that the mitochondrial MAO/ALDH-2 pathway may be the site of action of daidzin and that one or more biogenic aldehydes such as 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde (5-HIAL) and/or DOPAL derived from the action of monoamine oxidase (MAO) may be mediators of its antidipsotropic action.

  2. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  3. Targeting cancer using cholesterol conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Awwad A.; Alanazi, Fares K.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of cholesterol moiety to active compounds for either cancer treatment or diagnosis is an attractive approach. Cholesterol derivatives are widely studied as cancer diagnostic agents and as anticancer derivatives either in vitro or in vivo using animal models. In largely growing studies, anticancer agents have been chemically conjugated to cholesterol molecules, to enhance their pharmacokinetic behavior, cellular uptake, target specificity, and safety. To efficiently deliver anticancer agents to the target cells and tissues, many different cholesterol–anticancer conjugates were synthesized and characterized, and their anticancer efficiencies were tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24493968

  4. Conjugate symplectic B-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairer, Ernst; Zbinden, Christophe J.

    2012-09-01

    For the long-time integration of Hamiltonian differential equations the use of symplectic methods is recommended. In practice it is often sufficient to apply a method that is conjugate (up to a sufficiently high order) to a symplectic integrator. This article gives a criterion on the conjugate symplecticity of methods that can be represented as a B-series. It allows to characterize the conjugate symplecticity of a large class of numerical integrators including Lobatto IIIA and Lobatto IIIB methods, as well as energy-preserving collocation methods.

  5. Effects of cooking method, cooking oil, and food type on aldehyde emissions in cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Lin, Pei-Chen; Kuo, Yi-Chun

    2017-02-15

    Cooking oil fumes (COFs) contain a mixture of chemicals. Of all chemicals, aldehydes draw a great attention since several of them are considered carcinogenic and formation of long-chain aldehydes is related to fatty acids in cooking oils. The objectives of this research were to compare aldehyde compositions and concentrations in COFs produced by different cooking oils, cooking methods, and food types and to suggest better cooking practices. This study compared aldehydes in COFs produced using four cooking oils (palm oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and soybean oil), three cooking methods (stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying), and two foods (potato and pork loin) in a typical kitchen. Results showed the highest total aldehyde emissions in cooking methods were produced by deep frying, followed by pan frying then by stir frying. Sunflower oil had the highest emissions of total aldehydes, regardless of cooking method and food type whereas rapeseed oil and palm oil had relatively lower emissions. This study suggests that using gentle cooking methods (e.g., stir frying) and using oils low in unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., palm oil or rapeseed oil) can reduce the production of aldehydes in COFs, especially long-chain aldehydes such as hexanal and t,t-2,4-DDE.

  6. The rhodium catalyzed three-component reaction of diazoacetates, titanium(IV) alkoxides and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chong-Dao; Liu, Hui; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Wen-Hao; Mi, Ai-Qiao

    2005-05-28

    The rhodium(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of diazoacetates, titanium alkoxides and aldehydes is shown to give alpha-alkoxyl-beta-hydroxyl acid derivatives; the novel C-C bond formation reaction is proposed to occur through oxonium ylides derived from diazo compounds and titanium alkoxides, and followed by intermolecular trapping by aldehydes.

  7. Acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity: the role of the acyclovir aldehyde metabolite.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Patrina; Aleksa, Katarina; Bend, John; Koren, Gideon

    2011-11-01

    For decades, acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity was believed to be secondary to crystalluria. Clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity in the absence of crystalluria suggests that acyclovir induces direct insult to renal tubular cells. We postulated that acyclovir is metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme to acyclovir aldehyde, which is metabolized by the aldehyde dehydrognase 2 (ALDH2) enzyme to 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine (CMMG). We hypothesized that acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity. Human renal proximal tubular (HK-2) cells were used as our in vitro model. Western blot and enzymes activities assays were performed to determine whether the HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, respectively. Cytotoxicity (measured as a function of cell viability) assays were conducted to determine (1) whether the acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity and (2) whether CMMG induces cell death. A colorimetric assay was performed to determine whether acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in vitro. Our results illustrated that (1) HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, (2) 4-methylpyrazole rendered significant protection against cell death, (3) CMMG does not induce cell death, and (4) acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in tubular cells. These data indicate that acyclovir aldehyde is produced in HK-2 cells and that inhibition of its production by 4-methylpyrazole offers significant protection from cell death in vitro, suggesting that acyclovir aldehyde may cause the direct renal tubular insult associated with acyclovir.

  8. Carbinol derivatives via rhodium-catalyzed addition of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Pucheault, Mathieu; Darses, Sylvain; Genet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-10-07

    Reaction of potassium aryltrifluoroborates with aldehydes, in the presence of a rhodium catalyst, afforded carbinol derivatives in high yields under mild aqueous conditions; this efficient reaction proved to be general, allowing the production of highly hindered diarylmethanols and aliphatic aldehydes were also reactive under these conditions.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Aldehyde-Degrading Strain Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Ren, Chong; Shan, Xiexie

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8, a deep-sea strain isolated from the South China Sea, has the ability to degrade aldehydes. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of this species, which could provide fundamental molecular information on the aldehydes-degrading mechanism. PMID:27081145

  10. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8 Aliphatic Saturated Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Shannon D.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8, straight-chain, aliphatic aldehydes have been previously assessed and have been documented in volume 4 of Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants (James, 2000). These aldehydes as well as associated physical properties are shown in Table 1. The C3 to C8 aliphatic aldehydes can enter the habitable compartments and contaminate breathing air of spacecraft by several routes including incomplete oxidation of alcohols in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) air revitalization subsystem, as a byproduct of human metabolism, through materials off-gassing, or during food preparation. These aldehydes have been detected in the atmosphere of manned space vehicles in the past. Analysis performed by NASA of crew cabin air samples from the Russian Mir Space Station revealed the presence of C3 to C8 aldehydes at concentrations peaking at approximately 0.1 mg/cu m.

  11. Synthesis of bio-based aldehyde from seaweed polysaccharide and its interaction with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kholiya, Faisal; Chaudhary, Jai Prakash; Vadodariya, Nilesh; Meena, Ramavatar

    2016-10-05

    Here, we demonstrate a successful synthesis of bio-based aldehyde namely dialdehyde-carboxymethylagarose (DCMA) using carboxymethyagarose (CMA). Further reaction parameters (i.e. reaction temperature, pH and periodate concentration) were optimized to achieve maximum aldehyde content and product yield. The synthesis of DCMA was confirmed by employing FTIR, (1)H NMR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TGA, DSC, EA and GPC techniques. To investigate the aldehyde functionality, DCMA was allowed to interact with BSA and obtained results were found to be comparable with that of synthetic aldehyde (Formaldehyde). Further interaction of DCMA with BSA was confirmed by using UV-vis, FTIR, fluorescent spectroscopy, CD and DLS analysis. Results of this study revealed that bio-based aldehyde behaves like formaldehyde. This study adds value to abundant marine biopolymers and opens the new research area for polymer researchers.

  12. Chromatographic approaches for determination of low-molecular mass aldehydes in bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Tessini, Catherine; Müller, Niels; Mardones, Claudia; Meier, Dietrich; Berg, Alex; von Baer, Dietrich

    2012-01-06

    HPLC-UV and GC/MS determination of aldehydes in bio-oil were evaluated. HPLC-UV preceded by derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine allows separation and detection of bio-oil aldehydes, but the derivatization affected the bio-oil stability reducing their quantitative applicability. GC/MS determination of aldehydes was reached by derivatization with o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride. Two approaches for this reaction were evaluated. The first: "in solution derivatization and head space extraction" and the second: "on fiber derivatization SPME", the latter through an automatic procedure. Both sample treatments allows the quantification of most important aliphatic aldehydes in bio-oil, being the SPME approach more efficient. The aldehyde concentrations in bio-oil were ~2% formaldehyde, ~!0.1% acetaldehyde and ~0.05% propionaldehyde.

  13. Colorimetric monitoring of solid-phase aldehydes using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Simon K; Barany, George

    2004-01-01

    A simple and rapid method to achieve colorimetric monitoring of resin-bound aldehydes, based on ambient temperature reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) in the presence of dilute acid, has been developed as an adjunct to solid-phase organic synthesis and combinatorial chemistry. By this test, the presence of aldehydes is indicated by a red to dark-orange appearance, within a minute. Alternatively, resins that are free of aldehydes or in which aldehyde functions have reacted completely retain their original color. The DNPH test was demonstrated for poly(ethylene glycol)-polystyrene (PEG-PS), aminomethyl polystyrene (AMP), cross-linked ethoxylate acrylate resin (CLEAR), and acryloylated O,O'-bis(2-aminopropyl)poly(ethylene glycol) (PEGA) supports and gave results visible to the naked eye at levels as low as 18 micromol of aldehyde per gram of resin.

  14. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  15. A high molecular weight protease in liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Rose, I A; Warms, J V; Hershko, A

    1979-09-10

    A high molecular weight (greater than 400,000) protease active with [3H]leucine-labeled globin has been found in the postmicrosomal fraction of mouse kidney, brain, heart, spleen, and tumor cells and is most active in liver. The presence in liver was unexpected because liver cytosol is very ineffective in the breakdown of endogenous, labeled proteins. The enzyme has a number of properties that distinguish it from known cathepsins in addition to its high molecular weight. It is most active at pH approximately 7.5. When purified, it is unstable above 20 degrees C and is stabilized by metal chelating agents such as citrate, creatine-P, and glycerate-3-P. It is an -SH protease, but its thermal instability is not affected by 1 mM dithiothreitol. The enzyme is not lysosomal.

  16. Nod-Like Receptors: Cytosolic Watchdogs for Immunity against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sirard, Jean-Claude; Vignal, Cécile; Dessein, Rodrigue; Chamaillard, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, tissue-specific sets of pattern-recognition molecules, including Nod-like receptors (NLR), enable concomitant and sequential detection of microbial-associated molecular patterns from both the extracellular and intracellular microenvironment. Repressing and de-repressing the cytosolic surveillance machinery contributes to vital immune homeostasis and protective responses within specific tissues. Conversely, defective biology of NLR drives the development of recurrent infectious, autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases by failing to mount barrier functions against pathogens, to tolerate commensals, and/or to instruct the adaptive immune response against microbes. Better decoding microbial strategies that are evolved to circumvent NLR sensing will provide clues for the development of rational therapies aimed at curing and/or preventing common and emerging immunopathologies. PMID:18166077

  17. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  18. The first zinc-promoted, environmentally friendly, and highly efficient acetoxyallylation of aldehydes in aqueous ammonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, M; Girotti, R; Morganti, S; Trombini, C

    2001-11-21

    An exceptionally mild acetoxyallylation of aldehydes in water promoted by zinc is reported, using 3-bromo-1-acetoxyprop-1-ene as starting material; simple diastereoselectivity mainly depends on the nature of the aldehyde.

  19. Phosphorylation of nucleoside-metallacarborane and carborane conjugates by nucleoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Blazej A; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lesnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2013-01-01

    A library of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides modified with carborane or metallacarborane boron clusters at different locations, consisting of new molecules as well as already described compounds, was prepared. The compounds were tested as substrates for human deoxynucleoside kinases. Some conjugates, with modification attached to N3 of thymidine via a linker containing the triazole moiety, were efficiently phosphorylated by cytosolic thymidine kinase 1 and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2. Higher phosphorylation levels were observed with thymidine kinase 1, the phosphorylation of nucleosides modified with metallacarboranes was observed for the first time.

  20. Efficient, dual-stimuli responsive cytosolic gene delivery using a RGD modified disulfide-linked polyethylenimine functionalized gold nanorod.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Shen, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Min; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Dejian; Guo, Shengrong

    2014-12-28

    Controlled-release systems capable of responding to external stimuli and/or unique internal environments have received great interests in site-specific gene and/or drug delivery. In this work, a functionalized gene nanocarrier for dual-stimuli triggered cytosolic gene delivery is developed and showing high gene delivery efficacy with low cytotoxicity. The nanocarrier is prepared by conjugating gold nanorod (GNR) with multiple disulfide cross-linked short PEIs to harness the advantageous properties of GNR based near infrared (NIR) laser induced photothermal heating and intracellular stimuli-triggered degradability of disulfide cross-linked short PEIs (DSPEI). The DSPEI is further grafted with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) section to afford high carrier stability in cell cultures and a terminal RGD peptide for specific targeting of cancer cells. The nanocarrier is found to effectively condense plasmid DNA to form a highly stable GNR-DSPEI-PEG-RGD/DNA complex with tumor cell-targeting ability that can be efficiently uptaken by cancer cells. Moreover, the loaded genes can be effectively released from the complex triggered by the high intracellular glutathione content and/or by photothermal effect of NIR irradiation at 808 nm. Interestingly, the GNRs-based complex can easily escape from intracellular endo-/lyso-somal compartments and release the gene load into the cytosol upon exposure to NIR irradiation, resulting in significantly improved gene transfection efficiency. Our new gene carrier exhibits high gene transfection efficiency, comparable to or even better than that of high MW PEIs, but with a much lower cytotoxicity. Additionally, neither the GNR-based carrier nor the laser treatment shows any significant evidence of cytotoxicity. This work demonstrates a promising strategy for intracellular stimuli triggered, photothermal controllable gene delivery system, which can be further applied to many other nanomedicine fields.

  1. Inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy improves health in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Ostrovsky, Julian; Kwon, Young Joon; Polyak, Erzsebet; Licata, Joseph; Tsukikawa, Mai; Marty, Eric; Thomas, Jeffrey; Felix, Carolyn A.; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Gasser, David L.; Argon, Yair; Falk, Marni J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease therapies directed at intra-mitochondrial pathology are largely ineffective. Recognizing that RC dysfunction invokes pronounced extra-mitochondrial transcriptional adaptations, particularly involving dysregulated translation, we hypothesized that translational dysregulation is itself contributing to the pathophysiology of RC disease. Here, we investigated the activities, and effects from direct inhibition, of a central translational regulator (mTORC1) and its downstream biological processes in diverse genetic and pharmacological models of RC disease. Our data identify novel mechanisms underlying the cellular pathogenesis of RC dysfunction, including the combined induction of proteotoxic stress, the ER stress response and autophagy. mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin partially ameliorated renal disease in B6.Pdss2kd/kd mice with complexes I–III/II–III deficiencies, improved viability and mitochondrial physiology in gas-1(fc21) nematodes with complex I deficiency, and rescued viability across a variety of RC-inhibited human cells. Even more effective was probucol, a PPAR-activating anti-lipid drug that we show also inhibits mTORC1. However, directly inhibiting mTORC1-regulated downstream activities yielded the most pronounced and sustained benefit. Partial inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, or of autophagy by lithium chloride, rescued viability, preserved cellular respiratory capacity and induced mitochondrial translation and biogenesis. Cycloheximide also ameliorated proteotoxic stress via a uniquely selective reduction of cytosolic protein translation. RNAseq-based transcriptome profiling of treatment effects in gas-1(fc21) mutants provide further evidence that these therapies effectively restored altered translation and autophagy pathways toward that of wild-type animals. Overall, partially inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy offer novel treatment strategies to improve health across the diverse

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Conjugate Addition to Enones Via Allylnickel Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ruja; Dorn, Stephanie C. M.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    An alternative method to copper-catalyzed conjugate addition followed by enolate silylation for the synthesis of β-di-substituted silyl enol ether products (R1(R2)HCCH=C(OSiR43)R3) is presented. This method uses haloarenes instead of nucleophilic aryl reagents. Nickel ligated to either neocuproine or bipyridine couples an α,β-unsaturated ketone or aldehyde (R2HC=CHC(O)R3) with an organic halide (R1-X) in the presence of a trialkylchlorosilane reagent (Cl-SiR43). Reactions are assembled on the bench-top and tolerate a variety of functional groups (aldehyde, ketone, nitrile, sulfone, pentafluorosulfur, and N-aryltrifluoroacetamide), electron-rich iodoarenes, and electron-poor haloarenes. Mechanistic studies have confirmed the first example of a catalytic reductive conjugate addition of organic halides that proceeds via an allylnickel intermediate. Selectivity is attributed to: 1) rapid, selective reaction of LNi0 with chlorotriethylsilane and enone in the presence of other organic electrophiles, and 2) minimization of enone dimerization by ligand steric effects. PMID:23270480

  3. Studies on organic indole-3-aldehyde single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Ravi, G.; Dhanasekaran, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    Indole-3-aldehyde (IA) is a new organic nonlinear material for which its solubility in methanol and acetone was found out using the apparatus fabricated by the authors. In order to get the good-quality crystals, methods of evaporation of solvent at room temperature and slow cooling of saturated solution at boiling temperature were adopted. Simulated lattice parameter values were found out using experimentally known " d" values. The etching and mechanical strength studies on different planes of the crystal were carried out. Decomposition temperature, weight loss and different functional bond frequencies associated with the crystal were also found out from differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, respectively.

  4. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group.

  5. Electron impact ionization of cycloalkanes, aldehydes, and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-08-07

    The theoretical calculations of electron impact total ionization cross section for cycloalkane, aldehyde, and ketone group molecules are undertaken from ionization threshold to 2 keV. The present calculations are based on the spherical complex optical potential formalism and complex scattering potential ionization contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied compare fairly well with the recent measurements, wherever available and the cross sections for many targets are predicted for the first time. The correlation between the peak of ionization cross sections with number of target electrons and target parameters is also reported. It was found that the cross sections at their maximum depend linearly with the number of target electrons and with other target parameters, confirming the consistency of the values reported here.

  6. Enzymatic oxidation of phthalazine with guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase and liver slices: inhibition by isovanillin.

    PubMed

    Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I; Beedham, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The enzymes aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of N-heterocycles and aldehydes. These enzymes are widely known for their role in the metabolism of N-heterocyclic xenobiotics where they provide a protective barrier by aiding in the detoxification of ingested nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Isovanillin has been shown to inhibit the metabolism of aromatic aldehydes by aldehyde oxidase, but its inhibition towards the heterocyclic compounds has not been studied. The present investigation examines the oxidation of phthalazine in the absence and in the presence of the inhibitor isovanillin by partially purified aldehyde oxidase from guinea pig liver. In addition, the interaction of phthalazine with freshly prepared guinea pig liver slices, both in the absence and presence of specific inhibitors of several liver oxidizing enzymes, was investigated. ldehyde oxidase rapidly converted phthalazine into 1-phthalazinone, which was completely inhibited in the presence of isovanillin (a specific inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase). In freshly prepared liver slices, phthalazine was also rapidly converted to 1-phthalazinone. The formation of 1-phthalazinone was completely inhibited by isovanillin, whereas disulfiram (a specific inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase) only inhibited 1-phthalazinone formation by 24% and allopurinol (a specific inhibitor of xanthine oxidase) had little effect. Therefore, isovanillin has been proved as an inhibitor of the metabolism of heterocyclic substrates, such as phthalazine, by guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase, since it had not been tested before. Thus it would appear from the inhibitor results that aldehyde oxidase is the predominant enzyme in the oxidation of phthalazine to 1-phthalazinone in freshly prepared guinea pig liver slices, whereas xanthine oxidase only contributes to a small extent and aldehyde dehydrogenase does not take any part.

  7. Sequential measurements of conjugate observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    We present a unified treatment of sequential measurements of two conjugate observables. Our approach is to derive a mathematical structure theorem for all the relevant covariant instruments. As a consequence of this result, we show that every Weyl-Heisenberg covariant observable can be implemented as a sequential measurement of two conjugate observables. This method is applicable both in finite- and infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, therefore covering sequential spin component measurements as well as position-momentum sequential measurements.

  8. Pharmacological activities of cilantro's aliphatic aldehydes against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Donega, Mateus A; Mello, Simone C; Moraes, Rita M; Jain, Surendra K; Tekwani, Babu L; Cantrell, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    Leishmaniasis is a chronic infectious disease caused by different Leishmania species. Global occurrences of this disease are primarily limited to tropical and subtropical regions. Treatments are available; however, patients complain of side effects. Different species of plants have been screened as a potential source of new drugs against leishmaniasis. In this study, we investigated the antileishmanial activity of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) essential oil and its main components: (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-decenal, (E)-2-dodecenal, decanal, dodecanal, and tetradecanal. The essential oil of C. sativum leaves inhibits growth of Leishmani donovani promastigotes in culture with an IC50 of 26.58 ± 6.11 µg/mL. The aliphatic aldehydes (E)-2-decenal (7.85 ± 0.28 µg/mL), (E)-2-undecenal (2.81 ± 0.21 µg/mL), and (E)-2-dodecenal (4.35 ± 0.15 µg/mL), all isolated from C. sativum essential oil, are effective inhibitors of in vitro cultures of L. donovani promastigotes. Aldehydes (E)-2-decenal, (E)-2-undecenal, and (E)-2-dodecenal were also evaluated against axenic amastigotes and IC50 values were determined to be 2.47 ± 0.25 µg/mL, 1.25 ± 0.11 µg/mL, and 4.78 ± 1.12 µg/mL, respectively. (E)-2-Undecenal and (E)-2-dodecenal demonstrated IC50 values of 5.65 ± 0.19 µg/mL and 9.60 ± 0.89 µg/mL, respectively, against macrophage amastigotes. These cilantro compounds showed no cytotoxicity against THP-1 macrophages.

  9. Fluorescent and colorimetric probes for mercury(II): tunable structures of electron donor and π-conjugated bridge.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaohong; Li, Shuang; Jia, Huizhen; Zhong, Aoshu; Zhong, Cheng; Feng, Jun; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2012-02-06

    A new series of intramolecular-charge-transfer (ICT) molecules (compounds 1, 2, and 3) were synthesized by attaching various electron-donating thiophenes groups to a triphenylamine backbone with an aldehyde group as the electron acceptor. Based on the protection reaction between ethanethiol and aldehyde, the corresponding dithioacetals (compounds S1, S2, and S3) were prepared to serve as novel colorimetric and fluorescent chemosensors for Hg(2+) ions. Also, compound S1 was further utilized to construct the chemical-reaction-based conjugated polymer probe (PS1) towards Hg(2+) ions. In the presence of as little as 10 nM Hg(2+), compound PS1 displayed an apparent change in the fluorescent intensity. The sensing processes were revealed to be mediated by ICT, as confirmed by time-dependent DFT calculations. Furthermore, compound S1 was successfully applied to microscopic imaging for the detection of Hg(2+) in HeLa cells with ratiometric fluorescent methods.

  10. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  11. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  12. [Effects of panthenol and carnitine on aldehyde metabolic enzymes in rats with tetrachloromethane-induced liver injury].

    PubMed

    Satanovskaia, V I; Pron'ko, P S; Gaĭshmanova, A V; Miskevich, D A

    2009-01-01

    Tetrachloromethane (2 g/kg, intragastric) produced a decrease in the activity of NAD- and NADH- dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases with high Km for aldehydes in rat liver. Panthenol and L-carnitine administered separately normalized the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases, while a combination of the drugs did not produce any significant effect.

  13. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meets the Cytosol: The Role of cGAS in Anti-mycobacterial Immunity.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2015-06-10

    The intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a subject of long debate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, three independent studies reveal the detection of cytosolic mycobacterial DNA by the nucleotidyltransferase cGAS, emphasizing the concept of cytosolic access by M. tuberculosis and its role in balancing immune-protection and immune-pathogenesis.

  15. Identification of glutathione conjugates of acetylene-containing positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Huang, Xiaohua Stella; Degnan, Andrew P; Snyder, Lawrence B; Yang, Fukang; Huang, Hong; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Johnson, Benjamin M

    2015-04-01

    A recent medicinal chemistry campaign to identify positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) led to the discovery of potent compounds featuring an oxazolidinone structural core flanked by biaryl acetylene and haloaryl moieties. However, biotransformation studies of some of these mGluR5 PAMs demonstrated the formation of glutathione (GSH) conjugates. The conjugates in question were formed independently of NADPH as the main products in liver microsomes and liver cytosol (rat and human) and exhibited masses that were 307 u greater than their respective substrates, indicating the involvement of a reductive step in the formation of these metabolites. To further characterize the relevant metabolic sequences, GSH conjugates of (4R,5R)-5-(3-fluorophenyl)-4-(5-(pyrazin-2-ylethynyl)pyridin-3-yl)oxazolidin-2-one and (4R,5R)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-(6-((3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)ethynyl)pyridin-2-yl)oxazolidin-2-one were biosynthesized and isolated. Subsequent analysis by NMR showed that GSH had reacted with the acetylene carbon atoms of these mGluR5 PAMs, suggesting a conjugate addition mechanism and implicating cytosolic and microsomal GSH S-transferases (GSTs) in catalysis. Interestingly, five closely related mGluR5 PAMs were not similarly prone to the formation of GSH conjugates in vitro. These compounds also featured acetylenes, but were flanked by either phenyl or cyclohexyl rings, which indicated that the formation of GSH conjugates was influenced by proximal functional groups that modulated the electron density of the triple bond and/or differences in enzyme-substrate specificity. These results informed an ongoing drug-discovery effort to identify mGluR5 PAMs with drug-like properties and a low risk of reactivity with endogenous thiols.

  16. Fatty aldehyde and fatty alcohol metabolism: review and importance for epidermal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, William B

    2014-03-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  17. Control of aldehyde emissions in the diesel engines with alcoholic fuels.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V S Murali; Varaprasad, C M; Reddy, C Venkata Ramana

    2006-01-01

    The major pollutants emitted from compression ignition (CI) engine with diesel as fuel are smoke and nitrogen oxides (NOx). When the diesel engine is run with alternate fuels, there is need to check alcohols (methanol or ethanol) and aldehydes also. Alcohols cannot be used directly in diesel engine and hence engine modification is essential as alcohols have low cetane number and high latent hear of vaporization. Hence, for use of alcohol in diesel engine, it needs hot combustion chamber, which is provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine with an air gap insulated piston with superni crown and air gap insulated liner with superni insert. In the present study, the pollution levels of aldehydes are reported with the use of methanol and ethanol as alternate fuels in LHR diesel engine with varying injection pressure, injection timings with different percentage of alcohol induction. The aldehydes (formaldehyde and acetaldehyde) in the exhaust were estimated by wet chemical technique with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Aldehyde emissions increased with an increase in alcohol induction. The LHR engine showed a decrease in aldehyde emissions when compared to conventional engine. However, the variation of injection pressure showed a marginal effect in reducing aldehydes, while advancing the injection timing reduced aldehyde emissions.

  18. Fatty Aldehyde and Fatty Alcohol Metabolism: Review and Importance for Epidermal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. PMID:24036493

  19. Mitochondrial Matrix Ca2+ Accumulation Regulates Cytosolic NAD+/NADH Metabolism, Protein Acetylation, and Sirtuin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Raluca; Wiczer, Brian M.; Neeley, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uptake stimulates bioenergetics and drives energy production in metabolic tissue. It is unknown how a calcium-mediated acceleration in matrix bioenergetics would influence cellular metabolism in glycolytic cells that do not require mitochondria for ATP production. Using primary human endothelial cells (ECs), we discovered that repetitive cytosolic calcium signals (oscillations) chronically loaded into the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial calcium loading in turn stimulated bioenergetics and a persistent elevation in NADH. Rather than serving as an impetus for mitochondrial ATP generation, matrix NADH rapidly transmitted to the cytosol to influence the activity and expression of cytosolic sirtuins, resulting in global changes in protein acetylation. In endothelial cells, the mitochondrion-driven reduction in both the cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD+/NADH ratio stimulated a compensatory increase in SIRT1 protein levels that had an anti-inflammatory effect. Our studies reveal the physiologic importance of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the metabolic regulation of sirtuins and cytosolic signaling cascades. PMID:24865966

  20. Adenine Nucleotide Levels in the Cytosol, Chloroplasts, and Mitochondria of Wheat Leaf Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Mark; Lilley, Ross McC.; Heldt, Hans W.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, a new method has been described, in which membrane filtration is used to allow the levels of adenine nucleotides in the chloroplast stroma, the cytosol, and the mitochondrial matrix to be measured. This method is now used to investigate the effect of illumination, of respiratory inhibitors, and of uncouplers on the distribution of ATP, ADP, and AMP in wheat (Triticum aestivum var. `Timmo') leaf protoplasts. (a) The adenine nucleotides are apparently equilibrated by adenylate kinase in the stroma and the cytosol, but not in the mitochondrial matrix. (b) The ATP/ADP quotient in the cytosol is considerably higher than that in the mitochondrial matrix or the chloroplast stroma. (c) A large gradient exists between the ATP/ADP quotients in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix in the dark, with a very low ATP/ADP quotient in the mitochondria. This gradient is lowered by uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors showing that, as in animal tissues, it reflects the energization of the mitochondria. (d) In the dark, the stromal ATP/ADP is lower than in the light, and appears to be maintained, at least in part, by import from the cytosol. (e) The cytosolic ATP/ADP, however, actually decreases in the light. This contradicts the widespread assumption, that export of photosynthetically produced ATP from the chloroplast leads to an increase in the cytosolic ATP/ADP, which then inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. (f) The mitochondrial ATP/ADP increases in the light, and the gradient between the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix falls. This is also difficult to understand in terms of an inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation in the light due to a lack of ADP in the cytosol. (g) The significance of the measured variations in the adenine nucleotide pools are discussed with respect to the diurnal carbohydrate metabolism in a leaf, and to the metabolic function of the chloroplast, the cytosol and the mitochondria. PMID:16662653

  1. Direct Access to β-Fluorinated Aldehydes by Nitrite-Modified Wacker Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Crystal K; Ziegler, Daniel T; Carr, Brian; Wickens, Zachary K; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-07-11

    An aldehyde-selective Wacker-type oxidation of allylic fluorides proceeds with a nitrite catalyst. The method represents a direct route to prepare β-fluorinated aldehydes. Allylic fluorides bearing a variety of functional groups are transformed in high yield and very high regioselectivity. Additionally, the unpurified aldehyde products serve as versatile intermediates, thus enabling access to a diverse array of fluorinated building blocks. Preliminary mechanistic investigations suggest that inductive effects have a strong influence on the rate and regioselectivity of the oxidation.

  2. Formal [4 + 2] cycloaddition of donor-acceptor cyclobutanes and aldehydes: stereoselective access to substituted tetrahydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Andrew T; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-14

    A highly diastereoselective synthesis of 2,6-cis-disubstituted tetrahydropyrans (THPs) via Lewis acid-catalyzed formal [4 + 2] cycloaddition of donor-acceptor cyclobutanes and aldehydes has been developed. THP products are formed in up to 96% yield and 99:1 diastereoselectivity. Aromatic, cinnamyl, and aliphatic aldehydes are competent dipolarophiles in this system. This methodology was extended to a [[2 + 2] + 2] cycloaddition of 4-methoxystyrene, dimethyl methylidene malonate, and an aldehyde to furnish THPs directly without prior isolation of the cyclobutane.

  3. [The role of hepatic and erythrocyte aldehyde dehydrogenase in the development of burn toxemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A G

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to examine catalytic properties of non-specific aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver and erythrocyte as the main markers of endogenous intoxication after burn. Enzymatic activity was assayed from changes in the rate of NADH synthesis during acetaldehyde oxidation. Burn was shown to decrease it both in the liver and in erythrocytes which resulted in the accumulation of toxic aldehydes and the development of intoxication. Simultaneous fall in alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities is supposed to contribute to the decrease of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity as a result of thermal injury.

  4. Transformations of several monoterpenoids in the presence of aldehydes in supercritical solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. I.; Sivcev, V. P.; Il'ina, I. V.; Korchagina, D. V.; Statsenko, O. B.; Volcho, K. P.; Salakhutdinov, N. F.

    2013-03-01

    The reactivity of verbenol epoxide and isopulegol in supercritical solvents in the presence of aromatic aldehydes was studied using a flow type reactor and a heterogeneous catalyst (Al2O3) or no catalyst. The intramolecular transformations or interactions of reagents with the solvent prevailed in all cases; the yield of the products of intermolecular reactions of terpenoids with aldehydes was up to 1%. The aldehydes did not interact with verbenol epoxide but produced a considerable effect on the distribution of its isomerization products.

  5. An Efficient Synthesis of 2-Substituted Benzimidazoles via Photocatalytic Condensation of o-Phenylenediamines and Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Kovvuri, Jeshma; Nagaraju, Burri; Kamal, Ahmed; Srivastava, Ajay K

    2016-10-10

    A photocatalytic method has been developed for the efficient synthesis of functionalized benzimidazoles. This protocol involves photocatalytic condensation of o-phenylenediamines with various aldehydes using the Rose Bengal as photocatalyst. The method was found to be general and was successfully employed for accessing pharmaceutically important benzimidazoles by the condensation of aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic aldehydes with o-phenylenediamines, in good-to-excellent yields. Notably, the method was found to be effective for the condensation of less reactive heterocyclic aldehydes with o-phenylenediamines.

  6. A SeCSe-Pd(II) pincer complex as a highly efficient catalyst for allylation of aldehydes with allyltributyltin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Sheets, Matthew

    2006-07-07

    An air- and moisture-stable SeCSe-Pd(II) pincer complex was synthesized and found to catalyze the nucleophilic allylation of aldehydes with allyltributyltin. The allylation of a variety of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to give the corresponding homoallyl alcohols was performed at room temperature to 60 degrees C in yields ranging from 50% (for typical aliphatic aldehydes) to up to 97% (for aromatic aldehydes) using 5 x 10(-3) to 1 mol % of the Pd catalyst. NMR spectroscopic study indicated that a sigma-allylpalladium intermediate was formed and possibly functions as the nucleophilic species that undergoes addition to the aldehydes.

  7. Reactive ring-opened aldehyde metabolites in benzene hematotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Witz, G; Zhang, Z; Goldstein, B D

    1996-01-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene is mediated by reactive benzene metabolites and possibly by other intermediates including reactive oxygen species. We previously hypothesized that ring-opened metabolites may significantly contribute to benzene hematotoxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, our studies initially demonstrated that benzene is metabolized in vitro to trans-trans-muconaldehyde (MUC), a reactive six-carbon diene dialdehyde, and that MUC is toxic to the bone marrow in a manner similar to benzene. Benzene toxicity most likely involves interactions among several metabolites that operate by different mechanisms to produce more than one biological effect. Our studies indicate that MUC coadministered with hydroquinone is a particularly potent metabolite combination that causes bone marrow damage, suggesting that the involvement of ring-opened metabolites in benzene toxicity may be related to their biological effects in combination with other benzene metabolites. Studies in our laboratory and by others indicate that MUC is metabolized to a variety of compounds by oxidation or reduction of the aldehyde groups. The aldehydic MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienal (CHO-M-OH), similar to MUC but to a lesser extent, is reactive toward glutathione, mutagenic in V79 cells, and hematotoxic in mice. It is formed by monoreduction of MUC, a process that is reversible and could be of biological significance in benzene bone marrow toxicity. The MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic (COOH-M-OH) is an end product of MUC metabolism in vitro. Our studies indicate that COOH-M-OH is a urinary metabolite of benzene in mice, a finding that provides further indirect evidence for the in vivo formation of MUC from benzene. Mechanistic studies showed the formation of cis-trans-muconaldehyde in addition to MUC from benzene incubated in a hydroxyl radical-generating Fenton system. These results suggest that the benzene ring is initially opened to cis

  8. Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase 10 family members confer salt tolerance through putrescine-derived 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) production

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P.; Shelp, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines represent a potential source of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in plants exposed to abiotic stress. Terminal catabolism of putrescine in Arabidopsis thaliana involves amine oxidase and the production of 4-aminobutanal, which is a substrate for NAD+-dependent aminoaldehyde dehydrogenase (AMADH). Here, two AMADH homologs were chosen (AtALDH10A8 and AtALDH10A9) as candidates for encoding 4-aminobutanal dehydrogenase activity for GABA synthesis. The two genes were cloned and soluble recombinant proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. The pH optima for activity and catalytic efficiency of recombinant AtALDH10A8 with 3-aminopropanal as substrate was 10.5 and 8.5, respectively, whereas the optima for AtALDH10A9 were approximately 9.5. Maximal activity and catalytic efficiency were obtained with NAD+ and 3-aminopropanal, followed by 4-aminobutanal; negligible activity was obtained with betaine aldehyde. NAD+ reduction was accompanied by the production of GABA and β-alanine, respectively, with 4-aminobutanal and 3-aminopropanal as substrates. Transient co-expression systems using Arabidopsis cell suspension protoplasts or onion epidermal cells and several organelle markers revealed that AtALDH10A9 was peroxisomal, but AtALDH10A8 was cytosolic, although the N-terminal 140 amino acid sequence of AtALDH10A8 localized to the plastid. Root growth of single loss-of-function mutants was more sensitive to salinity than wild-type plants, and this was accompanied by reduced GABA accumulation. PMID:27725774

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  10. Cleavage by MALT1 induces cytosolic release of A20.

    PubMed

    Malinverni, Claire; Unterreiner, Adeline; Staal, Jens; Demeyer, Annelies; Galaup, Marion; Luyten, Marcel; Beyaert, Rudi; Bornancin, Frédéric

    2010-10-01

    The MALT1 paracaspase has arginine-directed proteolytic activity. A20 is a dual ubiquitin-editing enzyme involved in termination of NF-κB signaling. Upon T- or B-cell receptor engagement human (h) A20 is cleaved by MALT1 after arginine 439, yielding an N-terminal fragment (hA20p50) and a C-terminal one (hA20p37). The hA20p50 fragment has never been detected directly, thus limiting insight into the functional consequences of MALT1-mediated cleavage of A20. Here, various antibodies were tested, including newly generated hA20p50 and hA20p37 specific antibodies, leading to detection of the hA20p50 fragment produced after MALT1-mediated cleavage of ectopically expressed as well as endogenous A20 proteins. The properties of both A20 fragments, generated upon co-expression with a constitutively active MALT1 protein, were further studied by sub-cellular fractionation and fluorescence microscopy. In contrast to full-length A20 which is particulate and insoluble, we found hA20p50 to be soluble and readily released into the cytosol whereas hA20p37 was partially soluble, thus suggesting loss of compartmentalization as a possible mechanism for MALT1-mediated dampening of A20 function.

  11. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  12. Role of Cytosolic Carboxypeptidase 5 in Neuronal Survival and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Yuan; Wei, Peng; Morgan, James I.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins may undergo a type of posttranslational modification – polyglutamylation, where a glutamate residue is enzymatically linked to the γ-carboxyl group of a glutamate in the primary sequence of proteins and additional glutamates are then sequentially added via α-carboxyl–linkages to the growing glutamate side chain. Nna1 (a.k.a. CCP1) defines the 6-member cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) family that metabolizes polyglutamate side chain and its loss results in neurodegeneration and male infertility. Whereas most CCPs catalyze hydrolysis of α-carboxyl-linked glutamates, CCP5 uniquely metabolizes the γ-carboxyl linked, branch point glutamate. Using purified recombinant mouse CCP5, we confirmed that it metabolized γ-carboxyl-linked glutamate of synthetic substrates and tubulin. Despite this unique feature and its indispensible functions in lower species, we found that unlike Nna1, CCP5 is not essential for neuronal survival in mouse. CCP5 deficiency does cause male infertility. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is distinct from that of Nna1 loss. Instead, it is phenotypically reminiscent of the infertility of olt mice. Our findings suggest that Nna1 and CCP5 do not work coordinately in the same pathway in either the nervous system or spermatogenesis. This is the first study addressing the function of CCP5 in mammals. PMID:28128286

  13. Regulation of the cytosolic sulfotransferases by nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from the physiologic sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, to a nucleophilic substrate to generate a polar product that is more amenable to elimination from the body. As catalysts of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolism, the SULTs are major points of contact between the external and physiological environments, and modulation of SULT-catalyzed metabolism can not only affect xenobiotic disposition, but it can also alter endogenous metabolic processes. Therefore, it is not surprising that SULT expression is regulated by numerous members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that function as sensors of xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, such as fatty acids, bile acids, and oxysterols. These NRs include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, retinoid-related orphan receptors, and estrogen-related receptors. This review summarizes current information about NR regulation of SULT expression. Because species differences in SULT subfamily composition and tissue-, sex-, development-, and inducer-dependent regulation are prominent, these differences will be emphasized throughout the review. In addition, because of the central role of the SULTs in cellular physiology, the effect of NR-mediated SULT regulation on physiological and pathophysiological processes will be discussed. Gaps in current knowledge that require further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:23330539

  14. Cytosolic phospholipase A₂: physiological function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Christina C

    2015-08-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme.

  15. Horizontal Transmission of Cytosolic Sup35 Prions by Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu; Hossinger, André; Hofmann, Julia P.; Denner, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prions are infectious protein particles that replicate by templating their aggregated state onto soluble protein of the same type. Originally identified as the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, prions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are epigenetic elements of inheritance that induce phenotypic changes of their host cells. The prototype yeast prion is the translation termination factor Sup35. Prions composed of Sup35 or its modular prion domain NM are heritable and are transmitted vertically to progeny or horizontally during mating. Interestingly, in mammalian cells, protein aggregates derived from yeast Sup35 NM behave as true infectious entities that employ dissemination strategies similar to those of mammalian prions. While transmission is most efficient when cells are in direct contact, we demonstrate here that cytosolic Sup35 NM prions are also released into the extracellular space in association with nanometer-sized membrane vesicles. Importantly, extracellular vesicles are biologically active and are taken up by recipient cells, where they induce self-sustained Sup35 NM protein aggregation. Thus, in mammalian cells, extracellular vesicles can serve as dissemination vehicles for protein-based epigenetic information transfer. PMID:27406566

  16. Cytosolic pro-apoptotic SPIKE induces mitochondrial apoptosis in cancer.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ivana; Kastratovic, Tatjana; Zelen, Ivanka; Zivanovic, Aleksandar; Arsenijevic, Slobodan; Mitrovic, Marina

    2010-04-30

    Proteins of the BCL-2 family are important regulators of apoptosis. The BCL-2 family includes three main subgroups: the anti-apoptotic group, such as BCL-2, BCL-XL, BCL-W, and MCL-1; multi-domain pro-apoptotic BAX, BAK; and pro-apoptotic "BH3-only" BIK, PUMA, NOXA, BID, BAD, and SPIKE. SPIKE, a rare pro-apoptotic protein, is highly conserved throughout the evolution, including Caenorhabditis elegans, whose expression is downregulated in certain tumors, including kidney, lung, and breast. In the literature, SPIKE was proposed to interact with BAP31 and prevent BCL-XL from binding to BAP31. Here, we utilized the Position Weight Matrix method to identify SPIKE to be a BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein mainly localized in the cytosol of all cancer cell lines tested. Overexpression of SPIKE weakly induced apoptosis in comparison to the known BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein BIK. SPIKE promoted mitochondrial cytochrome c release, the activation of caspase 3, and the caspase cleavage of caspase's downstream substrates BAP31 and p130CAS. Although the informatics analysis of SPIKE implicates this protein as a member of the BH3-only BCL-2 subfamily, its role in apoptosis remains to be elucidated.

  17. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  18. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake mechanisms and pharmacokinetic properties.

  19. Genome-derived cytosolic DNA mediates type I interferon-dependent rejection of B cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu J; Le Bert, Nina; Chitre, Anuja A; Koo, Christine Xing'Er; Nga, Xing H; Ho, Samantha S W; Khatoo, Muznah; Tan, Nikki Y; Ishii, Ken J; Gasser, Stephan

    2015-04-21

    The DNA damage response (DDR) induces the expression of type I interferons (IFNs), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show the presence of cytosolic DNA in different mouse and human tumor cells. Treatment of cells with genotoxic agents increased the levels of cytosolic DNA in a DDR-dependent manner. Cloning of cytosolic DNA molecules from mouse lymphoma cells suggests that cytosolic DNA is derived from unique genomic loci and has the potential to form non-B DNA structures, including R-loops. Overexpression of Rnaseh1, which resolves R-loops, reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA, type I Ifn transcripts, and type I IFN-dependent rejection of lymphoma cells. Live-cell imaging showed a dynamic contact of cytosolic DNA with mitochondria, an important organelle for innate immune recognition of cytosolic nucleotides. In summary, we found that cytosolic DNA is present in many tumor cells and contributes to the immunogenicity of tumor cells.

  20. Bimolecular glutathione conjugation kinetics of ethacrynic acid in rat liver: in vitro and perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Tirona, R G; Pang, K S

    1999-09-01

    The conjugation kinetics of glutathione (GSH) and ethacrynic acid (EA) were studied in rat liver perfusion studies, where efficient removal occurred (steady-state extraction ratio E(ss), approximately 0.8-0.4 at concentrations ranging from 10-200 microM) despite the appreciable plasma protein binding. The declining E(ss) paralleled the saturation in GSH conjugate (EA-SG) formation; EA-SG primarily appeared in bile as the unchanged glutathionyl adduct (90%) and minimally as cleavage products. The GSH conjugation of EA in perfused liver was described by the constants K(m)(overall) of 67 microM and V(max)(overall) of 0.23 micromol/min/g liver. These differed from those observed for the bimolecular nonenzymatic (constant of 126 microM(-1) min(-1)) and enzymatic (K(m) for GSH and EA were 1.2 mM and 94 microM, respectively; V(max) of 533 nmol/min/mg liver cytosolic protein or 32 micromol/min/g liver) GSH conjugation of EA in vitro. But they were similar to those estimated for EA uptake in isolated rat hepatocytes by saturable (K(m)(uptake) = 57 microM, and V(max)(uptake) = 0.55 micromol/min/g liver) and nonsaturable (0.015 ml/min/mg) processes. At increasing EA concentrations (>25 microM), time-dependent changes were observed for E(ss) and EA-SG formation, which rapidly decreased with time after the attainment of steady state due to the rapid loss of cellular GSH. The composite data were described adequately by a physiological model that accounted for transport and the GSH-dependent conjugation of EA. The results suggest that the rate-limiting process for hepatic EA GSH conjugation is cellular uptake, but cosubstrate availability controls the rate of metabolism when GSH becomes depleted.

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Rhodes, Shannon L; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P; Lam, Hoa A; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C; Maidment, Nigel T; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2013-01-08

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis.

  2. Sodium borohydride removes aldehyde inhibitors for enhancing biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    To enhance biohydrogen production from glucose and xylose in the presence of aldehyde inhibitors, reducing agent (i.e., sodium borohydride) was in situ added for effective detoxification. The detoxification efficiencies of furfural (96.7%) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 91.7%) with 30mM NaBH4 were much higher than those of vanillin (77.3%) and syringaldehyde (69.3%). Biohydrogen fermentation was completely inhibited without detoxification, probably because of the consumption of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by inhibitors reduction (R-CHO+2NADH→R-CH2OH+2NAD(+)). Addition of 30mM NaBH4 provided the reducing power necessary for inhibitors reduction (4R-CHO+NaBH4+2H2O→4R-CH2OH+NaBO2). The recovered reducing power in fermentation resulted in 99.3% recovery of the hydrogen yield and 64.6% recovery of peak production rate. Metabolite production and carbon conversion after detoxification significantly increased to 63.7mM and 81.9%, respectively.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 associates with prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J; De Melo, J; Cutz, J-C; Aziz, T; Tang, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence demonstrates high levels of aldehyde dehydrogense (ALDH) activity in human cancer types, in part, because of its association with cancer stem cells. Whereas ALDH1A1 and ALDH7A1 isoforms were reported to associate with prostate tumorigenesis, whether other ALDH isoforms are associated with prostate cancer (PC) remains unclear. Methods: ALDH3A1 expression was analysed in various PC cell lines. Xenograft tumours and 54 primary and metastatic PC tumours were stained using immunohistochemistry for ALDH3A1 expression. Results: In comparison with the non-stem counterparts, a robust upregulation of ALDH3A1 was observed in DU145-derived PC stem cells (PCSCs). As DU145 PCSCs produced xenograft tumours with more advanced features compared with those derived from DU145 cells, higher levels of ALDH3A1 were detected in the former; a dramatic elevation of ALDH3A1 occurred in DU145 cell-derived lung metastasis compared with local xenograft tumours. Furthermore, while ALDH3A1 was not observed in prostate glands, ALDH3A1 was clearly present in PIN, and further increased in carcinomas. In comparison with the paired local carcinomas, ALDH3A1 was upregulated in lymph node metastatic tumours; the presence of ALDH3A1 in bone metastatic PC was also demonstrated. Conclusions: We report here the association of ALDH3A1 with PC progression. PMID:24762960

  4. Measurements Alcohols, Ketones, and Aldehydes During Trace-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, E. C.; Riemer, D. D.; Hills, A.; Lueb, R.; Fried, A.; Sachse, G.; Crawford, J.; Singh, H.; Blake, D.

    2002-12-01

    A sensitive and selective instrument (fast gas chromatographic mass spectrometer - FGCMS) was developed for the continuous measurement of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs: alcohols, ketones and aldehydes (except for formaldehyde)) containing fewer than 6 carbon atoms and subsequently deployed during the NASA's TRACE-P (Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific) experiment. This paper will briefly describe the instrument and present results obtained from 15 mission flights. Dramatic differences were observed in the mixing ratios and vertical profiles of the longer-lived species, acetone and methanol, compared to the shorter-lived species. For example, between 6 and 7 km, the median mixing ratios for the two longest lived species measured, acetone and methanol, are 765 pptv and 1061 pptv, respectively whereas the combined mixing ratio for all other species measured was less than 500 pptv. A large variety of air masses were encountered during this experiment and this is reflected in the behavior of the measured OVOCs. Relationships between the OVOCs and other trace species will be explored. Implications of these measurements for our current understanding of global tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibits inflammatory response and regulates atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-jian; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Xu-ping; Yuan, Qiu-huan; Xue, Li; Wang, Jia-li; Cui, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-guo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 polymorphism, which eliminates ALDH2 activity down to 1%-6%, is a susceptibility gene for coronary disease. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms based on our prior clinical and experimental studies. Male apoE−/− mice were transfected with GFP, ALDH2-overexpression and ALDH2-RNAi lentivirus respectively (n=20 each) after constrictive collars were placed around the right common carotid arteries. Consequently, ALDH2 gene silencing led to an increased en face plaque area, more unstable plaque with heavier accumulation of lipids, more macrophages, less smooth muscle cells and collagen, which were associated with aggravated inflammation. However, ALDH2 overexpression displayed opposing effects. We also found that ALDH2 activity decreased in atherosclerotic plaques of human and aged apoE−/− mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells further illustrated that, inhibition of ALDH2 activity resulted in elevating inflammatory molecules, an increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, AP-1 c-Jun, Jun-N terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, while ALDH2 activation could trigger contrary effects. These findings suggested that ALDH2 can influence plaque development and vulnerability, and inflammation via MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. PMID:27191745

  6. Biosynthesis of C9-aldehydes in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, Michael; Bode, Julia; Göbel, Cornelia; Wichard, Thomas; Schaaf, Andreas; Frank, Wolfgang; Frank, Markus; Reski, Ralf; Pohnert, Georg; Feussner, Ivo

    2006-03-01

    After wounding, the moss Physcomitrella patens emits fatty acid derived volatiles like octenal, octenols and (2E)-nonenal. Flowering plants produce nonenal from C18-fatty acids via lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase reactions, but the moss exploits the C20 precursor arachidonic acid for the formation of these oxylipins. We describe the isolation of the first cDNA (PpHPL) encoding a hydroperoxide lyase from a lower eukaryotic organism. The physiological pathway allocation and characterization of a downstream enal-isomerase gives a new picture for the formation of fatty acid derived volatiles from lower plants. Expression of a fusion protein with a yellow fluorescent protein in moss protoplasts showed that PpHPL was found in clusters in membranes of plastids. PpHPL can be classified as an unspecific hydroperoxide lyase having a substrate preference for 9-hydroperoxides of C18-fatty acids but also the predominant substrate 12-hydroperoxy arachidonic acid is accepted. Feeding experiments using arachidonic acid show an increase in the 12-hydroperoxide being metabolized to C8-aldehydes/alcohols and (3Z)-nonenal, which is rapidly isomerized to (2E)-nonenal. PpHPL knock out lines failed to emit (2E)-nonenal while formation of C8-volatiles was not affected indicating that in contrast to flowering plants, PpHPL is only involved in formation of a specific subset of volatiles.

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P.; Lam, Hoa A.; O’Donnell, Kelley C.; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E.; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis. PMID:23267077

  9. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  10. Nasal pungency and odor of homologous aldehydes and carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S; Abraham, M H

    1998-01-01

    Airborne substances can stimulate both the olfactory and the trigeminal nerve in the nose, giving rise to odor and pungent (irritant) sensations, respectively. Nose, eye, and throat irritation constitute common adverse effects in indoor environments. We measured odor and nasal pungency thresholds for homologous aliphatic aldehydes (butanal through octanal) and carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, butanoic, hexanoic, and octanoic). Nasal pungency was measured in subjects lacking olfaction (i.e., anosmics) to avoid odor biases. Similar to other homologous series, odor and pungency thresholds declined (i.e., sensory potency increased) with increasing carbon chain length. A previously derived quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) based on solvation energies predicted all nasal pungency thresholds, except for acetic acid, implying that a key step in the mechanism for threshold pungency involves transfer of the inhaled substance from the vapor phase to the receptive biological phase. In contrast, acetic acid - with a pungency threshold lower than predicted - is likely to produce threshold pungency through direct chemical reaction with the mucosa. Both in the series studied here and in those studied previously, we reach a member at longer chain-lengths beyond which pungency fades. The evidence suggests a biological cut-off, presumably based upon molecular size, across the various series.

  11. Aldehydes and hydrogen peroxide as mediators of ozone toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.; Church, D.F.; Das, B. )

    1991-03-15

    The unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) in lung lining fluids and cell membranes are a primary target for the reaction of ozone in the lung. The authors propose that ozone reacts with UFA in loci that are sufficiently aquated so the carbonyl oxide is captured by water. The data show that the stoichiometry and products from the reaction of ozone with either emulsions of UFA from oleic through arachidonate or with liposomes made from dioleoyl phosphadidyl choline (PC) are accurately described by eq 1. Soy PC also gives 1 mole of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} per mol of ozone used. Rat lung lavage and rat rbc ghosts give ca. 50% yields of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based on ozone reacted, presumably due to the reaction of thiol-containing proteins with ozone to give H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, aldehydes and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can be used as markers of ozone damage and probably are responsible for much of the pathology caused by ozone, particularly at sites other than immediate air/tissue boundary.

  12. Conjugate gradient method - Electromagnetism applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosig, Juan R.

    1987-10-01

    This paper presents a brief but rigorous description of the conjugate gradient technique as applied to the solution of algebraic linear systems with complex coefficients. The relationships between conjugate gradient techniques and other commonly used methods are established. A normalized algorithm is introduced which optimally exploits the computer capabilities. Its performance is compared with that of Gaussian elimination by numerical tests on Hilbert matrices of more than a thousand unknowns. As a practical application, the problem of electrostatic screening by a finite ground plane has been solved with this technique.

  13. Approximate transferability in conjugated polyalkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, Keiamars; Mandado, Marcos; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2007-03-01

    QTAIM computed atomic and bond properties, as well as delocalization indices (obtained from electron densities computed at HF, MP2 and B3LYP levels) of several linear and branched conjugated polyalkenes and O- and N-containing conjugated polyenes have been employed to assess approximate transferable CH groups. The values of these properties indicate the effects of the functional group extend to four CH groups, whereas those of the terminal carbon affect up to three carbons. Ternary carbons also modify significantly the properties of atoms in α, β and γ.

  14. SENP7 Potentiates cGAS Activation by Relieving SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Cytosolic DNA Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Yu, Huansha; Zheng, Xin; Peng, Rui; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiehua; Qu, Bo; Shen, Nan; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xing; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS, a.k.a. MB21D1), a cytosolic DNA sensor, catalyzes formation of the second messenger 2’3’-cGAMP that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. How the cGAS activity is modulated remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 7 (SENP7) interacted with and potentiated cGAS activation. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) was conjugated onto the lysine residues 335, 372 and 382 of cGAS, which suppressed its DNA-binding, oligomerization and nucleotidyl-transferase activities. SENP7 reversed this inhibition via catalyzing the cGAS de-SUMOylation. Consistently, silencing of SENP7 markedly impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by cGAS-STING axis. SENP7-knockdown mice were more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. SENP7 was significantly up-regulated in patients with SLE. Our study highlights the temporal modulation of the cGAS activity via dynamic SUMOylation, uncovering a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the STING signaling in innate immunity. PMID:28095500

  15. Francisella Inflammasomes: Integrated Responses to a Cytosolic Stealth Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Pierre; Lagrange, Brice; Henry, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium causing tularemia, a zoonotic disease. Francisella replicates in the macrophage cytosol and eventually triggers cytosolic immune responses. In murine macrophages, Francisella novicida and Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain lyse in the host cytosol and activate the cytosolic DNA receptor Aim2. Here, we review the mechanisms leading or contributing to Aim2 inflammasome activation, including the role of TLRs and of IFN signaling and the implication of the guanylate-binding proteins 2 and 5 in triggering cytosolic bacteriolysis. Furthermore, we present how this cytosolic Gram-negative bacterium escapes recognition by caspase-11 but can trigger a non-canonical caspase-8 inflammasome. In addition, we highlight the differences in inflammasome activation in murine and human cells with pyrin, NLRP3, and AIM2 involved in sensing Francisella in human phagocytes. From a bacterial prospective, we describe the hiding strategy of Francisella to escape recognition by innate sensors and to resist to bacteriolysis in the host cytosol. Finally, we discuss the inability of the inflammasome sensors to detect F. tularensis subspecies tularensis strains, making them highly pathogenic stealth microbes.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manzanillo, Paolo S; Shiloh, Michael U; Portnoy, Daniel A; Cox, Jeffery S

    2012-05-17

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between "vacuolar" and "cytosolic" pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the Sting/Tbk1/Irf3 axis, resulting in IFN-β production. Surprisingly, Irf3(-/-) mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis.

  17. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  18. Nitric oxide production occurs after cytosolic alkalinization during stomatal closure induced by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Gonugunta, Vijay K; Srivastava, Nupur; Puli, Mallikarjuna R; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2008-11-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) raised the cytosolic pH and nitric oxide (NO) levels in guard cells while inducing stomatal closure in epidermis of Pisum sativum. Butyrate (a weak acid) reduced the cytosolic pH/NO production and prevented stomatal closure by ABA. Methylamine (a weak base) enhanced the cytosolic alkalinization and aggravated stomatal closure by ABA. The rise in guard cell pH because of ABA became noticeable after 6 min and peaked at 12 min, while NO production started at 9 min and peaked at 18 min. These results suggested that NO production was downstream of the rise in cytosolic pH. The ABA-induced increase in NO of guard cells and stomatal closure was prevented by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl imidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (cPTIO, a NO scavenger) and partially by N-nitro-L-Arg-methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase). In contrast, cPTIO or L-NAME had only a marginal effect on the pH rise induced by ABA. Ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, a calcium chelator) prevented ABA-induced stomatal closure while restricting cytosolic pH rise and NO production. We suggest that during ABA-induced stomatal closure, a rise in cytosolic pH is necessary for NO production. Calcium may act upstream of cytosolic alkalinization and NO production, besides its known function as a downstream component.

  19. Cytosolic Na+ controls and epithelial Na+ channel via the Go guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Komwatana, P; Dinudom, A; Young, J A; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the fate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-beta-S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the alpha-subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8755611

  20. The cytosolic tail of the tumor marker protein Trop2 - a structural switch triggered by phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Vidmar, Tilen; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2015-05-01

    Trop2 is a transmembrane signaling glycoprotein upregulated in stem and carcinoma cells. Proliferation-enhancing signaling involves regulated intramembrane proteolytic release of a short cytoplasmic fragment, which is later engaged in a cytosolic signaling complex. We propose that Trop2 function is modulated by phosphorylation of a specific serine residue within this cytosolic region (Ser303), and by proximity effects exerted on the cytosolic tail by Trop2 dimerization. Structural characterization of both the transmembrane (Trop2TM) and cytosolic regions (Trop2IC) support this hypothesis, and shows that the central region of Trop2IC forms an α-helix. Comparison of NMR structures of non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms suggest that phosphorylation of Trop2IC triggers salt bridge reshuffling, resulting in significant conformational changes including ordering of the C-terminal tail. In addition, we demonstrate that the cytosolic regions of two Trop2 subunits can be brought into close proximity via transmembrane part dimerization. Finally, we show that Ser303-phosphorylation significantly affects the structure and accessibility of functionally important regions of the cytosolic tail. These observed structural features of Trop2 at the membrane-cytosol interface could be important for regulation of Trop2 signaling activity.

  1. Pd(0)-Catalyzed PMHS reductions of aromatic acid chlorides to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoungsoo; Maleczka, Robert E

    2006-04-27

    [reaction: see text] Contrary to previous reports, polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) under Pd(0) catalysis can efficiently reduce aryl acid chlorides to their corresponding aldehydes without requiring an additional reductant, provided the reactions are run in the presence of fluoride.

  2. An efficient enantioselective method for asymmetric Michael addition of nitroalkanes to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongcan; Li, Pengfei; Liang, Xinmiao; Zhang, Tony Y; Ye, Jinxing

    2008-03-14

    The addition of nitroalkanes to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes under the catalysis of (S)-2-(diphenyl(trimethylsilyloxy)methyl)pyrrolidine and lithium acetate as additive afforded gamma-nitroaldehydes in good yield and up to 97% ee.

  3. Lubricant and fuel compositions containing reaction products of polyalkenyl succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, D.A.; Cardis, A.B.; McGonigle, S.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes an additive for liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition, particularly diesel fuels. The additive composition is the reaction product of polyalkenyl-substituted succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles. It also finds use in lubricant compositions.

  4. Unsymmetrical E-Alkenes from the Stereoselective Reductive Coupling of Two Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarfard, Keyhan; Mai, Juri; Ott, Sascha

    2017-03-01

    The unprecedented formation of unsymmetrical alkenes from the intermolecular reductive coupling of two different aldehydes is described. In contrast to the McMurry reaction which affords statistical product mixtures, selectivity in the reported procedure is achieved by a sequential ionic mechanism in which a first aldehyde is reacted with a phosphanylphosphonate to afford a phosphaalkene intermediate which, upon activation by hydroxide, reacts with a second aldehyde to the unsymmetrical E-alkenes. The described reaction is free of transition metals and proceeds under ambient temperature within minutes in good to excellent overall yields. It is a new methodology to use feedstock aldehydes for the direct production of C═C double bond-containing products and may impact how chemists think of multistep synthetic sequences in the future.

  5. A new resistance source of aldehyde reductase functions from Scheffersomyces stipitis against biomass fermentation inhibitor furfural

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde inhibitory compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment are a major class of toxic chemicals that interfere with microbial growth and subsequent fermentation for advanced biofuels production. This study identified five uncharacterized putative genes of Scheffersomyces stipiti...

  6. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9-fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. The NADP-dependent FALDH exhibited apparent Km and Vmax values for decyl aldehyde of 5.0, 13.0, 18.0, and 18.3 microM and 537.0, 500.0, 25.0, and 38.0 nmol/min in hexadecane-, hexadecanol-, ethanol-, palmitate-grown cells, respectively. FALDH isozymes ald-a, ald-b, and ald-c were demonstrated by gel electrophoresis in extracts of hexadecane- and hexadecanol-grown cells. ald-a, ald-b, and ald-d were present in dodecyl aldehyde-grown cells, while palmitate-grown control cells contained ald-b and ald-d. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. The oxidation of [3H]hexadecane byAld21 yielded the accumulation of 61% more fatty aldehyde than the wild type, while Ald24 accumulated 27% more fatty aldehyde, 95% more fatty alcohol, and 65% more wax ester than the wild type. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol

  7. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  8. Detection of Toxin Translocation into the Host Cytosol by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; VanBennekom, Neyda; Teter, Ken

    2012-01-01

    AB toxins consist of an enzymatic A subunit and a cell-binding B subunit1. These toxins are secreted into the extracellular milieu, but they act upon targets within the eukaryotic cytosol. Some AB toxins travel by vesicle carriers from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before entering the cytosol2-4. In the ER, the catalytic A chain dissociates from the rest of the toxin and moves through a protein-conducting channel to reach its cytosolic target5. The translocated, cytosolic A chain is difficult to detect because toxin trafficking to the ER is an extremely inefficient process: most internalized toxin is routed to the lysosomes for degradation, so only a small fraction of surface-bound toxin reaches the Golgi apparatus and ER6-12. To monitor toxin translocation from the ER to the cytosol in cultured cells, we combined a subcellular fractionation protocol with the highly sensitive detection method of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)13-15. The plasma membrane of toxin-treated cells is selectively permeabilized with digitonin, allowing collection of a cytosolic fraction which is subsequently perfused over an SPR sensor coated with an anti-toxin A chain antibody. The antibody-coated sensor can capture and detect pg/mL quantities of cytosolic toxin. With this protocol, it is possible to follow the kinetics of toxin entry into the cytosol and to characterize inhibitory effects on the translocation event. The concentration of cytosolic toxin can also be calculated from a standard curve generated with known quantities of A chain standards that have been perfused over the sensor. Our method represents a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection system that does not require radiolabeling or other modifications to the target toxin. PMID:22231143

  9. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Hydroacylation: Enantioselective Cross-Coupling of Aldehydes and Ketoamides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Under Rh(I) catalysis, α-ketoamides undergo intermolecular hydroacylation with aliphatic aldehydes. A newly designed Josiphos ligand enables access to α-acyloxyamides with high atom-economy and enantioselectivity. On the basis of mechanistic and kinetic studies, we propose a pathway in which rhodium plays a dual role in activating the aldehyde for cross-coupling. A stereochemical model is provided to rationalize the sense of enantioinduction observed. PMID:24937681

  10. Substrate-Directed Hydroacylation: Rh-Catalyzed Coupling of Vinyl Phenols and Non-Chelating Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen K.; Bruch, Achim

    2014-01-01

    We report a protocol for branched-selective hydroacylation of vinylphenols with aryl, alkenyl and alkyl aldehydes. This cross-coupling yields α-aryl ketones that can be cyclized to benzofurans, and it enables access to eupomatenoid natural products in four steps or less from eugenol. Excellent reactivity and high levels of branched regioselectivity are obtained. We propose that aldehyde decarbonylation is overcome by using an anionic directing group on the olefin and a small bite-angle diphosphine ligand. PMID:24478146

  11. Unexpected ring-opening reactions of aziridines with aldehydes catalyzed by nucleophilic carbenes under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Kai; Li, Rui; Yue, Lei; Li, Bang-Jing; Chen, Ying-Chun; Wu, Yong; Ding, Li-Sheng

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] The chemoselective ring opening of N-tosyl aziridines with aldehydes catalyzed by an N-heterocyclic carbene was investigated under aerobic conditions. Unexpected carboxylates of 1,2-amino alcohols from the corresponding aldehydes, rather than the acyl anion ring-opened beta-amino ketones, were exclusively obtained. A plausible mechanism for this unprecedented carbene-mediated reaction was also proposed.

  12. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  13. Copper(II)/amine synergistically catalyzed enantioselective alkylation of cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-07-07

    The first catalytic asymmetric alkylation of N-acyl quinoliniums with aldehydes has been described. A copper/amine synergistic catalytic system has been developed, allowing the addition of functionalized aldehydes to a wide range of electronically varied N-acyl quinoliniums in good yields with excellent enantiocontrol. The synergistic catalytic system was also effective for N-acyl dihydroisoquinoliniums and β-caboliniums, demonstrating the general applicability of the protocol in the enantioselective alkylation of diverse cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals.

  14. Functionalization vs. fragmentation: n-aldehyde oxidation mechanisms and secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Madrid, Heber J; Presto, Albert A; Donahue, Neil M

    2010-11-14

    Because of their relatively well-understood chemistry and atmospheric relevance, aldehydes represent a good model system for carbon-carbon fragmentation reactions in organic-aerosol aging mechanisms. Small aldehydes such as ethanal and propanal react with OH radicals under high NO(x) conditions to form formaldehyde and ethanal, respectively, with nearly unit yield. CO(2) is formed as a coproduct. This path implies the formation of the C(n-1) aldehyde, or an aldehyde with one fewer methylene group than the parent. However, as the carbon number of the n-aldehyde increases, reaction with the carbon backbone becomes more likely and the C(n-1) formation path becomes less important. In this work we oxidized n-pentanal, n-octanal, n-undecanal and n-tridecanal with OH radicals at high NO(x). The C(n-1) aldehyde molar yields after the peroxyl radical + NO reaction were 69 ± 15, 36 ± 10, 16 ± 5 and 4 ± 1%, respectively. Complementary structure-activity relationship calculations of important rate constants enable estimates of branching ratios between several intermediates of the C(n)n-aldehyde reaction with OH: C(n) peroxyacyl nitrate versus C(n) alkoxyacyl radical formation, C(n-1) alkyl nitrate versus C(n-1) alkoxy radical, and C(n-1) aldehyde formation versus isomerization products. We also measured SOA mass yields, which we compare with analogous n-alkanes to understand the effect of fragmentation on organic-aerosol formation.

  15. Sources and concentrations of aldehydes and ketones in indoor environments in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Crump, D.R.; Gardiner, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Individual aldehydes and ketones can be separated, identified and quantitatively estimated by trapping the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatives and analysis by HPLC. Appropriate methods and detection limits are reported. Many sources of formaldehyde have been identified by this means and some are found to emit other aldehydes and ketones. The application of this method to determine the concentration of these compounds in the atmospheres of buildings is described and the results compared with those obtained using chromotropic acid or MBTH.

  16. Mass spectral determination of aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids using 1,1-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C A; Howard, R W

    1985-03-01

    Analyses of nanogram to milligram quantities of aliphatic aldehydes, fatty acids, and unhindered aliphatic ketones such as those typically found in pheromonal blends have been effected by treating these mixtures with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. The aldehydes and ketones formN,N-dimethylhydrazones, while the fatty acids form methyl esters. Structural elucidation of the reaction products was achieved using EI and CI gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  17. The participation of human hepatic P450 isoforms, flavin-containing monooxygenases and aldehyde oxidase in the biotransformation of the insecticide fenthion

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, Claudia; Buratti, Franca M. Testai, Emanuela

    2008-12-01

    Although fenthion (FEN) is widely used as a broad spectrum insecticide on various crops in many countries, very scant data are available on its biotransformation in humans. In this study the in vitro human hepatic FEN biotransformation was characterized, identifying the relative contributions of cytochrome P450 (CYPs) and/or flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOs) by using single c-DNA expressed human enzymes, human liver microsomes and cytosol and CYP/FMO-specific inhibitors. Two major metabolites, FEN-sulfoxide and FEN-oxon (FOX), are formed by some CYPs although at very different levels, depending on the relative CYP hepatic content. Formation of further oxidation products and the reduction of FEN-sulfoxide back to FEN by the cytosolic aldehyde oxidase enzyme were ruled out. Comparing intrinsic clearance values, FOX formation seemed to be favored and at low FEN concentrations CYP2B6 and 1A2 are mainly involved in its formation. At higher levels, a more widespread CYP involvement was evident, as in the case of FEN-sulfoxide, although a higher efficiency of CYP2C family was suggested. Hepatic FMOs were able to catalyze only sulfoxide formation, but at low FEN concentrations hepatic FEN sulfoxidation is predominantly P450-driven. Indeed, the contribution of the hepatic isoforms FMO{sub 3} and FMO{sub 5} was generally negligible, although at high FEN concentrations FMO's showed activities comparable to the active CYPs, accounting for up to 30% of total sulfoxidation. Recombinant FMO{sub 1} showed the highest efficiency with respect to CYPs and the other FMOs, but it is not expressed in the adult human liver. This suggests that FMO{sub 1}-catalysed sulfoxidation may represent the major extra-hepatic pathway of FEN biotransformation.

  18. Imaging cytosolic translocation of Mycobacteria with two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yassel; Zhang, Qi; Rahaman, Arifur; Ouellet, Hugues; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun; Li, Chunqiang

    2014-01-01

    Transition from latency to active tuberculosis requires Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to penetrate the phagosomal membrane and translocate to the cytosol of the host macrophage. Quantitative two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is developed to measure cytosolic translocation using Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) as a model organism for Mtb. Macrophages were infected with Mm or non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms) as a control, then loaded with a FRET substrate. Once translocation occurs, mycobacterium-bearing β-lactamase cleaves the substrate, resulting in decrease of FRET signal. Quantification of this FRET signal change revealed that Mm, but not Ms, is capable of translocating to the cytosol. PMID:25426325

  19. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  20. Gibberellin Metabolism in Maize (The Stepwise Conversion of Gibberellin A12-Aldehyde to Gibberellin A20.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M.; Spray, C. R.; Phinney, B. O.; Gaskin, P.; MacMillan, J.

    1996-02-01

    The stepwise metabolism of gibberellin A12-aldehyde (GA12-aldehyde) to GA20 is demonstrated from seedling shoots of maize (Zea mays L.). The labeled substrates [13C,3H]GA12-aldehyde, [13C,3H]GA12, [14C4]GA53, [14C4/2H2]GA44, and [14C4/2H2]GA19 were fed individually to dwarf-5 vegetative shoots. Both [13C,3H]GA12-aldehyde and [13C,3H]GA12 were also added individually to normal shoots. The labeled metabolites were identified by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats retention indices. GA12-aldehyde was metabolized to GA53-aldehyde, GA12, GA53, GA44, and GA19; GA12 was metabolized to 2[beta]-hydroxy-GA12, GA53, 2[beta]-hydroxyGA53, GA44, 2[beta]-hydroxyGA44, and GA19; GA53 was metabolized to GA44, GA19, GA20, and GA1; GA44 was metabolized to GA19; and GA19 was metabolized to GA20. These results, together with previously published data from this laboratory, document the most completely defined gibberellin pathway for the vegetative tissues of higher plants.

  1. Accurate determination of aldehydes in amine catalysts or amines by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhajendra N

    2014-01-31

    Carbonyl compounds, specifically aldehydes, present in amine catalysts or amines are determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection of their corresponding 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones. The primary focus has been to establish optimum conditions for determining aldehydes accurately because these add exposure concerns when the amine catalysts are used to manufacture polyurethane products. Concentrations of aldehydes determined by this method are found to vary with the pH of the aqueous amine solution and the derivatization time, the latter being problematic when the derivatization reaction proceeds slowly and not to completion in neutral and basic media. Accurate determination of aldehydes in amines through derivatization can be carried out at an effective solution pH of about 2 and with derivatization time of 20min. Hydrochloric acid has been used for neutralization of an amine. For complete derivatization, it is essential to protonate all nitrogen atoms in the amine. An approach for the determination of an adequate amount of acid needed for complete derivatization has been described. Several 0.2M buffer solutions varying in pH from 4 to 8 have also been used to make amine solutions for carrying out derivatization of aldehydes. These solutions have effective pHs of 10 or higher and provide much lower aldehyde concentrations compared to their true values. Mechanisms for the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones in both acidic and basic media are discussed.

  2. Brain, liver and plasma unsaturated aldehydes in nutritional encephalomalacia of chicks.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, H; Sallmann, H P

    2000-04-01

    Vitamin E deficiency and linoleic acid-feeding lead to nutritional encephalomalacia (NE) in chicks, affecting the cerebellum exclusively. The relevance of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products to the pathogenesis of the disease was studied. Laying hens received a diet low in vitamin E. Resulting chicks were assigned to four groups fed either with linoleic (C18: 2n-6) or linolenic (C18: 3n-3) acid together with 1 or 50 p.p.m. vitamin E. Nine days post-hatching NE occurred in the vitamin E-deficient group fed linoleic acid. With each chick showing NE, a healthy one from all four groups was killed. Unsaturated aldehydes were determined in plasma, liver, cerebrum and cerebellum. Results underlined that the type of dietary fat is decisive for the aldehyde pattern. In the liver of linoleic acid-fed animals total aldehydes were increased. Diseased animals had increased aldehydes stemming from n-3 fatty acids. In plasma, vitamin E deficiency led to higher malondialdehyde and OH-nonenal concentrations. In brain, neither vitamin E deficiency nor NE were accompanied by increased aldehyde concentrations. In consequence a direct role of unsaturated aldehydes for the development of NE in the cerebellum is not probable.

  3. Effect of selected aldehydes on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O.; Martinez, A. |

    1999-10-05

    Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic raw-materials requires the hydrolysis of carbohydrate polymers into a fermentable syrup. During the hydrolysis of hemicellulose with dilute acid, a variety of toxic compounds are produced such as soluble aromatic aldehydes from lignin and furfural from pentose destruction. In this study, the authors have investigated the toxicity of representative aldehydes (furfural, 5-hydroxymethlyfurfural, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, syringaldehyde, and vanillin) as inhibitors of growth and ethanol production by ethanologenic derivatives of Escherichia coli B (strains K011 and LY01). Aromatic aldyhydes were at least twice as toxic as furfural of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on a weight basis. The toxicities of all aldehydes (and ethanol) except furfural were additive when tested in binary combinations. In all cases, combinations with furfural were unexpectedly toxic. Although the potency of these aldehydes was directly related to hydrophobicity indicating a hydrophobic site of action, none caused sufficient membrane damage to allow the leakage of intracellular magnesium even when present at sixfold the concentrations required for growth inhibition. Of the aldehydes tested, only furfural strongly inhibited ethanol production in vitro. A comparison with published results for other microorganisms indicates that LY01 is equivalent or more resistant than other biocatalysts to the aldehydes examined in this study.

  4. Introduction of aldehyde vs. carboxylic groups to cellulose nanofibers using laccase/TEMPO mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jaušovec, Darja; Vogrinčič, Robert; Kokol, Vanja

    2015-02-13

    The chemo-enzymatic modification of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) using laccase as biocatalysts and TEMPO or 4-Amino-TEMPO as mediators under mild aqueous conditions (pH 5, 30 °C) has been investigated to introduce surface active aldehyde groups. 4-Amino TEMPO turned out to be kinetically 0.5-times (50%) more active mediator, resulting to oxoammonium cation intermediacy generated and its in situ regeneration during the modification of CNFs. Accordingly, beside of around 750 mmol/kg terminally-located aldehydes, originated during CNFs isolation, the reaction resulted to about 140% increase of C6-located aldehydes at optimal conditions, without reducing CNFs crystallinity. While only the C6-aldehydes were wholly transformed into the carboxyls after additional post-treatment using NaOH according to the Cannizzaro reaction, the post-oxidation with air-oxygen in EtOH/water medium or NaClO2 resulted to no- or very small amounts of carboxyls created, respectively, at a simultaneous loss of all C6- and some terminal-aldehydes in the latter due to the formation of highly-resistant hemiacetal covalent linkages with available cellulose hydroxyls. The results indicated a new way of preparing and stabilizing highly reactive C6-aldehydes on cellulose, and their exploitation in the development of new nanocellulose-based materials.

  5. Reduced aldehyde dehydrogenase expression in preeclamptic decidual mesenchymal stem/stromal cells is restored by aldehyde dehydrogenase agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Gina D.; Abumaree, Mohamed H.; Perkins, Anthony V.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Kalionis, Bill

    2017-01-01

    High resistance to oxidative stress is a common feature of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) and is associated with higher cell survival and ability to respond to oxidative damage. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a candidate “universal” marker for stem cells. ALDH expression was significantly lower in decidual MSC (DMSC) isolated from preeclamptic (PE) patients. ALDH gene knockdown by siRNA transfection was performed to create a cell culture model of the reduced ALDH expression detected in PE-DMSC. We showed that ALDH activity in DMSC is associated with resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity. Our data provide evidence that ALDH expression in DMSC is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Furthermore, candidate ALDH activators were screened and two of the compounds were effective in upregulating ALDH expression. This study provides a proof-of-principle that the restoration of ALDH activity in diseased MSC is a rational basis for a therapeutic strategy to improve MSC resistance to cytotoxic damage. PMID:28205523

  6. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  7. Cytosolic calcium coordinates mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Amit K; Ivannikov, Maxim V; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R; Macleod, Gregory T

    2012-01-25

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations that blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+ and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11 nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13 nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates, [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs.

  8. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  9. Cytosolic [Ca2+] signaling pathway in macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, J; Bell, P D

    1999-09-01

    Previous micropuncture studies suggested that macula densa (MD) cells might detect variations in luminal sodium chloride concentration ([NaCl]l) through changes in cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]c). To test this hypothesis, MD [Ca2+]c was measured with fluorescence microscopy using fura 2 in the isolated perfused thick ascending limb with attached glomerulus preparation dissected from rabbit kidney. Tubules were bathed and perfused with a Ringer solution, [NaCl]l was varied and isosmotically replaced with N-methyl-D-glucamine cyclamate. Control [Ca2+]c, during perfusion with 25 mM NaCl and 150 mM NaCl in the bath, averaged 101. 6 +/- 8.2 nM (n = 21). Increasing [NaCl]l to 150 mM elevated [Ca2+]c by 39.1 +/- 5.2 nM (n = 21, P < 0.01). This effect was concentration dependent between zero and 60 mM [NaCl]l. The presence of either luminal furosemide or basolateral nifedipine or 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), a potent Cl- channel blocker, significantly reduced resting [Ca2+]c and abolished the increase in [Ca2+]c in response to increased [NaCl]l. Nifedipine failed to produce a similar inhibitory effect when added exclusively to the luminal perfusate. Also, 100 nM BAY K 8644, a voltage-gated Ca2+ channel agonist, added to the bathing solution increased [Ca2+]c by 33.2 +/- 8.1 nM (n = 5, P < 0.05). These observations suggest that MD cells may detect variations in [NaCl]l through a signaling pathway that includes Na+-2Cl--K+ cotransport, basolateral membrane depolarization via Cl- channels, and Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.

  10. Cytosolic Calcium Coordinates Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism with Presynaptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Amit K.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Macleod, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations which blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+, and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs. PMID:22279208

  11. Enhanced photophysics of conjugated polymers

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai

    2007-06-12

    A particulate fluorescent conjugated polymer surfactant complex and method of making and using same. The particles are between about 15 and about 50 nm and when formed from a lipsome surfactant have a charge density similar to DNA and are strongly absorbed by cancer cells.

  12. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Colby S; Yu, Rosie Z; Gaus, Hans J; Greenlee, Sarah; Post, Noah; Schmidt, Karsten; Migawa, Michael T; Seth, Punit P; Zanardi, Thomas A; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Henry, Scott P; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3) is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA)-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of 3H-radiolabeled (3H placed in THA) or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5′-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs. PMID:27164023

  13. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-05

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  14. Aldehyde measurements in indoor environments in Strasbourg (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, C.; Bulliot, B.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations have been measured in indoor environments of various public spaces (railway station, airport, shopping center, libraries, underground parking garage, etc.) of Strasbourg area (east of France). In addition, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde propionaldehyde and hexanal concentrations have been measured in 22 private homes in the same area. In most of the sampling sites, indoor and outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were measured simultaneously. Gaseous aldehydes levels were quantified by a conventional DNHP-derivatization method followed by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection. Outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were both in the range 1-10 μg m -3, the highest values being measured at the airport and railway station. Indoor concentrations were strongly dependant upon the sampling sites. In homes, the average concentrations were 37 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 46 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for formaldehyde, 15 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 18 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for acetaldehyde, 1.2 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 1.6 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for propionaldehyde, 9 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 10 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for hexanal. However, concentrations as high as 123, 80 and 47 μg m -3 have been found for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal respectively. In public spaces, the highest formaldehyde concentration (62 μg m -3) was found in a library and the highest concentration of acetaldehyde (26 μg m -3) in the hall of a shopping center. Additional measurements of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were made inside a car both at rest or in a fluid or heavy traffic as well as in a room where cigarettes were smoked. Our data have been discussed and compared with those of previous studies.

  15. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  16. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  17. The Lysine 48 and Lysine 63 Ubiquitin Conjugates Are Processed Differently by the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Zhang, Nan-Yan; Xu, Ping; Han, Ke-Jun; Noone, Seth; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation is still obscure. We systematically compared proteasomal processing of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains with that of the canonical proteolytic signal, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of ubiquitin chains in HeLa cells determines that the levels of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains are insensitive to short-time proteasome inhibition. Also, the Lys-48/Lys-63 ratio in the 26 S proteasome-bound fraction is 1.7-fold more than that in the cell lysates, likely because some cellular Lys-63 ubiquitin conjugates are sequestered by Lys-63 chain-specific binding proteins. In vitro, Lys-48 and Lys-63 ubiquitin chains bind the 26 S proteasome comparably, whereas Lys-63 chains are deubiquitinated 6-fold faster than Lys-48 chains. Also, Lys-63 tetraubiquitin-conjugated UbcH10 is rapidly deubiquitinated into the monoubiquitinated form, whereas Lys-48 tetraubiquitin targets UbcH10 for degradation. Furthermore, we found that both the ubiquitin aldehyde- and 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive deubiquitinating activities of the 26 S proteasome contribute to Lys-48- and Lys-63-linkage deubiquitination, albeit the inhibitory extents are different. Together, our findings suggest that compared with Lys-48 chains, cellular Lys-63 chains have less proteasomal accessibility, and proteasome-bound Lys-63 chains are more rapidly deubiquitinated, which could cause inefficient degradation of Lys-63 conjugates. PMID:19858201

  18. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of 1,3-Butadiene-Containing π-Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuediao; Liu, Yating; Lu, Tian; Yang, Rui; Luo, Chuxin; Zhang, Qi; Chai, Yonghai

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the synthesis of π-conjugated polymers possessing arylene and 1,3-butadiene alternating units in the main chain by the reaction of α,β-unsaturated ester/nitrile containing γ-H with aromatic/heteroaromatic aldehyde compound. By using 4-(4-formylphenyl)-2-butylene acid ethyl ester as a model monomer, the different polymerization conditions, including catalyst, catalyst amount, and solvent, are optimized. The polymerization of 4-(4-formylphenyl)-2-butylene acid ethyl ester is carried out by refluxing in ethanol for 72 h with 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) as a catalyst to give a 1,3-butadiene-containing π-conjugated polymer, poly(phenylene-1,3-butadiene), in 84.3% yield with M¯n and M¯w/M¯n (PDI) estimated as 6172 and 1.65, respectively. Based on this new methodology, a series of π-conjugated polymers containing 1,3-butadiene units with different substituents are obtained in high yields. A possible mechanism is proposed for the polymerization through a six-membered ring transition state and then a 1,5-H shift intermediate.

  19. Nanoparticle and polysaccharide conjugate: a potential candidate vaccine to improve immunological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Sanjana P; Sahoo, Banalata; Behera, Birendra; Maiti, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    Active polysaccharides isolated from various fungal sources have been implicated to stimulate immune response against various pathogens as well as self anomalies such as cancer. Therefore, the nuanced approach presented in our work was to blend polysaccharides derived from Pleurotus ostreatus with biocompatible ferrite nanoparticles and thereafter investigate the enhanced immune functionality of the polysaccharide-nanoparticle composite. A Schiff base reductive amination reaction occurred between the aldehyde group of the polysaccharide and the amine group of the nanoparticles in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as sodium cyanoborohydride to form a stable amide bond between the two conjugating molecules. The multifaceted conjugate was characterized by physiochemical techniques such as electron microscopy, FTIR, VSM and DLS measurements. This particulate form of the polysaccharide showed a marked escalation in the production of free radicals such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in murine macrophages as compared to the soluble form. Animal based experiments demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume and augmentation in the proliferation of splenocytes in particulate or conjugated polysaccharide treated mice. Furthermore, molecular signaling studies showed a high upregulation in p-p38 and p-MEK molecules in particulate polysaccharide treated RAW264.7 cells suggesting a cellular downstream mechanistic regulation behind the immunostimulative response.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes triggers AIM2-mediated pyroptosis upon infrequent bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol.

    PubMed

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2010-05-20

    A host defense strategy against pathogens is the induction of cell death, thereby eliminating the pathogen's intracellular niche. Pyroptosis, one such form of cell death, is dependent on inflammasome activation. In a genetic screen to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death, we identified a mutation in lmo2473 that caused hyperstimulation of IL-1beta secretion and pyroptosis following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or induced to lyse by treatment with ampicillin stimulated pyroptosis. Pyroptosis was independent of the Nlrp3 and Nlrc4 inflammasome receptors but dependent on the inflammasome adaptor ASC and the cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2. Importantly, wild-type L. monocytogenes were also found to lyse, albeit at low levels, and trigger AIM2-dependent pyroptosis. These data suggested that pyroptosis is triggered by bacterial DNA released during cytosolic lysis.

  2. Bax exists in a dynamic equilibrium between the cytosol and mitochondria to control apoptotic priming.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Barbara; Wang, Pengbo; Keeble, James A; Rodriguez-Enriquez, Ricardo; Walker, Scott; Owens, Thomas W; Foster, Fiona; Tanianis-Hughes, Jolanta; Brennan, Keith; Streuli, Charles H; Gilmore, Andrew P

    2013-03-07

    The proapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bax is predominantly found in the cytosol of nonapoptotic cells and is commonly thought to translocate to mitochondria following an apoptotic stimulus. The current model for Bax activation is that BH3 proteins bind to cytosolic Bax, initiating mitochondrial targeting and outer-membrane permeabilization. Here, we challenge this and show that Bax is constitutively targeted to mitochondria but in nonapoptotic cells is constantly translocated back to the cytosol. Using live-cell spinning-disk confocal imaging with a combination of FLIP, FRAP, and photoactivatable GFP-Bax, we demonstrate that disrupting adhesion-dependent survival signals slows the rate of Bax's dissociation from mitochondria, leading to its accumulation on the outer mitochondrial membrane. The overall accumulation of mitochondrial Bax following loss of survival signaling sensitizes cells to proapoptotic BH3 proteins. Our findings show that Bax is normally in a dynamic equilibrium between cytosol and mitochondria, enabling fluctuations in survival signals to finely adjust apoptotic sensitivity.

  3. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  4. Both genome and cytosol dynamics change in E. coli challenged with sublethal rifampicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarski, Michal; Raciti, Bianca; Kotar, Jurij; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Fraser, Gillian M.; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    While the action of many antimicrobial drugs is well understood at the molecular level, a systems-level physiological response to antibiotics remains largely unexplored. This work considers fluctuation dynamics of both the chromosome and cytosol in Escherichia coli, and their response to sublethal treatments of a clinically important antibiotic, rifampicin. We precisely quantify the changes in dynamics of chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates (a rheovirus nonstructural protein known as μNS-GFP), measuring short time-scale displacements across several hours of drug exposure. To achieve this we develop an empirical method correcting for photo-bleaching and loci size effects. This procedure allows us to characterize the dynamic response to rifampicin in different growth conditions, including a customised microfluidic device. We find that sub-lethal doses of rifampicin cause a small but consistent increase in motility of both the chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates. Chromosomal and cytosolic responses are consistent with each other and between different growth conditions.

  5. Cytosolic pressure provides a propulsive force comparable to actin polymerization during lamellipod protrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoussaki, Daphne; Shin, William D.; Waterman, Clare M.; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2015-07-01

    Does cytosolic pressure facilitate f-actin polymerization to push the leading edge of a cell forward during self-propelled motion? AFM force-distance (f-d) curves obtained from lamellipodia of live cells often exhibit a signal from which the tension, bending modulus, elastic modulus and thickness in the membrane-cortex complex can be estimated close to the contact point. These measurements permit an estimate of the cytosolic pressure via the canonical Laplace force balance. The deeper portion of the f-d curve allows estimation of the bulk modulus of the cytoskeleton after removal of the bottom effect artifact. These estimates of tension, pressure, cortex thickness and elastic moduli imply that cytosolic pressure both pushes the membrane forward and compresses the actin cortex rearward to facilitate f-actin polymerization. We also estimate that cytosolic pressure fluctuations, most likely induced by myosin, provide a propulsive force comparable to that provided by f-actin polymerization in a lamellipod.

  6. Characterization of the kinetics of cardiac cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and comparative analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms.

    PubMed

    Dasika, Santosh K; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Beard, Daniel A

    2015-01-20

    Because the mitochondrial inner membrane is impermeable to pyridine nucleotides, transport of reducing equivalents between the mitochondrial matrix and the cytoplasm relies on shuttle mechanisms, including the malate-aspartate shuttle and the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. These shuttles are needed for reducing equivalents generated by metabolic reactions in the cytosol to be oxidized via aerobic metabolism. Two isoenzymes of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) operate as components of the malate-aspartate shuttle, in which a reducing equivalent is transported via malate, which when oxidized to oxaloacetate, transfers an electron pair to reduce NAD to NADH. Several competing mechanisms have been proposed for the MDH-catalyzed reaction. This study aims to identify the pH-dependent kinetic mechanism for cytoplasmic MDH (cMDH) catalyzed oxidation/reduction of MAL/OAA. Experiments were conducted assaying the forward and reverse directions with products initially present, varying pH between 6.5 and 9.0. By fitting time-course data to various mechanisms, it is determined that an ordered bi-bi mechanism with coenzyme binding first followed by the binding of substrate is able to explain the kinetic data. The proposed mechanism is similar to, but not identical to, the mechanism recently determined for the mitochondrial isoform, mMDH. cMDH and mMDH mechanisms are also shown to both be reduced versions of a common, more complex mechanism that can explain the kinetic data for both isoforms. Comparing the simulated activity (ratio of initial velocity to the enzyme concentration) under physiological conditions, the mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) activity is predicted to be higher than cMDH activity under mitochondrial matrix conditions while the cMDH activity is higher than mMDH activity under cytoplasmic conditions, suggesting that the functions of the isoforms are kinetically tuned to their individual physiological roles.

  7. Role of isothiocyanate conjugate of pterostilbene on the inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation and tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Bodipati, Naganjaneyulu; Krishna Peddinti, Rama; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-15

    Naturally occurring pterostilbene (PTER) and isothiocyanate (ITC) attract great attention due to their wide range of biological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-leukemic, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. A novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by introducing an ITC moiety on PTER backbone was evaluated for its anti-cancer efficacy in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in vitro and Ehrlich ascitic tumor bearing mice model in vivo. The novel hybrid molecule showed significant in vitro anti-cancer activity (IC{sub 50}=25±0.38) when compared to reference compound PTER (IC{sub 50}=65±0.42). The conjugate molecule induced both S and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest as indicated by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, the conjugate induced cell death was characterized by changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, activation of caspase-9, release of cytochrome-c into cytosol and increased Bax: Bcl-2 ratio. The conjugate also suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. The conjugate induced cell death was significantly increased in presence of A6730 (a potent Akt1/2 kinase inhibitor) and PD98059 (a specific ERK inhibitor). Moreover, the conjugated PTER inhibited tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice as observed by reduction in tumor volume compared to untreated animals. Collectively, the pro-apoptotic effect of conjugate is mediated through the activation of caspases, and is correlated with the blockade of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Conjugate was prepared by appending isothiocyanate moiety on pterostilbene backbone. • Conjugate showed anticancer effects at comparatively lower dose than pterostilbene. • Conjugate caused blockage of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. • Conjugate significantly reduced solid tumor volume as compared to pterostilbene.

  8. A Computational Model of Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [Ca2+] in Paced Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Woo; Jang, Chang Han; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Leem, Chae Hun; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a series of experiment demonstrating the role of mitochondria in the cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ transients and compared the results with those from computer simulation. In rat ventricular myocytes, increasing the rate of stimulation (1~3 Hz) made both the diastolic and systolic [Ca2+] bigger in mitochondria as well as in cytosol. As L-type Ca2+ channel has key influence on the amplitude of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, the relation between stimulus frequency and the amplitude of Ca2+ transients was examined under the low density (1/10 of control) of L-type Ca2+ channel in model simulation, where the relation was reversed. In experiment, block of Ca2+ uniporter on mitochondrial inner membrane significantly reduced the amplitude of mitochondrial Ca2+ transients, while it failed to affect the cytosolic Ca2+ transients. In computer simulation, the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ transients was not affected by removal of Ca2+ uniporter. The application of carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) known as a protonophore on mitochondrial membrane to rat ventricular myocytes gradually increased the diastolic [Ca2+] in cytosol and eventually abolished the Ca2+ transients, which was similarly reproduced in computer simulation. The model study suggests that the relative contribution of L-type Ca2+ channel to total transsarcolemmal Ca2+ flux could determine whether the cytosolic Ca2+ transients become bigger or smaller with higher stimulus frequency. The present study also suggests that cytosolic Ca2+ affects mitochondrial Ca2+ in a beat-to-beat manner, however, removal of Ca2+ influx mechanism into mitochondria does not affect the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ transients. PMID:21994480

  9. Biochemical Issues in Estimation of Cytosolic Free NAD/NADH Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Hu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio is fundamentally important in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis but current techniques cannot distinguish between protein-bound and free NAD/NADH. Williamson et al reported a method to estimate this ratio by cytosolic lactate/pyruvate (L/P) based on the principle of chemical equilibrium. Numerous studies used L/P ratio to estimate the cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio by assuming that the conversion in cells was at near-equilibrium but not verifying how near it was. In addition, it seems accepted that cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio was a dependent variable responding to the change of L/P ratio. In this study, we show (1) that the change of lactate/glucose (percentage of glucose that converts to lactate by cells) and L/P ratio could measure the status of conversion between pyruvate + NADH and lactate + NAD that tends to or gets away from equilibrium; (2) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH could be accurately estimated by L/P only when the conversion is at or very close to equilibrium otherwise a calculation error by one order of magnitude could be introduced; (3) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is stable and L/P is highly labile, that the highly labile L/P is crucial to maintain the homeostasis of NAD/NADH; (4) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is dependent on oxygen levels. Our study resolved the key issues regarding accurate estimation of cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio and the relationship between NAD/NADH and L/P. PMID:22570687

  10. Double phase conjugation in tungsten bronze crystals.

    PubMed

    Sharp, E J; Clark Iii, W W; Miller, M J; Wood, G L; Monson, B; Salamo, G J; Neurgaonkar, R R

    1990-02-20

    In this paper we report a new method for double phase conjugation particularly suited to the tungsten bronze crystal strontium barium niobate. It has also been observed to produce conjugate waves in BaTiO(3) and BSKNN. This new arrangement is called the bridge conjugator because the two beams enter opposing [100] crystal faces and fan together to form a bridge without reflection off a crystal face. Our measurements indicate that the bridge conjugator is competitive with previously reported double phase conjugate mirrors in reflectivity, response time, ease of alignment, and fidelity.

  11. Uniformly cationized protein efficiently reaches the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Futami, Midori; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Asama, Takashi; Murata, Hitoshi; Tada, Hiroko; Kosaka, Megumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Futami, Junichiro

    2012-10-17

    Protein cationization techniques are powerful protein transduction methods for mammalian cells. As we demonstrated previously, cationized proteins with limited conjugation to polyethylenimine have excellent ability to enter into cells by adsorption-mediated endocytosis [Futami, J., et al. (2005) J. Biosci. Bioeng. 99, 95-103]. In this study, we show that proteins with extensive and uniform cationization covering the protein surface reach the cytoplasm and nucleus more effectively than proteins with limited cationic polymers or proteins that are fused to cationic peptides. Although extensive modification of carboxylates results in loss of protein function, chicken avidin retains biotin-binding ability even after extensive amidation of carboxylates. Using this cationized avidin carrier system, the protein transduction ability of variously cationized avidins was investigated using biotinylated protein as a probe. The results revealed that cationized avidins bind rapidly to the cell surface followed by endocytotic uptake. Small amounts of uniformly cationized avidin showed direct penetration into the cytoplasm within a 15 min incubation. This penetration route seemed to be energy dependent and functioned under cellular physiological conditions. A biotinylated exogenous transcription factor protein that penetrated cells was demonstrated to induce target gene expression in living cells.

  12. Cotransin induces accumulation of a cytotoxic clusterin variant that cotranslationally rerouted to the cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ilho; Kim, Jiyeon; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kang, Sang-Wook

    2013-05-01

    Although clusterin (CLU) was originally identified as a secreted glycoprotein that plays cytoprotective role, several intracellular CLU variants have been recently identified in the diverse pathological conditions. The mechanistic basis of these variants is now believed to be alternative splicing and retrotranslocation. Here, we uncovered, an unglycosylated and signal sequence-unprocessed, CLU variant in the cytosol. This variant proved to be a product that cotranslationally rerouted to the cytosol during translocation. Cytosolic CLU was prone to aggregation at peri-nuclear region of cells and induced cell death. Signal sequence is shown to be an important determinant for cytosolic CLU generation and aggregation. These results provide not only a new mechanistic insight into the cytosolic CLU generation but also an idea for therapeutic mislocalization of CLU as a strategy for cancer treatment. - Highlights: ► Intracellular CLU variants have been recently identified in the diverse pathological conditions. ► Translocation of clusterin is less efficient than that of Prl. ► We identified a new cytotoxic clusterin variant whose signal sequence was unprocessed. ► This variant proved to be a product that cotranslationally rerouted to cytosol.

  13. Indole-3-acetic acid and fusicoccin cause cytosolic acidification of corn coleoptile cells

    PubMed Central

    Felle, Hubert; Brummer, Benno; Bertl, Adam; Parish, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Microelectrodes were used to measure simultaneously the effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on membrane potential and cytosolic pH of corn coleoptile cells. IAA caused an initial depolarization followed by hyperpolarization, the latter displaying rhythmic oscillations. The extent of the changes in membrane potential was dependent on IAA concentration, and hyperpolarization, but not depolarization, could be detected with concentrations of IAA as low as 10 nM. Membrane hyperpolarization was preceded by a decrease in cytosolic pH. The decrease commenced ≈5 min after adding IAA and continued for 15-20 min before reaching a new steady state ≈0.1 pH unit lower than the original pH. The decrease in pH was readily detectable after treatment with 0.1 μM IAA. Fusicoccin and acetate, which, like IAA, induce elongation growth, caused a similar drop in cytosolic pH and subsequent membrane hyperpolarization, the decrease in pH commencing within seconds. The addition of fusicoccin to IAA-treated cells resulted in a further cytosolic acidification and membrane hyperpolarization. The two substances probably change cytosolic pH via different mechanisms. The results imply that one of the primary effects of auxins in coleoptiles is to lower cytosolic pH. PMID:16593782

  14. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  15. Identification and Characterization of an Antennae-Specific Aldehyde Oxidase from the Navel Orangeworm

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Young-Moo; Pelletier, Julien; Atungulu, Elizabeth; Leal, Walter S.

    2013-01-01

    Antennae-specific odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) are postulated to inactivate odorant molecules after they convey their signal. Different classes of insect ODEs are specific to esters, alcohols, and aldehydes – the major functional groups of female-produced, hydrophobic sex pheromones from moth species. Esterases that rapidly inactive acetate and other esters have been well-studied, but less is known about aldehyde oxidases (AOXs). Here we report cloning of an aldehyde oxidase, AtraAOX2, from the antennae of the navel orangeworm (NOW), Amyelois transitella, and the first activity characterization of a recombinant insect AOX. AtraAOX2 gene spans 3,813 bp and encodes a protein with 1,270 amino acid residues. AtraAOX2 cDNA was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect Sf21 cells as a ≈280 kDa homodimer with 140 kDa subunits. Recombinant AtraAOX2 degraded Z11Z13–16Ald and plant volatile aldehydes as substrates. However, as expected for aldehyde oxidases, recombinant AtraAOX2 did not show specificity for Z11Z13–16Ald, the main constituent of the sex pheromone, but showed high activity for plant volatile aldehydes. Our data suggest AtraAOX2 might be involved in degradation of a diversity of aldehydes including sex pheromones, plant-derived semiochemicals, and chemical cues for oviposition sites. Additionally, AtraAOX2 could protect the insect's olfactory system from xenobiotics, including pesticides that might reach the sensillar lymph surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:23826341

  16. Non-specific recognition in phagocytosis: ingestion of aldehyde-treated erythrocytes by rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Capo, C; Bongrand, P; Benoliel, A M; Depieds, R

    1979-01-01

    Particles were chemically modified with aldehydes and incubated with rat peritoneal cells for phagocytosis. All dialdehydes and lower monaldehydes tested (methanal, ethanal and propanal) made sheep erythrocytes phagocytosable. Failure of higher monaldehydes to induce phagocytosis of treated erythrocytes was not due to lack of reactivity with red cell membranes. All erythrocytes tested (bird and mammal red cells were used) and rat thymocytes were phagocytosed by rat macrophages after incubation with aldehyde. Treatment of Candida albicans did not induce phagocytosis: this failure was not due to lack of aldehyde binding (as demonstrated with [14C]-methanal) nor to anti-phagocytic properties of the parasite membrane. Sheep erythrocytes were submitted to enzymatic treatment (pronase, trypsin, neuraminidase) or incubated with succinic anhydride (to block free NH2 groups) or iodacetamide (to block free SH groups) before aldehyde treatment: phagocytosis was not decreased, which suggested that aldehydes did not act by altering some definite surface structure of the treated particles. Treatment of erythrocytes with cross-linking compounds such as tetraazotized o-dianisidine (coupling occurs mainly on tyrosine and histidine residues) or l-ethyl(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (a bivalent reagent binding free COOH groups) did not induce any substantial phagocytosis of erythrocytes. Phagocytosis of aldehyde treated erythrocytes was partly correlated with hydrophobicity of these cells, as measured with a two-phase partition system. It is concluded that aldehyde-mediated phagocytosis of erythrocytes is mainly due to cross-linking of red cell membrane structures, probably involving free OH groups, which must increase local rigidity and thereby modify hydrophobicity of the red cell surface. Images Figure 1 PMID:437841

  17. Non-specific recognition in phagocytosis: ingestion of aldehyde-treated erythrocytes by rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Capo, C; Bongrand, P; Benoliel, A M; Depieds, R

    1979-03-01

    Particles were chemically modified with aldehydes and incubated with rat peritoneal cells for phagocytosis. All dialdehydes and lower monaldehydes tested (methanal, ethanal and propanal) made sheep erythrocytes phagocytosable. Failure of higher monaldehydes to induce phagocytosis of treated erythrocytes was not due to lack of reactivity with red cell membranes. All erythrocytes tested (bird and mammal red cells were used) and rat thymocytes were phagocytosed by rat macrophages after incubation with aldehyde. Treatment of Candida albicans did not induce phagocytosis: this failure was not due to lack of aldehyde binding (as demonstrated with [14C]-methanal) nor to anti-phagocytic properties of the parasite membrane. Sheep erythrocytes were submitted to enzymatic treatment (pronase, trypsin, neuraminidase) or incubated with succinic anhydride (to block free NH2 groups) or iodacetamide (to block free SH groups) before aldehyde treatment: phagocytosis was not decreased, which suggested that aldehydes did not act by altering some definite surface structure of the treated particles. Treatment of erythrocytes with cross-linking compounds such as tetraazotized o-dianisidine (coupling occurs mainly on tyrosine and histidine residues) or l-ethyl(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (a bivalent reagent binding free COOH groups) did not induce any substantial phagocytosis of erythrocytes. Phagocytosis of aldehyde treated erythrocytes was partly correlated with hydrophobicity of these cells, as measured with a two-phase partition system. It is concluded that aldehyde-mediated phagocytosis of erythrocytes is mainly due to cross-linking of red cell membrane structures, probably involving free OH groups, which must increase local rigidity and thereby modify hydrophobicity of the red cell surface.

  18. Effect of commonly used organic solvents on aldehyde oxidase-mediated vanillin, phthalazine and methotrexate oxidation in human, rat and mouse liver subcellular fractions.

    PubMed

    Behera, Dayanidhi; Pattem, Rambabu; Gudi, Girish

    2014-08-01

    1. Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein enzyme widely distributed across many tissues. In this study, we report the effect of commonly used organic solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), acetonitrile (ACN), methanol and ethanol on AOX activity in human, rat and mouse liver S9 fractions using vanillin, phthalazine and methotrexate as probe substrates. 2. Methanol was found to be the most potent solvent in inhibiting vanillic acid and 1-phthalazinone formation in comparison to DMSO, ACN and ethanol across the species tested, except 7-hydroxy methotrexate. 3. Treatment with these solvents at approximate IC50 (% v/v) concentrations showed significant reduction in Clint and Vmax of the probe substrates and also resulted in different effects on Km across the species. 4. Marked differences in the activity and affinity towards AOX were observed with different probe substrates with methotrexate showing least activity and affinity as compared to vanillin and phthalazine. 5. Overall, AOX activity seemed to be more resilient to the presence of organic solvents at higher concentrations in human and rodent species. These results suggest that low concentrations of organic solvents are acceptable for in vitro incubations involving AOX-mediated metabolism.

  19. Chemo- and Diastereoselective N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Cross-Benzoin Reactions Using N-Boc-α-amino Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Pouyan; Gravel, Michel

    2016-09-16

    N-Boc-α-amino aldehydes are shown to be excellent partners in cross-benzoin reactions with aliphatic or heteroaromatic aldehydes. The chemoselectivity of the reaction and the facial selectivity on the amino aldehyde allow cross-benzoin products to be obtained in good yields and good diastereomeric ratios. The developed method is utilized as the key step in a concise total synthesis of d-arabino-phytosphingosine.

  20. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  1. Enhanced photophysics of conjugated polymers

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; Xu, Su; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2003-05-27

    The addition of oppositely charged surfactant to fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer forms a polymer-surfactant complex that exhibits at least one improved photophysical property. The conjugated polymer is a fluorescent ionic polymer that typically has at least one ionic side chain or moiety that interacts with the specific surfactant selected. The photophysical property improvements may include increased fluorescence quantum efficiency, wavelength-independent emission and absorption spectra, and more stable fluorescence decay kinetics. The complexation typically occurs in a solution of a polar solvent in which the polymer and surfactant are soluble, but it may also occur in a mixture of solvents. The solution is commonly prepared with a surfactant molecule:monomer repeat unit of polymer ratio ranging from about 1:100 to about 1:1. A polymer-surfactant complex precipitate is formed as the ratio approaches 1:1. This precipitate is recoverable and usable in many forms.

  2. Sampling intercomparisons for aldehydes in simulated workplace air.

    PubMed

    Goelen, E; Lambrechts, M; Geyskens, F

    1997-05-01

    Thirty one laboratories of various EU Member States have participated in two interlaboratory comparisons in order to assess errors of personal sampling methods associated with both the sampling and the analytical steps. In contrast to conventional quality control schemes, this project particularly focuses attention on the sampling and identification step; it is executed by means of sampling exercises and has included discussions on potential sources of error. In a sampling exercise, participants come to a central facility and perform measurements on synthetic workplace air in a laboratory installation. Concentration levels of formaldehyde, acrolein, glutaraldehyde and acetaldehyde between 0.1 and 2 times the limit value for workplace air were prepared at various humidity levels and with acetone, occasionally, as interferent. Sampling times varied from 1-4 h. The related analytical work is performed at the analyst's own laboratory. The intention is for each participant to determine the observed value of the delivered standard atmosphere using the sampling method of his own choice. Trueness (bias), precision and relative overall uncertainty of each method-laboratory combination is calculated and verified towards compliance with EN 482, which outlines minimum performance criteria. The first challenge involved the precise gas phase generation of the selected analytes in high air flows (up to 300 1 min-1) and calculating the true value only by direct reference to primary standards. This was accomplished by modifying the capillary dosage injection technique so that reactive compounds, like low molecular mass aldehydes, could be dosed with the same accuracy and precision as unreactive solvents. A permeation tube with high emission rate was developed for formaldehyde. Up to ten different sampling techniques were evaluated. The measurement methods used by the majority of the participants were based on pumped sampling on silica cartridges (or tubes) and glass fiber filters

  3. E2 conjugating enzyme selectivity and requirements for function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Soss, Sarah E; Yue, Yuanyuan; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-06-17

    The transfer of ubiquitin (Ub) to a substrate protein requires a cascade of E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligating enzymes. E3 Ub ligases containing U-box and RING domains bind both E2∼Ub conjugates and substrates to facilitate transfer of the Ub molecule. Although the overall mode of action of E3 ligases is well established, many of the mechanistic details that determine the outcome of ubiquitination are poorly understood. CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) is a U-box E3 ligase that serves as a co-chaperone to heat shock proteins and is critical for the regulation of unfolded proteins in the cytosol. We have performed a systematic analysis of the interactions of CHIP with E2 conjugating enzymes and found that only a subset bind and function. Moreover, some E2 enzymes function in pairs to create products that neither create individually. Characterization of the products of these reactions showed that different E2 enzymes produce different ubiquitination products, i.e. that E2 determines the outcome of Ub transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis on the E2 enzymes Ube2D1 and Ube2L3 (UbcH5a and UbcH7) established that an SPA motif in loop 7 of E2 is required for binding to CHIP but is not sufficient for activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate and consequent ubiquitination activity. These data support the proposal that the E2 SPA motif provides specificity for binding to CHIP, whereas activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate is derived from other molecular determinants.

  4. Intracellular delivery and trafficking dynamics of a lymphoma-targeting antibody-polymer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Shi, Julie; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Duvall, Craig L; Pun, Suzie H; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2012-12-03

    Ratiometric fluorescence and cellular fractionation studies were employed to characterize the intracellular trafficking dynamics of antibody-poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) conjugates in CD22+ RAMOS-AW cells. The HD39 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directs CD22-dependent, receptor-mediated uptake in human B-cell lymphoma cells, where it is rapidly trafficked to the lysosomal compartment. To characterize the intracellular-release dynamics of the polymer-mAb conjugates, HD39-streptavidin (HD39/SA) was dual-labeled with pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 488 and pH-sensitive pHrodo fluorophores. The subcellular pH distribution of the HD39/SA-polymer conjugates was quantified as a function of time by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and the average intracellular pH value experienced by the conjugates was also characterized as a function of time by flow cytometry. PPAA was shown to alter the intracellular trafficking kinetics strongly relative to HD39/SA alone or HD39/SA conjugates with a control polymer, poly(methacryclic acid) (PMAA). Subcellular trafficking studies revealed that after 6 h, only 11% of the HD39/SA-PPAA conjugates had been trafficked to acidic lysosomal compartments with values at or below pH 5.6. In contrast, the average intracellular pH of HD39/SA alone dropped from 6.7 ± 0.2 at 1 h to 5.6 ± 0.5 after 3 h and 4.7 ± 0.6 after 6 h. Conjugation of the control polymer PMAA to HD39/SA showed an average pH drop similar to that of HD39/SA. Subcellular fractionation studies with tritium-labeled HD39/SA demonstrated that after 6 h, 89% of HD39/SA was associated with endosomes (Rab5+) and lysosomes (Lamp2+), while 45% of HD39/SA-PPAA was translocated to the cytosol (lactate dehydrogenase+). These results demonstrate the endosomal-releasing properties of PPAA with antibody-polymer conjugates and detail their intracellular trafficking dynamics and subcellular compartmental distributions over time.

  5. Knocking Out Cytosolic Cysteine Synthesis Compromises the Antioxidant Capacity of the Cytosol to Maintain Discrete Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    López-Martín, M. Carmen; Becana, Manuel; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Plant cells contain different O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) enzymes involved in cysteine (Cys) biosynthesis and located in different subcellular compartments. These enzymes are made up of a complex variety of isoforms resulting in different subcellular Cys pools. To unravel the contribution of cytosolic Cys to plant metabolism, we characterized the knockout oas-a1.1 and osa-a1.2 mutants, deficient in the most abundant cytosolic OASTL isoform in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Total intracellular Cys and glutathione concentrations were reduced, and the glutathione redox state was shifted in favor of its oxidized form. Interestingly, the capability of the mutants to chelate heavy metals did not differ from that of the wild type, but the mutants have an enhanced sensitivity to cadmium. With the aim of establishing the metabolic network most influenced by the cytosolic Cys pool, we used the ATH1 GeneChip for evaluation of differentially expressed genes in the oas-a1.1 mutant grown under nonstress conditions. The transcriptomic footprints of mutant plants had predicted functions associated with various physiological responses that are dependent on reactive oxygen species and suggested that the mutant was oxidatively stressed. Evidences that the mutation caused a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis are that, in the knockout, H2O2 production was localized in shoots and roots; spontaneous cell death lesions occurred in the leaves; and lignification and guaiacol peroxidase activity were significantly increased. All these findings indicate that a deficiency of OAS-A1 in the cytosol promotes a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis and that Cys is an important determinant of the antioxidative capacity of the cytosol in Arabidopsis. PMID:18441224

  6. Variable metric conjugate gradient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1994-07-01

    1.1 Motivation. In this paper we present a framework that includes many well known iterative methods for the solution of nonsymmetric linear systems of equations, Ax = b. Section 2 begins with a brief review of the conjugate gradient method. Next, we describe a broader class of methods, known as projection methods, to which the conjugate gradient (CG) method and most conjugate gradient-like methods belong. The concept of a method having either a fixed or a variable metric is introduced. Methods that have a metric are referred to as either fixed or variable metric methods. Some relationships between projection methods and fixed (variable) metric methods are discussed. The main emphasis of the remainder of this paper is on variable metric methods. In Section 3 we show how the biconjugate gradient (BCG), and the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) methods fit into this framework as variable metric methods. By modifying the underlying Lanczos biorthogonalization process used in the implementation of BCG and QMR, we obtain other variable metric methods. These, we refer to as generalizations of BCG and QMR.

  7. Uptake and glutathione conjugation of ethacrynic acid and efflux of the glutathione adduct by periportal and perivenous rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tirona, R G; Tan, E; Meier, G; Pang, K S

    1999-12-01

    We assessed the impact of zonal factors on the hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) conjugation of ethacrynic acid (EA). Uptake of EA by enriched periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) rat hepatocytes was characterized by both saturable (V(max)(uptake) = 3.4 +/- 1.7 and 3. 2 +/- 0.8 nmol/min/mg protein and K(m)(uptake) = 51 +/- 13 and 44 +/- 15 microM) and nonsaturable (12 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 3 microl/min/mg protein) components. Values for the overall GSH conjugation rates of EA (200 microM) were similar among the zonal hepatocytes and resembled those for the influx transport rates. In the absence of the hepatocyte membrane, GSH conjugation in PV and PP hepatocyte cytosol was similar, but a higher perivenous GSH conjugation activity toward EA (PV/PP of 2.4) that mirrored the higher PV/PP ratios of immunodetectable GSTs Ya (1.7) and Yb2 (2.5) was found in cell lysates obtained by the dual-digitonin-pulse perfusion technique. The GSH conjugation rates in the subcellular fragments were, however, much greater than those observed for intact hepatocytes. Efflux rates of the glutathione conjugate EA-SG from zonal hepatocytes were similar, as were levels of the immunodetectable multidrug-resistance protein 2/canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (Mrp2/cMoat) in the 100,000g pellets. The composite results suggest that the GSTs responsible for EA metabolism are more abundant in the PV region, albeit that the gradient of enzymatic activities is shallow. Despite the existence of zonal metabolic activity, the overall GSH conjugation rate of EA is homogeneous among cells because the reaction is rate limited by uptake, which occurs evenly. Results on EA-SG efflux suggest the acinar homogeneity in Mrp2/cMoat function for canalicular transport.

  8. Acaricidal effects of natural six-carbon and nine-carbon aldehydes on stored-product mites.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jan; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Nesvorná, Marta; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo

    2008-04-01

    The toxicities of three plant volatiles, (2E)-hexenal, (2E, 6Z)-nonadienal and (2E)-nonenal, intermediate products of the oxylipin biosynthesis pathway, were tested on three mites of importance for medical purposes and as pests. The aldehydes were diluted in hexane separately and incorporated into diets in ranges of 4-143 mg g(-1). The final density of mites in control and aldehyde-enriched diets was compared after 21 days. The aldehydes were toxic to the mites, whose final density showed an inverse correlation with aldehyde concentration. In addition to the effects of aldehyde concentration, the final density of mites was also influenced by the different aldehydes tested and the interaction among aldehyde concentration and chemical structure. In a functional combination of aldehydes and species, the doses calculated for growth inhibition and eradication of mites ranged from 4 to 35 mg g(-1) and from 36 to 314 mg g(-1), respectively. Due to the protective role displayed by natural six-carbon and nine-carbon aldehydes, these compounds are potential candidates for controlling stored-product mites in stored food and feed products.

  9. Aldehydes in Artic Snow at Barrow (AK) during the Barrow 2009 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Gallet, Jean-Charles; Domine, Florent; Beine, Harry; Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Weibring, Petter; Walega, James; Fried, Alan; Richter, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Aldehydes (RCHO) are key reactive intermediates in hydrocarbon oxidation and in OH cycling. They are also emitted and taken up by the snowpack and a combination of both physical and photochemical processes are likely involved. Since the photolysis of aldehydes is a source of HOx radicals, these exchanges can modify the oxidative capacity of the overlying air. Formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (MeCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methylglyoxal (MeCOCHO) concentrations were measured in over 250 snow samples collected during the Barrow 2009 campaign between late February and mid April 2009. Both continental and marine snowpacks were studied as well as frost flowers on sea ice. We found that HCHO was the most abundant aldehyde (1 to 9 µg/L), but significant concentrations of dicarbonyls glyoxal and methylglyoxal were also measured for the first time in Arctic snow. Similar concentrations were measured for the continental and marine snowpacks but some frost flowers exhibited HCHO concentrations as high as 150 µg/L. Daily cycles in the surface snow were observed for HCHO and CH3CHO but also for the dicarbonyls and we concluded to a photochemical production of these species from organic precursors. Additional data such as gas phase concentrations for the measured aldehydes and snow physical properties (specific surface area, density …) will be used to discuss on the location of aldehydes in the snow. This is essential to identify and quantify the physical processes that occur during the exchange of trace gases between the snow and the atmosphere.

  10. Toxicity of polyunsaturated aldehydes of diatoms to Indo-Pacific bioindicator organism Echinometra mathaei.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Davide; Gaion, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known suitability of early developmental stages of sea urchin as recommended model for pollutant toxicity testing, little is known about the sensitivity of Indo-Pacific species Echinometra mathaei to polyunsaturated aldehydes. In this study, the effect of three short chain aldehydes, 2,4-decadienal (DD), 2,4-octadienal (OD) and 2,4-heptadienal (HD), normally found in many diatoms, such as Skeletonema costatum, Skeletonema marinoi and Thalassiosira rotula, was evaluated on larval development of E. mathaei embryos. Aldehydes affected larval development in a dose-dependent manner, in particular HD>OD>DD; the results of this study highlighted the higher sensitivity of this species toward aldehydes compared with data registered for other sea urchin species. In comparison with studies reported in the literature, contrasting results were observed during our tests; therefore, an increasing toxic effect was registered with decreasing the chain length of aldehydes. This work could provide new insights in the development of new toxicological assays toward most sensitive species.

  11. Monounsaturated Fatty Acids Are Substrates for Aldehyde Generation in Tellurite-Exposed Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Díaz-Vásquez, Waldo A.; Pérez-Donoso, José M.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage macromolecules and cellular components in nearly all kinds of cells and often generate toxic intracellular byproducts. In this work, aldehyde generation derived from the Escherichia coli membrane oxidation as well as membrane fatty acid profiles, protein oxidation, and bacterial resistance to oxidative stress elicitors was evaluated. Studies included wild-type cells as well as cells exhibiting a modulated monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) ratio. The hydroxyaldehyde 4-hydroxy 2-nonenal was found to be most likely produced by E. coli, whose levels are dependent upon exposure to oxidative stress elicitors. Aldehyde amounts and markers of oxidative damage decreased upon exposure to E. coli containing low MUFA ratios, which was paralleled by a concomitant increase in resistance to ROS-generating compounds. MUFAs ratio, lipid peroxidation, and aldehyde generation were found to be directly related; that is, the lower the MUFAs ratio, the lower the peroxide and aldehyde generation levels. These results provide additional evidence about MUFAs being targets for membrane lipid oxidation and their relevance in aldehyde generation. PMID:23991420

  12. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana: Biochemical Requirements, Metabolic Pathways, and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Missihoun, Tagnon D; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Bartels, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are a family of enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Here we summarize molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of selected ArabidopsisALDH genes. Aldehyde molecules are very reactive and are involved in many metabolic processes but when they accumulate in excess they become toxic. Thus activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases is important in regulating the homeostasis of aldehydes. Overexpression of some ALDH genes demonstrated an improved abiotic stress tolerance. Despite the fact that several reports are available describing a role for specific ALDHs, their precise physiological roles are often still unclear. Therefore a number of genetic and biochemical tools have been generated to address the function with an emphasis on stress-related ALDHs. ALDHs exert their functions in different cellular compartments and often in a developmental and tissue specific manner. To investigate substrate specificity, catalytic efficiencies have been determined using a range of substrates varying in carbon chain length and degree of carbon oxidation. Mutational approaches identified amino acid residues critical for coenzyme usage and enzyme activities.

  13. Evaluation of the toxicity of stress-related aldehydes to photosynthesis in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Mano, Jun'ichi; Miyatake, Fumitaka; Hiraoka, Eiji; Tamoi, Masahiro

    2009-09-01

    Aldehydes produced under various environmental stresses can cause cellular injury in plants, but their toxicology in photosynthesis has been scarcely investigated. We here evaluated their effects on photosynthetic reactions in chloroplasts isolated from Spinacia oleracea L. leaves. Aldehydes that are known to stem from lipid peroxides inactivated the CO(2) photoreduction to various extents, while their corresponding alcohols and carboxylic acids did not affect photosynthesis. alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes (2-alkenals) showed greater inactivation than the saturated aliphatic aldehydes. The oxygenated short aldehydes malondialdehyde, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde showed only weak toxicity to photosynthesis. Among tested 2-alkenals, 2-propenal (acrolein) was the most toxic, and then followed 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and (E)-2-hexenal. While the CO(2)-photoreduction was inactivated, envelope intactness and photosynthetic electron transport activity (H(2)O --> ferredoxin) were only slightly affected. In the acrolein-treated chloroplasts, the Calvin cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-1,6-bisphophatase, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, aldolase, and Rubisco were irreversibly inactivated. Acrolein treatment caused a rapid drop of the glutathione pool, prior to the inactivation of photosynthesis. GSH exogenously added to chloroplasts suppressed the acrolein-induced inactivation of photosynthesis, but ascorbic acid did not show such a protective effect. Thus, lipid peroxide-derived 2-alkenals can inhibit photosynthesis by depleting GSH in chloroplasts and then inactivating multiple enzymes in the Calvin cycle.

  14. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  15. Simulation chamber studies on the NO3 chemistry of atmospheric aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossmeyer, J.; Brauers, T.; Richter, C.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.

    2006-09-01

    Absolute reaction rate studies of NO3 radicals with 4 aldehydes were performed in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Center Jülich. Rate coefficients (ethanal: 2.6 +/- 0.5, propanal: 5.8 +/- 1.0, butanal: 11.9 +/- 1.4, benzaldehyde: 2.2 +/- 0.6; in 10-15 cm3 s-1 at 300 K) were determined from measured concentration-time profiles of aldehydes and NO3 at near ambient conditions. The values for the aliphatic aldehydes are in good agreement with the most recent recommendations (IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry: Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry, 2005, available at http://www.iupac-kinetic.ch.cam.ac.uk). The measured concentration-time profiles of precursor aldehydes, NO3, NO2, and of product aldehydes were compared to model calculations based on the MCM v3 (Jenkin et al., 2003; Saunders et al., 2003). Differences between measurements and model are attributed to a major interference of the GC system to peroxyacyl nitrates. In addition modifications to the rate constants in the MCM are suggested.

  16. Concentration of simple aldehydes by sulfite-containing double-layer hydroxide minerals: implications for biopoesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitsch, S.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Arrhenius, G.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Environmental conditions play an important role in conceptual studies of prebiotically relevant chemical reactions that could have led to functional biomolecules. The necessary source compounds are likely to have been present in dilute solution, raising the question of how to achieve selective concentration and to reach activation. With the assumption of an initial 'RNA World', the questions of production, concentration, and interaction of aldehydes and aldehyde phosphates, potential precursors of sugar phosphates, come into the foreground. As a possible concentration process for simple, uncharged aldehydes, we investigated their adduct formation with sulfite ion bound in the interlayer of positively charged expanding-sheet-structure double-layer hydroxide minerals. Minerals of this type, initially with chloride as interlayer counter anion, have previously been shown to induce concentration and subsequent aldolization of aldehyde phosphates to form tetrose, pentose, and hexose phosphates. The reversible uptake of the simple aldehydes formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and glyceraldehyde by adduct formation with the immobilized sulfite ions is characterized by equilibrium constants of K=1.5, 9, and 11, respectively. This translates into an observable uptake at concentrations exceeding 50 mM.

  17. The role of aldehyde oxidase in ethanol-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S; Jayatilleke, E

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic lipid peroxidation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury, but the mechanism(s) by which ethanol metabolism or resultant free radicals initiate lipid peroxidation is not fully defined. The role of the molybdenum-containing enzymes aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase in the generation of such free radicals was investigated by measuring alkane production (lipoperoxidation products) in isolated rat hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. Inhibition of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase (by feeding tungstate at 100 mg/day per kg) decreased alkane production (80-95%), whereas allopurinol (20 mg/kg by mouth), a marked inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited alkane production by only 35-50%. Addition of acetaldehyde (0-100 microM) (in the presence of 50 microM-4-methylpyrazole) increased alkane production in a dose-dependent manner (Km of aldehyde oxidase for acetaldehyde 1 mM); menadione, an inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase, virtually inhibited alkane production. Desferrioxamine (5-10 microM) completely abolished alkane production induced by both ethanol and acetaldehyde, indicating the importance of catalytic iron. Thus free radicals generated during the metabolism of acetaldehyde by aldehyde oxidase may be a fundamental mechanism in the initiation of alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:2363695

  18. Quantification of aldehydes emissions from alternative and renewable aviation fuels using a gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hu; Altaher, Mohamed A.; Wilson, Chris W.; Blakey, Simon; Chung, Winson; Rye, Lucas

    2014-02-01

    In this research three renewable aviation fuel blends including two HEFA (Hydrotreated Ester and Fatty Acid) blends and one FAE (Fatty Acids Ethyl Ester) blend with conventional Jet A-1 along with a GTL (Gas To Liquid) fuel have been tested for their aldehydes emissions on a small gas turbine engine. Three strong ozone formation precursors: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were measured in the exhaust at different operational modes and compared to neat Jet A-1. The aim is to assess the impact of renewable and alternative aviation fuels on aldehydes emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines so as to provide informed knowledge for the future deployment of new fuels in aviation. The results show that formaldehyde was a major aldehyde species emitted with a fraction of around 60% of total measured aldehydes emissions for all fuels. Acrolein was the second major emitted aldehyde species with a fraction of ˜30%. Acetaldehyde emissions were very low for all the fuels and below the detention limit of the instrument. The formaldehyde emissions at cold idle were up to two to threefold higher than that at full power. The fractions of formaldehyde were 6-10% and 20% of total hydrocarbon emissions in ppm at idle and full power respectively and doubled on a g kg-1-fuel basis.

  19. Flavoring Compounds Dominate Toxic Aldehyde Production during E-Cigarette Vaping.

    PubMed

    Khlystov, Andrey; Samburova, Vera

    2016-12-06

    The growing popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) raises concerns about the possibility of adverse health effects to primary users and people exposed to e-cigarette vapors. E-Cigarettes offer a very wide variety of flavors, which is one of the main factors that attract new, especially young, users. How flavoring compounds in e-cigarette liquids affect the chemical composition and toxicity of e-cigarette vapors is practically unknown. Although e-cigarettes are marketed as safer alternatives to traditional cigarettes, several studies have demonstrated formation of toxic aldehydes in e-cigarette vapors during vaping. So far, aldehyde formation has been attributed to thermal decomposition of the main components of e-cigarette e-liquids (propylene glycol and glycerol), while the role of flavoring compounds has been ignored. In this study, we have measured several toxic aldehydes produced by three popular brands of e-cigarettes with flavored and unflavored e-liquids. We show that, within the tested e-cigarette brands, thermal decomposition of flavoring compounds dominates formation of aldehydes during vaping, producing levels that exceed occupational safety standards. Production of aldehydes was found to be exponentially dependent on concentration of flavoring compounds. These findings stress the need for a further, thorough investigation of the effect of flavoring compounds on the toxicity of e-cigarettes.

  20. Concentrations and determinants of gaseous aldehydes in 162 homes in Strasbourg (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, C.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.; Glasser, N.; Casset, A.; Schneider, N.; de Blay, F.

    Aldehydes concentrations were measured in 162 homes in the Strasbourg area (East of France) in the context of a case/control study pairing asthmatic and non-asthmatic people. The surveyed people have completed a questionnaire aiming to characterize the indoor homes and the people life practices. Gaseous aldehyde levels were quantified by a conventional DNHP-derivatization method followed by HPLC/UV. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal were the main encountered aldehydes with mean concentrations of 32.2±14.6, 14.3±9.7 and 8.6±8.1 μg m -3, respectively, while propionaldehyde and benzaldehyde concentrations were usually <3 μg m -3. The aldehydes concentrations simultaneously measured in both bedroom and living room were not significantly different except for formaldehyde and were correlated between them meaning that indoor air was quite homogenous in homes. Combination of information collected in our questionnaires and statistical analysis was used to investigate indoor aldehydes determinants. Even if formaldehyde sources are theoretically well identified, they are multiple so that it was difficult to determine the main parameters influencing its concentrations in domestic environment. Higher hexanal concentrations were related to new coatings such as painting, wallpapers and laminate floorings. Hexanal concentration decreased with both coating and furniture ages so that this compound may be considered as a tracer of these emissions.

  1. Photophysical studies of fused phenanthrimidazole derivatives as versatile π-conjugated systems for potential NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, Jayaraman; Thanikachalam, Venugopal; Venkatesh Perumal, Marimuthu

    Two new heterocyclic imidazole derivatives consists of π-conjugated system attached to a phenanthrimidazole moiety have been synthesized in moderate yield by the condensation of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione with substituted aromatic aldehydes and 4-methoxyaniline in the presence of ammonium acetate in ethanol medium. The photophysical properties of these imidazole derivatives were studied in several solvents. These derivatives were evaluated concerning their solvatochromic properties and molecular optical nonlinearities. Their electric dipole moment (μ) and hyperpolarizability (β) have been calculated theoretically and the results indicate that the extension of the π-framework of the ligands has an effect on the NLO properties of these imidazole derivatives. The non-zero tensor components of these imidazole derivatives reveal that they possess potent non-linear optical (NLO) behavior. The energies of the HOMO and LUMO levels and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) energy surface studies have exploited the existence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of naphthoquinone-coumarin conjugates as topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Amesty, Ángel; Anaissi-Afonso, Laura; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, Isabel; Machín, Félix; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2017-02-01

    Based on previous Topoisomerase II docking studies of naphthoquinone derivatives, a series of naphthoquinone-coumarin conjugates was synthesized through a multicomponent reaction from aromatic aldehydes, 4-hydroxycoumarin and 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone. The hybrid structures were evaluated against the α isoform of human topoisomerase II (hTopoIIα), Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase and E. coli Topoisomerase I. All tested compounds inhibited the hTopoIIα-mediated relaxation of negatively supercoiled circular DNA in the low micromolar range. This inhibition was specific since neither DNA Gyrase nor Topoisomerase I were affected. Cleavage assays pointed out that naphthoquinone-coumarins act by catalytically inhibiting hTopoIIα. ATPase assays and molecular docking studies further pointed out that the mode of action is related to the hTopoIIα ATP-binding site.

  3. Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 and Lysophospholipids in Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Linkous, Amanda G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme are highly angiogenic and, despite advances in treatment, remain resistant to therapy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activation contributes to treatment resistance through transduction of prosurvival signals. We investigated cPLA2 as a novel molecular target for antiangiogenesis therapy. Methods Glioblastoma (GL261) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) heterotopic tumor models were used to study the effects of cPLA2 expression on tumor growth and vascularity in C57/BL6 mice wild type for (cPLA2α+/+) or deficient in (cPLA2α−/−) cPLA2α, the predominant isoform in endothelium (n = 6–7 mice per group). The effect of inhibiting cPLA2 activity on GL261 and LLC tumor growth was studied in mice treated with the chemical cPLA2 inhibitor 4-[2-[5-chloro-1-(diphenylmethyl)-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-ethoxy]benzoic acid (CDIBA). Endothelial cell proliferation and function were evaluated by Ki-67 immunofluorescence and migration assays in primary cultures of murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMEC) isolated from cPLA2α+/+ and cPLA2α−/− mice. Proliferation, invasive migration, and tubule formation were assayed in mouse vascular endothelial 3B-11 cells treated with CDIBA. Effects of lysophosphatidylcholine, arachidonic acid, and lysophosphatidic acid (lipid mediators of tumorigenesis and angiogenesis) on proliferation and migration were examined in 3B-11 cells and cPLA2α−/− MPMEC. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results GL261 tumor progression proceeded normally in cPLA2α+/+ mice, whereas no GL261 tumors formed in cPLA2α−/− mice. In the LLC tumor model, spontaneous tumor regression was observed in 50% of cPLA2α−/− mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the remaining tumors from cPLA2α−/− mice revealed attenuated vascularity (P ≤ .001) compared with tumors from cPLA2α+/+ mice. Inhibition of cPLA2 activity by CDIBA resulted in a delay in tumor growth (eg, LLC model: average

  4. A molecularly defined iron-catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wienhöfer, Gerrit; Westerhaus, Felix A; Junge, Kathrin; Ludwig, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2013-06-10

    A selective iron-based catalyst system for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes to allylic alcohols is presented. Applying the defined iron-tetraphos complex [FeF(L)][BF4] (L = P(PhPPh2)3) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid a broad range of aldehydes are reduced in high yields using low catalyst loadings (0.05-1 mol %). Excellent chemoselectivity for the reduction of aldehydes in the presence of other reducible moieties, for example, ketones, olefins, esters, etc. is achieved. Based on the in situ detected hydride species [FeH(H2)(L)](+) a catalytic cycle is proposed that is supported by computational calculations.

  5. Pulsed corona discharge oxidation of aqueous lignin: decomposition and aldehydes formation.

    PubMed

    Panorel, Iris; Kaijanen, Laura; Kornev, Iakov; Preis, Sergei; Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is the mass waste product of pulp and paper industry mostly incinerated for energy recovery. Lignin is, however, a substantial source of raw material for derivatives currently produced in costly wet oxidation processes. The pulsed corona discharge (PCD) for the first time was applied to lignin oxidation aiming a cost-effective environmentally friendly lignin removal and transformation to aldehydes. The experimental research into treatment of coniferous kraft lignin aqueous solutions was undertaken to establish the dependence of lignin oxidation and aldehyde formation on the discharge parameters, initial concentration of lignin and gas phase composition. The rate and the energy efficiency of lignin oxidation increased with increasing oxygen concentration reaching up to 82 g kW-1 h-1 in 89% vol. oxygen. Oxidation energy efficiency in PCD treatment exceeds the one for conventional ozonation by the factor of two under the experimental conditions. Oxidation at low oxygen concentrations showed a tendency of the increasing aldehydes and glyoxylic acid formation yield.

  6. Effects of light and copper ions on volatile aldehydes of milk and milk fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeno, W.; Bassette, R.; Crang, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Raw, laboratory-pasteurized and plant-pasteurized homogenized milks were exposed to copper ions (5 ppm), to sunlight or fluorescent light and the effects determined on the composition of volatile aldehydes. The greatest change due to copper treatment was an increase in n-hexanal; acetaldehyde showed the least response in each of the sources of milk. The responses were similar from all three sources of milk with laboratory-pasteurized milk samples showing the greatest responses for each aldehyde analyzed. Similar milk samples exposed to sunlight also showed an increase in volatile aldehydes from all milk sources but with the greatest response being acetaldehyde and n-pentanal components. The milk fraction most susceptible to changes in the presence of light was neutralized whey, whereas resuspended cream was most susceptible to copper exposure. Overall, dialyzed whey appeared to be influenced more than other milk fractions by both light and copper ions.

  7. Catalytic production of methyl acrylates by gold-mediated cross coupling of unsaturated aldehydes with methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakalos, Stavros; Zugic, Branko; Stowers, Kara J.; Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M.; Madix, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    Modern methods of esterification, one of the most important reactions in organic synthesis, are reaching their limits, as far as waste and expense are concerned. Novel chemical approaches to ester formation are therefore of importance. Here we report a simple procedure free of caustic reagents or byproducts for the facile direct oxidative methyl esterification of aldehydes over nanoporous Au catalysts. Complementary model studies on single crystal gold surfaces establish the fundamental reactions involved. We find that methanol more readily reacts with adsorbed active oxygen than do the aldehydes, but that once the aldehydes do react, they form strongly-bound acrylates that block reactive sites and decrease the yields of acrylic esters under steady flow conditions at 420 K. Significant improvements in yield can be achieved by operating at higher temperatures, which render the site-blocking acrylates unstable.

  8. Simulation of Aldehyde Emissions from an Ethanol Fueled Spark Ignition Engine and Comparison with FTIR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros Zaránte, Paola Helena; Sodre, Jose Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model that calculates aldehyde emissions in the exhaust of a spark ignition engine fueled with ethanol. The numerical model for aldehyde emissions was developed using FORTRAN software, with the input data obtained from a dedicated engine cycle simulation software, AVL BOOST. The model calculates formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions, formed from the partial oxidation of methane, ethane and unburned ethanol. The calculated values were compared with experimental data obtained by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The experiments were performed with a mid-size sedan powered by a 1.4-liter spark ignition engine on a chassis dynamometer. In general, the results demonstrate that the concentrations of aldehydes and the source elements increased with engine speed and exhaust gas temperature. A reasonable agreement between simulated and measured values was achieved.

  9. Target-Specific Capture of Environmentally Relevant Gaseous Aldehydes and Carboxylic Acids with Functional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, McKenzie L; Guerra, Fernanda D; Dhulekar, Jhilmil; Alexis, Frank; Whitehead, Daniel C

    2015-10-12

    Aldehyde and carboxylic acid volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present significant environmental concern due to their prevalence in the atmosphere. We developed biodegradable functional nanoparticles comprised of poly(d,l-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ethyleneimine) (PDLLA-PEG-PEI) block co-polymers that capture these VOCs by chemical reaction. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) preparation involved nanoprecipitation and surface functionalization with branched PEI. The PDLLA-PEG-PEI NPs were characterized by using TGA, IR, (1) H NMR, elemental analysis, and TEM. The materials feature 1°, 2°, and 3° amines on their surface, capable of capturing aldehydes and carboxylic acids from gaseous mixtures. Aldehydes were captured by a condensation reaction forming imines, whereas carboxylic acids were captured by acid/base reaction. These materials reacted selectively with target contaminants obviating off-target binding when challenged by other VOCs with orthogonal reactivity. The NPs outperformed conventional activated carbon sorbents.

  10. Synthesis of (α,α-difluoropropargyl)phosphonates via aldehyde-to-alkyne homologation.

    PubMed

    Pajkert, Romana; Röschenthaler, Gerd-Volker

    2013-04-19

    An efficient synthetic methodology to a series of novel alkynes bearing a difluoromethylenephosphonate function via a Corey-Fuchs-type sequence starting from (diethoxyphosphoryl)difluoroacetic aldehyde is described. Dehydrobromination of the intermediate (3,3-dibromodifluoroallyl)phosphonate with potassium tert-butoxide gave rise to the corresponding bromoalkyne, whereas upon treatment with lithium base, the generation of ((diethoxyphosphoryl)difluoropropynyl)lithium has been achieved for the first time. The synthetic potential of this lithium reagent was further demonstrated by its reactions with selected electrophiles such as aldehydes, ketones, triflates, chlorophosphines, and chlorosilanes, leading to the corresponding propargyl phosphonates in good to excellent yields. However, in the case, of sterically hindered aldehydes, (α-fluoroallenyl)phosphonates were the solely isolated products.

  11. Palladium and platinum catalyzed addition of allylstannanes to aldehydes and imines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    1995-12-31

    The reaction of allylstannanes with aldehydes in THF was catalyzed by Pd(II) or Pt(II) complexes (10 mole %) either at room temperature or at reflux, giving the corresponding homoallyl alcohols in high to good yields. Among the catalysts examined, PtCl{sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} gave the best result. Aromatic, aliphatic, and {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes can be utilized and even cyclohexanone undergoes the allylation reaction. Allyl and methallyltributylstannane reacted very smoothly. Crotyltributylstannane also reacted with aldehydes to give the branched homoallyl alcohols in good yields, but the reaction speed was slower than that of allylstannane. Detailed mechanistic studies of the Pd(II) catalyzed allylation, using NMR spectra, revealed that bis-{pi}-allyl palladium 5 is a key intermediate for the catalytic cycle and it exhibits nucleophilic reactivity.

  12. Structurally simple pyridine N-oxides as efficient organocatalysts for the enantioselective allylation of aromatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, Luca; Benaglia, Maurizio; Annunziata, Rita; Cinquini, Mauro; Cozzi, Franco

    2006-02-17

    A series of structurally simple pyridine N-oxides have readily been assembled from inexpensive amino acids and tested as organocatalysts in the allylation of aldehydes with allyl(trichloro)silane to afford homoallylic alcohols. (S)-proline-based catalysts afforded the products derived from aromatic aldehydes in fair to good yields and in up to 84% enantiomeric excess (ee). The allylation of heteroaromatic, unsaturated, and aliphatic aldehydes was less satisfactory. By running the reaction in the presence of achiral and chiral additives and structurally different catalysts, we collected some insights into the relationship between the stereochemical outcome and the catalyst's structural features. Even if the ee's obtained are inferior to the best values observed with other catalysts, this work concurs to show that structurally simple pyridine N-oxides can also promote the allylation reaction with satisfactory stereocontrol.

  13. Vapour-phase gold-surface-mediated coupling of aldehydes with methanol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Liu, Xiaoying; Haubrich, Jan; Friend, Cynthia M

    2010-01-01

    Selective coupling of oxygenates is critical to many synthetic processes, including those necessary for the development of alternative fuels. We report a general process for selective coupling of aldehydes and methanol as a route to ester synthesis. All steps are mediated by oxygen-covered metallic gold nanoparticles on Au(111). Remarkably, cross-coupling of methanol with formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde and benzeneacetaldehyde to methyl esters is promoted by oxygen-covered Au(111) below room temperature with high selectivity. The high selectivity is attributed to the ease of nucleophilic attack of the aldehydes by the methoxy intermediate-formed from methanol on the surface-which yields the methyl esters. The competing combustion occurs via attack of both methanol and the aldehydes by oxygen. The mechanistic model constructed in this study provides insight into factors that control selectivity and clearly elucidates the crucial role of Au nanoparticles as active species in the catalytic oxidation of alcohols, even in solution.

  14. A catalytic reactor for the organocatalyzed enantioselective continuous flow alkylation of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Porta, Riccardo; Benaglia, Maurizio; Puglisi, Alessandra; Mandoli, Alessandro; Gualandi, Andrea; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    The use of immobilized metal-free catalysts offers the unique possibility to develop sustainable processes in flow mode. The challenging intermolecular organocatalyzed enantioselective alkylation of aldehydes was performed for the first time under continuous flow conditions. By using a packed-bed reactor filled with readily available supported enantiopure imidazolidinone, different aldehydes were treated with three distinct cationic electrophiles. In the organocatalyzed α-alkylation of aldehydes with 1,3-benzodithiolylium tetrafluoroborate, excellent enantioselectivities, in some cases even better than those obtained in the flask process (up to 95% ee at 25 °C), and high productivity (more than 3800 h(-1) ) were obtained, which thus shows that a catalytic reactor may continuously produce enantiomerically enriched compounds. Treatment of the alkylated products with Raney-nickel furnished enantiomerically enriched α-methyl derivatives, key intermediates for active pharmaceutical ingredients and natural products.

  15. Transition-metal-free coupling reaction of vinylcyclopropanes with aldehydes catalyzed by tin hydride.

    PubMed

    Ieki, Ryosuke; Kani, Yuria; Tsunoi, Shinji; Shibata, Ikuya

    2015-04-13

    Donor-acceptor cyclopropanes are useful building blocks for catalytic cycloaddition reactions with a range of electrophiles to give various cyclic products. In contrast, relatively few methods are available for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols through coupling of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) with aldehydes, even with transition-metal catalysts. Here, we report that the hydrostannation of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) was effectively promoted by dibutyliodotin hydride (Bu2 SnIH). The resultant allylic tin compounds reacted easily with aldehydes. Furthermore, the use of Bu2 SnIH was effectively catalytic in the presence of hydrosilane as a hydride source, which established a coupling reaction of VCPs with aldehydes for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols without the use of transition-metal catalysts. In contrast to conventional catalytic reactions of VCPs, the presented method allowed the use of several VCPs in addition to conventional donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  16. A peptide nucleic acid-aminosugar conjugate targeting transactivation response element of HIV-1 RNA genome shows a high bioavailability in human cells and strongly inhibits tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Das, Indrajit; Désiré, Jérôme; Manvar, Dinesh; Baussanne, Isabelle; Pandey, Virendra N; Décout, Jean-Luc

    2012-07-12

    The 6-aminoglucosamine ring of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B (ring II) was conjugated to a 16-mer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA. For this purpose, we prepared the aminoglucosamine monomer 15 and attached it to the protected PNA prior to its cleavage from the solid support. We found that the resulting PNA-aminoglucosamine conjugate is stable under acidic conditions, efficiently taken up by the human cells and fairly distributed in both cytosol and nucleus without endosomal entrapment because cotreatment with endosome-disrupting agent had no effect on its cellular distribution. The conjugate displayed very high target specificity in vitro and strongly inhibited Tat mediated transactivation of HIV-1 LTR transcription in a cell culture system. The unique properties of this new class of PNA conjugate suggest it to be a potential candidate for therapeutic application.

  17. Role of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in metabolism and toxicity of cysteine S-conjugates in rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Banki, K.; Elfarra, A.A.; Lash, L.H.; Anders, M.W.

    1986-05-01

    Several nephrotoxic cysteine S-conjugates are metabolized by renal cysteine conjugate ..beta..-lyase to thiols, which may release H/sub 2/S. The authors measured the rate of H/sub 2/S formation from S-conjugates with a colorimetric assay and compared the mitochondrial toxicity of H/sub 2/S and S-conjugates. H/sub 2/S formation from S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (CTFC) and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) was time- and concentration-dependent in cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat kidney cortex. With 5 mM substrate, the rate of H/sub 2/S formation from CTFC was 3.9 +/- 0.5 and 12.7 +/- 3.0 nmol/min per mg protein in mitochondria and cytosol, respectively; the corresponding rates with DCVC were 1.1 +/- 0.1 and 3.7 +/- 1.3. With S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-homocysteine (DCVHC), an extremely potent nephrotoxin, no H/sub 2/S formation was detected. Incubation of mitochondria with 1 mM DCVC or DCVHC for 2 h produced 60% and 70% inhibition, respectively, of state 3 respiration with succinate as the electron donor; with glutamate + malate or ascorbate + N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine as respiratory substrates, less than 20% inhibition was observed. Addition of Na/sub 2/S to respiring mitochrondria produced rapid and potent inhibition of state 3 respiration with all the above electron donors. These results show that H/sub 2/S is not a major metabolite of S-conjugates and that H/sub 2/S formation does not play a major role in S-conjugate-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Occupational Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in the U.S. Trucking Industry

    PubMed Central

    DAVIS, M. E.; BLICHARZ, A. P.; HART, J. E.; LADEN, F.; GARSHICK, E.; SMITH, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    Diesel exhaust is a complex chemical mixture that has been linked to lung cancer mortality in a number of epidemiologic studies. However, the dose–response relationship remains largely undefined, and the specific components responsible for carcinogenicity have not been identified. Although previous focus has been on the particulate phase, diesel exhaust includes a vapor phase of numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes that are either known or suspected carcinogens, such as 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and formaldehyde. However, there are relatively few studies that quantify exposure to VOCs and aldehydes in diesel-heavy and other exhaust-related microenvironments. As part of a nationwide assessment of exposure to diesel exhaust in the trucking industry, we collected measurements of VOCs and aldehydes at 15 different U.S. trucking terminals and in city truck drivers (with 6 repeat site visits), observing average shift concentrations in truck cabs and at multiple background and work area locations within each terminal. In this paper, we characterize occupational exposure to 18 different VOCs and aldehydes, as well as relationships with particulate mass (elemental carbon in PM < 1 μ m and PM2.5) across locations to determine source characteristics. Our results show that occupational exposure to VOCs and aldehydes varies significantly across the different sampling locations within each terminal, with significantly higher exposures noted in the work environments over background levels (p < 0.01). A structural equation model performed well in predicting terminal exposures to VOCs and aldehydes as a function of job, background levels, weather conditions, proximity to a major road, and geographic location (R2 = 0.2–0.4 work area; R2 = 0.5–0.9 background). PMID:17993162

  19. A fast sensor for in vivo quantification of cytosolic phosphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinrui; Sassen, Tom; ten Pierick, Angela; Ras, Cor; Heijnen, Joseph J; Wahl, Sebastian Aljoscha

    2015-05-01

    Eukaryotic metabolism consists of a complex network of enzymatic reactions and transport processes which are distributed over different subcellular compartments. Currently, available metabolite measurement protocols allow to measure metabolite whole cell amounts which hinder progress to describe the in vivo dynamics in different compartments, which are driven by compartment specific concentrations. Phosphate (Pi) is an essential component for: (1) the metabolic balance of upper and lower glycolytic flux; (2) Together with ATP and ADP determines the phosphorylation energy. Especially, the cytosolic Pi has a critical role in disregulation of glycolysis in tps1 knockout. Here we developed a method that enables us to monitor the cytosolic Pi concentration in S. cerevisiae using an equilibrium sensor reaction: maltose + Pi < = > glucose + glucose-1-phosphate. The required enzyme, maltose phosphorylase from L. sanfranciscensis was overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. With this reaction in place, the cytosolic Pi concentration was obtained from intracellular glucose, G1P and maltose concentrations. The cytosolic Pi concentration was determined in batch and chemostat (D = 0.1 h(-1) ) conditions, which was 17.88 µmol/gDW and 25.02 µmol/gDW, respectively under Pi-excess conditions. Under Pi-limited steady state (D = 0.1 h(-1) ) conditions, the cytosolic Pi concentration dropped to only 17.7% of the cytosolic Pi in Pi-excess condition (4.42 µmol/gDW vs. 25.02 µmol/gDW). In response to a Pi pulse, the cytosolic Pi increased very rapidly, together with the concentration of sugar phosphates. Main sources of the rapid Pi increase are vacuolar Pi (and not the polyPi), as well as Pi uptake from the extracellular space. The temporal increase of cytosolic Pi increases the driving force of GAPDH reaction of the lower glycolytic reactions. The novel cytosol specific Pi concentration measurements provide new insight into the thermodynamic driving force for ATP hydrolysis, GAPDH

  20. Growth inhibition of cytosolic Salmonella by caspase-1 and caspase-11 precedes host cell death

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Teresa L. M.; Matthews, Sophie A.; Jennings, Elliott; Alix, Eric; Shao, Feng; Shenoy, Avinash R.; Birrell, Mark A.; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Sensing bacterial products in the cytosol of mammalian cells by NOD-like receptors leads to the activation of caspase-1 inflammasomes, and the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-18 and IL-1β. In addition, mouse caspase-11 (represented in humans by its orthologs, caspase-4 and caspase-5) detects cytosolic bacterial LPS directly. Activation of caspase-1 and caspase-11 initiates pyroptotic host cell death that releases potentially harmful bacteria from the nutrient-rich host cell cytosol into the extracellular environment. Here we use single cell analysis and time-lapse microscopy to identify a subpopulation of host cells, in which growth of cytosolic Salmonella Typhimurium is inhibited independently or prior to the onset of cell death. The enzymatic activities of caspase-1 and caspase-11 are required for growth inhibition in different cell types. Our results reveal that these proteases have important functions beyond the direct induction of pyroptosis and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in the control of growth and elimination of cytosolic bacteria. PMID:27808091

  1. Micrometer-Scale Membrane Transition of Supported Lipid Bilayer Membrane Reconstituted with Cytosol of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kei; Toyota, Taro

    2017-01-01

    Background: The transformation of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membrane by extracted cytosol from living resources, has recently drawn much attention. It enables us to address the question of whether the purified phospholipid SLB membrane, including lipids related to amoeba locomotion, which was discussed in many previous studies, exhibits membrane deformation in the presence of cytosol extracted from amoeba; Methods: In this report, a method for reconstituting a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membrane, composed of purified phospholipids and cytosol extracted from Dictyostelium discoideum, is described. This technique is a new reconstitution method combining the artificial constitution of membranes with the reconstitution using animate cytosol (without precise purification at a molecular level), contributing to membrane deformation analysis; Results: The morphology transition of a SLB membrane composed of phosphatidylcholines, after the addition of cytosolic extract, was traced using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. As a result, pore formation in the SLB membrane was observed and phosphatidylinositides incorporated into the SLB membrane tended to suppress pore formation and expansion; Conclusions: The current findings imply that phosphatidylinositides have the potential to control cytoplasm activity and bind to a phosphoinositide-containing SLB membrane. PMID:28272354

  2. Cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolases are immunologically distinguishable from each other in the rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Hammock, B D; Vogel, U; Oesch, F

    1981-04-10

    Antibodies raised to homogeneous rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase were used to distinguish microsomal epoxide hydrolase from epoxide hydrolase of cytosolic origin in mice and rats. Using double diffusion analysis in agarose gels, we show that anti-rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase forms a single precipitin line with solubilized microsomes from rat and mouse liver, but no reaction is seen with the corresponding cytosolic fractions. Rat or mouse microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity (using benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide as substrate) can be completely precipitated out of solubilized preparations by the antibody, which is equipotent against rat and mouse microsomal epoxide hydrolase. No precipitation of cytosolic hydrolase activity (using trans-beta-ethyl styrene oxide as substrate) is seen with any concentration of the antibody tested. Thus, in the case of microsomal epoxide hydrolase, extensive immunological cross-reactivity exists between the two species, rat and mouse. In contrast, no cross-reactivity is detectable between cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolase, even when enzymes from the same species are compared. We conclude that microsomal and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activities represent distinct and immunologically non-cross-reactive protein species.

  3. Cytosolic Ca(2+) Signals Enhance the Vacuolar Ion Conductivity of Bulging Arabidopsis Root Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Dindas, Julian; Rienmüller, Florian; Krebs, Melanie; Waadt, Rainer; Schumacher, Karin; Wu, Wei-Hua; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-11-02

    Plant cell expansion depends on the uptake of solutes across the plasma membrane and their storage within the vacuole. In contrast to the well-studied plasma membrane, little is known about the regulation of ion transport at the vacuolar membrane. We therefore established an experimental approach to study vacuolar ion transport in intact Arabidopsis root cells, with multi-barreled microelectrodes. The subcellular position of electrodes was detected by imaging current-injected fluorescent dyes. Comparison of measurements with electrodes in the cytosol and vacuole revealed an average vacuolar membrane potential of -31 mV. Voltage clamp recordings of single vacuoles resolved the activity of voltage-independent and slowly deactivating channels. In bulging root hairs that express the Ca(2+) sensor R-GECO1, rapid elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was observed, after impalement with microelectrodes, or injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. Elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level stimulated the activity of voltage-independent channels in the vacuolar membrane. Likewise, the vacuolar ion conductance was enhanced during a sudden increase of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in cells injected with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator FURA-2. These data thus show that cytosolic Ca(2+) signals can rapidly activate vacuolar ion channels, which may prevent rupture of the vacuolar membrane, when facing mechanical forces.

  4. Structural model of the cytosolic domain of the plant ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1).

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-30

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants.

  5. Separate nuclear genes encode cytosolic and mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Troll, H; Winckler, T; Lascu, I; Müller, N; Saurin, W; Véron, M; Mutzel, R

    1993-12-05

    We have previously isolated cDNA clones for the gip17 gene encoding the cytosolic nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, and partial cDNAs for guk, a second member of the NDP kinase gene family (Wallet, V., Mutzel, R., Troll, H., Barzu, O., Wurster, B., Véron, M., and Lacombe, M. L. (1990) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80, 1199-1202). We now characterize genomic DNA clones for both NDP kinase genes, and we show that guk defines a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial NDP kinase. Isolated D. discoideum mitochondria contain 3% of the total cellular NDP kinase activity. Antibodies which specifically recognize and inhibit the activity of either cytosolic or mitochondrial NDP kinase unambiguously distinguish between these activities. The nascent mitochondrial NDP kinase contains a presequence of 57 amino acids that is removed during import into the organelle as shown by determination of the NH2 terminus of the mature protein from mitochondria. The genes for mitochondrial and cytosolic NDP kinases contain four and two introns, respectively. The positions of the of the introns in the gene for the cytosolic enzyme match exactly the positions of the second and fourth introns in the coding region of its mitochondrial homologue. From these results we conclude that the isozymes diverged from a common ancestor, and we discuss possible phylogenetic pathways for the evolution of cytosolic and organelle NDP kinases.

  6. Enantioselective Multicomponent Condensation Reactions of Phenols, Aldehydes, and Boronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Keith S; Luan, Yi; Ramella, Daniele; Panek, James S; Schaus, Scott E

    2015-12-04

    Chiral diols and biphenols catalyze the multicomponent condensation reaction of phenols, aldehydes, and alkenyl or aryl boronates. The condensation products are formed in good yields and enantioselectivities. The reaction proceeds via an initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the aldehyde and phenol to yield an ortho-quinone methide that undergoes an enantioselective boronate addition. A cyclization pathway was discovered while exploring the scope of the reaction that provides access to chiral 2,4-diaryl chroman products, the core of which is a structural motif found in natural products.

  7. Paternò-Büchi reaction between furan and heterocyclic aldehydes: oxetane formation vs. metathesis.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco; Viggiani, Licia

    2010-08-01

    The photochemical reaction of 2-substituted heterocyclic aldehydes with furan gave the corresponding exo oxetane derivatives through the excited triplet state. However, in situ the oxetane derivatives were converted through a metathesis reaction into the corresponding Z,E-butadienyl formate derivatives. On the contrary, 3-substituted heterocyclic aldehydes gave the corresponding exo oxetane derivatives. The effect of 2-substituted heterocyclic ring in order to facilitate the metathesis reaction is explained considering the possible participation of the pi aromatic orbitals in the oxetane C-O bond cleavage.

  8. Allylation of aldehydes and imines: promoted by reuseable polymer-supported sulfonamide of N-glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-long; Zhao, Gang

    2006-02-16

    [reaction: see text] A allylation of aldehydes and imines (generated in situ from aldehydes and amines) with allyltributyltin promoted by recoverable and reusable the polymer-supported sulfonamide of N-glycine has been developed. Good to high yields were obtained in various cases. Most of the SnBu(3) residue can be recovered as Bu(3)SnCl. Highly stereoselective synthesis of N-Boc-(2S,3S)-3-hydroxy-2-phenylpiperidine 7 was achieved by using the P4a-mediated allylation of Boc-l-phenylglycinal as a key step.

  9. Semi-catalytic reduction of secondary amides to imines and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2014-06-21

    Secondary amides can be reduced by silane HSiMe2Ph into imines and aldehydes by a two-stage process involving prior conversion of amides into iminoyl chlorides followed by catalytic reduction mediated by the ruthenium complex [Cp(i-Pr3P)Ru(NCCH3)2]PF6 (1). Alkyl and aryl amides bearing halogen, ketone, and ester groups were converted with moderate to good yields under mild reaction conditions to the corresponding imines and aldehydes. This procedure does not work for substrates bearing the nitro-group and fails for heteroaromatic amides. In the case of cyano substituted amides, the cyano group is reduced to imine.

  10. Synthesis of chiral alpha-amino aldehydes linked by their amine function to solid support.

    PubMed

    Cantel, Sonia; Heitz, Annie; Martinez, Jean; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain

    2004-09-01

    The anchoring of an alpha-amino-acid derivative by its amine function on to a solid support allows some chemical reactions starting from the carboxylic acid function. This paper describes the preparation of alpha-amino aldehydes linked to the support by their amine function. This was performed by reduction with LiAlH4 of the corresponding Weinreb amide linked to the resin. The aldehydes obtained were then involved in Wittig or reductive amination reactions. In addition, the linked Weinreb amide was reacted with methylmagnesium bromide to yield the corresponding ketone. After cleavage from the support, the compounds were obtained in good to excellent yields and characterized.

  11. Transition metal free catalytic hydroboration of aldehydes and aldimines by amidinato silane.

    PubMed

    Bisai, Milan Kumar; Pahar, Sanjukta; Das, Tamal; Vanka, Kumar; Sen, Sakya S

    2017-02-21

    The transition metal free catalytic hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones is very limited and has not been reported with a well-defined silicon(iv) compound. Therefore, we chose to evaluate the previously reported silicon(iv) hydride [PhC(NtBu)2SiHCl2], (1) as a single component catalyst and found that it catalyzes the reductive hydroboration of a range of aldehydes with pinacolborane (HBpin) under ambient conditions. In addition, compound 1 can catalyze imine hydroboration. DFT calculation was carried out to understand the mechanism.

  12. Evolution of Research on the DNA Adduct Chemistry of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine and Related Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Wang, Mingyao

    2011-01-01

    This perspective reviews our work on the identification of DNA adducts of N-nitrosopyrrolidine and some related aldehydes. The research began as a focused project to investigate mechanisms of cyclic nitrosamine carcinogenesis but expanded into other areas as aldehyde metabolites of NPYR were shown to have their own diverse DNA adduct chemistry. A total of 69 structurally distinct DNA adducts were identified and some of these, found in human tissues, have provided intriguing leads for investigating carcinogenesis mechanisms in humans due to exposure to both endogenous and exogenous agents. PMID:21480629

  13. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  14. Enantioselective Ethylation of Various Aldehydes Catalyzed by Readily Accessible Chiral Diols.

    PubMed

    Gök, Yaşar; Kiliçarslan, Seda; Gök, Halil Zeki; Karayiğit, İlker Ümit

    2016-08-01

    Four chiral C2 -symmetric diols were synthesized in a straightforward three-step reaction and demonstrated excellent enantioselectivities and good overall yields. Their catalytic activities were examined via the addition of diethylzinc to various aldehydes. The enantioselective addition of diethylzinc to 2-methoxybenzaldehyde gave the corresponding chiral secondary alcohol with high yields (up to 95%) and moderate to good enantiomeric excess (up to 88%). All synthesized ligands were evaluated in the addition of diethylzinc to various aldehydes in the presence of an additional metal such as Ti(IV) complexes. Chirality 28:593-598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Enantioselective Multicomponent Condensation Reactions of Phenols, Aldehydes, and Boronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Keith S.; Luan, Yi; Ramella, Daniele; Panek, James S.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Chiral diols and biphenols catalyze the multicomponent condensation reaction of phenols, aldehydes, and alkenyl or aryl boronates. The condensation products are formed in good yields and enantioselectivities. The reaction proceeds via an initial Friedel Crafts alkylation of the aldehyde and phenol to yield an ortho-quinone methide that undergoes an enantioselective boronate addition. A cyclization pathway was discovered while exploring the scope of the reaction that provides access to chiral 2,4-diaryl chroman products, the core of which is a structural motif found in natural products. PMID:26576776

  16. Effects of the biodiesel blend fuel on aldehyde emissions from diesel engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chien, Shu-Mei

    Interest in use of biodiesel fuels derived from vegetable oils or animal fats as alternative fuels for petroleum-based diesels has increased due to biodiesels having similar properties of those of diesels, and characteristics of renewability, biodegradability and potential beneficial effects on exhaust emissions. Generally, exhaust emissions of regulated pollutants are widely studied and the results favor biodiesels on CO, HC and particulate emissions; however, limited and inconsistent data are showed for unregulated pollutants, such as carbonyl compounds, which are also important indicators for evaluating available vehicle fuels. For better understanding biodiesel, this study examines the effects of the biodiesel blend fuel on aldehyde chemical emissions from diesel engine exhausts in comparison with those from the diesel fuel. Test engines (Mitsubishi 4M40-2AT1) with four cylinders, a total displacement of 2.84 L, maximum horsepower of 80.9 kW at 3700 rpm, and maximum torque of 217.6 N m at 2000 rpm, were mounted and operated on a Schenck DyNAS 335 dynamometer. Exhaust emission tests were performed several times for each fuel under the US transient cycle protocol from mileages of 0-80,000 km with an interval of 20,000 km, and two additional measurements were carried out at 40,000 and 80,000 km after maintenance, respectively. Aldehyde samples were collected from diluted exhaust by using a constant volume sampling system. Samples were extracted and analyzed by the HPLC/UV system. Dominant aldehydes of both fuels' exhausts are formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. These compounds together account for over 75% of total aldehyde emissions. Total aldehyde emissions for B20 (20% waste cooking oil biodiesel and 80% diesel) and diesel fuels are in the ranges of 15.4-26.9 mg bhp-h -1 and 21.3-28.6 mg bhp-h -1, respectively. The effects of increasing mileages and maintenance practice on aldehyde emissions are insignificant for both fuels. B20 generates slightly less emission than

  17. The Tcp conjugation system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Rood, Julian I

    2017-03-07

    The Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens possesses a family of large conjugative plasmids that is typified by the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. Since these plasmids may carry antibiotic resistance genes or genes encoding extracellular or sporulation-associated toxins, the conjugative transfer of these plasmids appears to be important for the epidemiology of C. perfringens-mediated diseases. Sequence analysis of members of this plasmid family identified a highly conserved 35kb region that encodes proteins with various functions, including plasmid replication and partitioning. The tcp conjugation locus also was identified in this region, initially based on low-level amino acid sequence identity to conjugation proteins from the integrative conjugative element Tn916. Genetic studies confirmed that the tcp locus is required for conjugative transfer and combined with biochemical and structural analyses have led to the development of a functional model of the Tcp conjugation apparatus. This review summarises our current understanding of the Tcp conjugation system, which is now one of the best-characterized conjugation systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Phononic Phase Conjugation in an Optomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, Lukas; Wright, Ewan; Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    We study theoretically the phase conjugation of a phononic field in an optomechanical system with two mechanical modes coupled to a common optical field. Phase conjugation becomes the dominant process for an appropriate choice of driving field parameters, and he effective coupling coefficients between phonon modes can result in amplification and entanglement, phase-conjugation or a mixture thereof. We discuss surprising consequences of mechanical phase-conjugation that could lead to the preparation of mechanical states with negative temperature, the improvement of quantum memories and the study of the quantum-classical transition. Supported by DARPA ORCHID program.

  19. Electrochemical spectroscopy of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    Conjugated polymers become conductors when they are doped (oxidized or reduced). The initial work was done on conducting polymers by three Nobel laureates (A. J. Heeger, H. Shirakawa, and A. G. MacDiarmid) in 1977. They discovered an increase by nearly 10 orders of magnitude in the electrical conductivity of polyacetylene when it was doped with iodine or other acceptors. Conjugated polymers have been studied intensively since that time because of their high conductivity, reversible doping and low-dimensional geometry. Doping causes electronic structure changes which have numerous potential applications. We have studied three thiophene derivative polymers: poly (3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene) (PEDOT), poly (3,4-propylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOT), and poly (3,4-dimethylpropylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOTMe2). Two types of samples were used for this study. The first was a thin polymer film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slide. The polymer film was deposited on a metallic ITO surface by an electrochemical method. We measured reflectance and transmittance of the sample. The data were analyzed by modeling all layers of this multi-layer thin film structure, using the Drude-Lorentz model for each layer. We calculated the optical constants from the modeling results and obtained information on the electronic structure of the neutral and doped polymers. Conjugated polymers can be reversibly doped in an electrochemical cell. The doping causes optical absorption bands to move from one optical frequency to another frequency. To study this behavior, we prepared another type of sample. First, a thin polymer film was deposited on a gold-coated Mylar film by the same electrochemical method. Then, we built electrochromic cells with an infrared transparent window, using the polymer films on the gold/Mylar strips as electrodes. We connected the cell to an electrical supply. As we change the cell voltage (potential difference between the two electrodes), we can change the doping

  20. 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F) is the standard vaccine for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal infections in infants and children under 5 years of age. A 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (with the addition of valences 1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F and 19A) has now been authorised to replace the 7-valent vaccine within the European Union. This new vaccine, adapted to recent epidemiological data on invasive pneumococcal infections, is supposed to cover at least 80% of pneumococcal infections in Europe. The protective potency of the 13-valent vaccine has not yet been tested in clinical trials. Clinical evaluation is based on two immunogenicity studies, in which the immunogenic potency of the 13-valent vaccine was similar to that of the 7-valent vaccine for their shared serotypes, but lower for serotypes 3, 6B and 9V. For these last two serotypes and for the new serotypes, the usual target antibody titre was reached after a booster injection. This was not the case for valence 3. * The vaccine used in immunogenicity studies did not contain polysorbate 80 (an excipient), and a non-inferiority study of the marketed vaccine containing polysorbate 80 was therefore conducted in 500 children. Non-inferiority was established for all 13 valences after the booster injection, but not for valences 6B and 23F after primary vaccination. According to the results of 10 studies, simultaneous administration of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine does not affect the immunogenicity of other vaccines generally administered before the age of 5 years. Other immunogenicity studies support the use of a variety of vaccine schedules for infants and children under 5 years of age who have not yet been vaccinated or who have started vaccination with the 7-valent vaccine. Increasing the number of valences in the vaccine from 7 to 13 led to no marked increase in local adverse effects (hypersensitivity, indurations, erythema) or systemic reactions

  1. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  2. Optimisation of the dibromomaleimide (DBM) platform for native antibody conjugation by accelerated post-conjugation hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Morais, Maurício; Nunes, João P M; Karu, Kersti; Forte, Nafsika; Benni, Irene; Smith, Mark E B; Caddick, Stephen; Chudasama, Vijay; Baker, James R

    2017-04-05

    Disulfide bridging offers a convenient approach to generate site-selective antibody conjugates from native antibodies. To optimise the reagents available to achieve this strategy, we describe here the use of dibromomaleimides designed to undergo accelerated post-conjugation hydrolysis. Conjugation and hydrolysis, which serve to 'lock' the conjugates as robustly stable maleamic acids, is achieved in just over 1 h. This dramatic acceleration is also shown to infer significant improvements in homogeneity, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry analysis.

  3. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Nevoigt, Elke; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-11-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH.

  4. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening.

  5. Metal exposures to native populations of the caddisfly Hydropsyche (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) determined from cytosolic and whole body metal concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, D.J.; Luoma, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    Metal concentrations of the soluble fraction of the cytoplasm (cytosol) and the whole body were determined in the caddisfly Hydropsyche spp. (Trichoptera). Metal accumulation in the cytosol and the whole body were compared in samples collected along 380 kms of a contamination gradient in the Clark Fork river in four consecutive years (1992-1995), and from a contaminated tributary (Flint Creek). Samples from the contaminated sites were compared to an uncontaminated tributary (Blackfoot River). Relations between cytosolic metal concentration and cytosolic protein (used as a general biomarker of protein metabolism) also were examined in 1994 and 1995. Relative to whole body concentrations, cytosolic metal concentrations varied among metals and years. Spatial patterns in whole body and cytosolic Cd, Cu and Pb concentrations were qualitatively similar each year, and these concentrations generally corresponded to contamination levels measured in bed sediments. The proportions of metals recovered in the cytosol of ranged from 12 to 64% for Cd and Cu and from 2 to 38% for Pb. Zinc in the whole body also was consistent with contamination levels, but cytosolic Zn concentrations increased only at the highest whole body Zn concentrations. As a result, the proportion of Zn recovered in the cytosol ranged from 16 to 63% and tended to be inversely related to whole body Zn concentrations. The proportions of cytosolic metals varied significantly among years and, as a result, interannual differences in metal concentrations were greater in the cytosol than in the whole body. The results demonstrated that Hydropsyche in the river were chronically exposed to biologically available metals. Some features of this exposure were not evident from whole body concentrations. In general, protein levels did not correspond to cytosolic metal concentrations. A variety of environmental factors could interact with metal exposures to produce complex responses in protein metabolism. Systematic study

  6. Substrate specificity of guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase and bovine milk xanthine oxidase for methyl- and nitrobenzaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kouretas, Demetrios; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2006-01-01

    Both aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of N-heterocycles and aldehydes. These enzymes are important in the oxidation of N-heterocyclic xenobiotics, whereas their role in the oxidation of xenobiotic aldehydes is usually ignored. The present investigation describes the interaction of methyl- and nitrosubstituted benzaldehydes, in the ortho-, meta- and parapositions, with guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase and bovine milk xanthine oxidase. The kinetic constants showed that most substituted benzaldehydes are excellent substrates of aldehyde oxidase with lower affinities for xanthine oxidase. Low Km values for aldehyde oxidase were observed with most benzaldehydes tested, with 3-nitrobenzaldehyde having the lowest Km value and 3-methylbenzaldehyde being the best substrate in terms of substrate efficiency (Ks). Additionally, low Km values for xanthine oxidase were found with most benzaldehydes tested. However, all benzaldehydes also had low Vmax values, which made them poor substrates of xanthine oxidase. It is therefore possible that aldehyde oxidase may be critical in the oxidation of xenobiotic and endobiotic derived aldehydes and its role in such reactions should not be ignored.

  7. Kinetics of forming aldehydes in frying oils and their distribution in French fries revealed by LC-MS-based chemometrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehydes are major secondary lipid oxidation products (LOPs) from heating vegetable oils and deep frying. The routes and reactions that generate aldehydes have been extensively investigated, but the sequences and kinetics of their formation in oils are poorly defined. In this study, a platform comb...

  8. Fluorescence lifetime analysis and effect of magnesium ions on binding of NADH to human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence ALDH1 activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity to the enzyme thus reducing activity. By using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we have resolved t...

  9. Direct access to ketones from aldehydes via rhodium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction with potassium trifluoro(organo)borates.

    PubMed

    Pucheault, Mathieu; Darses, Sylvain; Genet, Jean-Pierre

    2004-12-01

    A direct cross-coupling reaction of aromatic aldehydes with potassium trifluoro(organo)borates afforded ketones in high yields and under mild conditions in the presence of a rhodium catalyst and acetone. This new reaction, involving a formal aldehyde C-H bond activation, is believed to proceed via a Heck-type mechanism followed by hydride transfer to acetone.

  10. Quantification of aldehyde terminated heparin by SEC-MALLS-UV for the surface functionalization of polycaprolactone biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Scott A; Steele, Terry W J; Bhuthalingam, Ramya; Li, Min; Boujday, Souhir; Prawirasatya, Melissa; Neoh, Koon Gee; Boey, Freddy Yin Chiang; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2015-08-01

    A straight forward strategy of heparin surface grafting employs a terminal reactive-aldehyde group introduced through nitrous acid depolymerization. An advanced method that allows simultaneously monitoring of both heparin molar mass and monomer/aldehyde ratio by size exclusion chromatography, multi-angle laser light scattering and UV-absorbance (SEC-MALLS-UV) has been developed to improve upon heparin surface grafting. Advancements over older methods allow quantitative characterization by direct (aldehyde absorbance) and indirect (Schiff-based absorbance) evaluation of terminal functional aldehydes. The indirect quantitation of functional aldehydes through labeling with aniline (and the formation of a Schiff-base) allows independent quantitation of both polymer mass and terminal functional groups with the applicable UV mass extinction coefficients determined. The protocol was subsequently used to synthesize an optimized heparin-aldehyde that had minimal polydispersity (PDI<2) and high reaction yields (yield >60% by mass). The 8 kDa weight averaged molar mass heparin-aldehyde was then grafted on polycaprolactone (PCL), a common implant material. This optimized heparin-aldehyde retained its antithrombin activity, assessed in freshly drawn blood or surface immobilized on PCL films. Anticoagulant activity was equal to or better than the 24 kDa unmodified heparin it was fragmented from.

  11. Specific Mechanical and Structural Responses of Cortical and Cytosolic Cytoskeleton in Living Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Valérie M.; Fodil, Redouane; Cañadas, Patrick; Planus, Emmanuelle; Isabey, Daniel

    We studied the relation between actin structural changes and cytoskeleton mechanical properties in living adherent epithelial alveolar cells, before and during actin depolymerization. The mechanical response of adherent alveolar epithelial cells was measured using magnetic twisting cytometry and a two-component model representing the cortical and the cytosolic elastic components at equilibrium. Chemiluminescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton was performed in the same living cells to estimate the intracellular actin density distribution for each cytoskeleton component. We found that (i) cytoskeleton alterations induced by actin depolymerization differed between the cortical and cytosolic cytoskeleton components (e.g., -30% and -49%, respectively, at a stress of 31 Pa) and that (ii) the concomitant change in actin distribution was also different (e.g., actin volume decrease was -7% and -19% for the cortical and cytosolic components, respectively).

  12. Listeria monocytogenes that lyse in the macrophage cytosol trigger AIM2-mediated pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E.; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the mechanisms by which host cells detect cytosolic invasion by intracellular pathogens, a genetic screen was performed to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death. A mutation in lmo2473 resulted in hyper-stimulation of host cell death and IL-1β secretion (pyroptosis) following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or induced to lyse by treatment with ampicillin stimulated pyroptosis. Pyroptosis was independent of the Nlrp3 and Nlrc4 receptors, but dependent on ASC and AIM2. Importantly, wild type L. monocytogenes were also found to lyse, albeit at low levels, and trigger AIM2-dependent pyroptosis. Since AIM2 is activated by DNA, these data suggested that pyroptosis is triggered by bacterial DNA released during lysis. PMID:20417169

  13. Mg2+ mediates interaction between the voltage sensor and cytosolic domain to activate BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Hu, Lei; Shi, Jingyi; Delaloye, Kelli; Horrigan, Frank T; Cui, Jianmin

    2007-11-13

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes is critical for cellular responses to membrane potential. The VSD can also be regulated by interaction with intracellular proteins and ligands, but how this occurs is poorly understood. Here, we show that the VSD of the BK-type K(+) channel is regulated by a state-dependent interaction with its own tethered cytosolic domain that depends on both intracellular Mg(2+) and the open state of the channel pore. Mg(2+) bound to the cytosolic RCK1 domain enhances VSD activation by electrostatic interaction with Arg-213 in transmembrane segment S4. Our results demonstrate that a cytosolic domain can come close enough to the VSD to regulate its activity electrostatically, thereby elucidating a mechanism of Mg(2+)-dependent activation in BK channels and suggesting a general pathway by which intracellular factors can modulate the function of voltage-dependent proteins.

  14. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat levator ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both levator ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in levator ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.

  15. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  16. Genome-derived cytosolic DNA contributes to type I interferon expression and immunogenicity of B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu J; Ho, Samantha S W; Tan, Nikki Y; Koo, Christine Xing'Er; Khatoo, Muznah; Cheung, Florence S G; Gasser, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    We recently provided evidence that genome-derived DNA is present in the cytosol of many tumor cells. Genomic loci that give rise to cytosolic DNA can potentially form non-B DNA structures including triple-stranded RNA:DNA structures (R-loops). The RNA:DNA-specific endonuclease RNaseh1 reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA and type I interferon-dependent rejection of B-cell lymphoma suggesting that cytosolic DNA may contribute to immune surveillance of B-cell lymphoma.

  17. Glutaredoxin GRXS17 Associates with the Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Astrid Nagels; Ritter, Andrés; Klassen, Roland; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Leidel, Sebastian A.; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (GRXs) are required in iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster delivery and iron sensing in yeast and mammals. In plants, it is unclear whether they have similar functions. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a sole class II cytosolic monothiol GRX encoded by GRXS17. Here, we used tandem affinity purification to establish that Arabidopsis GRXS17 associates with most known cytosolic Fe-S assembly (CIA) components. Similar to mutant plants with defective CIA components, grxs17 loss-of-function mutants showed some degree of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and elevated expression of DNA damage marker genes. We also found that several putative Fe-S client proteins directly bind to GRXS17, such as XANTHINE DEHYDROGENASE1 (XDH1), involved in the purine salvage pathway, and CYTOSOLIC THIOURIDYLASE SUBUNIT1 and CYTOSOLIC THIOURIDYLASE SUBUNIT2, both essential for the 2-thiolation step of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) modification of tRNAs. Correspondingly, profiling of the grxs17-1 mutant pointed to a perturbed flux through the purine degradation pathway and revealed that it phenocopied mutants in the elongator subunit ELO3, essential for the mcm5 tRNA modification step, although we did not find XDH1 activity or tRNA thiolation to be markedly reduced in the grxs17-1 mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that plant cytosolic monothiol GRXs associate with the CIA complex, as in other eukaryotes, and contribute to, but are not essential for, the correct functioning of client Fe-S proteins in unchallenged conditions. PMID:27503603

  18. Single domain antibodies for the knockdown of cytosolic and nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Böldicke, Thomas

    2017-03-08

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) from camels or sharks comprise only the variable heavy chain domain. Human sdAbs comprise the variable domain of the heavy chain (VH) or light chain (VL) and can be selected from human antibodies. SdAbs are stable, non aggregating molecules in vitro and in vivo compared to complete antibodies and scFv fragments. They are excellent novel inhibitors of cytosolic/nuclear proteins because they are correctly folded inside the cytosol in contrast to scFv fragments. SdAbs are unique because of their excellent specificity and possibility to target posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation sites, conformers or interaction regions of proteins that cannot be targeted with genetic knockout techniques and are impossible to knockdown with RNAi. The number of inhibiting cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs is increasing and usage of synthetic single pot single domain libraries will boost the generation of these fascinating molecules without the need of immunization. The most frequently selected antigenic epitopes belong to viral and oncogenic proteins, followed by toxins, proteins of the nervous system as well as plant- and drosophila proteins. It is now possible to select functional sdAbs against virtually every cytosolic/nuclear protein and desired epitope. The development of new endosomal escape protein domains and cell-penetrating peptides for efficient transfection broaden the application of inhibiting sdAbs. Last but not least, the generation of relatively new cell-specific nanoparticles such as polymersomes and polyplexes carrying cytosolic/nuclear sdAb-DNA or -protein will pave the way to apply cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs for inhibition of viral infection and cancer in the clinic. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 in cytokine-stimulated prostaglandin release by human gallbladder cells.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, E M; Longo, W E; Mazuski, J E; Panesar, N; Kaminski, D L

    2000-01-01

    Eicosanoids are involved in gallbladder inflammation, epithelial water transport, and mucous secretion. Phospholipase Asubscript2 enzymes liberate arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids for the synthesis of eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of selective cytoplasmic and secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitors on basal and stimulated arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release in gallbladder cells. Western immunoblotting was employed to evaluate both cytosolic and secretory phospholipase A2 enzymes in human gallbladder cells. Cells were incubated for 22 hours with (3)H-labeled arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release was then measured in the supernate after 2 hours of exposure to human interleukin-1beta, alone or after pretreatment for 1 hour with the inhibitors. Unstimulated gallbladder cells express both 85 kDa cytosolic and 14 kDa secretory phospholipase A2++. The 85 kDa phospholipase A2 was induced by interleukin-1beta, whereas there was no apparent change in secretory phospholipase A2 enzyme concentrations. Both the secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor p-bromophenylacyl bromide and the cytosolic phospholipase A2 inhibitor arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone decreased basal and interleukin-1beta-stimulated arachidonic acid release. In contrast, only inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A2 led to a decrease in interleukin-1beta-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release. Basal and interleukin-1beta-stimulated arachidonic acid release appears to be the result of the activity of both cytosolic and secretory phospholipase A2. Interleukin-1beta-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release appears to be dependent on the activity of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

  20. Hyaluronan in cytosol--microinjection-based probing of its existence and suggested functions.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Hanna; Rilla, Kirsi; Kärnä, Riikka; Bart, Genevieve; Jing, Wei; Haller, Michael F; DeAngelis, Paul L; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2013-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a large glycosaminoglycan produced by hyaluronan synthases (HAS), enzymes normally active at plasma membrane. While HA is delivered into the extracellular space, intracellular HA is also seen, mostly in vesicular structures, but there are also reports on its presence in the cytosol and specific locations and functions there. We probed the possibility of HA localization and functions in cytosol by microinjecting fluorescent HA binding complex (fHABC), HA fragments and hyaluronidase (HYAL) into cytosol. Microinjection of fHABC did not reveal HA-specific intracellular binding sites. Likewise, specific cytosolic binding sites for HA were not detected, as microinjected fluorescent HA composed of 4-8 monosaccharide units (HA4-HA8) were evenly distributed throughout the cells, including the nucleus, but excluded from membrane-bound organelles. The largest HA tested (∼HA120 or ∼25 kDa) did not enter the nucleus, and HA10-HA28 were progressively excluded from parts of nuclei resembling nucleoli. In contrast, HA oligosaccharides endocytosed from medium remained in vesicular compartments. The activity of HA synthesis was estimated by measuring the HA coat on green fluorescent protein (GFP)-HAS3-transfected MCF-7 cells. Microinjection of HA4 reduced coat size at 4 h, but increased at 24 h after injection, while larger HA-oligosaccharides and HYAL had no influence. As a positive control, microinjection of glucose increased coat size. In summary, no evidence for the presence or function of HA in cytosol was obtained. Also, the synthesis of HA and the active site of HAS were not accessible to competition, binding and degradation by cytosolic effectors, while synthesis responded to increased substrate supply.

  1. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  2. Photoluminescence of Conjugated Star Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Prigodin, N. V.; Epstein, A. J.; Wang, F.

    2000-10-01

    Higher dimensionality "star" polymers provide new properties beyond those found in their linear analogs. They have been used to improving electronic properties for nonlinear optics through exciton transfer and molecular antenna structures for example (M. Kawa, J. M. J. Frechet, Chem. Mater. 10, 286 (1998).). We report on photoluminescence properties of star polymers with a hyperbranched core (both hyperbranched phenlyene and hyperbranched triphenylamine) and polyhexylthiophene arms. The arm is a conjugated oligomer of polythiophene that has been investigated extensively for metallic like conductivity when doped as well as utilized in field effect transistors in its undoped form (A. Tsumara, H. Koezuka, T. Ando, Appl. Phys. Lett. 49, 1210 (1986).). The cores are respectively, a nonconjugated polymer in the case of hyperbranched phenlyene and a conjugated polymer in the case of hyperbranched triphenylamine. The photoluminesce spectrum (λ_max at 575 nm) is identical for both star polymers with the two electronically different hyperbranched cores and for linear polythiophene alone. We conclude the wave functions of the core and arms do not strongly interact to form states different from their individual states and excitons formed on the hyperbranched cores migrate to the lower bandgap polythiophene before recombining.

  3. Spatial Ca(2+) profiling: decrypting the universal cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B

    2016-11-17

    Stimulation of cell-surface receptors that couple to phospholipase C to generate the second messenger inositol trisphosphate often evokes repetitive oscillations in cytosolic Ca(2+) . Signalling information is encoded in both the amplitude and frequency of the Ca(2+) spikes. Recent studies have revealed that the spatial profile of the oscillation also imparts signalling power; Ca(2+) microdomains near store-operated CRAC channels in the plasma membrane and inositol trisphosphate-gated channels in the endoplasmic reticulum both signal to distinct downstream targets. Spatial profiling therefore increases the transduction power of the universal oscillatory cytosolic Ca(2+) signal.

  4. Comparison of hydrazone heterobifunctional cross-linking agents for reversible conjugation of thiol-containing chemistry.

    PubMed

    Christie, R James; Anderson, Diana J; Grainger, David W

    2010-10-20

    Reversible covalent conjugation chemistries that allow site- and condition-specific coupling and uncoupling reactions are attractive components in nanotechnologies, bioconjugation methods, imaging, and drug delivery systems. Here, we compare three heterobifunctional cross-linkers, containing both thiol- and amine-reactive chemistries, to form pH-labile hydrazones with hydrazide derivatives of the known and often published water-soluble polymer, poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide)] (pHPMA), while subsequently coupling thiol-containing molecules to the cross-linker via maleimide addition. Two novel cross-linkers were prepared from the popular heterobifunctional cross-linking agent, succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC), modified to contain either terminal aldehyde groups (i.e., 1-(N-3-propanal)-4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane carboxamide, PMCA) or methylketone groups (i.e., 1-(N-3-butanone)-4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane carboxamide, BMCA). A third cross-linking agent was the commercially available N-4-acetylphenyl maleimide (APM). PMCA and BMCA exhibited excellent reactivity toward hydrazide-derivatized pHPMA with essentially complete hydrazone conjugation to polymer reactive sites, while APM coupled only ∼60% of available reactive sites on the polymer despite a 3-fold molar excess relative to polymer hydrazide groups. All polymer hydrazone conjugates bearing these bifunctional agents were then further reacted with thiol-modified tetramethylrhodamine dye, confirming cross-linker maleimide reactivity after initial hydrazone polymer conjugation. Incubation of dye-labeled polymer conjugates in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C showed that hydrazone coupling resulting from APM exhibited the greatest difference in stability between pH 7.4 and 5.0, with hydrolysis and dye release increased at pH 5.0 over a 24 h incubation period. Polymer conjugates bearing hydrazones formed from cross-linker BMCA exhibited intermediate stability

  5. Stereodivergent Coupling of Aldehydes and Alkynes via Synergistic Catalysis Using Rh and Jacobsen's Amine.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Faben A; Dong, Vy M

    2017-01-25

    We report an enantioselective coupling between α-branched aldehydes and alkynes to generate vicinal quaternary and tertiary carbon stereocenters. The choice of Rh and organocatalyst combination allows for access to all possible stereoisomers with high enantio-, diastereo-, and regioselectivity. Our study highlights the power of catalysis to activate two common functional groups and provide access to divergent stereoisomers and constitutional structures.

  6. One-pot reductive mono-N-alkylation of aniline and nitroarene derivatives using aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eunyoung; Hong, Bomi; De Castro, Kathlia A; Lim, Minkyung; Rhee, Hakjune

    2007-12-07

    One-pot reductive mono-N-alkylation of aniline and nitroarene derivatives using various aldehydes by Pd/C catalyst in aqueous 2-propanol solvent with ammonium formate as in situ hydrogen donor is illustrated. The reaction proceeded smoothly and selectively with excellent yield at room temperature. Our protocol presents a facile, economical, and environmentally benign alternative for reductive amination.

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Gross, Eric R.; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P.; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R2=0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was also beneficial when given even after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians’ apparent lower pain tolerance. PMID:25163478

  8. Dirhodium carboxylates catalyzed enantioselective coupling reactions of α-diazophosphonates, anilines, and electron-deficient aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cong-Ying; Wang, Jing-Cui; Wei, Jinhu; Xu, Zhen-Jiang; Guo, Zhen; Low, Kam-Hung; Che, Chi-Ming

    2012-11-05

    Chiral dirhodium carboxylate complexes ([Rh(2)(S-PTAD)(4)] or [Rh(2)(S-PTTL)(4)]) efficiently catalyze asymmetric three-component coupling reactions of α-diazophosphonates, anilines, and electron-deficient aldehydes to give α-amino-β-hydroxyphosphonates. The high level of enantiocontrol provides evidence for the intermediacy of metal-bound ammonium ylide in the product-forming step.

  9. Modulation of ethanol stress tolerance by aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Theodore; Krause, Katrin; Schlunk, Ines; Kothe, Erika

    2012-08-01

    We report the first mycorrhizal fungal aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, ald1, which was isolated from the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum. The gene, encoding a protein Ald1 of 502 amino acids, is up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses using 53 specific fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases from all major phyla in the kingdom of fungi including Ald1 and two partial sequences of T. vaccinum were performed to get an insight in the evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase family. By using competitive and real-time RT-PCR, ald1 is up-regulated in response to alcohol and aldehyde-related stress. Furthermore, heterologous expression of ald1 in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro enzyme activity assay demonstrated the oxidation of propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde with different kinetics using either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as cofactors. In addition, overexpression of ald1 in T. vaccinum after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation increased ethanol stress tolerance. These results demonstrate the ability of Ald1 to circumvent ethanol stress, a critical function in mycorrhizal habitats.

  10. APPLICATION OF MULTISPECTRAL TECHNIQUES TO THE PRECISE IDENTIFICATION OF ALDEHYDES IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    By using gas chromatography coupled with low- and high-resolution electron impact mass spectrometry, low- and high-resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, eight straight-chain aldehydes were identified in a water sample taken...

  11. A Theoretical Study of the Methyl and Aldehyde Torsion FIR Spectra in Symmetric Propanal Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeyers, Y. G.; Villa, M.; Uc, V. H.; Vivier-Bunge, A.

    2000-05-01

    This paper is an extension of the techniques developed by us [A. Vivier-Bunge, V. H. Uc, and Y. G. Smeyers, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2279 (1998)] for standard propanal. In that paper the potential energy surface for the simultaneous methyl and asymmetric aldehydic torsions was calculated at RHF/MP2 level using the 6-311(3df,p) basis set for propanal. The fit of the energy values to symmetry-adapted functional forms was carried out by using the 28 energy values which retain the C3 dynamical symmetry of the methyl group in the optimization procedure. With this potential, as well as with the kinetic parameters and the electric dipole moment variations, the FIR frequencies and intensities for the methyl and aldehyde torsions of seven symmetric isotopomers of propanal were determined theoretically using two-dimensional calculations. The calculated spectra of propanal and three of its isotopomers were compared with the available experimental data. It is found that the calculations for the cis conformer satisfactorily reproduce the aldehyde and methyl torsion spectra and furnish also methyl torsionally excited progressions for the aldehyde torsion modes. The methyl torsion frequencies agree especially well whenever the methyl group is nondeuterated. The small deviations encountered for the deuterated compound are probably due to some mass effect, such as the zero-point vibrational energy correction, which is not taken into account in the present calculations. Finally, the influence of the deuteration on the intensities is discussed.

  12. Directing-group-assisted copper-catalyzed oxidative esterification of phenols with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Song, Wei-Bin; Xuan, Li-Jiang

    2015-11-28

    A directing-group-assisted copper-catalyzed oxidative esterification of phenols with aldehydes using TBHP as an oxidant was described. This methodology which showed the advantages of base, ligand free, short routes and functional group tolerance could be used as an alternative protocol for the classical esterification reactions.

  13. A Cascade Resulting in the Reductive Ethynylation of Aldehydes: Dissection of its Components

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjoo; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    A mild and efficient two-carbon homologation of aldehydes exploiting multiple modes of KOt-Bu was developed. This process involves a sequential Peterson allenylation/allene-alkyne isomerization/protodesilylation in a single-flask operation. The differential roles played by the various elements of the process were demonstrated through dissection experiments. PMID:20201522

  14. Metathesis reactions of tris(adamantylimido)methylrhenium and aldehydes and imines

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.D.; Espenson, J.H.

    1999-11-22

    The tris(imido)methylrhenium compound CH{sub 3}Re(NAd){sub 3} (Ad = 1-adamantyl) was prepared and characterized. It reacts with aromatic aldehydes ArCHO forming the imines ArCH{double{underscore}bond} NAd. The reaction occurs in three stages, during which CH{sub 3}Re(NAd){sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}Re(NAd)O{sub 2} could be detected. In the third and slowest stage CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} (MTO) was formed, eventually in quantitative yield. The second-order rate constant for PhCHO in C{sub 6}D{sub 6} at 298 K is 1.4 x 10{sup {minus}4} L/mol s. Electron-donating substituents at the para-position of ArCHO cause a significant diminution in rate. Treated by the Hammett equation, the reaction constant is {rho} = +0.90. The reactions between CH{sub 3}Re(NAd){sub 3} and linear aliphatic aldehydes occur much faster than do reactions of nonlinear aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes, indicating an important steric effect. Ketones do not react. The imidorhenium complex evidently undergoes a metathesis reaction with the aldehyde. Analogously, CH{sub 3}Re(NAd){sub 3} reacts with imines. Imine-imine metathesis is catalyzed by MTO homogeneously and by MTO supported on Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  15. Nepetanal and nepetanoate: a new diterpene aldehyde and a benzene derivative ester from Nepeta juncea.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Jamila, Nargis; Khan, Farman Ullah; Devkota, Krishna Prasad; Shah, M Raza; Anwar, Saeed

    2009-07-01

    One new tricyclic clerodane type diterpene aldehyde nepetanal (1) and one new benzene derivative nepetanoate (2) have been isolated from a plant Nepeta juncea together with two known compounds oleanolic acid (3) and ursolic acid (4). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by means of modern spectroscopic techniques and comparison with literature data.

  16. On the history of basic fuchsin and aldehyde-Schiff reactions from 1862 to 1935.

    PubMed

    Puchtler, H; Meloan, S N; Brewton, B R

    1975-01-01

    The nature of products formed by aldehydes and Schiff's reagent, whether they are sulfonic or sulfinic acid compounds, has been the subject of much discussion. It seems therefore timely to review early studies of aldehyde-Schiff reactions, including the history of pararosanilin and related dyes. Dyes of the basic fuchsin group have been studied extensively since 1862, and their triphenylmethane structure was established in 1878. The currently used structural formulas were introduced around the turn of the century. Reactions of basic fuchsin with aldehydes, with and without addition of SO2, were investigated by Schiff in the 1860's i.e. before the structure of these dyes was known. In 1900 Prud'homme showed that the reaction products of basic fuschsin, sodium bisulfite and formaldehyde are alkylated and sulfonated derivatives of the parent compound; further chemical studies indicated attachment of the sulfonic acid group to the carbon atom of the aldehyde. Prud'homme's findings were repeatedly confirmed during the following decades. Wieland and Scheuing were apparently unaware of these studies and introduced the sulfinic acid theory in 1921; furthermore, they considered substitution at two amino group of Schiff's reagent essential for formation of the colored compound. However, later chemical and spectroscopic studies showed no evidence of-N-sulfinic acids but supported the sulfonic acid theory of Prud'homme.

  17. Dual Lewis Acid/Lewis Base Catalyzed Acylcyanation of Aldehydes: A Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Laurell Nash, Anna; Hertzberg, Robin; Wen, Ye-Qian; Dahlgren, Björn; Brinck, Tore; Moberg, Christina

    2016-03-07

    A mechanistic investigation, which included a Hammett correlation analysis, evaluation of the effect of variation of catalyst composition, and low-temperature NMR spectroscopy studies, of the Lewis acid-Lewis base catalyzed addition of acetyl cyanide to prochiral aldehydes provides support for a reaction route that involves Lewis base activation of the acyl cyanide with formation of a potent acylating agent and cyanide ion. The cyanide ion adds to the carbonyl group of the Lewis acid activated aldehyde. O-Acylation by the acylated Lewis base to form the final cyanohydrin ester occurs prior to decomplexation from titanium. For less reactive aldehydes, the addition of cyanide is the rate-determining step, whereas, for more reactive, electron-deficient aldehydes, cyanide addition is rapid and reversible and is followed by rate-limiting acylation. The resting state of the catalyst lies outside the catalytic cycle and is believed to be a monomeric titanium complex with two alcoholate ligands, which only slowly converts into the product.

  18. Electrophilic activation of aldehydes "on water": a facile route to dipyrromethanes.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Luca; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Shaken .. and stirred: Dipyrromethane, an important building block in porphyrin chemistry, can be easily accessed by a reaction performed on water in the absence of Lewis acids. Thus, a variety of substituted dipyrromethanes were prepared in moderate to good yields using a range of aldehydes.

  19. A HIGHLY STEREOSELECTIVE, NOVEL COUPLING REACTION BETWEEN ALKYNES WITH ALDEHYDES. (R828129)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of indium triflate or gallium chloride, a novel coupling between internal alkynes and aldehydes occurred to give unsaturated ketones and [4+1] annulation products.


    Graphical Abstrac...

  20. Structural and functional analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Rich, Rebecca L.; Chen, Chao; Joo, Jeong Chan; Minasov, George; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James R.; Myszka, David G.; Duban, Mark; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    When exposed to high osmolarity, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) restores its growth and establishes a new steady state by accumulating the osmoprotectant metabolite betaine. Effective osmoregulation has also been implicated in the acquirement of a profound antibiotic resistance by MRSA. Betaine can be obtained from the bacterial habitat or produced intracellularly from choline via the toxic betaine aldehyde (BA) employing the choline dehydrogenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) enzymes. Here, it is shown that the putative betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase SACOL2628 from the early MRSA isolate COL (SaBADH) utilizes betaine aldehyde as the primary substrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as the cofactor. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the affinity of NAD+, NADH and BA for SaBADH is affected by temperature, pH and buffer composition. Five crystal structures of the wild type and three structures of the Gly234Ser mutant of SaBADH in the apo and holo forms provide details of the molecular mechanisms of activity and substrate specificity/inhibition of this enzyme. PMID:25945581

  1. Asymmetric intramolecular α-cyclopropanation of aldehydes using a donor/acceptor carbene mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chaosheng; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Enantioselective α-alkylation of carbonyl is considered as one of the most important processes for asymmetric synthesis. Common alkylation agents, that is, alkyl halides, are notorious substrates for both Lewis acids and organocatalysts. Recently, olefins emerged as a benign alkylating species via photo/radical mechanisms. However, examples of enantioselective alkylation of aldehydes/ketones are scarce and direct asymmetric dialkylation remains elusive. Here we report an intramolecular α-cyclopropanation reaction of olefinic aldehydes to form chiral cyclopropane aldehydes. We demonstrate that an α-iodo aldehyde can function as a donor/acceptor carbene equivalent, which engages in a formal [2+1] annulation with a tethered double bond. Privileged bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-type scaffolds are prepared in good optical purity using a chiral amine. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated by versatile transformations of the bridgehead formyl functionality. We expect the concept of using α-iodo iminium as a donor/acceptor carbene surrogate will find wide applications in chemical reaction development. PMID:26644194

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Vanessa O; Gross, Eric R; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-08-27

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R(2) = 0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde- and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than in the wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was even beneficial when given after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic, cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians' apparent lower pain tolerance.

  3. An improved protocol for the Pd-catalyzed alpha-arylation of aldehydes with aryl halides.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rubén; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2008-10-16

    An improved protocol for the Pd-catalyzed alpha-arylation of aldehydes with aryl halides has been developed. The new catalytic system allows for the coupling of an array of substrates including challenging electron-rich aryl bromides and less reactive aryl chlorides. The utility of this method has been demonstrated in a new total synthesis of (+/-)-sporochnol.

  4. Aldehyde Recognition and Discrimination by Mammalian Odorant Receptors via Functional Group-Specific Hydration Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian odorant receptors (ORs) form a chemical-detecting interface between the atmosphere and the nervous system. This large gene family is composed of hundreds of membrane proteins predicted to form as many unique small molecule binding niches within their G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) framework, but very little is known about the molecular recognition strategies they use to bind and discriminate between small molecule odorants. Using rationally designed synthetic analogs of a typical aliphatic aldehyde, we report evidence that among the ORs showing specificity for the aldehyde functional group, a significant percentage detect the aldehyde through its ability to react with water to form a 1,1-geminal (gem)-diol. Evidence is presented indicating that the rat OR-I7, an often-studied and modeled OR known to require the aldehyde function of octanal for activation, is likely one of the gem-diol activated receptors. A homology model based on an activated GPCR X-ray structure provides a structural hypothesis for activation of OR-I7 by the gem-diol of octanal. PMID:25181321

  5. New HPLC methods to quantitate terpenoid aldehydes in foliage of cotton (Gossypium)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton plant (Gossypium) produces protective terpenoid aldehydes in lysigenous pigment glands. These terpenoids include hemigossypolone, hemigossypolone-6-methyl ether, gossypol, gossypol-6-methyl ether, gossypol-6,6'-dimethyl ether, heliocides H1, H2, H3 and H4, and heliocides B1, B2, B3 and B4...

  6. Mn(0)-mediated chemoselective reduction of aldehydes. Application to the synthesis of α-deuterioalcohols.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Tania; Barea, Elisa; Oltra, J Enrique; Cuerva, Juan M; Justicia, José

    2010-10-15

    A mild, simple, safe, chemoselective reduction of different kinds of aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols mediated by the Mn dust/water system is described. In addition to this, the use of D(2)O leads to the synthesis of α-deuterated alcohols and constitutes an efficient, inexpensive alternative for the preparation of these compounds.

  7. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of O-acetyl cyanohydrins from KCN, Ac2O and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Belokon, Yuri N; Gutnov, Andrey V; Moskalenko, Margarita A; Yashkina, Lidia V; Lesovoy, Denis E; Ikonnikov, Nicolai S; Larichev, Vladimir S; North, Michael

    2002-02-07

    A (salen)titanium catalyst has been found to induce the asymmetric addition of potassium cyanide and acetic anhydride to aldehydes, giving enantiomerically enriched cyanohydrin esters with up to 92% enantiomeric excess using just 1 mol% of the catalyst. This is the first report of the asymmetric synthesis of cyanohydrin derivatives using a cyanide source which is non-volatile and inexpensive.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Halavaty, Andrei S; Rich, Rebecca L; Chen, Chao; Joo, Jeong Chan; Minasov, George; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James R; Myszka, David G; Duban, Mark; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Yakunin, Alexander F; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-05-01

    When exposed to high osmolarity, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) restores its growth and establishes a new steady state by accumulating the osmoprotectant metabolite betaine. Effective osmoregulation has also been implicated in the acquirement of a profound antibiotic resistance by MRSA. Betaine can be obtained from the bacterial habitat or produced intracellularly from choline via the toxic betaine aldehyde (BA) employing the choline dehydrogenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) enzymes. Here, it is shown that the putative betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase SACOL2628 from the early MRSA isolate COL (SaBADH) utilizes betaine aldehyde as the primary substrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as the cofactor. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the affinity of NAD(+), NADH and BA for SaBADH is affected by temperature, pH and buffer composition. Five crystal structures of the wild type and three structures of the Gly234Ser mutant of SaBADH in the apo and holo forms provide details of the molecular mechanisms of activity and substrate specificity/inhibition of this enzyme.

  9. Two-Carbon Homologation of Ketones to 3-Methyl Unsaturated Aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usual scheme of two-carbon homologation of ketones to 3-methyl unsaturated aldehydes by Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons condensations with phosphonate esters, such as triethyl-2-phosphonoacetate, involves three steps. The phosphonate condensation step results in extension of the carbon chain by two carb...

  10. SmI(2)-promoted oxidation of aldehydes in the presence of electron-rich heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amos B; Lee, Dongjoo; Adams, Christopher M; Kozlowski, Marisa C

    2002-12-12

    [reaction: see text] The Evans-Tishchenko reaction provides an efficient and practical solution for the oxidation of aldehydes possessing sensitive electron-rich heteroatoms to the corresponding esters. Careful selection of the sacrificial beta-hydroxy ketone provides considerable subsequent flexibility to access the desired carboxylic acid.

  11. Rice aldehyde dehydrogenase7 is needed for seed maturation and viability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Hye; Kim, Sung-Ryul; An, Gynheung

    2009-02-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Although the proteins have been studied from various organisms and at different growth stages, their roles in seed development have not been well elucidated. We obtained T-DNA insertional mutants in OsALDH7, which is remarkably inducible by oxidative and abiotic stresses. Interestingly, endosperms from the osaldh7 null mutants accumulated brown pigments during desiccation and storage. Extracts from the mutant seeds showed a maximum absorbance peak at 360 nm, the wavelength that melanoidin absorbs. Under UV light, those extracts also exhibited much stronger fluorescence than the wild type, suggesting that the pigments are melanoidin. These pigments started to accumulate in the late seed developmental stage, the time when OsALDH7 expression began to increase significantly. Purified OsALDH7 protein showed enzyme activities to malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, and glyceraldehyde. These results suggest that OsALDH7 is involved in removing various aldehydes formed by oxidative stress during seed desiccation. The mutant seeds were more sensitive to our accelerated aging treatment and accumulated more malondialdehyde than the wild type. These data imply that OsALDH7 plays an important role in maintaining seed viability by detoxifying the aldehydes generated by lipid peroxidation.

  12. A novel protein modification generating an aldehyde group in sulfatases: its role in catalysis and disease.

    PubMed

    von Figura, K; Schmidt, B; Selmer, T; Dierks, T

    1998-06-01

    In multiple sulfatase deficiency, a rare human lysosomal storage disorder, all known sulfatases are synthesized as catalytically poorly active polypeptides. Analysis of the latter has shown that they lack a protein modification that was detected in all members of the sulfatase family. This novel protein modification generates a 2-amino-3-oxopropanoic acid (C alpha-formylglycine) residue by oxidation of the thiol group of a cysteine that is conserved among all eukaryotic sulfatases. The oxidation occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum at a stage when the nascent polypeptide is not yet folded. The aldehyde is part of the catalytic site and is likely to act as an aldehyde hydrate. One of the geminal hydroxyl groups accepts the sulfate during sulfate ester cleavage leading to the formation of a covalently sulfated enzyme intermediate. The other hydroxyl is required for the subsequent elimination of the sulfate and regeneration of the aldehyde group. In some prokaryotic members of the sulfatase gene family, the DNA sequence predicts a serine residue, and not a cysteine. Analysis of one of these prokaryotic sulfatases, however, revealed the presence of the C alpha-formylglycine indicating that the aldehyde group is essential for all members of the sulfatase family and that it can be generated from either cysteine or serine.

  13. Raspberry-like poly(γ-glutamic acid) hydrogel particles for pH-dependent cell membrane passage and controlled cytosolic delivery of antitumor drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Hee; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Noh, Young-Woock; Lee, Eunji; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lim, Yong Taik

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we synthesized bioderived poly(amino acid) hydrogel particles that showed pH-dependent membrane-disrupting properties and controlled cytosolic delivery of antitumor drugs. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) that has been produced extensively using bacteria, especially those of Bacillus subtilis species, was modified with cholesterol (γ-PGA/Chol), and the γ-PGA/Chol conjugates were used to form polymeric nanoparticles the size of 21.0±1.1 nm in aqueous solution. When the polymeric nanoparticles were mixed with doxorubicin (Dox), raspberry-like hydrogel particles (RBHPs) were formed by the electrostatic interaction between the cationically charged Dox and the anionically charged nanoparticles. The average size and surface charge of the RBHPs in aqueous solution were 444.9±122.5 nm and −56.44 mV, respectively. The loaded amount of Dox was approximately 63.9 μg/mg of RBHPs. The RBHPs showed controlled drug release behavior in both in vitro and ex vivo cell-based experiments. Through fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, the cellular uptake of RBHPs into human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect, evaluated by the methyl tetrazolium salt assay, was dependent on both the concentration of RBHPs and the treatment time. The pH-dependent membrane-disrupting properties of the RBHPs and the subsequent cytosolic delivery of Dox were evaluated using a standard hemolysis assay. Upon an increase in hydrophobicity at the lysosomal acidic pH, RBHPs could easily interact, penetrate cell membranes, and destabilize them. Taken together, the data suggested that RBHPs could be used as drug delivery carriers after loading with other therapeutic drugs, such as proteins or small interfering RNA for cancer therapy. PMID:27822040

  14. Substrate-Controlled Diastereoselectivity Reversal in NHC-Catalyzed Cross-Benzoin Reactions Using N-Boc-N-Bn-Protected α-Amino Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Pouyan; Quail, J Wilson; Gravel, Michel

    2016-12-16

    The effectiveness of utilizing N-Bn-N-Boc-α-amino aldehydes in cross-benzoin reactions with heteroaromatic aldehydes is demonstrated. The reaction is both chemoselective and syn-selective, making it complementary to the anti-selective cross-benzoin reaction of NHBoc-α-amino aldehydes. Good diastereoselectivity is obtained for a variety of amino aldehydes, including nonhindered ones. A Felkin-Anh model can be used to rationalize the observed diastereoselectivity.

  15. Kinetic models of conjugated metabolic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    A general method is developed for the quantitative kinetic analysis of conjugated metabolic cycles in the human organism. This method is used as a basis for constructing a kinetic graph and model of the conjugated citric acid and ureapoiesis cycles. The results from a kinetic analysis of the model for these cycles are given.

  16. Diversity of integrating conjugative elements in actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Eric; Ghinet, Mariana Gabriela; Burrus, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Conjugation is certainly the most widespread and promiscuous mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. During conjugation, DNA translocation across membranes of two cells forming a mating pair is mediated by two types of mobile genetic elements: conjugative plasmids and integrating conjugative elements (ICEs). The vast majority of conjugative plasmids and ICEs employ a sophisticated protein secretion apparatus called type IV secretion system to transfer to a recipient cell. Yet another type of conjugative DNA translocation machinery exists and to date appears to be unique to conjugative plasmids and ICEs of the Actinomycetales order, a sub-group of high G + C Gram-positive bacteria. This conjugative system is reminiscent of the machinery that allows segregation of chromosomal DNA during bacterial cell division and sporulation, and relies on a single FtsK-homolog protein to translocate double-stranded DNA molecules to the recipient cell. Recent thorough sequence analyses reveal that while this latter strategy appears to be used by the majority of ICEs in Actinomycetales, the former is also predicted to be important in exchange of genetic material in actinobacteria. PMID:22934248

  17. Description of charge conjugation from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lujan-Peschard, C.; Napsuciale, M.

    2006-09-25

    We construct the charge conjugation operator as a unitary automorphism in the spinor space ((1/2), 0) + (0 (1/2)) from first principles. We calculate its eigenspinors and derive the equation of motion they satisfy. The mapping associated to charge conjugation is constructed from parity eigenstates which are considered as particle and antiparticle.

  18. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  19. Conjugation of PEG-hexadecane markedly increases the immunogenicity of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xin; Yu, Weili; Ji, Shaoyang; Shen, Lijuan; Tan, Aijuan; Hu, Tao

    2017-02-24

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious Gram-positive pathogen that can lead to an invasive pneumococcal disease with high mortality rate. Pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) is a key virulence determinant and its immunogenicity can be increased by conjugation with a carrier protein. However, the PS-specific cellular and humoral immunity of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine needs further improvement. Hexadecane (HD) is an element of lipid that decorates the surface of nearly all microbial classes. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-HD conjugate (PEG-HD) is soluble and can act as an adjuvant. In the present study, a novel pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine was prepared by conjugation of tetanus toxoid (TT) portion of PS-TT conjugate (PS-TT) with PEG-HD. As compared with PS-TT, conjugation with PEG-HD led to an 8.0-fold increase in the PS-specific IgG titers. Conjugation with PEG-HD also gave rise to 34.9-, 3.6- and 7.7-fold increase in the IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-5 levels, respectively. Thus, the conjugated PEG-HD has a stimulatory adjuvant activity to potentiate a robust humoral and cellular immunity. Our proposed conjugate was expected to act as an effective pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for prevention of S. pneumoniae infections.

  20. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Wood, Andrew J.; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as ‘aldehyde scavengers’ by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried outgenome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species—including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  1. Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduces aldehydes to alcohols through a direct hydride transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspera, Ruediger; Sahele, Tariku; Lakatos, Kyle; Totah, Rheem A.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduced aldehydes to alcohols efficiently (k{sub cat} {approx} 25 min{sup -1}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction is a direct hydride transfer from R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P450 domain variants enhance reduction through potential allosteric/redox interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reaction will have implications for metabolism of xenobiotics. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450BM-3 catalyzed the reduction of lipophilic aldehydes to alcohols efficiently. A k{sub cat} of {approx}25 min{sup -1} was obtained for the reduction of methoxy benzaldehyde with wild type P450BM-3 protein which was higher than in the isolated reductase domain (BMR) alone and increased in specific P450-domain variants. The reduction was caused by a direct hydride transfer from preferentially R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety of the substrate. Weak substrate-P450-binding of the aldehyde, turnover with the reductase domain alone, a deuterium incorporation in the product from NADP{sup 2}H but not D{sub 2}O, and no inhibition by imidazole suggests the reductase domain of P450BM-3 as the potential catalytic site. However, increased aldehyde reduction by P450 domain variants (P450BM-3 F87A T268A) may involve allosteric or redox mechanistic interactions between heme and reductase domains. This is a novel reduction of aldehydes by P450BM-3 involving a direct hydride transfer and could have implications for the metabolism of endogenous substrates or xenobiotics.

  2. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chhabra, P. S.; Loza, C. L.; Crounse, J. D.; Yee, L. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde) under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN) as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(O)OONO2) formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios (3-8), the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOx photooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  3. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chhabra, P. S.; Loza, C. L.; Crounse, J. D.; Yee, L. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde) under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN) as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(O)OONO2) formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios, the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOxphotooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  4. Aldehyde modification and alum coadjuvancy enhance anti-TNF-α autovaccination and mitigate arthritis in rat.

    PubMed

    Bavoso, Alfonso; Ostuni, Angela; De Vendel, Jolanda; Bracalello, Angelo; Shcheglova, Tatiana; Makker, Sudesh; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Experimental vaccination to induce antibodies (Abs) capable of cytokine antagonism shows promise as a novel immunotherapy for chronic inflammatory disease. We prepared a hybrid antigen consisting of residues 141-235 of rat TNF-α fused to the C-terminus of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), chemically modified to incorporate aldehyde residues, for development of an auto-vaccine eliciting anti-rTNF-α Abs. In rat immunization the soluble aldehyde-modified fusion protein did not generate observable Ab responses. By contrast, vaccination with the aldehyde-modified fusion protein adsorbed on alum induced anti-TNF-α autoAbs with high titer and neutralizing activity. Induction of adjuvant arthritis in rats pre-immunized with unmodified fusion protein or a control protein in alum resulted in severe inflammation and joint damage, whereas the disease induced in rats immunized with the aldehyde-bearing fusion protein in alum was markedly attenuated. Similar results were obtained in a collagen-induced rat arthritis model. Anti-collagen II IgG Ab titers did not deviate significantly in groups pre-immunized with modified fusion protein and control protein, suggesting that anti-TNF vaccination did not skew the immune response related to disease induction. This study demonstrates synergy between particulate alum and protein bound carbonyl residues for enhancement of protein immunogenicity. The antigen-specific co-adjuvant system could prove advantageous for breaking tolerance in emerging auto-vaccination therapies targeting inflammatory cytokines as well as for enhancing a broader category of subunit vaccines. Aldehyde adduction introduces a minimal modification which, together with the established use of alum as a safe adjuvant for human use, could be favorable for further vaccine development.

  5. Role of aldehydes in the toxic and mutagenic effects of nitrosamines.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa A; Urban, Anna M; Vu, Choua C; Cummings, Meredith E; Brown, Lee C; Warmka, Janel K; Li, Li; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Patel, Yesha; Stram, Daniel O; Pegg, Anthony E

    2013-10-21

    α-Hydroxynitrosamine metabolites of nitrosamines decompose to a reactive diazohydroxide and an aldehyde. To test the hypothesis that the aldehydes contribute to the harmful effects of nitrosamines, the toxic and mutagenic activities of three model methylating agents were compared in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing or not expressing human O⁶-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). N-Nitrosomethylurethane (NMUr), acetoxymethylmethylnitrosamine (AMMN), and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-acetoxy-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK-4-OAc) are all activated by ester hydrolysis to methanediazohydroxide. NMUr does not form an aldehyde, whereas AMMN generates formaldehyde, and NNK-4-OAc produces 4-oxo-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (OPB). Since these compounds were likely to alkylate DNA to different extents, the toxic and mutagenic activities of these compounds were normalized to the levels of the most cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA adduct, O⁶-mG, to assess if the aldehydes contributed to the toxicological properties of these methylating agents. Levels of 7-mG indicated that the differences in cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these compounds resulted from differences in their ability to methylate DNA. When normalized against the levels of O⁶-mG, there was no difference between these three compounds in cells that lacked AGT. However, AMMN and NNK-4-OAc were more toxic than NMUr in cells expressing AGT when normalized against O⁶-mG levels. In addition, AMMN was more mutagenic than NNK-4-OAc and MNUr in these cells. These findings demonstrate that the aldehyde decomposition products of nitrosamines can contribute to the cytotoxic and/or mutagenic activity of methylating nitrosamines.

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies.

  7. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOEpatents

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  8. A new family of conjugate gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhen-Jun; Guo, Jinhua

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we develop a new class of conjugate gradient methods for unconstrained optimization problems. A new nonmonotone line search technique is proposed to guarantee the global convergence of these conjugate gradient methods under some mild conditions. In particular, Polak-Ribiére-Polyak and Liu-Storey conjugate gradient methods are special cases of the new class of conjugate gradient methods. By estimating the local Lipschitz constant of the derivative of objective functions, we can find an adequate step size and substantially decrease the function evaluations at each iteration. Numerical results show that these new conjugate gradient methods are effective in minimizing large-scale non-convex non-quadratic functions.

  9. Actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements

    PubMed Central

    te Poele, Evelien M.; Bolhuis, Henk

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge on actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements (AICEs). The best characterised AICEs, pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens (10.9 kb), SLP1 (17.3 kb) of Streptomyces coelicolor and pMEA300 of Amycolatopsis methanolica (13.3 kb), are present as integrative elements in specific tRNA genes, and are capable of conjugative transfer. These AICEs have a highly conserved structural organisation, with functional modules for excision/integration, replication, conjugative transfer, and regulation. Recently, it has been shown that pMEA300 and the related elements pMEA100 of Amycolatopsis mediterranei and pSE211 of Saccharopolyspora erythraea form a novel group of AICEs, the pMEA-elements, based on the unique characteristics of their replication initiator protein RepAM. Evaluation of a large collection of Amycolatopsis isolates has allowed identification of multiple pMEA-like elements. Our data show that, as AICEs, they mainly coevolved with their natural host in an integrated form, rather than being dispersed via horizontal gene transfer. The pMEA-like elements could be separated into two distinct populations from different geographical origins. One group was most closely related to pMEA300 and was found in isolates from Australia and Asia and pMEA100-related sequences were present in European isolates. Genome sequence data have enormously contributed to the recent insight that AICEs are present in many actinomycete genera. The sequence data also provide more insight into their evolutionary relationships, revealing their modular composition and their likely combined descent from bacterial plasmids and bacteriophages. Evidence is accumulating that AICEs act as modulators of host genome diversity and are also involved in the acquisition of secondary metabolite clusters and foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer. Although still speculative, these AICEs may play a role in the spread of antibiotic resistance factors into pathogenic bacteria

  10. Preparation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ezure, Toru; Ando, Eiji; Nishimura, Osamu; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Tsunasawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the most significant posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To evaluate the ability of an insect cell-free protein synthesis system to carry out ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to in vitro translated proteins, poly-Ub chain formation was studied in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system. Poly-Ub was generated in the presence of Ub aldehyde (UA), a de-ubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor. In vitro ubiquitination of the p53 tumor suppressor protein was also analyzed, and p53 was poly-ubiquitinated when Ub, UA, and Mdm2, an E3 Ub ligase (E3) for p53, were added to the in vitro reaction mixture. These results suggest that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system contains enzymatic activities capable of carrying out ubiquitination. CBB-detectable ubiquitinated p53 was easily purified from the insect cell-free protein synthesis system, allowing analysis of the Ub-conjugated proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). Lys 305 of p53 was identified as one of the Ub acceptor sites using this strategy. Thus, we conclude that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system is a powerful tool for studying various PTMs of eukaryotic proteins including ubiqutination presented here.

  11. Preparation of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines utilizing new fragmentation and conjugation technologies.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, A; Källenius, G; Svenson, S B

    2000-03-17

    There is a global urgent need for a new efficient and inexpensive vaccine to combat pneumococcal disease, which should also be affordable in developing countries. In view of this need a simple low-cost technique to prepare such a vaccine was developed. The preparation of serotype 14 and 23F pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PnPS)-protein conjugates to be included in a forthcoming multivalent PnPS conjugate vaccine is described. Commercial lots of PnPSs produced according to Good Manufacturing Practice from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 14 (PS14) and 23F (PS23F) were partially depolymerized by sonication or irradiation in an electron beam accelerator. The PnPS fragments were conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) using a recently developed conjugation chemistry. The application of these new simple, efficient and inexpensive fragmentation and conjugation technologies allowed the synthesis of several PnPS-protein conjugates containing PnPS fragments of preselected sizes and differing in the degree of substitution. The PS14TT and PS23FTT conjugate vaccine candidates were characterized chemically and their immunogenicity was evaluated in rabbits and mice. All PnPS conjugate vaccines, unlike the corresponding plain polysaccharides, produced high IgG titres in both animal species. The PS14TT conjugates tended to be more immunogenic than the PS23FTT conjugates. The immune response to the PS14TT conjugates, but not to the PS23FTT conjugates, was related to the size of the conjugated polysaccharide hapten. Both types of conjugates elicited strong booster effects upon secondary immunizations, resulting in high IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b titres.

  12. Test of charge conjugation invariance.

    PubMed

    Nefkens, B M K; Prakhov, S; Gårdestig, A; Allgower, C E; Bekrenev, V; Briscoe, W J; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Grosnick, D; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D; Koulbardis, A; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Manweiler, R; Marusić, A; McDonald, S; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D; Phaisangittisakul, N; Price, J W; Ramirez, A F; Sadler, M; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, T D S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M; Supek, I; Tippens, W B

    2005-02-04

    We report on the first determination of upper limits on the branching ratio (BR) of eta decay to pi0pi0gamma and to pi0pi0pi0gamma. Both decay modes are strictly forbidden by charge conjugation (C) invariance. Using the Crystal Ball multiphoton detector, we obtained BR(eta-->pi0pi0gamma)<5 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level, in support of C invariance of isoscalar electromagnetic interactions of the light quarks. We have also measured BR(eta-->pi0pi0pi0gamma)<6 x 10(-5) at the 90% confidence level, in support of C invariance of isovector electromagnetic interactions.

  13. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation cytosolic localization and oncogenic function of Skp2 by Akt/PKB

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Kuan; Wang, Guocan; Chen, Zhenbang; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Liu, Yan; Chan, Chia-Hsin; Yang, Wei-Lei; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Nimer, Stephen; Tempst, Paul; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Skp2 is an F-box protein that forms the SCF complex with Skp1 and Cullin-1 to constitute an E3 ligase for ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation and degradation of the p27 is critical for Skp2-mediated cell cycle entry, and overexpression and cytosolic accumulation of Skp2 have been clearly associated with tumorigenesis although the functional significance of the latter has remained elusive. Here we show that the Akt/PKB interacts with and directly phosphorylates Skp2. We find that Skp2 phosphorylation by Akt triggers SCF complex formation and E3 ligase activity. Importantly, a phosphorylation-defective Skp2 mutant is drastically impaired in its ability to promote cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that Akt-mediated phosphorylation triggers 14-3-3-β-dependent Skp2 relocalization to the cytosol, and we attribute a specific role to cytosolic Skp2 in the positive regulation of cell migration. Finally, we demonstrate that high levels of Akt activation correlate with Skp2 cytosolic accumulation in human cancer specimens. Our results therefore define a novel proto-oncogenic Akt/PKB-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:19270694

  14. The human two-pore channel 1 is modulated by cytosolic and luminal calcium

    PubMed Central

    Lagostena, Laura; Festa, Margherita; Pusch, Michael; Carpaneto, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPC) are intracellular endo-lysosomal proteins with only recently emerging roles in organellar signalling and involvement in severe human diseases. Here, we investigated the functional properties of human TPC1 expressed in TPC-free vacuoles from Arabidopsis thaliana cells. Large (20 pA/pF) TPC1 currents were elicited by cytosolic addition of the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-(3,5)-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) with an apparent binding constant of ~15 nM. The channel is voltage-dependent, activating at positive potentials with single exponential kinetics and currents are Na+ selective, with measurable but low permeability to Ca2+. Cytosolic Ca2+ modulated hTPC1 in dual way: low μM cytosolic Ca2+ increased activity by shifting the open probability towards negative voltages and by accelerating the time course of activation. This mechanism was well-described by an allosteric model. Higher levels of cytosolic Ca2+ induced a voltage-dependent decrease of the currents compatible with Ca2+ binding in the permeation pore. Conversely, an increase in luminal Ca2+ decreased hTPC1 activity. Our data point to a process in which Ca2+ permeation in hTPC1 has a positive feedback on channel activity while Na+ acts as a negative regulator. We speculate that the peculiar Ca2+ and Na+ dependence are key for the physiological roles of the channel in organellar homeostasis and signalling. PMID:28252105

  15. Characterization of microsomal and cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidases from mung bean hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Forsee, W T

    1985-10-01

    Microsomal and cytosolic alpha-mannosidase activities, which hydrolyze alpha-1,2-mannosyl-mannose linkages in the Man5GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide, have been isolated from homogenates of mung bean hypocotyls. The alpha-1,2-mannosidase activities were readily distinguished from previously described aryl alpha-mannosidases by several criteria. They were optimally active in the presence of Ca2+ between pH 5.5 and 6, they were inhibited by Zn2+, and they had essentially no activity with p-nitrophenyl-alpha-mannoside. The microsomal and cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidases demonstrated specificity for oligosaccharides with terminal nonreducing alpha-1,2-mannosyl linkages, and they were inhibited by mannosyl-mannose disaccharides, with the inhibition decreasing in the order of alpha-1,2-greater than alpha-1,3-greater than alpha-1,6-mannosyl-mannose. The cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidase activity, which was present in the 100,000 g supernatant, was separated from the aryl alpha-mannosidase by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The microsomal alpha-1,2-mannosidase, which was tightly associated with the particulate fraction, was solubilized with Triton X-100 and 0.2 M KCl. The two alpha-1,2-mannosidase activities were readily differentiated by gel-filtration chromatography. The solubilized microsomal enzyme chromatographed in approximately the same position as a Mr 460,000 globular protein whereas the cytosolic enzyme was eluted in a retarded position, indicating a much smaller protein.

  16. A mechanism for functional segregation of mitochondrial and cytosolic genetic codes.

    PubMed

    Español, Yaiza; Thut, Daniel; Schneider, André; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2009-11-17

    The coexistence of multiple gene translation machineries is a feature of eukaryotic cells and a result of the endosymbiotic events that gave rise to mitochondria, plastids, and other organelles. The conditions required for the integration of these apparatuses within a single cell are not understood, but current evidence indicates that complete ablation of the mitochondrial protein synthesis apparatus and its substitution by its cytosolic equivalent is not possible. Why certain mitochondrial components and not others can be substituted by cytosolic equivalents is not known. In trypanosomatids this situation reaches a limit, because certain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are mitochondrial specific despite the fact that all tRNAs in these organisms are shared between cytosol and mitochondria. Here we report that a mitochondria-specific lysyl-tRNA synthetase in Trypanosoma has evolved a mechanism to block the activity of the enzyme during its synthesis and translocation. Only when the enzyme reaches the mitochondria is it activated through the cleavage of a C-terminal structural extension, preventing the possibility of the enzyme being active in the cytosol.

  17. A simple method for discriminating between cell membrane and cytosolic proteins.

    PubMed

    Serna, Laura

    2005-03-01

    * Transgenic plants expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP)-genomic DNA or GFP-cDNA fusions have been used as powerful tools to define the subcellular localization of many proteins. Because most plant cells are highly vacuolated, the cytosol is confined to a thin layer at the periphery of the cells, making it very difficult to distinguish among cell wall, cell membrane and cytosolic GFP-fusion proteins. * Plasmolysis tests inform about cell-wall localization of GFP-tagged proteins, but they do not discriminate between its cell membrane and/or cytoplasmic localization. By observing the GFP signal in transgenic protoplasts placed at a hypotonic solution, it was possible to distinguish between cell membrane and cytosolic GFP-tagged proteins. * The osmotic disruption of the protoplast vacuole in the hypotonic solution allows the diffusion of the GFP signal from the cell periphery to the central part of the cell volume when the GFP is fused to a soluble protein. By contrast, such diffusion does not occur when the protein under study is attached to the cell membrane. * The present method is easier, faster and cheaper than subcellular fractionating studies and/or immunoelectron microscopy, which have been traditionally used to discern between cell membrane and cytosolic proteins.

  18. Intracellular click reaction with a fluorescent chemical Ca2+ indicator to prolong its cytosolic retention.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yoshiaki; Murata, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Kento; Arai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Inoue, Takafumi; Takeoka, Shinji

    2013-08-25

    The powerful strategy of "intracellular click reaction" was used to retain a chemical Ca(2+) indicator in the cytosol. Specifically, a novel clickable Ca(2+) indicator "N3-fura-2 AM" was coupled with dibenzylcyclooctyl-modified biomacromolecules via copper-free click reaction in living cells and Ca(2+) oscillation was observed for an extended period of time.

  19. A NOVEL S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM RAT LIVER CYTOSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Novel S-Adenosyl-L-methionine: Arsenic(III) Methyltransferase from Rat Liver Cytosol
    Shan Lin, Qing Shi, F. Brent Nix, Miroslav Styblo, Melinda A. Beck, Karen M. Herbin-Davis, Larry L. Hall, Josef B. Simeonsson, and David J. Thomas
    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet): ar...

  20. Calcium signatures and signaling in cytosol and organelles of tobacco cells induced by plant defense elicitors.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Hamid; Chiltz, Annick; Madani, Siham; Vatsa, Parul; Schoefs, Benoît; Pugin, Alain; Garcia-Brugger, Angela

    2012-06-01

    Calcium signatures induced by two elicitors of plant defense reactions, namely cryptogein and oligogalacturonides, were monitored at the subcellular level, using apoaequorin-transformed Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi cells, in which the apoaequorin calcium sensor was targeted either to cytosol, mitochondria or chloroplasts. Our study showed that both elicitors induced specific Ca(2+) signatures in each compartment, with the most striking difference relying on duration. Common properties also emerged from the analysis of Ca(2+) signatures: both elicitors induced a biphasic cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation together with a single mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] elevation concomitant with the first cytosolic [Ca(2+)] peak. In addition, both elicitors induced a chloroplastic [Ca(2+)] elevation peaking later in comparison to cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation. In cryptogein-treated cells, pharmacological studies indicated that IP(3) should play an important role in Ca(2+) signaling contrarily to cADPR or nitric oxide, which have limited or no effect on [Ca(2+)] variations. Our data also showed that, depending on [Ca(2+)] fluxes at the plasma membrane, cryptogein triggered a mitochondrial respiration increase and affected excess energy dissipation mechanisms in chloroplasts. Altogether the results indicate that cryptogein profoundly impacted cell functions at many levels, including organelles.